Science.gov

Sample records for aav vectors expressing

  1. [Gene expression of AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector in skeletal muscle of mice].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongqin; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Chun

    2014-11-01

    AAV-ITR single strand DNA mini vector (AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector) is a novel gene expression vector based on AAV-ITR. We have shown efficient gene expression of AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector in HEK 293T. Here, we studied the efficacy of gene expression of AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector in vivo. We injected the skeletal muscle of ICR mice separately with equal molars of AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector, ITR mutated AAV-ITR single strand DNA mini vector (AAV-ITRmm ssDNA mutant vector), AAV-ITR dsDNA and pUC57-minivector-GFP, combined with TurboFect. Florescence microscope analysis of skeletal muscle section shows that AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector had higher expression efficiency and longer expression period. We extracted DNA from the muscle three months after injection and quantified three vectors by Real-time PCR. RT-PCR analysis shows that there were highest copy numbers of AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector existing in muscle. Stable existing of AAV- TR ssDNA mini vector in muscle could be the molecular basis of long term gene expression of the vector. The results suggest that AAV-ITR ssDNA mini vector might be a promising vector for gene therapy.

  2. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  3. Inhibition of pathological brain angiogenesis through systemic delivery of AAV vector expressing soluble FLT1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fanxia; Mao, Lei; Zhu, Wan; Lawton, Michael T.; Pechan, Peter; Colosi, Peter; Wu, Zhijian; Scaria, Abraham; Su, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 1 (sFLT1) has been tested in both animals and humans for anti-angiogenic therapies, e.g., age-related macular degeneration. We hypothesized that adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated sFLT1 expression could be used to inhibit abnormal brain angiogenesis. We tested the anti-angiogenic effect of sFLT1 and the feasibility of using AAV serotype 9 to deliver sFLT1 through intravenous injection (IV) to the brain angiogenic region. AAV vectors were packaged in AAV serotypes 1 and 2 (stereotactic injection) and 9 (IV-injection). Brain angiogenesis was induced in adult mice through stereotactic injection of AAV1-VEGF. AAV2-sFLT02 containing sFLT1 VEGF-binding domain (domain 2) was injected into the brain angiogenic region, and AAV9-sFLT1 was injected into the jugular vein at the time of or 4 weeks after AAV1-VEGF injection. We showed that AAV2-sFLT02 inhibited brain angiogenesis at both time points. Intravenous injection of AAV9-sFLT1 inhibited angiogenesis only when the vector was injected 4 weeks after angiogenic induction. Neither lymphocyte infiltration nor neuron loss was observed in AAV9-sFLT1-treated mice. Our data show that systemically delivered AAV9-sFLT1 inhibits angiogenesis in the mouse brain, which could be utilized to treat brain angiogenic diseases such as brain arteriovenous malformation. PMID:26090874

  4. Inhibition of pathological brain angiogenesis through systemic delivery of AAV vector expressing soluble FLT1.

    PubMed

    Shen, F; Mao, L; Zhu, W; Lawton, M T; Pechan, P; Colosi, P; Wu, Z; Scaria, A; Su, H

    2015-11-01

    The soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 1 (sFLT1) has been tested in both animals and humans for anti-angiogenic therapies, for example, age-related macular degeneration. We hypothesized that adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated sFLT1 expression could be used to inhibit abnormal brain angiogenesis. We tested the anti-angiogenic effect of sFLT1 and the feasibility of using AAV serotype 9 to deliver sFLT1 through intravenous injection (IV) to the brain angiogenic region. AAVs were packaged in AAV serotypes 1 and 2 (stereotactic injection) and 9 (IV injection). Brain angiogenesis was induced in adult mice through stereotactic injection of AAV1-VEGF. AAV2-sFLT02 containing sFLT1 VEGF-binding domain (domain 2) was injected into the brain angiogenic region, and AAV9-sFLT1 was injected into the jugular vein at the time of or 4 weeks after AAV1-VEGF injection. We showed that AAV2-sFLT02 inhibited brain angiogenesis at both time points. IV injection of AAV9-sFLT1 inhibited angiogenesis only when the vector was injected 4 weeks after angiogenic induction. Neither lymphocyte infiltration nor neuron loss was observed in AAV9-sFLT1-treated mice. Our data show that systemically delivered AAV9-sFLT1 inhibits angiogenesis in the mouse brain, which could be utilized to treat brain angiogenic diseases such as brain arteriovenous malformation.

  5. Recombinant AAV Vectors for Enhanced Expression of Authentic IgG

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a vector of choice for the treatment of a variety of genetic diseases that require safe and long-term delivery of a missing protein. Muscle-directed gene transfer for delivery of protective antibodies against AIDS viruses and other pathogens has been used experimentally in mice and monkeys. Here we examined a number of variations to AAV vector design for the ability to produce authentic immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules. Expression of rhesus IgG from a single single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) vector (one vector approach) was compared to expression from two self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, one for heavy chain and one for light chain (two vector approach). Both the one vector and the two vector approaches yielded considerable levels of expressed full-length IgG. A number of modifications to the ssAAV expression system were then examined for their ability to increase the efficiency of IgG expression. Inclusion of a furin cleavage sequence with a linker peptide just upstream of the 2A self-cleaving sequence from foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A) increased IgG expression approximately 2 fold. Inclusion of these sequences also helped to ensure a proper sequence at the C-terminal end of the heavy chain. Inclusion of the post-transcriptional regulatory element from woodchuck hepatitis virus (WPRE) further increased IgG expression 1.5–2.0 fold. IgG1 versions of the two rhesus IgGs that were examined consistently expressed better than the IgG2 forms. In contrast to what has been reported for AAV2-mediated expression of other proteins, introduction of capsid mutations Y445F and Y731F did not increase ssAAV1-mediated expression of IgG as determined by transduction experiments in cell culture. Our findings provide a rational basis for AAV vector design for expression of authentic IgG. PMID:27332822

  6. Recombinant AAV Vectors for Enhanced Expression of Authentic IgG.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian P; Martinez-Navio, José M; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a vector of choice for the treatment of a variety of genetic diseases that require safe and long-term delivery of a missing protein. Muscle-directed gene transfer for delivery of protective antibodies against AIDS viruses and other pathogens has been used experimentally in mice and monkeys. Here we examined a number of variations to AAV vector design for the ability to produce authentic immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules. Expression of rhesus IgG from a single single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) vector (one vector approach) was compared to expression from two self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, one for heavy chain and one for light chain (two vector approach). Both the one vector and the two vector approaches yielded considerable levels of expressed full-length IgG. A number of modifications to the ssAAV expression system were then examined for their ability to increase the efficiency of IgG expression. Inclusion of a furin cleavage sequence with a linker peptide just upstream of the 2A self-cleaving sequence from foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A) increased IgG expression approximately 2 fold. Inclusion of these sequences also helped to ensure a proper sequence at the C-terminal end of the heavy chain. Inclusion of the post-transcriptional regulatory element from woodchuck hepatitis virus (WPRE) further increased IgG expression 1.5-2.0 fold. IgG1 versions of the two rhesus IgGs that were examined consistently expressed better than the IgG2 forms. In contrast to what has been reported for AAV2-mediated expression of other proteins, introduction of capsid mutations Y445F and Y731F did not increase ssAAV1-mediated expression of IgG as determined by transduction experiments in cell culture. Our findings provide a rational basis for AAV vector design for expression of authentic IgG.

  7. Enhancing Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV8 Vectors in Different Tissues Using Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been utilized extensively in gene therapy and gene function studies, as strong transgene expression is a prerequisite for positive outcomes. AAV8 was reported as the most efficient AAV serotype for transduction of the liver, brain and muscle compared with other serotypes. However, AAV8-mediated transduction of human hepatocytes is rather poor with approximately 20-fold lower efficiency compared with that of mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, we applied the woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) to enhance AAV8-mediated transgene expression driven by a combination promoter (CAG promoter) with a CMV-IE enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter for a more efficient viral vector. Transgene expression from recombinant AAV8 (rAAV8) vectors harboring a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter gene with or without WPRE were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that WPRE improved AAV8-mediated RFP expression in different cell lines with clear increases of transgene expression in the liver, brain or muscle of animals. The findings of this study will help to substantially reduce the quantity of viral particles that must be injected in order to reach a therapeutic level of transgene expression in gene therapy. Consequently, such dose reductions may lessen the potential risks associated with high doses of viral vectors. PMID:27076785

  8. The recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV2)-mediated apolipoprotein B mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme: a self-complementary AAV2 vector improves the gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shumei; Sun, Shihua; Teng, Ba-Bie

    2004-01-01

    Background In humans, overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) is positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. To reduce the levels of apoB mRNA, we have designed an apoB mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme targeted at nucleotide sequences GUA6679 (RB15) mediated by adenovirus, which efficiently cleaves and decreases apoB mRNA by 80% in mouse liver and attenuates the hyperlipidemic condition. In the current study, we used an adeno-associated virus vector, serotype 2 (AAV2) and a self-complementary AAV2 vector (scAAV2) to demonstrate the effect of long-term tissue-specific gene expression of RB15 on the regulation apoB mRNA in vivo. Methods We constructed a hammerhead ribozyme RB15 driven by a liver-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoter using an AAV2 vector (rAAV2-TTR-RB15). HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic mice deficient in both the low density lipoprotein receptor and the apoB mRNA editing enzyme genes (LDLR-/-Apobec1-/-; LDb) were transduced with rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and a control vector rAAV-TTR-RB15-mutant (inactive ribozyme). The effects of ribozyme RB15 on apoB metabolism and atherosclerosis development were determined in LDb mice at 5-month after transduction. A self-complementary AAV2 vector expressing ribozyme RB15 (scAAV2-TTR-RB15) was also engineered and used to transduce HepG2 cells. Studies were designed to compare the gene expression efficiency between rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and scAAV2-TTR-RB15. Results The effect of ribozyme RB15 RNA on reducing apoB mRNA levels in HepG2 cells was observed only on day-7 after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 transduction. And, at 5-month after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 treatment, the apoB mRNA levels in LDb mice were significantly decreased by 43%, compared to LDb mice treated with control vector rAAV2-TTR-RB15-mutant. Moreover, both the rAAV2-TTR-RB15 viral DNA and ribozyme RB15 RNA were still detectable in mice livers at 5-month after treatment. However, this rAAV2-TTR-RB15 vector mediated a prolonged but low level of ribozyme RB15 gene

  9. [Preparation of a novel AAV-ITR gene expression mini vector in Sf9 insect cells via baculovirus].

    PubMed

    Li, Taiming; Pan, Junjie; Qi, Jing; Zhang, Chun

    2015-08-01

    AAV-ITR gene expression mini vector is a double-strand or single-strand DNA that only contains inverted terminal repeats of adeno-associated virus, cis-elements and gene of interest and does not contain any other foreign DNA sequences. We prepared Bac-ITR-EGFP and Bac-inrep. Spodoptera frugiperda cells were infected with Bac-ITR-EGFP (P3) and Bac-inrep (P3). Up to 100 μg of AAV-ITR-EGFP gene expression mini vectors were extracted from 2 x 10(7) cells of Sf9 72 h after infection. The gel electrophoresis analysis shows that most forms of AAV-ITR-EGFP gene expression mini vector were monomer and dimer. The mini vector expression efficacy was examined in vitro with HEK 293T cells. The EGFP expression was observed at 24 h after transfection, and the positive ratio reached 65% at 48 h after transfection.

  10. Liver-specific microRNA-122 target sequences incorporated in AAV vectors efficiently inhibits transgene expression in the liver.

    PubMed

    Qiao, C; Yuan, Z; Li, J; He, B; Zheng, H; Mayer, C; Li, J; Xiao, X

    2011-04-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are effective in gene delivery in vivo. Tissue-specific gene expression is often needed to minimize ectopic expression in unintended cells and undesirable consequences. Here, we investigated whether incorporation of target sequences of tissue-specific microRNA (miRNA) into AAV vectors could inhibit ectopic expression in tissues such as the liver and hematopoietic cells. First we inserted liver-specific miR-122 target sequences (miR-122T) into the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of a number of AAV vectors. After intravenous delivery in mice, we found that five copies of the 20mer miR-122T reduced liver expression of luciferase by 50-fold and β-galactosidase (LacZ) by 70-fold. Five copies of miR-122T also reduced mRNA levels of a secretable protein (myostatin propeptide) from the AAV vector plasmid by 23-fold in the liver. However, gene expression in other tissues, including the heart was not inhibited. Similarly, we inserted four copies of miR-142-3pT or miR-142-5pT, both hematopoietic lineage-specific, into the 3'-UTR of the AAV-luciferase vector. We wished to see whether they could prolong transgene expression by inhibiting expression in antigen-presenting cells. However, in vivo luciferase gene expression in major tissues declined with time, regardless of the miR-142 target sequences used. Quantitative analysis of the vector DNA in various tissues revealed that the decline of transgene expression in vivo was mainly because of promoter shut-off other than loss of AAV-transduced cells by immune destruction. Moreover, transgene expression was not detected in circulating mononuclear cells after delivering AAV9 vector with or without miR142T. These results demonstrate that liver-specific miR-122 target sequence in AAV vectors was highly efficient in reducing liver expression, whereas hematopoietic miR-142 target sequences were ineffective in preventing decline of AAV vector gene expression in nonhematopoietic tissues

  11. Elimination of contaminating cap genes in AAV vector virions reduces immune responses and improves transgene expression in a canine gene therapy model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Halbert, C L; Lee, D; Butts, T; Tapscott, S J; Storb, R; Miller, A D

    2014-04-01

    Animal and human gene therapy studies utilizing AAV vectors have shown that immune responses to AAV capsid proteins can severely limit transgene expression. The main source of capsid antigen is that associated with the AAV vectors, which can be reduced by stringent vector purification. A second source of AAV capsid proteins is that expressed from cap genes aberrantly packaged into AAV virions during vector production. This antigen source can be eliminated by the use of a cap gene that is too large to be incorporated into an AAV capsid, such as a cap gene containing a large intron (captron gene). Here, we investigated the effects of elimination of cap gene transfer and of vector purification by CsCl gradient centrifugation on AAV vector immunogenicity and expression following intramuscular injection in dogs. We found that both approaches reduced vector immunogenicity and that combining the two produced the lowest immune responses and highest transgene expression. This combined approach enabled the use of a relatively mild immunosuppressive regimen to promote robust micro-dystrophin gene expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-affected dogs. Our study shows the importance of minimizing AAV cap gene impurities and indicates that this improvement in AAV vector production may benefit human applications.

  12. Innate Immune Responses to AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Martino, Ashley T; Aslanidi, George V; Jayandharan, Giridhara R; Srivastava, Arun; Herzog, Roland W

    2011-01-01

    Gene replacement therapy by in vivo delivery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) is attractive as a potential treatment for a variety of genetic disorders. However, while AAV has been used successfully in many models, other experiments in clinical trials and in animal models have been hampered by undesired responses from the immune system. Recent studies of AAV immunology have focused on the elimination of transgene-expressing cells by the adaptive immune system, yet the innate immune system also has a critical role, both in the initial response to the vector and in prompting a deleterious adaptive immune response. Responses to AAV vectors are primarily mediated by the TLR9-MyD88 pathway, which induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by activating the NF-κB pathways and inducing type I IFN production; self-complementary AAV vectors enhance these inflammatory processes. Additionally, the alternative NF-κB pathway influences transgene expression in cells transduced by AAV. This review highlights these recent discoveries regarding innate immune responses to AAV and discusses strategies to ablate these potentially detrimental signaling pathways.

  13. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Li; Li Baozheng; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Herzog, Roland W.

    2008-11-25

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, their transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by {approx} 68% and {approx} 74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which results from ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy.

  14. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Gene Delivery by AAV Virus Vectors Expressing Large Genomes in Hemophilia Mouse and Dog Models: A Strategy for Broad Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Paul E; Lothrop, Clinton D; Sun, Junjiang; Hirsch, Matthew L; Kafri, Tal; Kantor, Boris; Sarkar, Rita; Tillson, D Michael; Elia, Joseph R; Samulski, R Jude

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of genes that are larger than the wild-type adeno-associated virus (AAV) 4,681 nucleotide genome is inefficient using AAV vectors. We previously demonstrated in vitro that concurrent proteasome inhibitor (PI) treatment improves transduction by AAV vectors encoding oversized transgenes. In this study, an AAV vector with a 5.6 kilobase (kb) factor VIII expression cassette was used to test the effect of an US Food and Drug Administration–approved PI (bortezomib) treatment concurrent with vector delivery in vivo. Intrahepatic vector delivery resulted in factor VIII expression that persisted for >1 year in hemophilia mice. Single-dose bortezomib given with AAV2 or AAV8 factor VIII vector enhanced expression on average ~600 and ~300%, respectively. Moreover, coadministration of AAV8.canineFVIII (1 × 1013 vg/kg) and bortezomib in hemophilia A dogs (n = 4) resulted in normalization of the whole blood clotting time (WBCT) and 90% reduction in hemorrhages for >32 months compared to untreated hemophilia A dogs (n = 3) or dogs administered vector alone (n = 3). Demonstration of long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A dogs with combination adjuvant bortezomib and AAV vector expressing the oversized transgene establishes preclinical studies that support testing in humans and provides a working paradigm to facilitate a significant expansion of therapeutic targets for human gene therapy. PMID:20700109

  15. Expression of human alpha1-antitrypsin in mice and dogs following AAV6 vector-mediated gene transfer to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Christine L; Madtes, David K; Vaughan, Andrew E; Wang, Zejing; Storb, Rainer; Tapscott, Stephen J; Miller, A Dusty

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the potential of lung-directed gene therapy for alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency using an adeno-associated virus type 6 (AAV6) vector containing a human AAT (hAAT) complementary DNA (cDNA) delivered to the lungs of mice and dogs. The results in normal and immune-deficient mice showed that hAAT concentrations were much higher in lung fluid than in plasma, and therapeutic levels were obtained even in normal mice. However, in normal mice an immune response against the vector and/or transgene limited long-term gene expression. An AAV6 vector expressing a marker protein verified that AAV6 vectors efficiently transduced lung cells in dogs. Delivery of AAV6-hAAT resulted in low levels of hAAT in dog serum but therapeutic levels in the lung that persisted for at least 58 days to 4 months in three immunosuppressed dogs. Expression in the serum was not detectable after 45 days in one nonimmune suppressed dog. A lymphoproliferative response to AAV capsid but not to hAAT was detected even after immunosuppression. These results in mice and dogs show the feasibility of expression of therapeutic levels of AAT in the lungs after AAV vector delivery, and advocate for approaches to prevent cellular immune responses to AAV capsid proteins for persistence of gene expression in humans.

  16. Assaying the Stability and Inactivation of AAV Serotype 1 Vectors.

    PubMed

    Howard, Douglas B; Harvey, Brandon K

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are a commonplace tool for gene delivery ranging from cell culture to human gene therapy. One feature that makes AAV a desirable vector is its stability, in regard to both the duration of transgene expression and retention of infectivity as a viral particle. This study examined the stability of AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) vectors under different conditions. First, transducibility after storage at 4°C decreased 20% over 7 weeks. Over 10 freeze-thaw cycles, the resulting transduction efficiency became variable at 60-120% of a single thaw. Using small stainless steel slugs to mimic a biosafety cabinet or metal lab bench surface, it was found that an AAV1 vector can be reconstituted after 6 days of storage at room temperature. The stability of AAV is a desired feature, but effective decontamination procedures must be available for safety and experimental integrity. Multiple disinfectants commonly used in the laboratory for ability to inactivate an AAV1 vector were tested, and it was found that autoclaving, 0.25% peracetic acid, iodine, or 10% Clorox bleach completely prevented AAV-mediated transgene expression. These data suggest that peracetic acid should be used for inactivating AAV1 vectors on metal-based surfaces or instruments in order to avoid inadvertent transgene expression in human cells or cross-contamination of instruments.

  17. Improved adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 1 and 5 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Gabriel, Nishanth; Agrawal, Prachi; Roshini, Vaani; Samuel, Rekha; Srivastava, Alok; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advancements with recombinant AAV2 or AAV8 vectors for liver directed gene therapy in humans, it is well-recognized that host and vector-related immune challenges need to be overcome for long-term gene transfer. To overcome these limitations, alternate AAV serotypes (1-10) are being rigorously evaluated. AAV5 is the most divergent (55% similarity vs. other serotypes) and like AAV1 vector is known to transduce liver efficiently. AAV1 and AAV5 vectors are also immunologically distinct by virtue of their low seroprevalence and minimal cross reactivity against pre-existing AAV2 neutralizing antibodies. Here, we demonstrate that targeted bio-engineering of these vectors, augment their gene expression in murine hepatocytes in vivo (up to 16-fold). These studies demonstrate the feasibility of the use of these novel AAV1 and AAV5 vectors for potential gene therapy of diseases like hemophilia.

  18. Improved dual AAV vectors with reduced expression of truncated proteins are safe and effective in the retina of a mouse model of Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Ivana; Toriello, Elisabetta; de Simone, Sonia; Colella, Pasqualina; Iodice, Carolina; Polishchuk, Elena V; Sommella, Andrea; Colecchi, Linda; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Giunti, Massimo; Bacci, Maria L; Polishchuk, Roman S; Auricchio, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. We have shown that dual adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors effectively transfer ABCA4 to the retina of Abca4-/- mice. However, they express both lower levels of transgene compared with a single AAV and truncated proteins. To increase productive dual AAV concatemerization, which would overcome these limitations, we have explored the use of either various regions of homology or heterologous inverted terminal repeats (ITR). In addition, we tested the ability of various degradation signals to decrease the expression of truncated proteins. We found the highest levels of transgene expression using regions of homology based on either alkaline phosphatase or the F1 phage (AK). The use of heterologous ITR does not decrease the levels of truncated proteins relative to full-length ABCA4 and impairs AAV vector production. Conversely, the inclusion of the CL1 degradation signal results in the selective degradation of truncated proteins from the 5'-half without affecting full-length protein production. Therefore, we developed dual AAV hybrid ABCA4 vectors including homologous ITR2, the photoreceptor-specific G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 promoter, the AK region of homology and the CL1 degradation signal. We show that upon subretinal administration these vectors are both safe in pigs and effective in Abca4-/- mice. Our data support the use of improved dual AAV vectors for gene therapy of STGD1.

  19. Retinal gene delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors: Strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2015-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are the most widely used vehicle systems for neuronal gene transfer. This popularity is based on the non-pathogenic nature of AAVs and their versatility making them a multifunctional vector system for basic research and clinical applications. AAVs are successfully applied in clinical and pre-clinical gene therapy studies for inherited retinal disorders. Their excellent transduction profile and efficiency also boosted the use of AAV vectors in basic research. The AAV vector system can be easily modified and adjusted at multiple levels to allow for optimized and specific gene expression in target cells. Here, we will provide an overview on the AAV vector system and its applications focusing on gene transfer into retinal cells. Furthermore, we will outline and discuss strategies for the optimization of AAV gene transfer by modifications to the AAV vector expression cassette, the AAV capsid or the routes of vector administration.

  20. The Human Rhodopsin Kinase Promoter in an AAV5 Vector Confers Rod- and Cone-Specific Expression in the Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, John J.; Boye, Sanford L.; Witherspoon, Clark D.; Sandefer, Kristen J.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Erger, Kirsten; Sun, Jingfen; Ryals, Renee; Chiodo, Vince A.; Clark, Mark E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Hauswirth, William W.; Gamlin, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has proven an effective gene delivery vehicle for the treatment of retinal disease. Ongoing clinical trials using a serotype 2 AAV vector to express RPE65 in the retinal pigment epithelium have proven safe and effective. While many proof-of-concept studies in animal models of retinal disease have suggested that gene transfer to the neural retina will also be effective, a photoreceptor-targeting AAV vector has yet to be used in the clinic, principally because a vector that efficiently but exclusively targets all primate photoreceptors has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we evaluate a serotype 5 AAV vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter for its ability to target transgene expression to rod and cone photoreceptors when delivered subretinally in a nonhuman primate (NHP). In vivo fluorescent fundus imaging confirmed that AAV5-hGRK1-mediated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was restricted to the injection blebs of treated eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a lack of gross pathology after injection. Neutralizing antibodies against AAV5 were undetectable in post-injection serum samples from subjects receiving uncomplicated subretinal injections (i.e., no hemorrhage). Immunohistochemistry of retinal sections confirmed hGRK1 was active in, and specific for, both rods and cones of NHP retina. Biodistribution studies revealed minimal spread of vector genomes to peripheral tissues. These results suggest that AAV5-hGRK1 is a safe and effective AAV serotype/promoter combination for targeting therapeutic transgene expression protein to rods and cones in a clinical setting. PMID:22845794

  1. The human rhodopsin kinase promoter in an AAV5 vector confers rod- and cone-specific expression in the primate retina.

    PubMed

    Boye, Shannon E; Alexander, John J; Boye, Sanford L; Witherspoon, Clark D; Sandefer, Kristen J; Conlon, Thomas J; Erger, Kirsten; Sun, Jingfen; Ryals, Renee; Chiodo, Vince A; Clark, Mark E; Girkin, Christopher A; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has proven an effective gene delivery vehicle for the treatment of retinal disease. Ongoing clinical trials using a serotype 2 AAV vector to express RPE65 in the retinal pigment epithelium have proven safe and effective. While many proof-of-concept studies in animal models of retinal disease have suggested that gene transfer to the neural retina will also be effective, a photoreceptor-targeting AAV vector has yet to be used in the clinic, principally because a vector that efficiently but exclusively targets all primate photoreceptors has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we evaluate a serotype 5 AAV vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter for its ability to target transgene expression to rod and cone photoreceptors when delivered subretinally in a nonhuman primate (NHP). In vivo fluorescent fundus imaging confirmed that AAV5-hGRK1-mediated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was restricted to the injection blebs of treated eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed a lack of gross pathology after injection. Neutralizing antibodies against AAV5 were undetectable in post-injection serum samples from subjects receiving uncomplicated subretinal injections (i.e., no hemorrhage). Immunohistochemistry of retinal sections confirmed hGRK1 was active in, and specific for, both rods and cones of NHP retina. Biodistribution studies revealed minimal spread of vector genomes to peripheral tissues. These results suggest that AAV5-hGRK1 is a safe and effective AAV serotype/promoter combination for targeting therapeutic transgene expression protein to rods and cones in a clinical setting.

  2. AAV Vectors Expressing LDLR Gain-of-Function Variants Demonstrate Increased Efficacy in Mouse Models of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Jacobs, Frank; Wang, Qiang; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder that arises due to loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and homozygous FH (hoFH) is a candidate for gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and inducible degrader of LDLR (IDOL) negatively regulate LDLR protein and could dampen AAV encoded LDLR expression. Objective We sought to create vectors expressing gain-of-function human LDLR variants that are resistant to degradation by human PCSK9 and IDOL and thereby enhance hepatic LDLR protein abundance and plasma LDL cholesterol reduction. Methods and Results Amino acid substitutions were introduced into the coding sequence of human LDLR cDNA to reduce interaction with hPCSK9 and hIDOL. A panel of mutant hLDLRs was initially screened in vitro for escape from PCSK9. The variant hLDLR-L318D was further evaluated using a mouse model of hoFH lacking endogenous LDLR and apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, APOBEC-1 (DKO). Administration of wild type hLDLR to DKO mice, expressing hPCSK9, led to diminished LDLR activity. However, LDLR-L318D was resistant to hPCSK9 mediated degradation and effectively reduced cholesterol levels. Similarly, the LDLR-K809R\\C818A construct avoided hIDOL regulation and achieved stable reductions in serum cholesterol. An AAV8.LDLR-L318D\\K809R\\C818A vector that carried all three amino acid substitutions conferred partial resistance to both hPCSK9 and hIDOL mediated degradation. Conclusion Amino acid substitutions in the human LDLR confer partial resistance to PCSK9 and IDOL regulatory pathways with improved reduction in cholesterol levels and improve upon a potential gene therapeutic approach to treat homozygous FH subjects. PMID:25023731

  3. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  4. Neutralizing antibodies against AAV2, AAV5 and AAV8 in healthy and HIV-1-infected subjects in China: implications for gene therapy using AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Huang, W; Zhang, H; Wang, Y; Zhao, J; Song, A; Xie, H; Zhao, C; Gao, D; Wang, Y

    2014-08-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have attracted attention as potential vectors for gene therapy and vaccines against several diseases, including HIV-1 infection. However, the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) after natural AAV infections inhibits their transfection in re-exposed subjects. To identify candidate AAV vectors for therapeutic or prophylactic HIV vaccines, NAbs against AAV2, AAV5 and AAV8 were screened in the sera of healthy individuals in China and 10 developed countries and an HIV-1-infected Chinese population. Seroprevalence was higher for AAV2 (96.6%) and AAV8 (82.0%) than for AAV5 (40.2%) in normal Chinese subjects. Among individuals seropositive for AAV5, >80% had low NAb titers (<1:90). The prevalence and titers of NAbs against the three AAVs were significantly higher in China than in developed countries (P<0.01). The prevalence of NAbs against AAV5 did not differ significantly between healthy and HIV-1-infected Chinese subjects (P=0.39). Co-occurrence of NAbs against AAV2, AAV5, and AAV8 was observed in the healthy population, and 15, 41, and 41% of individuals were AAV2(+), AAV2(+)/AAV8(+), and AAV2(+)/AAV5(+)/AAV8(+), respectively. Therefore, AAV5 exposure is low in healthy and HIV-1-infected populations Chinese individuals, and vectors based on AAV5 may be appropriate for human gene therapy or vaccines.

  5. Improved dual AAV vectors with reduced expression of truncated proteins are safe and effective in the retina of a mouse model of Stargardt disease

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Toriello, Elisabetta; de Simone, Sonia; Colella, Pasqualina; Iodice, Carolina; Polishchuk, Elena V.; Sommella, Andrea; Colecchi, Linda; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Giunti, Massimo; Bacci, Maria L.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Auricchio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. We have shown that dual adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors effectively transfer ABCA4 to the retina of Abca4−/− mice. However, they express both lower levels of transgene compared with a single AAV and truncated proteins. To increase productive dual AAV concatemerization, which would overcome these limitations, we have explored the use of either various regions of homology or heterologous inverted terminal repeats (ITR). In addition, we tested the ability of various degradation signals to decrease the expression of truncated proteins. We found the highest levels of transgene expression using regions of homology based on either alkaline phosphatase or the F1 phage (AK). The use of heterologous ITR does not decrease the levels of truncated proteins relative to full-length ABCA4 and impairs AAV vector production. Conversely, the inclusion of the CL1 degradation signal results in the selective degradation of truncated proteins from the 5′-half without affecting full-length protein production. Therefore, we developed dual AAV hybrid ABCA4 vectors including homologous ITR2, the photoreceptor-specific G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 promoter, the AK region of homology and the CL1 degradation signal. We show that upon subretinal administration these vectors are both safe in pigs and effective in Abca4−/− mice. Our data support the use of improved dual AAV vectors for gene therapy of STGD1. PMID:26420842

  6. OneBac 2.0: Sf9 Cell Lines for Production of AAV1, AAV2, and AAV8 Vectors with Minimal Encapsidation of Foreign DNA.

    PubMed

    Mietzsch, Mario; Hering, Henrik; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2017-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for human gene therapy require efficient and economical production methods to keep pace with the rapidly increasing clinical demand. In addition, the manufacturing process must ensure high vector quality and biological safety. The OneBac system offers easily scalable rAAV vector production in insect Sf9-derived AAV rep/cap-expressing producer cell lines infected with a single baculovirus that carries the rAAV backbone. For most AAV serotypes high burst sizes per cell were achieved, combined with high infectivity rates. OneBac 2.0 represents a 2-fold advancement: First, enhanced VP1 proportions in AAV5 capsids lead to vastly increased per-particle infectivity rates. Second, collateral packaging of foreign DNA is suppressed by removal of the Rep-binding element (RBE). In this study we show that this advancement of AAV5 packaging can be translated to OneBac 2.0-derived packaging systems for alternative AAV serotypes. By removal of the RBE, collateral packaging of nonvector DNA was drastically reduced in all newly tested serotypes (AAV1, AAV2, and AAV8). However, the splicing-based strategy to enhance VP1 expression in order to increase AAV5 infectivity hardly improved infectivity rates of AAV-1, -2, or -8 compared with the original OneBac cell lines. Our results emphasize that OneBac 2.0 represents an advancement for scalable, high-titer production of various AAV serotypes, leading to AAV particles with minimal packaging of foreign DNA.

  7. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  8. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Palaschak, Brett; Hoffman, Brad E; Srikanthan, Meera A; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII) and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity. PMID:27738644

  9. Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    György, Bence; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Crommentuijn, Matheus H W; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A

    2014-08-01

    Recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) became the first clinically approved gene therapy product in the western world. To develop AAV for future clinical application in a widespread patient base, particularly in therapies which require intravenous (i.v.) administration of vector, the virus must be able to evade pre-existing antibodies to the wild type virus. Here we demonstrate that in mice, AAV vectors associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) can evade human anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. We observed different antibody evasion and gene transfer abilities with populations of EVs isolated by different centrifugal forces. EV-associated AAV vector (ev-AAV) was up to 136-fold more resistant over a range of neutralizing antibody concentrations relative to standard AAV vector in vitro. Importantly in mice, at a concentration of passively transferred human antibodies which decreased i.v. administered standard AAV transduction of brain by 80%, transduction of ev-AAV transduction was not reduced and was 4000-fold higher. Finally, we show that expressing a brain targeting peptide on the EV surface allowed significant enhancement of transduction compared to untargeted ev-AAV. Using ev-AAV represents an effective, clinically relevant approach to evade human neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies after systemic administration of vector.

  10. Development of Optimized AAV Serotype Vectors for High-Efficiency Transduction at Further Reduced Doses.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Srivastava, Arun

    2016-08-01

    We have described the development of capsid-modified next-generation AAV vectors for both AAV2 and AAV3 serotypes, in which specific surface-exposed tyrosine (Y), serine (S), threonine (T), and lysine (K) residues on viral capsids were modified to achieve high-efficiency transduction at lower doses. We have also described the development of genome-modified AAV vectors, in which the transcriptionally inactive, single-stranded AAV genome was modified to achieve improved transgene expression. Here, we describe that combination of capsid modifications and genome modifications leads to the generation of optimized AAV serotype vectors, which transduce cells and tissues more efficiently, both in vitro and in vivo, at ∼20-30-fold reduced doses. These studies have significant implications in the potential use of the optimized AAV serotype vectors in human gene therapy.

  11. AAV's Anatomy: Roadmap for Optimizing Vectors for Translational Success

    PubMed Central

    Samulski, R. Jude

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-Associated Virus based vectors (rAAV) are advantageous for human gene therapy due to low inflammatory responses, lack of toxicity, natural persistence, and ability to transencapsidate the genome allowing large variations in vector biology and tropism. Over sixty clinical trials have been conducted using rAAV serotype 2 for gene delivery with a number demonstrating success in immunoprivileged sites, including the retina and the CNS. Furthermore, an increasing number of trials have been initiated utilizing other serotypes of AAV to exploit vector tropism, trafficking, and expression efficiency. While these trials have demonstrated success in safety with emerging success in clinical outcomes, one benefit has been identification of issues associated with vector administration in humans (e.g. the role of pre-existing antibody responses, loss of transgene expression in non-immunoprivileged sites, and low transgene expression levels). For these reasons, several strategies are being used to optimize rAAV vectors, ranging from addition of exogenous agents for immune evasion to optimization of the transgene cassette for enhanced therapeutic output. By far, the vast majority of approaches have focused on genetic manipulation of the viral capsid. These methods include rational mutagenesis, engineering of targeting peptides, generation of chimeric particles, library and directed evolution approaches, as well as immune evasion modifications. Overall, these modifications have created a new repertoire of AAV vectors with improved targeting, transgene expression, and immune evasion. Continued work in these areas should synergize strategies to improve capsids and transgene cassettes that will eventually lead to optimized vectors ideally suited for translational success. PMID:20712583

  12. Exosome-associated AAV vector as a robust and convenient neuroscience tool.

    PubMed

    Hudry, E; Martin, C; Gandhi, S; György, B; Scheffer, D I; Mu, D; Merkel, S F; Mingozzi, F; Fitzpatrick, Z; Dimant, H; Masek, M; Ragan, T; Tan, S; Brisson, A R; Ramirez, S H; Hyman, B T; Maguire, C A

    2016-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are showing promise in gene therapy trials and have proven to be extremely efficient biological tools in basic neuroscience research. One major limitation to their widespread use in the neuroscience laboratory is the cost, labor, skill and time-intense purification process of AAV. We have recently shown that AAV can associate with exosomes (exo-AAV) when the vector is isolated from conditioned media of producer cells, and the exo-AAV is more resistant to neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies compared with standard AAV. Here, we demonstrate that simple pelleting of exo-AAV from media via ultracentrifugation results in high-titer vector preparations capable of efficient transduction of central nervous system (CNS) cells after systemic injection in mice. We observed that exo-AAV is more efficient at gene delivery to the brain at low vector doses relative to conventional AAV, even when derived from a serotype that does not normally efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier. Similar cell types were transduced by exo-AAV and conventionally purified vector. Importantly, no cellular toxicity was noted in exo-AAV-transduced cells. We demonstrated the utility and robustness of exo-AAV-mediated gene delivery by detecting direct GFP fluorescence after systemic injection, allowing three-dimensional reconstruction of transduced Purkinje cells in the cerebellum using ex vivo serial two-photon tomography. The ease of isolation combined with the high efficiency of transgene expression in the CNS, may enable the widespread use of exo-AAV as a neuroscience research tool. Furthermore, the ability of exo-AAV to evade neutralizing antibodies while still transducing CNS after peripheral delivery is clinically relevant.

  13. Exosome-associated AAV vector as a robust and convenient neuroscience tool

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Martin, Courtney; Gandhi, Sheetal; György, Bence; Scheffer, Deborah I.; Mu, Dakai; Merkel, Steven F.; Mingozzi, Federico; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Dimant, Hemi; Masek, Marissa; Ragan, Tim; Tan, Sisareuth; Brisson, Alain R.; Ramirez, Servio H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Maguire, Casey A.

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are showing promise in gene therapy trials and have proven to be extremely efficient biological tools in basic neuroscience research. One major limitation to their widespread use in the neuroscience laboratory is the cost, labor, skill, and time intense purification process of AAV. We have recently shown that AAV can associate with exosomes (exo-AAV) when vector is isolated from conditioned media of producer cells, and the exo-AAV is more resistant to neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies compared to standard AAV. Here we demonstrate that simple pelleting of exo-AAV from media via ultracentrifugation, results in high-titer vector preparations capable of efficient transduction of central nervous system (CNS) cells after systemic injection in mice. We observed that exo-AAV is more efficient at gene delivery to the brain at low vector doses relative to conventional AAV, even when derived from a serotype that does not normally efficiently cross the blood brain barrier. Similar cell types were transduced by exo-AAV and conventionally purified vector. Importantly, no cellular toxicity was noted in exo-AAV transduced cells. We demonstrated the utility and robustness of exo-AAV-mediated gene delivery by detecting direct GFP fluorescence after systemic injection, allowing 3-dimensional reconstruction of transduced Purkinje cells in the cerebellum using ex-vivo serial 2-photon tomography. The ease of isolation combined with the high efficiency of transgene expression in the CNS, may enable widespread use of exo-AAV as a neuroscience research tool. Furthermore, the ability of exo-AAV to evade neutralizing antibodies while still transducing CNS after peripheral delivery is clinically relevant. PMID:26836117

  14. Using AAV vectors expressing the β2-adrenoceptor or associated Gα proteins to modulate skeletal muscle mass and muscle fibre size

    PubMed Central

    Hagg, Adam; Colgan, Timothy D.; Thomson, Rachel E.; Qian, Hongwei; Lynch, Gordon S.; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists have been proposed as therapeutics for treating muscle wasting but concerns regarding possible off-target effects have hampered their use. We investigated whether β2-AR-mediated signalling could be modulated in skeletal muscle via gene delivery to the target tissue, thereby avoiding the risks of β2-AR agonists. In mice, intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus-based vector (rAAV vector) expressing the β2-AR increased muscle mass by >20% within 4 weeks. This hypertrophic response was comparable to that of 4 weeks’ treatment with the β2-AR agonist formoterol, and was not ablated by mTOR inhibition. Increasing expression of inhibitory (Gαi2) and stimulatory (GαsL) G-protein subunits produced minor atrophic and hypertrophic changes in muscle mass, respectively. Furthermore, Gαi2 over-expression prevented AAV:β2-AR mediated hypertrophy. Introduction of the non-muscle Gαs isoform, GαsXL elicited hypertrophy comparable to that achieved by AAV:β2-AR. Moreover, GαsXL gene delivery was found to be capable of inducing hypertrophy in the muscles of mice lacking functional β1- and β2-ARs. These findings demonstrate that gene therapy-based interventions targeting the β2-AR pathway can promote skeletal muscle hypertrophy independent of ligand administration, and highlight novel methods for potentially modulating muscle mass in settings of disease. PMID:26972746

  15. Reprogramming Immune Response With Capsid-Optimized AAV6 Vectors for Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Munjal; Britt, Kellee; Hoffman, Brad; Ling, Chen; Aslanidi, George V

    2015-09-01

    In the current studies we generated novel capsid-optimized adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) vectors expressing a tumor-associated antigen, and assessed their ability to activate a protective T-cell response in an animal model. First, we showed that specific mutations in the AAV6 capsid increase the transduction efficiency of these vectors in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in vitro for approximately 5-fold compared with the wild-type (WT) AAV6 vectors. Next, we evaluated the ability of the mutant AAV6 vectors to initiate specific T-cell clone proliferation in vivo. Our data indicate that the intramuscular administration of AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors expressing ovalbumin (OVA) led to a strong activation (approximately 9%) of specific T cells in peripheral blood compared with AAV6-WT treated animals (<1%). These OVA-specific T cells have a superior killing ability against mouse prostate cancer cell line RM1 stably expressing the OVA antigen when propagated in vitro. Finally, we evaluated the ability of capsid-optimized AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors to initiate a protective anticancer immune response in vivo. Our results document the suppression of subcutaneous tumor growth in animals immunized with AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors expressing prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) for approximately 4 weeks in comparison with 1 week and 2 weeks for the negative controls, AAV6-EGFP, and AAV6-WT-PAP treated mice, respectively. These studies suggest that successful inhibition of tumor growth in an animal model would set the stage for potential clinical application of the capsid-optimized AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors.

  16. Packaging of an AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase for gene therapy in glycogen storage disease type II with a modified hybrid adenovirus-AAV vector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Chen, Y-T; Bird, Andrew; Xu, Fang; Hou, Yang-Xun; Amalfitano, Andrea; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2003-04-01

    We have developed an improved method for packaging adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors with a replication-defective adenovirus-AAV (Ad-AAV) hybrid virus. The AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA) was cloned into an E1, polymerase/preterminal protein-deleted adenovirus, such that it is packaged as an Ad vector. Importantly, the Ad-AAV hybrid cannot replicate during AAV vector packaging in 293 cells, because of deletion of polymerase/preterminal protein. The residual Ad-AAV in the AAV vector stock was reduced to <1 infectious particle per 10(10) AAV vector particles. These modifications resulted in approximately 30-fold increased packaging of the AAV vector for the hybrid Ad-AAV vector method as compared with standard transfection-only methods. Similarly improved packaging was demonstrated for pseudotyping the AAV vector as AAV6, and for AAV vector packaging with a second Ad-AAV vector encoding canine glucose-6-phosphatase. Liver-targeted delivery of either the Ad-AAV hybrid or AAV vector particles in acid alpha-glucosidase-knockout (GAA-KO) mice revealed secretion of hGAA with the Ad-AAV vector, and sustained secretion of hGAA with an AAV vector in hGAA-tolerant GAA-KO mice. Further development of hybrid Ad-AAV vectors could offer distinct advantages for gene therapy in glycogen storage diseases.

  17. Comparative Study of Liver Gene Transfer With AAV Vectors Based on Natural and Engineered AAV Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Bell, Peter; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Wang, Qiang; He, Zhenning; Yu, Hongwei; McMenamin, Deirdre; Goode, Tamara; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2015-01-01

    Vectors based on the clade E family member adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8 have shown promise in patients with hemophilia B and have emerged as best in class for human liver gene therapies. We conducted a thorough evaluation of liver-directed gene therapy using vectors based on several natural and engineered capsids including the clade E AAVrh10 and the largely uncharacterized and phylogenically distinct AAV3B. Included in this study was a putatively superior hepatotropic capsid, AAVLK03, which is very similar to AAV3B. Vectors based on these capsids were benchmarked against AAV8 and AAV2 in a number of in vitro and in vivo model systems including C57BL/6 mice, immune-deficient mice that are partially repopulated with human hepatocytes, and nonhuman primates. Our studies in nonhuman primates and human hepatocytes demonstrated high level transduction of the clade E-derived vectors and equally high transduction with vectors based on AAV3B. In contrast to previous reports, AAVLK03 vectors are not superior to either AAV3B or AAV8. Vectors based on AAV3B should be considered for liver-directed gene therapy when administered following, or before, treatment with the serologically distinct clade E vectors. PMID:26412589

  18. Comparative Study of Liver Gene Transfer With AAV Vectors Based on Natural and Engineered AAV Capsids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Bell, Peter; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Wang, Qiang; He, Zhenning; Yu, Hongwei; McMenamin, Deirdre; Goode, Tamara; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2015-12-01

    Vectors based on the clade E family member adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8 have shown promise in patients with hemophilia B and have emerged as best in class for human liver gene therapies. We conducted a thorough evaluation of liver-directed gene therapy using vectors based on several natural and engineered capsids including the clade E AAVrh10 and the largely uncharacterized and phylogenically distinct AAV3B. Included in this study was a putatively superior hepatotropic capsid, AAVLK03, which is very similar to AAV3B. Vectors based on these capsids were benchmarked against AAV8 and AAV2 in a number of in vitro and in vivo model systems including C57BL/6 mice, immune-deficient mice that are partially repopulated with human hepatocytes, and nonhuman primates. Our studies in nonhuman primates and human hepatocytes demonstrated high level transduction of the clade E-derived vectors and equally high transduction with vectors based on AAV3B. In contrast to previous reports, AAVLK03 vectors are not superior to either AAV3B or AAV8. Vectors based on AAV3B should be considered for liver-directed gene therapy when administered following, or before, treatment with the serologically distinct clade E vectors.

  19. Application of Mutated miR-206 Target Sites Enables Skeletal Muscle-specific Silencing of Transgene Expression of Cardiotropic AAV9 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Schön, Christian; Größl, Tobias; Pinkert, Sandra; Stein, Elisabeth A; Kurreck, Jens; Vetter, Roland; Fechner, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of completely complementary microRNA (miR) target sites (miRTS) into a transgene has been shown to be a valuable approach to specifically repress transgene expression in non-targeted tissues. miR-122TS have been successfully used to silence transgene expression in the liver following systemic application of cardiotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 vectors. For miR-206–mediated skeletal muscle-specific silencing of miR-206TS–bearing AAV9 vectors, however, we found this approach failed due to the expression of another member (miR-1) of the same miR family in heart tissue, the intended target. We introduced single-nucleotide substitutions into the miR-206TS and searched for those which prevented miR-1–mediated cardiac repression. Several mutated miR-206TS (m206TS), in particular m206TS-3G, were resistant to miR-1, but remained fully sensitive to miR-206. All these variants had mismatches in the seed region of the miR/m206TS duplex in common. Furthermore, we found that some m206TS, containing mismatches within the seed region or within the 3′ portion of the miR-206, even enhanced the miR-206– mediated transgene repression. In vivo expression of m206TS-3G– and miR-122TS–containing transgene of systemically applied AAV9 vectors was strongly repressed in both skeletal muscle and the liver but remained high in the heart. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of miRTS provides a new strategy to differentiate transgene de-targeting of related miRs. PMID:23439498

  20. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in gene therapy: immune challenges and strategies to circumvent them.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Sen, Dwaipayan; Kumar, Sanjay; Srivastava, Alok; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2013-11-01

    AAV-based gene transfer protocols have shown remarkable success when directed to immune-privileged sites such as for retinal disorders like Lebers congenital amaurosis. In contrast, AAV-mediated gene transfer into liver or muscle tissue for diseases such as hemophilia B, α1 anti-trypsin deficiency and muscular dystrophy has demonstrated a decline in gene transfer efficacy over time. It is now known that in humans, AAV triggers specific pathways that recruit immune sensors. These factors initiate an immediate reaction against either the viral capsid or the vector encoded protein as part of innate immune response or to produce a more specific adaptive response that generates immunological memory. The vector-transduced cells are then rapidly destroyed due to this immune activation. However, unlike other viral vectors, AAV is not immunogenic in murine models. Its immunogenicity becomes apparent only in large animal models and human subjects. Moreover, humans are natural hosts to AAV and exhibit a high seroprevalence against AAV vectors. This limits the widespread application of AAV vectors into patients with pre-existing neutralising antibodies or memory T cells. To address these issues, various strategies are being tested. Alternate serotype vectors (AAV1-10), efficient expression cassettes, specific tissue targeting, immune-suppression and engineered capsid variants are some approaches proposed to minimise this immune stimulation. In this review, we have summarised the nature of the immune response documented against AAV in various pre-clinical and clinical settings and have further discussed the strategies to evade them.

  1. Diabetes enhances the efficacy of AAV2 vectors in the retina: therapeutic effect of AAV2 encoding vasoinhibin and soluble VEGF receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lezama, Nundehui; Wu, Zhijian; Adán-Castro, Elva; Arnold, Edith; Vázquez-Membrillo, Miguel; Arredondo-Zamarripa, David; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Martinez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Colosi, Peter; Clapp, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated delivery of inhibitors of blood-retinal barrier breakdown (BRBB) offers promise for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. Here, we demonstrated a reversal of blood-retinal barrier pathology mediated by AAV type 2 (AAV2) vectors encoding vasoinhibin or soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) when administered intravitreally to diabetic rats. Efficacy and safety of the AAV2 vasoinhibin vector were tested by monitoring its effect on diabetes-induced changes in the retinal vascular bed and thickness, and in the electroretinogram (ERG). Also, the transduction of AAV2 vectors and expression of AAV2 receptors and co-receptors were compared between the diabetic and the non-diabetic rat retinas. AAV2 vasoinhibin or AAV2 sFlt-1 vectors were injected intravitreally before or after enhanced BRBB due to diabetes induced by streptozotocin. The BRBB was examined by the Evans blue method, the vascular bed by fluorescein angiography, expression of the AAV2 EGFP reporter vector by confocal microscopy, and the AAV2 genome, expression of transgenes, receptors, and co-receptors by quantitative PCR. AAV2 vasoinhibin and sFlt-1 vectors inhibited the diabetes-mediated increase in BRBB when injected after, but not before, diabetes was induced. The AAV2 vasoinhibin vector decreased retinal microvascular abnormalities and the diabetes-induced reduction of the B-wave of the ERG, but it had no effect in non-diabetic controls. Also, retinal thickness was not altered by diabetes or by the AAV2 vasoinhibin vector. The AAV2 genome, vasoinhibin and sFlt-1 transgenes, and EGFP levels were higher in the retinas from diabetic rats and were associated with an elevated expression of AAV2 receptors (syndecan, glypican, and perlecan) and co-receptors (fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, αvβ5 integrin, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor). We conclude that retinal transduction and efficacy of AAV2 vectors are enhanced in diabetes, possibly due to their elevated

  2. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge L; Schaffer, David V

    2016-10-28

    Gene delivery vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) have been utilized in a large number of gene therapy clinical trials, which have demonstrated their strong safety profile and increasingly their therapeutic efficacy for treating monogenic diseases. For cancer applications, AAV vectors have been harnessed for delivery of an extensive repertoire of transgenes to preclinical models and, more recently, clinical trials involving certain cancers. This review describes the applications of AAV vectors to cancer models and presents developments in vector engineering and payload design aimed at tailoring AAV vectors for transduction and treatment of cancer cells. We also discuss the current status of AAV clinical development in oncology and future directions for AAV in this field.

  3. Efficient gene delivery to the cone-enriched pig retina by dual AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Colella, P; Trapani, I; Cesi, G; Sommella, A; Manfredi, A; Puppo, A; Iodice, C; Rossi, S; Simonelli, F; Giunti, M; Bacci, M L; Auricchio, A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is limited by AAV cargo capacity that prevents their application to the inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), such as Stargardt disease (STGD) or Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B), which are due to mutations in genes larger than 5 kb. Trans-splicing or hybrid dual AAV vectors have been successfully exploited to reconstitute large gene expression in the mouse retina. Here, we tested them in the large cone-enriched pig retina that closely mimics the human retina. We found that dual AAV trans-splicing and hybrid vectors transduce pig photoreceptors, the major cell targets for treatment of IRDs, to levels that were about two- to threefold lower than those obtained with a single AAV vector of normal size. This efficiency is significantly higher than that in mice, and is potentially due to the high levels of dual AAV co-transduction we observe in pigs. We also show that subretinal delivery in pigs of dual AAV trans-splicing and hybrid vectors successfully reconstitute, albeit at variable levels, the expression of the large genes ABCA4 and MYO7A mutated in STGD and USH1B, respectively. Our data support the potential of dual AAV vectors for large gene reconstitution in the cone-enriched pig retina that is a relevant preclinical model.

  4. Advances in AAV vector development for gene therapy in the retina.

    PubMed

    Day, Timothy P; Byrne, Leah C; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a small, non-pathogenic dependovirus that has shown great potential for safe and long-term expression of a genetic payload in the retina. AAV has been used to treat a growing number of animal models of inherited retinal degeneration, though drawbacks-including a limited carrying capacity, slow onset of expression, and a limited ability to transduce some retinal cell types from the vitreous-restrict the utility of AAV for treating some forms of inherited eye disease. Next generation AAV vectors are being created to address these needs, through rational design efforts such as the creation of self-complementary AAV vectors for faster onset of expression and specific mutations of surface-exposed residues to increase transduction of viral particles. Furthermore, directed evolution has been used to create, through an iterative process of selection, novel variants of AAV with newly acquired, advantageous characteristics. These novel AAV variants have been shown to improve the therapeutic potential of AAV vectors, and further improvements may be achieved through rational design, directed evolution, or a combination of these approaches, leading to broader applicability of AAV and improved treatments for inherited retinal degeneration.

  5. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Wolf, Sonya J.; Samulski, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber’s congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV’s high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package “large” genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161–169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568–8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002). This method involves “splitting” the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124–130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15

  6. Efficacy of codelivery of dual AAV2/5 vectors in the murine retina and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Palfi, Arpad; Chadderton, Naomi; McKee, Alex G; Blanco Fernandez, Alfonso; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2012-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) represents an efficient system for neuronal transduction. However, a potential drawback of AAV is its restricted packaging capacity of approximately 5 kb. To bypass this limitation, a number of dual- and triple-vector strategies divide the transgene(s) between two or three AAVs. The success of these approaches relies directly on efficient cotransduction of the component AAVs. Although proof of concept for these stratagems has been demonstrated, the underlying cotransduction rate has not been analyzed quantitatively. In this study, cotransduction efficiencies in both retina and hippocampus have been investigated, using two reporter AAVs expressing either a green (GFP) or red (DsR) fluorescent protein. Transduction efficiencies were monitored via microscopy, flow cytometry, and quantitative PCR. After viral transduction with 1.5×10(9) viral particles of each of the reporter AAVs, approximately one-third of the retinal cells expressed one or both transgenes at levels detectable by native fluorescence. Notably, the majority of the remaining retinal cells were also transduced and expressed the reporters at lower levels, which were detectable only by immunolabeling. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated cotransduction rates of up to 55% with the two reporter AAVs in retinal cells. Modifying the ratio of the two coadministered AAVs resulted in altered mRNA expression levels of the two reporter genes in cotransduced cell populations. The study suggests that codelivery of AAV is an efficient means of expanding the therapeutic application of AAV in neurons.

  7. Intraocular route of AAV2 vector administration defines humoral immune response and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rehae; Han, Ping-Yang; Pang, Jijing; Dinculescu, Astra; Chiodo, Vince; Hauswirth, William W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Safety and efficiency are critical for successful gene therapy. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are commonly used for gene transfer in both human and animal studies. However, administration of AAV vectors can lead to development of neutralizing antibodies against the vector capsid, thus decreasing the efficiency of therapeutic gene transfer and preventing effective vector readministration. We investigated immune responses to different routes of ocular administration and readministration of AAV vectors, and the effect of previous exposure of AAV vector in one eye on the transduction efficacy of subsequent intraocular AAV-mediated gene delivery to the partner eye. Methods We tested two vector systems. One contained a cDNA encoding a secreted pigment epithelial derived factor (PEDF) cDNA under the control of a Cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer and chicken β-actin promoter (CBA; AAV2-CBA-PEDF) and was tested in a murine model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The other vector contained a cDNA encoding the intracellular reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the same promoter (AAV2-CBA-GFP). Animals were divided into groups and received sequential injections at different combinations of either intravitreal or subretinal routes. CNV was evaluated by fluorescein angiographic choroidal flat-mount image analysis. The expression of GFP was analyzed in retinal sections by direct fluorescence imaging. Antibodies against AAV2 capsid and transgenes were analyzed by ELISA using serum samples collected before injection and different time points after the injection. Neutralizing antibodies were characterized by in vitro assays. Results Various ocular compartments responded to AAV administration differently. Intravitreal administration of AAV vectors, which resulted in transduction of inner retina (primarily retinal ganglion cells), generated a humoral immune response against AAV capsid that blocked vector expression upon

  8. rAAV vector product characterization and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Richard O; Audit, Muriel; Francis, Joyce D

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate the safe and long-term correction of genetic diseases following a single administration. Preclinical studies in animal models and human trials have shown rAAV vector persistence and safety. In some trials, sustained or transient transgene expression has been demonstrated in humans treated for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, LPL deficiency, hemophilia B and cystic fibrosis, and sustained correction of inherited blindness has been reported by three groups. For human use, rAAV vectors are manufactured and tested in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices as outlined in the Code of Federal Regulations (21CFR) or European Good Manufacturing Practices (Eudralex, Volume 4, GMP Guidelines, 2003/94/CE and 91/356/EEC). Manufacturing control, as well as product quality is evaluated by quality control testing and all manufacturing, facilities, and testing activities are reviewed by the quality assurance department. In-process specifications are set and in-process testing is conducted to confirm that the manufacturing process is controlled, aseptic, and performs consistently. Final product is tested to ensure release specifications are met for identity, safety, purity, potency, and stability.

  9. Systematic Evaluation of AAV Vectors for Liver directed Gene Transfer in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Wang, Huan; Bell, Peter; McCarter, Robert J; He, Jianping; Calcedo, Roberto; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Morizono, Hiroki; Batshaw, Mark L; Wilson, James M

    2009-01-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are being evaluated for use in liver-directed gene therapy. Candidates have been preselected on the basis of capsid structure that plays an important role in determining performance profiles. We describe a comprehensive and statistically powered set of mouse studies designed to compare the performance of vectors based on seven novel AAV capsids. The key criteria used to select candidates for successful gene therapy are high level and stable transgene expression in the absence of toxicity. Based on these criteria, the best performing vectors, AAV8, AAVhu.37, and AAVrh.8, will be further evaluated in nonhuman primates (NHPs). PMID:19861950

  10. The AAV Vector Toolkit: Poised at the Clinical Crossroads.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Aravind; Schaffer, David V; Jude Samulski, R

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of naturally occurring adeno-associated virus (AAV) isolates in different animal species and the generation of engineered AAV strains using molecular genetics tools have yielded a versatile AAV vector toolkit. Promising results in preclinical animal models of human disease spurred the much awaited transition toward clinical application, and early successes in phase I/II clinical trials for a broad spectrum of genetic diseases have recently been reported. As the gene therapy community forges ahead with cautious optimism, both preclinical and clinical studies using first generation AAV vectors have highlighted potential challenges. These include cross-species variation in vector tissue tropism and gene transfer efficiency, pre-existing humoral immunity to AAV capsids and vector dose-dependent toxicity in patients. A battery of second generation AAV vectors, engineered through rational and combinatorial approaches to address the aforementioned concerns, are now available. This review will provide an overview of preclinical studies with the ever-expanding AAV vector portfolio in large animal models and an update on new lead AAV vector candidates poised for clinical translation.

  11. The AAV vector toolkit: poised at the clinical crossroads.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Aravind; Schaffer, David V; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of naturally occurring adeno-associated virus (AAV) isolates in different animal species and the generation of engineered AAV strains using molecular genetics tools have yielded a versatile AAV vector toolkit. Promising results in preclinical animal models of human disease spurred the much awaited transition toward clinical application, and early successes in phase I/II clinical trials for a broad spectrum of genetic diseases have recently been reported. As the gene therapy community forges ahead with cautious optimism, both preclinical and clinical studies using first generation AAV vectors have highlighted potential challenges. These include cross-species variation in vector tissue tropism and gene transfer efficiency, pre-existing humoral immunity to AAV capsids and vector dose-dependent toxicity in patients. A battery of second generation AAV vectors, engineered through rational and combinatorial approaches to address the aforementioned concerns, are now available. This review will provide an overview of preclinical studies with the ever-expanding AAV vector portfolio in large animal models and an update on new lead AAV vector candidates poised for clinical translation.

  12. The impact of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses on design and outcome of clinical gene transfer trials with recombinant AAV vectors - an evolving controversy.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Hildegund Cj; High, Katherine A

    2017-01-02

    Recombinant adenovirus-associated (rAAV) vectors due to their ease of construction, wide tissue tropism and lack of pathogenicity remain at the forefront for long-term gene replacement therapy. In spite of very encouraging pre-clinical results, clinical trials were initially unsuccessful; expression of the rAAV vector-delivered therapeutic protein was transient. Loss of expression was linked to an expansion of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses, leading to the hypothesis that rAAV vectors recall pre-existing memory T cells that had been induced by natural infections with AAV together with a helper virus. Although this was hotly debated at first, AAV capsid-specific T cell responses were observed in several gene transfer trials that used high doses of rAAV vectors. Subsequent trials designed to circumvent these T cell responses through the use of immunosuppressive drugs, rAAV vectors based on rare serotypes or modified to allow for therapeutic levels of the transgene product at low, non-immunogenic vector doses are now successful in correcting debilitating diseases.

  13. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    PubMed

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases.

  14. Distinct immune responses to transgene products from rAAV1 and rAAV8 vectors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanqing; Song, Sihong

    2009-10-06

    Recently developed serotypes of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have significantly enhanced the use of rAAV vectors for gene therapy. However, host immune responses to the transgene products from different serotypes remain uncharacterized. In the present study, we evaluated the differential immune responses to the transgene products from rAAV1 and rAAV8 vectors. In non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which have a hypersensitive immunity, rAAV serotype 1 vector (rAAV1-hAAT) induced high levels of both humoral and cellular responses, while rAAV8-hAAT did not. In vitro studies showed that rAAV1, but not rAAV8 vector transduced dendritic cells (DCs) efficiently. In vivo studies indicated that vector transduction of DCs was essential for the immune responses; while the presence of a transgene product (or foreign gene product produced by host cells) was not immunogenic. Intriguingly, preimmunization with rAAV8-hAAT vector or with serum of hAAT transgenic NOD mouse induced immune tolerance to rAAV1-hAAT injection. These results demonstrate the immunogenic differences of rAAV1 and rAAV8 and imply tremendous potential for these vectors in different applications, where an immune response to transgene is to be either elicited or avoided.

  15. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Expressing Retinoschisin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Howard, Kellie; Knop, David R; Neuringer, Martha; McGill, Trevor; Stoddard, Jonathan; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation is developing rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector for treatment of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), an inherited retinal disease characterized by splitting (schisis) of retinal layers causing poor vision. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in normal cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of male animals (n = 6 per group) received an intravitreal injection in one eye of either vehicle, or rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 at one of two dose levels (4 × 10(10) or 4 × 10(11) vg/eye). Half the animals were sacrificed after 14 days and the others after 91 or 115 days. The intravitreal injection procedure was well tolerated in all groups. Serial ophthalmic examinations demonstrated a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that improved over time. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, electroretinography, visual evoked potential, hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal or moderate mononuclear infiltrates in 6 of 12 vector-injected eyes. Immunohistochemical staining showed RS1 labeling of the ganglion cell layer at the foveal slope in vector-injected eyes at both dose levels. Serum anti-AAV antibodies were detected in 4 of 6 vector-injected animals at the day 15 sacrifice and all vector-injected animals at later time points. No animals developed antibodies to RS1. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in clinical studies in patients with XLRS.

  16. OneBac 2.0: Sf9 Cell Lines for Production of AAV5 Vectors with Enhanced Infectivity and Minimal Encapsidation of Foreign DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mietzsch, Mario; Casteleyn, Vincent; Weger, Stefan; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Scalable production of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAV) in baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells yields high burst sizes but variable infectivity rates per packaged AAV vector genome depending on the chosen serotype. Infectivity rates are particularly low for rAAV5 vectors, based on the genetically most divergent AAV serotype. In this study we describe key improvements of the OneBac system for the generation of rAAV5 vectors, whose manufacturing has been unsatisfactory in all current insect cell-based production systems. The Sf9 cell-based expression strategy for AAV5 capsid proteins was modified to enhance relative AAV5 VP1 levels. This resulted in a 100-fold boost of infectivity per genomic AAV5 particle with undiminished burst sizes per producer cell. Furthermore, the issue of collateral packaging of helper DNA into AAV capsids was approached. By modifications of the AAV rep and cap expression constructs used for the generation of stable Sf9 cell lines, collateral packaging of helper DNA sequences during rAAV vector production was dramatically reduced down to 0.001% of packaged rAAV genomes, while AAV5 burst sizes and infectivity rates were maintained. OneBac 2.0 represents the first insect cell-based scalable production system for high per-particle AAV5 infectivity rates combined with minimal collateral packaging of helper DNA, allowing the manufacturing of safe AAV5-based gene therapies for clinical application. PMID:26134901

  17. OneBac 2.0: Sf9 Cell Lines for Production of AAV5 Vectors with Enhanced Infectivity and Minimal Encapsidation of Foreign DNA.

    PubMed

    Mietzsch, Mario; Casteleyn, Vincent; Weger, Stefan; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2015-10-01

    Scalable production of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAV) in baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells yields high burst sizes but variable infectivity rates per packaged AAV vector genome depending on the chosen serotype. Infectivity rates are particularly low for rAAV5 vectors, based on the genetically most divergent AAV serotype. In this study we describe key improvements of the OneBac system for the generation of rAAV5 vectors, whose manufacturing has been unsatisfactory in all current insect cell-based production systems. The Sf9 cell-based expression strategy for AAV5 capsid proteins was modified to enhance relative AAV5 VP1 levels. This resulted in a 100-fold boost of infectivity per genomic AAV5 particle with undiminished burst sizes per producer cell. Furthermore, the issue of collateral packaging of helper DNA into AAV capsids was approached. By modifications of the AAV rep and cap expression constructs used for the generation of stable Sf9 cell lines, collateral packaging of helper DNA sequences during rAAV vector production was dramatically reduced down to 0.001% of packaged rAAV genomes, while AAV5 burst sizes and infectivity rates were maintained. OneBac 2.0 represents the first insect cell-based scalable production system for high per-particle AAV5 infectivity rates combined with minimal collateral packaging of helper DNA, allowing the manufacturing of safe AAV5-based gene therapies for clinical application.

  18. Photoreceptor-targeted gene delivery using intravitreally administered AAV vectors in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, RF; Sledge, DG; Boye, SL; Boye, SE; Hauswirth, WW; Komáromy, AM; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic transgenes to retinal photoreceptors using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has traditionally required subretinal injection. Recently, photoreceptor transduction efficiency following intravitreal injection (IVT) has improved in rodent models through use of capsid-mutant AAV vectors; but remains limited in large animal models. Thickness of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) in large animals is thought to impair retinal penetration by AAV. Our study compared two newly developed AAV vectors containing multiple capsid amino acid substitutions following IVT in dogs. The ability of two promoter constructs to restrict reporter transgene expression to photoreceptors was also evaluated. AAV vectors containing the interphotoreceptor-binding protein (IRBP) promoter drove expression exclusively in rod and cone photoreceptors, with transduction efficiencies of ~ 4% of cones and 2% of rods. Notably, in the central region containing the cone-rich visual streak, 15.6% of cones were transduced. Significant regional variation existed, with lower transduction efficiencies in the temporal regions of all eyes. This variation did not correlate with ILM thickness. Vectors carrying a cone-specific promoter failed to transduce a quantifiable percentage of cone photoreceptors. The newly developed AAV vectors containing the IRBP promoter were capable of producing photoreceptor-specific transgene expression following IVT in the dog. PMID:26467396

  19. Photoreceptor-targeted gene delivery using intravitreally administered AAV vectors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R F; Sledge, D G; Boye, S L; Boye, S E; Hauswirth, W W; Komáromy, A M; Petersen-Jones, S M; Bartoe, J T

    2016-02-01

    Delivery of therapeutic transgenes to retinal photoreceptors using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has traditionally required subretinal injection. Recently, photoreceptor transduction efficiency following intravitreal injection (IVT) has improved in rodent models through use of capsid-mutant AAV vectors; but remains limited in large animal models. Thickness of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) in large animals is thought to impair retinal penetration by AAV. Our study compared two newly developed AAV vectors containing multiple capsid amino acid substitutions following IVT in dogs. The ability of two promoter constructs to restrict reporter transgene expression to photoreceptors was also evaluated. AAV vectors containing the interphotoreceptor-binding protein (IRBP) promoter drove expression exclusively in rod and cone photoreceptors, with transduction efficiencies of ~4% of cones and 2% of rods. Notably, in the central region containing the cone-rich visual streak, 15.6% of cones were transduced. Significant regional variation existed, with lower transduction efficiencies in the temporal regions of all eyes. This variation did not correlate with ILM thickness. Vectors carrying a cone-specific promoter failed to transduce a quantifiable percentage of cone photoreceptors. The newly developed AAV vectors containing the IRBP promoter were capable of producing photoreceptor-specific transgene expression following IVT in the dog.

  20. Humoral immunity to AAV vectors in gene therapy: challenges and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Masat, Elisa; Pavani, Giulia; Mingozzi, Federico

    2013-06-01

    Gene transfer trials with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have initiated to unveil the therapeutic potential of this approach, with some of the most exciting results coming from clinical studies of gene transfer for hemophilia B, congenital blindness, and the recent market approval of the first AAV-based gene therapy in Europe. With clinical development, however, some of the limitations of in vivo gene transfer have emerged; in particular the host immune system represents an important obstacle to be overcome in terms of both safety and efficacy of gene transfer in vivo with AAV vectors. Results in humans undergoing gene transfer indicate that capsid-specific T cell responses directed against transduced cells may limit the duration of transgene expression following AAV gene transfer, and similarly anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies can completely prevent transduction of a target tissue, resulting in lack of efficacy. Anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies are highly prevalent in humans, and the frequency of subjects with detectable titers can reach up to two thirds of the population. The approach to the problem of preexisting humoral immunity to AAV so far has been the exclusion of seropositive subjects, but this solution is far from being optimal. Several additional strategies have been proposed and tested in a variety of preclinical animal models. Future studies will help defining the optimal strategy, or combination of strategies, to successfully treat subjects with preexisting antibodies to AAV due to natural infection or to prior administration of AAV vectors. These advancements will likely have a significant impact on the field of gene transfer with AAV vectors.

  1. Inverse zonation of hepatocyte transduction with AAV vectors between mice and non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Peter; Wang, Lili; Gao, Guangping; Haskins, Mark E.; Tarantal, Alice F.; McCarter, Robert J.; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) are highly efficient in liver transduction and can be easily administered by intravenous injection. In mice, AAV8 transduces predominantly hepatocytes near central veins and yields lower transduction levels in hepatocytes in periportal regions. This transduction bias has important implications for gene therapy that aims to correct metabolic liver enzymes because metabolic zonation along the porto-central axis requires the expression of therapeutic proteins within the zone where they are normally localized. In the present study we compared the expression pattern of AAV8 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in liver between mice, dogs, and non-human primates. We confirmed the pericentral dominance in transgene expression in mice with AAV8 when the liver-specific thyroid hormone-binding globulin (TBG) promoter was used but also observed the same expression pattern with the ubiquitous chicken β-actin (CB) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoters, suggesting that transduction zonation is not caused by promoter specificity. Predominantly pericentral expression was also found in dogs injected with AAV8. In contrast, in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques the expression pattern from AAV vectors was reversed, i.e. transgene expression was most intense around portal areas and less intense or absent around central veins. Infant rhesus macaques as well as newborn mice injected with AAV8 however showed a random distribution of transgene expression with neither portal nor central transduction bias. Based on the data in monkeys, adult humans treated with AAV vectors are predicted to also express transgenes predominantly in periportal regions whereas infants are likely to show a uniform transduction pattern in liver. PMID:21778099

  2. AAV vector-mediated secretion of chondroitinase provides a sensitive tracer for axonal arborisations.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Nuno; Muir, Elizabeth M; Andrews, Melissa R; Ward, Anneliese; Michelmore, Nicholas; Dasgupta, Debayan; Verhaagen, Joost; Moloney, Elizabeth B; Keynes, Roger J; Fawcett, James W; Rogers, John H

    2014-04-30

    As part of a project to express chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) in neurons of the central nervous system, we have inserted a modified ChABC gene into an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector and injected it into the vibrissal motor cortex in adult rats to determine the extent and distribution of expression of the enzyme. A similar vector for expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into the same location. For each vector, two versions with minor differences were used, giving similar results. After 4 weeks, the brains were stained to show GFP and products of chondroitinase digestion. Chondroitinase was widely expressed, and the AAV-ChABC and AAV-GFP vectors gave similar expression patterns in many respects, consistent with the known projections from the directly transduced neurons in vibrissal motor cortex and adjacent cingulate cortex. In addition, diffusion of vector to deeper neuronal populations led to labelling of remote projection fields which was much more extensive with AAV-ChABC than with AAV-GFP. The most notable of these populations are inferred to be neurons of cortical layer 6, projecting widely in the thalamus, and neurons of the anterior pole of the hippocampus, projecting through most of the hippocampus. We conclude that, whereas GFP does not label the thinnest axonal branches of some neuronal types, chondroitinase is efficiently secreted from these arborisations and enables their extent to be sensitively visualised. After 12 weeks, chondroitinase expression was undiminished.

  3. Efficient and Targeted Transduction of Nonhuman Primate Liver With Systemically Delivered Optimized AAV3B Vectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyong; Ling, Chen; Zhong, Li; Li, Mengxin; Su, Qin; He, Ran; Tang, Qiushi; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A; Flotte, Terence R; Mueller, Christian; Srivastava, Arun; Gao, Guangping

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (rAAV3B) can transduce cultured human liver cancer cells and primary human hepatocytes efficiently. Serine (S)- and threonine (T)-directed capsid modifications further augment its transduction efficiency. Systemically delivered capsid-optimized rAAV3B vectors can specifically target cancer cells in a human liver cancer xenograft model, suggesting their potential use for human liver-directed gene therapy. Here, we compared transduction efficiencies of AAV3B and AAV8 vectors in cultured primary human hepatocytes and cancer cells as well as in human and mouse hepatocytes in a human liver xenograft NSG-PiZ mouse model. We also examined the safety and transduction efficacy of wild-type (WT) and capsid-optimized rAAV3B in the livers of nonhuman primates (NHPs). Intravenously delivered S663V+T492V (ST)-modified self-complementary (sc) AAV3B-EGFP vectors led to liver-targeted robust enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression in NHPs without apparent hepatotoxicity. Intravenous injections of both WT and ST-modified rAAV3B.ST-rhCG vectors also generated stable super-physiological levels of rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (rhCG) in NHPs. The vector genome predominantly targeted the liver. Clinical chemistry and histopathology examinations showed no apparent vector-related toxicity. Our studies should be important and informative for clinical development of optimized AAV3B vectors for human liver-directed gene therapy.

  4. Pre-clinical efficacy and dosing of an AAV8 vector expressing human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase in a murine model of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA).

    PubMed

    Chandler, Randy J; Venditti, Charles P

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT), delivered using an AAV serotype 8 vector, rescues the lethal phenotype displayed by mice with MMA and provides long-term phenotypic correction. In addition to defining a lower limit of effective dosing, our studies establish that neither a species barrier to mitochondrial processing nor an apparent immune response to MUT limits the murine model as an experimental platform to test the efficacy of human gene therapy vectors for MMA.

  5. AAV vector-mediated reversal of hypoglycemia in canine and murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Pinto, Carlos; Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Kozink, Daniel M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Demaster, Amanda K; Kruse, Meghan A; Vaughn, Valerie; Hillman, Steven; Bird, Andrew; Jackson, Mark; Brown, Talmage; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) profoundly impairs glucose release by the liver due to glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing a small human G6Pase transgene was pseudotyped with AAV8 (AAV2/8) to optimize liver tropism. Survival was prolonged in 2-week-old G6Pase (-/-) mice by 600-fold fewer AAV2/8 vector particles (vp), in comparison to previous experiments involving this model (2 x 10(9) vp; 3 x 10(11) vp/kg). When the vector was pseudotyped with AAV1, survival was prolonged only at a higher dose (3 x 10(13) vp/kg). The AAV2/8 vector uniquely prevented hypoglycemia during fasting and fully corrected liver G6Pase deficiency in GSD-Ia mice and dogs. The AAV2/8 vector has prolonged survival in three GSD-Ia dogs to >11 months, which validated this strategy in the large animal model for GSD-Ia. Urinary biomarkers, including lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, were corrected by G6Pase expression solely in the liver. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was reduced almost to the normal level in vector-treated GSD-Ia mice and dogs, as was the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in GSD-Ia mice. These preclinical data demonstrated the efficacy of correcting hepatic G6Pase deficiency, and support the further preclinical development of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy for GSD-Ia.

  6. Glymphatic fluid transport controls paravascular clearance of AAV vectors from the brain

    PubMed Central

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Crowther, Andrew; Reardon, Rebecca A.; Song, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for gene therapy of CNS disorders. However, host factors that influence the spread, clearance, and transduction efficiency of AAV vectors in the brain are not well understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that fluid flow mediated by aquaporin-4 (AQP4) channels located on astroglial end feet is essential for exchange of solutes between interstitial and cerebrospinal fluid. This phenomenon, which is essential for interstitial clearance of solutes from the CNS, has been termed glial-associated lymphatic transport or glymphatic transport. In the current study, we demonstrate that glymphatic transport profoundly affects various aspects of AAV gene transfer in the CNS. Altered localization of AQP4 in aged mouse brains correlated with significantly increased retention of AAV vectors in the parenchyma and reduced systemic leakage following ventricular administration. We observed a similar increase in AAV retention and transgene expression upon i.c.v. administration in AQP4–/– mice. Consistent with this observation, fluorophore-labeled AAV vectors showed markedly reduced flux from the ventricles of AQP4–/– mice compared with WT mice. These results were further corroborated by reduced AAV clearance from the AQP4-null brain, as demonstrated by reduced transgene expression and vector genome accumulation in systemic organs. We postulate that deregulation of glymphatic transport in aged and diseased brains could markedly affect the parenchymal spread, clearance, and gene transfer efficiency of AAV vectors. Assessment of biomarkers that report the kinetics of CSF flux in prospective gene therapy patients might inform variable treatment outcomes and guide future clinical trial design. PMID:27699236

  7. Glymphatic fluid transport controls paravascular clearance of AAV vectors from the brain.

    PubMed

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Crowther, Andrew; Reardon, Rebecca A; Song, Juan; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-09-08

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for gene therapy of CNS disorders. However, host factors that influence the spread, clearance, and transduction efficiency of AAV vectors in the brain are not well understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that fluid flow mediated by aquaporin-4 (AQP4) channels located on astroglial end feet is essential for exchange of solutes between interstitial and cerebrospinal fluid. This phenomenon, which is essential for interstitial clearance of solutes from the CNS, has been termed glial-associated lymphatic transport or glymphatic transport. In the current study, we demonstrate that glymphatic transport profoundly affects various aspects of AAV gene transfer in the CNS. Altered localization of AQP4 in aged mouse brains correlated with significantly increased retention of AAV vectors in the parenchyma and reduced systemic leakage following ventricular administration. We observed a similar increase in AAV retention and transgene expression upon i.c.v. administration in AQP4(-/-) mice. Consistent with this observation, fluorophore-labeled AAV vectors showed markedly reduced flux from the ventricles of AQP4(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. These results were further corroborated by reduced AAV clearance from the AQP4-null brain, as demonstrated by reduced transgene expression and vector genome accumulation in systemic organs. We postulate that deregulation of glymphatic transport in aged and diseased brains could markedly affect the parenchymal spread, clearance, and gene transfer efficiency of AAV vectors. Assessment of biomarkers that report the kinetics of CSF flux in prospective gene therapy patients might inform variable treatment outcomes and guide future clinical trial design.

  8. IL12-mediated liver inflammation reduces the formation of AAV transcriptionally active forms but has no effect over preexisting AAV transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Gil-Fariña, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Vanrell, Lucia; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; High, Katherine A; Prieto, Jesus; Mingozzi, Federico; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors (rAAV) have proven to be excellent candidates for gene therapy clinical applications. Recent results showed that cellular immunity to AAV represents a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of these vectors. Interestingly, no preclinical animal model has previously fully reproduced the clinical findings. The aim of the present work was to enhance the T cell immune response against AAV capsid in mice by the administration of a rAAV expressing the immunostimulatory cytokine IL-12. Our results indicate that although IL-12 expression enhanced the AAV capsid-specific immune response it failed to eliminate transduced hepatocytes and long-term expression was achieved. We found that AAV-mediated transgene expression is altered by IL-12-induced liver inflammation. However, IL-12 expression has no effect over preexisting AAV-mediated transgene expression. IL-12 down-regulates AAV mediated transgene expression via induction of IFN-γ production by NK and T cells, but without altering the transduction efficiency measured by viral genomes. Our results indicate that liver inflammation affects the formation of transcriptionally active AAV vector genomes through an unknown mechanism that can be avoided by the use of DNA-demethylating or anti-inflammatory agents.

  9. Gene delivery to adipose tissue using transcriptionally targeted rAAV8 vectors.

    PubMed

    Uhrig-Schmidt, Silke; Geiger, Matthias; Luippold, Gerd; Birk, Gerald; Mennerich, Detlev; Neubauer, Heike; Grimm, Dirk; Wolfrum, Christian; Kreuz, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the increasing prevalence of obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities fostered intensive research in the field of adipose tissue biology. To further unravel molecular mechanisms of adipose tissue function, genetic tools enabling functional studies in vitro and in vivo are essential. While the use of transgenic animals is well established, attempts using viral and non-viral vectors to genetically modify adipocytes in vivo are rare. Therefore, we here characterized recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors regarding their potency as gene transfer vehicles for adipose tissue. Our results demonstrate that a single dose of systemically applied rAAV8-CMV-eGFP can give rise to remarkable transgene expression in murine adipose tissues. Upon transcriptional targeting of the rAAV8 vector to adipocytes using a 2.2 kb fragment of the murine adiponectin (mAP2.2) promoter, eGFP expression was significantly decreased in off-target tissues while efficient transduction was maintained in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. Moreover, rAAV8-mAP2.2-mediated expression of perilipin A - a lipid-droplet-associated protein - resulted in significant changes in metabolic parameters only three weeks post vector administration. Taken together, our findings indicate that rAAV vector technology is applicable as a flexible tool to genetically modify adipocytes for functional proof-of-concept studies and the assessment of putative therapeutic targets in vivo.

  10. An efficient rHSV-based complementation system for the production of multiple rAAV vector serotypes.

    PubMed

    Kang, W; Wang, L; Harrell, H; Liu, J; Thomas, D L; Mayfield, T L; Scotti, M M; Ye, G J; Veres, G; Knop, D R

    2009-02-01

    Recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (rHSV)-assisted recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector production provides a highly efficient and scalable method for manufacture of clinical grade rAAV vectors. Here, we present an rHSV co-infection system for rAAV production, which uses two ICP27-deficient rHSV constructs, one bearing the rep2 and cap (1, 2 or 9) genes of rAAV, and the second bearing an AAV2 ITR-gene of interest (GOI) cassette. The optimum rAAV production parameters were defined by producing rAAV2/GFP in HEK293 cells, yielding greater than 9000 infectious particles per cell with a 14:1 DNase resistance particle to infectious particle (DRP/ip) ratio. The optimized co-infection parameters were then used to generate large-scale stocks of rAAV1/AAT, which encode the human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT) protein, and purified by column chromatography. The purified vector was extensively characterized by rAAV- and rHSV-specific assays and compared to transfection-made vector for in vivo efficacy in mice through intramuscular injection. The co-infection method was also used to produce rAAV9/AAT for comparison to rAAV1/AAT in vivo. Intramuscular administration of 1 x 10(11) DRP per animal of rHSV-produced rAAV1/AAT and rAAV9/AAT resulted in hAAT protein expression of 5.4 x 10(4) and 9.4 x 10(5) ng ml(-1) serum respectively, the latter being clinically relevant.

  11. Engineering the AAV capsid to optimize vector-host-interactions.

    PubMed

    Büning, Hildegard; Huber, Anke; Zhang, Liang; Meumann, Nadja; Hacker, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are the most widely used delivery system for in vivo gene therapy. Vectors developed from natural AAV isolates achieved clinical benefit for a number of patients suffering from monogenetic disorders. However, high vector doses were required and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies precluded a number of patients from participation. Further challenges are related to AAV's tropism that lacks cell type selectivity resulting in off-target transduction. Conversely, specific cell types representing important targets for gene therapy like stem cells or endothelial cells show low permissiveness. To overcome these limitations, elegant rational design- as well as directed evolution-based strategies were developed to optimize various steps of AAV's host interaction. These efforts resulted in next generation vectors with enhanced capabilities, that is increased efficiency of cell transduction, targeted transduction of previously non-permissive cell types, escape from antibody neutralization and off-target free in vivo delivery of vector genomes. These important achievements are expected to improve current and pave the way towards novel AAV-based applications in gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

  12. AAV retinal transduction in a large animal model species: Comparison of a self-complementary AAV2/5 with a single-stranded AAV2/5 vector

    PubMed Central

    Bartoe, J.T.; Fischer, A.J.; Scott, M.; Boye, S.L.; Chiodo, V.; Hauswirth, W.W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare self-complementary (sc) and single-stranded (ss) adeno-associated viral 2/5 (AAV2/5) vectors for retinal cell transduction in the dog when delivered by subretinal injection. Methods ScAAV2/5 and ssAAV2/5 vectors encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the chicken beta actin promoter were prepared to the same titer. Equal amounts of viral particles were delivered into the subretinal spaces of both eyes of two dogs. In each dog, one eye received the scAAV2/5 and the other the ssAAV2/5. In vivo expression of GFP was monitored ophthalmoscopically. The dogs were sacrificed, and their retinas were examined by fluorescent microscopy and immunohistochemistry to determine GFP expression patterns and to assay for glial reactivity. Results GFP expression in the scAAV2/5 injected eyes was detectable at a much earlier time point than in the ssAAV2/5 injected eyes. Expression of GFP was also at higher levels in the scAAV2/5-injected eyes. Expression levels remained stable for the seven month duration of the study. The types of cells transduced by both vectors were similar; there was strong reporter gene expression in the RPE and photoreceptors, although not all cones in the transduced area expressed GFP. Some horizontal and Müller cells were also transduced. Conclusions When delivered by subretinal injection in the dog, scAAV2/5 induces faster and stronger transgene expression than ssAAV2/5. The spectrum of retinal neurons transduced is similar between the two vectors. These results confirm in a large animal model those previously reported in the mouse. ScAAV2/5 shows promise for use in the treatment of conditions where a rapid transgene expression is desirable. Furthermore, it may be possible to use a lower number of viral particles to achieve the same effect compared with ssAAV2/5 vectors. PMID:19756181

  13. Hepatitis virus protein X-Phenylalanine Hydroxylase fusion proteins identified in PKU mice treated with AAV-WPRE vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing the Pahenu2 mouse model for phenylketonuria (PKU), we developed an improved expression vector containing the Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus post-transcriptional regulatory element inserted into a rAAV-mPAH construct (rAAV-mPAH-WPRE) for treatment of PKU. Following portal vein delivery of these ...

  14. Long-term Expression of Apolipoprotein B mRNA-specific Hammerhead Ribozyme via scAAV8.2 Vector Inhibits Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nischal, Hersharan; Sun, Hua; Wang, Yuchun; Ford, David A; Cao, Ying; Wei, Peng; Teng, Ba-Bie

    2013-01-01

    Target substrate-specific hammerhead ribozyme cleaves the specific mRNA efficiently and results in the inhibition of gene expression. In humans, overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) is positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that long-term reduction of apoB gene expression using hammerhead ribozyme would result in inhibition of atherosclerosis development. We designed two hammerhead ribozymes targeted at the nucleotides of apoB mRNA GUC2326 (designated RB1) and GUA6679 (designated RB15), and we used self-complementary adeno-associated virus 8.2 (scAAV8.2) vector to deliver these active ribozymes of RB1, RB15, combination of RB1/RB15, and an inactive hammerhead ribozyme RB15 mutant to atherosclerosis-prone LDb mice (Ldlr−/−Apobec1−/−). LDb mice lack both low density lipoproteins (LDL) receptor (Ldlr−/−) and apoB mRNA editing enzyme (Apobec1−/−) genes and develop atherosclerosis spontaneously. After the RB1, RB15, or combination of RB1/RB15 ribozymes treatment, the LDb mice had significantly decreased plasma triglyceride and apoB levels, resulting in markedly decreased of atherosclerotic lesions, Furthermore, the active ribozymes treatment decreased the levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (Dgat1) mRNA and the levels of multiple diacylglycerol (DAG) molecular species. These results provide the first evidence that decreased apoB levels results to reduction of Dgat1 expression and triglyceride levels (TAG), which had a significant impact on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:24084845

  15. Exosome-associated AAV2 vector mediates robust gene delivery into the murine retina upon intravitreal injection.

    PubMed

    Wassmer, Sarah J; Carvalho, Livia S; György, Bence; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Maguire, Casey A

    2017-03-31

    Widespread gene transfer to the retina is challenging as it requires vector systems to overcome physical and biochemical barriers to enter and diffuse throughout retinal tissue. We investigated whether exosome-associated adeno-associated virus, (exo-AAV) enabled broad retinal targeting following intravitreal (IVT) injection, as exosomes have been shown to traverse biological barriers and mediate widespread distribution upon systemic injection. We packaged an AAV genome encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into conventional AAV2 and exo-AAV2 vectors. Vectors were IVT injected into the eyes of adult mice. GFP expression was noninvasively monitored by fundus imaging and retinal expression was analyzed 4 weeks post-injection by qRT-PCR and histology. Exo-AAV2 outperformed conventional AAV2 in GFP expression based on fundus image analysis and qRT-PCR. Exo-AAV2 demonstrated deeper penetration in the retina, efficiently reaching the inner nuclear and outer plexiform, and to a lesser extent the outer nuclear layer. Cell targets were ganglion cells, bipolar cells, Müller cells, and photoreceptors. Exo-AAV2 serves as a robust gene delivery tool for murine retina, and the simplicity of production and isolation should make it widely applicable to basic research of the eye.

  16. Exosome-associated AAV2 vector mediates robust gene delivery into the murine retina upon intravitreal injection

    PubMed Central

    Wassmer, Sarah J.; Carvalho, Livia S.; György, Bence; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Maguire, Casey A.

    2017-01-01

    Widespread gene transfer to the retina is challenging as it requires vector systems to overcome physical and biochemical barriers to enter and diffuse throughout retinal tissue. We investigated whether exosome-associated adeno-associated virus, (exo-AAV) enabled broad retinal targeting following intravitreal (IVT) injection, as exosomes have been shown to traverse biological barriers and mediate widespread distribution upon systemic injection. We packaged an AAV genome encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into conventional AAV2 and exo-AAV2 vectors. Vectors were IVT injected into the eyes of adult mice. GFP expression was noninvasively monitored by fundus imaging and retinal expression was analyzed 4 weeks post-injection by qRT-PCR and histology. Exo-AAV2 outperformed conventional AAV2 in GFP expression based on fundus image analysis and qRT-PCR. Exo-AAV2 demonstrated deeper penetration in the retina, efficiently reaching the inner nuclear and outer plexiform, and to a lesser extent the outer nuclear layer. Cell targets were ganglion cells, bipolar cells, Müller cells, and photoreceptors. Exo-AAV2 serves as a robust gene delivery tool for murine retina, and the simplicity of production and isolation should make it widely applicable to basic research of the eye. PMID:28361998

  17. Widespread AAV1- and AAV2-mediated transgene expression in the nonhuman primate brain: implications for Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hadaczek, Piotr; Stanek, Lisa; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Sudhakar, Vivek; Samaranch, Lluis; Pivirotto, Philip; Bringas, John; O’Riordan, Catherine; Mastis, Bryan; San Sebastian, Waldy; Forsayeth, John; Cheng, Seng H; Bankiewicz, Krystof S; Shihabuddin, Lamya S

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is caused by a toxic gain-of-function associated with the expression of the mutant huntingtin (htt) protein. Therefore, the use of RNA interference to inhibit Htt expression could represent a disease-modifying therapy. The potential of two recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV), AAV1 and AAV2, to transduce the cortico-striatal tissues that are predominantly affected in HD was explored. Green fluorescent protein was used as a reporter in each vector to show that both serotypes were broadly distributed in medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortico-striatal neurons after infusion into the putamen and caudate nucleus of nonhuman primates (NHP), with AAV1-directed expression being slightly more robust than AAV2-driven expression. This study suggests that both serotypes are capable of targeting neurons that degenerate in HD, and it sets the stage for the advanced preclinical evaluation of an RNAi-based therapy for this disease. PMID:27408903

  18. Plectin-1 Targeted AAV Vector for the Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Konkalmatt, Prasad R; Deng, Defeng; Thomas, Stephanie; Wu, Michael T; Logsdon, Craig D; French, Brent A; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is highly malignant disease that is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Gene therapy using AAV vectors to selectively deliver genes to PDAC cells is an attractive treatment option for pancreatic cancer. However, most AAV serotypes display a broad spectrum of tissue tropism and none of the existing serotypes specifically target PDAC cells. This study tests the hypothesis that AAV2 can be genetically re-engineered to specifically target PDAC cells by modifying the capsid surface to display a peptide that has previously been shown to bind plectin-1. Toward this end, a Plectin-1 Targeting Peptide (PTP) was inserted into the loop IV region of the AAV2 capsid, and the resulting capsid (AAV-PTP) was used in a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, AAV-PTP was found to target all five human PDAC cell lines tested (PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, HPAC, MPanc-96, and BxPC-3) preferentially over two non-neoplastic human pancreatic cell lines (human pancreatic ductal epithelial and human pancreatic stellate cells). In vivo, mice bearing subcutaneous tumor xenografts were generated using the PANC-1 cell line. Once tumors reached a size of ∼1-2 mm in diameter, the mice were injected intravenously with luciferase reporter vectors packaged in the either AAV-PTP or wild type AAV2 capsids. Luciferase expression was then monitored by bioluminescence imaging on days 3, 7, and 14 after vector injection. The results indicate that the AAV-PTP capsid displays a 37-fold preference for PANC-1 tumor xenographs over liver and other tissues; whereas the wild type AAV2 capsid displays a complementary preference for liver over tumors and other tissues. Together, these results establish proof-of-principle for the ability of PTP-modified AAV capsids to selectively target gene delivery to PDAC cells in vivo, which opens promising new avenues for the early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Gene therapy following subretinal AAV5 vector delivery is not affected by a previous intravitreal AAV5 vector administration in the partner eye

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wensheng; Kong, Fansheng; Li, Xia; Dai, Xufeng; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Zheng, Qinxiang; Wu, Ronghan; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Li, Qiuhong; Hauswirth, William W.; Pang, Ji-jing

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In an earlier study we found normal adeno-associated viral vector type 2 (AAV2)-mediated GFP expression after intravitreal injection to one eye of normal C57BL/6J mice. However, GFP expression was very poor in the partner eye of the same mouse if this eye received an intravitreal injection of the same vector one month after the initial intravitreal injection. We also found both injections worked well if they were subretinal. In this study, we tested whether the efficiency of subretinal AAV vector transduction is altered by a previous intravitreal injection in the partner eye and more importantly whether therapeutic efficiency is altered in the rd12 mouse (with a recessive RPE65 mutation) after the same injection series. Methods One μl of scAAV5-smCBA-GFP (1x1013 genome containing viral particles per ml) was intravitreally injected into the right eyes of four-week-old C57BL/6J mice and 1 μl of scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 (1x1013 genome containing viral particles per ml) was intravitreally injected into the right eyes of four-week-old rd12 mice Four weeks later, the same vectors were subretinally injected into the left eyes of the same C57BL/6J and rd12 mice. Left eyes of another cohort of eight-week-old rd12 mice received a single subretinal injection of the same scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 vector as the positive control. Dark-adapted electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded five months after the subretinal injections. AAV-mediated GFP expression in C57BL/6J mice and RPE65 expression and ERG restoration in rd12 mice were evaluated five months after the second subretinal injection. Frozen section analysis was performed for GFP fluorescence in C57BL/6J mice and immunostaining for RPE65 in rd12 eyes. Results In rd12 mice, dark-adapted ERGs were minimal following the first intravitreal injection of scAAV5-smCBA-RPE65. Following subsequent subretinal injection in the partner eye, dramatic ERG restoration was recorded in that eye. In fact, ERG b-wave amplitudes were

  20. Construction and packaging of herpes simplex virus/adeno-associated virus (HSV/AAV) Hybrid amplicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Saydam, Okay; Glauser, Daniel L; Fraefel, Cornel

    2012-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based amplicon vectors conserve most properties of the parental virus: broad host range, the ability to transduce dividing and nondiving cells, and a large transgene capacity. This permits incorporation of genomic sequences as well as cDNA, large transcriptional regulatory sequences for cell-specific expression, multiple transgene cassettes, or genetic elements from other viruses. Hybrid vectors use elements from HSV-1 that allow replication and packaging of large-vector DNA into highly infectious particles, and elements from other viruses that confer genetic stability to vector DNA in the transduced cell. For example, adeno-associated virus (AAV) has the unique ability to integrate its genome into a specific site on human chromosome 19. The viral rep gene and the inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) that flank the AAV genome are sufficient for this process. However, AAV-based vectors have a very small transgene capacity and do not conventionally contain the rep gene to support site-specific genomic integration. HSV/AAV hybrid vectors contain both HSV-1 replication and packaging functions and the AAV rep gene and a transgene cassette flanked by the AAV ITRs. This combines the large transgene capacity of HSV-1 with the capability of site-specific genomic transgene integration and long-term transgene expression of AAV. This protocol describes the preparation of HSV/AAV hybrid vectors using a replication-competent/conditional, packaging-defective HSV-1 genome cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to provide helper functions for vector replication and packaging. The advantages and limitations of such vectors compared to standard HSV-1 amplicon vectors are also discussed.

  1. Phase 1 gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a translational optimized AAV vector.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Dawn E; McPhee, Scott W J; Li, Chengwen; Gray, Steven J; Samulski, Jade J; Camp, Angelique S; Li, Juan; Wang, Bing; Monahan, Paul E; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Grieger, Joshua C; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Xiao, Xiao; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-02-01

    Efficient and widespread gene transfer is required for successful treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here, we performed the first clinical trial using a chimeric adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid variant (designated AAV2.5) derived from a rational design strategy. AAV2.5 was generated from the AAV2 capsid with five mutations from AAV1. The novel chimeric vector combines the improved muscle transduction capacity of AAV1 with reduced antigenic crossreactivity against both parental serotypes, while keeping the AAV2 receptor binding. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled phase I clinical study in DMD boys, AAV2.5 vector was injected into the bicep muscle in one arm, with saline control in the contralateral arm. A subset of patients received AAV empty capsid instead of saline in an effort to distinguish an immune response to vector versus minidystrophin transgene. Recombinant AAV genomes were detected in all patients with up to 2.56 vector copies per diploid genome. There was no cellular immune response to AAV2.5 capsid. This trial established that rationally designed AAV2.5 vector was safe and well tolerated, lays the foundation of customizing AAV vectors that best suit the clinical objective (e.g., limb infusion gene delivery) and should usher in the next generation of viral delivery systems for human gene transfer.

  2. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate efficient gene transduction in cultured neonatal and adult microglia.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Kang, John; Sopher, Bryce; Gillespie, James; Aloi, Macarena S; Odom, Guy L; Hopkins, Stephanie; Case, Amanda; Wang, David B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are a specialized population of myeloid cells that mediate CNS innate immune responses. Efforts to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate microglia behaviors have been hampered by the lack of effective tools for manipulating gene expression. Cultured microglia are refractory to most chemical and electrical transfection methods, yielding little or no gene delivery and causing toxicity and/or inflammatory activation. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAVs) vectors are non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA vectors commonly used to transduce many primary cell types and tissues. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing rAAV serotype 2 (rAAV2) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia. rAAV2 yields high transduction and causes minimal toxicity or inflammatory response in both neonatal and adult microglia. To demonstrate that rAAV transduction can induce functional protein expression, we used rAAV2 expressing Cre recombinase to successfully excise a LoxP-flanked miR155 gene in cultured microglia. We further evaluated rAAV serotypes 5, 6, 8, and 9, and observed that all efficiently transduced cultured microglia to varying degrees of success and caused little or no alteration in inflammatory gene expression. These results provide strong encouragement for the application of rAAV-mediated gene expression in microglia for mechanistic and therapeutic purposes. Neonatal microglia are functionally distinct from adult microglia, although the majority of in vitro studies utilize rodent neonatal microglia cultures because of difficulties of culturing adult cells. In addition, cultured microglia are refractory to most methods for modifying gene expression. Here, we developed a novel protocol for culturing adult microglia and evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia.

  3. Robust Cardiomyocyte-Specific Gene Expression Following Systemic Injection of AAV: In Vivo Gene Delivery Follows a Poisson Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Konkal-Matt R.; Xu, Yaqin; Yang, Zequan; Acton, Scott T.; French, Brent A

    2010-01-01

    Newly-isolated serotypes of AAV readily cross the endothelial barrier to provide efficient transgene delivery throughout the body. However, tissue-specific expression is preferred in most experimental studies and gene therapy protocols. Previous efforts to restrict gene expression to the myocardium often relied on direct injection into heart muscle or intracoronary perfusion. Here, we report an AAV vector system employing the cardiac troponin T promoter (cTnT). Using luciferase and eGFP, the efficiency and specificity of cardiac reporter gene expression using AAV serotype capsids: AAV-1, 2, 6, 8 or 9 were tested after systemic administration to 1 week old mice. Luciferase assays showed that the cTnT promoter worked in combination with each of the AAV serotype capsids to provide cardiomyocyte-specific gene expression, but AAV-9 followed closely by AAV-8 was the most efficient. AAV9-mediated gene expression from the cTnT promoter was 640-fold greater in the heart compared to the next highest tissue (liver). eGFP fluorescence indicated a transduction efficiency of 96% using AAV-9 at a dose of only 3.15×1010 viral particles per mouse. Moreover, the intensity of cardiomyocyte eGFP fluorescence measured on a cell-by-cell basis revealed that AAV-mediated gene expression in the heart can be modeled as a Poisson distribution; requiring an average of nearly two vector genomes per cell to attain an 85% transduction efficiency. PMID:20703310

  4. Significant changes in endogenous retinal gene expression assessed 1 year after a single intraocular injection of AAV-CNTF or AAV-BDNF

    PubMed Central

    LeVaillant, Chrisna J; Sharma, Anil; Muhling, Jill; Wheeler, Lachlan PG; Cozens, Greg S; Hellström, Mats; Rodger, Jennifer; Harvey, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Use of viral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes to the central nervous system holds promise for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or ciliary derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promote the viability and regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cells. However, these growth-inducing transgenes are driven by a constitutively active promoter, thus we examined whether long-term AAV-mediated secretion of BDNF or CNTF affected endogenous retinal gene expression. One year after the intravitreal injection of AAV-green fluorescent protein (GFP), bi-cistronic AAV-BDNF-GFP or AAV-CNTF-GFP, mRNA was extracted and analyzed using custom 96 well polymerase chain reaction arrays. Of 93 test genes, 56% showed significantly altered expression in AAV-BDNF-GFP and/or AAV-CNTF-GFP retinas compared with AAV-GFP controls. Of these genes, 73% showed differential expression in AAV-BDNF versus AAV-CNTF injected eyes. To focus on retinal ganglion cell changes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was undertaken on mRNA (16 genes) obtained from fixed retinal sections in which the ganglion cell layer was enriched. The sign and extent of fold changes in ganglion cell layer gene expression differed markedly from whole retinal samples. Sustained and global alteration in endogenous mRNA expression after gene therapy should be factored into any interpretation of experimental/clinical outcomes, particularly when introducing factors into the central nervous system that require secretion to evoke functionality. PMID:27933306

  5. Significant changes in endogenous retinal gene expression assessed 1 year after a single intraocular injection of AAV-CNTF or AAV-BDNF.

    PubMed

    LeVaillant, Chrisna J; Sharma, Anil; Muhling, Jill; Wheeler, Lachlan Pg; Cozens, Greg S; Hellström, Mats; Rodger, Jennifer; Harvey, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Use of viral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes to the central nervous system holds promise for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or ciliary derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promote the viability and regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cells. However, these growth-inducing transgenes are driven by a constitutively active promoter, thus we examined whether long-term AAV-mediated secretion of BDNF or CNTF affected endogenous retinal gene expression. One year after the intravitreal injection of AAV-green fluorescent protein (GFP), bi-cistronic AAV-BDNF-GFP or AAV-CNTF-GFP, mRNA was extracted and analyzed using custom 96 well polymerase chain reaction arrays. Of 93 test genes, 56% showed significantly altered expression in AAV-BDNF-GFP and/or AAV-CNTF-GFP retinas compared with AAV-GFP controls. Of these genes, 73% showed differential expression in AAV-BDNF versus AAV-CNTF injected eyes. To focus on retinal ganglion cell changes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was undertaken on mRNA (16 genes) obtained from fixed retinal sections in which the ganglion cell layer was enriched. The sign and extent of fold changes in ganglion cell layer gene expression differed markedly from whole retinal samples. Sustained and global alteration in endogenous mRNA expression after gene therapy should be factored into any interpretation of experimental/clinical outcomes, particularly when introducing factors into the central nervous system that require secretion to evoke functionality.

  6. Efficacy and safety of long-term prophylaxis in severe hemophilia A dogs following liver gene therapy using AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Denise E; Lange, Amy M; Altynova, Ekaterina S; Sarkar, Rita; Zhou, Shangzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Franck, Helen G; Nichols, Timothy C; Arruda, Valder R; Kazazian, Haig H

    2011-03-01

    Developing adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia A (HA) has been challenging due to the large size of the factor VIII (FVIII) complementary DNA and the concern for the development of inhibitory antibodies to FVIII in HA patients. Here, we perform a systematic study in HA dogs by delivering a canine FVIII (cFVIII) transgene either as a single chain or two chains in an AAV vector. An optimized cFVIII single chain delivered using AAV serotype 8 (AAV8) by peripheral vein injection resulted in a dose-response with sustained expression of FVIII up to 7% (n = 4). Five HA dogs administered two-chain delivery using either AAV8 or AAV9 via the portal vein expressed long-term, vector dose-dependent levels of FVIII activity (up to 10%). In the two-chain approach, circulating cFVIII antigen levels were more than fivefold higher than activity. Notably, no long-term immune response to FVIII was observed in any of the dogs (1/9 dogs had a transient inhibitor). Long-term follow-up of the dogs showed a remarkable reduction (>90%) of bleeding episodes in a combined total of 24 years of observation. These data demonstrate that both approaches are safe and achieve dose-dependent therapeutic levels of FVIII expression, which supports translational studies of AAV-mediated delivery for HA.

  7. Stability and Safety of an AAV Vector for Treating RPGR-ORF15 X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M; Dinculescu, Astra; Li, Jie; Zhu, Ping; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Sanford L; Conlon, Thomas J; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Hauswirth, William W

    2015-09-01

    Our collaborative successful gene replacement therapy using AAV vectors expressing a variant of human RPGR-ORF15 in two canine models provided therapeutic proof of concept for translation into human treatment. The ORF15 sequence contained within this AAV vector, however, has ORF15 DNA sequence variations compared to the published sequence that are likely due to its unusual composition of repetitive purine nucleotides. This mutability is a concern for AAV vector production and safety when contemplating a human trial. In this study, we establish the safety profile of AAV-hIRBP-hRPGR and AAV-hGRK1-hRPGR vectors used in the initial canine proof-of-principle experiments by demonstrating hRPGR-ORF15 sequence stability during all phases of manipulation, from plasmid propagation to vector production to its stability in vivo after subretinal administration to animals. We also evaluate potential toxicity in vivo by investigating protein expression, retinal structure and function, and vector biodistribution. Expression of hRPGR is detected in the inner segments and synaptic terminals of photoreceptors and is restricted to the connecting cilium when the vector is further diluted. Treated eyes exhibit no toxicity as assessed by retinal histopathology, immunocytochemistry, optical coherence tomography, fundoscopy, electroretinogram, and vector biodistribution. Therefore, the hRPGR-ORF15 variant in our AAV vectors appears to be a more stable form than the endogenous hRPGR cDNA when propagated in vitro. Its safety profile presented here in combination with its proven efficacy supports future gene therapy clinical trials.

  8. Preexisting Immunity and Low Expression in Primates Highlight Translational Challenges for Liver-directed AAV8-mediated Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hurlbut, Gregory D; Ziegler, Robin J; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Foley, Joseph W; Woodworth, Lisa A; Meyers, Elizabeth; Bercury, Scott D; Pande, Nilesh N; Souza, David W; Bree, Mark P; Lukason, Michael J; Marshall, John; Cheng, Seng H; Scheule, Ronald K

    2010-01-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors effectively treats mouse models of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). We asked whether these results were likely to translate to patients. To understand to what extent preexisting anti-AAV8 antibodies could impede AAV8-mediated liver transduction in primates, commonly preexposed to AAV, we quantified the effects of preexisting antibodies on liver transduction and subsequent transgene expression in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. Using the highest viral dose previously reported in a clinical trial, passive transfer of NHP sera containing relatively low anti-AAV8 titers into mice blocked liver transduction, which could be partially overcome by increasing vector dose tenfold. Based on this and a survey of anti-AAV8 titers in 112 humans, we predict that high-dose systemic gene therapy would successfully transduce liver in >50% of human patients. However, although high-dose AAV8 administration to mice and monkeys with equivalent anti-AAV8 titers led to comparable liver vector copy numbers, the resulting transgene expression in primates was ~1.5-logs lower than mice. This suggests vector fate differs in these species and that strategies focused solely on overcoming preexisting vector-specific antibodies may be insufficient to achieve clinically meaningful expression levels of LSD genes using a liver-directed gene therapy approach in patients. PMID:20736932

  9. Intratumoral decorin gene delivery by AAV vector inhibits brain glioblastomas and prolongs survival of animals by inducing cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hsin-I; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Shui, Hao-Ai; Han, Jun-Ming; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Ming-Teh; Yang, Yi-Ping

    2014-03-12

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant cancer in the central nervous system with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of an anti-cancer protein, decorin, by delivering it into a xenograft U87MG glioma tumor in the brain of nude mice through an adeno-associated viral (AAV2) gene delivery system. Decorin expression from the AAV vector in vitro inhibited cultured U87MG cell growth by induction of cell differentiation. Intracranial injection of AAV-decorin vector to the glioma-bearing nude mice in vivo significantly suppressed brain tumor growth and prolonged survival when compared to control non-treated mice bearing the same U87MG tumors. Proteomics analysis on protein expression profiles in the U87MG glioma cells after AAV-mediated decorin gene transfer revealed up- and down-regulation of important proteins. Differentially expressed proteins between control and AAV-decorin-transduced cells were identified through MALDI-TOF MS and database mining. We found that a number of important proteins that are involved in apoptosis, transcription, chemotherapy resistance, mitosis, and fatty acid metabolism have been altered as a result of decorin overexpression. These findings offer valuable insight into the mechanisms of the anti-glioblastoma effects of decorin. In addition, AAV-mediated decorin gene delivery warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach for brain tumors.

  10. Efficient intrathymic gene transfer following in situ administration of a rAAV serotype 8 vector in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Aurélie; Vicente, Rita; Dubreil, Laurence; Adjali, Oumeya; Podevin, Guillaume; Jacquet, Chantal; Deschamps, Jack Yves; Klatzmann, David; Cherel, Yan; Taylor, Naomi; Moullier, Philippe; Zimmermann, Valérie S

    2009-03-01

    The thymus is the primary site of T-cell development and plays a key role in the induction of self-tolerance. We previously showed that the intrathymic (i.t.) injection of a transgene-expressing lentiviral vector (LV) in mice can result in the correction of a T cell-specific genetic defect. Nevertheless, the efficiency of thymocyte transduction did not exceed 0.1-0.3% and we were unable to detect any thymus transduction in macaques. As such, we initiated studies to assess the capacity of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors to transduce murine and primate thymic cells. In vivo administration of AAV serotype 2-derived single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors pseudotyped with capsid proteins of serotypes 1, 2, 4, 5, and 8 demonstrated that murine thymus transduction was significantly enhanced by scAAV2/8. Transgene expression was detected in 5% of thymocytes and, notably, transduced cells represented 1% of peripheral T lymphocytes. Moreover, i.t. administration of scAAV2/8 particles in macaques, by endoscopic-mediated guidance, resulted in significant gene transfer. Thus, in healthy animals, where thymic gene transfer does not provide a selective advantage, scAAV2/8 is a unique tool promoting the in situ transduction of thymocytes with the subsequent export of gene-modified lymphocytes to the periphery.

  11. Production and Characterization of Vectors Based on the Cardiotropic AAV Serotype 9.

    PubMed

    Kohlbrenner, Erik; Weber, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) efficiently transduce cardiomyocytes in both rodents and large animal models upon either systemic or regional vector delivery. In this chapter, we describe the most widely used production and purification method of AAV9. This production approach does not depend on the use of a helpervirus but instead on transient transfection of HEK293T cells with a plasmid containing the recombinant AAV genome and a second plasmid encoding the AAV9 capsid proteins, the AAV Rep proteins and the adenoviral helper functions. The recombinant AAV is then purified by iodixanol density gradient centrifugation. This chapter also describes in detail the characterization and quality control methods required for assuring high quality vector preparations, which is of particular importance for experiments in large animal models.

  12. Mapping the AAV Capsid Host Antibody Response toward the Development of Second Generation Gene Delivery Vectors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion, or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from MAbs, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  13. Mapping the AAV Capsid Host Antibody Response toward the Development of Second Generation Gene Delivery Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2013-01-01

    The recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion, or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from MAbs, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed. PMID:24523720

  14. Development of novel AAV serotype 6 based vectors with selective tropism for human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sayroo, R; Nolasco, D; Yin, Z; Colon-Cortes, Y; Pandya, M; Ling, C; Aslanidi, G

    2016-01-01

    Viral vectors-based gene therapy is an attractive alternative to common anti-cancer treatments. In the present studies, AAV serotype 6 vectors were identified to be particularly effective in the transduction of human prostate (PC3), breast (T47D) and liver (Huh7) cancer cells. Next, we developed chimeric AAV vectors with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide incorporated into the viral capsid to enable specific targeting of integrin-overexpressing malignant cells. These AAV6-RGD vectors improved transduction efficiency approximately 3-fold compared with wild-type AAV6 vectors by enhancing the viral entry into the cells. We also observed that transduction efficiency significantly improved, up to approximately 5-fold, by the mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine and threonine residues involved in the intracellular trafficking of AAV vectors. Therefore, in our study, the AAV6-Y705-731F+T492V vector was identified as the most efficient. The combination of RGD peptide, tyrosine and threonine mutations on the same AAV6 capsid further increased the transduction efficiency, approximately 8-fold in vitro. In addition, we mutated lysine (K531E) to impair the affinity of AAV6 vectors to heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Finally, we showed a significant increase in both specificity and efficiency of AAV6-RGD-Y705-731F+T492V+K531E vectors in a xenograft animal model in vivo. In summary, the approach described here can lead to the development of AAV vectors with selective tropism to human cancer cells.

  15. Potential of AAV vectors in the treatment of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, I E; Cunningham, S C; Logan, G J; Christodoulou, J

    2008-06-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism are collectively common, frequently severe and in many instances difficult or impossible to treat. Accordingly, there is a compelling need to explore novel therapeutic modalities, including gene therapy, and examine multiple phenotypes where the risks of experimental therapy are outweighed by potential benefits to trial participants. Among available gene delivery systems recombinant AAV shows special promise for the treatment of metabolic disease given the unprecedented efficiencies achieved in transducing key target tissues, such as liver and muscle, in small animal models. To date over 30 metabolic disease phenotypes have been investigated in small animal studies with complete phenotype correction being achieved in a substantial proportion. Achieving adequately widespread transduction within the central nervous system, however, remains a major challenge, and will be critical to realization of the therapeutic potential of gene therapy for many of the most clinically troubling metabolic disease phenotypes. Despite the relatively low immunogenicity of AAV vectors, immune responses are also emerging as a factor requiring special attention as efforts accelerate toward human clinical translation. Four metabolic disease phenotypes have reached phase I or I/II trials with one, targeting lipoprotein lipase deficiency, showing exciting early evidence of efficacy.

  16. High density recombinant AAV particles are competent vectors for in vivo transduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have recently achieved clinical successes in human gene therapy. However, the commonly observed heavier particles found in AAV preparations have traditionally been ignored due to its low in vitro infectivity. In this study, we systemically compared t...

  17. Long-term suppression of experimental arthritis following intramuscular administration of a pseudotyped AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc Vector.

    PubMed

    Sandalon, Ziv; Bruckheimer, Elizabeth M; Lustig, Kurt H; Burstein, Haim

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported that administration of an adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vector encoding a rat tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-immunoglobulin Fc (TNFR:Fc) fusion gene to rats with streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis resulted in suppression of joint inflammation and cartilage and bone destruction, as well as expression of joint proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, we used an alternate rat model of arthritis to compare the serum levels and duration of TNFR:Fc protein expression following intramuscular administration of pseudotyped AAV-TNFR:Fc vectors based on serotypes 1, 2, and 5. All three pseudotyped AAV-TNFR:Fc vectors led to sustained expression of serum TNFR:Fc protein for at least one year. Serum TNFR:Fc protein levels in rats administered intramuscularly with AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc vector were up to 100- and 10-fold higher than in rats administered the AAV2-TNFR:Fc or AAV2/5-TNFR:Fc vectors, respectively. A single intramuscular administration of AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc vector at vector doses ranging from 10(10) to 10(12) DNase-resistant particles (DRP) per animal, resulted in complete and long-term suppression of recurrent joint inflammation for at least 150 days. Our results establish a proof of concept for administration of an AAV2/1-TNFR:Fc vector to the muscle to achieve long-term, sustained and therapeutically relevant levels of TNFR:Fc protein to treat chronic systemic inflammatory joint diseases.

  18. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme Ml; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge.

  19. Impact of intravenous infusion time on AAV8 vector pharmacokinetics, safety, and liver transduction in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jenny A; Nordin, Jayme ML; Bote, Erin; Makaron, Leah; Garnett, Mason E; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Bell, Peter; Goode, Tamara; Wilson, James M

    2016-01-01

    Systemically delivered adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are now in early-phase clinical trials for a variety of diseases. While there is a general consensus on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each of these trials, the conditions under which vectors are infused vary significantly. In this study, we evaluated the impact of intravenous infusion rate of AAV8 vector in cynomolgus macaques on transgene expression, vector clearance from the circulation, and potential activation of the innate immune system. The dose of AAV8 vector in terms of genome copies per kilogram body weight and its concentration were fixed, while the rate of infusion varied to deliver the entire dose over different time periods, including 1, 10, or 90 minutes. Analyses during the in-life phase of the experiment included sequential evaluation of whole blood for vector genomes and appearance of proinflammatory cytokines. Liver tissues were analyzed at the time of necropsy for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genomes. The data were remarkable with a relative absence of any statistically significant effect of infusion time on vector transduction, safety, and clearance. However, some interesting and unexpected trends did emerge. PMID:27933307

  20. Synergistic inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling downregulates immune response against recombinant AAV2 vectors during hepatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2016-01-01

    Host immune response remains a key obstacle to widespread application of adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy. Thus, targeted inhibition of the signaling pathways that trigger such immune responses will be beneficial. Previous studies have reported that DNA damage response proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) negatively affect the integration of AAV in the host genome. However, the role of PARP-1 in regulating AAV transduction and the immune response against these vectors has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that repression of PARP-1 improves the transduction of single-stranded AAV vectors both in vitro (∼174%) and in vivo (two- to 3.4-fold). Inhibition of PARP-1, also significantly downregulated the expression of several proinflammatory and cytokine markers such as TLRs, ILs, NF-κB subunit proteins associated with the host innate response against self-complementary AAV2 vectors. The suppression of the inflammatory response targeted against these vectors was more effective upon combined inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling. This strategy also effectively attenuated the AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T-cell response, with minimal effect on vector transduction, as demonstrated in normal C57BL/6 and hemophilia B mice. These data suggest that targeting specific host cellular proteins could be useful to attenuate the immune barriers to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

  1. Development of Patient-specific AAV Vectors After Neutralizing Antibody Selection for Enhanced Muscle Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengwen; Wu, Shuqing; Albright, Blake; Hirsch, Matthew; Li, Wuping; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McPhee, Scott; Asokan, Aravind; Samulski, R Jude

    2016-02-01

    A major hindrance in gene therapy trials with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) that inhibit AAV transduction. In this study, we used directed evolution techniques in vitro and in mouse muscle to select novel NAb escape AAV chimeric capsid mutants in the presence of individual patient serum. AAV mutants isolated in vitro escaped broad patient-specific NAb activity but had poor transduction ability in vivo. AAV mutants isolated in vivo had enhanced NAb evasion from cognate serum and had high muscle transduction ability. More importantly, structural modeling identified a 100 amino acid motif from AAV6 in variable region (VR) III that confers this enhanced muscle tropism. In addition, a predominantly AAV8 capsid beta barrel template with a specific preference for AAV1/AAV9 in VR VII located at threefold symmetry axis facilitates NAb escape. Our data strongly support that chimeric AAV capsids composed of modular and nonoverlapping domains from various serotypes are capable of evading patient-specific NAbs and have enhanced muscle transduction.

  2. Evaluation of lateral spread of transgene expression following subretinal AAV-mediated gene delivery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bruewer, Ashlee R; Mowat, Freya M; Bartoe, Joshua T; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Dog models with spontaneously occurring mutations in retinal dystrophy genes are an invaluable resource for preclinical development of retinal gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been most successful; to target the outer retina and RPE they are delivered by subretinal injection, causing a temporary retinal detachment with some potential for retinal morbidity. A recent reporter gene study using an AAV2/8 vector in dogs reported transgene expression beyond the boundary of the subretinal bleb. This could be a desirable feature which increases the area of retina treated while minimizing the retinal detachment and any associated morbidity. We performed a detailed study of the lateral spread of transgene expression beyond the subretinal injection site following subretinally delivered AAV vectors in normal dogs. Vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) using a small chicken beta-actin promoter. AAV2/2 (quadruple tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant), self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 (single Y-F capsid mutant) and a scAAV2/5 were used. We found that in all eyes GFP expression involved retina beyond the initial post-injection subretinal bleb boundary. In all eyes there was post-injection spread of the retinal detachment within the first 3 days post procedure and prior to retinal reattachment. In 11/16 eyes this accounted for the entire "lateral spread" of GFP expression while in 5/16 eyes a very slight extension of GFP expression beyond the final boundary of the subretinal bleb could be detected. All 3 AAV constructs induced GFP expression in the nerve fiber layer with spread to the optic nerve. Patients treated by subretinal injection should be monitored for possible expansion of the subretinal injection bleb prior to reattachment. Injections in the para-foveal region may expand to lead to a foveal detachment that may be undesirable. Cell-specific promoters may be required to limit spread of expressed transgene to the brain with these

  3. AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Delivery to Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons: Implications for Gene Therapy and Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Albert, Katrina; Voutilainen, Merja H; Domanskyi, Andrii; Airavaara, Mikko

    2017-02-08

    Gene delivery using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a widely used method to transduce neurons in the brain, especially due to its safety, efficacy, and long-lasting expression. In addition, by varying AAV serotype, promotor, and titer, it is possible to affect the cell specificity of expression or the expression levels of the protein of interest. Dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum, comprising the nigrostriatal pathway, are involved in movement control and degenerate in Parkinson's disease. AAV-based gene targeting to the projection area of these neurons in the striatum has been studied extensively to induce the production of neurotrophic factors for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease. Much less emphasis has been put on AAV-based gene therapy targeting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra. We will review the literature related to targeting striatum and/or substantia nigra dopamine neurons using AAVs in order to express neuroprotective and neurorestorative molecules, as well as produce animal disease models of Parkinson's disease. We discuss difficulties in targeting substantia nigra dopamine neurons and their vulnerability to stress in general. Therefore, choosing a proper control for experimental work is not trivial. Since the axons along the nigrostriatal tract are the first to degenerate in Parkinson's disease, the location to deliver the therapy must be carefully considered. We also review studies using AAV-a-synuclein (a-syn) to target substantia nigra dopamine neurons to produce an α-syn overexpression disease model in rats. Though these studies are able to produce mild dopamine system degeneration in the striatum and substantia nigra and some behavioural effects, there are studies pointing to the toxicity of AAV-carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is often used as a control. Therefore, we discuss the potential difficulties in overexpressing proteins in general in the substantia nigra.

  4. AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Delivery to Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons: Implications for Gene Therapy and Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Katrina; Voutilainen, Merja H.; Domanskyi, Andrii; Airavaara, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    Gene delivery using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a widely used method to transduce neurons in the brain, especially due to its safety, efficacy, and long-lasting expression. In addition, by varying AAV serotype, promotor, and titer, it is possible to affect the cell specificity of expression or the expression levels of the protein of interest. Dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum, comprising the nigrostriatal pathway, are involved in movement control and degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. AAV-based gene targeting to the projection area of these neurons in the striatum has been studied extensively to induce the production of neurotrophic factors for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson’s disease. Much less emphasis has been put on AAV-based gene therapy targeting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra. We will review the literature related to targeting striatum and/or substantia nigra dopamine neurons using AAVs in order to express neuroprotective and neurorestorative molecules, as well as produce animal disease models of Parkinson’s disease. We discuss difficulties in targeting substantia nigra dopamine neurons and their vulnerability to stress in general. Therefore, choosing a proper control for experimental work is not trivial. Since the axons along the nigrostriatal tract are the first to degenerate in Parkinson’s disease, the location to deliver the therapy must be carefully considered. We also review studies using AAV-α-synuclein (α-syn) to target substantia nigra dopamine neurons to produce an α-syn overexpression disease model in rats. Though these studies are able to produce mild dopamine system degeneration in the striatum and substantia nigra and some behavioural effects, there are studies pointing to the toxicity of AAV-carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is often used as a control. Therefore, we discuss the potential difficulties in overexpressing proteins in general in the substantia

  5. Prevalence and pharmacological modulation of humoral immunity to AAV vectors in gene transfer to synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, F; Chen, Y; Edmonson, S C; Zhou, S; Thurlings, R M; Tak, P P; High, K A; Vervoordeldonk, M J

    2013-04-01

    Antibodies against adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are highly prevalent in humans. Both preclinical and clinical studies showed that antibodies against AAV block transduction even at low titers, particularly when the vector is introduced into the bloodstream. Here we measured the neutralizing antibody (NAb) titer against AAV serotypes 2, 5, 6 and 8 in the serum and matched synovial fluid (SF) from rheumatoid arthritis patients. The titer in the SF was lower than that in the matched plasma samples, indicating a difference in distribution of NAb to AAV depending on the body fluid compartment. This difference was more evident for AAV2, against which higher titers were measured. Of all serotypes, anti-AAV5 antibodies were the least prevalent in both the serum and SF. We next evaluated the impact of B-cell depletion on anti-AAV antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis patients who received one or two courses of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab as part of their disease management. A drop of NAb titer was observed in a subset of those subjects carrying NAb titers ≤1:1000; however, only in a minority of subjects titers dropped below 1:5. This work provides insights into strategies to overcome the limitation of pre-existing humoral immunity to AAV vectors.

  6. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  7. Tailored transgene expression to specific cell types in the central nervous system after peripheral injection with AAV9

    PubMed Central

    Dashkoff, Jonathan; Lerner, Eli P; Truong, Nhi; Klickstein, Jacob A; Fan, Zhanyun; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A; Hyman, Bradley T; Hudry, Eloise

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of certain adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to cross the blood–brain barrier after intravenous delivery offers a unique opportunity for noninvasive brain delivery. However, without a well-tailored system, the use of a peripheral route injection may lead to undesirable transgene expression in nontarget cells or organs. To refine this approach, the present study characterizes the transduction profiles of new self-complementary AAV9 (scAAV9) expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) either under an astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic (GFA) protein) or neuronal (Synapsin (Syn)) promoter, after intravenous injection of adult mice (2 × 1013 vg/kg). ScAAV9-GFA-GFP and scAAV9-Syn-GFP robustly transduce astrocytes (11%) and neurons (17%), respectively, without aberrant expression leakage. Interestingly, while the percentages of GFP-positive astrocytes with scAAV9-GFA-GFP are similar to the performances observed with scAAV9-CBA-GFP (broadly active promoter), significant higher percentages of neurons express GFP with scAAV9-Syn-GFP. GFP-positive excitatory as well as inhibitory neurons are observed, as well as motor neurons in the spinal cord. Additionally, both activated (GFAP-positive) and resting astrocytes (GFAP-negative) express the reporter gene after scAAV9-GFA-GFP injection. These data thoroughly characterize the gene expression specificity of AAVs fitted with neuronal and astrocyte-selective promoters after intravenous delivery, which will prove useful for central nervous system (CNS) gene therapy approaches in which peripheral expression of transgene is a concern. PMID:27933308

  8. A microRNA embedded AAV alpha-synuclein gene silencing vector for dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Khodr, Christina E.; Sapru, Mohan K.; Pedapati, Jyothi; Bohn, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA), an abundantly expressed presynaptic protein, is implicated in Parkinson disease (PD). Since over-expression of human SNCA (hSNCA) leads to death of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in human, rodent and fly brain, hSNCA gene silencing may reduce levels of toxic forms of SNCA and ameliorate degeneration of DA neurons in PD. To begin to develop a gene therapy for PD based on hSNCA gene silencing, two AAV gene silencing vectors were designed, and tested for efficiency and specificity of silencing, as well as toxicity in vitro. The same hSNCA silencing sequence (shRNA) was used in both vectors, but in one vector, the shRNA was embedded in a microRNA backbone and driven by a pol II promoter, and in the other the shRNA was not embedded in a microRNA and was driven by a pol III promoter. Both vectors silenced hSNCA to the same extent in 293T cells transfected with hSNCA. In DA PC12 cells, neither vector decreased expression of rat SNCA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT) or the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT). However, the mir30 embedded vector was significantly less toxic to both PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells. Our in vitro data suggest that this miRNA-embedded silencing vector may be ideal for chronic in vivo SNCA gene silencing in DA neurons. PMID:21338582

  9. Pseudotyped AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Human Fetal Trachea Xenograft Model: Implications for In Utero Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alice; Katz, Anna B.; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N.; Wilson, James M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG) novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. Conclusions/Significance Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:22937069

  10. Ultramicroscopy as a novel tool to unravel the tropism of AAV gene therapy vectors in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Sandro; Bode, Julia; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; von Kalle, Christof; Cartier, Nathalie; Tews, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have advanced to the vanguard of gene therapy. Numerous naturally occurring serotypes have been used to target cells in various tissues. There is a strong need for fast and dynamic methods which efficiently unravel viral tropism in whole organs. Ultramicroscopy (UM) is a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that images optically cleared undissected specimens, achieving good resolutions at high penetration depths while being non-destructive. UM was applied to obtain high-resolution 3D analysis of AAV transduction in adult mouse brains, especially in the hippocampus, a region of interest for Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We separately or simultaneously compared transduction efficacies for commonly used serotypes (AAV9 and AAVrh10) using fluorescent reporter expression. We provide a detailed comparative and quantitative analysis of the transduction profiles. UM allowed a rapid analysis of marker fluorescence expression in neurons with intact projections deep inside the brain, in defined anatomical structures. Major hippocampal neuronal transduction was observed with both vectors, with slightly better efficacy for AAV9 in UM. Glial response and synaptic marker expression did not change post transduction.We propose UM as a novel valuable complementary tool to efficiently and simultaneously unravel tropism of different viruses in a single non-dissected adult rodent brain. PMID:27320056

  11. Longevity of rAAV vector and plasmid DNA in blood after intramuscular injection in nonhuman primates: implications for gene doping.

    PubMed

    Ni, W; Le Guiner, C; Gernoux, G; Penaud-Budloo, M; Moullier, P; Snyder, R O

    2011-07-01

    Legitimate uses of gene transfer technology can benefit from sensitive detection methods to determine vector biodistribution in pre-clinical studies and in human clinical trials, and similar methods can detect illegitimate gene transfer to provide sports-governing bodies with the ability to maintain fairness. Real-time PCR assays were developed to detect a performance-enhancing transgene (erythropoietin, EPO) and backbone sequences in the presence of endogenous cellular sequences. In addition to developing real-time PCR assays, the steps involved in DNA extraction, storage and transport were investigated. By real-time PCR, the vector transgene is distinguishable from the genomic DNA sequence because of the absence of introns, and the vector backbone can be identified by heterologous gene expression control elements. After performance of the assays was optimized, cynomolgus macaques received a single dose by intramuscular (IM) injection of plasmid DNA, a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1 (rAAV1) or a rAAV8 vector expressing cynomolgus macaque EPO. Macaques received a high plasmid dose intended to achieve a significant, but not life-threatening, increase in hematocrit. rAAV vectors were used at low doses to achieve a small increase in hematocrit and to determine the limit of sensitivity for detecting rAAV sequences by single-step PCR. DNA extracted from white blood cells (WBCs) was tested to determine whether WBCs can be collaterally transfected by plasmid or transduced by rAAV vectors in this context, and can be used as a surrogate marker for gene doping. We demonstrate that IM injection of a conventional plasmid and rAAV vectors results in the presence of DNA that can be detected at high levels in blood before rapid elimination, and that rAAV genomes can persist for several months in WBCs.

  12. Sustained correction of FVII deficiency in dogs using AAV-mediated expression of zymogen FVII.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Contreras, Oscar A; Smith, Shannon M; Bellinger, Dwight A; Raymer, Robin A; Merricks, Elizabeth; Faella, Armida; Pavani, Giulia; Zhou, Shangzhen; Nichols, Timothy C; High, Katherine A; Margaritis, Paris

    2016-02-04

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder treated by infusion of fresh-frozen plasma, plasma-derived FVII concentrates and low-dose recombinant activated FVII. Clinical data suggest that a mild elevation of plasma FVII levels (>10% normal) results in improved hemostasis. Research dogs with a G96E missense FVII mutation (FVII-G96E) have <1% FVII activity. By western blot, we show that they have undetectable plasmatic antigen, thus representing the most prevalent type of human FVII deficiency (low antigen/activity). In these dogs, we determine the feasibility of a gene therapy approach using liver-directed, adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotype 8 vector delivery of a canine FVII (cFVII) zymogen transgene. FVII-G96E dogs received escalating AAV doses (2E11 to 4.95E13 vector genomes [vg] per kg). Clinically therapeutic expression (15% normal) was attained with as low as 6E11 vg/kg of AAV and has been stable for >1 year (ongoing) without antibody formation to the cFVII transgene. Sustained and supraphysiological expression of 770% normal was observed using 4.95E13 vg/kg of AAV (2.6 years, ongoing). No evidence of pathological activation of coagulation or detrimental animal physiology was observed as platelet counts, d-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and serum chemistries remained normal in all dogs (cumulative 6.4 years). We observed a transient and noninhibitory immunoglobulin G class 2 response against cFVII only in the dog receiving the highest AAV dose. In conclusion, in the only large-animal model representing the majority of FVII mutation types, our data are first to demonstrate the feasibility, safety, and long-term duration of AAV-mediated correction of FVII deficiency.

  13. Sustained transgene expression despite T lymphocyte responses in a clinical trial of rAAV1-AAT gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Brantly, Mark L; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Wang, Lili; Mueller, Christian; Humphries, Margaret; Spencer, L Terry; Rouhani, Farshid; Conlon, Thomas J; Calcedo, Roberto; Betts, Michael R; Spencer, Carolyn; Byrne, Barry J; Wilson, James M; Flotte, Terence R

    2009-09-22

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is well-suited as a target for human gene transfer. We performed a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation clinical trial of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing normal (M) AAT packaged into serotype 1 AAV capsids delivered by i.m. injection. Nine AAT-deficient subjects were enrolled sequentially in cohorts of 3 each at doses of 6.9 x 10(12), 2.2 x 10(13), and 6.0 x 10(13) vector genome particles per patient. Four subjects receiving AAT protein augmentation discontinued therapy 28 or 56 days before vector administration. Vector administration was well tolerated, with only mild local reactions and 1 unrelated serious adverse event (bacterial epididymitis). There were no changes in hematology or clinical chemistry parameters. M-specific AAT was expressed above background in all subjects in cohorts 2 and 3 and was sustained at levels 0.1% of normal for at least 1 year in the highest dosage level cohort, despite development of neutralizing antibody and IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses to AAV1 capsid at day 14 in all subjects. These findings suggest that immune responses to AAV capsid that develop after i.m. injection of a serotype 1 rAAV vector expressing AAT do not completely eliminate transduced cells in this context.

  14. Local administration of AAV-DJ pseudoserotype expressing COX2 provided early onset of transgene expression and promoted bone fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, R; Baylink, D J; Lau, K-H W; Tang, X; Sheng, M H-C; Rundle, C H; Qin, X

    2015-09-01

    We have previously obtained compelling proof-of-principle evidence for COX2 gene therapy for fracture repair using integrating retroviral vectors. For this therapy to be suitable for patient uses, a suitable vector with high safety profile must be used. Accordingly, this study sought to evaluate the feasibility of AAV as the vector for this COX2 gene therapy, because AAV raises less safety issues than the retroviral vectors used previously. However, an appropriate AAV serotype is required to provide early increase in and adequate level of COX2 expression that is needed for fracture repair. Herein, we reported that AAV-DJ, an artificial AAV pseudoserotype, is highly effective in delivering COX2 gene to fracture sites in a mouse femoral fracture model. Compared with AAV-2, the use of AAV-DJ led to ~5-fold increase in infectivity in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and provided an earlier and significantly higher level of transgene expression at the fracture site. Injection of this vector at a dose of 7.5 × 10(11) genomic copies led to high COX2 level at the fracture site on day 3 after injections and significantly promoted fracture union at 21 days, as analyzed by radiography and μ-CT. The therapeutic effect appears to involve enhanced osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs and remodeling of callus tissues to laminar bone. This interpretation is supported by the enhanced expression of several key genes participating in the fracture repair process. In conclusion, AAV-DJ is a promising serotype for the AAV-based COX2 gene therapy of fracture repair in humans.

  15. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Surface-Exposed Lysine Residues Leads to Improved Transduction by AAV2, But Not AAV8, Vectors in Murine Hepatocytes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Ling, Chen; Van Vliet, Kim; Huang, Lin-Ya; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Srivastava, Arun; Aslanidi, George V.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome pathway plays a critical role in the intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors, which negatively impacts the transduction efficiency of these vectors. Because ubiquitination occurs on lysine (K) residues, we performed site-directed mutagenesis where we replaced each of 10 surface-exposed K residues (K258, K490, K507, K527, K532, K544, K549, K556, K665, and K706) with glutamic acid (E) because of similarity of size and lack of recognition by modifying enzymes. The transduction efficiency of K490E, K544E, K549E, and K556E scAAV2 vectors increased in HeLa cells in vitro up to 5-fold compared with wild-type (WT) AAV2 vectors, with the K556E mutant being the most efficient. Intravenous delivery of WT and K-mutant ssAAV2 vectors further corroborated these results in murine hepatocytes in vivo. Because AAV8 vectors transduce murine hepatocytes exceedingly well, and because some of the surface-exposed K residues are conserved between these serotypes, we generated and tested two single mutants (K547E and K569E), and one double-mutant (K547 + 569E) AAV8 vector. However, no significant increase in the transduction efficiency of any of these mutant AAV8 vectors was observed in murine hepatocytes in vivo. These studies suggest that although targeting the surface-exposed K residues is yet another strategy to improve the transduction efficiency of AAV vectors, phenotypic outcome is serotype specific. PMID:26421998

  16. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Surface-Exposed Lysine Residues Leads to Improved Transduction by AAV2, But Not AAV8, Vectors in Murine Hepatocytes In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Ling, Chen; Van Vliet, Kim; Huang, Lin-Ya; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Srivastava, Arun; Aslanidi, George V

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays a critical role in the intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors, which negatively impacts the transduction efficiency of these vectors. Because ubiquitination occurs on lysine (K) residues, we performed site-directed mutagenesis where we replaced each of 10 surface-exposed K residues (K258, K490, K507, K527, K532, K544, K549, K556, K665, and K706) with glutamic acid (E) because of similarity of size and lack of recognition by modifying enzymes. The transduction efficiency of K490E, K544E, K549E, and K556E scAAV2 vectors increased in HeLa cells in vitro up to 5-fold compared with wild-type (WT) AAV2 vectors, with the K556E mutant being the most efficient. Intravenous delivery of WT and K-mutant ssAAV2 vectors further corroborated these results in murine hepatocytes in vivo. Because AAV8 vectors transduce murine hepatocytes exceedingly well, and because some of the surface-exposed K residues are conserved between these serotypes, we generated and tested two single mutants (K547E and K569E), and one double-mutant (K547 + 569E) AAV8 vector. However, no significant increase in the transduction efficiency of any of these mutant AAV8 vectors was observed in murine hepatocytes in vivo. These studies suggest that although targeting the surface-exposed K residues is yet another strategy to improve the transduction efficiency of AAV vectors, phenotypic outcome is serotype specific.

  17. A regulatable AAV vector mediating GDNF biological effects at clinically-approved sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses.

    PubMed

    Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Humbert-Claude, Marie; Bockstael, Olivier; Das, Atze T; Boutry, Sébastien; Breger, Ludivine S; Klaver, Bep; Melas, Catherine; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Tomas; Muller, Robert N; DeWitte, Olivier; Levivier, Marc; Lundberg, Cecilia; Berkhout, Ben; Tenenbaum, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical data stress the importance of pharmacologically-controlling glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) intracerebral administration to treat PD. The main challenge is finding a combination of a genetic switch and a drug which, when administered at a clinically-approved dose, reaches the brain in sufficient amounts to induce a therapeutic effect. We describe a highly-sensitive doxycycline-inducible adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. This vector allowed for the first time a longitudinal analysis of inducible transgene expression in the brain using bioluminescence imaging. To evaluate the dose range of GDNF biological activity, the inducible AAV vector (8.0 × 10(9) viral genomes) was injected in the rat striatum at four delivery sites and increasing doxycycline doses administered orally. ERK/Akt signaling activation as well as tyrosine hydroxylase downregulation, a consequence of long-term GDNF treatment, were induced at plasmatic doxycycline concentrations of 140 and 320 ng/ml respectively, which are known not to increase antibiotic-resistant microorganisms in patients. In these conditions, GDNF covered the majority of the striatum. No behavioral abnormalities or weight loss were observed. Motor asymmetry resulting from unilateral GDNF treatment only appeared with a 2.5-fold higher vector and a 13-fold higher inducer doses. Our data suggest that using the herein-described inducible AAV vector, biological effects of GDNF can be obtained in response to sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses.

  18. A regulatable AAV vector mediating GDNF biological effects at clinically-approved sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses

    PubMed Central

    Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Humbert-Claude, Marie; Bockstael, Olivier; Das, Atze T; Boutry, Sébastien; Breger, Ludivine S; Klaver, Bep; Melas, Catherine; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Tomas; Muller, Robert N; DeWitte, Olivier; Levivier, Marc; Lundberg, Cecilia; Berkhout, Ben; Tenenbaum, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical data stress the importance of pharmacologically-controlling glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) intracerebral administration to treat PD. The main challenge is finding a combination of a genetic switch and a drug which, when administered at a clinically-approved dose, reaches the brain in sufficient amounts to induce a therapeutic effect. We describe a highly-sensitive doxycycline-inducible adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. This vector allowed for the first time a longitudinal analysis of inducible transgene expression in the brain using bioluminescence imaging. To evaluate the dose range of GDNF biological activity, the inducible AAV vector (8.0 × 109 viral genomes) was injected in the rat striatum at four delivery sites and increasing doxycycline doses administered orally. ERK/Akt signaling activation as well as tyrosine hydroxylase downregulation, a consequence of long-term GDNF treatment, were induced at plasmatic doxycycline concentrations of 140 and 320 ng/ml respectively, which are known not to increase antibiotic-resistant microorganisms in patients. In these conditions, GDNF covered the majority of the striatum. No behavioral abnormalities or weight loss were observed. Motor asymmetry resulting from unilateral GDNF treatment only appeared with a 2.5-fold higher vector and a 13-fold higher inducer doses. Our data suggest that using the herein-described inducible AAV vector, biological effects of GDNF can be obtained in response to sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses. PMID:27069954

  19. Pre-Clinical Assessment of Immune Responses to Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Vectors.

    PubMed

    Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Bijjiga, Enoch; Martino, Ashley T

    2014-01-01

    Transitioning to human trials from pre-clinical models resulted in the emergence of inhibitory AAV vector immune responses which has become a hurdle for sustained correction. Early animal studies did not predict the full range of host immunity to the AAV vector in human studies. While pre-existing antibody titers against AAV vectors has been a lingering concern, cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses against the input capsid can prevent long-term therapy in humans. These discoveries spawned more thorough profiling of immune response to rAAV in pre-clinical models, which have assessed both innate and adaptive immunity and explored methods for bypassing these responses. Many efforts toward measuring innate immunity have utilized Toll-like receptor deficient models and have focused on differential responses to viral capsid and genome. From adaptive studies, it is clear that humoral responses are relevant for initial vector transduction efficiency while cellular responses impact long-term outcomes of gene transfer. Measuring humoral responses to AAV vectors has utilized in vitro neutralizing antibody assays and transfer of seropositive serum to immunodeficient mice. Overcoming antibodies using CD20 inhibitors, plasmapheresis, altering route of delivery and using different capsids have been explored. CTL responses were measured using in vitro and in vivo models. In in vitro assays expansion of antigen-specific T-cells as well as cytotoxicity toward AAV transduced cells can be shown. Many groups have successfully mimicked antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, but actual transgene level reduction and parameters of cytotoxicity toward transduced target cells have only been shown in one model. The model utilized adoptive transfer of capsid-specific in vitro expanded T-cells isolated from immunized mice with LPS as an adjuvant. Finally, the development of immune tolerance to AAV vectors by enriching regulatory T-cells as well as modulating the response pharmacologically has also

  20. Cell-Mediated Immunity to AAV Vectors, Evolving Concepts and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Mingozzi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most efficient in vivo gene delivery platforms. Over the past decade, clinical trials of AAV vector-mediated gene transfer led to some of the most exciting results in the field of gene therapy and, recently, to the market approval of an AAV-based drug in Europe. With clinical development, however, it became obvious that the host immune system represents an important obstacle to successful gene transfer with AAV vectors. In this review article, we will discuss the issue of cytotoxic T cell responses directed against the AAV capsid encountered on human studies. While over the past several years the field has acquired a tremendous amount of information on the interactions of AAV vectors with the immune system, a lot of questions are still unanswered. Novel concepts are emerging, such as the relationship between the total capsid dose and the T cell-mediated clearance of transduced cells, the potential role of innate immunity in vector immunogenicity highlighted in preclinical studies, and the cross talk between regulatory and effector T cells in the determination of the outcome of gene transfer. There is still a lot to learn about immune responses in AAV gene transfer, for example, it is not well understood what are the determinants of the kinetics of activation of T cells in response to vector administration, why not all subjects develop detrimental T cell responses following gene transfer, and whether the intervention strategies currently in use to block T cell-mediated clearance of transduced cells will be safe and effective for all gene therapy indications. Results from novel preclinical models and clinical studies will help to address these points and to reach the important goal of developing safe and effective gene therapy protocols to treat human diseases.

  1. The prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against AAV serotype 1 in healthy subjects in China: implications for gene therapy and vaccines using AAV1 vector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Zhao, Chenyan; Zhang, Li; Meng, Shufang; Gao, Dongying; Wang, Youchun

    2013-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) has attracted tremendous interest as a promising vector for gene therapy and vaccine applications. However, the presence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies as a consequence of exposure to wild type AAV1 can limit significantly effective gene transfer for biologics based AAV1 vector. Prior studies have reported that a prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies ranged from 10% to 50% in different countries around the world, and up to 79% in Dutch subjects. However, few studies have reported on the AAV1 neutralizing antibody prevalence in Chinese subjects. In this study, a high-throughput luciferase-based virus neutralization assay was established and standardized for critical parameters, including the appropriate cell line, and the optimal viral infection dose, and the infection time with homologous AAV1 vaccinated mice and guinea pig sera. Then, a total of 500 healthy individual serum samples from two separate regions of China were screened for the AAV1 neutralizing antibodies by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis. Interestingly, a high prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibody (69.8%) was found in all individuals. There was significant difference observed for prevalence by gender (P = 0.042), age range (P = 0.011) and geographic origin (P < 0.001). The percentage of positive AAV1 neutralizing antibodies (NT50  > 10) in teenagers (year <18, as of 2012) was significant lower than that of adults (19-56, as of 2012) (P = 0.011), indicating the optimal vaccination period of childhood. The current study provides a useful insight for the future development of AAV1-based vaccination and gene therapy strategies in Beijing and Anhui provinces of China.

  2. Combined Paracrine and Endocrine AAV9 mediated Expression of Hepatocyte Growth Factor for the Treatment of Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schievenbusch, Stephanie; Strack, Ingo; Scheffler, Melanie; Nischt, Roswitha; Coutelle, Oliver; Hösel, Marianna; Hallek, Michael; Fries, Jochen WU; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Odenthal, Margarete; Büning, Hildegard

    2010-01-01

    In chronic renal disease, tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a leading cause of renal failure. Here, we made use of one of the most promising gene therapy vector platforms, the adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector system, and the COL4A3-deficient mice, a genetic mouse model of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, to develop a novel bidirectional treatment strategy to prevent renal fibrosis. By comparing different AAV serotypes in reporter studies, we identified AAV9 as the most suitable delivery vector to simultaneously target liver parenchyma for endocrine and renal tubular epithelium for paracrine therapeutic expression of the antifibrogenic cytokine human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). We used transcriptional targeting to drive hHGF expression from the newly developed CMV-enhancer-Ksp-cadherin-promoter (CMV-Ksp) in renal and hepatic tissue following tail vein injection of rAAV9-CMV-Ksp-hHGF into COL4A3-deficient mice. The therapeutic efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by a remarkable attenuation of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and repression of fibrotic markers such as collagen1α1 (Col1A1), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Taken together, our results show the great potential of rAAV9 as an intravenously applicable vector for the combined paracrine and endocrine expression of antifibrogenic factors in the treatment of renal failure caused by tubulointerstitial fibrosis. PMID:20424598

  3. AAV8 capsid variable regions at the two-fold symmetry axis contribute to high liver transduction by mediating nuclear entry and capsid uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Bell, Christie L.; Wilson, James M.

    2014-04-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) is a promising vector for liver-directed gene therapy. Although efficient uncoating of viral capsids has been implicated in AAV8's robust liver transduction, much about the biology of AAV8 hepatotropism remains unclear. Our study investigated the structural basis of AAV8 liver transduction efficiency by constructing chimeric vector capsids containing sequences derived from AAV8 and AAV2 – a highly homologous yet poorly hepatotropic serotype. Engineered vectors containing capsid variable regions (VR) VII and IX from AAV8 in an AAV2 backbone mediated near AAV8-like transduction in mouse liver, with higher numbers of chimeric genomes detected in whole liver cells and isolated nuclei. Interestingly, chimeric capsids within liver nuclei also uncoated similarly to AAV8 by 6 weeks after administration, in contrast with AAV2, of which a significantly smaller proportion were uncoated. This study links specific AAV capsid regions to the transduction ability of a clinically relevant AAV serotype. - Highlights: • We construct chimeric vectors to identify determinants of AAV8 liver transduction. • An AAV2-based vector with 17 AAV8 residues exhibited high liver transduction in mice. • This vector also surpassed AAV2 in cell entry, nuclear entry and onset of expression. • Most chimeric vector particles were uncoated at 6 weeks, like AAV8 and unlike AAV2. • Chimera retained heparin binding and was antigenically distinct from AAV2 and AAV8.

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of a Clinical Candidate AAV8 Vector for Ornithine Transcarbamylase (OTC) Deficiency Reveals Functional Enzyme from Each Persisting Vector Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Morizono, Hiroki; Lin, Jianping; Bell, Peter; Jones, David; McMenamin, Deirdre; Yu, Hongwei; Batshaw, Mark L.; Wilson, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD), the most common and severe urea cycle disorder, is an excellent model for developing liver-directed gene therapy. No curative therapy exists except for liver transplantation which is limited by available donors and carries significant risk of mortality and morbidity. Adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) has been shown to be the most efficient vector for liver-directed gene transfer and is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial for treating hemophilia B. In this study, we generated a clinical candidate vector for a proposed OTC gene therapy trial in humans based on a self-complementary AAV8 vector expressing codon-optimized human OTC (hOTCco) under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Codon-optimization dramatically improved the efficacy of OTC gene therapy. Supraphysiological expression levels and activity of hOTC were achieved in adult spfash mice following a single intravenous injection of hOTCco vector. Vector doses as low as 1×1010 genome copies (GC) achieved robust and sustained correction of the OTCD biomarker orotic aciduria and clinical protection against an ammonia challenge. Functional expression of hOTC in 40% of liver areas was found in mice treated with a low vector dose of 1×109 GC. We suggest that the clinical candidate vector we have developed has the potential to achieve therapeutic effects in OTCD patients. PMID:22133298

  5. Preclinical evaluation of a clinical candidate AAV8 vector for ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency reveals functional enzyme from each persisting vector genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Morizono, Hiroki; Lin, Jianping; Bell, Peter; Jones, David; McMenamin, Deirdre; Yu, Hongwei; Batshaw, Mark L; Wilson, James M

    2012-02-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD), the most common and severe urea cycle disorder, is an excellent model for developing liver-directed gene therapy. No curative therapy exists except for liver transplantation which is limited by available donors and carries significant risk of mortality and morbidity. Adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) has been shown to be the most efficient vector for liver-directed gene transfer and is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial for treating hemophilia B. In this study, we generated a clinical candidate vector for a proposed OTC gene therapy trial in humans based on a self-complementary AAV8 vector expressing codon-optimized human OTC (hOTCco) under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Codon-optimization dramatically improved the efficacy of OTC gene therapy. Supraphysiological expression levels and activity of hOTC were achieved in adult spf(ash) mice following a single intravenous injection of hOTCco vector. Vector doses as low as 1×10(10) genome copies (GC) achieved robust and sustained correction of the OTCD biomarker orotic aciduria and clinical protection against an ammonia challenge. Functional expression of hOTC in 40% of liver areas was found in mice treated with a low vector dose of 1×10(9) GC. We suggest that the clinical candidate vector we have developed has the potential to achieve therapeutic effects in OTCD patients.

  6. Sustained Correction of OTC Deficiency in Spf ash mice Using Optimized Self-complementary AAV2/8 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Wang, Huan; Morizono, Hiroki; Bell, Peter; Jones, David; Lin, Jianping; McMenamin, Deirdre; Yu, Hongwei; Batshaw, Mark L.; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common inborn error of urea synthesis. Complete OTCD can result in hyperammonemic coma in the neonatal period which can rapidly become fatal. Current acute therapy involves dialysis; chronic therapy involves the stimulation of alternate nitrogen clearance pathways; and the only curative approach is liver transplantation. AAV vector based gene therapy would add to current treatment options provided the vector delivers high level and stable transgene expression in liver without dose limiting toxicity. In this study, we employed an AAV2/8-based self-complementary (sc) vector expressing the murine OTC gene under a liver-specific thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) promoter and examined the therapeutic effects in a mouse model of OTCD, the spf ash mouse. Seven days after a single intravenous injection of vector, treated mice showed complete normalization of urinary orotic acid, a measure of OTC activity. We further improved vector efficacy by incorporating a Kozak or Kozak-like sequence into mOTC cDNA which increased the OTC activity by 5- or 2-fold and achieved sustained correction of orotic aciduria for up to 7 months. Our results demonstrate that vector optimizations can significantly improve the efficacy of gene therapy. PMID:21850052

  7. A concept of eliminating nonhomologous recombination for scalable and safe AAV vector generation for human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biao; Moore, Andrea R; Dai, Jihong; Roberts, Sean; Chu, Kirk; Kapranov, Philipp; Moss, Bernard; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-07-01

    Scalable and efficient production of high-quality recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for gene therapy remains a challenge despite recent clinical successes. We developed a new strategy for scalable and efficient rAAV production by sequestering the AAV helper genes and the rAAV vector DNA in two different subcellular compartments, made possible by using cytoplasmic vaccinia virus as a carrier for the AAV helper genes. For the first time, the contamination of replication-competent AAV particles (rcAAV) can be completely eliminated in theory by avoiding ubiquitous nonhomologous recombination. Vector DNA can be integrated into the host genomes or delivered by a nuclear targeting vector such as adenovirus. In suspension HeLa cells, the achieved vector yield per cell is similar to that from traditional triple-plasmid transfection method. The rcAAV contamination was undetectable at the limit of our assay. Furthermore, this new concept can be used not only for production of rAAV, but also for other DNA vectors.

  8. Widespread Central Nervous System Gene Transfer and Silencing After Systemic Delivery of Novel AAV-AS Vector.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sourav R; Harris, Anne F; Cabral, Damien J; Keeler, Allison M; Sapp, Ellen; Ferreira, Jennifer S; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Johnson, Jacob A; Johnson, Aime K; Su, Qin; Stoica, Lorelei; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil; Martin, Douglas R; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Effective gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is vital for development of novel gene therapies for neurological diseases. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have emerged as an effective platform for in vivo gene transfer, but overall neuronal transduction efficiency of vectors derived from naturally occurring AAV capsids after systemic administration is relatively low. Here, we investigated the possibility of improving CNS transduction of existing AAV capsids by genetically fusing peptides to the N-terminus of VP2 capsid protein. A novel vector AAV-AS, generated by the insertion of a poly-alanine peptide, is capable of extensive gene transfer throughout the CNS after systemic administration in adult mice. AAV-AS is 6- and 15-fold more efficient than AAV9 in spinal cord and cerebrum, respectively. The neuronal transduction profile varies across brain regions but is particularly high in the striatum where AAV-AS transduces 36% of striatal neurons. Widespread neuronal gene transfer was also documented in cat brain and spinal cord. A single intravenous injection of an AAV-AS vector encoding an artificial microRNA targeting huntingtin (Htt) resulted in 33-50% knockdown of Htt across multiple CNS structures in adult mice. This novel AAV-AS vector is a promising platform to develop new gene therapies for neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY AND SYSTEMIC MANNITOL INCREASE GENE PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION OF AAV VECTORS 5, 8, AND 9 AND INCREASE GENE PRODUCT IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Nikisha; Lee, Daniel; Dickey, Chad; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jansen-West, Karen; Golde, Todd E.; Gordon, Marcia N.; Morgan, Dave; Nash, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The use of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors as a means of gene delivery to the central nervous system has emerged as a potentially viable method for the treatment of several types of degenerative brain diseases. However, a limitation of typical intracranial injections into the adult brain parenchyma is the relatively restricted distribution of the delivered gene to large brain regions such as the cortex, presumably due to confined dispersion of the injected particles. Optimizing the administration techniques to maximize gene distribution and gene expression is an important step in developing gene therapy studies. Here, we have found additive increases in distribution when 3 methods to increase brain distribution of rAAV were combined. The convection enhanced delivery (CED) method with the step-design cannula was used to deliver rAAV vector serotypes 5, 8 and 9 encoding GFP into the hippocampus of the mouse brain. While the CED method improved distribution of all 3 serotypes, the combination of rAAV9 and CED was particularly effective. Systemic mannitol administration, which reduces intracranial pressure, also further expanded distribution of GFP expression, in particular, increased expression on the contralateral hippocampi. These data suggest that combining advanced injection techniques with newer rAAV serotypes greatly improves viral vector distribution, which could have significant benefits for implementation of gene therapy strategies. PMID:20951738

  10. Comparative Transduction Efficiency of AAV Vector Serotypes 1–6 in the Substantia Nigra and Striatum of the Primate Brain

    PubMed Central

    Markakis, Eleni A; Vives, Kenneth P; Bober, Jeremy; Leichtle, Stefan; Leranth, Csaba; Beecham, Jeff; Elsworth, John D; Roth, Robert H; Samulski, R Jude; Redmond, D Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) are promising candidates for neural cell transduction in vivo because they are nonpathogenic and achieve long-term transduction in the central nervous system. AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) is the most widely used AAV vector in clinical trials based largely on its ability to transduce neural cells in the rodent and primate brain. Prior work in rodents suggests that other serotypes might be more efficient; however, a systematic evaluation of vector transduction efficiency has not yet been performed in the primate brain. In this study, AAV viral vectors of serotypes 1–6 with an enhanced green-fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were generated at comparable titers, and injected in equal amounts into the brains of Chlorocebus sabaeus. Vector injections were placed in the substantia nigra (SN) and the caudate nucleus (CD). One month after injection, immunohistochemistry for GFP was performed and the total number of GFP+ cells was calculated using unbiased stereology. AAV5 was the most efficient vector, not only transducing significantly more cells than any other serotype, but also transducing both NeuN+ and glial-fibrillary-acidic protein positive (GFAP+) cells. These results suggest that AAV5 is a more effective vector than AAV2 at delivering potentially therapeutic transgenes to the nigrostriatal system of the primate brain. PMID:20010918

  11. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette M; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n = 2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 10(11) or 4 × 10(12) vector genomes/ml) and were evaluated over a 3-month period before being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on study day 5, based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  12. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T. Michael; Miller, Paul E.; Sharma, Alok K.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Smith, Leia M.; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette M.; Knop, David R.; Hauswirth, William W.; Chulay, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n = 2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 1011 or 4 × 1012 vector genomes/ml) and were evaluated over a 3-month period before being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on study day 5, based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations. PMID:27003753

  13. Delivery of glucose-6-phosphatase in a canine model for glycogen storage disease, type Ia, with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors.

    PubMed

    Beaty, R M; Jackson, M; Peterson, D; Bird, A; Brown, T; Benjamin, D K; Juopperi, T; Kishnani, P; Boney, A; Chen, Y T; Koeberl, D D

    2002-08-01

    Therapy in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia), an inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, relies on nutritional support that postpones but fails to prevent long-term complications of GSD Ia. In the canine model for GSD Ia, we evaluated the potential of intravenously delivered adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for gene therapy. In three affected canines, liver glycogen was reduced following hepatic expression of canine glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Two months after AAV vector administration, one affected dog had normalization of fasting glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and lactic acid. Concatamerized AAV vector DNA was confirmed by Southern blot analysis of liver DNA isolated from treated dogs, as head-to-tail, head-to-head, and tail-to-tail concatamers. Six weeks after vector administration, the level of vector DNA signal in each dog varied from one to five copies per cell, consistent with variation in the efficiency of transduction within the liver. AAV vector administration in the canine model for GSD Ia resulted in sustained G6Pase expression and improvement in liver histology and in biochemical parameters.

  14. Modulation of CD8+ T cell responses to AAV vectors with IgG-derived MHC class II epitopes.

    PubMed

    Hui, Daniel J; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Chen, Yifeng; Davidson, Robert J; Buchlis, George; Yazicioglu, Mustafa; Pien, Gary C; Finn, Jonathan D; Haurigot, Virginia; Tai, Alex; Scott, David W; Cousens, Leslie P; Zhou, Shangzhen; De Groot, Anne S; Mingozzi, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Immune responses directed against viral capsid proteins constitute a main safety concern in the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) as gene transfer vectors in humans. Pharmacological immunosuppression has been proposed as a solution to the problem; however, the approach suffers from several potential limitations. Using MHC class II epitopes initially identified within human IgG, named Tregitopes, we showed that it is possible to modulate CD8+ T cell responses to several viral antigens in vitro. We showed that incubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with these epitopes triggers proliferation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells that suppress killing of target cells loaded with MHC class I antigens in an antigen-specific fashion, through a mechanism that seems to require cell-to-cell contact. Expression of a construct encoding for the AAV capsid structural protein fused to Tregitopes resulted in reduction of CD8+ T cell reactivity against the AAV capsid following immunization with an adenoviral vector expressing capsid. This was accompanied by an increase in frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells in spleens and lower levels of inflammatory infiltrates in injected tissues. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates modulation of CD8+ T cell reactivity to an antigen using regulatory T cell epitopes is possible.

  15. AAV Hybrid Serotypes: Improved Vectors for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, significant efforts have been made on studying and engineering adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid, in order to increase efficiency in targeting specific cell types that are non-permissive to wild type (wt) viruses and to improve efficacy in infecting only the cell type of interest. With our previous knowledge of the viral properties of the naturally occurring serotypes and the elucidation of their capsid structures, we can now generate capsid mutants, or hybrid serotypes, by various methods and strategies. In this review, we summarize the studies performed on AAV retargeting, and categorize the available hybrid serotypes to date, based on the type of modification: 1) transcapsidation, 2) adsorption of bi-specific antibody to capsid surface, 3) mosaic capsid, and 4) chimeric capsid. Not only these hybrid serotypes could achieve high efficiency of gene delivery to a specific targeted cell type, which can be better-tailored for a particular clinical application, but also serve as a tool for studying AAV biology such as receptor binding, trafficking and genome delivery into the nucleus. PMID:15975007

  16. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector

    PubMed Central

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Rao, Lavanya; Corriher, Travis; Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping; Sullivan, Patrick; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9), which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137) in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities. PMID:27434683

  17. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; Sharma, Alok K; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia; Arndt, Tara; Calcedo, Roberto; Gaskin, Chantelle; Robinson, Paulette; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey David

    2016-03-08

    AGTC is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of animals (n=2 males and 2 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 300 µL containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two concentrations (4 × 1011 or 4 × 1012 vg/mL) and were evaluated over a 3 month period prior to being euthanized. Administration of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 was associated with a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that was greater than that observed in eyes injected with the vehicle control. Most manifestations of inflammation improved over time except that vitreous cells persisted in vector-treated eyes until the end of the study. One animal in the lower vector dose group was euthanized on Study Day 5 based on a clinical diagnosis of endophthalmitis. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, visual evoked potential responses, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal mononuclear infiltrates in all vector-injected eyes. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in all vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to CNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  18. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Harding, C O; Gillingham, M B; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, D D

    2006-03-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudotyped with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pah(enu2) mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pah(enu2) mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5+/-2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism.

  19. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Harding, CO; Gillingham, MB; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, DD

    2009-01-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudo-typed with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pahenu2 mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pahenu2 mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5±2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:16319949

  20. Recombinant AAV-PR39-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α gene expression attenuates myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Hao, Yuewen; Nie, Xiaowei; Xu, Jian; Li, Zhenwu; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xuexin

    2014-01-01

    PR39 is an angiogenic masterswitch protein, belonging to the second generation of angiogenic growth factors. However, the role of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying the PR39 fusion gene (AAV-PR39) in acute myocardial infarction remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of AAV-PR39 in an experimental animal model of acute myocardial infarction. The PR39 gene was fused with the transmembrane peptide, TAT, 6xHis‑tag and NT4 signal sequences. AAV-PR39 was then obtained by calcium phosphate co-precipitation. A total of 18 healthy Chinese mini pigs were randomly divided into an experimental groups (the AAV-PR39-treated group) and a control group [phosphated-buffered saline (PBS)-treated group]. Following the induction of myocardial infarction, enhanced 3.0T MR imaging was performed to observe the changes in myocardial signal intensity at 0 h, 1, 2 and 3 weeks. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor‑1α (HIF-1α) in the myocardial tissues was determined by SABC immunohistochemistry. In addition, in vitro experiments using CRL-1730 endothelial cells transfected with AAV vector containing NT4-TAT-His-PR39 revealed that the AAV-PR39-treated group had a significantly higher expression of HIF-1α compared with the control group. Moreover, PR39 regulated the HIF-1α-induced expression of angiogenic growth factors. Under hypoxic conditions, the anti-apoptotic effects in the AAV-PR39 group were more pronounced than those observed in the control (PBS-treated) group. In vivo, the enforced expression of recombinant PR39 elevated the level of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions and decreased the size of the infarcted areas by upregulating the expression of HIF-1α in the areas surrounding the infarct area. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the recombinant AAV-PR39-mediated HIF-1α expression attenuates myocardial infarction, indicating that AAV-PR39 may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of myocardial infarction.

  1. Enzyme replacement in the CSF to treat metachromatic leukodystrophy in mouse model using single intracerebroventricular injection of self-complementary AAV1 vector.

    PubMed

    Hironaka, Kohei; Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Yamamoto, Motoko; Miyake, Noriko; Miyake, Koichi; Okada, Takashi; Morita, Akio; Shimada, Takashi

    2015-08-18

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a functional deficiency in human arylsulfatase A (hASA). We recently reported that ependymal cells and the choroid plexus are selectively transduced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) vector and serve as a biological reservoir for the secretion of lysosomal enzymes into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In the present study, we examined the feasibility of this AAV-mediated gene therapy to treat MLD model mice. Preliminary experiments showed that the hASA level in the CSF after ICV injection of self-complementary (sc) AAV1 was much higher than in mice injected with single-stranded AAV1 or scAAV9. However, when 18-week-old MLD mice were treated with ICV injection of scAAV1, the concentration of hASA in the CSF gradually decreased and was not detectable at 12 weeks after injection, probably due to the development of anti-hASA antibodies. As a result, the sulfatide levels in brain tissues of treated MLD mice were only slightly reduced compared with those of untreated MLD mice. These results suggest that this approach is potentially promising for treating MLD, but that controlling the immune response appears to be crucial for long-term expression of therapeutic proteins in the CSF.

  2. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  3. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  4. Development of a liver-specific Tet-on inducible system for AAV vectors and its application in the treatment of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Vanrell, Lucia; Di Scala, Marianna; Blanco, Laura; Otano, Itziar; Gil-Farina, Irene; Baldim, Victor; Paneda, Astrid; Berraondo, Pedro; Beattie, Stuart G; Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Tenenbaum, Lilianne; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2011-07-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) are effective gene delivery vehicles that can mediate long-lasting transgene expression. However, tight regulation and tissue-specific transgene expression is required for certain therapeutic applications. For regulatable expression from the liver we designed a hepatospecific bidirectional and autoregulatory tetracycline (Tet)-On system (Tet(bidir)Alb) flanked by AAV inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). We characterized the inducible hepatospecific system in comparison with an inducible ubiquitous expression system (Tet(bidir)CMV) using luciferase (luc). Although the ubiquitous system led to luc expression throughout the mouse, luc expression derived from the hepatospecific system was restricted to the liver. Interestingly, the induction rate of the Tet(bidir)Alb was significantly higher than that of Tet(bidir)CMV, whereas leakage of Tet(bidir)Alb was significantly lower. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of this vector, an AAV-Tet(bidir)-Alb-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) was tested in a murine model for hepatic colorectal metastasis. The vector induced dose-dependent levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), showing no significant toxicity. AAV-Tet(bidir)-Alb-IL-12 was highly efficient in preventing establishment of metastasis in the liver and induced an efficient T-cell memory response to tumor cells. Thus, we have demonstrated persistent, and inducible in vivo expression of a gene from a liver-specific Tet-On inducible construct delivered via an AAV vector and proved to be an efficient tool for treating liver cancer.

  5. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in CNGB3-Deficient Mice of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; McPherson, Leslie; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Mandapati, Savitri; Robinson, Paulette M; Calcedo, Roberto; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in CNGB3-deficient mice. Three groups of animals (n = 35 males and 35 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 1 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two dose concentrations (1 × 10(12) or 4.2 × 10(12) vg/ml) and were euthanized 4 or 13 weeks later. There were no test-article-related changes in clinical observations, body weights, food consumption, ocular examinations, clinical pathology parameters, organ weights, or macroscopic observations at necropsy. Cone-mediated electroretinography (ERG) responses were detected after vector administration in the treated eyes in 90% of animals in the higher dose group and 31% of animals in the lower dose group. Rod-mediated ERG responses were reduced in the treated eye for all groups, with the greatest reduction in males given the higher dose of vector, but returned to normal by the end of the study. Microscopic pathology results demonstrated minimal mononuclear cell infiltrates in the retina and vitreous of some animals at the interim euthanasia and in the vitreous of some animals at the terminal euthanasia. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in most vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to hCNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in vector-injected eyes but little or no vector DNA in nonocular tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations.

  6. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  7. TGF-β gene transfer and overexpression via rAAV vectors stimulates chondrogenic events in human bone marrow aspirates.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Janina; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-03-01

    Genetic modification of marrow concentrates may provide convenient approaches to enhance the chondrogenic differentiation processes and improve the repair capacities in sites of cartilage defects following administration in the lesions. Here, we provided clinically adapted recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors to human bone marrow aspirates to promote the expression of the potent transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) as a means to regulate the biological and chondrogenic activities in the samples in vitro. Successful TGF-β gene transfer and expression via rAAV was reached relative to control (lacZ) treatment (from 511.1 to 16.1 pg rhTGF-β/mg total proteins after 21 days), allowing to durably enhance the levels of cell proliferation, matrix synthesis, and chondrogenic differentiation. Strikingly, in the conditions applied here, application of the candidate TGF-β vector was also capable of reducing the hypertrophic and osteogenic differentiation processes in the aspirates, showing the potential benefits of using this particular vector to directly modify marrow concentrates to generate single-step, effective approaches that aim at improving articular cartilage repair in vivo.

  8. Regulation of retinal function but nonrescue of vision in RPE65-deficient dogs treated with doxycycline-regulatable AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Provost, Nathalie; Guihal, Caroline; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2010-06-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer of the doxycycline (Dox)-regulatable system allows for the regulation of erythropoietin (EPO) expression in the retina of nonhuman primates after intravenous or oral administration of Dox. In addition, it was shown that administrating different amounts of Dox resulted in a dose-response dynamic of transgene expression. Adeno-associated viral gene therapy has raised hope for the treatment of patients with Leber congenital amaurosis, caused by mutations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific gene RPE65. The preliminary results of three clinical trials suggest some improvement in visual function. However, further improvements might be necessary to optimize vision recovery and this means developing vectors able to generate transgene expression at physiological levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of the Dox-regulatable system to regulate retinal function in RPE65(-/-) Briard dogs. rAAV vectors expressing RPE65 under the control of either the TetOff and TetOn Dox-regulated promoters or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) constitutive promoter were generated and administered subretinally to seven RPE65-deficient dogs. We demonstrate that the induction and deinduction of retinal function, as assessed by electroretinography (ERG), can be achieved using a Dox-regulatable system, but do not lead to any recovery of vision.

  9. Preclinical potency and safety studies of an AAV2-mediated gene therapy vector for the treatment of MERTK associated retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Thomas J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Pang, Ji-jing; Ryals, Renee; Clément, Nathalie; Cleaver, Brian; McDoom, Issam; Boye, Shannon E; Peden, Marc C; Sherwood, Mark B; Abernathy, Corinne R; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Proof of concept for MERTK gene replacement therapy has been demonstrated using different viral vectors in the Royal College of Surgeon (RCS) rat, a well characterized model of recessive retinitis pigmentosa that contains a mutation in the Mertk gene. MERTK plays a key role in renewal of photoreceptor outer segments (OS) by phagocytosis of shed OS tips. Mutations in MERTK cause impaired phagocytic activity and accumulation of OS debris in the interphotoreceptor space that ultimately leads to photoreceptor cell death. In the present study, we conducted a series of preclinical potency and GLP-compliant safety evaluations of an adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) vector expressing human MERTK cDNA driven by the retinal pigment epithelium-specific, VMD2 promoter. We demonstrate the potency of the vector in RCS rats by improved electroretinogram (ERG) responses in treated eyes compared with contralateral untreated controls. Toxicology and biodistribution studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats injected with two different doses of AAV vectors and buffer control. Delivery of vector in SD rats did not result in a change in ERG amplitudes of rod and cone responses relative to balanced salt solution control-injected eyes, indicating that administration of AAV vector did not adversely affect normal retinal function. In vivo fundoscopic analysis and postmortem retinal morphology of the vector-injected eyes were normal compared with controls. Evaluation of blood smears showed the lack of transformed cells in the treated eyes. All injected eyes and day 1 blood samples were positive for vector genomes, and all peripheral tissues were negative. Our results demonstrate the potency and safety of the AAV2-VMD2-hMERTK vector in animal models tested. A GMP vector has been manufactured and is presently in clinical trial.

  10. Vitreal delivery of AAV vectored Cnga3 restores cone function in CNGA3-/-/Nrl-/- mice, an all-cone model of CNGA3 achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Tao, Ye; Deng, Wen-Tao; Zhu, Ping; Li, Jie; Dai, Xufeng; Zhang, Yuxin; Shi, Wei; Liu, Xuan; Chiodo, Vince A; Ding, Xi-Qin; Zhao, Chen; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Zhang, Zuoming; Qu, Jia; Hauswirth, William W; Pang, Ji-Jing

    2015-07-01

    The CNGA3(-/-)/Nrl(-/-) mouse is a cone-dominant model with Cnga3 channel deficiency, which partially mimics the all cone foveal structure of human achromatopsia 2 with CNGA3 mutations. Although subretinal (SR) AAV vector administration can transfect retinal cells efficiently, the injection-induced retinal detachment can cause retinal damage, particularly when SR vector bleb includes the fovea. We therefore explored whether cone function-structure could be rescued in CNGA3(-/-)/Nrl(-/-) mice by intravitreal (IVit) delivery of tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant AAV8. We find that AAV-mediated CNGA3 expression can restore cone function and rescue structure following IVit delivery of AAV8 (Y447, 733F) vector. Rescue was assessed by restoration of the cone-mediated electroretinogram (ERG), optomotor responses, and cone opsin immunohistochemistry. Demonstration of gene therapy in a cone-dominant mouse model by IVit delivery provides a potential alternative vector delivery mode for safely transducing foveal cones in achromatopsia patients and in other human retinal diseases affecting foveal function.

  11. Copackaged AAV9 Vectors Promote Simultaneous Immune Tolerance and Phenotypic Correction of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A.; Todd, Adrian G.; Clément, Nathalie; Falk, Darin J.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by lysosomal accumulation of glycogen from a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Replacement of the missing enzyme is available by repeated protein infusions; however, efficacy is limited by immune response and inability to restore enzymatic function in the central nervous system. An alternative therapeutic option is adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, which results in widespread gene transfer and prolonged transgene expression. Both enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and gene therapy can elicit anti-GAA immune reactions that dampen their effectiveness and pose life-threatening risks to patient safety. To modulate the immune responses related to gene therapy, we show that a human codon-optimized GAA (coGAA) driven by a liver-specific promoter (LSP) using AAV9 is capable of promoting immune tolerance in a Gaa−/− mouse model. Copackaging AAV9-LSP-coGAA with the tissue-restricted desmin promoter (AAV9-DES-coGAA) demonstrates the necessary cell autonomous expression in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, peripheral nerve, and the spinal cord. Simultaneous high-level expression in liver led to the expansion of GAA-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and induction of immune tolerance. Transfer of Tregs into naïve recipients prevented pathogenic allergic reactions after repeated ERT challenges. Copackaged AAV9 also attenuated preexisting humoral and cellular immune responses, which enhanced the biochemical correction. Our data present a therapeutic design in which simultaneous administration of two copackaged AAV constructs may provide therapeutic benefit and resolve immune reactions in the treatment of multisystem disorders. PMID:26603344

  12. Advanced Characterization of DNA Molecules in rAAV Vector Preparations by Single-stranded Virus Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Emilie; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martin-Fontaine, Mélanie; Broucque, Frédéric; Robin, Cécile; Hebben, Matthias; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Blouin, Véronique; François, Achille; Redon, Richard; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Recent successful clinical trials with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) have led to a renewed interest in gene therapy. However, despite extensive developments to improve vector-manufacturing processes, undesirable DNA contaminants in rAAV preparations remain a major safety concern. Indeed, the presence of DNA fragments containing antibiotic resistance genes, wild-type AAV, and packaging cell genomes has been found in previous studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses. However, because qPCR only provides a partial view of the DNA molecules in rAAV preparations, we developed a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) to extensively characterize single-stranded DNA virus preparations (SSV-Seq). In order to validate SSV-Seq, we analyzed three rAAV vector preparations produced by transient transfection of mammalian cells. Our data were consistent with qPCR results and showed a quasi-random distribution of contaminants originating from the packaging cells genome. Finally, we found single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) along the vector genome but no evidence of large deletions. Altogether, SSV-Seq could provide a characterization of DNA contaminants and a map of the rAAV genome with unprecedented resolution and exhaustiveness. We expect SSV-Seq to pave the way for a new generation of quality controls, guiding process development toward rAAV preparations of higher potency and with improved safety profiles. PMID:26506038

  13. Advanced Characterization of DNA Molecules in rAAV Vector Preparations by Single-stranded Virus Next-generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Emilie; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martin-Fontaine, Mélanie; Broucque, Frédéric; Robin, Cécile; Hebben, Matthias; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Blouin, Véronique; François, Achille; Redon, Richard; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-10-27

    Recent successful clinical trials with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) have led to a renewed interest in gene therapy. However, despite extensive developments to improve vector-manufacturing processes, undesirable DNA contaminants in rAAV preparations remain a major safety concern. Indeed, the presence of DNA fragments containing antibiotic resistance genes, wild-type AAV, and packaging cell genomes has been found in previous studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses. However, because qPCR only provides a partial view of the DNA molecules in rAAV preparations, we developed a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) to extensively characterize single-stranded DNA virus preparations (SSV-Seq). In order to validate SSV-Seq, we analyzed three rAAV vector preparations produced by transient transfection of mammalian cells. Our data were consistent with qPCR results and showed a quasi-random distribution of contaminants originating from the packaging cells genome. Finally, we found single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) along the vector genome but no evidence of large deletions. Altogether, SSV-Seq could provide a characterization of DNA contaminants and a map of the rAAV genome with unprecedented resolution and exhaustiveness. We expect SSV-Seq to pave the way for a new generation of quality controls, guiding process development toward rAAV preparations of higher potency and with improved safety profiles.

  14. Biodistribution of rAAV vectors following intraocular administration: evidence for the presence and persistence of vector DNA in the optic nerve and in the brain.

    PubMed

    Provost, Nathalie; Le Meur, Guylène; Weber, Michel; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Podevin, Guillaume; Cherel, Yan; Colle, Marie-Anne; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the biodistribution of rAAV vectors following subretinal or intravitreal injection. In rats, we performed subretinal or intravitreal injections of rAAV-2/2.CMV.gfp. In large animals, rAAV-2/4.CMV.gfp or rAAV-2/5.CMV.gfp was delivered into the subretinal space while rAAV-2/2.CMV.gfp was delivered either to the subretinal space or to the vitreous. In euthanized animals, we undertook a complete necropsy. In animals maintained alive, we collected blood and tissue samples from the submandibular lymph node, liver, and gonads. We analyzed total DNA, extracted from various tissue samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), by PCR. Following subretinal or intravitreal injections in rats and in large animals, vector sequences were not detected in the liver or in the gonads but were occasionally found in PBMC. An unexpected result was the detection of rAAV sequences in the optic nerve following subretinal injection. The most striking finding was the detection of vector sequences in the brain, along the visual pathway, in rAAV-2/2 intravitreally injected dogs. These findings raise safety concerns regarding intraocular administration of rAAV vectors and will have an impact on the development of future gene therapy trials for retinal diseases.

  15. C-reactive protein (CRP) is essential for efficient systemic transduction of recombinant adeno-associated virus vector 1 (rAAV-1) and rAAV-6 in mice.

    PubMed

    Denard, Jerome; Marolleau, Beatrice; Jenny, Christine; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Voit, Thomas; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2013-10-01

    The clinical relevance of gene therapy using the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors often requires widespread distribution of the vector, and in this case, systemic delivery is the optimal route of administration. Humoral blood factors, such as antibodies or complement, are the first barriers met by the vectors administered systemically. We have found that other blood proteins, galectin 3 binding protein (G3BP) and C-reactive protein (CRP), can interact with different AAV serotypes in a species-specific manner. While interactions of rAAV vectors with G3BP, antibodies, or complement lead to a decrease in vector efficacy, systemic transduction of the CRP-deficient mouse and its respective control clearly established that binding to mouse CRP (mCRP) boosts rAAV vector 1 (rAAV-1) and rAAV-6 transduction efficiency in skeletal muscles over 10 times. Notably, the high efficacy of rAAV-6 in CRP-deficient mice can be restored by reconstitution of the CRP-deficient mouse with mCRP. Human CRP (hCRP) does not interact with either rAAV-1 or rAAV-6, and, consequently, the high efficiency of mCRP-mediated muscle transduction by these serotypes in mice cannot be translated to humans. No interaction of mCRP or hCRP was observed with rAAV-8 and rAAV-9. We show, for the first time, that serum components can significantly enhance rAAV-mediated tissue transduction in a serotype- and species-specific manner. Bioprocessing in body fluids should be considered when transfer of a preclinical proof of concept for AAV-based gene therapy to humans is planned.

  16. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N. P.; Riedmayr, Lisa M.; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S.; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  17. Targeted gene delivery to the enteric nervous system using AAV: a comparison across serotypes and capsid mutants.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew J; Kuhn, Nathan C; Galligan, James J; Garcia, Joanna; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Mueller, Christian; Boye, Sanford L; Manfredsson, Fredric P

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most widely used gene transfer systems in research and clinical trials. AAV can transduce a wide range of biological tissues, however to date, there has been no investigation on targeted AAV transduction of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Here, we examined the efficiency, tropism, spread, and immunogenicity of AAV transduction in the ENS. Rats received direct injections of various AAV serotypes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the descending colon. AAV serotypes tested included; AAV 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, or 9 and the AAV2 and AAV8 capsid mutants, AAV2-Y444F, AAV2-tripleY-F, AAV2-tripleY-F+T-V, AAV8-Y733F, and AAV8-doubeY-F+T-V. Transduction, as determined by GFP-positive cells, occurred in neurons and enteric glia within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the ENS. AAV6 and AAV9 showed the highest levels of transduction within the ENS. Transduction efficiency scaled with titer and time, was translated to the murine ENS, and produced no vector-related immune response. A single injection of AAV into the colon covered an area of ~47 mm(2). AAV9 primarily transduced neurons, while AAV6 transduced enteric glia and neurons. This is the first report on targeted AAV transduction of neurons and glia in the ENS.

  18. AAV-Mediated Clarin-1 Expression in the Mouse Retina: Implications for USH3A Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dinculescu, Astra; Stupay, Rachel M; Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M; Min, Seok-Hong; Boye, Sanford L; Chiodo, Vince A; Abrahan, Carolina E; Zhu, Ping; Li, Qiuhong; Strettoi, Enrica; Novelli, Elena; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W Clay; Hauswirth, William W

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3A) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in clarin-1 (CLRN1) gene, leading to progressive retinal degeneration and sensorineural deafness. Efforts to develop therapies for preventing photoreceptor cell loss are hampered by the lack of a retinal phenotype in the existing USH3 mouse models and by conflicting reports regarding the endogenous retinal localization of clarin-1, a transmembrane protein of unknown function. In this study, we used an AAV-based approach to express CLRN1 in the mouse retina in order to determine the pattern of its subcellular localization in different cell types. We found that all major classes of retinal cells express AAV-delivered CLRN1 driven by the ubiquitous, constitutive small chicken β-actin promoter, which has important implications for the design of future USH3 gene therapy studies. Within photoreceptor cells, AAV-expressed CLRN1 is mainly localized at the inner segment region and outer plexiform layer, similar to the endogenous expression of other usher proteins. Subretinal delivery using a full strength viral titer led to significant loss of retinal function as evidenced by ERG analysis, suggesting that there is a critical limit for CLRN1 expression in photoreceptor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CLRN1 expression is potentially supported by a variety of retinal cells, and the right combination of AAV vector dose, promoter, and delivery method needs to be selected to develop safe therapies for USH3 disorder.

  19. AAV-expressed eCD4-Ig provides durable protection from multiple SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Matthew R; Kattenhorn, Lisa M; Kondur, Hema R; von Schaewen, Markus; Dorfman, Tatyana; Chiang, Jessica J; Haworth, Kevin G; Decker, Julie M; Alpert, Michael D; Bailey, Charles C; Neale, Ernest S; Fellinger, Christoph H; Joshi, Vinita R; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Martinez-Navio, Jose M; Quinlan, Brian D; Yao, Annie Y; Mouquet, Hugo; Gorman, Jason; Zhang, Baoshan; Poignard, Pascal; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Burton, Dennis R; Kwong, Peter D; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Evans, David T; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ploss, Alexander; Cannon, Paula M; Seaman, Michael S; Farzan, Michael

    2015-03-05

    Long-term in vivo expression of a broad and potent entry inhibitor could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine for HIV-1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can stably express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). However, even the best bNAbs neutralize 10-50% of HIV-1 isolates inefficiently (80% inhibitory concentration (IC80) > 5 μg ml(-1)), suggesting that high concentrations of these antibodies would be necessary to achieve general protection. Here we show that eCD4-Ig, a fusion of CD4-Ig with a small CCR5-mimetic sulfopeptide, binds avidly and cooperatively to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and is more potent than the best bNAbs (geometric mean half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) < 0.05 μg ml(-1)). Because eCD4-Ig binds only conserved regions of Env, it is also much broader than any bNAb. For example, eCD4-Ig efficiently neutralized 100% of a diverse panel of neutralization-resistant HIV-1, HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolates, including a comprehensive set of isolates resistant to the CD4-binding site bNAbs VRC01, NIH45-46 and 3BNC117. Rhesus macaques inoculated with an AAV vector stably expressed 17-77 μg ml(-1) of fully functional rhesus eCD4-Ig for more than 40 weeks, and these macaques were protected from several infectious challenges with SHIV-AD8. Rhesus eCD4-Ig was also markedly less immunogenic than rhesus forms of four well-characterized bNAbs. Our data suggest that AAV-delivered eCD4-Ig can function like an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  20. AAV-expressed eCD4-Ig provides durable protection from multiple SHIV challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Matthew R.; Kattenhorn, Lisa M.; Kondur, Hema R.; von Schaewen, Markus; Dorfman, Tatyana; Chiang, Jessica J.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Decker, Julie M.; Alpert, Michael D.; Bailey, Charles C.; Neale, Ernest S.; Fellinger, Christoph H.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, Jose M.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Yao, Annie Y.; Mouquet, Hugo; Gorman, Jason; Zhang, Baoshan; Poignard, Pascal; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Burton, Dennis R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Evans, David T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ploss, Alexander; Cannon, Paula M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Long-term in vivo expression of a broad and potent entry inhibitor could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine for HIV-1. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can stably express HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs)1,2. However even the best bNAbs neutralize 10–50% of HIV-1 isolates inefficiently (IC80 > 5 μg/ml), suggesting that high concentrations of these antibodies would be necessary to achieve general protection3–6. Here we show that eCD4-Ig, a fusion of CD4-Ig with a small CCR5-mimetic sulfopeptide, binds avidly and cooperatively to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and is more potent than the best bNAbs (geometric mean IC50 < 0.05 μg/ml). Because eCD4-Ig binds only conserved regions of Env, it is also much broader than any bNAb. For example, eCD4-Ig efficiently neutralized 100% of a diverse panel of neutralization-resistant HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates, including a comprehensive set of isolates resistant to the CD4-binding site bNAbs VRC01, NIH45-46, and 3BNC117. Rhesus macaques inoculated with an AAV vector stably expressed 17 to 77 μg/ml of fully functional rhesus eCD4-Ig for 40 weeks, and these macaques were protected from multiple infectious challenges with SHIV-AD8. Rhesus eCD4-Ig was also markedly less immunogenic than rhesus forms of four well characterized bNAbs. Our data suggest that AAV-delivered eCD4-Ig can function like an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25707797

  1. Targeted introduction and effective expression of hFIX at the AAVS1 locus in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Jun; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Le-Meng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia B occurs due to a deficiency in human blood coagulation factor IX (hFIX). Currently, no effective treatment for hemophilia B has been identified, and gene therapy has been considered the most appropriate treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have homing abilities and low immunogenicity, and therefore they may be potential cell carriers for targeted drug delivery to lesional tissues. The present study constructed an adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1)-targeted vector termed AAVS1-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-hFIX and a zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) expression vector. Nucleofection was used to co-transfect the targeting vector and the ZFN expression vector into human MSCs. The GFP-positive cells were selected using flow cytometry. Site-specific integration clones were obtained following the monoclonal culture, subsequent detections were performed using polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting. Following the confirmation of stem cell traits of the site-specific integration MSCs, the in vivo and in vitro expression levels of hFIX were detected. The results demonstrated that the hFIX gene was successfully transfected into the AAVS1 locus in human MSCs. The clones with the site-specific integration retained stem cell traits of the MSCs. In addition, hFIX was effectively expressed in vivo and in vitro. No significant differences in expression levels were identified among the individual clones. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the exogenous gene hFIX was effectively expressed following site-specific targeting into the AAVS1 locus in MSCs; therefore, MSCs may be used as potential cell carriers for gene therapy of hemophilia B. PMID:28112377

  2. Immune Responses to rAAV6: The Influence of Canine Parvovirus Vaccination and Neonatal Administration of Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Andrea L. H.; Garikipati, Dilip; Wang, Zejing; Tapscott, Stephen; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors promote long-term gene transfer in many animal species. Significant effort has focused on the evaluation of rAAV delivery and the immune response in both murine and canine models of neuromuscular disease. However, canines provided for research purposes are routinely vaccinated against canine parvovirus (CPV). rAAV and CPV possess significant homology and are both parvoviruses. Thus, any immune response generated to CPV vaccination has the potential to cross-react with rAAV vectors. In this study, we investigated the immune response to rAAV6 delivery in a cohort of CPV-vaccinated canines and evaluated multiple vaccination regimens in a mouse model of CPV-vaccination. We show that CPV-vaccination stimulates production of neutralizing antibodies with minimal cross-reactivity to rAAV6. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the magnitude of the rAAV6-directed immune response between CPV-vaccinated animals and controls. Moreover, CPV-vaccination did not inhibit rAAV6-mediated transduction. We also evaluated the immune response to early rAAV6-vaccination in neonatal mice. The influence of maternal hormones and cytokines leads to a relatively permissive state in the neonate. We hypothesized that immaturity of the immune system would permit induction of tolerance to rAAV6 when delivered during the neonatal period. Mice were vaccinated with rAAV6 at 1 or 5 days of age, and subsequently challenged with rAAV6 exposure during adulthood via two sequential IM injections, 1 month apart. All vaccinated animals generated a significant neutralizing antibody response to rAAV6-vaccination that was enhanced following IM injection in adulthood. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immune response raised against rAAV6 is distinct from that which is elicited by the standard parvoviral vaccines and is sufficient to prevent stable tolerization in neonatal mice. PMID:22065964

  3. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors as therapeutic tools for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, T; Graham, I R; Foster, H; Dickson, G

    2004-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic muscle disorder caused by recessive mutations in the dystrophin gene. The size of the gene (2.4 Mb) and mRNA (14 kb) in addition to immunogenicity problems and inefficient transduction of mature myofibres by currently available vector systems are formidable obstacles to the development of efficient gene therapy approaches. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors overcome many of the problems associated with other vector systems (nonpathogenicity and minimal immunogenicity, extensive cell and tissue tropism) but accommodate limited transgene capacity (<5 kb). As a result of these observations, a number of laboratories worldwide have engineered a series of microdystrophin cDNAs based on genotype-phenotype relationship in Duchenne (DMD) and Becker (BMD) dystrophic patients, and transgenic studies in mdx mice. Recent progress in characterization of AAV serotypes from various species has demonstrated that alternative AAV serotypes are far more efficient in transducing muscle than the traditionally used AAV2. This article summarizes the current progress in the field of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) delivery for DMD, including optimization of recombinant AAV-microdystrophin vector systems/cassettes targeting the skeletal and cardiac musculature.

  4. Long-term gene transfer to mouse fetuses with recombinant adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M; Jerebtsova, M; Batshaw, M L; Newman, K; Ye, X

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a micro-injection technique to deliver recombinant adenovirus and AAV to mouse fetuses at day 15 after conception. Several routes of delivery, including injections to the amniotic fluid, the front limb, the placenta, the liver, and the retro-orbital venus plexus, were tested using an E1-deleted recombinant adenovirus (Ad.CBlacZ) or a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV.CMVlacZ) carrying a beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ into the amniotic cavity led to transgene expression in the skin and in the digestive tract of the fetuses. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ in the front limb resulted in LacZ expression in all major muscle groups around the injection site and at low levels in the liver. The other three routes of delivery, ie intra-placental, intra-hepatic and retro-orbital injections of Ad.CBlacZ, all led to lacZ expression predominantly in the liver. Further studies revealed a maximal tolerant dose (defined as the highest viral dose with < or =20% mortality in the injected fetuses) of 1 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra- hepatic injections, 3 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra-placental injection, 1 x 1010 particles per fetus for retro-orbital and intra-amniotic injections, and 2 x 10(10) particle per fetus for intra-muscular injection. The adenovirus-mediated lacZ expression in liver and muscle persisted for at least 6 weeks. Intra-muscular injection of AAV.CMVlacZ also resulted in lacZ expression in the muscle up to 3 months after birth with no indication of cellular immune response at the injection site. Taken together, our results demonstrated that prolonged transgene expression can be achieved by in utero gene transfer using either adenoviral or AAV vectors. The distribution of virus-mediated gene transfer appeared to determined mostly by the route of viral administration.

  5. AAV-Mediated Liver-Directed Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is directly or indirectly involved in many essential processes and is affected by numerous inherited diseases. Therefore, many inherited diseases could be effectively treated by targeting the liver using gene transfer approaches. The challenges associated with liver-directed gene therapy are efficient targeting of hepatocytes, stability of the vector genome, and persistent high level expression. Many of these obstacles can be overcome with adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer vectors. The first AAV gene transfer vector developed for in vivo use was based on the AAV2 serotype. AAV2 has a broad tropism and transduces many cell types, including hepatocytes, relatively efficiently in vivo. The capsid protein confers the serological profile and at least 12 primate AAV serotypes have already been characterized. Importantly, pseudotyping a recombinant AAV vector with different capsid proteins can dramatically alter the tropism. Both AAV8 and AAV9 have higher affinities for hepatocytes when compared to AAV2. In particular, AAV8 can transduce 3–4 fold more hepatocytes and deliver 3–4 fold more genomes per transduced cell when compared to AAV2. Depending on the dose, AAV8 can transduce up to 90–95% of hepatocytes in the mouse liver following intraportal vein injection. Interestingly, comparable levels of transduction can be achieved following intravenous injection. Direct intraparenchymal injection of an AAV vector also mediates relatively high level long term expression. Additional specificity can be conferred by using liver-specific promoters in conjunction with AAV8 capsid proteins. In addition to treating primary hepatocyte defects, immune reactions to transgene products can be minimized by circumventing the fixed tissue macrophages of the liver, Kupffer cells, and limiting expression to hepatocytes. The ability to target hepatocytes by virtue of the AAV serotype and the use of liver-specific promoters allows investigators to test novel therapeutic

  6. Plasmapheresis eliminates the negative impact of AAV antibodies on microdystrophin gene expression following vascular delivery.

    PubMed

    Chicoine, L G; Montgomery, C L; Bremer, W G; Shontz, K M; Griffin, D A; Heller, K N; Lewis, S; Malik, V; Grose, W E; Shilling, C J; Campbell, K J; Preston, T J; Coley, B D; Martin, P T; Walker, C M; Clark, K R; Sahenk, Z; Mendell, J R; Rodino-Klapac, L R

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a monogenic disease potentially treatable by gene replacement. Use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) will ultimately require a vascular approach to broadly transduce muscle cells. We tested the impact of preexisting AAV antibodies on microdystrophin expression following vascular delivery to nonhuman primates. Rhesus macaques were treated by isolated limb perfusion using a fluoroscopically guided catheter. In addition to serostatus stratification, the animals were placed into one of the three immune suppression groups: no immune suppression, prednisone, and triple immune suppression (prednisone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil). The animals were analyzed for transgene expression at 3 or 6 months. Microdystrophin expression was visualized in AAV, rhesus serotype 74 sero-negative animals (mean: 48.0 ± 20.8%) that was attenuated in sero-positive animals (19.6 ± 18.7%). Immunosuppression did not affect transgene expression. Importantly, removal of AAV binding antibodies by plasmapheresis in AAV sero-positive animals resulted in high-level transduction (60.8 ± 18.0%), which is comparable with that of AAV sero-negative animals (53.7 ± 7.6%), whereas non-pheresed sero-positive animals demonstrated significantly lower transduction levels (10.1 ± 6.0%). These data support the hypothesis that removal of AAV binding antibodies by plasmapheresis permits successful and sustained gene transfer in the presence of preexisting immunity (natural infection) to AAV.

  7. Tropism-modified AAV vectors overcome barriers to successful cutaneous therapy.

    PubMed

    Sallach, Jessica; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Larcher, Fernando; Niehoff, Nadine; Rübsam, Matthias; Huber, Anke; Chiorini, Jay; Almarza, David; Eming, Sabine A; Ulus, Hikmet; Nishimura, Stephen; Hacker, Ulrich T; Hallek, Michael; Niessen, Carien M; Büning, Hildegard

    2014-05-01

    Autologous human keratinocytes (HK) forming sheet grafts are approved as skin substitutes. Genetic engineering of HK represents a promising technique to improve engraftment and survival of transplants. Although efficacious in keratinocyte-directed gene transfer, retro-/lentiviral vectors may raise safety concerns when applied in regenerative medicine. We therefore optimized adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors of the serotype 2, characterized by an excellent safety profile, but lacking natural tropism for HK, through capsid engineering. Peptides, selected by AAV peptide display, engaged novel receptors that increased cell entry efficiency by up to 2,500-fold. The novel targeting vectors transduced HK with high efficiency and a remarkable specificity even in mixed cultures of HK and feeder cells. Moreover, differentiated keratinocytes in organotypic airlifted three-dimensional cultures were transduced following topical vector application. By exploiting comparative gene analysis we further succeeded in identifying αvβ8 integrin as a target receptor thus solving a major challenge of directed evolution approaches and describing a promising candidate receptor for cutaneous gene therapy.

  8. A GLP-Compliant Toxicology and Biodistribution Study: Systemic Delivery of an rAAV9 Vector for the Treatment of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Aaron S.; Duncan, F. Jason; Camboni, Marybeth; Waligura, Kathryn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Bremer, William G.; Shilling, Christopher; Walker, Christopher M.; Bolon, Brad; Flanigan, Kevin M.; McBride, Kim L.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Fu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease due to defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In preparation for a clinical trial, we performed an IND-enabling GLP-toxicology study to assess systemic rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU gene delivery in WT C57BL/6 mice at 1 × 1014 vg/kg and 2 × 1014 vg/kg (n = 30/group, M:F = 1:1), and non-GLP testing in MPS IIIB mice at 2 × 1014 vg/kg. Importantly, no adverse clinical signs or chronic toxicity were observed through the 6 month study duration. The rAAV9-mediated rNAGLU expression was rapid and persistent in virtually all tested CNS and somatic tissues. However, acute liver toxicity occurred in 33% (5/15) WT males in the 2 × 1014 vg/kg cohort, which was dose-dependent, sex-associated, and genotype-specific, likely due to hepatic rNAGLU overexpression. Interestingly, a significant dose response was observed only in the brain and spinal cord, whereas in the liver at 24 weeks postinfection (pi), NAGLU activity was reduced to endogenous levels in the high dose cohort but remained at supranormal levels in the low dose group. The possibility of rAAV9 germline transmission appears to be minimal. The vector delivery resulted in transient T-cell responses and characteristic acute antibody responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in all rAAV9-treated animals, with no detectable impacts on tissue transgene expression. This study demonstrates a generally safe and effective profile, and may have identified the upper dosing limit of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU via systemic delivery for the treatment of MPS IIIB. PMID:26684447

  9. Pre-existing anti-adeno-associated virus antibodies as a challenge in AAV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Louis Jeune, Vedell; Joergensen, Jakob A; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for gene therapeutic applications, in part because AAVs are nonpathogenic viruses, and vectors derived from them can drive long-term transgene expression without integration of the vector DNA into the host genome. AAVs are not strongly immunogenic, but they can, nonetheless, give rise to both a cellular and humoral immune response. As a result, a significant fraction of potential patients for AAV-based gene therapy harbors pre-existing antibodies against AAV. Because even very low levels of antibodies can prevent successful transduction, antecedent anti-AAV antibodies pose a serious obstacle to the universal application of AAV gene therapy. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of the role of anti-AAV antibodies in AAV-based gene therapy with a particular emphasis on approaches to overcome the hurdle that they pose.

  10. Targeted gene transfer into ependymal cells through intraventricular injection of AAV1 vector and long-term enzyme replacement via the CSF.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Miyake, Koichi; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Enzyme replacement via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been shown to ameliorate neurological symptoms in model animals with neuropathic metabolic disorders. Gene therapy via the CSF offers a means to achieve a long-term sustainable supply of therapeutic proteins within the central nervous system (CNS) by setting up a continuous source of transgenic products. In the present study, a serotype 1 adeno-associated virus (AAV1) vector was injected into a lateral cerebral ventricle in adult mice to transduce the gene encoding human lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A (hASA) into the cells of the CNS. Widespread transduction and stable expression of hASA in the choroid plexus and ependymal cells was observed throughout the ventricles for more than 1 year after vector injection. Although humoral immunity to hASA developed after 6 weeks, which diminished the hASA levels detected in CSF from AAV1-injected mice, hASA levels in CSF were maintained for at least 12 weeks when the mice were tolerized to hASA prior of vector injection. Our results suggest that the cells lining the ventricles could potentially serve as a biological reservoir for long-term continuous secretion of lysosomal enzymes into the CSF following intracerebroventricular injection of an AAV1 vector.

  11. Long-term correction of glycogen storage disease type II with a hybrid Ad-AAV vector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-dong; Chen, Y-T; Bird, Andrew; Amalfitano, Andrea; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2003-02-01

    We administered an adenovirus-adeno-associated virus (Ad-AAV) vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA) to acid alpha-glucosidase-knockout (GAA-KO) mice on day 3 of life by gastrocnemius injection. In contrast to previous results for muscle-targeted Ad vector in adult GAA-KO mice, the muscles of the hindlimb showed reduced glycogen content and persistent hGAA for as long as 6 months after neonatal Ad-AAV vector administration. Not only the injected gastrocnemius muscles, but also the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles produced therapeutic levels of hGAA as a result of widespread transduction with the Ad-AAV vector; moreover, hGAA activity was 50-fold elevated as compared to normal mice. Vector RNA was detected in the hindlimb muscles, the hearts, and the livers by northern blot analysis and/or by RT-PCR for as long as 6 months. The low levels of hGAA detected in the heart were attributable to transduction with the Ad-AAV vector, not to secretion of hGAA by the injected muscle and uptake by the heart. Finally, although an antibody response to hGAA was present, it did not prevent the correction of glycogen storage in the skeletal muscle of GAA-KO mice.

  12. Preclinical dose-finding study with a liver-tropic, recombinant AAV-2/8 vector in the mouse model of galactosialidosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huimin; Gomero, Elida; Bonten, Erik; Gray, John T; Allay, Jim; Wu, Yanan; Wu, Jianrong; Calabrese, Christopher; Nienhuis, Arthur; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2012-02-01

    Galactosialidosis (GS) is a lysosomal storage disease linked to deficiency of the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). Similarly to GS patients, Ppca-null mice develop a systemic disease of the reticuloendothelial system, affecting most visceral organs and the nervous system. Symptoms include severe nephropathy, visceromegaly, infertility, progressive ataxia, and shortened life span. Here, we have conducted a preclinical, dose-finding study on a large cohort of GS mice injected intravenously at 1 month of age with increasing doses of a GMP-grade rAAV2/8 vector, expressing PPCA under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Treated mice, monitored for 16 weeks post-treatment, had normal physical appearance and behavior without discernable side effects. Despite the restricted expression of the transgene in the liver, immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of other systemic organs, serum, and urine showed a dose-dependent, widespread correction of the disease phenotype, suggestive of a protein-mediated mechanism of cross-correction. A notable finding was that rAAV-treated GS mice showed high expression of PPCA in the reproductive organs, which resulted in reversal of their infertility. Together these results support the use of this rAAV-PPCA vector as a viable and safe method of gene delivery for the treatment of systemic disease in non-neuropathic GS patients.

  13. Establishment of an AAV Reverse Infection-Based Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Dong, Zheyue; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Gang; Wu, Xiaobing; Xue, Jinglun; Wang, Yue; Chen, Jinzhong

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of a convenient high-throughput gene transduction approach is critical for biological screening. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are broadly used in gene therapy studies, yet their applications in in vitro high-throughput gene transduction are limited. Principal Findings We established an AAV reverse infection (RI)-based method in which cells were transduced by quantified recombinant AAVs (rAAVs) pre-coated onto 96-well plates. The number of pre-coated rAAV particles and number of cells loaded per well, as well as the temperature stability of the rAAVs on the plates, were evaluated. As the first application of this method, six serotypes or hybrid serotypes of rAAVs (AAV1, AAV2, AAV5/5, AAV8, AAV25 m, AAV28 m) were compared for their transduction efficiencies using various cell lines, including BHK21, HEK293, BEAS-2BS, HeLaS3, Huh7, Hepa1-6, and A549. AAV2 and AAV1 displayed high transduction efficiency; thus, they were deemed to be suitable candidate vectors for the RI-based array. We next evaluated the impact of sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment on rAAV vector-mediated reporter gene expression and found it was significantly enhanced, suggesting that our system reflected the biological response of target cells to specific treatments. Conclusions/Significance Our study provides a novel method for establishing a highly efficient gene transduction array that may be developed into a platform for cell biological assays. PMID:20976058

  14. Prolonged expression of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody to the female rhesus macaque lower genital tract by AAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Motal, U M; Harbison, C; Han, T; Pudney, J; Anderson, D J; Zhu, Q; Westmoreland, S; Marasco, W A

    2014-09-01

    Topical microbicides are a leading strategy for prevention of HIV mucosal infection to women; however, numerous pharmacokinetic limitations associated with coitally related dosing strategy have contributed to their limited success. Here we test the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated delivery of the b12 human anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody gene to the lower genital tract of female rhesus macaques (Rh) can provide prolonged expression of b12 minibodies in the cervical-vaginal secretions. Gene transfer studies demonstrated that, of various green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing AAV serotypes, AAV-6 most efficiently transduced freshly immortalized and primary genital epithelial cells (PGECs) of female Rh in vitro. In addition, AAV-6-b12 minibody transduction of Rh PGECs led to inhibition of SHIV162p4 transmigration and virus infectivity in vitro. AAV-6-GFP could also successfully transduce vaginal epithelial cells of Rh when applied intravaginally, including p63+ epithelial stem cells. Moreover, intravaginal application of AAV-6-b12 to female Rh resulted in prolonged minibody detection in their vaginal secretions throughout the 79-day study period. These data provide proof of principle that AAV-6-mediated delivery of anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody (BnAb) genes to the lower genital tract of female Rh results in persistent minibody detection for several months. This strategy offers promise that an anti-HIV-1 genetic microbicide strategy may be possible in which topical application of AAV vector, with periodic reapplication as needed, may provide sustained local BnAb expression and protection.

  15. The Balance between CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Clearance of AAV-Encoded Antigen in the Liver and Tolerance Is Dependent on the Vector Dose.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep R P; Hoffman, Brad E; Terhorst, Cox; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2017-04-05

    The liver continuously receives antigens from circulation and the gastrointestinal tract. A complex immune regulatory system has evolved in order to both limit inflammation and promote tolerance in the liver. Although in situ immune tolerance mechanisms enable successful gene therapy and liver transplantation, at the same time they facilitate chronic infections by pathogens such as hepatitis viruses. It is, however, poorly understood why hepatocytes infected with hepatitis viruses or transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors may be rejected by CD8(+) T cells several months later. We found that hepatic transfer of limited doses of an AAV-ovalbumin vector rapidly induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells that only became functionally competent after >2 months. At this time, CD8(+) T cells had downregulated negative checkpoint markers, e.g., the programmed death 1 [PD-1] receptor, and upregulated expression of relevant cytokines. At further reduced vector dose, only intrahepatic rather than systemic CD8(+) T cell responses occurred, showing identical delay in antigen clearance. In contrast, PD-1-deficient mice rapidly cleared ovalbumin. Interestingly, higher vector dose directed sustained transgene expression without CD8(+) T cell responses. Regulatory T cells, IL-10 expression, and Fas-L contributed to high-dose tolerance. Thus, viral vector doses profoundly impact CD8(+) T cell responses.

  16. The Skeletal Muscle Environment and Its Role in Immunity and Tolerance to AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Boisgérault, Florence; Mingozzi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of gene therapy, muscle has been one the most studied tissue targets for the correction of enzyme deficiencies and myopathies. Several preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Exciting progress has been made in the gene delivery technologies, from the identification of novel AAV serotypes to the development of novel vector delivery techniques. In parallel, significant knowledge has been generated on the host immune system and its interaction with both the vector and the transgene at the muscle level. In particular, the role of underlying muscle inflammation, characteristic of several diseases affecting the muscle, has been defined in terms of its potential detrimental impact on gene transfer with AAV vectors. At the same time, feedback immunomodulatory mechanisms peculiar of skeletal muscle involving resident regulatory T cells have been identified, which seem to play an important role in maintaining, at least to some extent, muscle homeostasis during inflammation and regenerative processes. Devising strategies to tip this balance towards unresponsiveness may represent an avenue to improve the safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer with AAV vectors. PMID:26122097

  17. AAV-directed persistent expression of a gene encoding anti-nicotine antibody for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Martin J; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; De, Bishnu P; Pagovich, Odelya E; Young, Colin N; Qiu, Jian-ping; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Hackett, Neil R; Worgall, Stefan; Janda, Kim D; Davisson, Robin L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2012-06-27

    Current strategies to help tobacco smokers quit have limited success as a result of the addictive properties of the nicotine in cigarette smoke. We hypothesized that a single administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector expressing high levels of an anti-nicotine antibody would persistently prevent nicotine from reaching its receptors in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an AAVrh.10 vector that expressed a full-length, high-affinity, anti-nicotine antibody derived from the Fab fragment of the anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody NIC9D9 (AAVantiNic). In mice treated with this vector, blood concentrations of the anti-nicotine antibody were dose-dependent, and the antibody showed high specificity and affinity for nicotine. The antibody shielded the brain from systemically administered nicotine, reducing brain nicotine concentrations to 15% of those in naïve mice. The amount of nicotine sequestered in the serum of vector-treated mice was more than seven times greater than that in untreated mice, with 83% of serum nicotine bound to immunoglobulin G. Treatment with the AAVantiNic vector blocked nicotine-mediated alterations in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and locomotor activity. In summary, a single administration of a gene transfer vector expressing a high-affinity anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody elicited persistent (18 weeks), high titers of an anti-nicotine antibody that obviated the physiologic effects of nicotine. If this degree of efficacy translates to humans, AAVantiNic could be an effective preventative therapy for nicotine addiction.

  18. Mutational Analysis of the Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Capsid Gene and Construction of AAV2 Vectors with Altered Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pei; Xiao, Wu; Conlon, Thomas; Hughes, Jeffrey; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Ferkol, Thomas; Flotte, Terence; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) has proven to be a valuable vector for gene therapy. Characterization of the functional domains of the AAV capsid proteins can facilitate our understanding of viral tissue tropism, immunoreactivity, viral entry, and DNA packaging, all of which are important issues for generating improved vectors. To obtain a comprehensive genetic map of the AAV capsid gene, we have constructed 93 mutants at 59 different positions in the AAV capsid gene by site-directed mutagenesis. Several types of mutants were studied, including epitope tag or ligand insertion mutants, alanine scanning mutants, and epitope substitution mutants. Analysis of these mutants revealed eight separate phenotypes. Infectious titers of the mutants revealed four classes. Class 1 mutants were viable, class 2 mutants were partially defective, class 3 mutants were temperature sensitive, and class 4 mutants were noninfectious. Further analysis revealed some of the defects in the class 2, 3, and 4 mutants. Among the class 4 mutants, a subset completely abolished capsid formation. These mutants were located predominantly, but not exclusively, in what are likely to be β-barrel structures in the capsid protein VP3. Two of these mutants were insertions at the N and C termini of VP3, suggesting that both ends of VP3 play a role that is important for capsid assembly or stability. Several class 2 and 3 mutants produced capsids that were unstable during purification of viral particles. One mutant, R432A, made only empty capsids, presumably due to a defect in packaging viral DNA. Additionally, five mutants were defective in heparan binding, a step that is believed to be essential for viral entry. These were distributed into two amino acid clusters in what is likely to be a cell surface loop in the capsid protein VP3. The first cluster spanned amino acids 509 to 522; the second was between amino acids 561 and 591. In addition to the heparan binding clusters, hemagglutinin epitope tag

  19. AAV-8 is more efficient than AAV-9 in transducing neonatal dog heart.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiufang; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Hakim, Chady H; Kodippili, Kasun; McDonald, Thomas; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype-8 and 9 (AAV-8 and 9) are the leading candidate vectors to test bodywide neonatal muscle gene therapy in large mammals. We have previously shown that systemic injection of 2-2.5×10(14) viral genome (vg) particles/kg of AAV-9 resulted in widespread skeletal muscle gene transfer in newborn dogs. However, nominal transduction was observed in the heart. In contrast, robust expression was achieved in both skeletal muscle and heart in neonatal dogs with 7.14-9.06×10(14) vg particles/kg of AAV-8. To determine whether superior cardiac transduction of AAV-8 is because of the higher vector dose, we delivered 6.14×10(14) and 9.65×10(14) vg particles/kg of AAV-9 to newborn puppies via the jugular vein. Transduction was examined 2.5 months later. Consistent with our previous reports, we observed robust bodywide transduction in skeletal muscle. However, increased AAV dose only moderately improved heart transduction. It never reached the level achieved by AAV-8. Our results suggest that differential cardiac transduction by AAV-8 and AAV-9 is likely because of the intrinsic property of the viral capsid rather than the vector dose.

  20. Engineering and evolution of synthetic adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy vectors via DNA family shuffling.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Eike; Senís, Elena; Börner, Kathleen; Niopek, Dominik; Wiedtke, Ellen; Grosse, Stefanie; Grimm, Dirk

    2012-04-02

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors represent some of the most potent and promising vehicles for therapeutic human gene transfer due to a unique combination of beneficial properties(1). These include the apathogenicity of the underlying wildtype viruses and the highly advanced methodologies for production of high-titer, high-purity and clinical-grade recombinant vectors(2). A further particular advantage of the AAV system over other viruses is the availability of a wealth of naturally occurring serotypes which differ in essential properties yet can all be easily engineered as vectors using a common protocol(1,2). Moreover, a number of groups including our own have recently devised strategies to use these natural viruses as templates for the creation of synthetic vectors which either combine the assets of multiple input serotypes, or which enhance the properties of a single isolate. The respective technologies to achieve these goals are either DNA family shuffling(3), i.e. fragmentation of various AAV capsid genes followed by their re-assembly based on partial homologies (typically >80% for most AAV serotypes), or peptide display(4,5), i.e. insertion of usually seven amino acids into an exposed loop of the viral capsid where the peptide ideally mediates re-targeting to a desired cell type. For maximum success, both methods are applied in a high-throughput fashion whereby the protocols are up-scaled to yield libraries of around one million distinct capsid variants. Each clone is then comprised of a unique combination of numerous parental viruses (DNA shuffling approach) or contains a distinctive peptide within the same viral backbone (peptide display approach). The subsequent final step is iterative selection of such a library on target cells in order to enrich for individual capsids fulfilling most or ideally all requirements of the selection process. The latter preferably combines positive pressure, such as growth on a certain cell type of interest, with negative

  1. Modulation of feeding by chronic rAAV expression of a relaxin-3 peptide agonist in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Ganella, D E; Callander, G E; Ma, S; Bye, C R; Gundlach, A L; Bathgate, R A D

    2013-07-01

    Relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide that is abundantly expressed by discrete brainstem neuron populations that broadly innervate forebrain areas rich in the relaxin-3 G-protein-coupled-receptor, RXFP3. Acute and subchronic central administration of synthetic relaxin-3 or an RXFP3-selective agonist peptide, R3/I5, increase feeding and body weight in rats. Intrahypothalamic injection of relaxin-3 also increases feeding. In this study, we developed a recombinant adeno-associated virus 1/2 (rAAV1/2) vector that drives expression and constitutive secretion of bioactive R3/I5 and assessed the effect of intrahypothalamic injections on daily food intake and body weight gain in adult male rats over 8 weeks. In vitro testing revealed that the vector rAAV1/2-fibronectin (FIB)-R3/I5 directs the constitutive secretion of bioactive R3/I5 peptide. Bilateral injection of rAAV1/2-FIB-R3/I5 vector into the paraventricular nucleus produced an increase in daily food intake and body weight gain (P<0.01, ~23%, respectively), relative to control treatment. In a separate cohort of rats, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of hypothalamic mRNA revealed strong expression of R3/I5 transgene at 3 months post-rAAV1/2-FIB-R3/I5 infusion. Levels of mRNA transcripts for the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3, the hypothalamic 'feeding' peptides neuropeptide Y, AgRP and POMC, and the reproductive hormone, GnRH, were all similar to control, whereas vasopressin and oxytocin (OT) mRNA levels were reduced by ~25% (P=0.051) and ~50% (P<0.005), respectively, in rAAV1/2-FIB-R3/I5-treated rats (at 12 weeks, n=9/8 rats per group). These data demonstrate for the first time that R3/I5 is effective in modulating feeding in the rat by chronic hypothalamic RXFP3 activation and suggest a potential underlying mechanism involving altered OT signalling. Importantly, there was no desensitization of the feeding response over the treatment period and no apparent deleterious health effects, indicating that targeting the

  2. Assessment of toxicity and biodistribution of recombinant AAV8 vector-mediated immunomodulatory gene therapy in mice with Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gensheng; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; Hutt, Julie; Li, Songtao; Benson, Janet; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2014-01-01

    A preclinical safety study was conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term toxicity of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) vector that has been developed as an immune-modulatory adjunctive therapy to recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA, Myozyme) enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) for patients with Pompe disease (AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA). The AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA vector at 1.6 × 10(13) vector particles/kg, after intravenous injection, did not cause significant short- or long-term toxicity. Recruitment of CD4(+) (but not CD8(+)) lymphocytes to the liver was elevated in the vector-dosed male animals at study day (SD) 15, and in group 8 animals at SD 113, in comparison to their respective control animals. Administration of the vector, either prior to or after the one ERT injection, uniformly prevented the hypersensitivity induced by subsequent ERT in males, but not always in female animals. The vector genome was sustained in all tissues through 16-week postdosing, except for in blood with a similar tissue tropism between males and females. Administration of the vector alone, or combined with the ERT, was effective in producing significantly increased GAA activity and consequently decreased glycogen accumulation in multiple tissues, and the urine biomarker, Glc4, was significantly reduced. The efficacy of the vector (or with ERT) was better in males than in females, as demonstrated both by the number of tissues showing significantly effective responses and the extent of response in a given tissue. Given the lack of toxicity for AAV2/8LSPhGAApA, further consideration of clinical translation is warranted in Pompe disease.

  3. Kinetics of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) and AAV8 capsid antigen presentation in vivo are identical.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Weinberg, Marc S; Hirsch, Matt; Johnson, Mark C; Tisch, Roland; Samulski, R Jude; Li, Chengwen

    2013-05-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors 2 and 8 have been used in clinical trials for patients with hemophilia, and data suggest that the capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cell response has had a negative impact on therapeutic success. To date the pattern of capsid cross-presentation from AAV2 and AAV8 transduction in vivo has not been elucidated. Previously, we have demonstrated that an engineered AAV2 virus carrying the immune-dominant SIINFEKL peptide in the capsid backbone was indistinguishable from wild type with respect to titer, tropism, and the ability to induce capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cell responses in vivo. In this study, we used the same strategy to engineer an AAV8 vector and demonstrated that antigen from SIINFEKL peptide-integrated AAV8 capsid was effectively presented via either plasmid transfection or AAV8 transduction in vitro. The tissue tropism and transgene expression kinetics of the engineered AAV8 vector in vivo were identical to that of wild-type AAV8. Animal studies show that capsid antigen presentation from AAV transduction was dose dependent, and more importantly, the proliferation of capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cells had similar kinetics (detectable before 30 days and undetectable after 40 days) for both AAV2 and AAV8 vectors. Elucidation of the kinetics of capsid antigen presentation from AAV transduction by various serotypes provides new insight into the potential impact CD8⁺ T cells can have during clinical trials and may help with rational design of effective strategies to prevent capsid-specific CD8⁺ T cell-mediated elimination of AAV-transduced target cells.

  4. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content. Images PMID:7524085

  5. Systemic Delivery of shRNA by AAV9 Provides Highly Efficient Knockdown of Ubiquitously Expressed GFP in Mouse Heart, but Not Liver

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Bryan A.; O’Connor, Daniel M.; French, Brent A.

    2013-01-01

    AAV9 is a powerful gene delivery vehicle capable of providing long-term gene expression in a variety of cell types, particularly cardiomyocytes. The use of AAV-delivery for RNA interference is an intense area of research, but a comprehensive analysis of knockdown in cardiac and liver tissues after systemic delivery of AAV9 has yet to be reported. We sought to address this question by using AAV9 to deliver a short-hairpin RNA targeting the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transgenic mice that constitutively overexpress GFP in all tissues. The expression cassette was initially tested in vitro and we demonstrated a 61% reduction in mRNA and a 90% reduction in GFP protein in dual-transfected 293 cells. Next, the expression cassette was packaged as single-stranded genomes in AAV9 capsids to test cardiac GFP knockdown with several doses ranging from 1.8×1010 to 1.8×1011 viral genomes per mouse and a dose-dependent response was obtained. We then analyzed GFP expression in both heart and liver after delivery of 4.4×1011 viral genomes per mouse. We found that while cardiac knockdown was highly efficient, with a 77% reduction in GFP mRNA and a 71% reduction in protein versus control-treated mice, there was no change in liver expression. This was despite a 4.5-fold greater number of viral genomes in the liver than in the heart. This study demonstrates that single-stranded AAV9 vectors expressing shRNA can be used to achieve highly efficient cardiac-selective knockdown of GFP expression that is sustained for at least 7 weeks after the systemic injection of 8 day old mice, with no change in liver expression and no evidence of liver damage despite high viral genome presence in the liver. PMID:24086659

  6. Enhanced efficacy of an AAV vector encoding chimeric, highly secreted acid alpha-glucosidase in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Benjamin, Daniel K; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2006-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) is an inherited muscular dystrophy caused by deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). We hypothesized that chimeric GAA containing an alternative signal peptide could increase the secretion of GAA from transduced cells and enhance the receptor-mediated uptake of GAA in striated muscle. The relative secretion of chimeric GAA from transfected 293 cells increased up to 26-fold. Receptor-mediated uptake of secreted, chimeric GAA corrected cultured GSD-II patient cells. High-level hGAA was sustained in the plasma of GSD-II mice for 24 weeks following administration of an AAV2/8 vector encoding chimeric GAA; furthermore, GAA activity was increased and glycogen content was significantly reduced in striated muscle and in the brain. Administration of only 1 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity in the heart and diaphragm for >18 weeks, whereas 3 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity and reduced glycogen content in the heart, diaphragm, and quadriceps. Furthermore, an AAV2/2 vector encoding chimeric GAA produced secreted hGAA for >12 weeks in the majority of treated GSD-II mice. Thus, chimeric, highly secreted GAA enhanced the efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-II mice.

  7. Development of an optimized AAV2/5 gene therapy vector for Leber congenital amaurosis owing to defects in RPE65

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, A; Duran, Y; Ribeiro, J; Abelleira-Hervas, L; Robbie, S J; Sünkel-Laing, B; Fourali, S; Gonzalez-Cordero, A; Cristante, E; Michaelides, M; Bainbridge, J W B; Smith, A J; Ali, R R

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a group of inherited retinal dystrophies that cause severe sight impairment in childhood; RPE65-deficiency causes impaired rod photoreceptor function from birth and progressive impairment of cone photoreceptor function associated with retinal degeneration. In animal models of RPE65 deficiency, subretinal injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) 2/2 vectors carrying RPE65 cDNA improves rod photoreceptor function, and intervention at an early stage of disease provides sustained benefit by protecting cone photoreceptors against retinal degeneration. In affected humans, administration of these vectors has resulted to date in relatively modest improvements in photoreceptor function, even when retinal degeneration is comparatively mild, and the duration of benefit is limited by progressive retinal degeneration. We conclude that the demand for RPE65 in humans is not fully met by current vectors, and predict that a more powerful vector will provide more durable benefit. With this aim we have modified the original AAV2/2 vector to generate AAV2/5-OPTIRPE65. The new configuration consists of an AAV vector serotype 5 carrying an optimized hRPE65 promoter and a codon-optimized hRPE65 gene. In mice, AAV2/5-OPTIRPE65 is at least 300-fold more potent than our original AAV2/2 vector. PMID:27653967

  8. Development of an optimized AAV2/5 gene therapy vector for Leber congenital amaurosis owing to defects in RPE65.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, A; Duran, Y; Ribeiro, J; Abelleira-Hervas, L; Robbie, S J; Sünkel-Laing, B; Fourali, S; Gonzalez-Cordero, A; Cristante, E; Michaelides, M; Bainbridge, J W B; Smith, A J; Ali, R R

    2016-12-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a group of inherited retinal dystrophies that cause severe sight impairment in childhood; RPE65-deficiency causes impaired rod photoreceptor function from birth and progressive impairment of cone photoreceptor function associated with retinal degeneration. In animal models of RPE65 deficiency, subretinal injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) 2/2 vectors carrying RPE65 cDNA improves rod photoreceptor function, and intervention at an early stage of disease provides sustained benefit by protecting cone photoreceptors against retinal degeneration. In affected humans, administration of these vectors has resulted to date in relatively modest improvements in photoreceptor function, even when retinal degeneration is comparatively mild, and the duration of benefit is limited by progressive retinal degeneration. We conclude that the demand for RPE65 in humans is not fully met by current vectors, and predict that a more powerful vector will provide more durable benefit. With this aim we have modified the original AAV2/2 vector to generate AAV2/5-OPTIRPE65. The new configuration consists of an AAV vector serotype 5 carrying an optimized hRPE65 promoter and a codon-optimized hRPE65 gene. In mice, AAV2/5-OPTIRPE65 is at least 300-fold more potent than our original AAV2/2 vector.

  9. Intrathecal administration of AAV/GALC vectors in 10-11-day-old twitcher mice improves survival and is enhanced by bone marrow transplant.

    PubMed

    Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Marshall, Michael S; Heindel, Clifford; Jakubauskas, Benas; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Gray, Steven J

    2016-11-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD), or Krabbe disease, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) provides modest benefit in presymptomatic patients but is well short of a cure. Gene transfer experiments using viral vectors have shown some success in extending the survival in the mouse model of GLD, twitcher mice. The present study compares three single-stranded (ss) AAV serotypes, two natural and one engineered (with oligodendrocyte tropism), and a self-complementary (sc) AAV vector, all packaged with a codon-optimized murine GALC gene. The vectors were delivered via a lumbar intrathecal route for global CNS distribution on PND10-11 at a dose of 2 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg) per mouse. The results showed a similar significant extension of life span of the twitcher mice for all three serotypes (AAV9, AAVrh10, and AAV-Olig001) as well as the scAAV9 vector, compared to control cohorts. The rAAV gene transfer facilitated GALC biodistribution and detectable enzymatic activity throughout the CNS as well as in sciatic nerve and liver. When combined with BMT from syngeneic wild-type mice, there was significant improvement in survival for ssAAV9. Histopathological analysis of brain, spinal cord, and sciatic nerve showed significant improvement in preservation of myelin, with ssAAV9 providing the greatest benefit. In summary, we demonstrate that lumbar intrathecal delivery of rAAV/mGALCopt can significantly enhance the life span of twitcher mice treated at PND10-11 and that BMT synergizes with this treatment to improve the survival further. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Efficient transduction of vascular smooth muscle cells with a translational AAV2.5 vector: a new perspective for in-stent restenosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lompré, A-M; Hadri, L; Merlet, E; Keuylian, Z; Mougenot, N; Karakikes, I; Chen, J; Atassi, F; Marchand, A; Blaise, R; Limon, I; McPhee, S W J; Samulski, R J; Hajjar, R J; Lipskaia, L

    2013-09-01

    Coronary artery disease represents the leading cause of mortality in the developed world. Percutaneous coronary intervention involving stent placement remains disadvantaged by restenosis or thrombosis. Vascular gene therapy-based methods may be approached, but lack a vascular gene delivery vector. We report a safe and efficient long-term transduction of rat carotid vessels after balloon injury intervention with a translational optimized AAV2.5 vector. Compared with other known adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, AAV2.5 demonstrated the highest transduction efficiency of human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local delivery of AAV2.5-driven transgenes in injured carotid arteries resulted in transduction as soon as day 2 after surgery and persisted for at least 30 days. In contrast to adenovirus 5 vector, inflammation was not detected in AAV2.5-transduced vessels. The functional effects of AAV2.5-mediated gene transfer on neointimal thickening were assessed using the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 2a (SERCA2a) human gene, known to inhibit VSMC proliferation. At 30 days, human SERCA2a messenger RNA was detected in transduced arteries. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant decrease in neointimal hyperplasia in AAV2.5-SERCA2a-transduced arteries: 28.36±11.30 (n=8) vs 77.96±24.60 (n=10) μm(2), in AAV2.5-green fluorescent protein-infected, P<0.05. In conclusion, AAV2.5 vector can be considered as a promising safe and effective vector for vascular gene therapy.

  11. High-Efficiency Transduction of Primary Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells by AAV6 Vectors: Strategies for Overcoming Donor-Variation and Implications in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Bhukhai, Kanit; Yin, Zifei; Tan, Mengqun; Yoder, Mervin C.; Leboulch, Philippe; Payen, Emmanuel; Srivastava, Arun

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that of the 10 commonly used AAV serotype vectors, AAV6 is the most efficient in transducing primary human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, the transduction efficiency of the wild-type (WT) AAV6 vector varies greatly in HSPCs from different donors. Here we report two distinct strategies to further increase the transduction efficiency in HSPCs from donors that are transduced less efficiently with the WT AAV6 vectors. The first strategy involved modifications of the viral capsid proteins where specific surface-exposed tyrosine (Y) and threonine (T) residues were mutagenized to generate a triple-mutant (Y705 + Y731F + T492V) AAV6 vector. The second strategy involved the use of ex vivo transduction at high cell density. The combined use of these strategies resulted in transduction efficiency exceeding ~90% in HSPCs at significantly reduced vector doses. Our studies have significant implications in the optimal use of capsid-optimized AAV6 vectors in genome editing in HSPCs. PMID:27759036

  12. Effective genetic modification and differentiation of hMSCs upon controlled release of rAAV vectors using alginate/poloxamer composite systems.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, P; Rey-Rico, A; Madry, H; Landin, M; Cucchiarini, M

    2015-12-30

    Viral vectors are common tools in gene therapy to deliver foreign therapeutic sequences in a specific target population via their natural cellular entry mechanisms. Incorporating such vectors in implantable systems may provide strong alternatives to conventional gene transfer procedures. The goal of the present study was to generate different hydrogel structures based on alginate (AlgPH155) and poloxamer PF127 as new systems to encapsulate and release recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors. Inclusion of rAAV in such polymeric capsules revealed an influence of the hydrogel composition and crosslinking temperature upon the vector release profiles, with alginate (AlgPH155) structures showing the fastest release profiles early on while over time vector release was more effective from AlgPH155+PF127 [H] capsules crosslinked at a high temperature (50°C). Systems prepared at room temperature (AlgPH155+PF127 [C]) allowed instead to achieve a more controlled release profile. When tested for their ability to target human mesenchymal stem cells, the different systems led to high transduction efficiencies over time and to gene expression levels in the range of those achieved upon direct vector application, especially when using AlgPH155+PF127 [H]. No detrimental effects were reported on either cell viability or on the potential for chondrogenic differentiation. Inclusion of PF127 in the capsules was also capable of delaying undesirable hypertrophic cell differentiation. These findings are of promising value for the further development of viral vector controlled release strategies.

  13. Integration Preferences of Wildtype AAV-2 for Consensus Rep-Binding Sites at Numerous Loci in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hüser, Daniela; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Lutter, Timo; Weger, Stefan; Winter, Kerstin; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Cathomen, Toni; Reinert, Knut; Heilbronn, Regine

    2010-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to establish latency by preferential integration in human chromosome 19q13.42. The AAV non-structural protein Rep appears to target a site called AAVS1 by simultaneously binding to Rep-binding sites (RBS) present on the AAV genome and within AAVS1. In the absence of Rep, as is the case with AAV vectors, chromosomal integration is rare and random. For a genome-wide survey of wildtype AAV integration a linker-selection-mediated (LSM)-PCR strategy was designed to retrieve AAV-chromosomal junctions. DNA sequence determination revealed wildtype AAV integration sites scattered over the entire human genome. The bioinformatic analysis of these integration sites compared to those of rep-deficient AAV vectors revealed a highly significant overrepresentation of integration events near to consensus RBS. Integration hotspots included AAVS1 with 10% of total events. Novel hotspots near consensus RBS were identified on chromosome 5p13.3 denoted AAVS2 and on chromsome 3p24.3 denoted AAVS3. AAVS2 displayed seven independent junctions clustered within only 14 bp of a consensus RBS which proved to bind Rep in vitro similar to the RBS in AAVS3. Expression of Rep in the presence of rep-deficient AAV vectors shifted targeting preferences from random integration back to the neighbourhood of consensus RBS at hotspots and numerous additional sites in the human genome. In summary, targeted AAV integration is not as specific for AAVS1 as previously assumed. Rather, Rep targets AAV to integrate into open chromatin regions in the reach of various, consensus RBS homologues in the human genome. PMID:20628575

  14. Efficient neuronal gene transfer with AAV8 leads to neurotoxic levels of tau or green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ronald L; Dayton, Robert D; Leidenheimer, Nancy J; Jansen, Karen; Golde, Todd E; Zweig, Richard M

    2006-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8 appears to be the strongest of the natural serotypes reported to date for gene transfer in liver and muscle. In this study, we evaluated AAV8 in the brain by several methods, including biophotonic imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP). In the adult rat hippocampus, levels of GFP expressed were clearly greater with AAV8 than with AAV2 or AAV5 by Western blot and biophotonic imaging and slightly but significantly greater than AAV1 by Western blot. In the substantia nigra, the GFP expression conferred by AAV8 was toxic to dopamine neurons, although toxicity could be avoided with dose titration. At the low dose at which there was no GFP toxicity from the GFP vector, another AAV8 vector for a disease-related (P301L) form of the microtubule-associated protein tau caused a 78% loss of dopamine neurons and significant amphetamine-stimulated rotational behavior. The AAV8 tau vector-induced cell loss was greater than that from AAV2 or AAV5 tau vectors, demonstrating that the increased gene transfer was functional. While the toxicity observed with GFP expression warrants great caution, the efficient AAV8 is promising for animal models of neurodegenerative diseases and potentially as well for gene therapy of brain diseases.

  15. Superior In vivo Transduction of Human Hepatocytes Using Engineered AAV3 Capsid.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Koen; Hoffman, Brad E; Zolotukhin, Irene; Keeler, Geoffrey D; Xiao, Jing W; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund Cj; Rice, Charles M; Srivastava, Arun; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials for liver-directed gene transfer to treat the bleeding disorders hemophilia A and B and metabolic disorders. The optimal viral capsid for transduction of human hepatocytes has been under active investigation, but results across various models are inconsistent. We tested in vivo transduction in "humanized" mice. Methods to quantitate percent AAV transduced human and murine hepatocytes in chimeric livers were optimized using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with image analysis. Distinct transduction efficiencies were noted following peripheral vein administration of a self-complementary vector expressing a gfp reporter gene. An engineered AAV3 capsid with two amino acid changes, S663V+T492V (AAV3-ST), showed best efficiency for human hepatocytes (~3-times, ~8-times, and ~80-times higher than for AAV9, AAV8, and AAV5, respectively). AAV5, 8, and 9 were more efficient in transducing murine than human hepatocytes. AAV8 yielded the highest transduction rate of murine hepatocytes, which was 19-times higher than that for human hepatocytes. In summary, our data show substantial differences among AAV serotypes in transduction of human and mouse hepatocytes, are the first to report on AAV5 in humanized mice, and support the use of AAV3-based vectors for human liver gene transfer.

  16. Site-specific Mtm1 mutagenesis by an AAV-Cre vector reveals that myotubularin is essential in adult muscle.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Romain; Vignaud, Alban; Le, Mickaël; Moal, Christelle; Messaddeq, Nadia; Buj-Bello, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Manipulation of the mouse genome by site-specific mutagenesis has been extensively used to study gene function and model human disorders. Mouse models of myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a severe congenital muscular disorder due to loss-of-function mutations in the MTM1 gene, have been generated by homologous recombination and shown that myotubularin is essential for skeletal muscle. However, since the Mtm1 deletion occurred constitutively or shortly after birth in these mice, it is not known whether myotubularin is required during adulthood, an important issue in the context of not only muscle biology but also therapies. To delete the Mtm1 gene in adult muscle fibers, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated vector (AAV) that expresses the Cre recombinase under the muscle-specific desmin promoter. We report that a single injection of this vector into muscles of 3-month-old Mtm1 conditional mice leads to a myotubular myopathy phenotype with myofiber atrophy, disorganization of organelle positioning, such as mitochondria and nuclei, T-tubule defects and severe muscle weakness. In addition, our results show that MTM1-related atrophy and dysfunction correlate with abnormalities in satellite cell number and markers of autophagy, protein synthesis and neuromuscular junction transmission. The expression level of atrogenes was also analyzed. Therefore, we provide a valuable tissue model that recapitulates the main features of the disease, and it is useful to study pathogenesis and evaluate therapeutic strategies. We establish the proof-of-concept that myotubularin is required for the proper function of skeletal muscle during adulthood, suggesting that therapies will be required for the entire life of XLMTM patients.

  17. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis.

  18. A human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, as a eucaryotic vector: Transient expression and encapsidation of the procaryotic gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Tratschin, J.D.; West, M.H.P.; Sandbank, T.; Carter, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors have used the defective human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a novel eurocaryotic vector (parvector) for the expression of a foreign gene in human cells. The recombinant, pAV2, contains the AAV genome in a pBR322-derived bacterial plasmid. When pAV2 is transfected into human cells together with helper adenovirus particles, the AAV genome is rescued from the recombinant plasmid and replicated to produce infectious AAV particles at high efficiency. To create a vector, we inserted a procaryotic sequence coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) into derivatives of pAV2 following either of the AAV promoters p/sub 40/ (pAVHiCAT) and p/sub 19/ (pAVBcCAT). When transfected into human 293 cells or HeLa cells, pAVHiCAT expressed CAT activity in the absence of adenovirus. In the presence of adenovirus, this vector produced increased amounts of CAT activity and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was replicated. In 293 cells, pAVBcCAT expressed a similar amount of CAT activity in the absence or presence of adenovirus and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was not replicated. In HeLa cells, pAVBcCAT expressed low levels of CAT activity, but this level was elevated by coinfection with adenovirus particles or by cotransfection with a plasmid which expressed the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) product. The E1A product is a transcriptional activator and is expressed in 293 cells. Thus, expression from two AAV promoters is differentially regulated: expression from p/sub 19/ is increased by E1A, whereas p/sub 40/ yields high levels of constitutive expression in the absence of E1A. Both AAV vectors were packaged into AAV particles by complementation with wild-type AAV and yielded CAT activity when subsequently infected into cells in the presence of adenovirus.

  19. AAV2/8 Vectors Purified from Culture Medium with a Simple and Rapid Protocol Transduce Murine Liver, Muscle, and Retina Efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Monica; Ferrara, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Abstract During the production of some adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, a large amount of vectors is found in the medium of producing cells. For their purification, previous protocols used tangential flow filtration (TFF) of the medium followed by iodixanol gradient centrifugation. Taking advantage of the higher purity of the medium than the cell-derived material as the source of AAV, we tested a simple method that combines production of large culture medium volumes containing AAV from cell stacks with medium clarification+TFF without further time-consuming and nonscalable centrifugation. To test this, we selected AAV2/8, which is emerging as a favored serotype for transduction of liver, muscle, and retina and abundantly found in the extracellular medium. We show that yields and in vitro infectivity of AAV2/8 vectors produced from the culture medium using this method are higher than those of vectors purified from the same cell lysate using a conventional CsCl2 gradient ultracentrifugation-based method, although purity appears inferior. In addition, we found that the transduction efficiency of AAV2/8 purified from medium was similar to that of AAV2/8 purified from the same cell lysate in the murine liver, muscle, and retina. Considering that the purification protocol from the medium we describe requires 3 hr as opposed to the 63 hr of a conventional two-round CsCl2-gradient ultracentrifugation+desalting, we conclude that TFF of the medium containing AAV2/8 represents a quick and scalable method to purify research-grade vectors for use in animal models. PMID:24116943

  20. AAV2/8 vectors purified from culture medium with a simple and rapid protocol transduce murine liver, muscle, and retina efficiently.

    PubMed

    Doria, Monica; Ferrara, Antonella; Auricchio, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    During the production of some adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, a large amount of vectors is found in the medium of producing cells. For their purification, previous protocols used tangential flow filtration (TFF) of the medium followed by iodixanol gradient centrifugation. Taking advantage of the higher purity of the medium than the cell-derived material as the source of AAV, we tested a simple method that combines production of large culture medium volumes containing AAV from cell stacks with medium clarification+TFF without further time-consuming and nonscalable centrifugation. To test this, we selected AAV2/8, which is emerging as a favored serotype for transduction of liver, muscle, and retina and abundantly found in the extracellular medium. We show that yields and in vitro infectivity of AAV2/8 vectors produced from the culture medium using this method are higher than those of vectors purified from the same cell lysate using a conventional CsCl2 gradient ultracentrifugation-based method, although purity appears inferior. In addition, we found that the transduction efficiency of AAV2/8 purified from medium was similar to that of AAV2/8 purified from the same cell lysate in the murine liver, muscle, and retina. Considering that the purification protocol from the medium we describe requires 3 hr as opposed to the 63 hr of a conventional two-round CsCl2-gradient ultracentrifugation+desalting, we conclude that TFF of the medium containing AAV2/8 represents a quick and scalable method to purify research-grade vectors for use in animal models.

  1. Transendocardial delivery of AAV6 results in highly efficient and global cardiac gene transfer in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangping; Bish, Lawrence T; Sleeper, Meg M; Mu, Xin; Sun, Lan; Lou, You; Duan, Jiachuan; Hu, Chunyan; Wang, Li; Sweeney, H Lee

    2011-08-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene transfer has potential as a novel therapeutic approach. We previously demonstrated safe and efficient gene transfer to the canine heart using a percutaneous transendocardial injection procedure to deliver self-complementary (sc) adeno-associated virus 6 (AAV6) vector. In the present study, we proceed with our vertical translation study to evaluate cardiac gene transfer in nonhuman primates (NHPs). We screened approximately 30 adult male rhesus macaques for the presence of neutralizing antibodies against AAV6, AAV8, and AAV9, and then selected seven monkeys whose antibody titers against these three serotypes were lower than 1/5. The animals were then randomized to receive either scAAV6 (n=3), scAAV8 (n=1), or scAAV9 (n=3) vector expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene at a dose of 5.4×10(12) genome copies/kg, which was administered according to a modified version of our previously developed transendocardial injection procedure. One animal treated with scAAV6 died secondary to esophageal intubation. The remaining animals were euthanized 7 days after gene transfer, at which time tissue was collected for analysis of EGFP expression, histopathology, and biodistribution of the vector genome. We found that (i) transendocardial delivery of AAV is safe in the NHP, (ii) AAV6 and AAV8 provide efficient cardiac gene transfer at similar levels and are superior to AAV9, and (iii) AAV6 is more cardiac-specific than AAV8 and AAV9. The results of this NHP study may help guide the development AAV vectors for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in humans.

  2. Vitrectomy Before Intravitreal Injection of AAV2/2 Vector Promotes Efficient Transduction of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Dogs and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Ameline, Baptiste; Weber, Michel; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Nedellec, Steven; Biget, Marine; Provost, Nathalie; Libeau, Lyse; Blouin, Véronique; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Pichard, Virginie; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising vector for retinal gene delivery to restore visual function in certain forms of inherited retinal dystrophies. Several studies in rodent models have shown that intravitreal injection of the AAV2/2 vector is the optimal route for efficient retinal ganglion cell (RGC) transduction. However, translation of these findings to larger species, including humans, is complicated by anatomical differences in the eye, a key difference being the comparatively smaller volume of the vitreous chamber in rodents. Here, we address the role of the vitreous body as a potential barrier to AAV2/2 diffusion and transduction in the RGCs of dogs and macaques, two of the most relevant preclinical models. We intravitreally administered the AAV2/2 vector carrying the CMV-eGFP reporter cassette in dog and macaque eyes, either directly into the vitreous chamber or after complete vitrectomy, a surgical procedure that removes the vitreous body. Our findings suggest that the vitreous body appears to trap the injected vector, thus impairing the diffusion and transduction of AAV2/2 to inner retinal neurons. We show that vitrectomy before intravitreal vector injection is an effective means of overcoming this physical barrier, improving the transduction of RGCs in dog and macaque retinas. These findings support the use of vitrectomy in clinical trials of intravitreal gene transfer techniques targeting inner retinal neurons.

  3. Impact of age and vector construct on striatal and nigral transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Polinski, Nicole K; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Benskey, Matthew J; Fischer, D Luke; Kemp, Christopher J; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Sandoval, Ivette M; Paumier, Katrina L; Sortwell, Caryl E

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein delivery using viral vectors has shown promise in preclinical models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) but clinical trial success remains elusive. This may partially be due to a failure to include advanced age as a covariate despite aging being the primary risk factor for PD. We investigated transgene expression following intracerebral injections of recombinant adeno-associated virus pseudotypes 2/2 (rAAV2/2), 2/5 (rAAV2/5), 2/9 (rAAV2/9), and lentivirus (LV) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in aged versus young adult rats. Both rAAV2/2 and rAAV2/5 yielded lower GFP expression following injection to either the aged substantia nigra or striatum. rAAV2/9-mediated GFP expression was deficient in the aged striatonigral system but displayed identical transgene expression between ages in the nigrostriatal system. Young and aged rats displayed equivalent GFP levels following LV injection to the striatonigral system but LV-delivered GFP was deficient in delivering GFP to the aged nigrostriatal system. Notably, age-related transgene expression deficiencies revealed by protein quantitation were poorly predicted by GFP-immunoreactive cell counts. Further, in situ hybridization for the viral CβA promoter revealed surprisingly limited tropism for astrocytes compared to neurons. Our results demonstrate that aging is a critical covariate to consider when designing gene therapy approaches for PD. PMID:27933309

  4. Humoral Immune Response to AAV

    PubMed Central

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a member of the family Parvoviridae that has been widely used as a vector for gene therapy because of its safety profile, its ability to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells, and its low immunogenicity. AAV has been detected in many different tissues of several animal species but has not been associated with any disease. As a result of natural infections, antibodies to AAV can be found in many animals including humans. It has been shown that pre-existing AAV antibodies can modulate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy by blocking vector transduction or by redirecting distribution of AAV vectors to tissues other than the target organ. This review will summarize antibody responses against natural AAV infections, as well as AAV gene therapy vectors and their impact in the clinical development of AAV vectors for gene therapy. We will also review and discuss the various methods used for AAV antibody detection and strategies to overcome neutralizing antibodies in AAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24151496

  5. Humoral Immune Response to AAV.

    PubMed

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2013-10-18

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a member of the family Parvoviridae that has been widely used as a vector for gene therapy because of its safety profile, its ability to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells, and its low immunogenicity. AAV has been detected in many different tissues of several animal species but has not been associated with any disease. As a result of natural infections, antibodies to AAV can be found in many animals including humans. It has been shown that pre-existing AAV antibodies can modulate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy by blocking vector transduction or by redirecting distribution of AAV vectors to tissues other than the target organ. This review will summarize antibody responses against natural AAV infections, as well as AAV gene therapy vectors and their impact in the clinical development of AAV vectors for gene therapy. We will also review and discuss the various methods used for AAV antibody detection and strategies to overcome neutralizing antibodies in AAV-mediated gene therapy.

  6. Intravitreal delivery of a novel AAV vector targets ON bipolar cells and restores visual function in a mouse model of complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Scalabrino, Miranda L; Boye, Sanford L; Fransen, Kathryn M H; Noel, Jennifer M; Dyka, Frank M; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; De Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Gregg, Ronald G; McCall, Maureen A; Peachey, Neal S; Boye, Shannon E

    2015-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) effectively targets therapeutic genes to photoreceptors, pigment epithelia, Müller glia and ganglion cells of the retina. To date, no one has shown the ability to correct, with gene replacement, an inherent defect in bipolar cells (BCs), the excitatory interneurons of the retina. Targeting BCs with gene replacement has been difficult primarily due to the relative inaccessibility of BCs to standard AAV vectors. This approach would be useful for restoration of vision in patients with complete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1), where signaling through the ON BCs is eliminated due to mutations in their G-protein-coupled cascade genes. For example, the majority of CSNB1 patients carry a mutation in nyctalopin (NYX), which encodes a protein essential for proper localization of the TRPM1 cation channel required for ON BC light-evoked depolarization. As a group, CSNB1 patients have a normal electroretinogram (ERG) a-wave, indicative of photoreceptor function, but lack a b-wave due to defects in ON BC signaling. Despite retinal dysfunction, the retinas of CSNB1 patients do not degenerate. The Nyx(nob) mouse model of CSNB1 faithfully mimics this phenotype. Here, we show that intravitreally injected, rationally designed AAV2(quadY-F+T-V) containing a novel 'Ple155' promoter drives either GFP or YFP_Nyx in postnatal Nyx(nob) mice. In treated Nyx(nob) retina, robust and targeted Nyx transgene expression in ON BCs partially restored the ERG b-wave and, at the cellular level, signaling in ON BCs. Our results support the potential for gene delivery to BCs and gene replacement therapy in human CSNB1.

  7. Intraparenchymal Stereotaxic Delivery of rAAV and Special Considerations in Vector Handling.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew J; Manfredsson, Fredric P

    2016-01-01

    Stereotaxic surgery enables precise and consistent microinjections to discrete neural nuclei. Using stereotaxic surgery to deliver viral vectors is a powerful tool that provides the ability to manipulate gene expression in specific regions, or even specific cell types in the brain. Here, we describe the proper handling and stereotaxic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus to various neuroanatomical structures of the rodent brain.

  8. Multi-parametric MRI at 14T for muscular dystrophy mice treated with AAV vector-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Joshua; Wicki, Jacqueline; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Lee, Donghoon

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool for the monitoring of gene therapy for muscular dystrophy. The clinical investigations for this family of diseases often involve surgical biopsy which limits the amount of information that can be obtained due to the invasive nature of the procedure. Thus, other non-invasive tools may provide more opportunities for disease assessment and treatment responses. In order to explore this, dystrophic mdx4cv mice were systemically treated with a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a codon-optimized micro-dystrophin gene. Multi-parametric MRI of T2, magnetization transfer, and diffusion effects alongside 3-D volume measurements were then utilized to monitor disease/treatment progression. Mice were imaged at 10 weeks of age for pre-treatment, then again post-treatment at 8, 16, and 24 week time points. The efficacy of treatment was assessed by physiological assays for improvements in function and quantification of expression. Tissues from the hindlimbs were collected for histological analysis after the final time point for comparison with MRI results. We found that introduction of the micro-dystrophin gene restored some aspects of normal muscle histology and pathology such as decreased necrosis and resistance to contraction-induced injury. T2 relaxation values showed percentage decreases across all muscle types measured (tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus) when treated groups were compared to untreated groups. Additionally, the differences between groups were statistically significant for the tibialis anterior as well. The diffusion measurements showed a wider range of percentage changes and less statistical significance while the magnetization transfer effect measurements showed minimal change. MR images displayed hyper-intense regions of muscle that correlated with muscle pathology in histological

  9. Several rAAV vectors efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier and transduce neurons and astrocytes in the neonatal mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Yang, Bin; Mu, Xin; Ahmed, Seemin Seher; Su, Qin; He, Ran; Wang, Hongyan; Mueller, Christian; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Brown, Robert; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping

    2011-08-01

    Noninvasive systemic gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) has largely been impeded by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent studies documented widespread CNS gene transfer after intravascular delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9). To investigate alternative and possibly more potent rAAV vectors for systemic gene delivery across the BBB, we systematically evaluated the CNS gene transfer properties of nine different rAAVEGFP vectors after intravascular infusion in neonatal mice. Several rAAVs efficiently transduce neurons, motor neurons, astrocytes, and Purkinje cells; among them, rAAVrh.10 is at least as efficient as rAAV9 in many of the regions examined. Importantly, intravenously delivered rAAVs did not cause abnormal microgliosis in the CNS. The rAAVs that achieve stable widespread gene transfer in the CNS are exceptionally useful platforms for the development of therapeutic approaches for neurological disorders affecting large regions of the CNS as well as convenient biological tools for neuroscience research.

  10. Proteasome Inhibitors Decrease AAV2 Capsid derived Peptide Epitope Presentation on MHC Class I Following Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Jonathan D; Hui, Daniel; Downey, Harre D; Dunn, Danielle; Pien, Gary C; Mingozzi, Federico; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are an extensively studied and highly used vector platform for gene therapy applications. We hypothesize that in the first clinical trial using AAV to treat hemophilia B, AAV capsid proteins were presented on the surface of transduced hepatocytes, resulting in clearance by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and consequent loss of therapeutic transgene expression. It has been previously shown that proteasome inhibitors can have a dramatic effect on AAV transduction in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, to decrease capsid antigen presentation on hepatocytes in vitro, whereas at the same time, enhancing gene expression in vivo. Using an AAV capsid-specific T-cell reporter (TCR) line to analyze the effect of proteasome inhibitors on antigen presentation, we demonstrate capsid antigen presentation at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs), and inhibition of antigen presentation at pharmacologic levels of bortezomib. We also demonstrate that bortezomib can enhance Factor IX (FIX) expression from an AAV2 vector in mice, although the same effect was not observed for AAV8 vectors. A pharmacological agent that can enhance AAV transduction, decrease T-cell activation/proliferation, and decrease capsid antigen presentation would be a promising solution to obstacles to successful AAV-mediated, liver-directed gene transfer in humans. PMID:19904235

  11. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Keiser, Nicholas W; Okulist, Anna; Martins, Inês; Wilson, Matthew S; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-10-14

    Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN) containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium.

  12. Codon and mRNA sequence optimization of microdystrophin transgenes improves expression and physiological outcome in dystrophic mdx mice following AAV2/8 gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Foster, Helen; Sharp, Paul S; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Trollet, Capucine; Graham, Ian R; Foster, Keith; Wells, Dominic J; Dickson, George

    2008-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal muscle-wasting disorder. Lack of dystrophin compromises the integrity of the sarcolemma and results in myofibers that are highly prone to contraction-induced injury. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated dystrophin gene transfer strategies to muscle for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have been limited by the small cloning capacity of rAAV vectors and high titers necessary to achieve efficient systemic gene transfer. In this study, we assess the impact of codon optimization on microdystrophin (DeltaAB/R3-R18/DeltaCT) expression and function in the mdx mouse and compare the function of two different configurations of codon-optimized microdystrophin genes (DeltaAB/R3-R18/DeltaCT and DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT) under the control of a muscle-restrictive promoter (Spc5-12). Codon optimization of microdystrophin significantly increases levels of microdystrophin mRNA and protein after intramuscular and systemic administration of plasmid DNA or rAAV2/8. Physiological assessment demonstrates that codon optimization of DeltaAB/R3-R18/DeltaCT results in significant improvement in specific force, but does not improve resistance to eccentric contractions compared with noncodon-optimized DeltaAB/R3-R18/DeltaCT. However, codon-optimized microdystrophin DeltaR4-R23/DeltaCT completely restored specific force generation and provided substantial protection from contraction-induced injury. These results demonstrate that codon optimization of microdystrophin under the control of a muscle-specific promoter can significantly improve expression levels such that reduced titers of rAAV vectors will be required for efficient systemic administration.

  13. Intramuscular administration of AAV overcomes pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Calcedo, Roberto; Grant, Rebecca L; Peng, Hui; Medina-Jaszek, C Angelica; Ahonkhai, Omua; Qin, Qiuyue; Roy, Soumitra; Tretiakova, Anna P; Wilson, James M

    2016-12-07

    The seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector capsids may preclude a percentage of the population from receiving gene therapy, particularly following systemic vector administration. We hypothesized that the use of intramuscular (IM) administration of AAV vectors might circumvent this issue. IM injections were used to administer AAV8 vectors expressing either secreted or non-secreted transgenes into mice and the influence of NAbs supplied by pre-administration of pooled human IgG on transgene expression was evaluated. We then studied the impact of naturally occurring pre-existing AAV8 NAbs on expression of a secreted transgene following IM vector delivery in rhesus macaques. Finally, we evaluated the ability to readminister AAV vectors via IM injections in rhesus macaques. In mice, the presence of AAV8 NAbs had no effect on gene expression in the injected skeletal muscle. However, liver transgene expression following hepatic distribution of the vector was ablated. In rhesus macaques, naturally occurring pre-existing AAV8 NAb titers of ⩽1:160 had no effect on expression levels of a secreted transgene after IM delivery of the vector. Additionally, readministration of AAV vectors was possible by IM injection into the previously injected muscle groups, with no effect on transgene expression by the original vector. Therefore, the presence of pre-existing NAbs in the human population should not preclude subjects from receiving gene therapy by IM administration of the vector so long as sufficient levels of secreted transgene expression can be produced without the involvement of liver.

  14. Systemic gene transfer reveals distinctive muscle transduction profile of tyrosine mutant AAV-1, -6, and -9 in neonatal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Chady H; Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Williams, Regina R; Zhang, Keqing; Smith, Bruce F; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-03-05

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating genetic disorders that affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle. An effective gene therapy for these diseases requires bodywide muscle delivery. Tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been considered as a class of highly potent gene transfer vectors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that systemic delivery of tyrosine mutant AAV can result in bodywide muscle transduction in newborn dogs. Three tyrosine mutant AAV vectors (Y445F/Y731F AAV-1, Y445F AAV-6, and Y731F AAV-9) were evaluated. These vectors expressed the alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under transcriptional regulation of either the muscle-specific Spc5-12 promoter or the ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Robust skeletal and cardiac muscle transduction was achieved with Y445F/Y731F AAV-1. However, Y731F AAV-9 only transduced skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, Y445F AAV-6 resulted in minimal muscle transduction. Serological study suggests that the preexisting neutralization antibody may underlie the limited transduction of Y445F AAV-6. In summary, we have identified Y445F/Y731F AAV-1 as a potentially excellent systemic gene transfer vehicle to target both skeletal muscle and the heart in neonatal puppies. Our findings have important implications in exploring systemic neonatal gene therapy in canine models of muscular dystrophy.

  15. A viral vector expressing hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiqing; Kong, Weina; Liu, Lingyun; Yu, Wenguo; Zhang, Zhenqing; Sun, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) attenuates amyloid-beta protein neurotoxicity and decreases apoptosis induced by oxidative stress or hypoxia in cortical neurons. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human HIF-1α gene (rAAV-HIF-1α), and tested the assumption that rAAV-HIF-1α represses hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein. Our results confirmed that rAAV-HIF-1α significantly reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Direct intracerebral rAAV-HIF-1α administration also induced robust and prolonged HIF-1α production in rat hippocampus. Single rAAV-HIF-1α administration resulted in decreased apoptosis of hippocampal neurons in an Alzheimer's disease rat model established by intracerebroventricular injection of aggregated amyloid-beta protein (25–35). Our in vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that HIF-1 has potential for attenuating hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein, and provides experimental support for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases using gene therapy. PMID:25206774

  16. Repeated Delivery of Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors to the Rabbit Airway

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Suzanne E.; Jones, Lori A.; Chesnut, Kye; Walsh, Scott M.; Reynolds, Thomas C.; Carter, Barrie J.; Askin, Frederic B.; Flotte, Terence R.; Guggino, William B.

    1999-01-01

    Efficient local expression from recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) vectors has been observed in the airways of rabbits and monkeys for up to 6 months following a single bronchoscopic delivery. However, it is likely that repeated administrations of rAAV vectors will be necessary for sustained correction of the CF defect in the airways. The current study was designed to test the feasibility of repeated airway delivery of rAAV vectors in the rabbit lung. After two doses of rAAV-CFTR to the airways, rabbits generated high titers of serum anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. Rabbits then received a third dose of a rAAV vector containing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene packaged in either AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) or serotype 3 (AAV3) capsids. Each dose consisted of 1 ml containing 5 × 109 DNase-resistant particles of rAAV vector, having no detectable replication-competent AAV or adenovirus. Three weeks later, GFP expression was observed in airway epithelial cells despite high anti-AAV neutralizing titers at the time of delivery. There was no significant difference in the efficiency of DNA transfer or expression between the rAAV3 and rAAV2 groups. No significant inflammatory responses to either repeated airway exposure to rAAV2-CFTR vectors or to GFP expression were observed. These experiments demonstrate that serum anti-AAV neutralizing antibody titers do not predict airway neutralization in vivo and that repeated airway delivery rAAV allows for safe and effective gene transfer. PMID:10516053

  17. Enhanced Efficacy of an AAV Vector Encoding Chimeric, Highly-Secreted Acid α-glucosidase in Glycogen Storage Disease Type II

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P.; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) is an inherited muscular dystrophy caused by deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). We hypothesized that chimeric GAA containing an alternative signal peptide could increase the secretion of GAA from transduced cells and enhance the receptor-mediated uptake of GAA in striated muscle. The relative secretion of chimeric GAA from transfected 293 cells increased up to 26-fold. Receptor-mediated uptake of secreted, chimeric GAA corrected cultured GSD-II patient cells. High-level hGAA was sustained in the plasma of GSD-II mice for 24 weeks following administration of an AAV2/8 vector encoding chimeric GAA; furthermore, GAA activity was increased and glycogen content was significantly reduced in striated muscle and in the brain. Administration of only 1×1010 vector particles increased GAA activity in the heart and diaphragm for >18 weeks, whereas 3×1010 vector particles increased GAA activity and reduced glycogen content in the heart, diaphragm, and quadriceps. Furthermore, an AAV2/2 vector encoding chimeric GAA produced secreted hGAA for >12 weeks in the majority of treated GSD-II mice. Thus, chimeric, highly secreted GAA enhanced the efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16987711

  18. Establishment of a novel cell line for the enhanced production of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Satkunanathan, Stifani; Wheeler, Jun; Thorpe, Robin; Zhao, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors show great promise because of their excellent safety profile; however, pre-existing immune responses have necessitated the administration of high titer AAV, posing a significant challenge to the advancement of gene therapy involving AAV vectors. Recombinant AAV vectors contain minimum viral proteins necessary for their assembly and gene delivery functions. During the process of AAV assembly and production, AAV vectors acquire, inherently and submissively, various cellular proteins, but the identity of these proteins is poorly characterized. We reason that by identifying host cell proteins inherently associated with AAV vectors we may better understand the contribution of cellular components to AAV vector assembly and, ultimately, may improve the production of AAV vectors for gene therapy. In this study, three serotypes of recombinant AAV, namely AAV2, AAV5, and AAV8, were investigated. We used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods to identify protein composition in purified AAV vectors, confirmed protein identities using western blotting, and explored the potential function of selected proteins in AAV vector production using small hairpin (shRNA) methods. Using LC-MS/MS, we identified 44 AAV-associated cellular proteins including Y-box binding protein (YB1). We showed for the first time that the establishment of a novel producer cell line by introducing an shRNA sequence down-regulating YB1 resulted in up to 45- and 9-fold increase in physical vector genome titers of AAV2 and AAV8, respectively, and up to 7-fold increase in AAV2 transduction vector genome titers. Our results revealed that YB1 gene knockdown promoted AAV2 rep expression and vector DNA production and reduced the number of empty particles in AAV2 products, suggesting that YB1 plays an important role in AAV vector assembly by competition with adenovirus E2A and AAV capsid proteins for binding to the inverted terminal repeat

  19. Establishment of a Novel Cell Line for the Enhanced Production of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Satkunanathan, Stifani; Wheeler, Jun; Thorpe, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors show great promise because of their excellent safety profile; however, pre-existing immune responses have necessitated the administration of high titer AAV, posing a significant challenge to the advancement of gene therapy involving AAV vectors. Recombinant AAV vectors contain minimum viral proteins necessary for their assembly and gene delivery functions. During the process of AAV assembly and production, AAV vectors acquire, inherently and submissively, various cellular proteins, but the identity of these proteins is poorly characterized. We reason that by identifying host cell proteins inherently associated with AAV vectors we may better understand the contribution of cellular components to AAV vector assembly and, ultimately, may improve the production of AAV vectors for gene therapy. In this study, three serotypes of recombinant AAV, namely AAV2, AAV5, and AAV8, were investigated. We used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods to identify protein composition in purified AAV vectors, confirmed protein identities using western blotting, and explored the potential function of selected proteins in AAV vector production using small hairpin (shRNA) methods. Using LC-MS/MS, we identified 44 AAV-associated cellular proteins including Y-box binding protein (YB1). We showed for the first time that the establishment of a novel producer cell line by introducing an shRNA sequence down-regulating YB1 resulted in up to 45- and 9-fold increase in physical vector genome titers of AAV2 and AAV8, respectively, and up to 7-fold increase in AAV2 transduction vector genome titers. Our results revealed that YB1 gene knockdown promoted AAV2 rep expression and vector DNA production and reduced the number of empty particles in AAV2 products, suggesting that YB1 plays an important role in AAV vector assembly by competition with adenovirus E2A and AAV capsid proteins for binding to the inverted terminal

  20. Successful attenuation of humoral immunity to viral capsid and transgenic protein following AAV-mediated gene transfer with a non-depleting CD4 antibody and cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, J H; Cochrane, M; Cobbold, S; Waldmann, H; Nathwani, S A; Davidoff, A M; Nathwani, A C

    2012-01-01

    The ability of transient immunosuppression with a combination of a non-depleting anti-CD4 (NDCD4) antibody and cyclosporine (CyA) to abrogate immune reactivity to both adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) and its transgene product was evaluated. This combination of immunosuppressants resulted in a 20-fold reduction in the resulting anti-AAV8 antibody titres, to levels in naïve mice, following intravenous administration of 2 × 10(12) AAV8 vector particles per kg to immunocompetent mice. This allowed efficient transduction upon secondary challenge with vector pseudotyped with the same capsid. Persistent tolerance did not result, however, as an anti-AAV8 antibody response was elicited upon rechallenge with AAV8 without immunosuppression. The route of vector administration, vector dose, AAV serotype or the concomitant administration of adenoviral vector appeared to have little impact on the ability of the NDCD4 antibody and CyA combination to moderate the primary humoral response to AAV capsid proteins. The combination of NDCD4 and CyA also abrogated the humoral response to the transgene product, that otherwise invariably would occur, following intramuscular injection of AAV5, leading to stable transgene expression. These observations could significantly improve the prospects of using rAAV vectors for chronic disorders by allowing for repeated vector administration and avoiding the development of antibodies to the transgene product.

  1. Retinal pigment epithelial cell expression of active Rap 1a by scAAV2 inhibits choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Bretz, Colin A; Becker, Silke; Gambhir, Deeksha; Smith, George W; Samulski, R Jude; Wittchen, Erika S; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased Rap1a activity specifically in retinal pigment epithelial cells resists choroidal neovascularization (CNV), self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (scAAV2) with RPE65-promoter-driven GFP vectors were generated and introduced subretinally into Rap1b-deficient mice. Six-week-old mice that received subretinal control (scAAV2-Con) or constitutively active Rap1a (scAAV2-CARap1a) showed strong GFP at the 5 × 108 viral particle/µl dose 5 weeks later without altering retinal morphology or function. Compared to scAAV2-Con- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-injected, eyes injected with scAAV2-CARap1a had increased Rap1 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)/choroidal lysates and a significant reduction in CNV volume 7 days after laser, comparable to eyes that received intravitreal anti-VEGF versus IgG control. scAAV2-CARap1a-, but not anti-VEGF-, injected eyes had increased pan-cadherin in RPE/choroids. In cultured RPE cells, increased active Rap1a inhibited TNFα-induced disassociation of junctional pan-cadherin/β-catenin complexes, increased transepithelial electrical resistance through an interaction of β-catenin with phosphorylated scaffold protein, IQGAP1, and inhibited choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) transmigration of an RPE monolayer. This evidence shows that increased Rap1a activity specifically in RPE cells is sufficient to reduce CEC transmigration and CNV and involves IQGAP1-mediated protection of RPE junctional complexes. PMID:27606349

  2. A comparison of AAV strategies distinguishes overlapping vectors for efficient systemic delivery of the 6.2 kb Dysferlin coding sequence

    PubMed Central

    Pryadkina, Marina; Lostal, William; Bourg, Nathalie; Charton, Karine; Roudaut, Carinne; Hirsch, Matthew L; Richard, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is currently the best vector for gene delivery into the skeletal muscle. However, the 5-kb packaging size of this virus is a major obstacle for large gene transfer. This past decade, many different strategies were developed to circumvent this issue (concatemerization-splicing, overlapping vectors, hybrid dual or fragmented AAV). Loss of function mutations in the DYSF gene whose coding sequence is 6.2kb lead to progressive muscular dystrophies (LGMD2B: OMIM_253601; MM: OMIM_254130; DMAT: OMIM_606768). In this study, we compared large gene transfer techniques to deliver the DYSF gene into the skeletal muscle. After rAAV8s intramuscular injection into dysferlin deficient mice, we showed that the overlap strategy is the most effective approach to reconstitute a full-length messenger. After systemic administration, the level of dysferlin obtained on different muscles corresponded to 0.5- to 2-fold compared to the normal level. We further demonstrated that the overlapping vector set was efficient to correct the histopathology, resistance to eccentric contractions and whole body force in the dysferlin deficient mice. Altogether, these data indicate that using overlapping vectors could be a promising approach for a potential clinical treatment of dysferlinopathies. PMID:26029720

  3. CD8+ T cell recognition of epitopes within the capsid of adeno-associated virus 8-based gene transfer vectors depends on vectors' genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Te-Lang; Li, Hua; Faust, Susan M; Chi, Emily; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, Fraser; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2014-01-01

    Self-complementary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing human factor IX (hF.IX) have achieved transient or sustained correction of hemophilia B in human volunteers. High doses of AAV2 or AAV8 vectors delivered to the liver caused in several patients an increase in transaminases accompanied by a rise in AAV capsid-specific T cells and a decrease in circulating hF.IX levels suggesting immune-mediated destruction of vector-transduced cells. Kinetics of these adverse events differed in patients receiving AAV2 or AAV8 vectors causing rise in transaminases at 3 versus 8 weeks after vector injection, respectively. To test if CD8+ T cells to AAV8 vectors, which are similar to AAV2 vectors are fully-gutted vectors and thereby fail to encode structural viral proteins, could cause damage at this late time point, we tested in a series of mouse studies how long major histocompatibility (MHC) class I epitopes within AAV8 capsid can be presented to CD8+ T cells. Our results clearly show that depending on the vectors' genome, CD8+ T cells can detect such epitopes on AAV8's capsid for up to 6 months indicating that the capsid of AAV8 degrades slowly in mice.

  4. Adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1 and 5 targeted to the neonatal rat and pig striatum induce widespread transgene expression in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Stott, Simon R W; Mattsson, Bengt; Wisman, Liselijn; Ettrup, Anders; Hermening, Stephan; Knudsen, Gitte M; Kirik, Deniz

    2010-03-01

    Viral vector-mediated gene transfer has emerged as a powerful means to target transgene expression in the central nervous system. Here we characterized the efficacy of serotypes 1 and 5 recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) after stereotaxic delivery to the neonatal rat and minipig striatum. The efficiency of GFP expression and the phenotype of GFP-positive cells were assessed within the forebrain at different time points up to 12 months after surgery. Both rAAV1-GFP and rAAV5-GFP delivery resulted in transduction of the striatum as well as striatal input and output areas, including large parts of the cortex. In both species, rAAV5 resulted in a more widespread transgene expression compared to rAAV1. In neonatal rats, rAAV5 also transduced several other areas such as the olfactory bulbs, hippocampus, and septum. Phenotypic analysis of the GFP-positive cells, performed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, showed that most of the GFP-positive cells by either serotype were NeuN-positive neuronal profiles. The rAAV5 vector further displayed the ability to transduce non-neuronal cell types in both rats and pigs, albeit at a low frequency. Our results show that striatal delivery of rAAV5 vectors in the neonatal brain represents a useful tool to express genes of interest both in the basal ganglia and the neocortex. Furthermore, we apply, for the first time, viral vector-mediated gene transfer to the pig brain providing the opportunity to study effects of genetic manipulation in this non-primate large animal species. Finally, we generated an atlas of the Göttingen minipig brain for guiding future studies in this large animal species.

  5. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Deverman, Benjamin E; Pravdo, Piers L; Simpson, Bryan P; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV9 (refs. 14,15,16,17), and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications.

  6. Formation of AAV single stranded DNA genome from a circular plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3(+) clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway.

  7. Formation of AAV Single Stranded DNA Genome from a Circular Plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3+ clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  8. Gene therapy for choroideremia using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Alun R; Groppe, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E

    2014-10-30

    Choroideremia is an outer retinal degeneration with a characteristic clinical appearance that was first described in the nineteenth century. The disorder begins with reduction of night vision and gradually progresses to blindness by middle age. The appearance of the fundus in sufferers is recognizable by the characteristic pale color caused by the loss of the outer retina, retinal-pigmented epithelium, and choroidal vessels, leading to exposure of the underlying sclera. Choroideremia shows X-linked recessive inheritance and the choroideremia gene (CHM) was one of the first to be identified by positional cloning in 1990. Subsequent identification and characterization of the CHM gene, which encodes Rab escort protein 1 (REP1), has led to better comprehension of the disease and enabled advances in genetic diagnosis. Despite several decades of work to understand the exact pathogenesis, no established treatments currently exist to stop or even slow the progression of retinal degeneration in choroideremia. Encouragingly, several specific molecular and clinical features make choroideremia an ideal candidate for treatment with gene therapy. This work describes the considerations and challenges in the development of a new clinical trial using adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding the CHM gene.

  9. Gene Therapy for Choroideremia Using an Adeno-Associated Viral (AAV) Vector

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Alun R.; Groppe, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Choroideremia is an outer retinal degeneration with a characteristic clinical appearance that was first described in the nineteenth century. The disorder begins with reduction of night vision and gradually progresses to blindness by middle age. The appearance of the fundus in sufferers is recognizable by the characteristic pale color caused by the loss of the outer retina, retinal-pigmented epithelium, and choroidal vessels, leading to exposure of the underlying sclera. Choroideremia shows X-linked recessive inheritance and the choroideremia gene (CHM) was one of the first to be identified by positional cloning in 1990. Subsequent identification and characterization of the CHM gene, which encodes Rab escort protein 1 (REP1), has led to better comprehension of the disease and enabled advances in genetic diagnosis. Despite several decades of work to understand the exact pathogenesis, no established treatments currently exist to stop or even slow the progression of retinal degeneration in choroideremia. Encouragingly, several specific molecular and clinical features make choroideremia an ideal candidate for treatment with gene therapy. This work describes the considerations and challenges in the development of a new clinical trial using adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding the CHM gene. PMID:25359548

  10. Pseudotyped adeno-associated viral vector tropism and transduction efficiencies in murine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Balaji, Swathi; Le, Louis; Leung, Alice; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N; Wilson, James M; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Cell specific gene transfer and sustained transgene expression are goals of cutaneous gene therapy for tissue repair and regeneration. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2/2) mediated gene transfer to the skin results in stable transgene expression in the muscle fascicles of the panniculus carnosus in mice, with minimal gene transfer to the dermal or epidermal elements. We hypothesized that pseudotyped AAV vectors may have a unique and characteristic tropism and transduction efficiency profile for specific cells in the cutaneous wounds. We compared transduction efficiencies of cells in the epidermis, cells in the dermis, and the fascicles of the panniculus carnosus by AAV2/2 and three pseudotyped AAV vectors, AAV2/5, AAV2/7, and AAV2/8 in a murine excisional wound model. AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 result in significantly enhanced transduction of cells both in the epidermis and the dermis compared to AAV2/2. AAV2/5 transduces both the basilar and supra-basilar keratinocytes. In contrast, AAV2/8 transduces mainly supra-basilar keratinocytes. Both AAV2/7 and AAV2/8 result in more efficient gene transfer to the muscular panniculus carnosus compared to AAV2/2. The capsid of the different pseudotyped AAV vectors produces distinct tropism and efficiency profiles in the murine wound healing model. Both AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 administration result in significantly enhanced gene transfer. To further characterize cell specific transduction and tropism profiles of the AAV pseudotyped vectors, we performed in vitro experiments using human and mouse primary dermal fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that pseudotyping strategy confers a differential transduction of dermal fibroblasts, with higher transduction of both human and murine cells by AAV2/5 and AAV2/8 at early and later time points. At later time points, AAV2/2 demonstrates increased transduction. Interestingly, AAV2/8 appears to be more efficacious in transducing human cells as compared to AAV2/5. The pseudotype-specific pattern of

  11. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  12. Efficient production of dual recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for factor VIII delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Roberts, Sean; Moore, Andrea Rossi; Cao, Wenjing; Diao, Yong; Kapranov, Philipp; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have gained attention for human gene therapy because of their high safety and clinical efficacy profile. For factor VIII gene delivery, splitting the coding region between two AAV vectors remains a viable strategy to avoid the packaging capacity limitation (∼5.0 kb). However, it is time-consuming and labor-intensive to produce two rAAV vectors in separate batches. Here we demonstrated successful production of dual rAAV vectors for hemophilia A gene therapy in a single preparation. When the AAV vector plasmids carrying the human factor VIII heavy chain (hHC) and the light chain (hLC) expression cassettes were cotransfected into 293 cells along with the AAV rep&cap and mini-adenovirus helper plasmids, both rAAV-hHC and rAAV-hLC were produced at the desired ratio and in high titer. Interestingly, the rAAV-hHC vectors always yielded higher titers than rAAV-hLC vectors as a result of more efficient replication of rAAV-hHC genomes. The resulting vectors were effective in transducing the tissue culture cells in vitro. When these vectors were administered to hemophilia A mice, factor VIII was detected in the mouse plasma by both the activated partial thromboplastin time assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The functional activity as well as the antigen levels of secreted factor VIII were similar to those of vectors produced by the traditional method. The dual-vector production method has been successfully extended to both AAV2 and AAV8 serotypes. In conclusion, cotransfection of vector plasmids presents an efficient method for producing dual or multiple AAV vectors at significantly reduced cost and labor.

  13. Minimizing the inhibitory effect of neutralizing antibody for efficient gene expression in the liver with adeno-associated virus 8 vectors.

    PubMed

    Mimuro, Jun; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Hishikawa, Shuji; Ikemoto, Tomokazu; Ishiwata, Akira; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Madoiwa, Seiji; Ono, Fumiko; Ozawa, Keiya; Sakata, Yoichi

    2013-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are known to interfere with AAV vector-mediated gene transfer by intravascular delivery. Evading the inhibitory effects of antibodies against AAV vectors is necessary for efficient transfer of therapeutic genes clinically. For this purpose, we tested the efficacy of saline flushing in order to avoid contact of vectors with NAbs present in blood. Direct injection of the AAV8 vector carrying the factor IX (FIX) gene into the portal vein of macaques using saline flushing achieved transgene-derived FIX expression (4.7 ± 2.10-10.1 ± 5.45% of normal human FIX concentration) in the presence of NAbs. Expression was as efficient as that (5.43 ± 2.59-12.68 ± 4.83%) in macaques lacking NAbs. We next tested the efficacy of saline flushing using less invasive balloon catheter-guided injection. This approach also resulted in efficient expression of transgene-derived FIX (2.5 ± 1.06-9.0 ± 2.37%) in the presence of NAbs (14-56× dilutions). NAbs at this range of titers reduced the efficiency of transduction in the macaque liver by 100-fold when the same vector was injected into mesenteric veins without balloon catheters. Our results suggest that portal vein-directed vector delivery strategies with flushing to remove blood are efficacious for minimizing the inhibitory effect of anti-AAV antibodies.

  14. AAV-mediated photoreceptor transduction of the pig cone-enriched retina

    PubMed Central

    Mussolino, C; della Corte, M; Rossi, S; Viola, F; Di Vicino, U; Marrocco, E; Neglia, S; Doria, M; Testa, F; Giovannoni, R; Crasta, M; Giunti, M; Villani, E; Lavitrano, M; Bacci, M L; Ratiglia, R; Simonelli, F; Auricchio, A; Surace, E M

    2011-01-01

    Recent success in clinical trials supports the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene therapy of retinal diseases caused by defects in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In contrast, evidence of the efficacy of AAV-mediated gene transfer to retinal photoreceptors, the major site of inherited retinal diseases, is less robust. In addition, although AAV-mediated RPE transduction appears efficient, independently of the serotype used and species treated, AAV-mediated photoreceptor gene transfer has not been systematically investigated thus so far in large animal models, which also may allow identifying relevant species-specific differences in AAV-mediated retinal transduction. In the present study, we used the porcine retina, which has a high cone/rod ratio. This feature allows to properly evaluate both cone and rod photoreceptors transduction and compare the transduction characteristics of AAV2/5 and 2/8, the two most efficient AAV vector serotypes for photoreceptor targeting. Here we show that AAV2/5 and 2/8 transduces both RPE and photoreceptors. AAV2/8 infects and transduces photoreceptor more efficiently than AAV2/5, similarly to what we have observed in the murine retina. The use of the photoreceptor-specific rhodopsin promoter restricts transgene expression to porcine rods and cones, and results in photoreceptor transduction levels similar to those obtained with the ubiquitous promoters tested. Finally, immunological, toxicological and biodistribution studies support the safety of AAV subretinal administration to the large porcine retina. The data presented here on AAV-mediated transduction of the cone-enriched porcine retina may affect the development of gene-based therapies for rare and common severe photoreceptor diseases. PMID:21412286

  15. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-Scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Deverman, Benjamin E; Klein, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin (CBA) hybrid promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related protein transactive response DNA-binding protein, 43 kDa (TDP-43) with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats.

  16. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-Scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kasey L.; Dayton, Robert D.; Deverman, Benjamin E.; Klein, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin (CBA) hybrid promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related protein transactive response DNA-binding protein, 43 kDa (TDP-43) with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats. PMID:27867348

  17. Gene transfer properties and structural modeling of human stem cell-derived AAV.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura J; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Carvaines, Sarah K; Van Vliet, Kim; Yang, Ethel; Wong, Kamehameha K; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Chatterjee, Saswati

    2014-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are proving to be remarkably successful for in vivo gene delivery. Based upon reports of abundant AAV in the human marrow, we tested CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells for the presence of natural AAV. Here, we report for the first time, the presence of novel AAV variants in healthy CD34(+) human peripheral blood stem cells. The majority of healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors were found to harbor AAV in their CD34(+) cells. Every AAV isolated from CD34(+) cells mapped to AAV Clade F. Gene transfer vectors derived from these novel AAVs efficiently underwent entry and postentry processing in human cord blood stem cells and supported stable gene transfer into long-term, in vivo engrafting human HSCs significantly better than other serotypes. AAVHSC-transduced human CD34(+) cells engrafted in vivo and gave rise to differentiated transgene-expressing progeny. Importantly, gene-marked CD34(+) stem cells persisted long term in xenograft recipients, indicating transduction of primitive progenitors. Notably, correlation of structure with function permitted identification of potential capsid components important for HSC transduction. Thus, AAVHSCs represent a new class of genetic vectors for the manipulation of HSC genomes.

  18. Gene Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Is Effective in Cats Without Pre-Existing Immunity to AAV8

    PubMed Central

    Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M.; Haskins, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

  19. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis caused by defects in AIPL1: effective rescue of mouse models of partial and complete Aipl1 deficiency using AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mei Hong; Smith, Alexander J.; Pawlyk, Basil; Xu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Bainbridge, James B.; Basche, Mark; McIntosh, Jenny; Tran, Hoai Viet; Nathwani, Amit; Li, Tiansen; Ali, Robin R.

    2009-01-01

    Defects in the photoreceptor-specific gene encoding aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1) are clinically heterogeneous and present as Leber Congenital Amaurosis, the severest form of early-onset retinal dystrophy and milder forms of retinal dystrophies such as juvenile retinitis pigmentosa and dominant cone-rod dystrophy. [Perrault, I., Rozet, J.M., Gerber, S., Ghazi, I., Leowski, C., Ducroq, D., Souied, E., Dufier, J.L., Munnich, A. and Kaplan, J. (1999) Leber congenital amaurosis. Mol. Genet. Metab., 68, 200–208.] Although not yet fully elucidated, AIPL1 is likely to function as a specialized chaperone for rod phosphodiesterase (PDE). We evaluate whether AAV-mediated gene replacement therapy is able to improve photoreceptor function and survival in retinal degeneration associated with AIPL1 defects. We used two mouse models of AIPL1 deficiency simulating three different rates of photoreceptor degeneration. The Aipl1 hypomorphic (h/h) mouse has reduced Aipl1 levels and a relatively slow degeneration. Under light acceleration, the rate of degeneration in the Aipl1 h/h mouse is increased by 2–3-fold. The Aipl1−/− mouse has no functional Aipl1 and has a very rapid retinal degeneration. To treat the different rates of degeneration, two pseudotypes of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibiting different transduction kinetics are used for gene transfer. We demonstrate restoration of cellular function and preservation of photoreceptor cells and retinal function in Aipl1 h/h mice following gene replacement therapy using an AAV2/2 vector and in the light accelerated Aipl1 h/h model and Aipl1−/− mice using an AAV2/8 vector. We have thus established the potential of gene replacement therapy in varying rates of degeneration that reflect the clinical spectrum of disease. This is the first gene replacement study to report long-term rescue of a photoreceptor-specific defect and to demonstrate effective rescue of a rapid photoreceptor

  20. Sustained expression from DNA vectors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suet Ping; Argyros, Orestis; Harbottle, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    DNA vectors have the potential to become powerful medical tools for treatment of human disease. The human body has, however, developed a range of defensive strategies to detect and silence foreign or misplaced DNA, which is more typically encountered during infection or chromosomal damage. A clinically relevant human gene therapy vector must overcome or avoid these protections whilst delivering sustained levels of therapeutic gene product without compromising the vitality of the recipient host. Many non-viral DNA vectors trigger these defense mechanisms and are subsequently destroyed or rendered silent. Thus, without modification or considered design, the clinical utility of a typical DNA vector is fundamentally limited due to the transient nature of its transgene expression. The development of safe and persistently expressing DNA vectors is a crucial prerequisite for its successful clinical application and subsequently remains, therefore, one of the main strategic tasks of non-viral gene therapy research. In this chapter we will describe our current understanding of the mechanisms that can destroy or silence DNA vectors and discuss strategies, which have been utilized to improve their sustenance and the level and duration of their transgene expression.

  1. A Translational Pathway Toward a Clinical Trial Using the Second-Generation AAV Micro-Dystrophin Vector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0302 TITLE: A Translational Pathway Toward a Clinical Trial Using the Second-Generation AAV Micro-Dystrophin...COVERED 1 Sep 2014 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Translational Pathway Toward a Clinical Trial Using the Second-Generation AAV Micro-Dystrophin...phophotase) or are not clinically meaningful (Table 2). 4   In our previous study, we demonstrated bodywide skeletal muscle transduction after

  2. Locally Targeted Cardiac Gene Delivery by AAV Microbubble Destruction in a Large Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Philipp; Huditz, Regina; Meinhardt, Eric; Rapti, Kleopatra; Geis, Nicolas; Most, Patrick; Katus, Hugo A; Müller, Oliver J; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Raake, Philip W

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac gene therapy is a promising approach for treating heart diseases. Although clinical studies are ongoing, effective and targeted transgene delivery is still a major obstacle. We sought to improve and direct transgene expression in myocardium by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). In pigs, adeno-associated virus-derived (AAV) vectors harboring the luciferase reporter gene were delivered via retroinfusion into the anterior interventricular coronary vein (AIV). AAV vectors were either loaded to lipid microbubbles before injection or injected unmodified. Upon injection of AAV/microbubble solution, UTMD was performed. After 4 weeks, reporter gene expression levels in the anterior wall (target area), in the posterior wall (control area), and in noncardiac organs were analyzed. Retroinfusion of AAV-luciferase vectors loaded to lipid microbubbles led to a significant increase in transgene expression, with an increase in UTMD targeted areas of the anterior wall. Moreover, off-target expression was reduced in comparison to control animals, receiving AAV-luciferase without microbubbles. Besides an increase in overall target area transgene expression, UTMD alters the spatial expression of the luciferase transgene, focusing expression to ultrasound-targeted left ventricular wall. These data suggest UTMD as a promising approach for directing AAV to specific cardiac segments.

  3. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  4. The future of epilepsy treatment: focus on adeno-associated virus vector gene therapy.

    PubMed

    McCown, Thomas J

    2010-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors support long-term, nontoxic gene expression in the central nervous system, and these AAV properties prove particularly applicable to the treatment of focal epilepsies, especially intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. A number of clinical studies have employed AAV vectors and to date, no known adverse effects have been directly associated with these treatments, particularly AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Although other AAV serotypes may confer an advantage in the future, extensive studies on the inhibitory neuropeptides, galanin and neuropeptide Y, have generated enough preclinical evidence of efficacy to warrant AAV2-based clinical trials in the near future. Beyond these trials, emerging evidence suggests that AAV-mediated manipulation of adenosine can significantly impact limbic seizure activity. Thus, with appropriate nonhuman primate transduction patterns and favorable overall toxicology studies, AAV-based manipulation of adenosine could follow the AAV-neuropeptide clinical studies. Finally, recent findings using AAV capsid shuffling and directed evolution have identified a hybrid AAV vector that can selectively cross the seizure compromised blood-brain barrier and transduce cells after peripheral, intravenous administration. Thus, in the more distant future, AAV therapeutics for focal epilepsies may be delivered without any neurosurgical interventions.

  5. Systemic Gene Transfer of a Hexosaminidase Variant Using an scAAV9.47 Vector Corrects GM2 Gangliosidosis in Sandhoff Mice.

    PubMed

    Osmon, Karlaina J L; Woodley, Evan; Thompson, Patrick; Ong, Katalina; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Keimel, John G; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S

    2016-07-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by β-hexosaminidase A (HexA) enzyme deficiency. There is currently no cure. HexA is composed of two similar, nonidentical subunits, α and β, which must interact with the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), a substrate-specific cofactor, to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. Mutations in either subunit or the activator can result in the accumulation of GM2 ganglioside within neurons throughout the central nervous system. The resulting neuronal cell death induces the primary symptoms of the disease: motor impairment, seizures, and sensory impairments. This study assesses the long-term effects of gene transfer in a Sandhoff (β-subunit knockout) mouse model. The study utilized a modified human β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (μ-subunit) that contains critical sequences from the β-subunit that enables formation of a stable homodimer (HexM) and interaction with GM2AP to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. We investigated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral (scAAV) vector expressing HexM, through intravenous injections of the neonatal mice. We monitored one cohort for 8 weeks and another cohort long-term for survival benefit, behavioral, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Untreated Sandhoff disease (SD) control mice reached a humane endpoint at approximately 15 weeks, whereas treated mice had a median survival age of 40 weeks, an approximate 2.5-fold survival advantage. On behavioral tests, the treated mice outperformed their knockout age-matched controls and perform similarly to the heterozygous controls. Through the enzymatic and GM2 ganglioside analyses, we observed a significant decrease in the GM2 ganglioside level, even though the enzyme levels were not significantly increased. Molecular analyses revealed a global distribution of the vector between brain and spinal cord regions. In conclusion, the neonatal delivery of a novel viral vector expressing the human HexM enzyme is effective in ameliorating the SD

  6. Hepatorenal correction in murine glycogen storage disease type I with a double-stranded adeno-associated virus vector.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Hall, Gentzon; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Lavin, Peter J; Winn, Michelle P; Kemper, Alex R; Brown, Talmage T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (-/-) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (-/-) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (-/-) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism.

  7. Hepatorenal Correction in Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type I With a Double-stranded Adeno-associated Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Hall, Gentzon; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Lavin, Peter J; Winn, Michelle P; Kemper, Alex R; Brown, Talmage T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (−/−) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (−/−) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (−/−) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism. PMID:21730973

  8. Systemic Correction of Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV by an AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Zhang, Quan; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yang, Chunyu; Thurberg, Beth L; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-11-10

    Deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) causes glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV), which is characterized by the accumulation of a less branched, poorly soluble form of glycogen called polyglucosan (PG) in multiple tissues. This study evaluates the efficacy of gene therapy with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector in a mouse model of adult form of GSD IV (Gbe1(ys/ys)). An AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) vector containing a human GBE expression cassette (AAV-GBE) was intravenously injected into 14-day-old Gbe1(ys/ys) mice at a dose of 5 × 10(11) vector genomes per mouse. Mice were euthanized at 3 and 9 months of age. In the AAV-treated mice at 3 months of age, GBE enzyme activity was highly elevated in heart, which is consistent with the high copy number of the viral vector genome detected. GBE activity also increased significantly in skeletal muscles and the brain, but not in the liver. The glycogen content was reduced to wild-type levels in muscles and significantly reduced in the liver and brain. At 9 months of age, though GBE activity was only significantly elevated in the heart, glycogen levels were significantly reduced in the liver, brain, and skeletal muscles of the AAV-treated mice. In addition, the AAV treatment resulted in an overall decrease in plasma activities of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and creatine kinase, and a significant increase in fasting plasma glucose concentration at 9 months of age. This suggests an alleviation of damage and improvement of function in the liver and muscles by the AAV treatment. This study demonstrated a long-term benefit of a systemic injection of an AAV-GBE vector in Gbe1(ys/ys) mice.

  9. Recombinant AAV2-mediated β-globin expression in human fetal hematopoietic cells from the aborted fetuses with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Feng; Xue, Jin-Feng; Zhao, Fei; Song, Liu-Jiang; Tan, Meng-Qun

    2011-06-01

    Genetic correction of autologous hematopoietic stem cells has been proposed as an attractive treatment method for β-thalassemia. Our previous study has shown that recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2) efficiently transduces human fetal liver hematopoietic cells, and mediates the expression of the human β-globin gene in vivo. In this study, we investigated whether rAAV2 could also mediate the expression of normal β-globin gene in human hematopoietic cells from β-thalassemia patients. Human hematopoietic cells were isolated from aborted β-thalassemia major fetuses, transduced with rAAV2-β-globin, and then transplanted into nude mice. We found that rAAV2-β-globin transduced human fetal hematopoietic cells, as determined by allele-specific PCR analysis. Furthermore, β-globin transgene expression was detected in human hematopoietic cells up to 70 days post-transplantation in the recipient mice. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that human β-globin expression levels increased significantly compared with control, as indicated by a 1.2-2.8-fold increase in the ratio of β/α-globin chain. These novel data demonstrate that rAAV2 can transduce and mediate the normal β-globin gene expression in fetal hematopoietic cells from β-thalassemia patients. Our findings further support the potential use of rAAV-based gene therapy in the treatment of human β-thalassemia.

  10. Transcriptional activity of novel ALDH1L1 promoters in the rat brain following AAV vector-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mudannayake, Janitha M; Mouravlev, Alexandre; Fong, Dahna M; Young, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, member L1 (ALDH1L1) is a recently characterized pan-astrocytic marker that is more homogenously expressed throughout the brain than the classic astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein. We generated putative promoter sequence variants of the rat ALDH1L1 gene for use in adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, with an aim to achieve selective regulation of transgene expression in astrocytes in the rat brain. Unexpectedly, ALDH1L1 promoter variants mediated transcriptional activity exclusively in neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta as assessed by luciferase reporter expression at 3 weeks postvector infusion. This selectivity for neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta also persisted in the context of adeno-associated viral serotype 5, 8 or 9 vector-mediated gene delivery. An in vivo promoter comparison showed the highest performing ALDH1L1 promoter variant mediated higher transgene expression than the neuronal-specific synapsin 1 and tyrosine hydroxylase promoters. The ALDH1L1 promoter was also transcriptionally active in dentate granule neurons following intrahippocampal adeno-associated viral vector infusion, whereas transgene expression was detected in both striatal neurons and astrocytes following vector infusion into the striatum. Our results demonstrate the potential suitability of the ALDH1L1 promoter as a new tool in the development of gene therapy and disease modelling applications. PMID:27990448

  11. A fragmented adeno-associated viral dual vector strategy for treatment of diseases caused by mutations in large genes leads to expression of hybrid transcripts

    PubMed Central

    McClements, Michelle E.; Charbel Issa, Peter; Blouin, Véronique; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Dual vector AAV systems are being utilised to enable gene therapy for disorders in which the disease gene is too large to fit into a single capsid. Fragmented adeno-associated viral (fAAV) vectors containing single inverted terminal repeat truncated transgenes have been considered as one such gene replacement strategy. Here we aim to add to the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms employed by fAAV dual vector systems. Methods Oversized (>8kb) transgene constructs containing ABCA4 coding sequence were packaged as truncated fragments <5kb in size into various AAV serotypes. In vitro transductions with these fAAV vector preparations were conducted with mRNA and protein expression products assessed by way of RT-PCR, qPCR and western blot techniques. Results Transductions with fAAV vector preparations yielded ABCA4 mRNA, but did not generate detectable levels of protein. Sequencing of the transcript population revealed the presence of full length ABCA4 CDS with additional hybrid ABCA4 variants, indicating truncated transgenes without regions of overlap were joining and forming stable hybrid transgenes. In contrast, an ABCA4 overlapping dual vector system (OV) with a defined complementary region generated only full length mRNA transcripts plus detectable ABCA4 protein. Conclusion Despite previous success shown with the fAAV approach, the lack of repeatability and identification of stable hybrid transcripts capable of protein production suggests there is more refinement required before considering this approach in a clinical setting. PMID:28239514

  12. Serotype-dependent transduction efficiencies of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors in monkey neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Annelies; Vancraeyenest, Pascaline; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Michiels, Annelies; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Moons, Lieve; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle; Arckens, Lutgarde; Vanduffel, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Viral vector-mediated expression of genes (e.g., coding for opsins and designer receptors) has grown increasingly popular. Cell-type specific expression is achieved by altering viral vector tropism through crosspackaging or by cell-specific promoters driving gene expression. Detailed information about transduction properties of most recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) serotypes in macaque cortex is gradually becoming available. Here, we compare transduction efficiencies and expression patterns of reporter genes in two macaque neocortical areas employing different rAAV serotypes and promoters. A short version of the calmodulin-kinase-II (CaMKIIα0.4) promoter resulted in reporter gene expression in cortical neurons for all tested rAAVs, albeit with different efficiencies for spread: rAAV2/5>>rAAV2/7>rAAV2/8>rAAV2/9>>rAAV2/1 and proportion of transduced cells: rAAV2/1>rAAV2/5>rAAV2/7=rAAV2/9>rAAV2/8. In contrast to rodent studies, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter appeared least efficient in macaque cortex. The human synapsin-1 promoter preceded by the CMV enhancer (enhSyn1) produced homogeneous reporter gene expression across all layers, while two variants of the CaMKIIα promoter resulted in different laminar transduction patterns and cell specificities. Finally, differences in expression patterns were observed when the same viral vector was injected in two neocortical areas. Our results corroborate previous findings that reporter-gene expression patterns and efficiency of rAAV transduction depend on serotype, promoter, cortical layer, and area. PMID:26839901

  13. Direct interaction of human serum proteins with AAV virions to enhance AAV transduction: immediate impact on clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Sun, J; Crosby, A; Woodard, K; Hirsch, M L; Samulski, R J; Li, C

    2017-01-01

    Recent hemophilia B clinical trials using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery have demonstrated much lower coagulation factor IX (FIX) production in patients compared with the high levels observed in animal models and AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response elicited at high doses of AAV vectors. These results emphasize the necessity to explore effective approaches for enhancement of AAV transduction. Initially, we found that incubation of all AAV vectors with human serum enhanced AAV transduction. Complementary analytical experiments demonstrated that human serum albumin (HSA) directly interacted with the AAV capsid and augmented AAV transduction. The enhanced transduction was observed with clinical grade HSA. Mechanistic studies suggest that HSA increases AAV binding to target cells, and that the interaction of HSA with AAV does not interfere with the AAV infection pathway. Importantly, HSA incubation during vector dialysis also increased transduction. Finally, HSA enhancement of AAV transduction in a model of hemophilia B displayed greater than a fivefold increase in vector-derived circulating FIX, which improved the bleeding phenotype correction. In conclusion, incubation of HSA with AAV vectors supports a universal augmentation of AAV transduction and, more importantly, this approach can be immediately transitioned to the clinic for the treatment of hemophilia and other diseases.

  14. AAV2-mediated CLN2 gene transfer to rodent and non-human primate brain results in long-term TPP-I expression compatible with therapy for LINCL.

    PubMed

    Sondhi, D; Peterson, D A; Giannaris, E L; Sanders, C T; Mendez, B S; De, B; Rostkowski, A B; Blanchard, B; Bjugstad, K; Sladek, J R; Redmond, D E; Leopold, P L; Kaminsky, S M; Hackett, N R; Crystal, R G

    2005-11-01

    Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL) is a fatal, autosomal recessive disease resulting from mutations in the CLN2 gene with consequent deficiency in its product tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPP-I). In the central nervous system (CNS), the deficiency of TPP-I results in the accumulation of proteins in lysosomes leading to a loss of neurons causing progressive neurological decline, and death by ages 10-12 years. To establish the feasibility of treating the CNS manifestations of LINCL by gene transfer, an adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vector encoding the human CLN2 cDNA (AAV2CUhCLN2) was assessed for its ability to establish therapeutic levels of TPP-I in the brain. In vitro studies demonstrated that AAV2CUhCLN2 expressed CLN2 and produced biologically active TPP-I protein of which a fraction was secreted as the pro-TPP-I precursor and was taken up by nontransduced cells (ie, cross-correction). Following AAV2-mediated CLN2 delivery to the rat striatum, enzymatically active TPP-I protein was detected. By immunohistochemistry TPP-I protein was detected in striatal neurons (encompassing nearly half of the target structure) for up to 18 months. At the longer time points following striatal administration, TPP-I-positive cell bodies were also observed in the substantia nigra, frontal cerebral cortex and thalamus of the injected hemisphere, and the frontal cerebral cortex of the noninjected hemisphere. These areas of the brain contain neurons that extend axons into the striatum, suggesting that CNS circuitry may aid the distribution of the gene product. To assess the feasibility of human CNS delivery, a total of 3.6 x 10(11) particle units of AAV2CUhCLN2 was administered to the CNS of African green monkeys in 12 distributed doses. Assessment at 5 and 13 weeks demonstrated widespread detection of TPP-I in neurons, but not glial cells, at all regions of injection. The distribution of TPP-I-positive cells was similar between the two time points at all injection

  15. Transgene expression and effective gene silencing in vagal afferent neurons in vivo using recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Kollarik, M; Carr, M J; Ru, F; Ring, C J A; Hart, V J; Murdock, P; Myers, A C; Muroi, Y; Undem, B J

    2010-01-01

    Vagal afferent fibres innervating thoracic structures such as the respiratory tract and oesophagus are diverse, comprising several subtypes of functionally distinct C-fibres and A-fibres. Both morphological and functional studies of these nerve subtypes would be advanced by selective, effective and long-term transduction of vagal afferent neurons with viral vectors. Here we addressed the hypothesis that vagal sensory neurons can be transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in vivo, in a manner that would be useful for morphological assessment of nerve terminals, using enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as well as for the selective knock-down of specific genes of interest in a tissue-selective manner. We found that a direct microinjection of AAV vectors into the vagal nodose ganglia in vivo leads to selective, effective and long-lasting transduction of the vast majority of primary sensory vagal neurons without transduction of parasympathetic efferent neurons. The transduction of vagal neurons by pseudoserotype AAV2/8 vectors in vivo is sufficiently efficient such that it can be used to functionally silence TRPV1 gene expression using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The eGFP encoded by AAV vectors is robustly transported to both the central and peripheral terminals of transduced vagal afferent neurons allowing for bright imaging of the nerve endings in living tissues and suitable for structure–function studies of vagal afferent nerve endings. Finally, the AAV2/8 vectors are efficiently taken up by the vagal nerve terminals in the visceral tissue and retrogradely transported to the cell body, allowing for tissue-specific transduction. PMID:20736420

  16. A translatable, closed recirculation system for AAV6 vector-mediated myocardial gene delivery in the large animal.

    PubMed

    Swain, JaBaris D; Katz, Michael G; White, Jennifer D; Thesier, Danielle M; Henderson, Armen; Stedman, Hansell H; Bridges, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Current strategies for managing congestive heart failure are limited, validating the search for an alternative treatment modality. Gene therapy holds tremendous promise as both a practical and translatable technology platform. Its effectiveness is evidenced by the improvements in cardiac function observed in vector-mediated therapeutic transgene delivery to the murine myocardium. A large animal model validating these results is the likely segue into clinical application. However, controversy still exists regarding a suitable method of vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery that provides for efficient, global gene transfer to the large animal myocardium that is also clinically translatable and practical. Intramyocardial injection and catheter-based coronary delivery techniques are attractive alternatives with respect to their clinical applicability; yet, they are fraught with numerous challenges, including concerns regarding collateral gene expression in other organs, low efficiency of vector delivery to the myocardium, inhomogeneous expression, and untoward immune response secondary to gene delivery. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) delivery with dual systemic and isolated cardiac circuitry precludes these drawbacks and has the added advantage of allowing for control of the pharmacological milieu, multiple pass recirculation through the coronary circulation, the selective addition of endothelial permeabilizing agents, and an increase in vector residence time. Collectively, these mechanics significantly improve the efficiency of global, vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery to the large animal myocardium, highlighting a potential therapeutic strategy to be extended to some heart failure patients.

  17. AAVPG: A vigilant vector where transgene expression is induced by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Medrano, Ruan F.V.; Carvalho, Anna Carolina P.V.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2013-12-15

    Using p53 to drive transgene expression from viral vectors may provide on demand expression in response to physiologic stress, such as hypoxia or DNA damage. Here we introduce AAVPG, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector where a p53-responsive promoter, termed PG, is used to control transgene expression. In vitro assays show that expression from the AAVPG-luc vector was induced specifically in the presence of functional p53 (1038±202 fold increase, p<0.001). The AAVPG-luc vector was an effective biosensor of p53 activation in response to hypoxia (4.48±0.6 fold increase in the presence of 250 µM CoCl{sub 2}, p<0.001) and biomechanical stress (2.53±0.4 fold increase with stretching, p<0.05). In vivo, the vigilant nature of the AAVPG-luc vector was revealed after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with doxorubicin (pre-treatment, 3.4×10{sup 5}±0.43×10{sup 5} photons/s; post-treatment, 6.6×10{sup 5}±2.1×10{sup 5} photons/s, p<0.05). These results indicate that the AAVPG vector is an interesting option for detecting p53 activity both in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • AAV vector where transgene expression is controlled by the tumor suppressor p53. • The new vector, AAVPG, shown to function as a biosensor of p53 activity, in vitro and in vivo. • The p53 activity monitored by the AAVPG vector is relevant to cancer and other diseases. • AAVPG reporter gene expression was activated upon DNA damage, hypoxia and mechanical stress.

  18. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  19. Rapid, scalable, and low-cost purification of recombinant adeno-associated virus produced by baculovirus expression vector system

    PubMed Central

    Buclez, Pierre-Olivier; Dias Florencio, Gabriella; Relizani, Karima; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Benchaouir, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) are largely used for gene transfer in research, preclinical developments, and clinical trials. Their broad in vivo biodistribution and long-term efficacy in postmitotic tissues make them good candidates for numerous gene transfer applications. Upstream processes able to produce large amounts of rAAV were developed, particularly those using baculovirus expression vector system. In parallel, downstream processes present a large panel of purification methods, often including multiple and time consuming steps. Here, we show that simple tangential flow filtration, coupled with an optimized iodixanol-based isopycnic density gradient, is sufficient to purify several liters of crude lysate produced by baculovirus expression vector system in only one working day, leading to high titers and good purity of rAAV products. Moreover, we show that the viral vectors retain their in vitro and in vivo functionalities. Our results demonstrate that simple, rapid, and relatively low-cost methods can easily be implemented for obtaining a high-quality grade of gene therapy products based on rAAV technology. PMID:27226971

  20. Single residue AAV capsid mutation improves transduction of photoreceptors in the Abca4-/- mouse and bipolar cells in the rd1 mouse and human retina ex-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mandeep S.; Lipinski, Daniel M.; Barnea-Cramer, Alona O.; Walker, Nathan J.; Barnard, Alun R.; Hankins, Mark W.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) for the treatment of retinal degenerations has shown safety and efficacy in clinical trials. However, very high levels of vector expression may be necessary for the treatment of conditions such as Stargardt disease where a dual vector approach is potentially needed, or in optogenetic strategies for end-stage degeneration in order to achieve maximal light sensitivity. In this study, we assessed two vectors with single capsid mutations, rAAV2/2(Y444F) and rAAV2/8(Y733F) in their ability to transduce retina in the Abca4-/- and rd1 mouse models of retinal degeneration. We noted significantly increased photoreceptor transduction using rAAV2/8(Y733F) in the Abca4-/- mouse, in contrast to previous work where vectors tested in this model have shown low levels of photoreceptor transduction. Bipolar cell transduction was achieved following subretinal delivery of both vectors in the rd1 mouse, and via intravitreal delivery of rAAV2/2(Y444F). The successful use of rAAV2/8(Y733F) to target bipolar cells was further validated on human tissue using an ex-vivo culture system of retinal explants. Capsid mutant AAV vectors transduce human retinal cells and may be particularly suited to treating retinal degenerations in which high levels of transgene expression are required. PMID:27416076

  1. AAV-mediated gene delivery of BDNF or GDNF is neuroprotective in a model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kells, Adrian P; Fong, Dahna M; Dragunow, Mike; During, Matthew J; Young, Deborah; Connor, Bronwen

    2004-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that results in the progressive loss of GABAergic medium spiny projection neurons in the striatum. Neurotrophic factors have demonstrated neuroprotective actions on striatal neurons, suggesting that increased neurotrophic factor expression may prevent or reduce neuronal loss in the HD brain. We investigated whether enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), achieved by adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene delivery, could protect striatal neurons in the quinolinic acid (QA) rodent model of HD. Adult Wistar rats received unilateral intrastriatal injections of AAV-BDNF, AAV-GDNF, AAV-GFP, or PBS. Three weeks later, the rats were lesioned with QA, a toxin that induces striatal neuron death by an excitotoxic process. Both AAV-BDNF and AAV-GDNF significantly reduced the loss of both NeuN- and calbindin-immunopositive striatal neurons 2 weeks after lesion compared to controls. AAV-BDNF also provided significant neurotrophic support to NOS-immunopositive striatal interneurons, while AAV-GDNF-treated rats demonstrated significant protection of parvalbumin-immunopositive striatal interneurons compared to controls. These results indicate that AAV-mediated gene transfer of BDNF or GDNF into the striatum provides neuronal protection in a rodent model of HD.

  2. Correction of glycogen storage disease type II by an adeno-associated virus vector containing a muscle-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Schneider, Ayn; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure due to acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) deficiency. An AAV2 vector pseudotyped as AAV6 (AAV2/6 vector) transiently expressed high-level human GAA in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice without reducing glycogen storage; however, in immunodeficient GAA-KO/SCID mice the AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced the glycogen content of the injected muscle for 24 weeks. A CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrate was observed in response to the AAV2/6 vector in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. When a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter was substituted for the CB promoter (AAV-MCKhGAApA), that AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced glycogen content in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. Muscle-restricted expression of hGAA provoked only a humoral (not cellular) immune response. Intravenous administration of a high number of particles of AAV-MCKhGAApA as AAV2/7 reduced the glycogen content of the heart and skeletal muscle and corrected individual myofibers in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice 24 weeks postinjection. In summary, persistent correction of muscle glycogen content was achieved with an AAV vector containing a muscle-specific promoter in GAA-KO mice, and this approach should be considered for muscle-targeted gene therapy in Pompe disease.

  3. Role of cellular FKBP52 protein in intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Weihong; Wu Jianqing ||; Zhong Li; Chen Linyuan; Weigel-Kelley, Kirsten A. |; Qing Keyun; Larsen, Steven H.; Shou Weinian; Warrington, Kenneth H. |; Srivastava, Arun |. E-mail: asrivastava@gtc.ufl.edu

    2006-09-30

    We have reported that tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of a cellular protein, FKBP52, inhibit the second-strand DNA synthesis of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), leading to inefficient transgene expression from recombinant AAV vectors. To further explore the role of FKBP52 in AAV-mediated transduction, we established murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cultures from FKBP52 wild-type (WT), heterozygous (HE), and knockout (KO) mice. Conventional AAV vectors failed to transduce WT MEFs efficiently, and the transduction efficiency was not significantly increased in HE or KO MEFs. AAV vectors failed to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in these cells. Treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) increased the transduction efficiency of conventional AAV vectors by {approx}25-fold in WT MEFs, but only by {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs. The use of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, which bypass the requirement of viral second-strand DNA synthesis, revealed that HU treatment increased the transduction efficiency {approx}23-fold in WT MEFs, but only {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs, indicating that the lack of HU treatment-mediated increase in KO MEFs was not due to failure of AAV to undergo viral second-strand DNA synthesis. Following HU treatment, {approx}59% of AAV genomes were present in the nuclear fraction from WT MEFs, but only {approx}28% in KO MEFs, indicating that the pathway by which HU treatment mediates nuclear transport of AAV was impaired in KO MEFs. When KO MEFs were stably transfected with an FKBP52 expression plasmid, HU treatment-mediated increase in the transduction efficiency was restored in these cells, which correlated directly with improved intracellular trafficking. Intact AAV particles were also shown to interact with FKBP52 as well as with dynein, a known cellular protein involved in AAV trafficking. These studies suggest that FKBP52, being a cellular chaperone protein, facilitates intracellular trafficking of AAV, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant

  4. Differential Contribution of Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Rep Protein Expression and Nucleic Acid Elements to Inhibition of Adenoviral Replication in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Eva; Heilbronn, Regine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The helper-dependent adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) exhibits complex interactions with its helper adenovirus. Whereas AAV-2 is dependent on adenoviral functions for productive replication, it conversely inhibits adenoviral replication, both when its genome is present in trans after coinfection with both viruses and when it is present in cis, as in the production of recombinant adenovirus (rAd)/AAV-2 hybrid vectors. The notion that AAV-mediated inhibition of adenoviral replication is due predominantly to the expression of the AAV-2 Rep proteins was recently challenged by successful Rep78 expression in a rAd5 vector through recoding of the Rep open reading frame (ORF). We closely analyzed the relative contributions of AAV-2 nucleic acid elements and Rep protein expression to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in both of the above scenarios. When present in cis, a sequence element in the 3′ part of the rep gene, comprising only the AAV-2 p40 promoter and the AAV-2 intron sequence, which we termed the RIS-Ad, completely blocks adenoviral replication. p5/p19 promoter-driven Rep protein expression, on the other hand, only weakly inhibits rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation, and by inactivation of the RIS-Ad, it is feasible to generate first-generation rAd vectors expressing functional Rep proteins. The RIS-Ad plays no role in the inhibition of adenoviral replication in trans in a model closely mimicking AAV-2–Ad coinfection. In this case, expression of the Rep proteins is required, as well as the presence of an amplifiable inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-containing template. Thus, very different AAV-2 elements and mechanisms are involved in inhibition of adenoviral replication during rAd/AAV-2 vector propagation and after Ad-AAV coinfection. IMPORTANCE This is the first study to systematically compare the contributions of AAV-2 protein expression and AAV-2 nucleic acid elements to the inhibition of adenoviral replication in rAd/AAV-2 hybrid vector

  5. Tyrosine triple mutated AAV2-BDNF gene therapy in a rat model of transient IOP elevation

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Maika; Kameya, Shuhei; Fujimoto, Chiaki; Nakamoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Hisatomo; Igarashi, Toru; Miyake, Noriko; Iijima, Osamu; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the neuroprotective effects of exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which provides protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rodents, in a model of transient intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation using a mutant (triple Y-F) self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 2 vector encoding BDNF (tm-scAAV2-BDNF). Methods The tm-scAAV2-BDNF or control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP; tm-scAAV2-GFP) was intravitreally administered to rats, which were then divided into four groups: control, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury only, I/R injury with tm-scAAV2-GFP, and tm-scAAV2-BDNF. I/R injury was then induced by transiently increasing IOP, after which the rats were euthanized to measure the inner retinal thickness and cell counts in the RGC layer. Results Intravitreous injection of tm-scAAV2-BDNF resulted in high levels of BDNF expression in the neural retina. Histological analysis showed that the inner retinal thickness and cell numbers in the RGC layer were preserved after transient IOP elevation in eyes treated with tm-scAAV2-BDNF but not in the other I/R groups. Significantly reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining after I/R injury in the rats that received tm-scAAV2-BDNF indicated reduced retinal stress, and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis confirmed preservation of retinal function in the tm-scAAV2-BDNF group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of neuroprotective gene therapy using tm-scAAV2-BDNF to protect the inner retina from transiently high intraocular pressure. An in vivo gene therapeutic approach to the clinical management of retinal diseases in conditions such as glaucoma, retinal artery occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, and diabetic retinopathy thus appears feasible. PMID:27440998

  6. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-02-22

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness.

  7. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 each complement the Ad5 helper gene set, increasing rAAV2 and wt AAV2 production.

    PubMed

    Cao, M; Zhu, H; Bandyopadhyay, S; You, H; Hermonat, P L

    2012-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is a popular vector for human gene therapy, because of its safety record and ability to express genes long term. Yet large-scale recombinant (r) AAV production remains problematic because of low particle yield. The adenovirus (Ad) and herpes (simplex) virus helper genes for AAV have been widely used and studied, but the helper genes of human papillomavirus (HPV) have not. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 help wild-type (wt) AAV productive infection in differentiating keratinocytes, however, HEK293 cells are the standard cell line used for generating rAAV. Here we demonstrate that the three HPV genes were unable to stimulate significant rAAV replication in HEK293 cells when used alone. However, when used in conjunction (complementation) with the standard Ad5 helper gene set, E1, E2 and E6 were each capable of significantly boosting rAAV DNA replication and virus particle yield. Moreover, wt AAV DNA replication and virion yield were also significantly boosted by each HPV gene along with wt Ad5 virus co-infection. Mild-to-moderate changes in rep- and cap-encoded protein levels were evident in the presence of the E1, E2 and E6 genes. Higher wt AAV DNA replication was not matched by similar increases in the levels of rep-encoded protein. Moreover, although rep mRNA was upregulated, cap mRNA was upregulated more. Higher virus yields did correlate most consistently with increased Rep52-, VP3- and VP-related 21/31 kDa species. The observed boost in wt and rAAV production by HPV genes was not unexpected, as the Ad and HPV helper gene sets do not seem to recapitulate each other. These results raise the possibility of generating improved helper gene sets derived from both the Ad and HPV helper gene sets.

  8. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 each complement the Ad5 helper gene set, increasing rAAV2 and wt AAV2 production

    PubMed Central

    Cao, M.; Zhu, H.; Bandyopadhyay, S; You, H; Hermonat, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is a popular vector for human gene therapy, because of its safety record and ability to express genes long term. Yet large scale recombinant (r)AAV production remains problematic due to low particle yield. The adenovirus (Ad) and herpes (simplex) virus (HSV) helper genes for AAV have been widely used and studied, but the helper genes of human papillomavirus (HPV) have not. HPV-16 E1, E2 and E6 help wild type (wt) AAV productive infection in differentiating keratinocytes, however HEK293 cells are the standard cell line used for generating rAAV. Here we demonstrate that the three HPV genes were unable to stimulate significant rAAV replication in HEK293 cells when used alone. However, when used in conjunction (complementation) with the standard Ad5 helper gene set, E1, E2 and E6 were each capable of significantly boosting rAAV DNA replication and virus particle yield. Moreover, wt AAV DNA replication and virion yield were also significantly boosted by each HPV gene along with wt Ad5 virus co-infection. Mild to moderate changes in rep- and cap–encoded protein levels were evident in the presence of the E1, E2 and E6 genes. Higher wt AAV DNA replication was not matched by similar increases in the levels of rep-encoded protein. Moreover, while rep mRNA was up-regulated, cap mRNA was up-regulated more. Higher virus yields did correlate most consistently with increased Rep52, VP3 and VP-related 21/31 kDa species. The observed boost in wt and rAAV production by HPV genes was not unexpected, as the Ad and HPV helper gene sets do not seem to recapitulate each other. These results raise the possibility of generating improved helper gene sets derived from both the Ad and HPV helper gene sets. PMID:21850053

  9. Intracranial AAV-IFN-β gene therapy eliminates invasive xenograft glioblastoma and improves survival in orthotopic syngeneic murine model.

    PubMed

    GuhaSarkar, Dwijit; Neiswender, James; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The highly invasive property of glioblastoma (GBM) cells and genetic heterogeneity are largely responsible for tumor recurrence after the current standard-of-care treatment and thus a direct cause of death. Previously, we have shown that intracranial interferon-beta (IFN-β) gene therapy by locally administered adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) successfully treats noninvasive orthotopic glioblastoma models. Here, we extend these findings by testing this approach in invasive human GBM xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. First, we show that a single intracranial injection of AAV encoding human IFN-β eliminates invasive human GBM8 tumors and promotes long-term survival. Next, we screened five AAV-IFN-β vectors with different promoters to drive safe expression of mouse IFN-β in the brain in the context of syngeneic GL261 tumors. Two AAV-IFN-β vectors were excluded due to safety concerns, but therapeutic studies with the other three vectors showed extensive tumor cell death, activation of microglia surrounding the tumors, and a 56% increase in median survival of the animals treated with AAV/P2-Int-mIFN-β vector. We also assessed the therapeutic effect of combining AAV-IFN-β therapy with temozolomide (TMZ). As TMZ affects DNA replication, an event that is crucial for second-strand DNA synthesis of single-stranded AAV vectors before active transcription, we tested two TMZ treatment regimens. Treatment with TMZ prior to AAV-IFN-β abrogated any benefit from the latter, while the reverse order of treatment doubled the median survival compared to controls. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of intracranial AAV-IFN-β therapy in a highly migratory GBM model as well as in a syngeneic mouse model and that combination with TMZ is likely to enhance its antitumor potency.

  10. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated high-efficiency, transient expression of the murine cationic amino acid transporter (ecotropic retroviral receptor) permits stable transduction of human HeLa cells by ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, J; Miller, J L; Yang, Y; Fenimore-Justman, A; Rueda, F; Vanin, E F; Nienhuis, A W

    1996-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus has a broad host range, is nonpathogenic, and integrates into a preferred location on chromosome 19, features that have fostered development of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) as gene transfer vectors for therapeutic applications. We have used an rAAV to transfer and express the murine cationic amino acid transporter which functions as the ecotropic retroviral receptor, thereby rendering human cells conditionally susceptible to infection by an ecotropic retroviral vector. The proportion of human HeLa cells expressing the receptor at 60 h varied as a function of the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the rAAV. Cells expressing the ecotropic receptor were efficiently transduced with an ecotropic retroviral vector encoding a nucleus-localized form of beta-galactosidase. Cells coexpressing the ecotropic receptor and nucleus-localized beta-galactosidase were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and cell lines were recovered by cloning at limiting dilution. After growth in culture, all clones contained the retroviral vector genome, but fewer than 10% (3 of 47) contained the rAAV genome and continued to express the ecotropic receptor. The ecotropic receptor coding sequences in the rAAV genome were under the control of a tetracycline-modulated promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, receptor expression was low and the proportion of cells transduced by the ecotropic retroviral vector was decreased. Modulation of receptor expression was achieved with both an episomal and an integrated form of the rAAV genome. These data establish that functional gene expression from an rAAV genome can occur transiently without genome integration. PMID:8794313

  11. Transduction efficiency of neurons and glial cells by AAV-1, -5, -9, -rh10 and -hu11 serotypes in rat spinal cord following contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, H A; Alessi, V; Singh, V; Hunanyan, A S; Levine, J M; Arvanian, V L

    2014-12-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are a promising system for therapeutic gene delivery to neurons in a number of neurodegenerative conditions including spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Considering the role of macrophages and glia in the progression of 'secondary damage', we searched for the optimal vectors for gene transfer to both neurons and glia following contusion SCI in adult rats. Contusion models share many similarities to most human spinal cord traumas. Several AAV serotypes known for their neuronal tropism expressing enhanced green-fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected intraspinally following thoracic T10 contusion. We systematically compared the transduction efficacy and cellular tropism of these vectors for neurons, macrophages/microglia, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and NG2-positive glial cells following contusion SCI. No additional changes in inflammatory responses or behavioral performance were observed for any of the vectors. We identified that AAV-rh10 induced robust transduction of both neuronal and glial cells. Even though efficacy to transduce neurons was comparable to already established AAV-1, AAV-5 and AAV-9, AAV-rh10 transduced significantly higher number of macrophages/microglia and oligodendrocytes in damaged spinal cord compared with other serotypes tested. Thus, AAV-rh10 carries promising potential as a gene therapy vector, particularly if both the neuronal and glial cell populations in damaged spinal cord are targeted.

  12. The state of the art of adeno-associated virus-based vectors in gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Renata dos Santos; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2007-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) has rapidly gained popularity in gene therapy since the establishment of the first AAV2 infectious clone, in 1982, due to some of their distinguishing characteristics such as lack of pathogenicity, wide range of infectivity, and ability to establish long-term transgene expression. Notably over the past decade, this virus has attracted considerable interest as a gene therapy vector, and about 85% of the currently available 2,041 PubMed references on adeno-associated viruses have been published during this time. The exponential progress of AAV-based vectors has been made possible by the advances in the knowledge of the virology and biology of this virus, which allows great improvement in AAV vectors construction and a better comprehension of their operation. Moreover, with the recent discovery of novel AAV serotypes, there is virtually one preferred serotype for nearly every organ or tissue to target. Thus, AAV-based vectors have been successfully overcoming the main gene therapy challenges such as transgene maintenance, safety and host immune response, and meeting the desirable vector system features of high level of safety combined with clinical efficacy and versatility in terms of potential applications. Consequently, AAV is increasingly becoming the vector of choice for a wide range of gene therapy approaches. This report will highlight the state of the art of AAV-based vectors studies and the advances on the use of AAV vectors for several gene therapy approaches. PMID:17939872

  13. AAV-mediated transfer of RhoA shRNA and CNTF promotes retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cen, Ling-Ping; Liang, Jia-Jian; Chen, Jian-Huan; Harvey, Alan R; Ng, Tsz Kin; Zhang, Mingzhi; Pang, Chi Pui; Cui, Qi; Fan, You-Ming

    2017-02-20

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) mediated transfer of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and RhoA shRNA has additive effects on promoting the survival and axon regeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve crush (ONC). Silencing effects of AAV-RhoA shRNA were confirmed by examining neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and by quantifying RhoA expression levels with western blotting. Young adult Fischer rats received an intravitreal injection of (i) saline, (ii) AAV green fluorescent protein (GFP), (iii) AAV-CNTF, (iv) AAV-RhoA shRNA, or (v) a combination of both AAV-CNTF and AAV-RhoA shRNA. Two weeks later, the ON was completely crushed. Three weeks after ONC, RGC survival was estimated by counting βIII-tubulin-positive neurons in retinal whole mounts. Axon regeneration was evaluated by counting GAP-43-positive axons in the crushed ON. It was found that AAV-RhoA shRNA decreased RhoA expression levels and promoted neurite outgrowth in vitro. In the ONC model, AAV-RhoA shRNA by itself had only weak beneficial effects on RGC axon regeneration. However, when combined with AAV-CNTF, AAV-RhoA shRNA significantly improved the therapeutic effect of AAV-CNTF on axon regeneration by nearly two fold, even though there was no significant change in RGC viability. In sum, this combination of vectors increases the regenerative response and can lead to more successful therapeutic outcomes following neurotrauma.

  14. Effective and durable genetic modification of human mesenchymal stem cells via controlled release of rAAV vectors from self-assembling peptide hydrogels with a maintained differentiation potency.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Frisch, Janina; Schmitt, Gertrud; Monge-Marcet, Amália; Lopez-Chicon, Patricia; Mata, Alvaro; Semino, Carlos; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2015-05-01

    Controlling the release of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors from biocompatible materials is a novel, attractive approach to increase the residence time and effectiveness of a gene carrier at a defined target site. Self-assembling peptides have an ability to form stable hydrogels and encapsulate cells upon exposure to physiological pH and ionic strength. Here, we examined the capacity of the peptide hydrogel RAD16-I in a pure (RAD) form or combined with hyaluronic acid (RAD-HA) to release rAAV vectors as a means to genetically modify primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), a potent source of cells for regenerative medicine. Specifically, we demonstrate the ability of the systems to efficiently encapsulate and release rAAV vectors in a sustained, controlled manner for the effective transduction of hMSCs (up to 80%) without deleterious effects on cell viability (up to 100%) or on their potential for chondrogenic differentiation over time (up to 21days). The present study demonstrates that RAD16-I is an advantageous material with tunable properties to control the release of rAAV vectors as a promising tool to develop new, improved therapeutic approaches for tissue engineering in vivo.

  15. Prolonged expansion of human nucleus pulposus cells expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase mediated by lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Deli; Ruan, Dike; He, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chaofeng; Xin, Hongkui; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Human degenerative disc disease (DDD) is characterized by progressive loss of human nucleus pulposus (HNP) cells and extracellular matrix, in which the massive deposition are secreted by HNP cells. Cell therapy to supplement HNP cells to degenerated discs has been thought to be a promising strategy to treat DDD. However, obtaining a large quality of fully functional HNP cells has been severely hampered by limited proliferation capacity of HNP cells in vitro. Previous studies have used lipofectamine or recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors to deliver human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) into ovine or HNP cells to prolong the activity of nucleus pulposus cells with limited success. Here we developed a lentiviral vector bearing both hTERT and a gene encoding green fluorescence protein (L-hTERT/EGFP). This vector efficiently mediated both hTERT and EGFP into freshly isolated HNP cells. The expressions of both transgenes in L-hTERT/EGFP transduced HNP cells were detected up to day 210 post viral infection, which was twice as long as rAAV vector did. Furthermore, we observed restored telomerase activity, maintained telomere length, delayed cell senescence, and increased cell proliferation rate in those L-hTERT/EGFP transduced HNP cells. Our study suggests that lentiviral vector might be a useful gene delivery vehicle for HNP cell therapy to treat DDD.

  16. Widespread neuron-specific transgene expression in brain and spinal cord following synapsin promoter-driven AAV9 neonatal intracerebroventricular injection.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jesse R; Smith, Gaynor A; Rocha, Emily M; Hayes, Melissa A; Beagan, Jonathan A; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2014-07-25

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer holds great promise for treating a wide-range of neurodegenerative disorders. The AAV9 serotype crosses the blood-brain barrier and shows enhanced transduction efficiency compared to other serotypes, thus offering advantageous targeting when global transgene expression is required. Neonatal intravenous or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) delivery of recombinant AAV9 (rAAV9) have recently proven effective for modeling and treating several rodent models of neurodegenerative disease, however, the technique is associated with variable cellular tropism, making tailored gene transfer a challenge. In the current study, we employ the human synapsin 1 (hSYN1) gene promoter to drive neuron-specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) after neonatal i.c.v. injection of rAAV9 in mice. We observed widespread GFP expression in neurons throughout the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves and ganglia at 6 weeks-of-age. Region-specific quantification of GFP expression showed high neuronal transduction rates in substantia nigra pars reticulata (43.9±5.4%), motor cortex (43.5±3.3%), hippocampus (43.1±2.7%), cerebellum (29.6±2.3%), cervical spinal cord (24.9±3.9%), and ventromedial striatum (16.9±4.3%), among others. We found that 14.6±2.2% of neuromuscular junctions innervating the gastrocnemius muscle displayed GFP immunoreactivity. GFP expression was identified in several neuronal sub-types, including nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic cells, striatal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein (DARPP-32)-positive neurons, and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive motor neurons. These results build on contemporary gene transfer techniques, demonstrating that the hSYN1 promoter can be used with rAAV9 to drive robust neuron-specific transgene expression throughout the nervous system.

  17. A Molecular Toolbox for Rapid Generation of Viral Vectors to Up- or Down-Regulate Neuronal Gene Expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    White, Melanie D.; Milne, Ruth V. J.; Nolan, Matthew F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins, and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV) or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1, and Kir3.2) and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miRNA). We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miRNA produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miRNA with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience. PMID:21772812

  18. Targeting gene expression to cones with human cone opsin promoters in recombinant AAV.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, A M; Alexander, J J; Cooper, A E; Chiodo, V A; Glushakova, L G; Acland, G M; Hauswirth, W W; Aguirre, G D

    2008-07-01

    Specific cone-directed therapy is of high priority in the treatment of human hereditary retinal diseases. However, not much information exists about the specific targeting of photoreceptor subclasses. Three versions of the human red cone opsin promoter (PR0.5, 3LCR-PR0.5 and PR2.1), and the human blue cone opsin promoter HB569, were evaluated for their specificity and robustness in targeting green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression to subclasses of cones in the canine retina when used in recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors of serotype 5. The vectors were administered by subretinal injection. The promoter PR2.1 led to most effective and specific expression of GFP in the long- and medium-wavelength-absorbing cones (L/M cones) of normal and diseased retinas. The PR0.5 promoter was not effective. Adding three copies of the 35-bp LCR in front of PR0.5 lead to weak GFP expression in L/M cones. The HB569 promoter was not specific, and GFP was expressed in a few L/M cones, some rods and the retinal pigment epithelium. These results suggest that L/M cones, the predominant class of cone photoreceptors in the retinas of dogs and most mammalian species can be successfully targeted using the human red cone opsin promoter.

  19. Correction of Murine Diabetic Hyperglycaemia With A Single Systemic Administration of An AAV2/8 Vector Containing A Novel Codon Optimized Human Insulin Gene.

    PubMed

    Gan, Shu Uin; Notaridou, Maria; Fu, Zhen Ying; Lee, Kok Onn; Sia, Kian Chuan; Nathwani, Amit Chunilal; Della Peruta, Marco; Calne, Roy Yorke

    2016-01-01

    We report the correction of hyperglycemia of STZ induced diabetic mice using one intravenous systemic administration of a single stranded serotype 8 pseudotyped adeno-associated virus (ssAAV2/8) vector encoding the human proinsulin gene under a constitutive liver specific promoter. In vivo dose titration experiments were carried out and we identified an optimal range that achieved maintenance of euglycaemia or a mild diabetic condition for at least 9 months and ongoing to beyond 1 year for some animals, accompanied by human C-peptide secretion and weight gain. Further DNA codon optimization of the insulin gene construct resulted in approximately 3-10 times more human C-peptide secreted in the blood of codon optimized treated animals thereby reducing the number of vector particles required to achieve the same extent of reduction in blood glucose levels as the non-codon optimized vector. The constitutive secretion of insulin achieved with a single administration of the vector could be of therapeutic value for some diabetic patients.

  20. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 replication and packaging is entirely supported by a herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon expressing Rep and Cap.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, J E; Zolotukhin, S; Muzyczka, N; Hayward, G S; Byrne, B J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 (rAAV) vectors have recently been shown to have great utility as gene transfer agents both in vitro and in vivo. One of the problems associated with the use of rAAV vectors has been the difficulty of large-scale vector production. Low-efficiency plasmid transfection of the rAAV vector and complementing AAV type 2 (AAV-2) functions (rep and cap) followed by superinfection with adenovirus has been the standard approach to rAAV production. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the ability of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon expressing AAV-2 Rep and Cap to support replication and packaging of rAAV vectors. HSV-1 amplicon vectors were constructed which contain the AAV-2 rep and cap genes under control of their native promoters (p5, p19, and p40). An HSV-1 amplicon vector, HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27, was generated by supplying helper functions with either wild-type HSV-1 (KOS strain) or the ICP27-deleted mutant of HSV-1, d27-1, respectively. Replication of the amplicon stocks is not inhibited by the presence of AAV-2 Rep proteins, which highlights important differences between HSV-1 and adenovirus replication and the mechanism of providing helper function for productive AAV infection. Coinfection of rAAV and HSV-RC/KOS resulted in the replication and amplification of rAAV genomes. Similarly, rescue and replication of rAAV genomes occurred when rAAV vector plasmids were transfected into cells followed by HSV-RC/KOS infection and when two rAAV proviral cell lines were infected with HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27. Production of infectious rAAV by rescue from two rAAV proviral cell lines has also been achieved with HSV-RC/KOS and HSV-RC/d27. The particle titer of rAAV produced with HSV-RC/d27 is equal to that achieved by supplying rep and cap by transfection followed by adenovirus superinfection. Importantly, no detectable wild-type AAV-2 is generated with this approach. These results demonstrate

  1. Induction of Immune Tolerance to Foreign Protein via Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Gene Transfer in Mid-Gestation Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Marcus G.; Riley, John S.; Andrews, Abigail; Tyminski, Alec; Limberis, Maria; Pogoriler, Jennifer E.; Partridge, Emily; Olive, Aliza; Hedrick, Holly L.; Flake, Alan W.; Peranteau, William H.

    2017-01-01

    A major limitation to adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy is the generation of host immune responses to viral vector antigens and the transgene product. The ability to induce immune tolerance to foreign protein has the potential to overcome this host immunity. Acquisition and maintenance of tolerance to viral vector antigens and transgene products may also permit repeat administration thereby enhancing therapeutic efficacy. In utero gene transfer (IUGT) takes advantage of the immunologic immaturity of the fetus to induce immune tolerance to foreign antigens. In this large animal study, in utero administration of AAV6.2, AAV8 and AAV9 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to ~60 day fetal sheep (term: ~150 days) was performed. Transgene expression and postnatal immune tolerance to GFP and viral antigens were assessed. We demonstrate 1) hepatic expression of GFP 1 month following in utero administration of AAV6.2.GFP and AAV8.GFP, 2) in utero recipients of either AAV6.2.GFP or AAV8.GFP fail to mount an anti-GFP antibody response following postnatal GFP challenge and lack inflammatory cellular infiltrates at the intramuscular site of immunization, 3) a serotype specific anti-AAV neutralizing antibody response is elicited following postnatal challenge of in utero recipients of AAV6.2 or AAV8 with the corresponding AAV serotype, and 4) durable hepatic GFP expression was observed up to 6 months after birth in recipients of AAV8.GFP but expression was lost between 1 and 6 months of age in recipients of AAV6.2.GFP. The current study demonstrates, in a preclinical large animal model, the potential of IUGT to achieve host immune tolerance to the viral vector transgene product but also suggests that a single exposure to the vector capsid proteins at the time of IUGT is inadequate to induce tolerance to viral vector antigens. PMID:28141818

  2. Engineering AAV receptor footprints for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Victoria J; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently at the forefront of human gene therapy clinical trials as recombinant vectors. Significant progress has been made in elucidating the structure, biology and tropisms of different naturally occurring AAV isolates in the past decade. In particular, a spectrum of AAV capsid interactions with host receptors have been identified and characterized. These studies have enabled a better understanding of key determinants of AAV cell recognition and entry in different hosts. This knowledge is now being applied toward engineering new, lab-derived AAV capsids with favorable transduction profiles. The current review conveys a structural perspective of capsid-glycan interactions and provides a roadmap for generating synthetic strains by engineering AAV receptor footprints.

  3. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W; Bigelow, Chad E; McGee, Terri L; Gujar, Akshata N; Li, Hui; Hanks, Shawn M; Vrouvlianis, Joanna; Maker, Michael; Leehy, Barrett; Zhang, Yiqin; Aranda, Jorge; Bounoutas, George; Demirs, John T; Yang, Junzheng; Ornberg, Richard; Wang, Yu; Martin, Wendy; Stout, Kelly R; Argentieri, Gregory; Grosenstein, Paul; Diaz, Danielle; Turner, Oliver; Jaffee, Bruce D; Police, Seshidhar R; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs) composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein). A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types) at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1) had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone) and photopic (cone) electroretinograms (ERGs). The effect was still present after 1 year. PMID:26199951

  4. Differential targeting of feline photoreceptors by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors: implications for preclinical gene therapy trials.

    PubMed

    Minella, A L; Mowat, F M; Willett, K L; Sledge, D; Bartoe, J T; Bennett, J; Petersen-Jones, S M

    2014-10-01

    The cat is emerging as a promising large animal model for preclinical testing of retinal dystrophy therapies, for example, by gene therapy. However, there is a paucity of studies investigating viral vector gene transfer to the feline retina. We therefore sought to study the tropism of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for the feline outer retina. We delivered four rAAV serotypes: rAAV2/2, rAAV2/5, rAAV2/8 and rAAV2/9, each expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter, to the subretinal space in cats and, for comparison, mice. Cats were monitored for gene expression by in vivo imaging and cellular tropism was determined using immunohistochemistry. In cats, rAAV2/2, rAAV2/8 and rAAV2/9 vectors induced faster and stronger GFP expression than rAAV2/5 and all vectors transduced the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors. Unlike in mice, cone photoreceptors in the cat retina were more efficiently transduced than rod photoreceptors. In mice, rAAV2/2 only transduced the RPE whereas the other vectors also transduced rods and cones. These results highlight species differences in cellular tropism of rAAV vectors in the outer retina. We conclude that rAAV serotypes are suitable for use for retinal gene therapy in feline models, particularly when cone photoreceptors are the target cell.

  5. Future of rAAV Gene Therapy: Platform for RNAi, Gene Editing, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Valdmanis, Paul N; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-10

    The use of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) ushered in a new millennium of gene transfer for therapeutic treatment of a number of conditions, including congenital blindness, hemophilia, and spinal muscular atrophy. rAAV vectors have remarkable staying power from a therapeutic standpoint, withstanding several ebbs and flows. As new technologies such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat genome editing emerge, it is now the delivery tool-the AAV vector-that is the stalwart. The long-standing safety of this vector in a multitude of clinical settings makes rAAV a selling point in the advancement of approaches for gene replacement, gene knockdown, gene editing, and genome modification/engineering. The research community is building on these advances to develop more tailored delivery approaches and to tweak the genome in new and unique ways. Intertwining these approaches with newly engineered rAAV vectors is greatly expanding the available tools to manipulate gene expression with a therapeutic intent.

  6. Reversal of blindness in animal models of leber congenital amaurosis using optimized AAV2-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Bennicelli, Jeannette; Wright, John Fraser; Komaromy, Andras; Jacobs, Jonathan B; Hauck, Bernd; Zelenaia, Olga; Mingozzi, Federico; Hui, Daniel; Chung, Daniel; Rex, Tonia S; Wei, Zhangyong; Qu, Guang; Zhou, Shangzhen; Zeiss, Caroline; Arruda, Valder R; Acland, Gregory M; Dell'Osso, Lou F; High, Katherine A; Maguire, Albert M; Bennett, Jean

    2008-03-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of an optimized adeno-associated virus (AAV; AAV2.RPE65) in animal models of the RPE65 form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Protein expression was optimized by addition of a modified Kozak sequence at the translational start site of hRPE65. Modifications in AAV production and delivery included use of a long stuffer sequence to prevent reverse packaging from the AAV inverted-terminal repeats, and co-injection with a surfactant. The latter allows consistent and predictable delivery of a given dose of vector. We observed improved electroretinograms (ERGs) and visual acuity in Rpe65 mutant mice. This has not been reported previously using AAV2 vectors. Subretinal delivery of 8.25 x 10(10) vector genomes in affected dogs was well tolerated both locally and systemically, and treated animals showed improved visual behavior and pupillary responses, and reduced nystagmus within 2 weeks of injection. ERG responses confirmed the reversal of visual deficit. Immunohistochemistry confirmed transduction of retinal pigment epithelium cells and there was minimal toxicity to the retina as judged by histopathologic analysis. The data demonstrate that AAV2.RPE65 delivers the RPE65 transgene efficiently and quickly to the appropriate target cells in vivo in animal models. This vector holds great promise for treatment of LCA due to RPE65 mutations.

  7. Reversal of Blindness in Animal Models of Leber Congenital Amaurosis Using Optimized AAV2-mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bennicelli, Jeannette; Wright, John Fraser; Komaromy, Andras; Jacobs, Jonathan B; Hauck, Bernd; Zelenaia, Olga; Mingozzi, Federico; Hui, Daniel; Chung, Daniel; Rex, Tonia S; Wei, Zhangyong; Qu, Guang; Zhou, Shangzhen; Zeiss, Caroline; Arruda, Valder R; Acland, Gregory M; Dell’Osso, Lou F; High, Katherine A; Maguire, Albert M; Bennett, Jean

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of an optimized adeno-associated virus (AAV; AAV2.RPE65) in animal models of the RPE65 form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Protein expression was optimized by addition of a modified Kozak sequence at the translational start site of hRPE65. Modifications in AAV production and delivery included use of a long stuffer sequence to prevent reverse packaging from the AAV inverted-terminal repeats, and co-injection with a surfactant. The latter allows consistent and predictable delivery of a given dose of vector. We observed improved electroretinograms (ERGs) and visual acuity in Rpe65 mutant mice. This has not been reported previously using AAV2 vectors. Subretinal delivery of 8.25 × 1010 vector genomes in affected dogs was well tolerated both locally and systemically, and treated animals showed improved visual behavior and pupillary responses, and reduced nystagmus within 2 weeks of injection. ERG responses confirmed the reversal of visual deficit. Immunohistochemistry confirmed transduction of retinal pigment epithelium cells and there was minimal toxicity to the retina as judged by histopathologic analysis. The data demonstrate that AAV2.RPE65 delivers the RPE65 transgene efficiently and quickly to the appropriate target cells in vivo in animal models. This vector holds great promise for treatment of LCA due to RPE65 mutations. PMID:18209734

  8. Vaccinia virus as a subhelper for AAV replication and packaging.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrea R; Dong, Biao; Chen, Lingxia; Xiao, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been widely used as a gene therapy vector to treat a variety of disorders. While these vectors are increasingly popular and successful in the clinic, there is still much to learn about the viruses. Understanding the biology of these viruses is essential in engineering better vectors and generating vectors more efficiently for large-scale use. AAV requires a helper for production and replication making this aspect of the viral life cycle crucial. Vaccinia virus (VV) has been widely cited as a helper virus for AAV. However, to date, there are no detailed analyses of its helper function. Here, the helper role of VV was studied in detail. In contrast to common belief, we demonstrated that VV was not a sufficient helper virus for AAV replication. Vaccinia failed to produce rAAV and activate AAV promoters. While this virus could not support rAAV production, Vaccinia could initiate AAV replication and packaging when AAV promoter activation is not necessary. This activity is due to the ability of Vaccinia-driven Rep78 to transcribe in the cytoplasm and subsequently translate in the nucleus and undergo typical functions in the AAV life cycle. As such, VV is subhelper for AAV compared to complete helper functions of adenovirus.

  9. Stable enhanced green fluorescent protein expression after differentiation and transplantation of reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells generated by AAVS1 transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Cerbini, Trevor; San, Hong; Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Guokai; Rao, Mahendra S; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell lines with tissue-specific or ubiquitous reporter genes are extremely useful for optimizing in vitro differentiation conditions as well as for monitoring transplanted cells in vivo. The adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus has been used as a "safe harbor" locus for inserting transgenes because of its open chromatin structure, which permits transgene expression without insertional mutagenesis. However, it is not clear whether targeted transgene expression at the AAVS1 locus is always protected from silencing when driven by various promoters, especially after differentiation and transplantation from hiPS cells. In this paper, we describe a pair of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that enable more efficient genome editing than the commercially available zinc finger nuclease at the AAVS1 site. Using these TALENs for targeted gene addition, we find that the cytomegalovirus-immediate early enhancer/chicken β-actin/rabbit β-globin (CAG) promoter is better than cytomegalovirus 7 and elongation factor 1α short promoters in driving strong expression of the transgene. The two independent AAVS1, CAG, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) hiPS cell reporter lines that we have developed do not show silencing of EGFP either in undifferentiated hiPS cells or in randomly and lineage-specifically differentiated cells or in teratomas. Transplanting cardiomyocytes from an engineered AAVS1-CAG-EGFP hiPS cell line in a myocardial infarcted mouse model showed persistent expression of the transgene for at least 7 weeks in vivo. Our results show that high-efficiency targeting can be obtained with open-source TALENs and that careful optimization of the reporter and transgene constructs results in stable and persistent expression in vitro and in vivo.

  10. The X gene of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is involved in viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Cao, Maohua; You, Hong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) (type 2) is a popular human gene therapy vector with a long active transgene expression period and no reported vector-induced adverse reactions. Yet the basic molecular biology of this virus has not been fully addressed. One potential gene at the far 3' end of the AAV2 genome, previously referred to as X (nt 3929 to 4393), overlapping the 3' end of the cap gene, has never been characterized, although we did previously identify a promoter just up-stream (p81). Computer analysis suggested that X was involved in replication and transcription. The X protein was identified during active AAV2 replication using a polyclonal antibody against a peptide starting at amino acid 98. Reagents for the study of X included an AAV2 deletion mutant (dl78-91), a triple nucleotide substitution mutant that destroys all three 5' AUG-initiation products of X, with no effect on the cap coding sequence, and X-positive-293 cell lines. Here, we found that X up-regulated AAV2 DNA replication in differentiating keratinocytes (without helper virus, autonomous replication) and in various forms of 293 cell-based assays with help from wild type adenovirus type 5 (wt Ad5) or Ad5 helper plasmid (pHelper). The strongest contribution by X was seen in increasing wt AAV2 DNA replication in keratinocytes and dl78-91 in Ad5-infected X-positive-293 cell lines (both having multi-fold effects). Mutating the X gene in pAAV-RC (pAAV-RC-3Xneg) yielded approximately a ∼33% reduction in recombinant AAV vector DNA replication and virion production, but a larger effect was seen when using this same X-knockout AAV helper plasmid in X-positive-293 cell lines versus normal 293 cells (again, multi-fold). Taken together these data strongly suggest that AAV2 X encodes a protein involved in the AAV life cycle, particularly in increasing AAV2 DNA replication, and suggests that further studies are warranted.

  11. CFTR gene transfer with AAV improves early cystic fibrosis pig phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Steines, Benjamin; Dickey, David D.; Bergen, Jamie; Excoffon, Katherine J.D.A.; Weinstein, John R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Yan, Ziying; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Shah, Viral S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Powers, Linda S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Engelhardt, John F.; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.; Sinn, Patrick L.; Schaffer, David V.

    2016-01-01

    The physiological components that contribute to cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease are steadily being elucidated. Gene therapy could potentially correct these defects. CFTR-null pigs provide a relevant model to test gene therapy vectors. Using an in vivo selection strategy that amplifies successful capsids by replicating their genomes with helper adenovirus coinfection, we selected an adeno-associated virus (AAV) with tropism for pig airway epithelia. The evolved capsid, termed AAV2H22, is based on AAV2 with 5 point mutations that result in a 240-fold increased infection efficiency. In contrast to AAV2, AAV2H22 binds specifically to pig airway epithelia and is less reliant on heparan sulfate for transduction. We administer AAV2H22-CFTR expressing the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA to the airways of CF pigs. The transduced airways expressed CFTR on ciliated and nonciliated cells, induced anion transport, and improved the airway surface liquid pH and bacterial killing. Most gene therapy studies to date focus solely on Cl– transport as the primary metric of phenotypic correction. Here, we describe a gene therapy experiment where we not only correct defective anion transport, but also restore bacterial killing in CFTR-null pig airways. PMID:27699238

  12. High Prevalence of Infectious Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Indicative of T Lymphocytes as Sites of AAV Persistence.

    PubMed

    Hüser, Daniela; Khalid, Dina; Lutter, Timo; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Weger, Stefan; Heßler, Melanie; Kalus, Ulrich; Tauchmann, Yvonne; Hensel-Wiegel, Karin; Lassner, Dirk; Heilbronn, Regine

    2017-02-15

    Seroepidemiology shows that infections with adeno-associated virus (AAV) are widespread, but diverse AAV serotypes isolated from humans or nonhuman primates have so far not been proven to be causes of human disease. In view of the increasing success of AAV-derived vectors in human gene therapy, definition of the in vivo sites of wild-type AAV persistence and the clinical consequences of its reactivation is becoming increasingly urgent. Here, we identify the presumed cell type for AAV persistence in the human host by highly sensitive AAV PCRs developed for the full spectrum of human AAV serotypes. In genomic-DNA samples from leukocytes of 243 healthy blood donors, 34% were found to be AAV positive, predominantly AAV type 2 (AAV2) (77%), AAV5 (19%), and additional serotypes. Roughly 11% of the blood donors had mixed AAV infections. AAV prevalence was dramatically increased in immunosuppressed patients, 76% of whom were AAV positive. Of these, at least 45% displayed mixed infections. Follow-up of single blood donors over 2 years allowed repeated detection of the initial and/or additional AAV serotypes, suggestive of fluctuating, persistent infection. Leukocyte separation revealed that AAV resided in CD3(+) T lymphocytes, perceived as the putative in vivo site of AAV persistence. Moreover, infectious AAVs of various serotypes could be rescued and propagated from numerous samples. The high prevalence and broad spectrum of human AAVs in leukocytes closely follow AAV seroepidemiology. Immunosuppression obviously enhances AAV replication in parallel with activation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), reminiscent of herpesvirus-induced AAV activation.

  13. Cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated elimination of target cells transduced with engineered adeno-associated virus type 2 vector in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matt; DiPrimio, Nina; Asokan, Aravind; Goudy, Kevin; Tisch, Roland; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-07-01

    A recent clinical trial in patients with hemophilia B has suggested that adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminated AAV-transduced hepatocytes and resulted in therapeutic failure. AAV capsids elicit a CTL response in animal models; however, these capsid-specific CTLs fail to kill AAV-transduced target cells in mice. To better model the human clinical trial data in mice, we introduced an immunodominant epitope derived from ovalbumin (OVA; SIINFEKL) into the AAV capsid and tested CTL-mediated killing of AAV2-transduced target tissues in vivo. Initially, in vitro experiments demonstrated both classical class I and cross-presentation of the OVA antigen, following endogenous expression or AAV2-OVA vector transduction, respectively. Furthermore, an OVA-specific CTL response was elicited after muscular or systemic injection of the AAV2-OVA vector. Finally, CTL reactivity was enhanced in mice with established SIINFEKL-specific immunity after AAV2-OVA/alpha1 anti-trypsin (AAT) administration. Most importantly, these OVA-specific CTLs decreased AAT expression in mice treated with AAV2-OVA/AAT vector that followed a time course mimicking uncoating kinetics of AAV2 transduction in OVA-immunized mice. These results demonstrate that AAV capsid-derived antigens elicit CD8(+) CTL reactivity, and these CTLs eliminated AAV-transduced target cells in mice. Notably, this model system can be exploited to study the kinetics of capsid presentation from different serotypes of AAV and permit the design of novel strategies to block CTL-mediated killing of AAV-transduced cells.

  14. Cytotoxic-T-Lymphocyte-Mediated Elimination of Target Cells Transduced with Engineered Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 Vector In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengwen; Hirsch, Matt; DiPrimio, Nina; Asokan, Aravind; Goudy, Kevin; Tisch, Roland; Samulski, R. Jude

    2009-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in patients with hemophilia B has suggested that adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminated AAV-transduced hepatocytes and resulted in therapeutic failure. AAV capsids elicit a CTL response in animal models; however, these capsid-specific CTLs fail to kill AAV-transduced target cells in mice. To better model the human clinical trial data in mice, we introduced an immunodominant epitope derived from ovalbumin (OVA; SIINFEKL) into the AAV capsid and tested CTL-mediated killing of AAV2-transduced target tissues in vivo. Initially, in vitro experiments demonstrated both classical class I and cross-presentation of the OVA antigen, following endogenous expression or AAV2-OVA vector transduction, respectively. Furthermore, an OVA-specific CTL response was elicited after muscular or systemic injection of the AAV2-OVA vector. Finally, CTL reactivity was enhanced in mice with established SIINFEKL-specific immunity after AAV2-OVA/α1 anti-trypsin (AAT) administration. Most importantly, these OVA-specific CTLs decreased AAT expression in mice treated with AAV2-OVA/AAT vector that followed a time course mimicking uncoating kinetics of AAV2 transduction in OVA-immunized mice. These results demonstrate that AAV capsid-derived antigens elicit CD8+ CTL reactivity, and these CTLs eliminated AAV-transduced target cells in mice. Notably, this model system can be exploited to study the kinetics of capsid presentation from different serotypes of AAV and permit the design of novel strategies to block CTL-mediated killing of AAV-transduced cells. PMID:19369348

  15. Biodistribution and safety assessment of AAV2-GAD following intrasubthalamic injection in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, Helen L.; Riban, Veronique; Bland, Ross J.; Wendelken, Jennifer L.; Sapan, Christine V.; During, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The steps necessary to translate promising new biological therapies to the clinic are poorly documented. For gene therapy there are unique aspects that need to be addressed in biodistribution studies. Notably, spread of the vector beyond the intended target cells or tissue may result in persistent unwanted biological activity or unpredictable biological events, thus it is critical to evaluate risks associated with viral vector-mediated gene transfer prior to embarking on human clinical trials. Methods Here we present a rodent study comprising of a comprehensive assessment of vector biodistribution through the brain, blood and major organs of rats injected into the subthalamic nucleus with recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). In addition, behavioral and histological analyses were also performed. Results AAV genomes were not detected in blood or CSF, and did not disseminate to organs outside of the brain in the majority of animals. In the brain, an average 97.3% of AAV2-GAD genomes were restricted to the area of the ipsilateral STN. There were no discernable effects of AAV2-GAD on general health and behavioral assessment of the animals did not reveal any alteration in general behavior, exploration, locomotion or motor symmetry. Conclusions This study met FDA requirements, in addition to efficacy and toxicity studies in rodents and non-human primates, to support and supplement a Phase II clinical trial for gene transfer of AAV2-GAD to the human STN for the potential therapy of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:20352617

  16. Differential adenoassociated virus vector-driven expression of a neuropeptide Y gene in primary rat brain astroglial cultures after transfection with Sendai virosomes versus Lipofectin.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, C M; Wu, P; Notabartolo, D; Millard, W J; Meyer, E M

    1994-06-01

    The ability of Sendai virosomes or Lipofectin to introduce an AAV vector into primary rat brain astroglial cultures was characterized. The pJDT95npy vector was constructed by inserting rat NPY cDNA downstream from the indigenous AAV p5, p19 and p40 promoters in pJDT95. Lipofectin-mediated transfection with pJDT95npy (10 micrograms) resulted in pronounced expression of several NPY mRNA species: p5-driven (3.3 kb), p19-driven (2.7 kb) and p40-driven (0.6, 0.8, 1.1, and 1.8 kb). Exposure to virosomally encapsulated pJDT95npy (50 or 100 ng) resulted in transient expression of some p40-driven mRNA species (0.8 and 1.8 kb). Neither method produced astroglia cells which synthesized mature NPY immunoreactivity. This demonstrates that an AAV-derived vector can drive gene expression in astroglia, that Sendai virosomes can infuse vectors into astroglia, but that the amount of DNA infused in this manner may limit long term expression.

  17. Systemic elimination of de novo capsid protein synthesis from replication-competent AAV contamination in the liver.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Qu, Guang; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    The capsid protein synthesis in targeted tissues resulting from residual contaminating replication-competent adeno-associated virus particles (rcAAV) remains a concern for hazardous immune responses that shut down the factor IX expression in the hemophilia B clinical trial. To systematically reduce/eliminate the effects of potential contaminating rcAAV particles, we designed a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) helper (pH22mir) with a microRNA binding cassette containing multiple copies of liver-specific (hsa-mir-122) and hematopoietic-specific (has-mir-142-3p) sequences to specifically control cap gene expression. In 293 cells, the rep and cap gene from pH22mir functioned similarly to that of conventional helper pH22. The vector yields and compositions from pH22mir and pH22 were indistinguishable. The performance of vector produced in this new system was comparable to that of similar vectors produced by conventional methods. In the human hepatic cell line, the capsid expression was reduced significantly from cap-mir cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. In the liver, 99.9% of capsid expression could be suppressed and no cap expression could be detected by western blot. In summary, we demonstrated a new concept in reducing de novo capsid synthesis in the targeted tissue. This strategy may not only help AAV vectors in controlling undesirable capsid gene expression, but can also be adopted for lentiviral or adenoviral vector production.

  18. Characterization of naturally-occurring humoral immunity to AAV in sheep.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Joseph; Van Vliet, Kim; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Finn, Jonathan D; Tschernia, Nick; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Arruda, Valder R; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Porada, Christopher D

    2013-01-01

    AAV vectors have shown great promise for clinical gene therapy (GT), but pre-existing human immunity against the AAV capsid often limits transduction. Thus, testing promising AAV-based GT approaches in an animal model with similar pre-existing immunity could better predict clinical outcome. Sheep have long been used for basic biological and preclinical studies. Moreover, we have re-established a line of sheep with severe hemophilia A (HA). Given the impetus to use AAV-based GT to treat hemophilia, we characterized the pre-existing ovine humoral immunity to AAV. ELISA revealed naturally-occurring antibodies to AAV1, AAV2, AAV5, AAV6, AAV8, and AAV9. For AAV2, AAV8, and AAV9 these inhibit transduction in a luciferase-based neutralization assay. Epitope mapping identified peptides that were common to the capsids of all AAV serotypes tested (AAV2, AAV5, AAV8 and AAV9), with each animal harboring antibodies to unique and common capsid epitopes. Mapping using X-ray crystallographic AAV capsid structures demonstrated that these antibodies recognized both surface epitopes and epitopes located within regions of the capsid that are internal or buried in the capsid structure. These results suggest that sheep harbor endogenous AAV, which induces immunity to both intact capsid and to capsid epitopes presented following proteolysis during the course of infection. In conclusion, their clinically relevant physiology and the presence of naturally-occurring antibodies to multiple AAV serotypes collectively make sheep a unique model in which to study GT for HA, and other diseases, and develop strategies to circumvent the clinically important barrier of pre-existing AAV immunity.

  19. Characterization of Naturally-Occurring Humoral Immunity to AAV in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Joseph; Van Vliet, Kim; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Finn, Jonathan D.; Tschernia, Nick; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Arruda, Valder R.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Porada, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    AAV vectors have shown great promise for clinical gene therapy (GT), but pre-existing human immunity against the AAV capsid often limits transduction. Thus, testing promising AAV-based GT approaches in an animal model with similar pre-existing immunity could better predict clinical outcome. Sheep have long been used for basic biological and preclinical studies. Moreover, we have re-established a line of sheep with severe hemophilia A (HA). Given the impetus to use AAV-based GT to treat hemophilia, we characterized the pre-existing ovine humoral immunity to AAV. ELISA revealed naturally-occurring antibodies to AAV1, AAV2, AAV5, AAV6, AAV8, and AAV9. For AAV2, AAV8, and AAV9 these inhibit transduction in a luciferase-based neutralization assay. Epitope mapping identified peptides that were common to the capsids of all AAV serotypes tested (AAV2, AAV5, AAV8 and AAV9), with each animal harboring antibodies to unique and common capsid epitopes. Mapping using X-ray crystallographic AAV capsid structures demonstrated that these antibodies recognized both surface epitopes and epitopes located within regions of the capsid that are internal or buried in the capsid structure. These results suggest that sheep harbor endogenous AAV, which induces immunity to both intact capsid and to capsid epitopes presented following proteolysis during the course of infection. In conclusion, their clinically relevant physiology and the presence of naturally-occurring antibodies to multiple AAV serotypes collectively make sheep a unique model in which to study GT for HA, and other diseases, and develop strategies to circumvent the clinically important barrier of pre-existing AAV immunity. PMID:24086458

  20. AAV8-mediated hepatic gene transfer in infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Bell, Peter; Lin, Jianping; Calcedo, Roberto; Tarantal, Alice F; Wilson, James M

    2011-11-01

    Many genetic metabolic diseases manifest in infancy, therefore, it is important to develop effective treatments that could be implemented at this time. Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) gene transfer has been studied in neonatal mouse, cat, and dog models and shown some efficacy with a single hepatic injection at birth. AAV8-mediated liver gene transfer has also generated sustained therapeutic effects in feline and canine models of lysosomal storage disorders. In these models, delaying the age of vector treatment increased gene transfer stability. The growth rate of infant nonhuman primates is more similar to the growth trajectory of humans, thus infant monkeys provide an excellent model to study AAV gene transfer efficiency, stability, and safety. In this study, we report for the first time that AAV8-mediated hepatic gene transfer in infant monkeys is safe and efficient but less stable when compared to adolescent animals. Infant monkeys administered AAV8 intravenously at 1 week postnatal age achieved up to 98% transduction of hepatocytes within 7 days of injection; however, there was significant dilution of genomes and loss of transgene expression 35 days postadministration. Delaying the injection to 1 month postnatal age did not improve stability of transduction but decreased the antibody response to AAV8 capsid.

  1. AAV natural infection induces broad cross-neutralizing antibody responses to multiple AAV serotypes in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to sero-negative nonhuman primates which is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified three distinct groups of animals: those which never sero-converted to AAV (naïve); those which were persistently seropositive (chronic); and those that seroconverted during the 10 year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad sero-response characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes.

  2. AAV Natural Infection Induces Broad Cross-Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Multiple AAV Serotypes in Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to seronegative nonhuman primates that is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified 3 distinct groups of animals: those that never seroconverted to AAV (naïve), those that were persistently seropositive (chronic), and those that seroconverted during the 10-year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad seroresponse characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes.

  3. Preclinical safety evaluation of AAV2-sFLT01- a gene therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, Timothy K; Lukason, Michael; Collins, Margaret; Munger, Robert; Isenberger, Elisabete; Rogers, Cindy; Malatos, Shana; Dufresne, Elizabeth; Morris, James; Calcedo, Roberto; Veres, Gabor; Scaria, Abraham; Andrews, Laura; Wadsworth, Samuel

    2011-02-01

    AAV2-sFLT01 is a vector that expresses a modified soluble Flt1 receptor designed to neutralize the proangiogenic activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) via an intravitreal injection. Owing to minimal data available for the intravitreal route of administration for adeno-associated virus (AAV), we initiated a 12-month safety study of AAV2-sFLT01 administered intravitreally at doses of 2.4 × 10(9) vector genomes (vg) and 2.4 × 10(10) vg to cynomolgus monkeys. Expression of sFlt01 protein peaked at ~1-month postadministration and remained relatively constant for the remainder of the study. Electroretinograms, fluorescein angiograms, and tonometry were assessed every 3 months, with no test article-related findings observed in any group. Indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp exams performed monthly revealed a mild to moderate but self-resolving vitreal inflammation in the high-dose group only, which follow-up studies suggest was directed against the AAV2 capsid. Histological evaluation revealed no structural changes in any part of the eye and occasional inflammatory cells in the trabecular meshwork, vitreous and retina in the high-dose group. Biodistribution analysis in rats and monkeys found only trace amounts of vector outside the injected eye. In summary, these studies found AAV2-sFLT01 to be well-tolerated, localized, and capable of long-term expression.

  4. Intra-amniotic rAAV-mediated microdystrophin gene transfer improves canine X-linked muscular dystrophy and may induce immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Hironori; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Chiyo, Tomoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe congenital disease due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. Supplementation of dystrophin using recombinant adenoassociated virus vector has promise as a treatment of DMD, although therapeutic benefit of the truncated dystrophin still remains to be elucidated. Besides, host immune responses against the vector as well as transgene products have been denoted in the clinical gene therapy studies. Here, we transduced dystrophic dogs fetuses to investigate the therapeutic effects of an AAV vector expressing microdystrophin under conditions of immune tolerance. rAAV-CMV-microdystrophin and a rAAV-CAG-luciferase were injected into the amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. We also reinjected rAAV9-CMV-microdystrophin into the jugular vein of an infant dystrophic dog to induce systemic expression of microdystrophin. Gait and cardiac function significantly improved in the rAAV-microdystrophin-injected dystrophic dog, suggesting that an adequate treatment of rAAV-microdystrophin with immune modulation induces successful long-term transgene expression to analyze improved dystrophic phenotype.

  5. A comparative analysis of constitutive promoters located in adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Ota, Akinobu; Hossain, Ekhtear; Konishi, Yuko; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Konishi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The properties of constitutive promoters within adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have not yet been fully characterized. In this study, AAV vectors, in which enhanced GFP expression was directed by one of the six constitutive promoters (human β-actin, human elongation factor-1α, chicken β-actin combined with cytomegalovirus early enhancer, cytomegalovirus (CMV), simian virus 40, and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase), were constructed and introduced into the HCT116, DLD-1, HT-1080, and MCF-10A cell lines. Quantification of GFP signals in infected cells demonstrated that the CMV promoter produced the highest GFP expression in the six promoters and maintained relatively high GFP expression for up to eight weeks after infection of HCT116, DLD-1, and HT-1080. Exogenous human CDKN2A gene expression was also introduced into DLD-1 and MCF-10A in a similar pattern by using AAV vectors bearing the human β-actin and the CMV promoters. The six constitutive promoters were subsequently placed upstream of the neomycin resistance gene within AAV vectors, and HCT116, DLD-1, and HT-1080 were infected with the resulting vectors. Of the six promoters, the CMV promoter produced the largest number of G418-resistant colonies in all three cell lines. Because AAV vectors have been frequently used as a platform to construct targeting vectors that permit gene editing in human cell lines, we lastly infected the three cell lines with AAV-based targeting vectors against the human PIGA gene in which one of the six promoters regulate the neomycin resistance gene. This assay revealed that the CMV promoter led to the lowest PIGA gene targeting efficiency in the investigated promoters. These results provide a clue to the identification of constitutive promoters suitable to express exogenous genes with AAV vectors, as well as those helpful to conduct efficient gene targeting using AAV-based targeting vectors in human cell lines.

  6. Genetic modification of adeno-associated viral vector type 2 capsid enhances gene transfer efficiency in polarized human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    White, April F; Mazur, Marina; Sorscher, Eric J; Zinn, Kurt R; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2008-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common genetic disease characterized by defects in the expression of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Gene therapy offers better hope for the treatment of CF. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are capable of stable expression with low immunogenicity. Despite their potential in CF gene therapy, gene transfer efficiency by AAV is limited because of pathophysiological barriers in these patients. Although a few AAV serotypes have shown better transduction compared with the AAV2-based vectors, gene transfer efficiency in human airway epithelium has still not reached therapeutic levels. To engineer better AAV vectors for enhanced gene delivery in human airway epithelium, we developed and characterized mutant AAV vectors by genetic capsid modification, modeling the well-characterized AAV2 serotype. We genetically incorporated putative high-affinity peptide ligands to human airway epithelium on the GH loop region of AAV2 capsid protein. Six independent mutant AAV were constructed, containing peptide ligands previously reported to bind with high affinity for known and unknown receptors on human airway epithelial cells. The vectors were tested on nonairway cells and nonpolarized and polarized human airway epithelial cells for enhanced infectivity. One of the mutant vectors, with the peptide sequence THALWHT, not only showed the highest transduction in undifferentiated human airway epithelial cells but also indicated significant transduction in polarized cells. Interestingly, this modified vector was also able to infect cells independently of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan receptor. Incorporation of this ligand on other AAV serotypes, which have shown improved gene transfer efficiency in the human airway epithelium, may enhance the application of AAV vectors in CF gene therapy.

  7. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant NT4-NAP/AAV Exerts Potential Antidepressant Effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xian-Cang; Chu, Zheng; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Jiang, Wen-Hui; Jia, Min; Dang, Yong-Hui; Gao, Cheng-Ge

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to construct a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) which can express NAP in the brain and examine whether this virus can produce antidepressant effects on C57 BL/6 mice that had been subjected to open field test and forced swimming test, via nose-to-brain pathway. When the recombinant plasmid pGEM-T Easy/NT4-NAP was digested by EcoRI, 297 bp fragments can be obtained and NT4-NAP sequence was consistent with the designed sequence confirmed by DNA sequencing. When the recombinant plasmid pSSCMV/NT4-NAP was digested by EcoRI, 297 bp fragments is visible. Immunohistochemical staining of fibroblasts revealed that expression of NAP was detected in NT4-NAP/AAV group. Intranasal delivery of NT4-NAP/AAV significantly reduced immobility time when the FST was performed after 1 day from the last administration. The effects observed in the FST could not be attributed to non-specific increases in activity since intranasal delivery of NT4-NAP/AAV did not alter the behavior of the mice during the open field test. The results indicated that a recombinant AAV vector which could express NAP in cells was successfully constructed and NAP may be a potential target for therapeutic action of antidepressant treatment.

  8. Immunodominant liver-specific expression suppresses transgene-directed immune responses in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R; Clay, Timothy M; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-05-01

    Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression might best

  9. Immunodominant Liver-Specific Expression Suppresses Transgene-Directed Immune Responses in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R.; Clay, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression

  10. Towards a Non-Human Primate Model of Alpha-Synucleinopathy for Development of Therapeutics for Parkinson’s Disease: Optimization of AAV1/2 Delivery Parameters to Drive Sustained Expression of Alpha Synuclein and Dopaminergic Degeneration in Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Koprich, James B.; Johnston, Tom H.; Reyes, Gabriela; Omana, Vanessa; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent failures in clinical trials for disease modification in Parkinson’s disease have highlighted the need for a non-human primate model of the synucleinopathy underpinning dopaminergic neuron degeneration. The present study was defined to begin the development of such a model in cynomolgus macaque. We have validated surgical and vector parameters to define a means to provide a robust over-expression of alpha-synuclein which is associated with Lewy-like pathology and robust degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. Thus, an AAV1/2 vector incorporating strong transcription and transduction regulatory elements was used to deliver the gene for the human A53T mutation of alpha-synuclein. When injected into 4 sites within each substantia nigra (7 μl per site, 1.7 x 1012 gp/ml), this vector provided expression lasting at least 4 months, and a 50% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a 60% reduction in striatal dopamine. Further studies will be required to develop this methodology into a validated model of value as a drug development platform. PMID:27902767

  11. Towards a Non-Human Primate Model of Alpha-Synucleinopathy for Development of Therapeutics for Parkinson's Disease: Optimization of AAV1/2 Delivery Parameters to Drive Sustained Expression of Alpha Synuclein and Dopaminergic Degeneration in Macaque.

    PubMed

    Koprich, James B; Johnston, Tom H; Reyes, Gabriela; Omana, Vanessa; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Recent failures in clinical trials for disease modification in Parkinson's disease have highlighted the need for a non-human primate model of the synucleinopathy underpinning dopaminergic neuron degeneration. The present study was defined to begin the development of such a model in cynomolgus macaque. We have validated surgical and vector parameters to define a means to provide a robust over-expression of alpha-synuclein which is associated with Lewy-like pathology and robust degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. Thus, an AAV1/2 vector incorporating strong transcription and transduction regulatory elements was used to deliver the gene for the human A53T mutation of alpha-synuclein. When injected into 4 sites within each substantia nigra (7 μl per site, 1.7 x 1012 gp/ml), this vector provided expression lasting at least 4 months, and a 50% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a 60% reduction in striatal dopamine. Further studies will be required to develop this methodology into a validated model of value as a drug development platform.

  12. High-throughput screening and biophysical interrogation of hepatotropic AAV.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Samuel L; Bhagwat, Anand; Edmonson, Shyrie; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A

    2008-12-01

    We set out to analyze the fundamental biological differences between AAV2 and AAV8 that may contribute to their different performances in vivo. High-throughput protein interaction screens were used to identify binding partners for each serotype. Of the >8,000 proteins probed, 115 and 134 proteins were identified that interact with AAV2 and AAV8, respectively. Notably, 76 of these protein interactions were shared between the two serotypes. CDK2/cyclinA kinase was identified as a binding partner for both serotypes in the screen. Subsequent analysis confirmed direct binding of CDK2/cyclinA by AAV2 and AAV8. Inhibition of CDK2/cyclinA resulted in increased levels of vector transduction. Biophysical study of vector particle stability and genome uncoating demonstrated slightly greater thermostability for AAV8 than for AAV2. Heat-induced genome uncoating occurred at the same temperature as particle degradation, suggesting that these two processes may be intrinsically related for adeno-associated virus (AAV). Together, these analyses provide insight into commonalities and divergences in the biology of functionally distinct hepatotropic AAV serotypes.

  13. Adeno-associated viral vector serotype 5 poorly transduces liver in rat models.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Miranda, Paula S; Pañeda, Astrid; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R; Gonzalez- Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Aseguinolaza, Gloria Gonzalez; Bosma, Piter J

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies in mice and non-human primates showed that AAV serotype 5 provides efficient liver transduction and as such seems a promising vector for liver directed gene therapy. An advantage of AAV5 compared to serotype 8 already shown to provide efficient correction in a phase 1 trial in patients suffering from hemophilia B, is its lower seroprevalence in the general population. Our goal is liver directed gene therapy for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I, inherited severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by UGT1A1 deficiency. In a relevant animal model, the Gunn rat, we compared the efficacy of AAV 5 and 8 to that of AAV1 previously shown to be effective. Ferrying a construct driving hepatocyte specific expression of UGT1A1, both AAV8 and AAV1 provided an efficient correction of hyperbilirubinemia. In contrast to these two and to other animal models AAV5 failed to provide any correction. To clarify whether this unexpected finding was due to the rat model used or due to a problem with AAV5, the efficacy of this serotype was compared in a mouse and two additional rat strains. Administration of an AAV5 vector expressing luciferase under the control of a liver specific promoter confirmed that this serotype poorly performed in rat liver, rendering it not suitable for proof of concept studies in this species.

  14. Evaluation of Readministration of a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Expressing Acid Alpha-Glucosidase in Pompe Disease: Preclinical to Clinical Planning

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Manuela; Cleaver, Brian; Clément, Nathalie; Conlon, Thomas J.; Faris, Kaitlyn J.; Wang, Gensheng; Benson, Janet; Tarantal, Alice F.; Fuller, Davis; Herzog, Roland W.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant serotype 9 adeno-associated virus (rAAV9) vector carrying a transgene that expresses codon-optimized human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA, or GAA) driven by a human desmin (DES) promoter (i.e., rAAV9-DES-hGAA) has been generated as a clinical candidate vector for Pompe disease. The rAAV9-DES-hGAA vector is being developed as a treatment for both early- and late-onset Pompe disease, in which patients lack sufficient lysosomal alpha-glucosidase leading to glycogen accumulation. In young patients, the therapy may need to be readministered after a period of time to maintain therapeutic levels of GAA. Administration of AAV-based gene therapies is commonly associated with the production of neutralizing antibodies that may reduce the effectiveness of the vector, especially if readministration is required. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of rAAV9-DES-hGAA to correct cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology in Gaa−/− mice, an animal model of Pompe disease. This article describes the IND-enabling preclinical studies supporting the program for a phase I/II clinical trial in adult patients with Pompe. These studies were designed to evaluate the toxicology, biodistribution, and potential for readministration of rAAV9-DES-hGAA injected intramuscularly into the tibialis anterior muscle using an immune modulation strategy developed for this study. In the proposed clinical study, six adult participants with late-onset Pompe disease will be enrolled. The goal of the immune modulation strategy is to ablate B-cells before the initial exposure of the study agent in one leg and the subsequent exposure of the same vector to the contralateral leg four months after initial dosing. The dosing of the active agent is accompanied by a control injection of excipient dosing in the contralateral leg to allow for blinding and randomization of dosing, which may also strengthen the evidence generated from gene therapy studies in the future. Patients will act as their own

  15. Evaluation of Vascular Delivery Methodologies to Enhance rAAV6-mediated Gene Transfer to Canine Striated Musculature

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Schultz, Brian R; Allen, James M; Halldorson, Jeffrey B; Blankinship, Michael J; Meznarich, Norman A; Kuhr, Christian S; Doremus, Caitlin; Finn, Eric; Liggitt, Denny; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the development of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for delivery of gene expression cassettes to striated musculature as a method of treating severe neuromuscular conditions. However, it is unclear whether delivery protocols that achieve extensive gene transfer in mice can be adapted to produce similarly extensive gene transfer in larger mammals and ultimately patients. Consequently, we sought to investigate methodological modifications that would facilitate rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the striated musculature of canines. A simple procedure incorporating acute (i) occlusion of limb blood flow, (ii) exsanguination via compression bandage, and (iii) vector “dwell” time of <20 minutes, markedly enhanced the transduction of limb muscles, compared with a simple bolus limb infusion of vector. A complementary method whereby vector was infused into the jugular vein led to efficient transduction of cardiomyocytes and to a lesser degree the diaphragm. Together these methods can be used to achieve transgene expression in heart, diaphragm, and limb muscles of juvenile dogs using rAAV6 vectors. These results establish that rAAV-mediated gene delivery is a viable approach to achieving systemic transduction of striated musculature in mammals approaching the dimensions of newborn humans. PMID:19471246

  16. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  17. AAV ANCESTRAL RECONSTRUCTION LIBRARY ENABLES SELECTION OF BROADLY INFECTIOUS VIRAL VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge; Ojala, David S.; Westesson, Oscar; Weinstein, John R.; Wong, Sophie Y.; Steinsapir, Andrew; Kumar, Sanjay; Holmes, Ian; Schaffer, David V.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. Enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications, however, and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties, and to gain insights into AAV’s evolutionary history, we computationally designed and experimentally constructed a putative ancestral AAV library. Combinatorial variations at 32 amino acid sites were introduced to account for uncertainty in their identities. We then analyzed the evolutionary flexibility of these residues, the majority of which have not been previously studied, by subjecting the library to iterative selection on a representative cell line panel. The resulting variants exhibited transduction efficiencies comparable to the most efficient extant serotypes, and in general ancestral libraries were broadly infectious across the cell line panel, indicating that they favored promiscuity over specificity. Interestingly, putative ancestral AAVs were more thermostable than modern serotypes and did not utilize sialic acids, galactose, or heparan sulfate proteoglycans for cellular entry. Finally, variants mediated 19–31 fold higher gene expression in muscle compared to AAV1, a clinically utilized serotype for muscle delivery, highlighting their promise for gene therapy. PMID:26186661

  18. A novel method for the quantification of adeno-associated virus vectors for RNA interference applications using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and purified genomic adeno-associated virus DNA as a standard.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anke; Röhrs, Viola; Kedzierski, Radoslaw; Fechner, Henry; Kurreck, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are promising tools in gene therapy, but accurate quantification of the vector dose remains a critical issue for their successful application. We therefore aimed at the precise determination of the titer of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors to improve the reliability of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown approaches. Vector titers were initially determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) using four primer sets targeting different regions within the AAV vector genome (VG) and either coiled or linearized plasmid standards. Despite very low variability between replicates in each assay, these quantification experiments revealed up to 20-fold variation in vector titers. Therefore, we developed a novel approach for the reproducible determination of titers of scAAV vectors based on the use of purified genomic vector DNA as a standard (scAAVStd). Consistent results were obtained in qPCR assays using the four primer sets mentioned above. RNAi-mediated silencing of human cyclophilin B (hCycB) by short hairpin RNA-expressing scAAV vectors was investigated in HeLa cells using two independent vector preparations. We found that the required vector titers for efficient knockdown differed by a factor of 3.5 between both preparations. Hence, we also investigated the number of internalized scAAV vectors, termed transduction units (TUs). TUs were determined by qPCR applying the scAAVStd. Very similar values for 80% hCycB knockdown were obtained for the two AAV vector preparations. Thus, only the determination of TUs, rather than vector concentration, allows for reproducible results in functional analyses using AAV vectors.

  19. Recombinant AAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina: gene therapy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rolling, F

    2004-10-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as retinal macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa constitute a broad group of diseases that all share one critical feature, the progressive apoptotic loss of cells in the retina. There is currently no effective treatment available by which the course of these disorders can be modified, and visual dysfunction often progresses to total blindness. Gene therapy represents an attractive approach to treating retinal degeneration because the eye is easily accessible and allows local application of therapeutic vectors with reduced risk of systemic effects. Furthermore, transgene expression within the retina and effects of treatments may be monitored by a variety of noninvasive examinations. An increasing number of strategies for molecular treatment of retinal disease rely on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a therapeutic gene delivery vector. Before rAAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal degeneration becomes a reality, there are a number of important requirements that include: (1) evaluation of different rAAV serotypes, (2) screening of vectors in large animals in order to ensure that they mediate safe and long-term gene expression, (3) appropriate regulation of therapeutic gene expression, (4) evaluation of vectors carrying a therapeutic gene in relevant animal models, (5) identification of suitable patients, and finally (6) manufacture of clinical grade vector. All these steps towards gene therapy are still being explored. Outcomes of these studies will be discussed in the order in which they occur, from vector studies to preclinical assessment of the therapeutic potential of rAAV in animal models of retinal degeneration.

  20. AAV-Mediated angiotensin 1-7 overexpression inhibits tumor growth of lung cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Wang, Shengyao; Yan, Renhe; Bai, Na; Li, Andrew; Zhang, Yanling; Du, Hongyan; Chen, Baihong; Sumners, Colin; Li, Jinlong; Li, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    Ang-(1-7) inhibits lung cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. However, the molecular mechanism of action is unclear and also the rapid degradation of Ang-(1-7) in vivo limits its clinical application. Here, we have demonstrated that Ang- (1-7) inhibits lung cancer cell growth by interrupting pre-replicative complex assembly and restrains epithelial-mesenchymal transition via Cdc6 inhibition. Furthermore, we constructed a mutant adeno-associated viral vector AAV8 (Y733F) that produced stable and high efficient Ang-(1-7) expression in a xenograft tumor model. The results show that AAV8-mediated Ang-(1-7) over-expression can remarkably suppress tumor growth in vivo by down-regulating Cdc6 and anti-angiogenesis. Ang-(1-7) over-expression via the AAV8 method may be a promising strategy for lung cancer treatment. PMID:27861149

  1. Preferred transduction with AAV8 and AAV9 via thalamic administration in the MPS IIIB model: A comparison of four rAAV serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J.A.; Bloom, M.D.; Heldermon, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. Since early therapeutic intervention is likely to yield the most efficacious results, we sought to determine the possible therapeutic utility of rAAV in early gene therapy based interventions. Currently, the application of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is one of the most widely used gene transfer systems, and represents a promising approach in the treatment of MPS IIIB. From a translational standpoint, a minimally invasive, yet highly efficient method of vector administration is ideal. The thalamus is thought to be the switchboard for signal relay in the central nervous system (CNS) and therefore represents an attractive target. To identify an optimal AAV vector for early therapeutic intervention, and establish whether thalamic administration represents a feasible therapeutic approach, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four green fluorescent protein (GFP) bearing rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10, administered bilaterally into the thalamus. Of the four serotypes compared, AAV8 and -9 proved superior to AAV5 and -rh10 both in biodistribution and transduction efficiency profiles. Genotype differences in transduction efficiency and biodistribution patterns were also observed. Importantly, we conclude that AAV8 and to a lesser extent, AAV9 represent preferable candidates for early gene therapy based intervention in the treatment of MPS IIIB. We also highlight the feasibility of thalamic rAAV administration, and conclude that this method results in moderate rAAV biodistribution with limited treatment capacity, thus suggesting a need for alternate methods of vector delivery. PMID:27014573

  2. Convection-Enhanced Delivery of AAV2-PrPshRNA in Prion-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Misol; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Oehler, Abby; Lemus, Azucena; Bankiewicz, Krystof; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Prion disease is caused by a single pathogenic protein (PrPSc), an abnormal conformer of the normal cellular prion protein PrPC. Depletion of PrPC in prion knockout mice makes them resistant to prion disease. Thus, gene silencing of the Prnp gene is a promising effective therapeutic approach. Here, we examined adeno-associated virus vector type 2 encoding a short hairpin RNA targeting Prnp mRNA (AAV2-PrP-shRNA) to suppress PrPC expression both in vitro and in vivo. AAV2-PrP-shRNA treatment suppressed PrP levels and prevented dendritic degeneration in RML-infected brain aggregate cultures. Infusion of AAV2-PrP-shRNA-eGFP into the thalamus of CD-1 mice showed that eGFP was transported to the cerebral cortex via anterograde transport and the overall PrPC levels were reduced by ∼70% within 4 weeks. For therapeutic purposes, we treated RML-infected CD-1 mice with AAV2-PrP-shRNA beginning at 50 days post inoculation. Although AAV2-PrP-shRNA focally suppressed PrPSc formation in the thalamic infusion site by ∼75%, it did not suppress PrPSc formation efficiently in other regions of the brain. Survival of mice was not extended compared to the untreated controls. Global suppression of PrPC in the brain is required for successful therapy of prion diseases. PMID:24866748

  3. Terminal differentiation of cardiac and skeletal myocytes induces permissivity to AAV transduction by relieving inhibition imposed by DNA damage response proteins.

    PubMed

    Lovric, Jasmina; Mano, Miguel; Zentilin, Lorena; Eulalio, Ana; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are extremely efficient for gene transfer into post-mitotic cells of heart, muscle, brain, and retina. The reason for their exquisite tropism for these cells has long remained elusive. Here, we show that upon terminal differentiation, cardiac and skeletal myocytes downregulate proteins of the DNA damage response (DDR) and that this markedly induces permissivity to AAV transduction. We observed that expression of members of the MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50, Nbs1), which bind the incoming AAV genomes, faded in cardiomyocytes at ~2 weeks after birth, as well as upon myoblast differentiation in vitro; in both cases, withdrawal of the cells from the cell cycle coincided with increased AAV permissivity. Treatment of proliferating cells with short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the MRN proteins, or with microRNA-24, which is normally upregulated upon terminal differentiation and negatively controls the Nbs1 levels, significantly increased permissivity to AAV transduction. Consistently, delivery of these small RNAs to the juvenile liver concomitant with AAV markedly improved in vivo hepatocyte transduction. Collectively, these findings support the conclusion that cellular DDR proteins inhibit AAV transduction and that terminal cell differentiation relieves this restriction.

  4. Surface immobilization of hexa-histidine-tagged adeno-associated viral vectors for localized gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jang, J-H; Koerber, J T; Gujraty, K; Bethi, S R; Kane, R S; Schaffer, D V

    2010-11-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, which are undergoing broad exploration in clinical trials, have significant promise for therapeutic gene delivery because of their safety and delivery efficiency. Gene delivery technologies capable of mediating localized gene expression may further enhance the potential of AAV in a variety of therapeutic applications by reducing spread outside a target region, which may thereby reduce off-target side effects. We have genetically engineered an AAV variant capable of binding to surfaces with high affinity through a hexa-histidine metal-binding interaction. This immobilized AAV vector system mediates high-efficiency delivery to cells that contact the surface and thus may have promise for localized gene delivery, which may aid numerous applications of AAV delivery to gene therapy.

  5. Manufacturing of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Nathalie; Grieger, Joshua C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to elicit robust and long-term transgene expression in vivo together with minimal immunogenicity and little to no toxicity are only a few features that make recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors ideally suited for many gene therapy applications. Successful preclinical studies have encouraged the use of rAAV for therapeutic gene transfer to patients in the clinical setting. Nevertheless, the use of rAAV in clinical trials has underscored the need for production and purification systems capable of generating large amounts of highly pure rAAV particles. To date, generating vector quantities sufficient to meet the expanding clinical demand is still a hurdle when using current production systems. In this chapter, we will provide a description of the current methods to produce clinical grade of rAAV under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) settings. PMID:27014711

  6. Improved Intravitreal AAV-Mediated Inner Retinal Gene Transduction after Surgical Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Miyake, Koichi; Kobayashi, Maika; Yaguchi, Chiemi; Iijima, Osamu; Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Katakai, Yuko; Miyake, Noriko; Kameya, Shuhei; Shimada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okada, Takashi

    2017-01-04

    The retina is an ideal target for gene therapy because of its easy accessibility and limited immunological response. We previously reported that intravitreally injected adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduced the inner retina with high efficiency in a rodent model. In large animals, however, the efficiency of retinal transduction was low, because the vitreous and internal limiting membrane (ILM) acted as barriers to transduction. To overcome these barriers in cynomolgus monkeys, we performed vitrectomy (VIT) and ILM peeling before AAV vector injection. Following intravitreal injection of 50 μL triple-mutated self-complementary AAV serotype 2 vector encoding EGFP, transduction efficiency was analyzed. Little expression of GFP was detected in the control and VIT groups, but in the VIT+ILM group, strong GFP expression was detected within the peeled ILM area. To detect potential adverse effects, we monitored the retinas using color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and electroretinography. No serious side effects associated with the pretreatment were observed. These results indicate that surgical ILM peeling before AAV vector administration would be safe and useful for efficient transduction of the nonhuman primate retina and provide therapeutic benefits for the treatment of retinal diseases.

  7. A translationally optimized AAV-UGT1A1 vector drives safe and long-lasting correction of Crigler-Najjar syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Bortolussi, Giulia; van Dijk, Remco; Collaud, Fanny; Charles, Severine; Leborgne, Christian; Vidal, Patrice; Martin, Samia; Gjata, Bernard; Sola, Marcelo Simon; van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Vignaud, Alban; Veron, Philippe; Bosma, Piter J; Muro, Andres F; Mingozzi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a severe metabolic disease of the liver due to a reduced activity of the UDP Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) enzyme. In an effort to translate to the clinic an adeno-associated virus vector mediated liver gene transfer approach to treat Crigler-Najjar syndrome, we developed and optimized a vector expressing the UGT1A1 transgene. For this purpose, we designed and tested in vitro and in vivo multiple codon-optimized UGT1A1 transgene cDNAs. We also optimized noncoding sequences in the transgene expression cassette. Our results indicate that transgene codon-optimization is a strategy that can improve efficacy of gene transfer but needs to be carefully tested in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, while inclusion of introns can enhance gene expression, optimization of these introns, and in particular removal of cryptic ATGs and splice sites, is an important maneuver to enhance safety and efficacy of gene transfer. Finally, using a translationally optimized adeno-associated virus vector expressing the UGT1A1 transgene, we demonstrated rescue of the phenotype of Crigler-Najjar syndrome in two animal models of the disease, Gunn rats and Ugt1a1-/- mice. We also showed long-term (>1 year) correction of the disease in Gunn rats. These results support further translation of the approach to humans. PMID:27722180

  8. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 6 (rAAV6) Potently and Preferentially Transduces Rat Astrocytes In vitro and In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Alexandra L.; Gagarkin, Dmitriy A.; Chen, Ying; Gao, Guangping; Jacobson, Lauren; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors are an increasingly popular tool for gene delivery to the CNS because of their non-pathological nature, low immunogenicity, and ability to stably transduce dividing and non-dividing cells. One of the limitations of rAAVs is their preferential tropism for neuronal cells. Glial cells, specifically astrocytes, appear to be infected at low rates. To overcome this limitation, previous studies utilized rAAVs with astrocyte-specific promoters or assorted rAAV serotypes and pseudotypes with purported selectivity for astrocytes. Yet, the reported glial infection rates are not consistent from study to study. In the present work, we tested seven commercially available recombinant serotypes– rAAV1, 2, and 5 through 9, for their ability to transduce primary rat astrocytes [visualized via viral expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)]. In cell cultures, rAAV6 consistently demonstrated the highest infection rates, while rAAV2 showed astrocytic transduction in some, but not all, of the tested viral batches. To verify that all rAAV constructs utilized by us were viable and effective, we confirmed high infectivity rates in retinal pigmented epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which are known to be transduced by numerous rAAV serotypes. Based on the in vitro results, we next tested the cell type tropism of rAAV6 and rAAV2 in vivo, which were both injected in the barrel cortex at approximately equal doses. Three weeks later, the brains were sectioned and immunostained for viral GFP and the neuronal marker NeuN or the astrocytic marker GFAP. We found that rAAV6 strongly and preferentially transduced astrocytes (>90% of cells in the virus-infected areas), but not neurons (∼10% infection rate). On the contrary, rAAV2 preferentially infected neurons (∼65%), but not astrocytes (∼20%). Overall, our results suggest that rAAV6 can be used as a tool for manipulating gene expression (either delivery or knockdown) in rat astrocytes in vivo. PMID

  9. Evasion of immune responses to introduced human acid alpha-glucosidase by liver-restricted expression in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Sun, Baodong; Yang, Xiaoyi; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Schneider, Ayn; Brown, Talmage; Young, Sarah P; Clay, Timothy M; Amalfitano, Andrea; Chen, Y T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease) is caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) and manifests as muscle weakness, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus vectors containing either a liver-specific promoter (LSP) (AAV-LSPhGAApA) or a hybrid CB promoter (AAV-CBhGAApA) to drive human GAA expression were pseudotyped as AAV8 and administered to immunocompetent GAA-knockout mice. Secreted hGAA was detectable in plasma between 1 day and 12 weeks postadministration with AAV-LSPhGAApA and only from 1 to 8 days postadministration for AAV-CBGAApA. No anti-GAA antibodies were detected in response to AAV-LSPhGAApA (<1:200), whereas AAV-CBhGAApA provoked an escalating antibody response starting 2 weeks postadministration. The LSP drove approximately 60-fold higher GAA expression than the CB promoter in the liver by 12 weeks following vector administration. Furthermore, the detected cellular immunity was provoked by AAV-CBhGAApA, as detected by ELISpot and CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte immunodetection. GAA activity was increased to higher than normal and glycogen content was reduced to essentially normal levels in the heart and skeletal muscle following administration of AAV-LSPhGAApA. Therefore, liver-restricted GAA expression with an AAV vector evaded immunity and enhanced efficacy in GSD-II mice.

  10. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD. PMID:27408904

  11. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD.

  12. Pharmacological modulation of humoral immunity in a nonhuman primate model of AAV gene transfer for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Chen, Yifeng; Murphy, Samuel L; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Tai, Alex; Price, Sandra D; Metzger, Mark E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Donahue, Robert E; Dunbar, Cynthia E; High, Katherine A

    2012-07-01

    Liver gene transfer for hemophilia B has shown very promising results in recent clinical studies. A potential complication of gene-based treatments for hemophilia and other inherited disorders, however, is the development of neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against the therapeutic transgene. The risk of developing NAb to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated hepatic gene transfer for hemophilia is small but not absent, as formation of inhibitory antibodies to F.IX is observed in experimental animals following liver gene transfer. Thus, strategies to modulate antitransgene NAb responses are needed. Here, we used the anti-B cell monoclonal antibody rituximab (rtx) in combination with cyclosporine A (CsA) to eradicate anti-human F.IX NAb in rhesus macaques previously injected intravenously with AAV8 vectors expressing human F.IX. A short course of immunosuppression (IS) resulted in eradication of anti-F.IX NAb with restoration of plasma F.IX transgene product detection. In one animal, following IS anti-AAV6 antibodies also dropped below detection, allowing for successful AAV vector readministration and resulting in high levels (60% or normal) of F.IX transgene product in plasma. Though the number of animals is small, this study supports for the safety and efficacy of B cell-targeting therapies to eradicate NAb developed following AAV-mediated gene transfer.

  13. Bioengineered coagulation factor VIII enables long-term correction of murine hemophilia A following liver-directed adeno-associated viral vector delivery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Harrison C; Wright, J Fraser; Zhou, Shangzhen; Lytle, Allison M; Shields, Jordan E; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data support the feasibility and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in gene therapy applications. Despite several clinical trials of AAV-based gene transfer for hemophilia B, a unique set of obstacles impede the development of a similar approach for hemophilia A. These include (i) the size of the factor VIII (fVIII) transgene, (ii) humoral immune responses to fVIII, (iii) inefficient biosynthesis of human fVIII, and (iv) AAV vector immunity. Through bioengineering approaches, a novel fVIII molecule, designated ET3, was developed and shown to improve biosynthetic efficiency 10- to 100-fold. In this study, the utility of ET3 was assessed in the context of liver-directed, AAV-mediated gene transfer into hemophilia A mice. Due to the large size of the expression cassette, AAV-ET3 genomes packaged into viral particles as partial genome fragments. Despite this potential limitation, a single peripheral vein administration of AAV-ET3 into immune-competent hemophilia A mice resulted in correction of the fVIII deficiency at lower vector doses than previously reported for similarly oversized AAV-fVIII vectors. Therefore, ET3 appears to improve vector potency and mitigate at least one of the critical barriers to AAV-based clinical gene therapy for hemophilia A. PMID:26015976

  14. Nonreplicating vaccinia vector efficiently expresses recombinant genes.

    PubMed

    Sutter, G; Moss, B

    1992-11-15

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), a highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain that has been safety tested in humans, was evaluated for use as an expression vector. MVA has multiple genomic deletions and is severely host cell restricted: it grows well in avian cells but is unable to multiply in human and most other mammalian cells tested. Nevertheless, we found that replication of viral DNA appeared normal and that both early and late viral proteins were synthesized in human cells. Proteolytic processing of viral structural proteins was inhibited, however, and only immature virus particles were detected by electron microscopy. We constructed an insertion plasmid with the Escherichia coli lacZ gene under the control of the vaccinia virus late promoter P11, flanked by sequences of MVA DNA, to allow homologous recombination at the site of a naturally occurring 3500-base-pair deletion within the MVA genome. MVA recombinants were isolated and propagated in permissive avian cells and shown to express the enzyme beta-galactosidase upon infection of nonpermissive human cells. The amount of enzyme made was similar to that produced by a recombinant of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve, which also had the lacZ gene under control of the P11 promoter, but multiplied to high titers. Since recombinant gene expression is unimpaired in nonpermissive human cells, MVA may serve as a highly efficient and exceptionally safe vector.

  15. Systemic gene delivery following intravenous administration of AAV9 to fetal and neonatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Wong, Andrew M S; Hoefer, Klemens; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Howe, Steven J; Cooper, Jonathan D; Waddington, Simon N; Chan, Jerry K Y; Rahim, Ahad A

    2015-09-01

    Several acute monogenic diseases affect multiple body systems, causing death in childhood. The development of novel therapies for such conditions is challenging. However, improvements in gene delivery technology mean that gene therapy has the potential to treat such disorders. We evaluated the ability of the AAV9 vector to mediate systemic gene delivery after intravenous administration to perinatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates (NHPs). Titer-matched single-stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were intravenously administered to fetal and neonatal mice, with noninjected age-matched mice used as the control. Extensive GFP expression was observed in organs throughout the body, with the epithelial and muscle cells being particularly well transduced. ssAAV9 carrying the WPRE sequence mediated significantly more gene expression than its sc counterpart, which lacked the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) sequence. To examine a realistic scale-up to larger models or potentially patients for such an approach, AAV9 was intravenously administered to late-gestation NHPs by using a clinically relevant protocol. Widespread systemic gene expression was measured throughout the body, with cellular tropisms similar to those observed in the mouse studies and no observable adverse events. This study confirms that AAV9 can safely mediate systemic gene delivery in small and large animal models and supports its potential use in clinical systemic gene therapy protocols.

  16. Antibody neutralization poses a barrier to intravitreal adeno-associated viral vector gene delivery to non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Kotterman, M A; Yin, L; Strazzeri, J M; Flannery, J G; Merigan, W H; Schaffer, D V

    2015-02-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have exhibited promise in both preclinical disease models and human clinical trials for numerous disease targets, including the retinal degenerative disorders Leber's congenital amaurosis and choroideremia. One general challenge for AAV is that preexisting immunity, as well as subsequent development of immunity following vector administration, can severely inhibit systemic AAV vector gene delivery. However, the role of neutralizing antibodies (NABs) in AAV transduction of tissues considered to be immune privileged, such as the eye, is unclear in large animals. Intravitreal AAV administration allows for broad retinal delivery, but is more susceptible to interactions with the immune system than subretinal administration. To assess the effects of systemic anti-AAV antibody levels on intravitreal gene delivery, we quantified the anti-AAV antibodies present in sera from non-human primates before and after intravitreal injections with various AAV capsids. Analysis showed that intravitreal administration resulted in an increase in anti-AAV antibodies regardless of the capsid serotype, transgene or dosage of virus injected. For monkeys injected with wild-type AAV2 and/or an AAV2 mutant, the variable that most significantly affected the production of anti-AAV2 antibodies was the amount of virus delivered. In addition, post-injection antibody titers were highest against the serotype administered, but the antibodies were also cross-reactive against other AAV serotypes. Furthermore, NAB levels in serum correlated with those in vitreal fluid, demonstrating both that this route of administration exposes AAV capsid epitopes to the adaptive immune system and that serum measurements are predictive of vitreous fluid NAB titers. Moreover, the presence of preexisting NAB titers in the serum of monkeys correlated strongly (R=0.76) with weak, decaying or no transgene expression following intravitreal administration of AAV

  17. Properly scaled and targeted AAV2-NRTN (neurturin) to the substantia nigra is safe, effective and causes no weight loss: support for nigral targeting in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bartus, Raymond T; Brown, Lamar; Wilson, Alistair; Kruegel, Brian; Siffert, Joao; Johnson, Eugene M; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Herzog, Christopher D

    2011-10-01

    Recent analyses of autopsied brains from subjects previously administered AAV2-neurturin (NRTN) gene transfer argues that optimizing the effects of neurotrophic factors in Parkinson's disease (PD) likely requires delivery to both the degenerating cell bodies (in substantia nigra) and their terminals (in striatum). Prior to implementing this novel dosing paradigm in humans, we conducted eight nonclinical experiments with three general objectives: (1) evaluate the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of targeting the substantia nigra (SN) with AAV2-NRTN, (2) better understand and appraise recent warnings of serious weight loss that might occur with targeting the SN with neurotrophic factors, and (3) define an appropriate dose of AAV2-NRTN that should safely and effectively cover the SN in PD patients. Toward these ends, we first determined SN volume for rats, monkeys and humans, and employed these values to calculate comparable dose equivalents for each species by scaling each dose, based on relative SN volume. Using this information, we next injected AAV2-GFP to monkey SN to quantify AAV2-vector distribution and confirm reasonable SN coverage. We then selected and administered a ~200-fold range of AAV2-NRTN doses (and a single AAV2-GDNF dose) to rat SN, producing a wide range of protein expression. In contrast to recent warnings regarding nigra targeting, no dose produced any serious side effects or toxicity, though we replicated the modest reduction in weight gain reported by others with the highest AAV2-NRTN and the AAV2-GDNF dose. A dose-related increase in NRTN expression was seen, with the lower doses limiting NRTN to the peri-SN and the highest dose producing mistargeted NRTN well outside the SN. We then demonstrated that the reduction in weight gain following excessive-doses can be dissociated from NRTN in the targeted SN, and is linked to mistargeted NRTN in the diencephalon. We also showed that prior destruction of the dopaminergic SN neurons via 6-OHDA

  18. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  19. Novel Mutant AAV2 Rep Proteins Support AAV2 Replication without Blocking HSV-1 Helpervirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Seyffert, Michael; Glauser, Daniel L.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; de Oliveira, Anna-Paula; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Vogt, Bernd; Büning, Hildegard; Linden, R. Michael; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-01-01

    As their names imply, parvoviruses of the genus Dependovirus rely for their efficient replication on the concurrent presence of a helpervirus, such as herpesvirus, adenovirus, or papilloma virus. Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is such an example, which in turn can efficiently inhibit the replication of each helpervirus by distinct mechanisms. In a previous study we have shown that expression of the AAV2 rep gene is not compatible with efficient replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). In particular, the combined DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities of the Rep68/78 proteins have been shown to exert opposite effects on the replication of AAV2 and HSV-1. While essential for AAV2 DNA replication these protein activities account for the Rep-mediated inhibition of HSV-1 replication. Here, we describe a novel Rep mutant (Rep-D371Y), which displayed an unexpected phenotype. Rep-D371Y did not block HSV-1 replication, but still supported efficient AAV2 replication, at least when a double-stranded AAV2 genome template was used. We also found that the capacity of Rep-D371Y to induce apoptosis and a Rep-specific DNA damage response was significantly reduced compared to wild-type Rep. These findings suggest that AAV2 Rep-helicase subdomains exert diverging activities, which contribute to distinct steps of the AAV2 life cycle. More important, the novel AAV2 mutant Rep-D371Y may allow deciphering yet unsolved activities of the AAV2 Rep proteins such as DNA second-strand synthesis, genomic integration or packaging, which all involve the Rep-helicase activity. PMID:28125695

  20. Construction of glucose-repressible yeast expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Yao, B; Marmur, J; Sollitti, P

    1993-12-31

    A set of two episomal yeast expression vectors, pYME1 and pYME2, were constructed. These Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors each contain a modified yeast MAL6S (encoding maltase) promoter that is expressed constitutively, but is subject to carbon catabolite repression by glucose. Expression from this promoter is still dependent upon the presence of active MALR (regulatory) protein. These expression vectors are particularly useful because most S. cerevisiae strains are MAL+, thereby exhibiting a wider host range than GAL-based vector systems. These pYME1 and pYME2 vectors are capable of expression to levels comparable to GAL-based expression plasmids and much higher than a variety of other repressible promoter vectors. The vectors are identical, except that their multiple cloning sites (MCS) are in opposite orientations, making them convenient for inserting heterologous genes.

  1. Targeted genetic manipulations of neuronal subtypes using promoter-specific combinatorial AAVs in wild-type animals

    PubMed Central

    Gompf, Heinrich S.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Bass, Caroline E.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques to genetically manipulate the activity of defined neuronal subpopulations have been useful in elucidating function, however applicability to translational research beyond transgenic mice is limited. Subtype targeted transgene expression can be achieved using specific promoters, but often currently available promoters are either too large to package into many vectors, in particular adeno-associated virus (AAV), or do not drive expression at levels sufficient to alter behavior. To permit neuron subtype specific gene expression in wildtype animals, we developed a combinatorial AAV targeting system that drives, in combination, subtype specific Cre-recombinase expression with a strong but non-specific Cre-conditional transgene. Using this system we demonstrate that the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre-AAV) restricted expression of channelrhodopsin-2 (EF1α-DIO-ChR2-EYFP-AAV) to the rat ventral tegmental area (VTA), or an activating DREADD (hSyn-DIO-hM3Dq-mCherry-AAV) to  the  rat  locus  coeruleus  (LC). High expression levels were achieved in both regions. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed the majority of ChR2+ neurons (>93%) colocalized with TH in the VTA, and optical stimulation evoked striatal dopamine release. Activation of TH neurons in the LC produced sustained EEG and behavioral arousal. TH-specific hM3Dq expression in the LC was further compared with: (1) a Cre construct driven by a strong but non-specific promoter (non-targeting); and (2) a retrogradely-transported WGA-Cre delivery mechanism (targeting a specific projection). IHC revealed that the area of c-fos activation after CNO treatment in the LC and peri-LC neurons appeared proportional to the resulting increase in wakefulness (non-targeted > targeted > ACC to LC projection restricted). Our dual AAV targeting system effectively overcomes the large size and weak activity barrier prevalent with many subtype specific promoters by functionally separating subtype specificity from

  2. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-09-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 10(12) viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30-50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients.

  3. Self-complementary AAV2.5-BMP2-coated Femoral Allografts Mediated Superior Bone Healing Versus Live Autografts in Mice With Equivalent Biomechanics to Unfractured Femur

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Cemal; Takahata, Masahiko; Reynolds, David G; Xie, Chao; Samulski, R Jude; Samulski, Jade; Beecham, E Jeffrey; Gertzman, Arthur A; Spilker, Mark; Zhang, Xinping; O'Keefe, Regis J; Awad, Hani A; Schwarz, Edward M

    2011-01-01

    Structural allografts used for critical bone defects have limited osteogenic properties for biointegration. Although ex vivo tissue-engineered constructs expressing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) have demonstrated efficacy in critical defect models, similar success has not been achieved with off-the-shelf acellular approaches, including allografts coated with freeze-dried single-stranded adeno-associated virus (ssAAV-BMP2). To see whether the self-complementary AAV serotype 2.5 vector (scAAV2.5-BMP2) could overcome this, we performed side-by-side comparisons in vitro and in the murine femoral allograft model. Although ssAAV-BMP2 was unable to induce BMP2 expression and differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells in culture, scAAV2.5-BMP2 transduction led to dose-dependent BMP2 expression and alkaline phosphatase activity, and displayed a 25-fold increased transduction efficiency in vivo. After 6 weeks, the ssAAV-BMP2 coating failed to demonstrate any significant effects. However, all allografts coated with 1010 scAAV2.5-BMP2 formed a new cortical shell that was indistinguishable to that formed by live autografts. Additionally, coated allografts experienced reduced resorption resulting in a threefold increase in graft bone volume versus autograft. This led to biomechanical superiority versus both allografts and autografts, and equivalent torsional rigidity to unfractured femur. Collectively, these results demonstrate that scAAV2.5-BMP2 coating overcomes the major limitations of structural allografts, which can be used to heal critical defects of any size. PMID:21206485

  4. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  5. A Single Vector Platform for High-Level Gene Transduction of Central Neurons: Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Equipped with the Tet-Off System

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jaerin; Takahashi, Megumu; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Ishida, Yoko; Furuta, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Visualization of neurons is indispensable for the investigation of neuronal circuits in the central nervous system. Virus vectors have been widely used for labeling particular subsets of neurons, and the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector has gained popularity as a tool for gene transfer. Here, we developed a single AAV vector Tet-Off platform, AAV-SynTetOff, to improve the gene-transduction efficiency, specifically in neurons. The platform is composed of regulator and response elements in a single AAV genome. After infection of Neuro-2a cells with the AAV-SynTetOff vector, the transduction efficiency of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was increased by approximately 2- and 15-fold relative to the conventional AAV vector with the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or human synapsin I (SYN) promoter, respectively. We then injected the AAV vectors into the mouse neostriatum. GFP expression in the neostriatal neurons infected with the AAV-SynTetOff vector was approximately 40-times higher than that with the CMV or SYN promoter. By adding a membrane-targeting signal to GFP, the axon fibers of neostriatal neurons were clearly visualized. In contrast, by attaching somatodendritic membrane-targeting signals to GFP, axon fiber labeling was mostly suppressed. Furthermore, we prepared the AAV-SynTetOff vector, which simultaneously expressed somatodendritic membrane-targeted GFP and membrane-targeted red fluorescent protein (RFP). After injection of the vector into the neostriatum, the cell bodies and dendrites of neostriatal neurons were labeled with both GFP and RFP, whereas the axons in the projection sites were labeled only with RFP. Finally, we applied this vector to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive (VIP+) neocortical neurons, one of the subclasses of inhibitory neurons in the neocortex, in layer 2/3 of the mouse primary somatosensory cortex. The results revealed the differential distribution of the somatodendritic and axonal structures at the population level. The

  6. Long-term restoration of rod and cone vision by single dose rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina in a canine model of childhood blindness.

    PubMed

    Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2005-12-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations.

  7. Long-Term Restoration of Rod and Cone Vision by Single Dose rAAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to the Retina in a Canine Model of Childhood Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Maguire, Albert M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2010-01-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. PMID:16226919

  8. 75 FR 55808 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of AAV5 Based Therapeutics To Treat Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Thereof'' ; and U.S. Patent 6, 855, 314 entitled ``AAV5 Vector for Transducing Brain Cells and Lung Cells... sale of AAV5 based therapeutic products to be delivered to the brain, eyes and liver for treatment of... particles. The specific brain cells that are targeted by AAV5 belong to both non-neuronal/glial cells...

  9. Persistent expression of human clotting factor IX from mouse liver after intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, Dwight D.; Alexander, Ian E.; Halbert, Christine L.; Russell, David W.; Miller, A. Dusty

    1997-01-01

    We previously found that gene transduction by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in cell culture can be stimulated over 100-fold by treatment of the target cells with agents that affect DNA metabolism, such as irradiation or topoisomerase inhibitors. Here we show that previous γ-irradiation increased the transduction rate in mouse liver by up to 900-fold, and the topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide increased transduction by about 20-fold. Similar rates of hepatic transduction were obtained by direct injection of the liver or by systemic delivery via tail vein injection. Hepatocytes were much more efficiently transduced than other cells after systemic delivery, and up to 3% of all hepatocytes could be transduced after one vector injection. The presence of wild-type AAV, which contaminates many AAV vector preparations, was required to observe a full response to γ-irradiation. Injection of mice with AAV vectors encoding human clotting factor IX after γ-irradiation resulted in synthesis of low levels of human clotting factor IX for the 5-month period of observation. These studies show the potential of targeted gene transduction of the liver by AAV vectors for treatment of various hematological or metabolic diseases. PMID:9037069

  10. Rapid/sustained anti-anthrax passive immunity mediated by co-administration of Ad/AAV.

    PubMed

    De, Bishnu P; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie L

    2008-01-01

    Achieving both immediate and sustained protection against diseases caused by bacterial toxins and extracellular pathogens is a challenge in developing biodefense therapeutics. We hypothesized that a single co-administration of an adenovirus (Ad) vector and an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, both expressing a pathogen-specific monoclonal antibody, would provide rapid, persistent passive immunotherapy against the pathogen. In order to test this strategy, we used the lethal toxin of Bacillus anthracis as a target of a monoclonal antibody directed against the protective antigen (PA) component of the toxin, using co-administration of an Ad vector encoding an anti-PA monoclonal antibody (AdalphaPA) and an AAV vector encoding an anti-PA monoclonal antibody (AAVrh.10alphaPA). As early as 1 day after co-administration of AdalphaPA and AAVrh.10alphaPA to mice, serum anti-PA antibody levels were detectable, and were sustained through 6 months. Importantly, animals that received both vectors were protected against toxin challenge as early as 1 day after administration and throughout the 6 month duration of the experiment. These data provide a new paradigm of genetic passive immunotherapy by co-administration of Ad and AAV vectors, each encoding a pathogen-specific monoclonal antibody, as an effective approach for both rapid and sustained protection against a bio-terror attack.

  11. The Upstream enhancer elements of the G6PC promoter are critical for optimal G6PC expression in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Mok; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Koeberl, Dwight D.; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type-Ia (GSD-Ia) patients deficient in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) manifest impaired glucose homeostasis characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidemia. Two efficacious recombinant adeno-associated virus pseudotype 2/8 (rAAV8) vectors expressing human G6Pase-α have been independently developed. One is a single-stranded vector containing a 2864-bp of the G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-GPE) and the other is a double-stranded vector containing a shorter 382-bp minimal G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-miGPE). To identify the best construct, a direct comparison of the rAAV8-GPE and the rAAV8-miGPE vectors was initiated to determine the best vector to take forward into clinical trials. We show that the rAAV8-GPE vector directed significantly higher levels of hepatic G6Pase-α expression, achieved greater reduction in hepatic glycogen accumulation, and led to a better toleration of fasting in GSD-Ia mice than the rAAV8-miGPE vector. Our results indicated that additional control elements in the rAAV8-GPE vector outweigh the gains from the double-stranded rAAV8-miGPE transduction efficiency, and that the rAAV8-GPE vector is the current choice for clinical translation in human GSD-Ia. PMID:23856420

  12. The upstream enhancer elements of the G6PC promoter are critical for optimal G6PC expression in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mok; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Koeberl, Dwight D; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2013-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type-Ia (GSD-Ia) patients deficient in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) manifest impaired glucose homeostasis characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidemia. Two efficacious recombinant adeno-associated virus pseudotype 2/8 (rAAV8) vectors expressing human G6Pase-α have been independently developed. One is a single-stranded vector containing a 2864-bp of the G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-GPE) and the other is a double-stranded vector containing a shorter 382-bp minimal G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-miGPE). To identify the best construct, a direct comparison of the rAAV8-GPE and the rAAV8-miGPE vectors was initiated to determine the best vector to take forward into clinical trials. We show that the rAAV8-GPE vector directed significantly higher levels of hepatic G6Pase-α expression, achieved greater reduction in hepatic glycogen accumulation, and led to a better toleration of fasting in GSD-Ia mice than the rAAV8-miGPE vector. Our results indicated that additional control elements in the rAAV8-GPE vector outweigh the gains from the double-stranded rAAV8-miGPE transduction efficiency, and that the rAAV8-GPE vector is the current choice for clinical translation in human GSD-Ia.

  13. Human Treg responses allow sustained recombinant adeno-associated virus–mediated transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Christian; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Humphries, Margaret; Carey, Brenna; Sandhaus, Robert A.; McElvaney, Noel G.; Messina, Louis; Tang, Qiushi; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Fu, Ann Dongtao; Yachnis, Anthony; Knop, David R.; Ye, Guo-jie; Brantly, Mark; Calcedo, Roberto; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Richman, Lee P.; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Hulme, Maigan A.; Brusko, Todd M.; Wilson, James M.; Flotte, Terence R.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have shown promise for the treatment of several diseases; however, immune-mediated elimination of transduced cells has been suggested to limit and account for a loss of efficacy. To determine whether rAAV vector expression can persist long term, we administered rAAV vectors expressing normal, M-type α-1 antitrypsin (M-AAT) to AAT-deficient subjects at various doses by multiple i.m. injections. M-specific AAT expression was observed in all subjects in a dose-dependent manner and was sustained for more than 1 year in the absence of immune suppression. Muscle biopsies at 1 year had sustained AAT expression and a reduction of inflammatory cells compared with 3 month biopsies. Deep sequencing of the TCR Vβ region from muscle biopsies demonstrated a limited number of T cell clones that emerged at 3 months after vector administration and persisted for 1 year. In situ immunophenotyping revealed a substantial Treg population in muscle biopsy samples containing AAT-expressing myofibers. Approximately 10% of all T cells in muscle were natural Tregs, which were activated in response to AAV capsid. These results suggest that i.m. delivery of rAAV type 1–AAT (rAAV1-AAT) induces a T regulatory response that allows ongoing transgene expression and indicates that immunomodulatory treatments may not be necessary for rAAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24231351

  14. The potential of adeno-associated viral vectors for gene delivery to muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, M Abu; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Muscle-directed gene therapy is rapidly gaining attention primarily because muscle is an easily accessible target tissue and is also associated with various severe genetic disorders. Localized and systemic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors of several serotypes results in very efficient transduction of skeletal and cardiac muscles, which has been achieved in both small and large animals, as well as in humans. Muscle is the target tissue in gene therapy for many muscular dystrophy diseases, and may also be exploited as a biofactory to produce secretory factors for systemic disorders. Current limitations of using rAAVs for muscle gene transfer include vector size restriction, potential safety concerns such as off-target toxicity and the immunological barrier composing of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies and CD8+ T-cell response against AAV capsid in humans. Areas covered In this article, we will discuss basic AAV vector biology and its application in muscle-directed gene delivery, as well as potential strategies to overcome the aforementioned limitations of rAAV for further clinical application. Expert opinion Delivering therapeutic genes to large muscle mass in humans is arguably the most urgent unmet demand in treating diseases affecting muscle tissues throughout the whole body. Muscle-directed, rAAV-mediated gene transfer for expressing antibodies is a promising strategy to combat deadly infectious diseases. Developing strategies to circumvent the immune response following rAAV administration in humans will facilitate clinical application. PMID:24386892

  15. AAV-based neonatal gene therapy for hemophilia A: long-term correction and avoidance of immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Lipshutz, G S

    2012-12-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy has been hampered by immune responses to vector-associated antigens and by neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors against the factor VIII (FVIII) protein; these 'inhibitors' more commonly affect hemophilia A patients than those with hemophilia B. A gene replacement strategy beginning in the neonatal period may avoid the development of these immune responses and lead to prolonged expression with correction of phenotype, thereby avoiding long-term consequences. A serotype rh10 adeno-associated virus (AAV) was developed splitting the FVIII coding sequence into heavy and light chains with the chicken β-actin promoter/CMV enhancer for dual recombinant adeno-associated viral vector delivery. Virions of each FVIII chain were co-injected intravenously into mice on the second day of life. Mice express sustained levels of FVIII antigen ≥5% up to 22 months of life without development of antibodies against FVIII. Phenotypic correction was manifest in all AAV-FVIII-treated mice as demonstrated by functional assay and reduction in bleeding time. This study demonstrates the use of AAV in a gene replacement strategy in neonatal mice that establishes both long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A and lack of antibody development against FVIII in this disease model where AAV is administered shortly after birth. These studies support the consideration of gene replacement therapy for diseases that are diagnosed in utero or in the early neonatal period.

  16. AAV1/2-mediated BDNF gene therapy in a transgenic rat model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Connor, B; Sun, Y; von Hieber, D; Tang, S K; Jones, K S; Maucksch, C

    2016-03-01

    Reduced expression and disrupted corticostriatal transportation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is proposed to contribute to the selective vulnerability of medium spiny striatal projection neurons (MSNs) in Huntington's disease (HD). We have previously demonstrated that BDNF overexpression in the quinolinic acid lesioned rat striatum attenuates motor impairment and reduces the extent of MSN cell loss. To further investigate the potential therapeutic properties of BDNF for HD, the current study examines the effect of bilateral AAV1/2-mediated BDNF expression in the striatum of a transgenic rat model of HD. Transfer of the BDNF gene to striatal neurons using an AAV1/2 serotype vector enhanced BDNF protein levels in the striatum. Bilateral BDNF expression attenuated the impairment of both motor and cognitive function when compared with AAV1/2-vehicle- or YFP-treated transgenic HD rats. Interestingly, a gender effect was apparent with female transgenic HD rats exhibiting less functional impairment than males. Quantification of NeuN and DARRP32 immunoreactivity and striatal volume revealed limited disease phenotype between wild type and transgenic HD animals. However, AAV1/2-BDNF-treated transgenic HD rats showed evidence of greater striatal volume and increased NeuN+ cell numbers compared with wild-type vehicle- and AAV1/2-vehicle- or YFP-treated transgenic HD rats. We propose BDNF holds considerable therapeutic potential for alleviating behavioral dysfunction and neuronal degeneration in HD, with further work required to examine the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling and the preservation of axonal and synaptic function.

  17. AAV-Nrf2 Promotes Protection and Recovery in Animal Models of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Katharine J; Woodard, Kenton T; Weaver, Mark A; Gaylor, John Paul; Weiss, Ellen R; Samulski, R Jude

    2017-03-01

    NRF2 is a transcription factor that drives antioxidant gene expression in multiple organ systems. We hypothesized that Nrf2 overexpression could be therapeutically applied toward diseases in which redox homeostasis is disrupted. In this study, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-Nrf2 was tested in a mouse model of acute acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity and successfully conferred protection from hepatotoxicity, validating the vector design and early onset of NRF2-mediated protection. Furthermore, therapeutic potential of AAV-Nrf2 in chronic disease also was tested in a light-induced mouse model of age-related macular degeneration. Adult BALB/c mice were intravitreally injected with AAV-Nrf2 and subject to light damage following injection. Retinal thickness and function were monitored following light damage using optical coherence tomography and electroretinography, respectively. By 3 months post-damage, injected eyes had greater retinal thickness compared to uninjected controls. At 1 month post-damage, AAV-Nrf2 injection facilitated full functional recovery from light damage. Our results suggest a therapeutic potential for Nrf2 overexpression in acute and long-term capacities in multiple organ systems, opening up doors for combination gene therapy where replacement gene therapy requires additional therapeutic support to prevent further degeneration.

  18. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  19. AAV2-mediated gene delivery to monkey putamen: Evaluation of an infusion device and delivery parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sanftner, Laura M.; Sommer, Jurg M.; Suzuki, Brian M.; Smith, Peter H.; Vijay, Sharmila; Vargas, Joseph A.; Forsayeth, John R.; Cunningham, Janet; Bankiewicz, Krys S.; Kao, Haihwa; Bernal, Jan; Pierce, Glenn F.; Johnson, Kirk W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a modified infusion procedure and a novel infusion device designed for use in humans (Clinical Device B) were evaluated for delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV2) to brain. The device is composed of 1.2 m of fused silica inserted through a 24.6-cm surgical steel cannula designed to fit a standard Leksell® clinical stereotaxic frame and micro-infusion syringe pump. AAV2 encoding the human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene (AAV-hAADC-2) was infused into the putamen of 4 normal rhesus monkeys as a supportive study for a clinical trial in Parkinson&apos ;s disease (PD) patients. Two infusion protocols were tested: a ramped procedure (slow stepwise increases in rate from 0.2 μL/min to 1μL/min), thought to be essential for convection-enhanced delivery (CED), and a non-ramped infusion at a constant rate of 1 μL/min. The primary endpoints were safety evaluation of the infusion procedures and assessment of transgene expression at 5.5 weeks post-infusion. Clinical observations after vector infusions revealed no behavioral abnormalities during the study period. No differences in gross pathology with either the ramped or non-ramped infusion procedure were observed. Histopathology of the putamen was comparable with both procedures, and revealed only minimal localized inflammatory tissue reaction along the needle track in response to cannula placement and vector infusion. AADC immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vector was distributed throughout the putamen, with no significant difference in volume of immunostaining with either infusion procedure. Serum antibody levels against AAV2 vector exhibited a minor increase after infusion. These results validate the clinical utility of this new infusion device and non-ramped infusion conditions for intraputamenal gene therapy, and have the potential to impact a number of human diseases in which delivery of therapeutics to brain is indicated. PMID:16022872

  20. AAV genome loss from dystrophic mouse muscles during AAV-U7 snRNA-mediated exon-skipping therapy.

    PubMed

    Le Hir, Maëva; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Peccate, Cécile; Précigout, Guillaume; Davies, Kay E; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Lorain, Stéphanie

    2013-08-01

    In the context of future adeno-associated viral (AAV)-based clinical trials for Duchenne myopathy, AAV genome fate in dystrophic muscles is of importance considering the viral capsid immunogenicity that prohibits recurring treatments. We showed that AAV genomes encoding non-therapeutic U7 were lost from mdx dystrophic muscles within 3 weeks after intramuscular injection. In contrast, AAV genomes encoding U7ex23 restoring expression of a slightly shortened dystrophin were maintained endorsing that the arrest of the dystrophic process is crucial for maintaining viral genomes in transduced fibers. Indeed, muscles treated with low doses of AAV-U7ex23, resulting in sub-optimal exon skipping, displayed much lower titers of viral genomes, showing that sub-optimal dystrophin restoration does not prevent AAV genome loss. We also followed therapeutic viral genomes in severe dystrophic dKO mice over time after systemic treatment with scAAV9-U7ex23. Dystrophin restoration decreased significantly between 3 and 12 months in various skeletal muscles, which was correlated with important viral genome loss, except in the heart. Altogether, these data show that the success of future AAV-U7 therapy for Duchenne patients would require optimal doses of AAV-U7 to induce substantial levels of dystrophin to stabilize the treated fibers and maintain the long lasting effect of the treatment.

  1. Long-term Amelioration of Feline Mucopolysaccharidosis VI After AAV-mediated Liver Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Cotugno, Gabriella; Annunziata, Patrizia; Tessitore, Alessandra; O'Malley, Thomas; Capalbo, Anita; Faella, Armida; Bartolomeo, Rosa; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Russo, Fabio; Sleeper, Meg M; Knox, Van W; Fernandez, Steven; Levanduski, Leah; Hopwood, John; De Leonibus, Elvira; Haskins, Mark; Auricchio, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is caused by deficient arylsulfatase B (ARSB) activity resulting in lysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). MPS VI is characterized by dysostosis multiplex, organomegaly, corneal clouding, and heart valve thickening. Gene transfer to a factory organ like liver may provide a lifetime source of secreted ARSB. We show that intravascular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) 2/8-TBG-felineARSB in MPS VI cats resulted in ARSB expression up to 1 year, the last time point of the study. In newborn cats, normal circulating ARSB activity was achieved following delivery of high vector doses (6 × 1013 genome copies (gc)/kg) whereas delivery of AAV2/8 vector doses as low as 2 × 1012 gc/kg resulted in higher than normal serum ARSB levels in juvenile MPS VI cats. In MPS VI cats showing high serum ARSB levels, independent of the age at treatment, we observed: (i) clearance of GAG storage, (ii) improvement of long bone length, (iii) reduction of heart valve thickness, and (iv) improvement in spontaneous mobility. Thus, AAV2/ 8-mediated liver gene transfer represents a promising therapeutic strategy for MPS VI patients. PMID:21119624

  2. A muscle-targeting peptide displayed on AAV2 improves muscle tropism on systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, C-Y; Yuan, Z; Cao, Z; Wang, B; Qiao, C; Li, J; Xiao, X

    2009-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a leading gene transfer vector for striated muscles. However, the AAV vectors also exhibit broad tropisms after systemic delivery. In an attempt to improve muscle tropism, we inserted a 7-amino-acid (ASSLNIA) muscle-targeting peptide (MTP) in the capsids of AAV2 at residue 587 or 588, generating AAV(587)MTP and AAV(588)MTP. In vitro studies showed that both viruses diminished their infectivity on non-muscle cell lines as well as on un-differentiated myoblasts; however, preserved or enhanced their infectivity on differentiated myotubes. AAV(587)MTP, but not AAV(588)MTP, also abolished its heparin-binding capacity and infected myotubes in a heparin-independent manner. Furthermore, in vivo studies by intravenous vector administration in mice showed that AAV(587)MTP enhanced its tropism to various muscles and particularly to the heart (24.3-fold of unmodified AAV2), whereas reduced its tropism to the non-muscle tissues such as the liver, lungs, spleen and so on. This alteration of tissue tropism is not simply because of the loss of heparin-binding, as a mutant AAV2 (AAVHBSMut) containing heparin-binding site mutations lost infectivity on both non-muscle and muscle cells. Furthermore, free MTP peptide, but not the scrambled control peptide, competitively inhibited AAV(587)MTP infection on myotubes. These results suggest that AAV2 could be re-targeted to the striated muscles by a MTP inserted after residue 587 of the capsids. This proof of principle study showed first evidence of peptide-directed muscle targeting on systemic administration of AAV vectors.

  3. Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Genomes Persist as Episomal Chromatin in Primate Muscle▿

    PubMed Central

    Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Nowrouzi, Ali; Toromanoff, Alice; Chérel, Yan; Chenuaud, Pierre; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Rolling, Fabienne; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are capable of mediating long-term gene expression following administration to skeletal muscle. In rodent muscle, the vector genomes persist in the nucleus in concatemeric episomal forms. Here, we demonstrate with nonhuman primates that rAAV vectors integrate inefficiently into the chromosomes of myocytes and reside predominantly as episomal monomeric and concatemeric circles. The episomal rAAV genomes assimilate into chromatin with a typical nucleosomal pattern. The persistence of the vector genomes and gene expression for years in quiescent tissues suggests that a bona fide chromatin structure is important for episomal maintenance and transgene expression. These findings were obtained from primate muscles transduced with rAAV1 and rAAV8 vectors for up to 22 months after intramuscular delivery of 5 × 1012 viral genomes/kg. Because of this unique context, our data, which provide important insight into in situ vector biology, are highly relevant from a clinical standpoint. PMID:18524821

  4. Cytotoxic immune response after retroviral-mediated hepatic gene transfer in rat does not preclude expression from adeno-associated virus 1 transduced muscles.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Dominique; Pichard, Virginie; Durand, Sophie; Moullier, Philippe; Ferry, Nicolas

    2003-03-20

    Intravenous delivery of nls-lacZ retroviral vectors to the regenerating liver triggers a cytotoxic immune response directed against transduced hepatocytes. We sought to determine whether prior immunization with retroviral vectors impacted on adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated muscular expression of the same transgene. The first group of rats first received nls-lacZ retroviral vectors intravenously after a partial hepatectomy. Thirty days later they received AAV vectors intramuscularly in both legs. In the second group, animals received the same vectors in the opposite sequence (i.e., AAV first and retroviruses 20 days later). In the first group, immune response occurred after retrovirus delivery with appearance of anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies and elimination of transduced hepatocytes. However, the immune response did not prevent sustained (9-month) beta-galactosidase expression in AAV-injected muscles. In the second group, AAV injections did not induce immune response and resulted in beta-galactosidase expression in myofibers. In this group, subsequent delivery of retroviral vectors triggered appearance of immune response and elimination of transduced hepatocytes. However, the immune response did not modify beta-galactosidase expression in AAV-transduced myofibers for up to 9 months. These results demonstrate a differential susceptibility between retrovirally transduced liver and AAV-transduced muscles to immune response against the transgene product.

  5. Impact of pre-existing immunity on gene transfer to nonhuman primate liver with adeno-associated virus 8 vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Calcedo, Roberto; Bell, Peter; Lin, Jianping; Grant, Rebecca L; Siegel, Don L; Wilson, James M

    2011-11-01

    Vectors based on the primate-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) are being evaluated in preclinical and clinical models. Natural infections with related AAVs activate memory B cells that produce antibodies capable of modulating the efficacy and safety of the vector. We have evaluated the biology of AAV8 gene transfer in macaque liver, with a focus on assessing the impact of pre-existing humoral immunity. Twenty-one macaques with various levels of AAV neutralizing antibody (NAb) were injected intravenously with AAV8 vector expressing green fluorescent protein. Pre-existing antibody titers in excess of 1:10 substantially diminished hepatocyte transduction that, in the absence of NAbs, was highly efficient. Vector-specific NAb diminished liver deposition of genomes and unexpectedly increased genome distribution to the spleen. The majority of animals showed high-level and stable sequestration of vector capsid protein by follicular dendritic cells of splenic germinal centers. These studies illustrate how natural immunity to a virus that is related to a vector can impact the efficacy and potential safety of in vivo gene therapy. We propose to use the in vitro transduction inhibition assay to evaluate research subjects before gene therapy and to preclude from systemic AAV8 trials those that have titers in excess of 1:10.

  6. Long-term luciferase expression monitored by bioluminescence imaging after adeno-associated virus-mediated fetal gene delivery in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I

    2010-02-01

    The safety and efficiency of fetal adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery in rhesus monkeys and long-term monitoring of transgene expression by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were evaluated. Early second-trimester fetal monkeys were administered AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10 vector supernatant preparations expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter, using an intrathoracic (n = 6) or intramyocardial (n = 6) approach and established ultrasound-guided techniques. Postnatal BLI was performed monthly up to 6 months postnatal age (n = 12) and then every 3 months thereafter to monitor transgene expression up to 24 months postnatal age (27 months after gene transfer; n = 6). All AAV serotypes showed greater than 1.0 x 10(9) photons/sec at all time points evaluated with limited biodistribution to nontargeted anatomical sites. The highest levels of bioluminescence (photons per second) observed were noted with AAV2/9 and AAV2/10 when the three vector constructs were compared. To correlate in vivo findings at the tissue level, specimens were collected from selected animals and analyzed. Three-dimensional reconstruction showed that firefly luciferase expression was consistent with imaging and morphometric measures. These findings suggest that (1) high levels of AAV-mediated firefly luciferase expression can be found after fetal AAV gene transfer and without any evidence of adverse effects; (2) the intercostal muscles, myocardium, and muscular component of the diaphragm of developing fetuses are readily transduced with AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10; and (3) postnatal outcomes and long-term luciferase expression can be effectively monitored by BLI in young rhesus monkeys.

  7. Successful gene therapy in older Rpe65-deficient dogs following subretinal injection of an adeno-associated vector expressing RPE65.

    PubMed

    Annear, Matthew J; Mowat, Freya M; Bartoe, Joshua T; Querubin, Janice; Azam, Selina A; Basche, Mark; Curran, Paul G; Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-10-01

    Young Rpe65-deficient dogs have been used as a model for human RPE65 Leber congenital amaurosis (RPE65-LCA) in proof-of-concept trials of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene therapy. However, there are relatively few reports of the outcome of rAAV gene therapy in Rpe65-deficient dogs older than 2 years of age. The purpose of this study was to investigate the success of this therapy in older Rpe65-deficient dogs. Thirteen eyes were treated in dogs between 2 and 6 years old. An rAAV2 vector expressing the human RPE65 cDNA driven by the human RPE65 promoter was delivered by subretinal injection. Twelve of the 13 eyes had improved retinal function as assessed by electroretinography, and all showed improvement in vision at low lighting intensities. Histologic examination of five of the eyes was performed but found no correlation between electroretinogram (ERG) rescue and numbers of remaining photoreceptors. We conclude that functional rescue is still possible in older dogs and that the use of older Rpe65-deficient dogs, rather than young Rpe65-deficient dogs that have very little loss of photoreceptors, more accurately models the situation when treating human RPE65-LCA patients.

  8. CERE-110, an adeno-associated virus-based gene delivery vector expressing human nerve growth factor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Ronald J

    2010-04-01

    To date, only five drugs have been approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, these agents impact the symptoms rather than the progression of the disease. It is well established that nerve growth factor (NGF) enhances the function and survival of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that are vulnerable in AD. However, NGF does not cross the blood-brain barrier, and intraventricular NGF injections in animals and humans were associated with significant side effects. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based gene delivery is a novel technology being developed for administration of NGF to the brain to treat AD symptoms and progression. Indeed, the efficacy of ex vivo gene delivery was demonstrated in patients with AD who experienced improvements in cerebral metabolism and cognition compared with pre-operative function without adverse events. CERE-110 (AAV2-NGF), under development by Ceregene Inc, is an AAV serotype 2-based vector expressing human NGF delivered to the nucleus basalis of Meynert by stereotactic injection for the treatment of AD. Animal studies have established the preclinical efficacy of CERE-110, revealing an excellent safety profile. CERE-110 has passed phase I clinical testing and a multicenter phase II clinical trial has commenced. CERE-110 is a promising candidate for the treatment of AD.

  9. Hydrostatic Isolated Limb Perfusion with Adeno-associated Virus Vectors Enhances Correction of Skeletal Muscle in Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) stems from the inherited deficiency of acid-α-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase; EC 3.2.1.20), which primarily involves cardiac and skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that hydrostatic isolated limb perfusion (ILP) administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing a muscle specific promoter could achieve relatively higher transgene expression in the hindlimb muscles of GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice, in comparison with intravenous (IV) administration. ILP adminstration of AAV2/8 vectors encoding alkaline phosphatase or human GAA transduced skeletal muscles of the hindlimb widely, despite the relatively low number of vector particles administered (1×1011), and IV administration of an equivalent vector dose failed to transduce skeletal muscle detectably. Similarly, ILP administration of fewer vector particles of the AAV2/9 vector encoding human GAA (3×1010) transduced skeletal muscles of the hindlimb widely and significantly reduced glycogen content to, in comparison with IV administration. The only advantage for IV administration was moderately high level transduction of cardiac muscle, which demonstrated compellingly that ILP administration sequestered vector particles within the perfused limb. Reduction of glycogen storage in the extensor digitorum longus demonstrated the potential advantage of ILP-mediated delivery of AAV vectors in Pompe disease, because type II myofibers are resistant to enzyme replacement therapy. Thus, ILP will enhance AAV transduction of multiple skeletal muscles while reducing the required dosages in terms of vector particle numbers. PMID:20686508

  10. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors in the treatment of rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Eric; Samulski, R. Jude

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 25 million Americans are living with rare diseases. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is an emerging therapeutic option for the more than 7,000 identified rare diseases. This paper highlights the benefits of AAV therapy compared to conventional small molecules, discusses current pre-clinical and clinical applications of AAV-mediated gene therapy, and offers insights into cutting edge research that will shape the future of AAV for broad therapeutic use. Areas covered In this review the biology of AAV and our ability to generate disease-specific variants is summarized. Limitations of current therapy are reviewed, with an emphasis on immune detection of virus, viral tropism and tissue targeting, and limitations of gene expression. Information for this review was found using PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov. Expert opinion Currently the scope of clinical trials of AAV gene therapy is concentrated in an array of phase I/II safety trials with less than two dozen rare diseases featured. Pre-clinical, translational studies are expanding in number as developments within the last decade have made generation of improved AAV vectors available to more researchers. Further, one bottleneck that is being overcome is the availability of disease models, which will allow for improved preclinical testing and advancement of AAV to more clinical applications. PMID:27668135

  11. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of AAV for pain: evidence from human AAV studies and from the pharmacology of analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Pleticha, Josef; Heilmann, Lukas F; Evans, Christopher H; Asokan, Aravind; Samulski, Richard Jude; Beutler, Andreas S

    2014-09-02

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) has advanced in the last few years from promising results in animal models to >100 clinical trials (reported or under way). While vector availability was a substantial hurdle a decade ago, innovative new production methods now routinely match the scale of AAV doses required for clinical testing. These advances may become relevant to translational research in the chronic pain field. AAV for pain targeting the peripheral nervous system was proven to be efficacious in rodent models several years ago, but has not yet been tested in humans. The present review addresses the steps needed for translation of AAV for pain from the bench to the bedside focusing on pre-clinical toxicology. We break the potential toxicities into three conceptual categories of risk: First, risks related to the delivery procedure used to administer the vector. Second, risks related to AAV biology, i.e., effects of the vector itself that may occur independently of the transgene. Third, risks related to the effects of the therapeutic transgene. To identify potential toxicities, we consulted the existing evidence from AAV gene therapy for other nervous system disorders (animal toxicology and human studies) and from the clinical pharmacology of conventional analgesic drugs. Thereby, we identified required preclinical studies and charted a hypothetical path towards a future phase I/II clinical trial in the oncology-palliative care setting.

  12. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of AAV for pain: evidence from human AAV studies and from the pharmacology of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) has advanced in the last few years from promising results in animal models to >100 clinical trials (reported or under way). While vector availability was a substantial hurdle a decade ago, innovative new production methods now routinely match the scale of AAV doses required for clinical testing. These advances may become relevant to translational research in the chronic pain field. AAV for pain targeting the peripheral nervous system was proven to be efficacious in rodent models several years ago, but has not yet been tested in humans. The present review addresses the steps needed for translation of AAV for pain from the bench to the bedside focusing on pre-clinical toxicology. We break the potential toxicities into three conceptual categories of risk: First, risks related to the delivery procedure used to administer the vector. Second, risks related to AAV biology, i.e., effects of the vector itself that may occur independently of the transgene. Third, risks related to the effects of the therapeutic transgene. To identify potential toxicities, we consulted the existing evidence from AAV gene therapy for other nervous system disorders (animal toxicology and human studies) and from the clinical pharmacology of conventional analgesic drugs. Thereby, we identified required preclinical studies and charted a hypothetical path towards a future phase I/II clinical trial in the oncology-palliative care setting. PMID:25183392

  13. Modulation of tolerance to the transgene product in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-mediated gene transfer to liver.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Hasbrouck, Nicole C; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Edmonson, Shyrie A; Hui, Daniel J; Sabatino, Denise E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A

    2007-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer of factor IX (F.IX) to the liver results in long-term expression of transgene in experimental animals, but only short-term expression in humans. Loss of F.IX expression is likely due to a cytotoxic immune response to the AAV capsid, which results in clearance of transduced hepatocytes. We used a nonhuman primate model to assess the safety of AAV gene transfer coupled with an anti-T-cell regimen designed to block this immune response. Administration of a 3-drug regimen consisting of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), sirolimus, and the anti-IL-2 receptor antibody daclizumab consistently resulted in formation of inhibitory antibodies to human F.IX following hepatic artery administration of an AAV-hF.IX vector, whereas a 2-drug regimen consisting only of MMF and sirolimus did not. Administration of daclizumab was accompanied by a dramatic drop in the population of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that choice of immunosuppression (IS) regimen can modulate immune responses to the transgene product upon hepatic gene transfer in subjects not fully tolerant; and that induction of transgene tolerance may depend on a population of antigen-specific Tregs.

  14. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  15. Therapeutic in vivo gene transfer for genetic disease using AAV: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A

    2011-05-01

    In vivo gene replacement for the treatment of inherited disease is one of the most compelling concepts in modern medicine. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been extensively used for this purpose and have shown therapeutic efficacy in a range of animal models. Successful translation to the clinic was initially slow, but long-term expression of donated genes at therapeutic levels has now been achieved in patients with inherited retinal disorders and haemophilia B. Recent exciting results have raised hopes for the treatment of many other diseases. As we discuss here, the prospects and challenges for AAV gene therapy are to a large extent dependent on the target tissue and the specific disease.

  16. Prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies and consequences for a clinical trial of gene transfer for advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, B; Butler, J; Felker, G M; Ponikowski, P; Voors, A A; Pogoda, J M; Provost, R; Guerrero, J; Hajjar, R J; Zsebo, K M

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) has many advantages as a gene therapy vector, but the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is an important limitation. This study was designed to determine: (1) characteristics of AAV NAbs in human subjects, (2) prevalence of AAV1 NAbs in heart failure patients and (3) utility of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy in reducing NAb seroconversion in an animal model. NAb titers were assessed in a cohort of heart failure patients and in patients screened for a clinical trial of gene therapy with AAV1 carrying the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase gene (AAV1/SERCA2a). AAV1 NAbs were found in 59.5% of 1552 heart failure patients. NAb prevalence increased with age (P=0.001) and varied geographically. The pattern of NAb titers suggested that exposure is against AAV2, with AAV1 NAb seropositivity due to crossreactivity. The effects of immunosuppression on NAb formation were tested in mini-pigs treated with immunosuppressant therapy before, during and after a single AAV1/SERCA2a infusion. Aggressive immunosuppression did not prevent formation of AAV1 NAbs. We conclude that immunosuppression is unlikely to be a viable solution for repeat AAV1 dosing. Strategies to reduce NAbs in heart failure patients are needed to increase eligibility for gene transfer using AAV vectors.

  17. Viral vectors: from virology to transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouard, D; Alazard-Dany, N; Cosset, F-L

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1970s, it was predicted that gene therapy would be applied to humans within a decade. However, despite some success, gene therapy has still not become a routine practise in medicine. In this review, we will examine the problems, both experimental and clinical, associated with the use of viral material for transgenic insertion. We shall also discuss the development of viral vectors involving the most important vector types derived from retroviruses, adenoviruses, herpes simplex viruses and adeno-associated viruses. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:18776913

  18. Chronic suppression of heart-failure progression by a pseudophosphorylated mutant of phospholamban via in vivo cardiac rAAV gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Hoshijima, Masahiko; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Minamisawa, Susumu; Date, Moto-o; Gu, Yusu; Iwatate, Mitsuo; Li, Manxiang; Wang, Lili; Wilson, James M; Wang, Yibin; Ross, John; Chien, Kenneth R

    2002-08-01

    The feasibility of gene therapy for cardiomyopathy, heart failure and other chronic cardiac muscle diseases is so far unproven. Here, we developed an in vivo recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) transcoronary delivery system that allows stable, high efficiency and relatively cardiac-selective gene expression. We used rAAV to express a pseudophosphorylated mutant of human phospholamban (PLN), a key regulator of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) cycling in BIO14.6 cardiomyopathic hamsters. The rAAV/S16EPLN treatment enhanced myocardial SR Ca(2+) uptake and suppressed progressive impairment of left ventricular (LV) systolic function and contractility for 28-30 weeks, thereby protecting cardiac myocytes from cytopathic plasma-membrane disruption. Low LV systolic pressure and deterioration in LV relaxation were also largely prevented by rAAV/S16EPLN treatment. Thus, transcoronary gene transfer of S16EPLN via rAAV vector is a potential therapy for progressive dilated cardiomyopathy and associated heart failure.

  19. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Hao, Yuewen; Nie, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Guangxiao; Wang, Quanying

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  20. Widespread Gene Delivery and Structure-Specific Patterns of Expression in the Brain after Intraventricular Injections of Neonatal Mice with an Adeno-Associated Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Passini, Marco A.; Wolfe, John H.

    2001-01-01

    Developing a system for widespread somatic gene transfer in the central nervous system (CNS) would be beneficial for understanding the global influence of exogenous genes on animal models. We injected an adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector into the cerebral lateral ventricles at birth and mapped its distribution and transduction pattern from a promoter capable of expression in multiple targets. The injections resulted in structure-specific patterns of expression that were maintained for at least 1 year in most regions, with efficient targeting of some of the major principal neuron layers. The patterns of transduction were explained by circulation of the viral vector in the subarachnoid space via CSF flow, followed by transduction of underlying structures, rather than by progenitor cell infection and subsequent migration. This study demonstrates that gene transfer throughout the CNS can be achieved without germ line transmission and establishes an experimental strategy for introducing genes to somatic cells in a highly predictable manner. PMID:11711628

  1. Immunology of AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Keirnan; Bennett, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The eye has been at the forefront of translational gene therapy largely owing to suitable disease targets, anatomic accessibility, and well-studied immunologic privilege. These advantages have fostered research culminating in several clinical trials and adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the vector of choice for many ocular therapies. Pre-clinical and clinical investigations have assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses to a variety of naturally occurring and engineered AAV serotypes as well as their delivered transgenes and these data have been correlated to potential clinical sequelae. Encouragingly, AAV appears safe and effective with clinical follow-up surpassing 5 years in some studies. As disease targets continue to expand for AAV in the eye, thorough and deliberate assessment of immunologic safety is critical. With careful study, the development of these technologies should concurrently inform the biology of the ocular immune response. PMID:24009613

  2. Intrinsic transgene immunogenicity gears CD8(+) T-cell priming after rAAV-mediated muscle gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Maxime; Lorain, Stéphanie; Chappert, Pascal; Lalfer, Mélanie; Hardet, Romain; Urbain, Dominique; Peccate, Cécile; Adriouch, Sahil; Garcia, Luis; Davoust, Jean; Gross, David-Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    Antitransgene CD8(+) T-cell responses are an important hurdle after recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer. Indeed, depending on the mutational genotype of the host, transgene amino-acid sequences of foreign origin can elicit deleterious cellular and humoral responses. We compared here two different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes of an engineered ovalbumin transgene delivered in muscle tissue by rAAV1 vector and found very different strength of CD8 responses, muscle destruction being correlated with the course of the immunodominant response. We further demonstrate that robust CD8(+) T-cell priming can occur through the cross-presentation pathway but requires the presence of either a strong MHC class II epitope or antibodies to the transgene product. Finally, manipulating transgene subcellular localization, we found that provided we avoid transgene expression in antigen presenting cells, the poorly accessible cytosolic form of ovalbumin transgene lacking strong MHC II epitope, evades CD8(+) T-cell priming and remains permanently expressed in muscle with no immune cell infiltration. Our results demonstrate that the intrinsic immunogenicity of transgenes delivered with rAAV vector in muscle can be manipulated in a rational manner to avoid adverse immune responses.

  3. Intrinsic Transgene Immunogenicity Gears CD8(+) T-cell Priming After rAAV-Mediated Muscle Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Maxime; Lorain, Stéphanie; Chappert, Pascal; Lalfer, Mélanie; Hardet, Romain; Urbain, Dominique; Peccate, Cécile; Adriouch, Sahil; Garcia, Luis; Davoust, Jean; Gross, David-Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    Antitransgene CD8(+) T-cell responses are an important hurdle after recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer. Indeed, depending on the mutational genotype of the host, transgene amino-acid sequences of foreign origin can elicit deleterious cellular and humoral responses. We compared here two different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes of an engineered ovalbumin transgene delivered in muscle tissue by rAAV1 vector and found very different strength of CD8 responses, muscle destruction being correlated with the course of the immun