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Sample records for aav vectors expressing

  1. Recombinant AAV Vectors for Enhanced Expression of Authentic IgG

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a vector of choice for the treatment of a variety of genetic diseases that require safe and long-term delivery of a missing protein. Muscle-directed gene transfer for delivery of protective antibodies against AIDS viruses and other pathogens has been used experimentally in mice and monkeys. Here we examined a number of variations to AAV vector design for the ability to produce authentic immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules. Expression of rhesus IgG from a single single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) vector (one vector approach) was compared to expression from two self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, one for heavy chain and one for light chain (two vector approach). Both the one vector and the two vector approaches yielded considerable levels of expressed full-length IgG. A number of modifications to the ssAAV expression system were then examined for their ability to increase the efficiency of IgG expression. Inclusion of a furin cleavage sequence with a linker peptide just upstream of the 2A self-cleaving sequence from foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A) increased IgG expression approximately 2 fold. Inclusion of these sequences also helped to ensure a proper sequence at the C-terminal end of the heavy chain. Inclusion of the post-transcriptional regulatory element from woodchuck hepatitis virus (WPRE) further increased IgG expression 1.5–2.0 fold. IgG1 versions of the two rhesus IgGs that were examined consistently expressed better than the IgG2 forms. In contrast to what has been reported for AAV2-mediated expression of other proteins, introduction of capsid mutations Y445F and Y731F did not increase ssAAV1-mediated expression of IgG as determined by transduction experiments in cell culture. Our findings provide a rational basis for AAV vector design for expression of authentic IgG. PMID:27332822

  2. Enhancing Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV8 Vectors in Different Tissues Using Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been utilized extensively in gene therapy and gene function studies, as strong transgene expression is a prerequisite for positive outcomes. AAV8 was reported as the most efficient AAV serotype for transduction of the liver, brain and muscle compared with other serotypes. However, AAV8-mediated transduction of human hepatocytes is rather poor with approximately 20-fold lower efficiency compared with that of mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, we applied the woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) to enhance AAV8-mediated transgene expression driven by a combination promoter (CAG promoter) with a CMV-IE enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter for a more efficient viral vector. Transgene expression from recombinant AAV8 (rAAV8) vectors harboring a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter gene with or without WPRE were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that WPRE improved AAV8-mediated RFP expression in different cell lines with clear increases of transgene expression in the liver, brain or muscle of animals. The findings of this study will help to substantially reduce the quantity of viral particles that must be injected in order to reach a therapeutic level of transgene expression in gene therapy. Consequently, such dose reductions may lessen the potential risks associated with high doses of viral vectors. PMID:27076785

  3. The recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV2)-mediated apolipoprotein B mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme: a self-complementary AAV2 vector improves the gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shumei; Sun, Shihua; Teng, Ba-Bie

    2004-01-01

    Background In humans, overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) is positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. To reduce the levels of apoB mRNA, we have designed an apoB mRNA-specific hammerhead ribozyme targeted at nucleotide sequences GUA6679 (RB15) mediated by adenovirus, which efficiently cleaves and decreases apoB mRNA by 80% in mouse liver and attenuates the hyperlipidemic condition. In the current study, we used an adeno-associated virus vector, serotype 2 (AAV2) and a self-complementary AAV2 vector (scAAV2) to demonstrate the effect of long-term tissue-specific gene expression of RB15 on the regulation apoB mRNA in vivo. Methods We constructed a hammerhead ribozyme RB15 driven by a liver-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoter using an AAV2 vector (rAAV2-TTR-RB15). HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic mice deficient in both the low density lipoprotein receptor and the apoB mRNA editing enzyme genes (LDLR-/-Apobec1-/-; LDb) were transduced with rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and a control vector rAAV-TTR-RB15-mutant (inactive ribozyme). The effects of ribozyme RB15 on apoB metabolism and atherosclerosis development were determined in LDb mice at 5-month after transduction. A self-complementary AAV2 vector expressing ribozyme RB15 (scAAV2-TTR-RB15) was also engineered and used to transduce HepG2 cells. Studies were designed to compare the gene expression efficiency between rAAV2-TTR-RB15 and scAAV2-TTR-RB15. Results The effect of ribozyme RB15 RNA on reducing apoB mRNA levels in HepG2 cells was observed only on day-7 after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 transduction. And, at 5-month after rAAV2-TTR-RB15 treatment, the apoB mRNA levels in LDb mice were significantly decreased by 43%, compared to LDb mice treated with control vector rAAV2-TTR-RB15-mutant. Moreover, both the rAAV2-TTR-RB15 viral DNA and ribozyme RB15 RNA were still detectable in mice livers at 5-month after treatment. However, this rAAV2-TTR-RB15 vector mediated a prolonged but low level of ribozyme RB15 gene

  4. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Li; Li Baozheng; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Herzog, Roland W.

    2008-11-25

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, their transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by {approx} 68% and {approx} 74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which results from ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy.

  5. AAV Vectors Expressing LDLR Gain-of-Function Variants Demonstrate Increased Efficacy in Mouse Models of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Jacobs, Frank; Wang, Qiang; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder that arises due to loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and homozygous FH (hoFH) is a candidate for gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and inducible degrader of LDLR (IDOL) negatively regulate LDLR protein and could dampen AAV encoded LDLR expression. Objective We sought to create vectors expressing gain-of-function human LDLR variants that are resistant to degradation by human PCSK9 and IDOL and thereby enhance hepatic LDLR protein abundance and plasma LDL cholesterol reduction. Methods and Results Amino acid substitutions were introduced into the coding sequence of human LDLR cDNA to reduce interaction with hPCSK9 and hIDOL. A panel of mutant hLDLRs was initially screened in vitro for escape from PCSK9. The variant hLDLR-L318D was further evaluated using a mouse model of hoFH lacking endogenous LDLR and apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, APOBEC-1 (DKO). Administration of wild type hLDLR to DKO mice, expressing hPCSK9, led to diminished LDLR activity. However, LDLR-L318D was resistant to hPCSK9 mediated degradation and effectively reduced cholesterol levels. Similarly, the LDLR-K809R\\C818A construct avoided hIDOL regulation and achieved stable reductions in serum cholesterol. An AAV8.LDLR-L318D\\K809R\\C818A vector that carried all three amino acid substitutions conferred partial resistance to both hPCSK9 and hIDOL mediated degradation. Conclusion Amino acid substitutions in the human LDLR confer partial resistance to PCSK9 and IDOL regulatory pathways with improved reduction in cholesterol levels and improve upon a potential gene therapeutic approach to treat homozygous FH subjects. PMID:25023731

  6. Neutralizing antibodies against AAV2, AAV5 and AAV8 in healthy and HIV-1-infected subjects in China: implications for gene therapy using AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Huang, W; Zhang, H; Wang, Y; Zhao, J; Song, A; Xie, H; Zhao, C; Gao, D; Wang, Y

    2014-08-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have attracted attention as potential vectors for gene therapy and vaccines against several diseases, including HIV-1 infection. However, the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) after natural AAV infections inhibits their transfection in re-exposed subjects. To identify candidate AAV vectors for therapeutic or prophylactic HIV vaccines, NAbs against AAV2, AAV5 and AAV8 were screened in the sera of healthy individuals in China and 10 developed countries and an HIV-1-infected Chinese population. Seroprevalence was higher for AAV2 (96.6%) and AAV8 (82.0%) than for AAV5 (40.2%) in normal Chinese subjects. Among individuals seropositive for AAV5, >80% had low NAb titers (<1:90). The prevalence and titers of NAbs against the three AAVs were significantly higher in China than in developed countries (P<0.01). The prevalence of NAbs against AAV5 did not differ significantly between healthy and HIV-1-infected Chinese subjects (P=0.39). Co-occurrence of NAbs against AAV2, AAV5, and AAV8 was observed in the healthy population, and 15, 41, and 41% of individuals were AAV2(+), AAV2(+)/AAV8(+), and AAV2(+)/AAV5(+)/AAV8(+), respectively. Therefore, AAV5 exposure is low in healthy and HIV-1-infected populations Chinese individuals, and vectors based on AAV5 may be appropriate for human gene therapy or vaccines. PMID:24849042

  7. Improved dual AAV vectors with reduced expression of truncated proteins are safe and effective in the retina of a mouse model of Stargardt disease

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Toriello, Elisabetta; de Simone, Sonia; Colella, Pasqualina; Iodice, Carolina; Polishchuk, Elena V.; Sommella, Andrea; Colecchi, Linda; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Giunti, Massimo; Bacci, Maria L.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Auricchio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. We have shown that dual adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors effectively transfer ABCA4 to the retina of Abca4−/− mice. However, they express both lower levels of transgene compared with a single AAV and truncated proteins. To increase productive dual AAV concatemerization, which would overcome these limitations, we have explored the use of either various regions of homology or heterologous inverted terminal repeats (ITR). In addition, we tested the ability of various degradation signals to decrease the expression of truncated proteins. We found the highest levels of transgene expression using regions of homology based on either alkaline phosphatase or the F1 phage (AK). The use of heterologous ITR does not decrease the levels of truncated proteins relative to full-length ABCA4 and impairs AAV vector production. Conversely, the inclusion of the CL1 degradation signal results in the selective degradation of truncated proteins from the 5′-half without affecting full-length protein production. Therefore, we developed dual AAV hybrid ABCA4 vectors including homologous ITR2, the photoreceptor-specific G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 promoter, the AK region of homology and the CL1 degradation signal. We show that upon subretinal administration these vectors are both safe in pigs and effective in Abca4−/− mice. Our data support the use of improved dual AAV vectors for gene therapy of STGD1. PMID:26420842

  8. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  9. Vaccine protection against lethal homologous and heterologous challenge using recombinant AAV vectors expressing codon-optimized genes from pandemic swine origin influenza virus (SOIV).

    PubMed

    Sipo, Isaac; Knauf, Mathias; Fechner, Henry; Poller, Wolfgang; Planz, Oliver; Kurth, Reinhard; Norley, Stephen

    2011-02-11

    The recent H1N1 influenza pandemic and the inevitable delay between identification of the virus and production of the specific vaccine have highlighted the urgent need for new generation influenza vaccines that can preemptively induce broad immunity to different strains of the virus. In this study we have produced AAV-based vectors expressing the A/Mexico/4603/2009 (H1N1) hemagglutinin (HA), nucleocapsid (NP) and the matrix protein M1 and have evaluated their ability to induce specific immune response and protect mice against homologous and heterologous challenge. Each of the vaccine vectors elicited potent cellular and humoral immune responses in mice. Although immunization with AAV-M1 did not improve survival after challenge with the homologous strain, immunization with the AAV-H1 and AAV-NP vectors resulted in survival of all mice, as did inoculation with a combination of all three vectors. Furthermore, trivalent vaccination also conferred partial protection against challenge with the highly heterologous and virulent A/PR/8/34 strain of H1N1 influenza. PMID:21195079

  10. Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    György, Bence; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) became the first clinically approved gene therapy product in the western world. To develop AAV for future clinical application in a widespread patient base, particularly in therapies which require intravenous (i.v.) administration of vector, the virus must be able to evade pre-existing antibodies to the wild type virus. Here we demonstrate that in mice, AAV vectors associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) can evade human anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. We observed different antibody evasion and gene transfer abilities with populations of EVs isolated by different centrifugal forces. EV-associated AAV vector (ev-AAV) was up to 136-fold more resistant over a range of neutralizing antibody concentrations relative to standard AAV vector in vitro. Importantly in mice, at a concentration of passively transferred human antibodies which decreased i.v. administered standard AAV transduction of brain by 80%, transduction of ev-AAV transduction was not reduced and was 4,000-fold higher. Finally, we show that expressing a brain targeting peptide on the EV surface allowed significant enhancement of transduction compared to untargeted ev-AAV. Using ev-AAV represents an effective, clinically relevant approach to evade human neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies after systemic administration of vector. PMID:24917028

  11. Treatment of hypophosphatasia by muscle-directed expression of bone-targeted alkaline phosphatase via self-complementary AAV8 vector

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura-Takahashi, Aki; Miyake, Koichi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hirai, Yukihiko; Iijima, Osamu; Miyake, Noriko; Adachi, Kumi; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Noguchi, Taku; Abe, Shinichi; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, Jose Luis; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited disease caused by genetic mutations in the gene encoding tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP). This results in defects in bone and tooth mineralization. We recently demonstrated that TNALP-deficient (Akp2−/−) mice, which mimic the phenotype of the severe infantile form of HPP, can be treated by intravenous injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) expressing bone-targeted TNALP with deca-aspartates at the C-terminus (TNALP-D10) driven by the tissue-nonspecific CAG promoter. To develop a safer and more clinically applicable transduction strategy for HPP gene therapy, we constructed a self-complementary type 8 AAV (scAAV8) vector that expresses TNALP-D10 via the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter (scAAV8-MCK-TNALP-D10) and examined the efficacy of muscle-directed gene therapy. When scAAV8-MCK-TNALP-D10 was injected into the bilateral quadriceps of neonatal Akp2−/− mice, the treated mice grew well and survived for more than 3 months, with a healthy appearance and normal locomotion. Improved bone architecture, but limited elongation of the long bone, was demonstrated on X-ray images. Micro-CT analysis showed hypomineralization and abnormal architecture of the trabecular bone in the epiphysis. These results suggest that rAAV-mediated, muscle-specific expression of TNALP-D10 represents a safe and practical option to treat the severe infantile form of HPP. PMID:26904710

  12. Expression of an engineered soluble coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor by a dimeric AAV9 vector inhibits adenovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Röger, C; Pozzuto, T; Klopfleisch, R; Kurreck, J; Pinkert, S; Fechner, H

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressed (IS) patients, such as recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, occasionally develop severe and fatal adenovirus (Ad) infections. Here, we analyzed the potential of a virus receptor trap based on a soluble coxsackievirus and Ad receptor (sCAR) for inhibition of Ad infection. In vitro, a dimeric fusion protein, sCAR-Fc, consisting of the extracellular domain of CAR and the Fc portion of human IgG1 and a monomeric sCAR lacking the Fc domain, were expressed in cell culture. More sCAR was secreted into the cell culture supernatant than sCAR-Fc, but it had lower Ad neutralization activity than sCAR-Fc. Further investigations showed that sCAR-Fc reduced the Ad infection by a 100-fold and Ad-induced cytotoxicity by ~20-fold. Not only was Ad infection inhibited by sCAR-Fc applied prior to infection, it also inhibited infection when used to treat ongoing Ad infection. In vivo, sCAR-Fc was delivered to IS mice by an AAV9 vector, resulting in persistent and high (>40 μg ml(-1)) sCAR-Fc serum levels. The sCAR-Fc serum concentration was sufficient to significantly inhibit hepatic and cardiac wild-type Ad5 infection. Treatment with sCAR-Fc did not induce side effects. Thus, sCAR-Fc virus receptor trap may be a promising novel therapeutic for treatment of Ad infections. PMID:25786873

  13. AAV's Anatomy: Roadmap for Optimizing Vectors for Translational Success

    PubMed Central

    Samulski, R. Jude

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-Associated Virus based vectors (rAAV) are advantageous for human gene therapy due to low inflammatory responses, lack of toxicity, natural persistence, and ability to transencapsidate the genome allowing large variations in vector biology and tropism. Over sixty clinical trials have been conducted using rAAV serotype 2 for gene delivery with a number demonstrating success in immunoprivileged sites, including the retina and the CNS. Furthermore, an increasing number of trials have been initiated utilizing other serotypes of AAV to exploit vector tropism, trafficking, and expression efficiency. While these trials have demonstrated success in safety with emerging success in clinical outcomes, one benefit has been identification of issues associated with vector administration in humans (e.g. the role of pre-existing antibody responses, loss of transgene expression in non-immunoprivileged sites, and low transgene expression levels). For these reasons, several strategies are being used to optimize rAAV vectors, ranging from addition of exogenous agents for immune evasion to optimization of the transgene cassette for enhanced therapeutic output. By far, the vast majority of approaches have focused on genetic manipulation of the viral capsid. These methods include rational mutagenesis, engineering of targeting peptides, generation of chimeric particles, library and directed evolution approaches, as well as immune evasion modifications. Overall, these modifications have created a new repertoire of AAV vectors with improved targeting, transgene expression, and immune evasion. Continued work in these areas should synergize strategies to improve capsids and transgene cassettes that will eventually lead to optimized vectors ideally suited for translational success. PMID:20712583

  14. Using AAV vectors expressing the β2-adrenoceptor or associated Gα proteins to modulate skeletal muscle mass and muscle fibre size

    PubMed Central

    Hagg, Adam; Colgan, Timothy D.; Thomson, Rachel E.; Qian, Hongwei; Lynch, Gordon S.; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists have been proposed as therapeutics for treating muscle wasting but concerns regarding possible off-target effects have hampered their use. We investigated whether β2-AR-mediated signalling could be modulated in skeletal muscle via gene delivery to the target tissue, thereby avoiding the risks of β2-AR agonists. In mice, intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus-based vector (rAAV vector) expressing the β2-AR increased muscle mass by >20% within 4 weeks. This hypertrophic response was comparable to that of 4 weeks’ treatment with the β2-AR agonist formoterol, and was not ablated by mTOR inhibition. Increasing expression of inhibitory (Gαi2) and stimulatory (GαsL) G-protein subunits produced minor atrophic and hypertrophic changes in muscle mass, respectively. Furthermore, Gαi2 over-expression prevented AAV:β2-AR mediated hypertrophy. Introduction of the non-muscle Gαs isoform, GαsXL elicited hypertrophy comparable to that achieved by AAV:β2-AR. Moreover, GαsXL gene delivery was found to be capable of inducing hypertrophy in the muscles of mice lacking functional β1- and β2-ARs. These findings demonstrate that gene therapy-based interventions targeting the β2-AR pathway can promote skeletal muscle hypertrophy independent of ligand administration, and highlight novel methods for potentially modulating muscle mass in settings of disease. PMID:26972746

  15. Using AAV vectors expressing the β2-adrenoceptor or associated Gα proteins to modulate skeletal muscle mass and muscle fibre size.

    PubMed

    Hagg, Adam; Colgan, Timothy D; Thomson, Rachel E; Qian, Hongwei; Lynch, Gordon S; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists have been proposed as therapeutics for treating muscle wasting but concerns regarding possible off-target effects have hampered their use. We investigated whether β2-AR-mediated signalling could be modulated in skeletal muscle via gene delivery to the target tissue, thereby avoiding the risks of β2-AR agonists. In mice, intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus-based vector (rAAV vector) expressing the β2-AR increased muscle mass by >20% within 4 weeks. This hypertrophic response was comparable to that of 4 weeks' treatment with the β2-AR agonist formoterol, and was not ablated by mTOR inhibition. Increasing expression of inhibitory (Gαi2) and stimulatory (GαsL) G-protein subunits produced minor atrophic and hypertrophic changes in muscle mass, respectively. Furthermore, Gαi2 over-expression prevented AAV:β2-AR mediated hypertrophy. Introduction of the non-muscle Gαs isoform, GαsXL elicited hypertrophy comparable to that achieved by AAV:β2-AR. Moreover, GαsXL gene delivery was found to be capable of inducing hypertrophy in the muscles of mice lacking functional β1- and β2-ARs. These findings demonstrate that gene therapy-based interventions targeting the β2-AR pathway can promote skeletal muscle hypertrophy independent of ligand administration, and highlight novel methods for potentially modulating muscle mass in settings of disease. PMID:26972746

  16. Exosome-associated AAV vector as a robust and convenient neuroscience tool.

    PubMed

    Hudry, E; Martin, C; Gandhi, S; György, B; Scheffer, D I; Mu, D; Merkel, S F; Mingozzi, F; Fitzpatrick, Z; Dimant, H; Masek, M; Ragan, T; Tan, S; Brisson, A R; Ramirez, S H; Hyman, B T; Maguire, C A

    2016-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are showing promise in gene therapy trials and have proven to be extremely efficient biological tools in basic neuroscience research. One major limitation to their widespread use in the neuroscience laboratory is the cost, labor, skill and time-intense purification process of AAV. We have recently shown that AAV can associate with exosomes (exo-AAV) when the vector is isolated from conditioned media of producer cells, and the exo-AAV is more resistant to neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies compared with standard AAV. Here, we demonstrate that simple pelleting of exo-AAV from media via ultracentrifugation results in high-titer vector preparations capable of efficient transduction of central nervous system (CNS) cells after systemic injection in mice. We observed that exo-AAV is more efficient at gene delivery to the brain at low vector doses relative to conventional AAV, even when derived from a serotype that does not normally efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier. Similar cell types were transduced by exo-AAV and conventionally purified vector. Importantly, no cellular toxicity was noted in exo-AAV-transduced cells. We demonstrated the utility and robustness of exo-AAV-mediated gene delivery by detecting direct GFP fluorescence after systemic injection, allowing three-dimensional reconstruction of transduced Purkinje cells in the cerebellum using ex vivo serial two-photon tomography. The ease of isolation combined with the high efficiency of transgene expression in the CNS, may enable the widespread use of exo-AAV as a neuroscience research tool. Furthermore, the ability of exo-AAV to evade neutralizing antibodies while still transducing CNS after peripheral delivery is clinically relevant. PMID:26836117

  17. Exosome-associated AAV vector as a robust and convenient neuroscience tool

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Martin, Courtney; Gandhi, Sheetal; György, Bence; Scheffer, Deborah I.; Mu, Dakai; Merkel, Steven F.; Mingozzi, Federico; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Dimant, Hemi; Masek, Marissa; Ragan, Tim; Tan, Sisareuth; Brisson, Alain R.; Ramirez, Servio H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Maguire, Casey A.

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are showing promise in gene therapy trials and have proven to be extremely efficient biological tools in basic neuroscience research. One major limitation to their widespread use in the neuroscience laboratory is the cost, labor, skill, and time intense purification process of AAV. We have recently shown that AAV can associate with exosomes (exo-AAV) when vector is isolated from conditioned media of producer cells, and the exo-AAV is more resistant to neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies compared to standard AAV. Here we demonstrate that simple pelleting of exo-AAV from media via ultracentrifugation, results in high-titer vector preparations capable of efficient transduction of central nervous system (CNS) cells after systemic injection in mice. We observed that exo-AAV is more efficient at gene delivery to the brain at low vector doses relative to conventional AAV, even when derived from a serotype that does not normally efficiently cross the blood brain barrier. Similar cell types were transduced by exo-AAV and conventionally purified vector. Importantly, no cellular toxicity was noted in exo-AAV transduced cells. We demonstrated the utility and robustness of exo-AAV-mediated gene delivery by detecting direct GFP fluorescence after systemic injection, allowing 3-dimensional reconstruction of transduced Purkinje cells in the cerebellum using ex-vivo serial 2-photon tomography. The ease of isolation combined with the high efficiency of transgene expression in the CNS, may enable widespread use of exo-AAV as a neuroscience research tool. Furthermore, the ability of exo-AAV to evade neutralizing antibodies while still transducing CNS after peripheral delivery is clinically relevant. PMID:26836117

  18. Reprogramming Immune Response With Capsid-Optimized AAV6 Vectors for Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Munjal; Britt, Kellee; Hoffman, Brad; Ling, Chen; Aslanidi, George V

    2015-09-01

    In the current studies we generated novel capsid-optimized adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 6 (AAV6) vectors expressing a tumor-associated antigen, and assessed their ability to activate a protective T-cell response in an animal model. First, we showed that specific mutations in the AAV6 capsid increase the transduction efficiency of these vectors in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in vitro for approximately 5-fold compared with the wild-type (WT) AAV6 vectors. Next, we evaluated the ability of the mutant AAV6 vectors to initiate specific T-cell clone proliferation in vivo. Our data indicate that the intramuscular administration of AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors expressing ovalbumin (OVA) led to a strong activation (approximately 9%) of specific T cells in peripheral blood compared with AAV6-WT treated animals (<1%). These OVA-specific T cells have a superior killing ability against mouse prostate cancer cell line RM1 stably expressing the OVA antigen when propagated in vitro. Finally, we evaluated the ability of capsid-optimized AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors to initiate a protective anticancer immune response in vivo. Our results document the suppression of subcutaneous tumor growth in animals immunized with AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors expressing prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) for approximately 4 weeks in comparison with 1 week and 2 weeks for the negative controls, AAV6-EGFP, and AAV6-WT-PAP treated mice, respectively. These studies suggest that successful inhibition of tumor growth in an animal model would set the stage for potential clinical application of the capsid-optimized AAV6-S663V+T492V vectors. PMID:26261893

  19. Application of Mutated miR-206 Target Sites Enables Skeletal Muscle-specific Silencing of Transgene Expression of Cardiotropic AAV9 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Schön, Christian; Größl, Tobias; Pinkert, Sandra; Stein, Elisabeth A; Kurreck, Jens; Vetter, Roland; Fechner, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of completely complementary microRNA (miR) target sites (miRTS) into a transgene has been shown to be a valuable approach to specifically repress transgene expression in non-targeted tissues. miR-122TS have been successfully used to silence transgene expression in the liver following systemic application of cardiotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 vectors. For miR-206–mediated skeletal muscle-specific silencing of miR-206TS–bearing AAV9 vectors, however, we found this approach failed due to the expression of another member (miR-1) of the same miR family in heart tissue, the intended target. We introduced single-nucleotide substitutions into the miR-206TS and searched for those which prevented miR-1–mediated cardiac repression. Several mutated miR-206TS (m206TS), in particular m206TS-3G, were resistant to miR-1, but remained fully sensitive to miR-206. All these variants had mismatches in the seed region of the miR/m206TS duplex in common. Furthermore, we found that some m206TS, containing mismatches within the seed region or within the 3′ portion of the miR-206, even enhanced the miR-206– mediated transgene repression. In vivo expression of m206TS-3G– and miR-122TS–containing transgene of systemically applied AAV9 vectors was strongly repressed in both skeletal muscle and the liver but remained high in the heart. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of miRTS provides a new strategy to differentiate transgene de-targeting of related miRs. PMID:23439498

  20. Diabetes enhances the efficacy of AAV2 vectors in the retina: therapeutic effect of AAV2 encoding vasoinhibin and soluble VEGF receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lezama, Nundehui; Wu, Zhijian; Adán-Castro, Elva; Arnold, Edith; Vázquez-Membrillo, Miguel; Arredondo-Zamarripa, David; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Martinez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Colosi, Peter; Clapp, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated delivery of inhibitors of blood-retinal barrier breakdown (BRBB) offers promise for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. Here, we demonstrated a reversal of blood-retinal barrier pathology mediated by AAV type 2 (AAV2) vectors encoding vasoinhibin or soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) when administered intravitreally to diabetic rats. Efficacy and safety of the AAV2 vasoinhibin vector were tested by monitoring its effect on diabetes-induced changes in the retinal vascular bed and thickness, and in the electroretinogram (ERG). Also, the transduction of AAV2 vectors and expression of AAV2 receptors and co-receptors were compared between the diabetic and the non-diabetic rat retinas. AAV2 vasoinhibin or AAV2 sFlt-1 vectors were injected intravitreally before or after enhanced BRBB due to diabetes induced by streptozotocin. The BRBB was examined by the Evans blue method, the vascular bed by fluorescein angiography, expression of the AAV2 EGFP reporter vector by confocal microscopy, and the AAV2 genome, expression of transgenes, receptors, and co-receptors by quantitative PCR. AAV2 vasoinhibin and sFlt-1 vectors inhibited the diabetes-mediated increase in BRBB when injected after, but not before, diabetes was induced. The AAV2 vasoinhibin vector decreased retinal microvascular abnormalities and the diabetes-induced reduction of the B-wave of the ERG, but it had no effect in non-diabetic controls. Also, retinal thickness was not altered by diabetes or by the AAV2 vasoinhibin vector. The AAV2 genome, vasoinhibin and sFlt-1 transgenes, and EGFP levels were higher in the retinas from diabetic rats and were associated with an elevated expression of AAV2 receptors (syndecan, glypican, and perlecan) and co-receptors (fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, αvβ5 integrin, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor). We conclude that retinal transduction and efficacy of AAV2 vectors are enhanced in diabetes, possibly due to their elevated

  1. A Single Direct Injection into the Left Ventricular Wall of an AAV9 Vector Expressing EcSOD from the Cardiac Troponin-T Promoter Protects Mice Against Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Konkal-Matt R.; Smith, Robert S.; Xu, Yaqin; French, Brent A

    2014-01-01

    Background Localized administration of a highly efficient gene delivery system in combination with a cardiac-selective promoter may provide an adequate biosafety profile in clinical applications such as coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), where regions of myocardium can be readily injected to protect them against the potential threat of future ischemic events. Methods AAV vectors expressing firefly luciferase or eGFP packaged into AAV serotypes 1, 2, 6, 8 and 9 were injected into the left ventricular (LV) wall of adult mice to determine the time course, magnitude and distribution of gene expression. An AAV9 vector expressing the extracellular isoform of superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) from the cTnT promoter was then directly injected into the LV wall of adult mice. Acute myocardial infarction (MI) was induced 4 weeks after injection and infarct size was determined by TTC and Phthalo blue staining. Results Serotypes AAV 9, 8, 1 and 6 provided early onset of gene expression in the heart with minimal extra-cardiac gene expression. AAV9 provided the highest magnitude of gene expression. Immunostaining for eGFP showed expression spanning the anterior to posterior walls from the mid ventricle to the apex. A single direct injection of the AAV9 vector bearing EcSOD (n =5) decreased the mean infarct size by 50% as compared to the eGFP control group (n=8) (44±7% vs 22±5%, p=0.04). Conclusions AAV serotype 9 is highly efficient for cardiac gene delivery, as evidenced by early onset and high-level gene expression. AAV9 mediated, cardiac selective overexpression of EcSOD from the cTnT promoter significantly reduced infarct size in mice. PMID:21674736

  2. Widespread AAV1- and AAV2-mediated transgene expression in the nonhuman primate brain: implications for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Hadaczek, Piotr; Stanek, Lisa; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Sudhakar, Vivek; Samaranch, Lluis; Pivirotto, Philip; Bringas, John; O'Riordan, Catherine; Mastis, Bryan; San Sebastian, Waldy; Forsayeth, John; Cheng, Seng H; Bankiewicz, Krystof S; Shihabuddin, Lamya S

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a toxic gain-of-function associated with the expression of the mutant huntingtin (htt) protein. Therefore, the use of RNA interference to inhibit Htt expression could represent a disease-modifying therapy. The potential of two recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV), AAV1 and AAV2, to transduce the cortico-striatal tissues that are predominantly affected in HD was explored. Green fluorescent protein was used as a reporter in each vector to show that both serotypes were broadly distributed in medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortico-striatal neurons after infusion into the putamen and caudate nucleus of nonhuman primates (NHP), with AAV1-directed expression being slightly more robust than AAV2-driven expression. This study suggests that both serotypes are capable of targeting neurons that degenerate in HD, and it sets the stage for the advanced preclinical evaluation of an RNAi-based therapy for this disease. PMID:27408903

  3. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Wolf, Sonya J.; Samulski, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber’s congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV’s high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package “large” genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6–8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161–169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568–8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002). This method involves “splitting” the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383–391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697–701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124–130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15

  4. Transduction, Tropism, and Biodistribution of AAV Vectors in the Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Riveros, Paola Perez; Quinn, Kathrina; Handelman, Beverly; Chiorini, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The lacrimal gland (LG) delivers defensive and metabolic factors to the ocular surface. These functions may be disrupted in several diseases, and for most of them there is no cure. The aim of this study is to investigate conditions and limitations for using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors as gene transfer agents to LG. Methods. Eight-week-old Balb/c mice were used to investigate route, gene expression, and time course of AAV gene vector transfer to LG. AAV vectors encoding firefly luciferase were administered to the LG and luciferase expression was evaluated in vivo by immunohistochemistry. Ocular surface and neutralizing antibodies were also evaluated. Results. The present work revealed that AAV vectors are able to delivery DNA to the LGs of mice. Direct injection had the highest level of transduction, and topical ocular drops the lowest. Overall, the AAV strain with highest transduction activity as measured by both luminescence and immunohistochemistry was AAV9, followed by AAV 5w8 and AAV5. Transduction was not different between sexes, could be detected as soon as 24 hours after injection, and lasted for at least 30 days (study termination). No tissue damage was observed when compared with controls. All vectors with detectable LG transduction induced neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions. LG gene delivery by AAV vectors appears to be both safe and well tolerated. The choice of vector influences both the overall transduction activity, as well as the spread of vector to other organs. This work supports the use of AAV-mediated gene therapy for dry eye. PMID:22110082

  5. Development of rAAV2-CFTR: History of the First rAAV Vector Product to be Used in Humans.

    PubMed

    Loring, Heather S; ElMallah, Mai K; Flotte, Terence R

    2016-04-01

    The first human gene therapy trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors were performed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Over 100 CF patients were enrolled in 5 separate trials of rAAV2-CFTR administration via nasal, endobronchial, maxillary sinus, and aerosol delivery. Recombinant AAV vectors were designed to deliver the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and correct the basic CFTR defect by restoring chloride transport and reverting the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. However, vector DNA expression was limited in duration because of the low incidence of integration and natural airway epithelium turnover. In addition, repeated administration of AAV-CFTR vector resulted in a humoral immune response that prevented effective gene transfer from subsequent doses of vector. AAV serotype 2 was used in human trials before the comparison with other serotypes and determination that serotypes 1 and 5 not only possess higher tropism for the airway epithelium, but also are capable of bypassing the binding and trafficking processes-both were important hindrances to the effectiveness of rAAV2. Although rAAV-CFTR gene therapy does not appear likely to supplant newer small-molecule CFTR modulators in the near future, early work with rAAV-CFTR provided an important foundation for later use of rAAV in humans. PMID:26895204

  6. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    PubMed

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases. PMID:27280971

  7. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in Cynomolgus Macaques of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Expressing Retinoschisin

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Miller, Paul E.; Sharma, Alok K.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Howard, Kellie; Knop, David R.; Neuringer, Martha; McGill, Trevor; Stoddard, Jonathan; Chulay, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation is developing rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector for treatment of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), an inherited retinal disease characterized by splitting (schisis) of retinal layers causing poor vision. We report here results of a study evaluating the safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in normal cynomolgus macaques. Three groups of male animals (n = 6 per group) received an intravitreal injection in one eye of either vehicle, or rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 at one of two dose levels (4 × 1010 or 4 × 1011 vg/eye). Half the animals were sacrificed after 14 days and the others after 91 or 115 days. The intravitreal injection procedure was well tolerated in all groups. Serial ophthalmic examinations demonstrated a dose-related anterior and posterior segment inflammatory response that improved over time. There were no test article-related effects on intraocular pressure, electroretinography, visual evoked potential, hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry, or gross necropsy observations. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal or moderate mononuclear infiltrates in 6 of 12 vector-injected eyes. Immunohistochemical staining showed RS1 labeling of the ganglion cell layer at the foveal slope in vector-injected eyes at both dose levels. Serum anti-AAV antibodies were detected in 4 of 6 vector-injected animals at the day 15 sacrifice and all vector-injected animals at later time points. No animals developed antibodies to RS1. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in the injected eye but minimal or no vector DNA in any other tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-CB-hRS1 in clinical studies in patients with XLRS. PMID:26390090

  8. Photoreceptor-targeted gene delivery using intravitreally administered AAV vectors in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, RF; Sledge, DG; Boye, SL; Boye, SE; Hauswirth, WW; Komáromy, AM; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic transgenes to retinal photoreceptors using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has traditionally required subretinal injection. Recently, photoreceptor transduction efficiency following intravitreal injection (IVT) has improved in rodent models through use of capsid-mutant AAV vectors; but remains limited in large animal models. Thickness of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) in large animals is thought to impair retinal penetration by AAV. Our study compared two newly developed AAV vectors containing multiple capsid amino acid substitutions following IVT in dogs. The ability of two promoter constructs to restrict reporter transgene expression to photoreceptors was also evaluated. AAV vectors containing the interphotoreceptor-binding protein (IRBP) promoter drove expression exclusively in rod and cone photoreceptors, with transduction efficiencies of ~ 4% of cones and 2% of rods. Notably, in the central region containing the cone-rich visual streak, 15.6% of cones were transduced. Significant regional variation existed, with lower transduction efficiencies in the temporal regions of all eyes. This variation did not correlate with ILM thickness. Vectors carrying a cone-specific promoter failed to transduce a quantifiable percentage of cone photoreceptors. The newly developed AAV vectors containing the IRBP promoter were capable of producing photoreceptor-specific transgene expression following IVT in the dog. PMID:26467396

  9. Tyrosine capsid-mutant AAV vectors for gene delivery to the canine retina from a subretinal or intravitreal approach

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, FM; Gornik, KR; Dinculescu, A; Boye, SL; Hauswirth, WW; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses are important vectors for retinal gene delivery. Currently utilized vectors have relatively slow onset and for efficient transduction it is necessary to deliver treatment subretinally, with the potential for damage to the retina. Amino-acid substitutions in the viral capsid improve efficiency in rodent eyes by evading host responses. As dogs are important large animal models for human retinitis pigmentosa, we evaluated the speed and efficiency of retinal transduction using capsid-mutant vectors injected both subretinally and intravitreally. We evaluated AAV serotypes 2 and 8 with amino-acid substitutions of surface exposed capsid tyrosine residues. The chicken beta-actin promoter was used to drive green fluorescent protein expression. Twelve normal adult beagles were injected, 4 dogs received intravitreal injections, 8 dogs received subretinal injections. Capsid-mutant viruses tested included AAV2(quad Y-F) (intravitreal and subretinal), and self-complementary scAAV8(Y733F) (subretinal only). Contralateral control eyes received injections of scAAV5 (subretinal) or scAAV2 (intravitreal). Subretinally delivered vectors had a faster expression onset than intravitreally delivered vectors. Subretinally delivered scAAV8(Y733F) had a faster onset of expression than scAAV5. All subretinally injected vector types transduced the outer retina with high efficiency, and the inner retina with moderate efficiency. Intravitreally delivered AAV2(quad Y-F) had a marginally higher efficiency of transduction of both outer retinal and inner retinal cells than scAAV2. Because of their rapid expression onset and efficient transduction, subretinally delivered capsid-mutant AAV8 vectors may increase the efficacy of gene therapy treatment for rapid photoreceptor degenerative diseases. With further refinement, capsid-mutant AAV2 vectors show promise for retinal gene delivery from an intravitreal approach. PMID:24225638

  10. AAV vector-mediated secretion of chondroitinase provides a sensitive tracer for axonal arborisations.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Nuno; Muir, Elizabeth M; Andrews, Melissa R; Ward, Anneliese; Michelmore, Nicholas; Dasgupta, Debayan; Verhaagen, Joost; Moloney, Elizabeth B; Keynes, Roger J; Fawcett, James W; Rogers, John H

    2014-04-30

    As part of a project to express chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) in neurons of the central nervous system, we have inserted a modified ChABC gene into an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector and injected it into the vibrissal motor cortex in adult rats to determine the extent and distribution of expression of the enzyme. A similar vector for expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into the same location. For each vector, two versions with minor differences were used, giving similar results. After 4 weeks, the brains were stained to show GFP and products of chondroitinase digestion. Chondroitinase was widely expressed, and the AAV-ChABC and AAV-GFP vectors gave similar expression patterns in many respects, consistent with the known projections from the directly transduced neurons in vibrissal motor cortex and adjacent cingulate cortex. In addition, diffusion of vector to deeper neuronal populations led to labelling of remote projection fields which was much more extensive with AAV-ChABC than with AAV-GFP. The most notable of these populations are inferred to be neurons of cortical layer 6, projecting widely in the thalamus, and neurons of the anterior pole of the hippocampus, projecting through most of the hippocampus. We conclude that, whereas GFP does not label the thinnest axonal branches of some neuronal types, chondroitinase is efficiently secreted from these arborisations and enables their extent to be sensitively visualised. After 12 weeks, chondroitinase expression was undiminished. PMID:24583077

  11. IL12-mediated liver inflammation reduces the formation of AAV transcriptionally active forms but has no effect over preexisting AAV transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Gil-Fariña, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Vanrell, Lucia; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; High, Katherine A; Prieto, Jesus; Mingozzi, Federico; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors (rAAV) have proven to be excellent candidates for gene therapy clinical applications. Recent results showed that cellular immunity to AAV represents a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of these vectors. Interestingly, no preclinical animal model has previously fully reproduced the clinical findings. The aim of the present work was to enhance the T cell immune response against AAV capsid in mice by the administration of a rAAV expressing the immunostimulatory cytokine IL-12. Our results indicate that although IL-12 expression enhanced the AAV capsid-specific immune response it failed to eliminate transduced hepatocytes and long-term expression was achieved. We found that AAV-mediated transgene expression is altered by IL-12-induced liver inflammation. However, IL-12 expression has no effect over preexisting AAV-mediated transgene expression. IL-12 down-regulates AAV mediated transgene expression via induction of IFN-γ production by NK and T cells, but without altering the transduction efficiency measured by viral genomes. Our results indicate that liver inflammation affects the formation of transcriptionally active AAV vector genomes through an unknown mechanism that can be avoided by the use of DNA-demethylating or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:23844082

  12. IL12-Mediated Liver Inflammation Reduces the Formation of AAV Transcriptionally Active Forms but Has No Effect over Preexisting AAV Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Fariña, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Vanrell, Lucia; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; High, Katherine A.; Prieto, Jesus; Mingozzi, Federico; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors (rAAV) have proven to be excellent candidates for gene therapy clinical applications. Recent results showed that cellular immunity to AAV represents a major challenge facing the clinical use of systemic administration of these vectors. Interestingly, no preclinical animal model has previously fully reproduced the clinical findings. The aim of the present work was to enhance the T cell immune response against AAV capsid in mice by the administration of a rAAV expressing the immunostimulatory cytokine IL-12. Our results indicate that although IL-12 expression enhanced the AAV capsid-specific immune response it failed to eliminate transduced hepatocytes and long-term expression was achieved. We found that AAV-mediated transgene expression is altered by IL-12-induced liver inflammation. However, IL-12 expression has no effect over preexisting AAV-mediated transgene expression. IL-12 down-regulates AAV mediated transgene expression via induction of IFN-γ production by NK and T cells, but without altering the transduction efficiency measured by viral genomes. Our results indicate that liver inflammation affects the formation of transcriptionally active AAV vector genomes through an unknown mechanism that can be avoided by the use of DNA-demethylating or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:23844082

  13. AAV vector-mediated reversal of hypoglycemia in canine and murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Pinto, Carlos; Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Kozink, Daniel M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Demaster, Amanda K; Kruse, Meghan A; Vaughn, Valerie; Hillman, Steven; Bird, Andrew; Jackson, Mark; Brown, Talmage; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) profoundly impairs glucose release by the liver due to glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) containing a small human G6Pase transgene was pseudotyped with AAV8 (AAV2/8) to optimize liver tropism. Survival was prolonged in 2-week-old G6Pase (-/-) mice by 600-fold fewer AAV2/8 vector particles (vp), in comparison to previous experiments involving this model (2 x 10(9) vp; 3 x 10(11) vp/kg). When the vector was pseudotyped with AAV1, survival was prolonged only at a higher dose (3 x 10(13) vp/kg). The AAV2/8 vector uniquely prevented hypoglycemia during fasting and fully corrected liver G6Pase deficiency in GSD-Ia mice and dogs. The AAV2/8 vector has prolonged survival in three GSD-Ia dogs to >11 months, which validated this strategy in the large animal model for GSD-Ia. Urinary biomarkers, including lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, were corrected by G6Pase expression solely in the liver. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was reduced almost to the normal level in vector-treated GSD-Ia mice and dogs, as was the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in GSD-Ia mice. These preclinical data demonstrated the efficacy of correcting hepatic G6Pase deficiency, and support the further preclinical development of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:18362924

  14. Near-perfect infectivity of wild-type AAV as benchmark for infectivity of recombinant AAV vectors

    PubMed Central

    Zeltner, Nadja; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Clément, Nathalie; Weber, Thomas; Linden, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Viral vectors derived from adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are widely used for gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo. The increasing use of AAV as a gene transfer vector, as well as recently demonstrated immunological complications in clinical trials, highlight the necessity to define the specific activity of vector preparations beyond current standards. In this report, we determined the infectious, physical and genome-containing particle titers of several wild-type AAV type 2 (wtAAV2) and recombinant AAV type 2 (rAAV2) preparations that were produced and purified by standard methods. We found that the infectivity of wtAAV2 approaches a physical-to-infectious particle ratio of one. This near-perfect physical-to-infectious particle ratio defines a “ceiling” for the theoretically achievable quality of recombinant AAV vectors. In comparison, for rAAV2, only approximately 50 out of 100 viral particles contained a genome and more strikingly only approximately one of the 100 viral particles was infectious. Our findings suggest that current strategies for rAAV vector design, production and/or purification should be amenable to improvements. Ultimately, this could result in the generation of near-perfect vector particles, a prospect with significant implications for gene therapy. PMID:20336156

  15. Hepatitis virus protein X-Phenylalanine Hydroxylase fusion proteins identified in PKU mice treated with AAV-WPRE vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing the Pahenu2 mouse model for phenylketonuria (PKU), we developed an improved expression vector containing the Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus post-transcriptional regulatory element inserted into a rAAV-mPAH construct (rAAV-mPAH-WPRE) for treatment of PKU. Following portal vein delivery of these ...

  16. Engineering the AAV capsid to optimize vector-host-interactions.

    PubMed

    Büning, Hildegard; Huber, Anke; Zhang, Liang; Meumann, Nadja; Hacker, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are the most widely used delivery system for in vivo gene therapy. Vectors developed from natural AAV isolates achieved clinical benefit for a number of patients suffering from monogenetic disorders. However, high vector doses were required and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies precluded a number of patients from participation. Further challenges are related to AAV's tropism that lacks cell type selectivity resulting in off-target transduction. Conversely, specific cell types representing important targets for gene therapy like stem cells or endothelial cells show low permissiveness. To overcome these limitations, elegant rational design- as well as directed evolution-based strategies were developed to optimize various steps of AAV's host interaction. These efforts resulted in next generation vectors with enhanced capabilities, that is increased efficiency of cell transduction, targeted transduction of previously non-permissive cell types, escape from antibody neutralization and off-target free in vivo delivery of vector genomes. These important achievements are expected to improve current and pave the way towards novel AAV-based applications in gene therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:26302254

  17. Long-term Expression of Apolipoprotein B mRNA-specific Hammerhead Ribozyme via scAAV8.2 Vector Inhibits Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nischal, Hersharan; Sun, Hua; Wang, Yuchun; Ford, David A; Cao, Ying; Wei, Peng; Teng, Ba-Bie

    2013-01-01

    Target substrate-specific hammerhead ribozyme cleaves the specific mRNA efficiently and results in the inhibition of gene expression. In humans, overproduction of apolipoprotein B (apoB) is positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. The goal of this study is to demonstrate that long-term reduction of apoB gene expression using hammerhead ribozyme would result in inhibition of atherosclerosis development. We designed two hammerhead ribozymes targeted at the nucleotides of apoB mRNA GUC2326 (designated RB1) and GUA6679 (designated RB15), and we used self-complementary adeno-associated virus 8.2 (scAAV8.2) vector to deliver these active ribozymes of RB1, RB15, combination of RB1/RB15, and an inactive hammerhead ribozyme RB15 mutant to atherosclerosis-prone LDb mice (Ldlr−/−Apobec1−/−). LDb mice lack both low density lipoproteins (LDL) receptor (Ldlr−/−) and apoB mRNA editing enzyme (Apobec1−/−) genes and develop atherosclerosis spontaneously. After the RB1, RB15, or combination of RB1/RB15 ribozymes treatment, the LDb mice had significantly decreased plasma triglyceride and apoB levels, resulting in markedly decreased of atherosclerotic lesions, Furthermore, the active ribozymes treatment decreased the levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (Dgat1) mRNA and the levels of multiple diacylglycerol (DAG) molecular species. These results provide the first evidence that decreased apoB levels results to reduction of Dgat1 expression and triglyceride levels (TAG), which had a significant impact on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:24084845

  18. Widespread AAV1- and AAV2-mediated transgene expression in the nonhuman primate brain: implications for Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hadaczek, Piotr; Stanek, Lisa; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Sudhakar, Vivek; Samaranch, Lluis; Pivirotto, Philip; Bringas, John; O’Riordan, Catherine; Mastis, Bryan; San Sebastian, Waldy; Forsayeth, John; Cheng, Seng H; Bankiewicz, Krystof S; Shihabuddin, Lamya S

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is caused by a toxic gain-of-function associated with the expression of the mutant huntingtin (htt) protein. Therefore, the use of RNA interference to inhibit Htt expression could represent a disease-modifying therapy. The potential of two recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV), AAV1 and AAV2, to transduce the cortico-striatal tissues that are predominantly affected in HD was explored. Green fluorescent protein was used as a reporter in each vector to show that both serotypes were broadly distributed in medium spiny neurons in the striatum and cortico-striatal neurons after infusion into the putamen and caudate nucleus of nonhuman primates (NHP), with AAV1-directed expression being slightly more robust than AAV2-driven expression. This study suggests that both serotypes are capable of targeting neurons that degenerate in HD, and it sets the stage for the advanced preclinical evaluation of an RNAi-based therapy for this disease. PMID:27408903

  19. Intramuscular Injection of AAV8 in Mice and Macaques Is Associated with Substantial Hepatic Targeting and Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jenny A.; Peng, Hui; Ohlstein, Jason; Medina-Jaszek, C. Angelica; Ahonkhai, Omua; Mentzinger, Anne; Grant, Rebecca L.; Roy, Soumitra; Chen, Shu-Jen; Bell, Peter; Tretiakova, Anna P.; Wilson, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Intramuscular (IM) administration of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has entered the early stages of clinical development with some success, including the first approved gene therapy product in the West called Glybera. In preparation for broader clinical development of IM AAV vector gene therapy, we conducted detailed pre-clinical studies in mice and macaques evaluating aspects of delivery that could affect performance. We found that following IM administration of AAV8 vectors in mice, a portion of the vector reached the liver and hepatic gene expression contributed significantly to total expression of secreted transgenes. The contribution from liver could be controlled by altering injection volume and by the use of traditional (promoter) and non-traditional (tissue-specific microRNA target sites) expression control elements. Hepatic distribution of vector following IM injection was also noted in rhesus macaques. These pre-clinical data on AAV delivery should inform safe and efficient development of future AAV products. PMID:25393537

  20. Strategies to generate high-titer, high-potency recombinant AAV3 serotype vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Yin, Zifei; Li, Jun; Zhang, Daniel; Aslanidi, George; Srivastava, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Although recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 3 (AAV3) vectors were largely ignored previously, owing to their poor transduction efficiency in most cells and tissues examined, our initial observation of the selective tropism of AAV3 serotype vectors for human liver cancer cell lines and primary human hepatocytes has led to renewed interest in this serotype. AAV3 vectors and their variants have recently proven to be extremely efficient in targeting human and nonhuman primate hepatocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. In the present studies, we wished to evaluate the relative contributions of the cis-acting inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) from AAV3 (ITR3), as well as the trans-acting Rep proteins from AAV3 (Rep3) in the AAV3 vector production and transduction. To this end, we utilized two helper plasmids: pAAVr2c3, which carries rep2 and cap3 genes, and pAAVr3c3, which carries rep3 and cap3 genes. The combined use of AAV3 ITRs, AAV3 Rep proteins, and AAV3 capsids led to the production of recombinant vectors, AAV3-Rep3/ITR3, with up to approximately two to fourfold higher titers than AAV3-Rep2/ITR2 vectors produced using AAV2 ITRs, AAV2 Rep proteins, and AAV3 capsids. We also observed that the transduction efficiency of Rep3/ITR3 AAV3 vectors was approximately fourfold higher than that of Rep2/ITR2 AAV3 vectors in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines in vitro. The transduction efficiency of Rep3/ITR3 vectors was increased by ~10-fold, when AAV3 capsids containing mutations in two surface-exposed residues (serine 663 and threonine 492) were used to generate a S663V+T492V double-mutant AAV3 vector. The Rep3/ITR3 AAV3 vectors also transduced human liver tumors in vivo approximately twofold more efficiently than those generated with Rep2/ITR2. Our data suggest that the transduction efficiency of AAV3 vectors can be significantly improved both using homologous Rep proteins and ITRs as well as by capsid optimization. Thus, the combined use of homologous Rep

  1. AAV Vectors for Cardiac Gene Transfer: Experimental Tools and Clinical Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Pacak, Christina A; Byrne, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    Since the first demonstration of in vivo gene transfer into myocardium there have been a series of advancements that have driven the evolution of cardiac gene delivery from an experimental tool into a therapy currently at the threshold of becoming a viable clinical option. Innovative methods have been established to address practical challenges related to tissue-type specificity, choice of delivery vehicle, potency of the delivered material, and delivery route. Most importantly for therapeutic purposes, these strategies are being thoroughly tested to ensure safety of the delivery system and the delivered genetic material. This review focuses on the development of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as one of the most valuable cardiac gene transfer agents available today. Various forms of rAAV have been used to deliver “pre-event” cardiac protection and to temper the severity of hypertrophy, cardiac ischemia, or infarct size. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have also been functional delivery tools for cardiac gene expression knockdown studies and successfully improving the cardiac aspects of several metabolic and neuromuscular diseases. Viral capsid manipulations along with the development of tissue-specific and regulated promoters have greatly increased the utility of rAAV-mediated gene transfer. Important clinical studies are currently underway to evaluate AAV-based cardiac gene delivery in humans. PMID:21792180

  2. Development of novel AAV serotype 6 based vectors with selective tropism for human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sayroo, R; Nolasco, D; Yin, Z; Colon-Cortes, Y; Pandya, M; Ling, C; Aslanidi, G

    2016-01-01

    Viral vectors-based gene therapy is an attractive alternative to common anti-cancer treatments. In the present studies, AAV serotype 6 vectors were identified to be particularly effective in the transduction of human prostate (PC3), breast (T47D) and liver (Huh7) cancer cells. Next, we developed chimeric AAV vectors with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide incorporated into the viral capsid to enable specific targeting of integrin-overexpressing malignant cells. These AAV6-RGD vectors improved transduction efficiency approximately 3-fold compared with wild-type AAV6 vectors by enhancing the viral entry into the cells. We also observed that transduction efficiency significantly improved, up to approximately 5-fold, by the mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine and threonine residues involved in the intracellular trafficking of AAV vectors. Therefore, in our study, the AAV6-Y705-731F+T492V vector was identified as the most efficient. The combination of RGD peptide, tyrosine and threonine mutations on the same AAV6 capsid further increased the transduction efficiency, approximately 8-fold in vitro. In addition, we mutated lysine (K531E) to impair the affinity of AAV6 vectors to heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Finally, we showed a significant increase in both specificity and efficiency of AAV6-RGD-Y705-731F+T492V+K531E vectors in a xenograft animal model in vivo. In summary, the approach described here can lead to the development of AAV vectors with selective tropism to human cancer cells. PMID:26270885

  3. Quantitative comparison of expression with adeno-associated virus (AAV-2) brain-specific gene cassettes.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Janson, C G; Mastakov, M; Lawlor, P; Young, D; Mouravlev, A; Fitzsimons, H; Choi, K L; Ma, H; Dragunow, M; Leone, P; Chen, Q; Dicker, B; During, M J

    2001-09-01

    This study compared a range of mammalian CNS expression cassettes in recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV-2) vectors using strong endogenous promoter sequences, with or without a strong post-regulatory element and polyadenylation signal. Changes in these elements led to transgene expression varying by over three orders of magnitude. In experiments conducted in primary cell culture and in >100 stereotactically injected rats, we observed highly efficient and stable (>15 months) gene expression in neurons and limited expression in glia; the highest expression occurred with endogenous, nonviral promoters such as neuron-specific enolase and beta-actin. The packaging size of AAV-2 was maximized at 5.7 kb without impairing gene expression, as judged by direct comparison with a number of smaller AAV-2 constructs. The genomic insert size and titer were confirmed by Southern blot and quantitative PCR, and infectivity was tested by particle titer using ELISA with a conformation-dependent epitope that requires the full intact capsid. A packaging and purification protocol we describe allows for high-titer, high-capacity AAV-2 vectors that can transduce over 2 x 10(5) neurons in vivo per microliter of vector, using the strongest expression cassette. PMID:11571569

  4. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering: an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector toolbox.

    PubMed

    Senís, Elena; Fatouros, Chronis; Große, Stefanie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Niopek, Dominik; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Börner, Kathleen; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Its remarkable ease and efficiency make the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) DNA editing machinery highly attractive as a new tool for experimental gene annotation and therapeutic genome engineering in eukaryotes. Here, we report a versatile set of plasmids and vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) that allow robust and specific delivery of the two essential CRISPR components - Cas9 and chimeric g(uide)RNA - either alone or in combination. All our constructs share a modular design that enables simple and stringent guide RNA (gRNA) cloning as well as rapid exchange of promoters driving Cas9 or gRNA. Packaging into potent synthetic AAV capsids permits CRISPR delivery even into hard-to-transfect targets, as shown for human T-cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the feasibility to direct Cas9 expression to or away from hepatocytes, using a liver-specific promoter or a hepatic miRNA binding site, respectively. We also report a streamlined and economical protocol for detection of CRISPR-induced mutations in less than 3 h. Finally, we provide original evidence that AAV/CRISPR vectors can be exploited for gene engineering in vivo, as exemplified in the liver of adult mice. Our new tools and protocols should foster the broad application of CRISPR technology in eukaryotic cells and organisms, and accelerate its clinical translation into humans. PMID:25186301

  5. Synergistic inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling downregulates immune response against recombinant AAV2 vectors during hepatic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Sangeetha; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2016-01-01

    Host immune response remains a key obstacle to widespread application of adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy. Thus, targeted inhibition of the signaling pathways that trigger such immune responses will be beneficial. Previous studies have reported that DNA damage response proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) negatively affect the integration of AAV in the host genome. However, the role of PARP-1 in regulating AAV transduction and the immune response against these vectors has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that repression of PARP-1 improves the transduction of single-stranded AAV vectors both in vitro (∼174%) and in vivo (two- to 3.4-fold). Inhibition of PARP-1, also significantly downregulated the expression of several proinflammatory and cytokine markers such as TLRs, ILs, NF-κB subunit proteins associated with the host innate response against self-complementary AAV2 vectors. The suppression of the inflammatory response targeted against these vectors was more effective upon combined inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB signaling. This strategy also effectively attenuated the AAV capsid-specific cytotoxic T-cell response, with minimal effect on vector transduction, as demonstrated in normal C57BL/6 and hemophilia B mice. These data suggest that targeting specific host cellular proteins could be useful to attenuate the immune barriers to AAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:26443873

  6. Global brain delivery of neprilysin gene by intravascular administration of AAV vector in mice

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Nobuhisa; Sekiguchi, Misaki; Hattori, Yoshino; Takahashi, Akane; Asai, Masashi; Ji, Bin; Higuchi, Makoto; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Saido, Takaomi C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is closely associated with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Stereotaxic infusion of neprilysin-encoding viral vectors into the hippocampus has been shown to decrease Aβ in AD-model mice, but more efficient and global delivery is necessary to treat the broadly distributed burden in AD. Here we developed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector capable of providing neuronal gene expression throughout the brains after peripheral administration. A single intracardiac administration of the vector carrying neprilysin gene in AD-model mice elevated neprilysin activity broadly in the brain, and reduced Aβ oligomers, with concurrent alleviation of abnormal learning and memory function and improvement of amyloid burden. The exogenous neprilysin was localized mainly in endosomes, thereby effectively excluding Aβ oligomers from the brain. AAV vector-mediated gene transfer may provide a therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases, where global transduction of a therapeutic gene into the brain is necessary. PMID:23503602

  7. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  8. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector.

    PubMed

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  9. Effective delivery of large genes to the retina by dual AAV vectors

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Colella, Pasqualina; Sommella, Andrea; Iodice, Carolina; Cesi, Giulia; de Simone, Sonia; Marrocco, Elena; Rossi, Settimio; Giunti, Massimo; Palfi, Arpad; Farrar, Gwyneth J; Polishchuk, Roman; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, AAV's limited cargo capacity prevents its application to therapies of inherited retinal diseases due to mutations of genes over 5 kb, like Stargardt's disease (STGD) and Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B). Previous methods based on ‘forced’ packaging of large genes into AAV capsids may not be easily translated to the clinic due to the generation of genomes of heterogeneous size which raise safety concerns. Taking advantage of AAV's ability to concatemerize, we generated dual AAV vectors which reconstitute a large gene by either splicing (trans-splicing), homologous recombination (overlapping), or a combination of the two (hybrid). We found that dual trans-splicing and hybrid vectors transduce efficiently mouse and pig photoreceptors to levels that, albeit lower than those achieved with a single AAV, resulted in significant improvement of the retinal phenotype of mouse models of STGD and USH1B. Thus, dual AAV trans-splicing or hybrid vectors are an attractive strategy for gene therapy of retinal diseases that require delivery of large genes. PMID:24150896

  10. Enhancement of flap survival and changes in angiogenic gene expression after AAV2-mediated VEGF gene transfer to rat ischemic flaps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Tian; Avanessian, Bella; Ma, Qiangzhong; Durfee, Heather; Tang, Yu Qing; Liu, Paul Y

    2011-01-01

    Necrosis of surgically transferred flaps due to ischemia is a serious wound problem. We evaluated the improvement of flap survival and changes in angiogenic gene expression profiles after transfer of the VEGF gene by means of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) vector to rat ischemic flaps. Thirty rats were divided into one experimental group, one AAV2-GFP group, and one saline group. AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-GFP were injected intradermally into the rat dorsum in the AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-GFP group. The saline group received saline injection. A 3 × 10 cm flap was raised in each rat two weeks post-injection. One week after surgery, flap viability was evaluated. Angiogenesis real-time PCR array was performed to analyze the expression of angiogenesis-associated genes. The AAV2-VEGF treatment significantly improved flap survival (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased VEGF expression in AAV2-VEGF treated flaps. The PCR array identified remarkable changes in 6 out of the 84 angiogenesis-associated genes in AAV2-VEGF treated flaps. Particularly, EGF, PDGF-A and VEGF-B genes were up-regulated in these flaps. In contrast, FGF2 gene expression was down-regulated. In conclusion, AAV2-VEGF improves flap survival and affects the expression of a series of endogenous growth factor genes, which likely play critical roles in the enhancement of ischemic flap survival. PMID:21649787

  11. Ultramicroscopy as a novel tool to unravel the tropism of AAV gene therapy vectors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sandro; Bode, Julia; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; von Kalle, Christof; Cartier, Nathalie; Tews, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have advanced to the vanguard of gene therapy. Numerous naturally occurring serotypes have been used to target cells in various tissues. There is a strong need for fast and dynamic methods which efficiently unravel viral tropism in whole organs. Ultramicroscopy (UM) is a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that images optically cleared undissected specimens, achieving good resolutions at high penetration depths while being non-destructive. UM was applied to obtain high-resolution 3D analysis of AAV transduction in adult mouse brains, especially in the hippocampus, a region of interest for Alzheimer's disease therapy. We separately or simultaneously compared transduction efficacies for commonly used serotypes (AAV9 and AAVrh10) using fluorescent reporter expression. We provide a detailed comparative and quantitative analysis of the transduction profiles. UM allowed a rapid analysis of marker fluorescence expression in neurons with intact projections deep inside the brain, in defined anatomical structures. Major hippocampal neuronal transduction was observed with both vectors, with slightly better efficacy for AAV9 in UM. Glial response and synaptic marker expression did not change post transduction.We propose UM as a novel valuable complementary tool to efficiently and simultaneously unravel tropism of different viruses in a single non-dissected adult rodent brain. PMID:27320056

  12. Ultramicroscopy as a novel tool to unravel the tropism of AAV gene therapy vectors in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Sandro; Bode, Julia; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; von Kalle, Christof; Cartier, Nathalie; Tews, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have advanced to the vanguard of gene therapy. Numerous naturally occurring serotypes have been used to target cells in various tissues. There is a strong need for fast and dynamic methods which efficiently unravel viral tropism in whole organs. Ultramicroscopy (UM) is a novel fluorescence microscopy technique that images optically cleared undissected specimens, achieving good resolutions at high penetration depths while being non-destructive. UM was applied to obtain high-resolution 3D analysis of AAV transduction in adult mouse brains, especially in the hippocampus, a region of interest for Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We separately or simultaneously compared transduction efficacies for commonly used serotypes (AAV9 and AAVrh10) using fluorescent reporter expression. We provide a detailed comparative and quantitative analysis of the transduction profiles. UM allowed a rapid analysis of marker fluorescence expression in neurons with intact projections deep inside the brain, in defined anatomical structures. Major hippocampal neuronal transduction was observed with both vectors, with slightly better efficacy for AAV9 in UM. Glial response and synaptic marker expression did not change post transduction.We propose UM as a novel valuable complementary tool to efficiently and simultaneously unravel tropism of different viruses in a single non-dissected adult rodent brain. PMID:27320056

  13. Sustained correction of FVII deficiency in dogs using AAV-mediated expression of zymogen FVII

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Contreras, Oscar A.; Smith, Shannon M.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Raymer, Robin A.; Merricks, Elizabeth; Faella, Armida; Pavani, Giulia; Zhou, Shangzhen; Nichols, Timothy C.; High, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder treated by infusion of fresh-frozen plasma, plasma-derived FVII concentrates and low-dose recombinant activated FVII. Clinical data suggest that a mild elevation of plasma FVII levels (>10% normal) results in improved hemostasis. Research dogs with a G96E missense FVII mutation (FVII-G96E) have <1% FVII activity. By western blot, we show that they have undetectable plasmatic antigen, thus representing the most prevalent type of human FVII deficiency (low antigen/activity). In these dogs, we determine the feasibility of a gene therapy approach using liver-directed, adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotype 8 vector delivery of a canine FVII (cFVII) zymogen transgene. FVII-G96E dogs received escalating AAV doses (2E11 to 4.95E13 vector genomes [vg] per kg). Clinically therapeutic expression (15% normal) was attained with as low as 6E11 vg/kg of AAV and has been stable for >1 year (ongoing) without antibody formation to the cFVII transgene. Sustained and supraphysiological expression of 770% normal was observed using 4.95E13 vg/kg of AAV (2.6 years, ongoing). No evidence of pathological activation of coagulation or detrimental animal physiology was observed as platelet counts, d-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and serum chemistries remained normal in all dogs (cumulative 6.4 years). We observed a transient and noninhibitory immunoglobulin G class 2 response against cFVII only in the dog receiving the highest AAV dose. In conclusion, in the only large-animal model representing the majority of FVII mutation types, our data are first to demonstrate the feasibility, safety, and long-term duration of AAV-mediated correction of FVII deficiency. PMID:26702064

  14. In Vivo Hepatic Reprogramming of Myofibroblasts with AAV Vectors as a Therapeutic Strategy for Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Español-Suñer, Regina; Malato, Yann; Dumont, Laure; Grimm, Andrew A; Kienle, Eike; Bindman, Julia G; Wiedtke, Ellen; Hsu, Bernadette Y; Naqvi, Syed J; Schwabe, Robert F; Corvera, Carlos U; Grimm, Dirk; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis, a form of scarring, develops in chronic liver diseases when hepatocyte regeneration cannot compensate for hepatocyte death. Initially, collagen produced by myofibroblasts (MFs) functions to maintain the integrity of the liver, but excessive collagen accumulation suppresses residual hepatocyte function, leading to liver failure. As a strategy to generate new hepatocytes and limit collagen deposition in the chronically injured liver, we developed in vivo reprogramming of MFs into hepatocytes using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing hepatic transcription factors. We first identified the AAV6 capsid as effective in transducing MFs in a mouse model of liver fibrosis. We then showed in lineage-tracing mice that AAV6 vector-mediated in vivo hepatic reprogramming of MFs generates hepatocytes that replicate function and proliferation of primary hepatocytes, and reduces liver fibrosis. Because AAV vectors are already used for liver-directed human gene therapy, our strategy has potential for clinical translation into a therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27257763

  15. Local administration of AAV-DJ pseudoserotype expressing COX2 provided early onset of transgene expression and promoted bone fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, R; Baylink, D J; Lau, K-H W; Tang, X; Sheng, M H-C; Rundle, C H; Qin, X

    2015-09-01

    We have previously obtained compelling proof-of-principle evidence for COX2 gene therapy for fracture repair using integrating retroviral vectors. For this therapy to be suitable for patient uses, a suitable vector with high safety profile must be used. Accordingly, this study sought to evaluate the feasibility of AAV as the vector for this COX2 gene therapy, because AAV raises less safety issues than the retroviral vectors used previously. However, an appropriate AAV serotype is required to provide early increase in and adequate level of COX2 expression that is needed for fracture repair. Herein, we reported that AAV-DJ, an artificial AAV pseudoserotype, is highly effective in delivering COX2 gene to fracture sites in a mouse femoral fracture model. Compared with AAV-2, the use of AAV-DJ led to ~5-fold increase in infectivity in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and provided an earlier and significantly higher level of transgene expression at the fracture site. Injection of this vector at a dose of 7.5 × 10(11) genomic copies led to high COX2 level at the fracture site on day 3 after injections and significantly promoted fracture union at 21 days, as analyzed by radiography and μ-CT. The therapeutic effect appears to involve enhanced osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs and remodeling of callus tissues to laminar bone. This interpretation is supported by the enhanced expression of several key genes participating in the fracture repair process. In conclusion, AAV-DJ is a promising serotype for the AAV-based COX2 gene therapy of fracture repair in humans. PMID:25965395

  16. Lack of Humoral Immune Response to the Tetracycline (Tet) Activator in Rats Injected Intracranially with Tet-off rAAV Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Chang, Qin A.; Virag, Tamas; West, Neva C.; George, David; Castro, Maria G.; Bohn, Martha C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to safely control transgene expression from viral vectors is a long-term goal in the gene therapy field. We have previously reported tight regulation of GFP expression in rat brain using a self-regulating tet-off rAAV vector. The immune responses against tet regulatory elements observed by other groups in nonhuman primates after intramuscular injection of tet-on encoding vectors raise concerns about the clinical value of tet-regulated vectors. However, previous studies have not examined immune responses following injection of AAV vectors into brain. Therefore, rat striatum was injected with tet-off rAAV harboring a therapeutic gene for Parkinson's disease, either hAADC or hGDNF. The expression of each gene was tightly controlled by the tet-off regulatory system. Using an ELISA developed with purified GST-tTA protein, no detectable immunogenicity against tTA was observed in sera of rats that received an intrastriatal injection of either vector. In contrast, sera from rats intradermally injected with an adenovirus containing either tTA or rtTA, as positive controls, had readily detectable antibodies. These observations suggest that tet-off rAAV vectors do not elicit an immune response when injected into rat brain and that these may offer safer vectors for Parkinson's disease than vectors with constitutive expression. PMID:20164859

  17. Systemic Administration of a Recombinant AAV1 Vector Encoding IGF-1 Improves Disease Manifestations in SMA Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Ting, Chen-Hung; Lin-Chao, Sue; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Dodge, James C; Passini, Marco A; Cheng, Seng H

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intravenous administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV1) vector encoding human insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in a severe mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy. Measurable quantities of human IGF-1 transcripts and protein were detected in the liver (up to 3 months postinjection) and in the serum indicating that IGF-1 was secreted from the liver into systemic circulation. Spinal muscular atrophy mice administered AAV1-IGF-1 on postnatal day 1 exhibited a lower extent of motor neuron degeneration, cardiac and muscle atrophy as well as a greater extent of innervation at the neuromuscular junctions compared to untreated controls at day 8 posttreatment. Importantly, treatment with AAV1-IGF-1 prolonged the animals' lifespan, increased their body weights and improved their motor coordination. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that AAV1-mediated expression of IGF-1 led to an increase in survival motor neuron transcript and protein levels in the spinal cord, brain, muscles, and heart. These data indicate that systemically delivered AAV1-IGF-1 can correct several of the biochemical and behavioral deficits in spinal muscular atrophy mice through increasing tissue levels of survival motor neuron. PMID:24814151

  18. Development of a Liver-specific Tet-On Inducible System for AAV Vectors and Its Application in the Treatment of Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vanrell, Lucia; Di Scala, Marianna; Blanco, Laura; Otano, Itziar; Gil-Farina, Irene; Baldim, Victor; Paneda, Astrid; Berraondo, Pedro; Beattie, Stuart G; Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Tenenbaum, Lilianne; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) are effective gene delivery vehicles that can mediate long-lasting transgene expression. However, tight regulation and tissue-specific transgene expression is required for certain therapeutic applications. For regulatable expression from the liver we designed a hepatospecific bidirectional and autoregulatory tetracycline (Tet)-On system (TetbidirAlb) flanked by AAV inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). We characterized the inducible hepatospecific system in comparison with an inducible ubiquitous expression system (TetbidirCMV) using luciferase (luc). Although the ubiquitous system led to luc expression throughout the mouse, luc expression derived from the hepatospecific system was restricted to the liver. Interestingly, the induction rate of the TetbidirAlb was significantly higher than that of TetbidirCMV, whereas leakage of TetbidirAlb was significantly lower. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of this vector, an AAV-Tetbidir-Alb-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) was tested in a murine model for hepatic colorectal metastasis. The vector induced dose-dependent levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), showing no significant toxicity. AAV-Tetbidir-Alb-IL-12 was highly efficient in preventing establishment of metastasis in the liver and induced an efficient T-cell memory response to tumor cells. Thus, we have demonstrated persistent, and inducible in vivo expression of a gene from a liver-specific Tet-On inducible construct delivered via an AAV vector and proved to be an efficient tool for treating liver cancer. PMID:21364542

  19. A regulatable AAV vector mediating GDNF biological effects at clinically-approved sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses

    PubMed Central

    Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Humbert-Claude, Marie; Bockstael, Olivier; Das, Atze T; Boutry, Sébastien; Breger, Ludivine S; Klaver, Bep; Melas, Catherine; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Tomas; Muller, Robert N; DeWitte, Olivier; Levivier, Marc; Lundberg, Cecilia; Berkhout, Ben; Tenenbaum, Liliane

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical data stress the importance of pharmacologically-controlling glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) intracerebral administration to treat PD. The main challenge is finding a combination of a genetic switch and a drug which, when administered at a clinically-approved dose, reaches the brain in sufficient amounts to induce a therapeutic effect. We describe a highly-sensitive doxycycline-inducible adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. This vector allowed for the first time a longitudinal analysis of inducible transgene expression in the brain using bioluminescence imaging. To evaluate the dose range of GDNF biological activity, the inducible AAV vector (8.0 × 109 viral genomes) was injected in the rat striatum at four delivery sites and increasing doxycycline doses administered orally. ERK/Akt signaling activation as well as tyrosine hydroxylase downregulation, a consequence of long-term GDNF treatment, were induced at plasmatic doxycycline concentrations of 140 and 320 ng/ml respectively, which are known not to increase antibiotic-resistant microorganisms in patients. In these conditions, GDNF covered the majority of the striatum. No behavioral abnormalities or weight loss were observed. Motor asymmetry resulting from unilateral GDNF treatment only appeared with a 2.5-fold higher vector and a 13-fold higher inducer doses. Our data suggest that using the herein-described inducible AAV vector, biological effects of GDNF can be obtained in response to sub-antimicrobial doxycycline doses. PMID:27069954

  20. Combined Paracrine and Endocrine AAV9 mediated Expression of Hepatocyte Growth Factor for the Treatment of Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schievenbusch, Stephanie; Strack, Ingo; Scheffler, Melanie; Nischt, Roswitha; Coutelle, Oliver; Hösel, Marianna; Hallek, Michael; Fries, Jochen WU; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Odenthal, Margarete; Büning, Hildegard

    2010-01-01

    In chronic renal disease, tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a leading cause of renal failure. Here, we made use of one of the most promising gene therapy vector platforms, the adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector system, and the COL4A3-deficient mice, a genetic mouse model of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, to develop a novel bidirectional treatment strategy to prevent renal fibrosis. By comparing different AAV serotypes in reporter studies, we identified AAV9 as the most suitable delivery vector to simultaneously target liver parenchyma for endocrine and renal tubular epithelium for paracrine therapeutic expression of the antifibrogenic cytokine human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). We used transcriptional targeting to drive hHGF expression from the newly developed CMV-enhancer-Ksp-cadherin-promoter (CMV-Ksp) in renal and hepatic tissue following tail vein injection of rAAV9-CMV-Ksp-hHGF into COL4A3-deficient mice. The therapeutic efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by a remarkable attenuation of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and repression of fibrotic markers such as collagen1α1 (Col1A1), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Taken together, our results show the great potential of rAAV9 as an intravenously applicable vector for the combined paracrine and endocrine expression of antifibrogenic factors in the treatment of renal failure caused by tubulointerstitial fibrosis. PMID:20424598

  1. Novel Caprine Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Capsid (AAV-Go.1) Is Closely Related to the Primate AAV-5 and Has Unique Tropism and Neutralization Properties

    PubMed Central

    Arbetman, Alejandra E.; Lochrie, Michael; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wellman, Jennifer; Scallan, Ciaran; Doroudchi, Mohammad M.; Randlev, Britta; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Liu, Tongyao; Smith, Peter; Lehmkuhl, Howard; Hobbs, Lea Ann; Pierce, Glenn F.; Colosi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Preexisting humoral immunity to adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors may limit their clinical utility in gene delivery. We describe a novel caprine AAV (AAV-Go.1) capsid with unique biological properties. AAV-Go.1 capsid was cloned from goat-derived adenovirus preparations. Surprisingly, AAV-Go.1 capsid was 94% identical to the human AAV-5, with differences predicted to be largely on the surface and on or under the spike-like protrusions. In an in vitro neutralization assay using human immunoglobulin G (IgG) (intravenous immune globulin [IVIG]), AAV-Go.1 had higher resistance than AAV-5 (100-fold) and resistance similar to that of AAV-4 or AAV-8. In an in vivo model, SCID mice were pretreated with IVIG to generate normal human IgG plasma levels prior to the administration of AAV human factor IX vectors. Protein expression after intramuscular administration of AAV-Go.1 was unaffected in IVIG-pretreated mice, while it was reduced 5- and 10-fold after administration of AAV-1 and AAV-8, respectively. In contrast, protein expression after intravenous administration of AAV-Go.1 was reduced 7.1-fold, similar to the 3.8-fold reduction observed after AAV-8administration in IVIG-pretreated mice, and protein expression was essentially extinguished after AAV-2 administration in mice pretreated with much less IVIG (15-fold). AAV-Go.1 vectors also demonstrated a marked tropism for lung when administered intravenously in SCID mice. The pulmonary tropism and high neutralization resistance to human preexisting antibodies suggest novel therapeutic uses for AAV-Go.1 vectors, including targeting diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Nonprimate sources of AAVs may be useful to identify additional capsids with distinct tropisms and high resistance to neutralization by human preexisting antibodies. PMID:16306595

  2. AAV8 capsid variable regions at the two-fold symmetry axis contribute to high liver transduction by mediating nuclear entry and capsid uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Bell, Christie L.; Wilson, James M.

    2014-04-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) is a promising vector for liver-directed gene therapy. Although efficient uncoating of viral capsids has been implicated in AAV8's robust liver transduction, much about the biology of AAV8 hepatotropism remains unclear. Our study investigated the structural basis of AAV8 liver transduction efficiency by constructing chimeric vector capsids containing sequences derived from AAV8 and AAV2 – a highly homologous yet poorly hepatotropic serotype. Engineered vectors containing capsid variable regions (VR) VII and IX from AAV8 in an AAV2 backbone mediated near AAV8-like transduction in mouse liver, with higher numbers of chimeric genomes detected in whole liver cells and isolated nuclei. Interestingly, chimeric capsids within liver nuclei also uncoated similarly to AAV8 by 6 weeks after administration, in contrast with AAV2, of which a significantly smaller proportion were uncoated. This study links specific AAV capsid regions to the transduction ability of a clinically relevant AAV serotype. - Highlights: • We construct chimeric vectors to identify determinants of AAV8 liver transduction. • An AAV2-based vector with 17 AAV8 residues exhibited high liver transduction in mice. • This vector also surpassed AAV2 in cell entry, nuclear entry and onset of expression. • Most chimeric vector particles were uncoated at 6 weeks, like AAV8 and unlike AAV2. • Chimera retained heparin binding and was antigenically distinct from AAV2 and AAV8.

  3. CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY AND SYSTEMIC MANNITOL INCREASE GENE PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION OF AAV VECTORS 5, 8, AND 9 AND INCREASE GENE PRODUCT IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Nikisha; Lee, Daniel; Dickey, Chad; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jansen-West, Karen; Golde, Todd E.; Gordon, Marcia N.; Morgan, Dave; Nash, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The use of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors as a means of gene delivery to the central nervous system has emerged as a potentially viable method for the treatment of several types of degenerative brain diseases. However, a limitation of typical intracranial injections into the adult brain parenchyma is the relatively restricted distribution of the delivered gene to large brain regions such as the cortex, presumably due to confined dispersion of the injected particles. Optimizing the administration techniques to maximize gene distribution and gene expression is an important step in developing gene therapy studies. Here, we have found additive increases in distribution when 3 methods to increase brain distribution of rAAV were combined. The convection enhanced delivery (CED) method with the step-design cannula was used to deliver rAAV vector serotypes 5, 8 and 9 encoding GFP into the hippocampus of the mouse brain. While the CED method improved distribution of all 3 serotypes, the combination of rAAV9 and CED was particularly effective. Systemic mannitol administration, which reduces intracranial pressure, also further expanded distribution of GFP expression, in particular, increased expression on the contralateral hippocampi. These data suggest that combining advanced injection techniques with newer rAAV serotypes greatly improves viral vector distribution, which could have significant benefits for implementation of gene therapy strategies. PMID:20951738

  4. Widespread Central Nervous System Gene Transfer and Silencing After Systemic Delivery of Novel AAV-AS Vector.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sourav R; Harris, Anne F; Cabral, Damien J; Keeler, Allison M; Sapp, Ellen; Ferreira, Jennifer S; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Johnson, Jacob A; Johnson, Aime K; Su, Qin; Stoica, Lorelei; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil; Martin, Douglas R; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Effective gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is vital for development of novel gene therapies for neurological diseases. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have emerged as an effective platform for in vivo gene transfer, but overall neuronal transduction efficiency of vectors derived from naturally occurring AAV capsids after systemic administration is relatively low. Here, we investigated the possibility of improving CNS transduction of existing AAV capsids by genetically fusing peptides to the N-terminus of VP2 capsid protein. A novel vector AAV-AS, generated by the insertion of a poly-alanine peptide, is capable of extensive gene transfer throughout the CNS after systemic administration in adult mice. AAV-AS is 6- and 15-fold more efficient than AAV9 in spinal cord and cerebrum, respectively. The neuronal transduction profile varies across brain regions but is particularly high in the striatum where AAV-AS transduces 36% of striatal neurons. Widespread neuronal gene transfer was also documented in cat brain and spinal cord. A single intravenous injection of an AAV-AS vector encoding an artificial microRNA targeting huntingtin (Htt) resulted in 33-50% knockdown of Htt across multiple CNS structures in adult mice. This novel AAV-AS vector is a promising platform to develop new gene therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26708003

  5. Practical utilization of recombinant AAV vector reference standards: focus on vector genomes titration by free ITR qPCR

    PubMed Central

    D’Costa, Susan; Blouin, Veronique; Broucque, Frederic; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; François, Achille; Perez, Irene C; Le Bec, Christine; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O; Ayuso, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have demonstrated efficacy and a good safety profile. Although the field is advancing quickly, vector analytics and harmonization of dosage units are still a limitation for commercialization. AAV reference standard materials (RSMs) can help ensure product safety by controlling the consistency of assays used to characterize rAAV stocks. The most widely utilized unit of vector dosing is based on the encapsidated vector genome. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is now the most common method to titer vector genomes (vg); however, significant inter- and intralaboratory variations have been documented using this technique. Here, RSMs and rAAV stocks were titered on the basis of an inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) sequence-specific qPCR and we found an artificial increase in vg titers using a widely utilized approach. The PCR error was introduced by using single-cut linearized plasmid as the standard curve. This bias was eliminated using plasmid standards linearized just outside the ITR region on each end to facilitate the melting of the palindromic ITR sequences during PCR. This new “Free-ITR” qPCR delivers vg titers that are consistent with titers obtained with transgene-specific qPCR and could be used to normalize in-house product-specific AAV vector standards and controls to the rAAV RSMs. The free-ITR method, including well-characterized controls, will help to calibrate doses to compare preclinical and clinical data in the field. PMID:27069952

  6. Developing immunologically inert adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for gene therapy: possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Selot, Ruchita S; Hareendran, Sangeetha; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has become a clinical reality as demonstrated by remarkable benefits seen in Phase I/II clinical trials for hemophilia B, lipoprotein lipase deficiency and Leber's congenital amarousis. The choice of, and the improved understanding in vector characteristics have contributed significantly to this success. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors used in these trials have been long known to be relatively safe and efficacious. However, certain factors, most notably host immunity to the vector, prevent their widespread use. In patients who have pre-existing antibodies to AAV, these vectors will be rapidly cleared. Administration of a relatively high initial dose of vector to achieve and sustain a higher margin of therapeutic benefit is limited by concerns of vector dose-dependent T cell response. Frequent vector administration necessitated by the non-integrating nature of the virus is difficult due to the variable, yet significant host immunological memory. Thus generation of AAV vectors that are immunologically inert is pivotal for the long-term success with this promising vector system. Several strategies, that aim targeted disruption of antigenic sites or those that chemically modify the vectors have been proposed for host immune evasion. While these approaches have been successful in the pre-clinical model systems, this continues to be a field of intense experimentation and constant improvisation due to limited information available on vector immunology or data from human studies. This review forms a comprehensive report on current strategies available to generate immunologically inert AAV vectors and their potential in mediating longterm gene transfer. PMID:24678652

  7. CNS-restricted Transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Deletion with an Engineered AAV Vector.

    PubMed

    Murlidharan, Giridhar; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Rao, Lavanya; Corriher, Travis; Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping; Sullivan, Patrick; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is emerging as a promising approach to treat central nervous system disorders such as Spinal muscular atrophy, Batten, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease amongst others. A critical remaining challenge for central nervous system-targeted gene therapy, silencing or gene editing is to limit potential vector dose-related toxicity in off-target cells and organs. Here, we characterize a lab-derived AAV chimeric (AAV2g9), which displays favorable central nervous system attributes derived from both parental counterparts, AAV2 and AAV9. This synthetic AAV strain displays preferential, robust, and widespread neuronal transduction within the brain and decreased glial tropism. Importantly, we observed minimal systemic leakage, decreased sequestration and gene transfer in off-target organs with AAV2g9, when administered into the cerebrospinal fluid. A single intracranial injection of AAV2g9 vectors encoding guide RNAs targeting the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137 (encoding MIR137) in CRISPR/Cas9 knockin mice resulted in brain-specific gene deletion with no detectable events in the liver. This engineered AAV vector is a promising platform for treating neurological disorders through gene therapy, silencing or editing modalities. PMID:27434683

  8. Microglia-specific targeting by novel capsid-modified AAV6 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Awilda M; Cruz, Pedro E; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Strickland, Michael R; Siemienski, Zoe; Pardo, Meghan; Schob, Keri-Lyn; Li, Andrew; Aslanidi, George V; Srivastava, Arun; Golde, Todd E; Chakrabarty, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) have been widely used in gene therapy applications for central nervous system diseases. Though rAAV can efficiently target neurons and astrocytes in mouse brains, microglia, the immune cells of the brain, are refractile to rAAV. To identify AAV capsids with microglia-specific transduction properties, we initially screened the most commonly used serotypes, AAV1–9 and rh10, on primary mouse microglia cultures. While these capsids were not permissive, we then tested the microglial targeting properties of a newly characterized set of modified rAAV6 capsid variants with high tropism for monocytes. Indeed, these newly characterized rAAV6 capsid variants, specially a triply mutated Y731F/Y705F/T492V form, carrying a self-complementary genome and microglia-specific promoters (F4/80 or CD68) could efficiently and selectively transduce microglia in vitro. Delivery of these constructs in mice brains resulted in microglia-specific expression of green fluorescent protein, albeit at modest levels. We further show that CD68 promoter–driven expression of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, using this capsid variant leads to increased astrogliosis in the brains of wild-type mice. Our study describes the first instance of AAV-targeted microglial gene expression leading to functional modulation of the innate immune system in mice brains. This provides the rationale for utilizing these unique capsid/promoter combinations for microglia-specific gene targeting for modeling or functional studies. PMID:27308302

  9. AAV Hybrid Serotypes: Improved Vectors for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, significant efforts have been made on studying and engineering adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid, in order to increase efficiency in targeting specific cell types that are non-permissive to wild type (wt) viruses and to improve efficacy in infecting only the cell type of interest. With our previous knowledge of the viral properties of the naturally occurring serotypes and the elucidation of their capsid structures, we can now generate capsid mutants, or hybrid serotypes, by various methods and strategies. In this review, we summarize the studies performed on AAV retargeting, and categorize the available hybrid serotypes to date, based on the type of modification: 1) transcapsidation, 2) adsorption of bi-specific antibody to capsid surface, 3) mosaic capsid, and 4) chimeric capsid. Not only these hybrid serotypes could achieve high efficiency of gene delivery to a specific targeted cell type, which can be better-tailored for a particular clinical application, but also serve as a tool for studying AAV biology such as receptor binding, trafficking and genome delivery into the nucleus. PMID:15975007

  10. Efficient lysis of epithelial ovarian cancer cells by MAGE-A3-induced cytotoxic T lymphocytes using rAAV-6 capsid mutant vector.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Ramesh B; Gruzdyn, Oksana V; Moreno-Bost, Amberly M; Szmania, Susann; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Srivastava, Arun; Kolli, Bala K; Weaver, Donald W; van Rhee, Frits; Gruber, Scott A

    2014-02-12

    MAGE-A3 is highly expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), making it a promising candidate for immunotherapy. We investigated whether dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with a rAAV-6 capsid mutant vector Y445F could elicit effective MAGE-A3-specific anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in vitro. MAGE-A3 was cloned and rAAV-6-MAGE-A3 purified, followed by proviral genome detection using real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence detection of rAAV-6-Y445F-MAGE-A3-transduced DCs demonstrated 60% transduction efficiency. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis confirmed chromosomal integration of rAAV vectors. Flow cytometric analysis of transduced DCs showed unaltered expression of critical monocyte-derived surface molecules with retention of allo-stimulatory activity. Co-culture of autologous T lymphocytes with MAGE-A3-expressing DCs produced CTLs that secreted IFN-γ, and efficiently killed MAGE-A3+ EOC cells. This form of rAAV-based DC immunotherapy, either alone or more likely in combination with other immune-enhancing protocols, may prove useful in the clinical setting for management of EOC. PMID:24406390

  11. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Harding, CO; Gillingham, MB; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, DD

    2009-01-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudo-typed with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pahenu2 mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pahenu2 mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5±2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:16319949

  12. Complete correction of hyperphenylalaninemia following liver-directed, recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy in murine phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Harding, C O; Gillingham, M B; Hamman, K; Clark, H; Goebel-Daghighi, E; Bird, A; Koeberl, D D

    2006-03-01

    Novel recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors pseudotyped with serotype 8 capsid (rAAV2/8) have recently shown exciting promise as effective liver-directed gene transfer reagents. We have produced a novel liver-specific rAAV2/8 vector expressing the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) cDNA and have administered this vector to hyperphenylalaninemic PAH-deficient Pah(enu2) mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU). Our hypothesis was that this vector would produce sufficient hepatocyte transduction frequency and PAH activity to correct blood phenylalanine levels in murine PKU. Portal vein injection of recombinant AAV2/8 vector into five adult Pah(enu2) mice yielded complete and stable (up to 17 weeks) correction of serum phenylalanine levels. Liver PAH activity was corrected to 11.5+/-2.4% of wild type liver activity and was associated with a significant increase in phenylalanine clearance following parenteral phenylalanine challenge. Although questions of long-term safety and stability of expression remain, recombinant AAV2/8-mediated, liver-directed gene therapy is a promising novel treatment approach for PKU and allied inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:16319949

  13. Serotype-specific Binding Properties and Nanoparticle Characteristics Contribute to the Immunogenicity of rAAV1 Vectors.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Maxime; Da Rocha, Sylvie; Corre, Guillaume; Galy, Anne; Boisgerault, Florence

    2015-06-01

    The immunogenic properties of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene transfer vectors remain incompletely characterized in spite of their usage as gene therapy vectors or as vaccines. Molecular interactions between rAAV and various types of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), as well as the impact of these interactions on transgene or capsid-specific immunization remain unclear. We herein show that binding motifs recognized by the capsid and which determine the vector tissue tropism are also critical for key immune activation processes. Using rAAV capsid serotype 1 (rAAV1) vectors which primary receptors on target cells are α2,3 and α2,6 N-linked sialic acids, we show that sialic acid-dependent binding of rAAV1 on APCs is essential to trigger CD4(+) T-cell responses by increasing rAAV1 uptake and contributing to antigenic presentation of both the capsid and transgene product although this involves different APCs. In addition, the nanoparticulate structure of the vector in itself appears to be sufficient to trigger mobilization and activation of some APCs. Therefore, combinations of structural and of serotype-specific cell-targeting properties of rAAV1 determine its complex immunogenicity. These findings may be useful to guide a selection of rAAV variants depending on the intended level of immunogenicity for either gene therapy or vaccination applications. PMID:25881000

  14. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  15. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  16. Enzyme replacement in the CSF to treat metachromatic leukodystrophy in mouse model using single intracerebroventricular injection of self-complementary AAV1 vector

    PubMed Central

    Hironaka, Kohei; Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Yamamoto, Motoko; Miyake, Noriko; Miyake, Koichi; Okada, Takashi; Morita, Akio; Shimada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a functional deficiency in human arylsulfatase A (hASA). We recently reported that ependymal cells and the choroid plexus are selectively transduced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) vector and serve as a biological reservoir for the secretion of lysosomal enzymes into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In the present study, we examined the feasibility of this AAV-mediated gene therapy to treat MLD model mice. Preliminary experiments showed that the hASA level in the CSF after ICV injection of self-complementary (sc) AAV1 was much higher than in mice injected with single-stranded AAV1 or scAAV9. However, when 18-week-old MLD mice were treated with ICV injection of scAAV1, the concentration of hASA in the CSF gradually decreased and was not detectable at 12 weeks after injection, probably due to the development of anti-hASA antibodies. As a result, the sulfatide levels in brain tissues of treated MLD mice were only slightly reduced compared with those of untreated MLD mice. These results suggest that this approach is potentially promising for treating MLD, but that controlling the immune response appears to be crucial for long-term expression of therapeutic proteins in the CSF. PMID:26283284

  17. Efficient recombinase-mediated cassette exchange at the AAVS1 locus in human embryonic stem cells using baculoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Chrishan J A; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Kwang, Timothy W X; Choudhury, Yukti; Bak, Xiao Ying; Yang, Jing; Wang, Shu

    2011-09-01

    Insertion of a transgene into a defined genomic locus in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is crucial in preventing random integration-induced insertional mutagenesis, and can possibly enable persistent transgene expression during hESC expansion and in their differentiated progenies. Here, we employed homologous recombination in hESCs to introduce heterospecific loxP sites into the AAVS1 locus, a site with an open chromatin structure that allows averting transgene silencing phenomena. We then performed Cre recombinase mediated cassette exchange using baculoviral vectors to insert a transgene into the modified AAVS1 locus. Targeting efficiency in the master hESC line with the loxP-docking sites was up to 100%. Expression of the inserted transgene lasted for at least 20 passages during hESC expansion and was retained in differentiated cells derived from the genetically modified hESCs. Thus, this study demonstrates the feasibility of genetic manipulation at the AAVS1 locus with homologous recombination and using viral transduction in hESCs to facilitate recombinase-mediated cassette exchange. The method developed will be useful for repeated gene targeting at a defined locus of the hESC genome. PMID:21685448

  18. AAV1 mediated co-expression of formylglycine-generating enzyme and arylsulfatase a efficiently corrects sulfatide storage in a mouse model of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kurai, Toshiyuki; Hisayasu, Sanae; Kitagawa, Ryo; Migita, Makoto; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA) and is characterized by deposition of sulfatide in all organs, particularly the nervous system. Recently, formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) was found to be essential for activation of sulfatases. This study examined the utility of FGE co-expression in AAV type 1 vector (AAV1)-mediated gene therapy of ASA knockout (MLD) mice. AAV1-ASA alone or AAV1-ASA and AAV1-FGE were co-injected into a single site of the hippocampus. Enzyme assay and immunohistochemical analysis showed that ASA was detected not only in the injected hemisphere but also in the non-injected hemisphere by 7 months after injection. Level of ASA activity and extent of ASA distribution were significantly enhanced by co-introduction of AAV1-FGE. Marked reductions in sulfatide levels were observed throughout the entire brain. The unexpectedly widespread distribution of ASA may be due to a combination of diffusion in extracellular spaces, transport through axons, and circulation in cerebrospinal fluid. The rotarod test revealed improvement of neurological functions. These results demonstrate that direct injection of AAV1 vectors expressing ASA and FGE represents a highly promising approach with significant implications for the development of clinical protocols for MLD gene therapy. PMID:17164773

  19. Safety and Biodistribution Evaluation in CNGB3-Deficient Mice of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a Recombinant AAV Vector for Treatment of Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guo-Jie; Budzynski, Ewa; Sonnentag, Peter; Nork, T Michael; Miller, Paul E; McPherson, Leslie; Ver Hoeve, James N; Smith, Leia M; Arndt, Tara; Mandapati, Savitri; Robinson, Paulette M; Calcedo, Roberto; Knop, David R; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC) is developing rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human CNGB3 gene, for treatment of achromatopsia, an inherited retinal disorder characterized by markedly reduced visual acuity, extreme light sensitivity, and absence of color discrimination. We report here results of a study evaluating safety and biodistribution of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in CNGB3-deficient mice. Three groups of animals (n = 35 males and 35 females per group) received a subretinal injection in one eye of 1 μl containing either vehicle or rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 at one of two dose concentrations (1 × 10(12) or 4.2 × 10(12) vg/ml) and were euthanized 4 or 13 weeks later. There were no test-article-related changes in clinical observations, body weights, food consumption, ocular examinations, clinical pathology parameters, organ weights, or macroscopic observations at necropsy. Cone-mediated electroretinography (ERG) responses were detected after vector administration in the treated eyes in 90% of animals in the higher dose group and 31% of animals in the lower dose group. Rod-mediated ERG responses were reduced in the treated eye for all groups, with the greatest reduction in males given the higher dose of vector, but returned to normal by the end of the study. Microscopic pathology results demonstrated minimal mononuclear cell infiltrates in the retina and vitreous of some animals at the interim euthanasia and in the vitreous of some animals at the terminal euthanasia. Serum anti-AAV antibodies developed in most vector-injected animals. No animals developed antibodies to hCNGB3. Biodistribution studies demonstrated high levels of vector DNA in vector-injected eyes but little or no vector DNA in nonocular tissue. These results support the use of rAAV2tYF-PR1.7-hCNGB3 in clinical studies in patients with achromatopsia caused by CNGB3 mutations. PMID:27003752

  20. High-Efficiency Transduction of Fibroblasts and Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tyrosine-Mutant AAV2 Vectors for Their Potential Use in Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxin; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.; Li, Baozheng; Ling, Chen; Ma, Wenqin; Srivastava, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors transduce fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) inefficiently, which limits their potential widespread applicability in combinatorial gene and cell therapy. We have reported that AAV2 vectors fail to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in murine fibroblasts. We have also reported that site-directed mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine residues on viral capsids leads to improved intracellular trafficking of the mutant vectors, and the transduction efficiency of the single tyrosine-mutant vectors is ∼10-fold higher in human cells. In the current studies, we evaluated the transduction efficiency of single as well as multiple tyrosine-mutant AAV2 vectors in murine fibroblasts. Our results indicate that the Y444F mutant vectors transduce these cells most efficiently among the seven single-mutant vectors, with >30-fold increase in transgene expression compared with the wild-type vectors. When the Y444F mutation is combined with additional mutations (Y500F and Y730F), the transduction efficiency of the triple-mutant vectors is increased by ∼130-fold and the viral intracellular trafficking is also significant improved. Similarly, the triple-mutant vectors are capable of transducing up to 80–90% of bone marrow-derived primary murine as well as human MSCs. Thus, high-efficiency transduction of fibroblasts with reprogramming genes to generate induced pluripotent stem cells, and the MSCs for delivering therapeutic genes, should now be feasible with the tyrosine-mutant AAV vectors. PMID:20507237

  1. Directed Evolution of a Novel Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Vector That Crosses the Seizure-compromised Blood–Brain Barrier (BBB)

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J; Blake, Bonita L; Criswell, Hugh E; Nicolson, Sarah C; Samulski, R Jude; McCown, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    DNA shuffling and directed evolution were employed to develop a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector capable of crossing the seizure-compromised blood–brain barrier (BBB) and transducing cells in the brain. Capsid DNA from AAV serotypes 1–6, 8, and 9 were shuffled and recombined to create a library of chimeric AAVs. One day after kainic acid–induced limbic seizure activity in rats, the virus library was infused intravenously (i.v.), and 3 days later, neuron-rich cells were mechanically dissociated from seizure-sensitive brain sites, collected and viral DNA extracted. After three cycles of selection, green fluorescent protein (GFP)–packaged clones were administered directly into brain or i.v. 1 day after kainic acid–induced seizures. Several clones that were effective after intracranial administration did not transduce brain cells after the i.v. administration. However, two clones (32 and 83) transduced the cells after direct brain infusion and after i.v. administration transduced the cells that were localized to the piriform cortex and ventral hippocampus, areas exhibiting a seizure-compromised BBB. No transduction occurred in areas devoid of BBB compromise. Only one parental serotype (AAV8) exhibited a similar expression profile, but the biodistribution of 32 and 83 diverged dramatically from this parental serotype. Thus, novel AAV vectors have been created that can selectively cross the seizure-compromised BBB and transduce cells. PMID:20040913

  2. Targeted Gene Delivery to the Enteric Nervous System Using AAV: A Comparison Across Serotypes and Capsid Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Benskey, Matthew J; Kuhn, Nathan C; Galligan, James J; Garcia, Joanna; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Mueller, Christian; Boye, Sanford L; Manfredsson, Fredric P

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most widely used gene transfer systems in research and clinical trials. AAV can transduce a wide range of biological tissues, however to date, there has been no investigation on targeted AAV transduction of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Here, we examined the efficiency, tropism, spread, and immunogenicity of AAV transduction in the ENS. Rats received direct injections of various AAV serotypes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the descending colon. AAV serotypes tested included; AAV 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, or 9 and the AAV2 and AAV8 capsid mutants, AAV2-Y444F, AAV2-tripleY-F, AAV2-tripleY-F+T-V, AAV8-Y733F, and AAV8-doubeY-F+T-V. Transduction, as determined by GFP-positive cells, occurred in neurons and enteric glia within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the ENS. AAV6 and AAV9 showed the highest levels of transduction within the ENS. Transduction efficiency scaled with titer and time, was translated to the murine ENS, and produced no vector-related immune response. A single injection of AAV into the colon covered an area of ~47 mm2. AAV9 primarily transduced neurons, while AAV6 transduced enteric glia and neurons. This is the first report on targeted AAV transduction of neurons and glia in the ENS. PMID:25592336

  3. Vitreal delivery of AAV vectored Cnga3 restores cone function in CNGA3−/−/Nrl−/− mice, an all-cone model of CNGA3 achromatopsia†

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Tao, Ye; Deng, Wen-Tao; Zhu, Ping; Li, Jie; Dai, Xufeng; Zhang, Yuxin; Shi, Wei; Liu, Xuan; Chiodo, Vince A.; Ding, Xi-Qin; Zhao, Chen; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Zhang, Zuoming; Qu, Jia; Hauswirth, William W.; Pang, Ji-jing

    2015-01-01

    The CNGA3−/−/Nrl−/− mouse is a cone-dominant model with Cnga3 channel deficiency, which partially mimics the all cone foveal structure of human achromatopsia 2 with CNGA3 mutations. Although subretinal (SR) AAV vector administration can transfect retinal cells efficiently, the injection-induced retinal detachment can cause retinal damage, particularly when SR vector bleb includes the fovea. We therefore explored whether cone function–structure could be rescued in CNGA3−/−/Nrl−/− mice by intravitreal (IVit) delivery of tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant AAV8. We find that AAV-mediated CNGA3 expression can restore cone function and rescue structure following IVit delivery of AAV8 (Y447, 733F) vector. Rescue was assessed by restoration of the cone-mediated electroretinogram (ERG), optomotor responses, and cone opsin immunohistochemistry. Demonstration of gene therapy in a cone-dominant mouse model by IVit delivery provides a potential alternative vector delivery mode for safely transducing foveal cones in achromatopsia patients and in other human retinal diseases affecting foveal function. PMID:25855802

  4. AAV-Mediated Clarin-1 Expression in the Mouse Retina: Implications for USH3A Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M.; Min, Seok-Hong; Boye, Sanford L.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Abrahan, Carolina E.; Zhu, Ping; Li, Qiuhong; Strettoi, Enrica; Novelli, Elena; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay; Hauswirth, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3A) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in clarin-1 (CLRN1) gene, leading to progressive retinal degeneration and sensorineural deafness. Efforts to develop therapies for preventing photoreceptor cell loss are hampered by the lack of a retinal phenotype in the existing USH3 mouse models and by conflicting reports regarding the endogenous retinal localization of clarin-1, a transmembrane protein of unknown function. In this study, we used an AAV-based approach to express CLRN1 in the mouse retina in order to determine the pattern of its subcellular localization in different cell types. We found that all major classes of retinal cells express AAV-delivered CLRN1 driven by the ubiquitous, constitutive small chicken β-actin promoter, which has important implications for the design of future USH3 gene therapy studies. Within photoreceptor cells, AAV-expressed CLRN1 is mainly localized at the inner segment region and outer plexiform layer, similar to the endogenous expression of other usher proteins. Subretinal delivery using a full strength viral titer led to significant loss of retinal function as evidenced by ERG analysis, suggesting that there is a critical limit for CLRN1 expression in photoreceptor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CLRN1 expression is potentially supported by a variety of retinal cells, and the right combination of AAV vector dose, promoter, and delivery method needs to be selected to develop safe therapies for USH3 disorder. PMID:26881841

  5. Advanced Characterization of DNA Molecules in rAAV Vector Preparations by Single-stranded Virus Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Emilie; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martin-Fontaine, Mélanie; Broucque, Frédéric; Robin, Cécile; Hebben, Matthias; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Blouin, Véronique; François, Achille; Redon, Richard; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Recent successful clinical trials with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) have led to a renewed interest in gene therapy. However, despite extensive developments to improve vector-manufacturing processes, undesirable DNA contaminants in rAAV preparations remain a major safety concern. Indeed, the presence of DNA fragments containing antibiotic resistance genes, wild-type AAV, and packaging cell genomes has been found in previous studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses. However, because qPCR only provides a partial view of the DNA molecules in rAAV preparations, we developed a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) to extensively characterize single-stranded DNA virus preparations (SSV-Seq). In order to validate SSV-Seq, we analyzed three rAAV vector preparations produced by transient transfection of mammalian cells. Our data were consistent with qPCR results and showed a quasi-random distribution of contaminants originating from the packaging cells genome. Finally, we found single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) along the vector genome but no evidence of large deletions. Altogether, SSV-Seq could provide a characterization of DNA contaminants and a map of the rAAV genome with unprecedented resolution and exhaustiveness. We expect SSV-Seq to pave the way for a new generation of quality controls, guiding process development toward rAAV preparations of higher potency and with improved safety profiles. PMID:26506038

  6. RH10 provides superior transgene expression in mice when compared with natural AAV serotypes for neonatal gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chuhong; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating diseases diagnosed before or shortly after birth. Early and long-term expression of therapeutic proteins may limit the consequences of genetic mutations and result in a potential ‘cure’. Adeno-associated viral vectors have shown promise in many areas of adult gene therapy but their properties have not been systematically investigated in the neonate. Methods In these studies using a constitutive promoter expressing luciferase, animals were administered one of ten serotypes of AAV on the second day of life. Examination of expression, organ growth and vector distribution, maintenance of expression and copy number were examined. Results All serotypes demonstrated expression and, in general, transduction of all organs within 3 days, albeit with different biodistribution patterns and expression levels. Highest expression was detected with AAVrh10 while lowest was with AAV4. Expression and genomes declined with growth over the first 10 weeks of life; thereafter, to day 100, expression and genomes remained relatively stable. With the highest expressing vectors, whole animal expression at 100 days declined to ~10% of that detected on the fifth day. AAVrh10 maintained the highest expression level and copy number throughout these studies. Conclusion The impact of tissue and organ growth on the stability of AAV expression will be important if neonatal gene transfer is to be considered as a modality for human gene therapy. While all vectors did demonstrate expression, rh10 holds the greater promise of the vectors tested to maintain copy number in both mitotic and post-mitotic tissues. PMID:20821747

  7. Biodistribution of rAAV vectors following intraocular administration: evidence for the presence and persistence of vector DNA in the optic nerve and in the brain.

    PubMed

    Provost, Nathalie; Le Meur, Guylène; Weber, Michel; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Podevin, Guillaume; Cherel, Yan; Colle, Marie-Anne; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the biodistribution of rAAV vectors following subretinal or intravitreal injection. In rats, we performed subretinal or intravitreal injections of rAAV-2/2.CMV.gfp. In large animals, rAAV-2/4.CMV.gfp or rAAV-2/5.CMV.gfp was delivered into the subretinal space while rAAV-2/2.CMV.gfp was delivered either to the subretinal space or to the vitreous. In euthanized animals, we undertook a complete necropsy. In animals maintained alive, we collected blood and tissue samples from the submandibular lymph node, liver, and gonads. We analyzed total DNA, extracted from various tissue samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), by PCR. Following subretinal or intravitreal injections in rats and in large animals, vector sequences were not detected in the liver or in the gonads but were occasionally found in PBMC. An unexpected result was the detection of rAAV sequences in the optic nerve following subretinal injection. The most striking finding was the detection of vector sequences in the brain, along the visual pathway, in rAAV-2/2 intravitreally injected dogs. These findings raise safety concerns regarding intraocular administration of rAAV vectors and will have an impact on the development of future gene therapy trials for retinal diseases. PMID:15668139

  8. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N. P.; Riedmayr, Lisa M.; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S.; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  9. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments.

    PubMed

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N P; Riedmayr, Lisa M; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  10. Immune Responses to rAAV6: The Influence of Canine Parvovirus Vaccination and Neonatal Administration of Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Andrea L. H.; Garikipati, Dilip; Wang, Zejing; Tapscott, Stephen; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors promote long-term gene transfer in many animal species. Significant effort has focused on the evaluation of rAAV delivery and the immune response in both murine and canine models of neuromuscular disease. However, canines provided for research purposes are routinely vaccinated against canine parvovirus (CPV). rAAV and CPV possess significant homology and are both parvoviruses. Thus, any immune response generated to CPV vaccination has the potential to cross-react with rAAV vectors. In this study, we investigated the immune response to rAAV6 delivery in a cohort of CPV-vaccinated canines and evaluated multiple vaccination regimens in a mouse model of CPV-vaccination. We show that CPV-vaccination stimulates production of neutralizing antibodies with minimal cross-reactivity to rAAV6. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the magnitude of the rAAV6-directed immune response between CPV-vaccinated animals and controls. Moreover, CPV-vaccination did not inhibit rAAV6-mediated transduction. We also evaluated the immune response to early rAAV6-vaccination in neonatal mice. The influence of maternal hormones and cytokines leads to a relatively permissive state in the neonate. We hypothesized that immaturity of the immune system would permit induction of tolerance to rAAV6 when delivered during the neonatal period. Mice were vaccinated with rAAV6 at 1 or 5 days of age, and subsequently challenged with rAAV6 exposure during adulthood via two sequential IM injections, 1 month apart. All vaccinated animals generated a significant neutralizing antibody response to rAAV6-vaccination that was enhanced following IM injection in adulthood. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immune response raised against rAAV6 is distinct from that which is elicited by the standard parvoviral vaccines and is sufficient to prevent stable tolerization in neonatal mice. PMID:22065964

  11. A GLP-Compliant Toxicology and Biodistribution Study: Systemic Delivery of an rAAV9 Vector for the Treatment of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Aaron S; Duncan, F Jason; Camboni, Marybeth; Waligura, Kathryn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Naughton, Bartholomew J; Bremer, William G; Shilling, Christopher; Walker, Christopher M; Bolon, Brad; Flanigan, Kevin M; McBride, Kim L; McCarty, Douglas M; Fu, Haiyan

    2015-12-01

    No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease due to defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In preparation for a clinical trial, we performed an IND-enabling GLP-toxicology study to assess systemic rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU gene delivery in WT C57BL/6 mice at 1 × 10(14) vg/kg and 2 × 10(14) vg/kg (n = 30/group, M:F = 1:1), and non-GLP testing in MPS IIIB mice at 2 × 10(14) vg/kg. Importantly, no adverse clinical signs or chronic toxicity were observed through the 6 month study duration. The rAAV9-mediated rNAGLU expression was rapid and persistent in virtually all tested CNS and somatic tissues. However, acute liver toxicity occurred in 33% (5/15) WT males in the 2 × 10(14) vg/kg cohort, which was dose-dependent, sex-associated, and genotype-specific, likely due to hepatic rNAGLU overexpression. Interestingly, a significant dose response was observed only in the brain and spinal cord, whereas in the liver at 24 weeks postinfection (pi), NAGLU activity was reduced to endogenous levels in the high dose cohort but remained at supranormal levels in the low dose group. The possibility of rAAV9 germline transmission appears to be minimal. The vector delivery resulted in transient T-cell responses and characteristic acute antibody responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in all rAAV9-treated animals, with no detectable impacts on tissue transgene expression. This study demonstrates a generally safe and effective profile, and may have identified the upper dosing limit of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU via systemic delivery for the treatment of MPS IIIB. PMID:26684447

  12. Targeted gene transfer into ependymal cells through intraventricular injection of AAV1 vector and long-term enzyme replacement via the CSF.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Miyake, Koichi; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been shown to ameliorate neurological symptoms in model animals with neuropathic metabolic disorders. Gene therapy via the CSF offers a means to achieve a long-term sustainable supply of therapeutic proteins within the central nervous system (CNS) by setting up a continuous source of transgenic products. In the present study, a serotype 1 adeno-associated virus (AAV1) vector was injected into a lateral cerebral ventricle in adult mice to transduce the gene encoding human lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A (hASA) into the cells of the CNS. Widespread transduction and stable expression of hASA in the choroid plexus and ependymal cells was observed throughout the ventricles for more than 1 year after vector injection. Although humoral immunity to hASA developed after 6 weeks, which diminished the hASA levels detected in CSF from AAV1-injected mice, hASA levels in CSF were maintained for at least 12 weeks when the mice were tolerized to hASA prior of vector injection. Our results suggest that the cells lining the ventricles could potentially serve as a biological reservoir for long-term continuous secretion of lysosomal enzymes into the CSF following intracerebroventricular injection of an AAV1 vector. PMID:24981028

  13. Preclinical Dose-Finding Study With a Liver-Tropic, Recombinant AAV-2/8 Vector in the Mouse Model of Galactosialidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huimin; Gomero, Elida; Bonten, Erik; Gray, John T; Allay, Jim; Wu, Yanan; Wu, Jianrong; Calabrese, Christopher; Nienhuis, Arthur; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Galactosialidosis (GS) is a lysosomal storage disease linked to deficiency of the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). Similarly to GS patients, Ppca-null mice develop a systemic disease of the reticuloendothelial system, affecting most visceral organs and the nervous system. Symptoms include severe nephropathy, visceromegaly, infertility, progressive ataxia, and shortened life span. Here, we have conducted a preclinical, dose-finding study on a large cohort of GS mice injected intravenously at 1 month of age with increasing doses of a GMP-grade rAAV2/8 vector, expressing PPCA under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Treated mice, monitored for 16 weeks post-treatment, had normal physical appearance and behavior without discernable side effects. Despite the restricted expression of the transgene in the liver, immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of other systemic organs, serum, and urine showed a dose-dependent, widespread correction of the disease phenotype, suggestive of a protein-mediated mechanism of cross-correction. A notable finding was that rAAV-treated GS mice showed high expression of PPCA in the reproductive organs, which resulted in reversal of their infertility. Together these results support the use of this rAAV-PPCA vector as a viable and safe method of gene delivery for the treatment of systemic disease in non-neuropathic GS patients. PMID:22008912

  14. The Skeletal Muscle Environment and Its Role in Immunity and Tolerance to AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Boisgérault, Florence; Mingozzi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of gene therapy, muscle has been one the most studied tissue targets for the correction of enzyme deficiencies and myopathies. Several preclinical and clinical studies have been conducted using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Exciting progress has been made in the gene delivery technologies, from the identification of novel AAV serotypes to the development of novel vector delivery techniques. In parallel, significant knowledge has been generated on the host immune system and its interaction with both the vector and the transgene at the muscle level. In particular, the role of underlying muscle inflammation, characteristic of several diseases affecting the muscle, has been defined in terms of its potential detrimental impact on gene transfer with AAV vectors. At the same time, feedback immunomodulatory mechanisms peculiar of skeletal muscle involving resident regulatory T cells have been identified, which seem to play an important role in maintaining, at least to some extent, muscle homeostasis during inflammation and regenerative processes. Devising strategies to tip this balance towards unresponsiveness may represent an avenue to improve the safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer with AAV vectors. PMID:26122097

  15. Biodistribution of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector after intrathecal and intravenous delivery in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Daniel J.; Dykstra, Jaclyn A.; Riedl, Maureen S.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Belur, Lalitha R.; McIvor, R. Scott; Elde, Robert P.; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Vulchanova, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-mediated gene transfer has been reported in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. The current study compared the pattern of expression of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) across the mouse CNS and selected peripheral tissues after intrathecal (i.t.) or intravenous (i.v.) delivery of equivalent doses of single-stranded AAV9 vector. After i.t. delivery, GFP immunoreactivity (-ir) was observed in spinal neurons, primary afferent fibers and corresponding primary sensory neurons at all spinal levels. Robust transduction was seen in small and large dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as well as trigeminal and vagal primary afferent neurons. Transduction efficiency in sensory ganglia was substantially lower in i.v. treated mice. In brain, i.v. delivery yielded GFP-immunoreactivity (-ir) primarily in spinal trigeminal tract, pituitary, and scattered isolated neurons and astrocytes. In contrast, after i.t. delivery, GFP-ir was widespread throughout CNS, with greater intensity and more abundant neuropil-like staining at 6 weeks compared to 3 weeks. Brain regions with prominent GFP-ir included cranial nerve nuclei, ventral pons, cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, pituitary, choroid plexus, and selected nuclei of midbrain, thalamus and hypothalamus. In cortex, GFP-ir was associated with blood vessels, and was seen in both neurons and astrocytes. In the periphery, GFP-ir in colon and ileum was present in the enteric nervous system in both i.v. and i.t. treated mice. Liver and adrenal cortex, but not adrenal medulla, also showed abundant GFP-ir after both routes of delivery. In summary, i.t. delivery yielded higher transduction efficiency in sensory neurons and the CNS. The observation of comparable gene transfer to peripheral tissues using the two routes indicates that a component of i.t. delivered vector is redistributed from the subarachnoid space to the systemic circulation. PMID:24959122

  16. Biodistribution of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector after intrathecal and intravenous delivery in mouse.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniel J; Dykstra, Jaclyn A; Riedl, Maureen S; Kitto, Kelley F; Belur, Lalitha R; McIvor, R Scott; Elde, Robert P; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Vulchanova, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-mediated gene transfer has been reported in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. The current study compared the pattern of expression of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) across the mouse CNS and selected peripheral tissues after intrathecal (i.t.) or intravenous (i.v.) delivery of equivalent doses of single-stranded AAV9 vector. After i.t. delivery, GFP immunoreactivity (-ir) was observed in spinal neurons, primary afferent fibers and corresponding primary sensory neurons at all spinal levels. Robust transduction was seen in small and large dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as well as trigeminal and vagal primary afferent neurons. Transduction efficiency in sensory ganglia was substantially lower in i.v. treated mice. In brain, i.v. delivery yielded GFP-immunoreactivity (-ir) primarily in spinal trigeminal tract, pituitary, and scattered isolated neurons and astrocytes. In contrast, after i.t. delivery, GFP-ir was widespread throughout CNS, with greater intensity and more abundant neuropil-like staining at 6 weeks compared to 3 weeks. Brain regions with prominent GFP-ir included cranial nerve nuclei, ventral pons, cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, pituitary, choroid plexus, and selected nuclei of midbrain, thalamus and hypothalamus. In cortex, GFP-ir was associated with blood vessels, and was seen in both neurons and astrocytes. In the periphery, GFP-ir in colon and ileum was present in the enteric nervous system in both i.v. and i.t. treated mice. Liver and adrenal cortex, but not adrenal medulla, also showed abundant GFP-ir after both routes of delivery. In summary, i.t. delivery yielded higher transduction efficiency in sensory neurons and the CNS. The observation of comparable gene transfer to peripheral tissues using the two routes indicates that a component of i.t. delivered vector is redistributed from the subarachnoid space to the systemic circulation. PMID:24959122

  17. AAV-8 Is More Efficient than AAV-9 in Transducing Neonatal Dog Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiufang; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Hakim, Chady H.; Kodippili, Kasun; McDonald, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated virus serotype-8 and 9 (AAV-8 and 9) are the leading candidate vectors to test bodywide neonatal muscle gene therapy in large mammals. We have previously shown that systemic injection of 2–2.5×1014 viral genome (vg) particles/kg of AAV-9 resulted in widespread skeletal muscle gene transfer in newborn dogs. However, nominal transduction was observed in the heart. In contrast, robust expression was achieved in both skeletal muscle and heart in neonatal dogs with 7.14–9.06×1014 vg particles/kg of AAV-8. To determine whether superior cardiac transduction of AAV-8 is because of the higher vector dose, we delivered 6.14×1014 and 9.65×1014 vg particles/kg of AAV-9 to newborn puppies via the jugular vein. Transduction was examined 2.5 months later. Consistent with our previous reports, we observed robust bodywide transduction in skeletal muscle. However, increased AAV dose only moderately improved heart transduction. It never reached the level achieved by AAV-8. Our results suggest that differential cardiac transduction by AAV-8 and AAV-9 is likely because of the intrinsic property of the viral capsid rather than the vector dose. PMID:25763686

  18. A Preclinical Animal Model to Assess the Effect of Pre-existing Immunity on AAV-mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Lin, Shih-Wen; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Li, Yan; Zhou, Dongming; Xiang, Zhi Quan; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund CJ

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic adeno-associated virus (AAV)-serotype 2–mediated gene transfer results in sustained transgene expression in experimental animals but not in human subjects. We hypothesized that loss of transgene expression in humans might be caused by immune memory mechanisms that become reactivated upon AAV vector transfer. Here, we tested the effect of immunological memory to AAV capsid on AAV-mediated gene transfer in a mouse model. Upon hepatic transfer of an AAV2 vector expressing human factor IX (hF.IX), mice immunized with adenovirus (Ad) vectors expressing AAV8 capsid before AAV2 transfer developed less circulating hF.IX and showed a gradual loss of hF.IX gene copies in liver cells as compared to control animals. This was not observed in mice immunized with an Ad vectors expressing AAV2 capsid before transfer of rAAV8-hF.IX vectors. The lower hF.IX expression was primarily linked to AAV-binding antibodies that lacked AAV-neutralizing activity in vitro rather than to AAV capsid–specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:19367258

  19. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content. Images PMID:7524085

  20. Engineering the AAVS1 locus for consistent and scalable transgene expression in human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Kim, Shin-Il; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Tan, Ghee Wan; Xiang, Long; Hatani, Takeshi; Kondo, Takayuki; Ikeya, Makoto; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Inoue, Haruhisa; Woltjen, Knut

    2016-05-15

    The potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in personalized regenerative medicine applications may be augmented by transgenics, including the expression of constitutive cell labels, differentiation reporters, or modulators of disease phenotypes. Thus, there is precedence for reproducible transgene expression amongst iPSC sub-clones with isogenic or diverse genetic backgrounds. Using virus or transposon vectors, transgene integration sites and copy numbers are difficult to control, and nearly impossible to reproduce across multiple cell lines. Moreover, randomly integrated transgenes are often subject to pleiotropic position effects as a consequence of epigenetic changes inherent in differentiation, undermining applications in iPSCs. To address this, we have adapted popular TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease technologies in order to introduce transgenes into pre-defined loci and overcome random position effects. AAVS1 is an exemplary locus within the PPP1R12C gene that permits robust expression of CAG promoter-driven transgenes. Gene targeting controls transgene copy number such that reporter expression patterns are reproducible and scalable by ∼2-fold. Furthermore, gene expression is maintained during long-term human iPSC culture and in vitro differentiation along multiple lineages. Here, we outline our AAVS1 targeting protocol using standardized donor vectors and construction methods, as well as provide practical considerations for iPSC culture, drug selection, and genotyping. PMID:26707206

  1. Assessment of toxicity and biodistribution of recombinant AAV8 vector-mediated immunomodulatory gene therapy in mice with Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gensheng; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; Hutt, Julie; Li, Songtao; Benson, Janet; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2014-01-01

    A preclinical safety study was conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term toxicity of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) vector that has been developed as an immune-modulatory adjunctive therapy to recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA, Myozyme) enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) for patients with Pompe disease (AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA). The AAV2/8-LSPhGAApA vector at 1.6 × 10(13) vector particles/kg, after intravenous injection, did not cause significant short- or long-term toxicity. Recruitment of CD4(+) (but not CD8(+)) lymphocytes to the liver was elevated in the vector-dosed male animals at study day (SD) 15, and in group 8 animals at SD 113, in comparison to their respective control animals. Administration of the vector, either prior to or after the one ERT injection, uniformly prevented the hypersensitivity induced by subsequent ERT in males, but not always in female animals. The vector genome was sustained in all tissues through 16-week postdosing, except for in blood with a similar tissue tropism between males and females. Administration of the vector alone, or combined with the ERT, was effective in producing significantly increased GAA activity and consequently decreased glycogen accumulation in multiple tissues, and the urine biomarker, Glc4, was significantly reduced. The efficacy of the vector (or with ERT) was better in males than in females, as demonstrated both by the number of tissues showing significantly effective responses and the extent of response in a given tissue. Given the lack of toxicity for AAV2/8LSPhGAApA, further consideration of clinical translation is warranted in Pompe disease. PMID:26015962

  2. Enhanced efficacy of an AAV vector encoding chimeric, highly secreted acid alpha-glucosidase in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Benjamin, Daniel K; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2006-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) is an inherited muscular dystrophy caused by deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). We hypothesized that chimeric GAA containing an alternative signal peptide could increase the secretion of GAA from transduced cells and enhance the receptor-mediated uptake of GAA in striated muscle. The relative secretion of chimeric GAA from transfected 293 cells increased up to 26-fold. Receptor-mediated uptake of secreted, chimeric GAA corrected cultured GSD-II patient cells. High-level hGAA was sustained in the plasma of GSD-II mice for 24 weeks following administration of an AAV2/8 vector encoding chimeric GAA; furthermore, GAA activity was increased and glycogen content was significantly reduced in striated muscle and in the brain. Administration of only 1 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity in the heart and diaphragm for >18 weeks, whereas 3 x 10(10) vector particles increased GAA activity and reduced glycogen content in the heart, diaphragm, and quadriceps. Furthermore, an AAV2/2 vector encoding chimeric GAA produced secreted hGAA for >12 weeks in the majority of treated GSD-II mice. Thus, chimeric, highly secreted GAA enhanced the efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16987711

  3. Cell-Type Specific Oxytocin Gene Expression from AAV Delivered Promoter Deletion Constructs into the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Makoto; Gainer, Harold

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamus selectively express either oxytocin (OXT) or vasopressin (AVP) neuropeptide genes, a property that defines their phenotypes. Here we examine the molecular basis of this selectivity in the OXT MCNs by stereotaxic microinjections of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors that contain various OXT gene promoter deletion constructs using EGFP as the reporter into the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON). Two weeks following injection of the AAVs, immunohistochemical assays of EGFP expression from these constructs were done to determine whether the EGFP reporter co-localizes with either the OXT- or AVP-immunoreactivity in the MCNs. The results show that the key elements in the OT gene promoter that regulate the cell-type specific expression the SON are located −216 to −100 bp upstream of the transcription start site. We hypothesize that within this 116 bp domain a repressor exists that inhibits expression specifically in AVP MCNs, thereby leading to the cell-type specific expression of the OXT gene only in the OXT MCNs. PMID:22363799

  4. Comparative Analysis of DNA Nanoparticles and AAVs for Ocular Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zongchao; Conley, Shannon M.; Makkia, Rasha; Guo, Junjing; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is a critical tool for the treatment of monogenic retinal diseases. However, the limited vector capacity of the current benchmark delivery strategy, adeno-associated virus (AAV), makes development of larger capacity alternatives, such as compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), critical. Here we conduct a side-by-side comparison of self-complementary AAV and CK30PEG NPs using matched ITR plasmids. We report that although AAVs are more efficient per vector genome (vg) than NPs, NPs can drive gene expression on a comparable scale and longevity to AAV. We show that subretinally injected NPs do not leave the eye while some of the AAV-injected animals exhibited vector DNA and GFP expression in the visual pathways of the brain from PI-60 onward. As a result, these NPs have the potential to become a successful alternative for ocular gene therapy, especially for the multitude of genes too large for AAV vectors. PMID:23272225

  5. Comparative analysis of DNA nanoparticles and AAVs for ocular gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Han, Zongchao; Conley, Shannon M; Makkia, Rasha; Guo, Junjing; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is a critical tool for the treatment of monogenic retinal diseases. However, the limited vector capacity of the current benchmark delivery strategy, adeno-associated virus (AAV), makes development of larger capacity alternatives, such as compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), critical. Here we conduct a side-by-side comparison of self-complementary AAV and CK30PEG NPs using matched ITR plasmids. We report that although AAVs are more efficient per vector genome (vg) than NPs, NPs can drive gene expression on a comparable scale and longevity to AAV. We show that subretinally injected NPs do not leave the eye while some of the AAV-injected animals exhibited vector DNA and GFP expression in the visual pathways of the brain from PI-60 onward. As a result, these NPs have the potential to become a successful alternative for ocular gene therapy, especially for the multitude of genes too large for AAV vectors. PMID:23272225

  6. Transduction of rat pancreatic islets with pseudotyped adeno-associated virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Anthony T; Gavrilova, Oksana; Dwyer, Nancy K; Jou, William; Pack, Stephanie; Liu, Eric; Pechhold, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael; McAlister, Victor J; Chiorini, John A; Blanchette-Mackie, E Joan; Harlan, David M; Owens, Roland A

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising treatment for type I diabetes mellitus, but current immunosuppressive strategies do not consistently provide long-term survival of transplanted islets. We are therefore investigating the use of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) as gene therapy vectors to transduce rat islets with immunosuppressive genes prior to transplantation into diabetic mice. Results We compared the transduction efficiency of AAV2 vectors with an AAV2 capsid (AAV2/2) to AAV2 vectors pseudotyped with AAV5 (AAV2/5), AAV8 (AAV2/8) or bovine adeno-associated virus (BAAV) capsids, or an AAV2 capsid with an insertion of the low density lipoprotein receptor ligand from apolipoprotein E (AAV2apoE), on cultured islets, in the presence of helper adenovirus infection to speed expression of a GFP transgene. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry were used. The AAV2/5 vector was superior to AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in rat islets. Flow cytometry indicated AAV2/5-mediated gene expression in approximately 9% of rat islet cells and almost 12% of insulin-positive cells. The AAV2/8 vector had a higher dependence on the helper virus multiplicity of infection than the AAV 2/5 vector. In addition, the BAAV and AAV2apoE vectors were superior to AAV2/2 for transducing rat islets. Rat islets (300 per mouse) transduced with an AAV2/5 vector harboring the immunosuppressive transgene, tgfβ1, retain the ability to correct hyperglycemia when transplanted into immune-deficient diabetic mice. Conclusion AAV2/5 vectors may therefore be useful for pre-treating donor islets prior to transplantation. PMID:19450275

  7. Functions of AAV-CMV-F.IX And AAV-EF1alpha-F.IX in gene therapy for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2007-02-01

    There has been substantial progress in using gene therapy to treat animals with hemophilia. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer of coagulation factor IX to skeletal muscle and liver of murine and canine models of hemophilia has resulted in sustained systemic expression and, in several studies, in complete cure of the bleeding disorder. Two AAV vectors widely used at present are AAV-CMV-F.IX and AAV-EF1alpha-F.IX. This work compares the predicted molecular functions of AAV-CMV-F.IX and AAV-EF1alpha -F.IX by sequence docking and gene ontology. It is shown that both AAV-CMV-F.IX and AAV-EF1alpha -F.IX induce coagulation factor IXa activity; however, AAV-CMV-F.IX administration also yields coagulation factor XIa activity and AAV-EF1alpha -F.IX treatment results in coagulation factor Xa activity. Therefore, AAV-CMV-F.IX might be useful for factor XI deficiency. AAV-CMV-F.IX has several additional molecular functions and processes compared with AAV-CMV-F.IX. PMID:17266422

  8. Effective genetic modification and differentiation of hMSCs upon controlled release of rAAV vectors using alginate/poloxamer composite systems.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, P; Rey-Rico, A; Madry, H; Landin, M; Cucchiarini, M

    2015-12-30

    Viral vectors are common tools in gene therapy to deliver foreign therapeutic sequences in a specific target population via their natural cellular entry mechanisms. Incorporating such vectors in implantable systems may provide strong alternatives to conventional gene transfer procedures. The goal of the present study was to generate different hydrogel structures based on alginate (AlgPH155) and poloxamer PF127 as new systems to encapsulate and release recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors. Inclusion of rAAV in such polymeric capsules revealed an influence of the hydrogel composition and crosslinking temperature upon the vector release profiles, with alginate (AlgPH155) structures showing the fastest release profiles early on while over time vector release was more effective from AlgPH155+PF127 [H] capsules crosslinked at a high temperature (50°C). Systems prepared at room temperature (AlgPH155+PF127 [C]) allowed instead to achieve a more controlled release profile. When tested for their ability to target human mesenchymal stem cells, the different systems led to high transduction efficiencies over time and to gene expression levels in the range of those achieved upon direct vector application, especially when using AlgPH155+PF127 [H]. No detrimental effects were reported on either cell viability or on the potential for chondrogenic differentiation. Inclusion of PF127 in the capsules was also capable of delaying undesirable hypertrophic cell differentiation. These findings are of promising value for the further development of viral vector controlled release strategies. PMID:26556623

  9. AAV8-mediated expression of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase attenuates bone loss in a mouse model of mucolipidosis II.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ah-Ra; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Cho, Sung Yoon; Park, Sung Won; Przybylska, Malgorzata; Yew, Nelson S; Cheng, Seng H; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kwak, Min Jung; Kim, Su Jin; Sohn, Young Bae

    2016-04-01

    Mucolipidoses II and III (ML II and ML III) are lysosomal disorders in which the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker is absent from lysosomal hydrolases and other glycoproteins due to mutations in GNPTAB, which encodes two of three subunits of the heterohexameric enzyme, N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. Both disorders are caused by the same gene, but ML II represents the more severe phenotype. Bone manifestations of ML II include hip dysplasia, scoliosis, rickets and osteogenesis imperfecta. In this study, we sought to determine whether a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (AAV2/8-GNPTAB) could confer high and prolonged gene expression of GNPTAB and thereby influence the pathology in the cartilage and bone tissue of a GNPTAB knock out (KO) mouse model. The results demonstrated significant increases in bone mineral density and content in AAV2/8-GNPTAB-treated as compared to non-treated KO mice. We also showed that IL-6 (interleukin-6) expression in articular cartilage was reduced in AAV2/8-GNPTAB treated ML II mice. Together, these data suggest that AAV-mediated expression of GNPTAB in ML II mice can attenuate bone loss via inhibition of IL-6 production. This study emphasizes the value of the MLII KO mouse to recapitulate the clinical manifestations of the disease and highlights its amenability to therapy. PMID:26857995

  10. AAV-mediated gene transfer to the mouse CNS

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Lorelei; Ahmed, Seemin S.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno associated virus (rAAV) vectors are great tools for gene transfer due to their ability to mediate long-term gene expression. Recombinant AAVs have been used at various ages of development with no apparent toxicity. There are multiple ways of delivering AAV vectors to the CNS, depending on the stage of development of the mouse. In neonates, intravascular injections into the facial vein are often used. In adults, direct injections into target regions of the brain are achieved with great spatiotemporal control through stereotaxic surgeries. Recently, discoveries of new AAV vectors with the ability to cross the blood brain barrier have made it possible to also target the adult CNS by intravascular injections. rAAVs have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles in multiple animal models of CNS disorders, and several clinical trials are currently underway. PMID:23686825

  11. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  12. A human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, as a eucaryotic vector: Transient expression and encapsidation of the procaryotic gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Tratschin, J.D.; West, M.H.P.; Sandbank, T.; Carter, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors have used the defective human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a novel eurocaryotic vector (parvector) for the expression of a foreign gene in human cells. The recombinant, pAV2, contains the AAV genome in a pBR322-derived bacterial plasmid. When pAV2 is transfected into human cells together with helper adenovirus particles, the AAV genome is rescued from the recombinant plasmid and replicated to produce infectious AAV particles at high efficiency. To create a vector, we inserted a procaryotic sequence coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) into derivatives of pAV2 following either of the AAV promoters p/sub 40/ (pAVHiCAT) and p/sub 19/ (pAVBcCAT). When transfected into human 293 cells or HeLa cells, pAVHiCAT expressed CAT activity in the absence of adenovirus. In the presence of adenovirus, this vector produced increased amounts of CAT activity and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was replicated. In 293 cells, pAVBcCAT expressed a similar amount of CAT activity in the absence or presence of adenovirus and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was not replicated. In HeLa cells, pAVBcCAT expressed low levels of CAT activity, but this level was elevated by coinfection with adenovirus particles or by cotransfection with a plasmid which expressed the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) product. The E1A product is a transcriptional activator and is expressed in 293 cells. Thus, expression from two AAV promoters is differentially regulated: expression from p/sub 19/ is increased by E1A, whereas p/sub 40/ yields high levels of constitutive expression in the absence of E1A. Both AAV vectors were packaged into AAV particles by complementation with wild-type AAV and yielded CAT activity when subsequently infected into cells in the presence of adenovirus.

  13. Immunosuppression Decreases Inflammation and Increases AAV6-hSERCA2a-Mediated SERCA2a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaodong; McTiernan, Charles F.; Rajagopalan, Navin; Shah, Hemal; Fischer, David; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Letts, Dustin; Bortinger, Jonathan; Gibson, Gregory; Xiang, Wenyu; McCurry, Kenneth; Mathier, Michael; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The calcium pump SERCA2a (sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a), which plays a central role in cardiac contraction, shows decreased expression in heart failure (HF). Increasing SERCA2a expression in HF models improves cardiac function. We used direct cardiac delivery of adeno-associated virus encoding human SERCA2a (AAV6-hSERCA2a) in HF and normal canine models to study safety, efficacy, and the effects of immunosuppression. Tachycardic-paced dogs received left ventricle (LV) wall injection of AAV6-hSERCA2a or solvent. Pacing continued postinjection for 2 or 6 weeks, until euthanasia. Tissue/serum samples were analyzed for hSERCA2a expression (Western blot) and immune responses (histology and AAV6-neutralizing antibodies). Nonpaced dogs received AAV6-hSERCA2a and were analyzed at 12 weeks; a parallel cohort received AAV-hSERCA2a and immunosuppression. AAV-mediated cardiac expression of hSERCA2a peaked at 2 weeks and then declined (to ∼50%; p<0.03, 6 vs. 2 weeks). LV end diastolic and end systolic diameters decreased in 6-week dogs treated with AAV6-hSERCA2a (p<0.05) whereas LV diameters increased in control dogs. Dogs receiving AAV6-hSERCA2a developed neutralizing antibodies (titer ≥1:120) and cardiac cellular infiltration. Immunosuppression dramatically reduced immune responses (reduced inflammation and neutralizing antibody titers <1:20), and maintained hSERCA2a expression. Thus cardiac injection of AAV6-hSERCA2a promotes local hSERCA2a expression and improves cardiac function. However, the hSERCA2a protein level is reduced by host immune responses. Immunosuppression alleviates immune responses and sustains transgene expression, and may be an important adjuvant for clinical gene therapy trials. PMID:22482463

  14. AAV2/8 Vectors Purified from Culture Medium with a Simple and Rapid Protocol Transduce Murine Liver, Muscle, and Retina Efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Monica; Ferrara, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Abstract During the production of some adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, a large amount of vectors is found in the medium of producing cells. For their purification, previous protocols used tangential flow filtration (TFF) of the medium followed by iodixanol gradient centrifugation. Taking advantage of the higher purity of the medium than the cell-derived material as the source of AAV, we tested a simple method that combines production of large culture medium volumes containing AAV from cell stacks with medium clarification+TFF without further time-consuming and nonscalable centrifugation. To test this, we selected AAV2/8, which is emerging as a favored serotype for transduction of liver, muscle, and retina and abundantly found in the extracellular medium. We show that yields and in vitro infectivity of AAV2/8 vectors produced from the culture medium using this method are higher than those of vectors purified from the same cell lysate using a conventional CsCl2 gradient ultracentrifugation-based method, although purity appears inferior. In addition, we found that the transduction efficiency of AAV2/8 purified from medium was similar to that of AAV2/8 purified from the same cell lysate in the murine liver, muscle, and retina. Considering that the purification protocol from the medium we describe requires 3 hr as opposed to the 63 hr of a conventional two-round CsCl2-gradient ultracentrifugation+desalting, we conclude that TFF of the medium containing AAV2/8 represents a quick and scalable method to purify research-grade vectors for use in animal models. PMID:24116943

  15. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Mediated Transgene Expression Is Independent of DNA Methylation in Primate Liver and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Adrien; Le Guiner, Caroline; Nickerson, Michael L.; McGee Im, Kate; Ferry, Nicolas; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O.; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors can support long-term transgene expression in quiescent tissues. Intramuscular (IM) administration of a single-stranded AAV vector (ssAAV) in the nonhuman primate (NHP) results in a peak protein level at 2–3 months, followed by a decrease over several months before reaching a steady-state. To investigate transgene expression and vector genome persistence, we previously demonstrated that rAAV vector genomes associate with histones and form a chromatin structure in NHP skeletal muscle more than one year after injection. In the mammalian nucleus, chromatin remodeling via epigenetic modifications plays key role in transcriptional regulation. Among those, CpG hyper-methylation of promoters is a known hallmark of gene silencing. To assess the involvement of DNA methylation on the transgene expression, we injected NHP via the IM or the intravenous (IV) route with a recombinant ssAAV2/1 vector. The expression cassette contains the transgene under the transcriptional control of the constitutive Rous Sarcoma Virus promoter (RSVp). Total DNA isolated from NHP muscle and liver biopsies from 1 to 37 months post-injection was treated with sodium bisulfite and subsequently analyzed by pyrosequencing. No significant CpG methylation of the RSVp was found in rAAV virions or in vector DNA isolated from NHP transduced tissues. Direct de novo DNA methylation appears not to be involved in repressing transgene expression in NHP after gene transfer mediated by ssAAV vectors. The study presented here examines host/vector interactions and the impact on transgene expression in a clinically relevant model. PMID:21687632

  16. Humoral Immune Response to AAV

    PubMed Central

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a member of the family Parvoviridae that has been widely used as a vector for gene therapy because of its safety profile, its ability to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells, and its low immunogenicity. AAV has been detected in many different tissues of several animal species but has not been associated with any disease. As a result of natural infections, antibodies to AAV can be found in many animals including humans. It has been shown that pre-existing AAV antibodies can modulate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy by blocking vector transduction or by redirecting distribution of AAV vectors to tissues other than the target organ. This review will summarize antibody responses against natural AAV infections, as well as AAV gene therapy vectors and their impact in the clinical development of AAV vectors for gene therapy. We will also review and discuss the various methods used for AAV antibody detection and strategies to overcome neutralizing antibodies in AAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24151496

  17. Vitrectomy Before Intravitreal Injection of AAV2/2 Vector Promotes Efficient Transduction of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Dogs and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Ameline, Baptiste; Weber, Michel; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Nedellec, Steven; Biget, Marine; Provost, Nathalie; Libeau, Lyse; Blouin, Véronique; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Pichard, Virginie; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising vector for retinal gene delivery to restore visual function in certain forms of inherited retinal dystrophies. Several studies in rodent models have shown that intravitreal injection of the AAV2/2 vector is the optimal route for efficient retinal ganglion cell (RGC) transduction. However, translation of these findings to larger species, including humans, is complicated by anatomical differences in the eye, a key difference being the comparatively smaller volume of the vitreous chamber in rodents. Here, we address the role of the vitreous body as a potential barrier to AAV2/2 diffusion and transduction in the RGCs of dogs and macaques, two of the most relevant preclinical models. We intravitreally administered the AAV2/2 vector carrying the CMV-eGFP reporter cassette in dog and macaque eyes, either directly into the vitreous chamber or after complete vitrectomy, a surgical procedure that removes the vitreous body. Our findings suggest that the vitreous body appears to trap the injected vector, thus impairing the diffusion and transduction of AAV2/2 to inner retinal neurons. We show that vitrectomy before intravitreal vector injection is an effective means of overcoming this physical barrier, improving the transduction of RGCs in dog and macaque retinas. These findings support the use of vitrectomy in clinical trials of intravitreal gene transfer techniques targeting inner retinal neurons. PMID:27229628

  18. Intravitreal delivery of a novel AAV vector targets ON bipolar cells and restores visual function in a mouse model of complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Scalabrino, Miranda L; Boye, Sanford L; Fransen, Kathryn M H; Noel, Jennifer M; Dyka, Frank M; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; De Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Gregg, Ronald G; McCall, Maureen A; Peachey, Neal S; Boye, Shannon E

    2015-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) effectively targets therapeutic genes to photoreceptors, pigment epithelia, Müller glia and ganglion cells of the retina. To date, no one has shown the ability to correct, with gene replacement, an inherent defect in bipolar cells (BCs), the excitatory interneurons of the retina. Targeting BCs with gene replacement has been difficult primarily due to the relative inaccessibility of BCs to standard AAV vectors. This approach would be useful for restoration of vision in patients with complete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1), where signaling through the ON BCs is eliminated due to mutations in their G-protein-coupled cascade genes. For example, the majority of CSNB1 patients carry a mutation in nyctalopin (NYX), which encodes a protein essential for proper localization of the TRPM1 cation channel required for ON BC light-evoked depolarization. As a group, CSNB1 patients have a normal electroretinogram (ERG) a-wave, indicative of photoreceptor function, but lack a b-wave due to defects in ON BC signaling. Despite retinal dysfunction, the retinas of CSNB1 patients do not degenerate. The Nyx(nob) mouse model of CSNB1 faithfully mimics this phenotype. Here, we show that intravitreally injected, rationally designed AAV2(quadY-F+T-V) containing a novel 'Ple155' promoter drives either GFP or YFP_Nyx in postnatal Nyx(nob) mice. In treated Nyx(nob) retina, robust and targeted Nyx transgene expression in ON BCs partially restored the ERG b-wave and, at the cellular level, signaling in ON BCs. Our results support the potential for gene delivery to BCs and gene replacement therapy in human CSNB1. PMID:26310623

  19. Chondroitin Sulfate is the Primary Receptor for a Peptide-Modified AAV That Targets Brain Vascular Endothelium In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C; Keiser, Nicholas W; Okulist, Anna; Martins, Inês; Wilson, Matthew S; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we described a peptide-modified AAV2 vector (AAV-GMN) containing a capsid-displayed peptide that directs in vivo brain vascular targeting and transduction when delivered intravenously. In this study, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates transduction by AAV-GMN. We found that AAV-GMN, but not AAV2, readily transduces the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3, a result that mirrors previously observed in vivo transduction profiles of brain vasculature. Studies in vitro revealed that the glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate C, acts as the primary receptor for AAV-GMN. Unlike AAV2, chondroitin sulfate expression is required for cell transduction by AAV-GMN, and soluble chondroitin sulfate C can robustly inhibit AAV-GMN transduction of brain endothelial cells. Interestingly, AAV-GMN retains heparin-binding properties, though in contrast to AAV2, it poorly transduces cells that express heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate, indicating that the peptide insertion negatively impacts heparan-mediated transduction. Lastly, when delivered directly, this modified virus can transduce multiple brain regions, indicating that the potential of AAV-GMN as a therapeutic gene delivery vector for central nervous system disorders is not restricted to brain vascular endothelium. PMID:25313621

  20. Multi-Parametric MRI at 14T for Muscular Dystrophy Mice Treated with AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joshua; Wicki, Jacqueline; Knoblaugh, Sue E.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Lee, Donghoon

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool for the monitoring of gene therapy for muscular dystrophy. The clinical investigations for this family of diseases often involve surgical biopsy which limits the amount of information that can be obtained due to the invasive nature of the procedure. Thus, other non-invasive tools may provide more opportunities for disease assessment and treatment responses. In order to explore this, dystrophic mdx4cv mice were systemically treated with a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a codon-optimized micro-dystrophin gene. Multi-parametric MRI of T2, magnetization transfer, and diffusion effects alongside 3-D volume measurements were then utilized to monitor disease/treatment progression. Mice were imaged at 10 weeks of age for pre-treatment, then again post-treatment at 8, 16, and 24 week time points. The efficacy of treatment was assessed by physiological assays for improvements in function and quantification of expression. Tissues from the hindlimbs were collected for histological analysis after the final time point for comparison with MRI results. We found that introduction of the micro-dystrophin gene restored some aspects of normal muscle histology and pathology such as decreased necrosis and resistance to contraction-induced injury. T2 relaxation values showed percentage decreases across all muscle types measured (tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus) when treated groups were compared to untreated groups. Additionally, the differences between groups were statistically significant for the tibialis anterior as well. The diffusion measurements showed a wider range of percentage changes and less statistical significance while the magnetization transfer effect measurements showed minimal change. MR images displayed hyper-intense regions of muscle that correlated with muscle pathology in histological

  1. Noninvasive Imaging Reveals Stable Transgene Expression in Mouse Airways After Delivery of a Nonintegrating Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vector.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Dragana; Gijsbers, Rik; Jimenez, Ana Quiles; Dooley, James; Van den Haute, Chris; Van der Perren, Anke; Liston, Adrian; Baekelandt, Veerle; Debyser, Zeger; Carlon, Marianne Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise to cure a wide range of genetic and acquired diseases. Recent successes in recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV)-based gene therapy in the clinic for hereditary disorders such as Leber's congenital amaurosis and hemophilia B encouraged us to reexplore an rAAV approach for pulmonary gene transfer. Only limited clinical successes have been achieved for airway gene transfer so far, underscoring the need for further preclinical development of rAAV-based gene therapy for pulmonary disorders. We sought to determine the preclinical potential of an airway-tropic serotype, rAAV2/5, encoding reporter genes when delivered to mouse airways. Although several groups have assessed the stability of gene transfer using a nonintegrating rAAV in mouse airways, long-term stability for more than a year has not been reported. Additionally, an extensive quantitative analysis of the specific cell types targeted by rAAV2/5 using cell-specific markers is lacking. We obtained sustained gene expression in upper and lower airways up to 15 months after vector administration, a substantial proportion of the lifespan of a laboratory mouse. In addition, we demonstrated that readministration of rAAV2/5 to the airways is feasible and increases gene expression 14 months after primary vector administration, despite the presence of circulating neutralizing antibodies. Finally, identification of transduced cell types revealed different subpopulations being targeted by rAAV2/5, with 64% of β-galactosidase-positive cells being ciliated cells, 34% club cells in the conducting airways, and 75% alveolar type II cells in the alveoli at 1 month postinjection. This underscores the therapeutic potential of a nonintegrating rAAV vector to develop a gene therapeutic drug for a variety of pulmonary disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, and surfactant deficiencies. PMID:26567984

  2. AAV liver expression of FIX-Padua prevents and eradicates FIX inhibitor without increasing thrombogenicity in hemophilia B dogs and mice.

    PubMed

    Crudele, Julie M; Finn, Jonathan D; Siner, Joshua I; Martin, Nicholas B; Niemeyer, Glenn P; Zhou, Shangzhen; Mingozzi, Federico; Lothrop, Clinton D; Arruda, Valder R

    2015-03-01

    Emerging successful clinical data on gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector for hemophilia B (HB) showed that the risk of cellular immune response to vector capsid is clearly dose dependent. To decrease the vector dose, we explored AAV-8 (1-3 × 10(12) vg/kg) encoding a hyperfunctional factor IX (FIX-Padua, arginine 338 to leucine) in FIX inhibitor-prone HB dogs. Two naïve HB dogs showed sustained expression of FIX-Padua with an 8- to 12-fold increased specific activity reaching 25% to 40% activity without antibody formation to FIX. A third dog with preexisting FIX inhibitors exhibited a transient anamnestic response (5 Bethesda units) at 2 weeks after vector delivery following by spontaneous eradication of the antibody to FIX by day 70. In this dog, sustained FIX expression reached ∼200% and 30% of activity and antigen levels, respectively. Immune tolerance was confirmed in all dogs after challenges with plasma-derived FIX concentrate. Shortening of the clotting times and lack of bleeding episodes support the phenotypic correction of the severe phenotype, with no clinical or laboratory evidence of risk of thrombosis. Provocative studies in mice showed that FIX-Padua exhibits similar immunogenicity and thrombogenicity compared with FIX wild type. Collectively, these data support the potential translation of gene-based strategies using FIX-Padua for HB. PMID:25568350

  3. AAV liver expression of FIX-Padua prevents and eradicates FIX inhibitor without increasing thrombogenicity in hemophilia B dogs and mice

    PubMed Central

    Crudele, Julie M.; Finn, Jonathan D.; Siner, Joshua I.; Martin, Nicholas B.; Niemeyer, Glenn P.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Mingozzi, Federico; Lothrop, Clinton D.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging successful clinical data on gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector for hemophilia B (HB) showed that the risk of cellular immune response to vector capsid is clearly dose dependent. To decrease the vector dose, we explored AAV-8 (1-3 × 1012 vg/kg) encoding a hyperfunctional factor IX (FIX-Padua, arginine 338 to leucine) in FIX inhibitor-prone HB dogs. Two naïve HB dogs showed sustained expression of FIX-Padua with an 8- to 12-fold increased specific activity reaching 25% to 40% activity without antibody formation to FIX. A third dog with preexisting FIX inhibitors exhibited a transient anamnestic response (5 Bethesda units) at 2 weeks after vector delivery following by spontaneous eradication of the antibody to FIX by day 70. In this dog, sustained FIX expression reached ∼200% and 30% of activity and antigen levels, respectively. Immune tolerance was confirmed in all dogs after challenges with plasma-derived FIX concentrate. Shortening of the clotting times and lack of bleeding episodes support the phenotypic correction of the severe phenotype, with no clinical or laboratory evidence of risk of thrombosis. Provocative studies in mice showed that FIX-Padua exhibits similar immunogenicity and thrombogenicity compared with FIX wild type. Collectively, these data support the potential translation of gene-based strategies using FIX-Padua for HB. PMID:25568350

  4. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  5. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression.

    PubMed

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-07-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  6. Systemic gene transfer reveals distinctive muscle transduction profile of tyrosine mutant AAV-1, -6, and -9 in neonatal dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H; Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Williams, Regina R; Zhang, Keqing; Smith, Bruce F; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating genetic disorders that affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle. An effective gene therapy for these diseases requires bodywide muscle delivery. Tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been considered as a class of highly potent gene transfer vectors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that systemic delivery of tyrosine mutant AAV can result in bodywide muscle transduction in newborn dogs. Three tyrosine mutant AAV vectors (Y445F/Y731F AAV-1, Y445F AAV-6, and Y731F AAV-9) were evaluated. These vectors expressed the alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under transcriptional regulation of either the muscle-specific Spc5-12 promoter or the ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Robust skeletal and cardiac muscle transduction was achieved with Y445F/Y731F AAV-1. However, Y731F AAV-9 only transduced skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, Y445F AAV-6 resulted in minimal muscle transduction. Serological study suggests that the preexisting neutralization antibody may underlie the limited transduction of Y445F AAV-6. In summary, we have identified Y445F/Y731F AAV-1 as a potentially excellent systemic gene transfer vehicle to target both skeletal muscle and the heart in neonatal puppies. Our findings have important implications in exploring systemic neonatal gene therapy in canine models of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25105153

  7. rAAV2/7 vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mouse substantia nigra induces protein aggregation and progressive dose-dependent neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alpha-synuclein is a key protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is the main component of the Lewy bodies, a cardinal neuropathological feature in the disease. In addition, whole locus multiplications and point mutations in the gene coding for alpha-synuclein lead to autosomal dominant monogenic PD. Over the past decade, research on PD has impelled the development of new animal models based on alpha-synuclein. In this context, transgenic mouse lines have failed to reproduce several hallmarks of PD, especially the strong and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration over time that occurs in the patients. In contrast, viral vector-based models in rats and non-human primates display prominent, although highly variable, nigral dopaminergic neuron loss. However, the few studies available on viral vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mice report a weak neurodegenerative process and no clear Lewy body-like pathology. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive comparative study of alpha-synuclein overexpression by means of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors serotype 2/7 (rAAV2/7) at different doses in adult mouse substantia nigra. Results We noted a significant and dose-dependent alpha-synucleinopathy over time upon nigral viral vector-mediated alpha-synuclein overexpression. We obtained a strong, progressive and dose-dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, reaching a maximum of 82% after 8 weeks. This effect correlated with a reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum. Moreover, behavioural analysis revealed significant motor impairments from 12 weeks after injection on. In addition, we detected the presence of alpha-synuclein-positive aggregates in the remaining surviving neurons. When comparing wild-type to mutant A53T alpha-synuclein at the same vector dose, both induced a similar degree of cell death. These data were supported by a biochemical

  8. Gene Therapy Using a Liver-targeted AAV Vector Restores Nucleoside and Nucleotide Homeostasis in a Murine Model of MNGIE

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Viscomi, Carlo; Cabrera-Pérez, Raquel; Cámara, Yolanda; Di Meo, Ivano; Barquinero, Jordi; Auricchio, Alberto; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Hirano, Michio; Zeviani, Massimo; Martí, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TYMP, enconding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). TP deficiency results in systemic accumulation of thymidine and deoxyuridine, which interferes with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. To date, the only treatment available for MNGIE patients is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report that AAV2/8-mediated transfer of the human TYMP coding sequence (hcTYMP) under the control of a liver-specific promoter prevents the biochemical imbalances in a murine model of MNGIE. hcTYMP expression was restricted to liver, and a dose as low as 2 × 1011 genome copies/kg led to a permanent reduction in systemic nucleoside levels to normal values in about 50% of treated mice. Higher doses resulted in reductions to normal or slightly below normal levels in virtually all mice treated. The nucleoside reduction achieved by this treatment prevented deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) depletion, which is the limiting factor affecting mtDNA replication in this disease. These results demonstrate that the use of AAV to direct TYMP expression in liver is feasible as a potentially safe gene therapy strategy for MNGIE. PMID:24448160

  9. Gene therapy using a liver-targeted AAV vector restores nucleoside and nucleotide homeostasis in a murine model of MNGIE.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Viscomi, Carlo; Cabrera-Pérez, Raquel; Cámara, Yolanda; Di Meo, Ivano; Barquinero, Jordi; Auricchio, Alberto; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Hirano, Michio; Zeviani, Massimo; Martí, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TYMP, enconding thymidine phosphorylase (TP). TP deficiency results in systemic accumulation of thymidine and deoxyuridine, which interferes with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. To date, the only treatment available for MNGIE patients is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report that AAV2/8-mediated transfer of the human TYMP coding sequence (hcTYMP) under the control of a liver-specific promoter prevents the biochemical imbalances in a murine model of MNGIE. hcTYMP expression was restricted to liver, and a dose as low as 2 × 10(11) genome copies/kg led to a permanent reduction in systemic nucleoside levels to normal values in about 50% of treated mice. Higher doses resulted in reductions to normal or slightly below normal levels in virtually all mice treated. The nucleoside reduction achieved by this treatment prevented deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) depletion, which is the limiting factor affecting mtDNA replication in this disease. These results demonstrate that the use of AAV to direct TYMP expression in liver is feasible as a potentially safe gene therapy strategy for MNGIE. PMID:24448160

  10. AAV9 supports wide-scale transduction of the CNS and TDP-43 disease modeling in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Klein, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    AAV9 has emerged as an efficient adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype for gene transfer to the central nervous system. We have used this technique to study aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by administering AAV encoding the ALS-related gene transactive response DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) to neonatal rats. However, inducing the expression in adult subjects would be preferable to mimic the adult onset of symptoms in ALS. We expressed either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or TDP-43 in adult rats after an intravenous (i.v.) route of administration to attempt wide-scale transduction of the spinal cord for disease modeling. In order to optimize the gene transfer, we made comparisons of efficiency by age, gender, and across several AAV serotypes (AAV1, AAV8, AAV9, and AAV10). The data indicate more efficient neuronal transduction in neonates, with little evidence of glial transduction at either age, no gender-related differences in transduction, and that AAV9 was efficient in adults relative to the other serotypes tested. Based on these data, AAV9 TDP-43 was expressed at three vector doses in adult female rats yielding highly consistent, dose-dependent motor deficits. AAV9 can be delivered i.v. to adult rats to achieve consistent pathophysiological changes and a relevant adult-onset system for disease modeling. PMID:26445725

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1/Adeno-Associated Virus rep+ Hybrid Amplicon Vector Improves the Stability of Transgene Expression in Human Cells by Site-Specific Integration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Camp, S. M.; Niwano, M.; Shen, X.; Bakowska, J. C.; Breakefield, X. O.; Allen, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are promising gene delivery tools, but their utility in gene therapy has been impeded to some extent by their inability to achieve stable transgene expression. In this study, we examined the possibility of improving transduction stability in cultured human cells via site-specific genomic integration mediated by adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep and inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). A rep− HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon vector was made by inserting a transgene cassette flanked with AAV ITRs into an HSV-1 amplicon backbone, and a rep+ HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon was made by inserting rep68/78 outside the rep− vector 3′ AAV ITR sequence. Both vectors also had a pair of loxP sites flanking the ITRs. The resulting hybrid amplicon vectors were successfully packaged and compared to a standard amplicon vector for stable transduction frequency (STF) in human 293 and Gli36 cell lines and primary myoblasts. The rep+, but not the rep−, hybrid vector improved STF in all three types of cells; 84% of Gli36 and 40% of 293 stable clones transduced by the rep+ hybrid vector integrated the transgene into the AAVS1 site. Due to the difficulty in expanding primary myoblasts, we did not assess site-specific integration in these cells. A strategy to attempt further improvement of STF by “deconcatenating” the hybrid amplicon DNA via Cre-loxP recombination was tested, but it did not increase STF. These data demonstrate that introducing the integrating elements of AAV into HSV-1 amplicon vectors can significantly improve their ability to achieve stable gene transduction by conferring the AAV-like capability of site-specific genomic integration in dividing cells. PMID:12072515

  12. Retinal pigment epithelial cell expression of active Rap 1a by scAAV2 inhibits choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Bretz, Colin A; Becker, Silke; Gambhir, Deeksha; Smith, George W; Samulski, R Jude; Wittchen, Erika S; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased Rap1a activity specifically in retinal pigment epithelial cells resists choroidal neovascularization (CNV), self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (scAAV2) with RPE65-promoter-driven GFP vectors were generated and introduced subretinally into Rap1b-deficient mice. Six-week-old mice that received subretinal control (scAAV2-Con) or constitutively active Rap1a (scAAV2-CARap1a) showed strong GFP at the 5 × 108 viral particle/µl dose 5 weeks later without altering retinal morphology or function. Compared to scAAV2-Con- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-injected, eyes injected with scAAV2-CARap1a had increased Rap1 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)/choroidal lysates and a significant reduction in CNV volume 7 days after laser, comparable to eyes that received intravitreal anti-VEGF versus IgG control. scAAV2-CARap1a-, but not anti-VEGF-, injected eyes had increased pan-cadherin in RPE/choroids. In cultured RPE cells, increased active Rap1a inhibited TNFα-induced disassociation of junctional pan-cadherin/β-catenin complexes, increased transepithelial electrical resistance through an interaction of β-catenin with phosphorylated scaffold protein, IQGAP1, and inhibited choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) transmigration of an RPE monolayer. This evidence shows that increased Rap1a activity specifically in RPE cells is sufficient to reduce CEC transmigration and CNV and involves IQGAP1-mediated protection of RPE junctional complexes. PMID:27606349

  13. Retinal pigment epithelial cell expression of active Rap 1a by scAAV2 inhibits choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Bretz, Colin A; Becker, Silke; Gambhir, Deeksha; Smith, George W; Samulski, R Jude; Wittchen, Erika S; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased Rap1a activity specifically in retinal pigment epithelial cells resists choroidal neovascularization (CNV), self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (scAAV2) with RPE65-promoter-driven GFP vectors were generated and introduced subretinally into Rap1b-deficient mice. Six-week-old mice that received subretinal control (scAAV2-Con) or constitutively active Rap1a (scAAV2-CARap1a) showed strong GFP at the 5 × 10(8) viral particle/µl dose 5 weeks later without altering retinal morphology or function. Compared to scAAV2-Con- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-injected, eyes injected with scAAV2-CARap1a had increased Rap1 in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE)/choroidal lysates and a significant reduction in CNV volume 7 days after laser, comparable to eyes that received intravitreal anti-VEGF versus IgG control. scAAV2-CARap1a-, but not anti-VEGF-, injected eyes had increased pan-cadherin in RPE/choroids. In cultured RPE cells, increased active Rap1a inhibited TNFα-induced disassociation of junctional pan-cadherin/β-catenin complexes, increased transepithelial electrical resistance through an interaction of β-catenin with phosphorylated scaffold protein, IQGAP1, and inhibited choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) transmigration of an RPE monolayer. This evidence shows that increased Rap1a activity specifically in RPE cells is sufficient to reduce CEC transmigration and CNV and involves IQGAP1-mediated protection of RPE junctional complexes. PMID:27606349

  14. Assessment of Tropism and Effectiveness of New Primate-Derived Hybrid Recombinant AAV Serotypes in the Mouse and Primate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Daniel M.; Singh, Mandeep S.; Mouravlev, Alexandre; You, Qisheng; Barnard, Alun R.; Hankins, Mark W.; During, Matthew J.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have been shown to be safe in the treatment of retinal degenerations in clinical trials. Thus, improving the efficiency of viral gene delivery has become increasingly important to increase the success of clinical trials. In this study, structural domains of different rAAV serotypes isolated from primate brain were combined to create novel hybrid recombinant AAV serotypes, rAAV2/rec2 and rAAV2/rec3. The efficacy of these novel serotypes were assessed in wild type mice and in two models of retinal degeneration (the Abca4−/− mouse which is a model for Stargardt disease and in the Pde6brd1/rd1 mouse) in vivo, in primate tissue ex-vivo, and in the human-derived SH-SY5Y cell line, using an identical AAV2 expression cassette. We show that these novel hybrid serotypes can transduce retinal tissue in mice and primates efficiently, although no more than AAV2/2 and rAAV2/5 serotypes. Transduction efficiency appeared lower in the Abca4−/− mouse compared to wild type with all vectors tested, suggesting an effect of specific retinal diseases on the efficiency of gene delivery. Shuffling of AAV capsid domains may have clinical applications for patients who develop T-cell immune responses following AAV gene therapy, as specific peptide antigen sequences could be substituted using this technique prior to vector re-treatments. PMID:23593201

  15. Enhanced Efficacy of an AAV Vector Encoding Chimeric, Highly-Secreted Acid α-glucosidase in Glycogen Storage Disease Type II

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P.; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) is an inherited muscular dystrophy caused by deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). We hypothesized that chimeric GAA containing an alternative signal peptide could increase the secretion of GAA from transduced cells and enhance the receptor-mediated uptake of GAA in striated muscle. The relative secretion of chimeric GAA from transfected 293 cells increased up to 26-fold. Receptor-mediated uptake of secreted, chimeric GAA corrected cultured GSD-II patient cells. High-level hGAA was sustained in the plasma of GSD-II mice for 24 weeks following administration of an AAV2/8 vector encoding chimeric GAA; furthermore, GAA activity was increased and glycogen content was significantly reduced in striated muscle and in the brain. Administration of only 1×1010 vector particles increased GAA activity in the heart and diaphragm for >18 weeks, whereas 3×1010 vector particles increased GAA activity and reduced glycogen content in the heart, diaphragm, and quadriceps. Furthermore, an AAV2/2 vector encoding chimeric GAA produced secreted hGAA for >12 weeks in the majority of treated GSD-II mice. Thus, chimeric, highly secreted GAA enhanced the efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16987711

  16. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Deverman, Benjamin E; Pravdo, Piers L; Simpson, Bryan P; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV9 (refs. 14,15,16,17), and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications. PMID:26829320

  17. Formation of AAV Single Stranded DNA Genome from a Circular Plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3+ clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  18. Formation of AAV single stranded DNA genome from a circular plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3(+) clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  19. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  20. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  1. Systemically administered AAV9-sTRAIL combats invasive glioblastoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Kantar, Rami; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Badr, Christian E; Würdinger, Thomas; Maguire, Casey A; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing tumoricidal genes injected directly into brain tumors have shown some promise, however, invasive tumor cells are relatively unaffected. Systemic injection of AAV9 vectors provides widespread delivery to the brain and potentially the tumor/microenvironment. Here we assessed AAV9 for potential glioblastoma therapy using two different promoters driving the expression of the secreted anti-cancer agent sTRAIL as a transgene model; the ubiquitously active chicken β-actin (CBA) promoter and the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter to restrict expression in brain. Intravenous injection of AAV9 vectors encoding a bioluminescent reporter showed similar distribution patterns, although the NSE promoter yielded 100-fold lower expression in the abdomen (liver), with the brain-to-liver expression ratio remaining the same. The main cell types targeted by the CBA promoter were astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells, while expression by NSE promoter mostly occurred in neurons. Intravenous administration of either AAV9-CBA-sTRAIL or AAV9-NSE-sTRAIL vectors to mice bearing intracranial patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts led to a slower tumor growth and significantly increased survival, with the CBA promoter having higher efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the potential of systemic injection of AAV9 vector encoding a therapeutic gene for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:27382645

  2. Safety, Biodistribution, and Efficacy of an AAV-5 Vector Encoding Human Interferon-Beta (ART-I02) Delivered via Intra-Articular Injection in Rhesus Monkeys with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bevaart, Lisette; Aalbers, Caroline J; Vierboom, Michel P M; Broekstra, Niels; Kondova, Ivanela; Breedveld, Elia; Hauck, Bernd; Wright, J Fraser; Tak, Paul Peter; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical studies to assess biodistribution, safety, and initial efficacy of ART-I02, an adeno-associated type 5 (rAAV5) vector expressing human interferon β (hIFN-β), were performed in a total of 24 rhesus monkeys with collagen-induced arthritis. All monkeys were naïve or showed limited neutralizing antibody (Nab) titers to AAV5 at the start of the study. Animals were injected with a single intra-articular dose of ART-I02 or placebo, consisting of 3.2×10(13) vg (Dose A=maximum feasible dose), 4.58×10(12) vg (Dose B), or placebo in the first affected finger joint, the ipsilateral knee, and ankle joint at the same time point. Animals were monitored for clinical parameters and well-being with a maximum of 4 weeks, with the option that the severity of arthritis could necessitate an earlier time point of sacrifice. No adverse events were noted after injection of ART-I02. No abnormalities were observed after histological evaluation of all organs. At both dose levels, immunohistochemical staining indicated expression of hIFN-β. In animals injected with Dose A, we observed stabilization or a reduction in swelling in the finger joint in which vector was administered. The highest copy numbers of vector DNA were detected in synovial tissue of the injected joint and the draining lymph node of the injected knee. High titers of Nab to rAAV5 were observed at the end of the study. Five monkeys developed an rAAV5-specific T-cell response. Two monkeys developed Nab to hIFN-β. In conclusion, intra-articular injection of ART-I02 was well-tolerated and did not induce adverse events. After administration of Dose A of ART-I02, we observed a beneficial effect on joint swelling, substantiated by decreased histological inflammation and bone erosion scores. A GMP vector for clinical application has been manufactured and is currently being tested in GLP rodent studies, with the aim to move forward to a clinical trial. PMID:26086763

  3. Gene therapy for choroideremia using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Alun R; Groppe, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-03-01

    Choroideremia is an outer retinal degeneration with a characteristic clinical appearance that was first described in the nineteenth century. The disorder begins with reduction of night vision and gradually progresses to blindness by middle age. The appearance of the fundus in sufferers is recognizable by the characteristic pale color caused by the loss of the outer retina, retinal-pigmented epithelium, and choroidal vessels, leading to exposure of the underlying sclera. Choroideremia shows X-linked recessive inheritance and the choroideremia gene (CHM) was one of the first to be identified by positional cloning in 1990. Subsequent identification and characterization of the CHM gene, which encodes Rab escort protein 1 (REP1), has led to better comprehension of the disease and enabled advances in genetic diagnosis. Despite several decades of work to understand the exact pathogenesis, no established treatments currently exist to stop or even slow the progression of retinal degeneration in choroideremia. Encouragingly, several specific molecular and clinical features make choroideremia an ideal candidate for treatment with gene therapy. This work describes the considerations and challenges in the development of a new clinical trial using adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding the CHM gene. PMID:25359548

  4. The advent of AAV9 expands applications for brain and spinal cord gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, Robert D; Wang, David B; Klein, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Straightforward studies compared adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes to determine the most appropriate one for robust expression in the CNS. AAV9 was efficient when directly injected into the brain, but more surprisingly, AAV9 produced global expression in the brain and spinal cord after a peripheral, systemic route of administration to neonatal mice. Areas covered Topics include AAV9 gene delivery from intraparenchymal, intravenous, intrathecal and intrauterine routes of administration, and related preclinical studies and disease models. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer yields remarkably consistent neuronal expression, though only in early development. AAV9 is versatile to study neuropathological proteins: microtubule-associated protein tau and transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43). Expert opinion AAV9 will be more widely used based on current data, although other natural serotypes and recombineered vectors may also support or improve upon wide-scale expression. A peripheral-to-central gene delivery that can affect the entire CNS without having to inject the CNS is promising for basic functional experiments, and potentially for gene therapy. Systemic or intra-cerebrospinal fluid routes of AAV9 administration should be considered for spinal muscular atrophy, lysosomal storage diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, if more neuronal expression can be achieved in adults, or if glial expression can be exploited. PMID:22519910

  5. Gene Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Is Effective in Cats Without Pre-Existing Immunity to AAV8

    PubMed Central

    Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M.; Haskins, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

  6. Expressing Transgenes That Exceed the Packaging Capacity of Adeno-Associated Virus Capsids.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Kyle; Riyad, Jalish Mahmud; Weber, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAV) are being explored as gene delivery vehicles for the treatment of various inherited and acquired disorders. rAAVs are attractive vectors for several reasons: wild-type AAVs are nonpathogenic, and rAAVs can trigger long-term transgene expression even in the absence of genome integration-at least in postmitotic tissues. Moreover, rAAVs have a low immunogenic profile, and the various AAV serotypes and variants display broad but distinct tropisms. One limitation of rAAVs is that their genome-packaging capacity is only ∼5 kb. For most applications this is not of major concern because the median human protein size is 375 amino acids. Excluding the ITRs, for a protein of typical length, this allows the incorporation of ∼3.5 kb of DNA for the promoter, polyadenylation sequence, and other regulatory elements into a single AAV vector. Nonetheless, for certain diseases the packaging limit of AAV does not allow the delivery of a full-length therapeutic protein by a single AAV vector. Hence, approaches to overcome this limitation have become an important area of research for AAV gene therapy. Among the most promising approaches to overcome the limitation imposed by the packaging capacity of AAV is the use of dual-vector approaches, whereby a transgene is split across two separate AAV vectors. Coinfection of a cell with these two rAAVs will then-through a variety of mechanisms-result in the transcription of an assembled mRNA that could not be encoded by a single AAV vector because of the DNA packaging limits of AAV. The main purpose of this review is to assess the current literature with respect to dual-AAV-vector design, to highlight the effectiveness of the different methodologies and to briefly discuss future areas of research to improve the efficiency of dual-AAV-vector transduction. PMID:26757051

  7. Single tyrosine mutation in AAV8 and AAV9 capsids is insufficient to enhance gene delivery to skeletal muscle and heart.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Yuan, Zhenhua; Li, Jianbin; Tang, Ruhang; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2012-02-01

    Site-directed mutations of tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) on the surface of adeno-associated viral (AAV) capsids have been reported as a simple method to greatly enhance gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. To determine whether the Y-to-F mutation could also enhance AAV8 and AAV9 gene transfer in skeletal muscle and heart to facilitate muscular dystrophy gene therapy, we investigated four capsid mutants of AAV8 (Y447F or Y733F) and AAV9 (Y446F or Y731F). The mutants and their wild-type control AAV8 and AAV9 capsids were used to package reporter genes (luciferase or β-galactosidase) resulting in similar vector yields. To evaluate gene delivery efficiencies, especially in muscle and heart, the vectors were compared side by side in a series of experiments in vivo in two different strains of mice, the outbred ICR and the inbred C57BL/6. Because AAV8 and AAV9 are among the most effective in systemic gene delivery, we first examined the mutant and wild-type vectors in neonatal mice by intraperitoneal injection, or in adult mice by intravenous injection. To our surprise, no statistically significant differences in transgene expression were observed between the mutant and wild-type vectors, regardless of the reporter genes, vector doses, and the ages and strains of mice used. In addition, quantitative analyses of vector DNA copy number in various tissues from mice treated with mutant and wild-type vectors also showed similar results. Finally, direct intramuscular injection of the above-described vectors with the luciferase gene into the hind limb muscles revealed the same levels of gene expression between mutant and wild-type vectors. Our results thus demonstrate that a single mutation of Y447F or Y733F on capsids of AAV8, and of Y446F or Y731F on AAV9, is insufficient to enhance gene delivery to the skeletal muscle and heart. PMID:22428978

  8. Humoral and cell-mediated immune response, and growth factor synthesis after direct intraarticular injection of rAAV2-IGF-I and rAAV5-IGF-I in the equine middle carpal joint.

    PubMed

    Ortved, Kyla; Wagner, Bettina; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James; Schaefer, Deanna; Nixon, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Intraarticular (IA) administration of viral vectors expressing a therapeutic transgene is an attractive treatment modality for osteoarthritis (OA) as the joint can be treated as a contained unit. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo can limit vector effectiveness. Transduction of articular tissues has been investigated; however, the immune response to IA vectors remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that IA rAAV2 and rAAV5 overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) would result in long-term IGF-I formation but would also induce neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and anti-capsid effector T cells. Twelve healthy horses were assigned to treatment (rAAV2 or rAAV5) or control (saline) groups. Middle carpal joints were injected with 5×10(11) vector genomes/joint. Synovial fluid was analyzed for changes in composition, NAb titers, immunoglobulin isotypes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IGF-I. Serum was analyzed for antibody titers and cytokines. A T cell restimulation assay was used to assess T cell responses. Injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I did not induce greater inflammation compared with saline. Synovial fluid IGF-I was significantly increased in both rAAV2- and rAAV5-IGF-I joints by day 14 and remained elevated until day 56; however, rAAV5 achieved the highest concentrations. A capsid-specific T cell response was not noted although all virus-treated horses had increased NAbs in serum and synovial fluid after treatment. Taken together, our data show that IA injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I does not incite a clinically detectable inflammatory or cell-mediated immune response and that IA gene therapy using minimally immunogenic vectors represents a clinically relevant tool for treating articular disorders including OA. PMID:25705927

  9. Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Response, and Growth Factor Synthesis After Direct Intraarticular Injection of rAAV2-IGF-I and rAAV5-IGF-I in the Equine Middle Carpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Bettina; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James; Schaefer, Deanna; Nixon, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intraarticular (IA) administration of viral vectors expressing a therapeutic transgene is an attractive treatment modality for osteoarthritis (OA) as the joint can be treated as a contained unit. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo can limit vector effectiveness. Transduction of articular tissues has been investigated; however, the immune response to IA vectors remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that IA rAAV2 and rAAV5 overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) would result in long-term IGF-I formation but would also induce neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and anti-capsid effector T cells. Twelve healthy horses were assigned to treatment (rAAV2 or rAAV5) or control (saline) groups. Middle carpal joints were injected with 5×1011 vector genomes/joint. Synovial fluid was analyzed for changes in composition, NAb titers, immunoglobulin isotypes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IGF-I. Serum was analyzed for antibody titers and cytokines. A T cell restimulation assay was used to assess T cell responses. Injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I did not induce greater inflammation compared with saline. Synovial fluid IGF-I was significantly increased in both rAAV2- and rAAV5-IGF-I joints by day 14 and remained elevated until day 56; however, rAAV5 achieved the highest concentrations. A capsid-specific T cell response was not noted although all virus-treated horses had increased NAbs in serum and synovial fluid after treatment. Taken together, our data show that IA injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I does not incite a clinically detectable inflammatory or cell-mediated immune response and that IA gene therapy using minimally immunogenic vectors represents a clinically relevant tool for treating articular disorders including OA. PMID:25705927

  10. Intra-Arterial Delivery of AAV Vectors to the Mouse Brain After Mannitol Mediated Blood Brain Barrier Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Ballon, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  11. Intra-arterial delivery of AAV vectors to the mouse brain after mannitol mediated blood brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Foley, Conor P; Rubin, David G; Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P; Gobin, Y Pierre; Crystal, Ronald G; Ballon, Douglas J

    2014-12-28

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption that we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  12. Intravitreal Injection of AAV2 Transduces Macaque Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lu; Greenberg, Kenneth; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D.; Masella, Benjamin D.; Wolfe, Robert; Visel, Meike; Stone, Daniel; Libby, Richard T.; DiLoreto, David; Schaffer, David; Flannery, John; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) has been shown to be effective in transducing inner retinal neurons after intravitreal injection in several species. However, results in nonprimates may not be predictive of transduction in the human inner retina, because of differences in eye size and the specialized morphology of the high-acuity human fovea. This was a study of inner retina transduction in the macaque, a primate with ocular characteristics most similar to that of humans. Methods. In vivo imaging and histology were used to examine GFP expression in the macaque inner retina after intravitreal injection of AAV vectors containing five distinct promoters. Results. AAV2 produced pronounced GFP expression in inner retinal cells of the fovea, no expression in the central retina beyond the fovea, and variable expression in the peripheral retina. AAV2 vector incorporating the neuronal promoter human connexin 36 (hCx36) transduced ganglion cells within a dense annulus around the fovea center, whereas AAV2 containing the ubiquitous promoter hybrid cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer/chicken-β-actin (CBA) transduced both Müller and ganglion cells in a dense circular disc centered on the fovea. With three shorter promoters—human synapsin (hSYN) and the shortened CBA and hCx36 promoters (smCBA and hCx36sh)—AAV2 produced visible transduction, as seen in fundus images, only when the retina was altered by ganglion cell loss or enzymatic vitreolysis. Conclusions. The results in the macaque suggest that intravitreal injection of AAV2 would produce high levels of gene expression at the human fovea, important in retinal gene therapy, but not in the central retina beyond the fovea. PMID:21310920

  13. Anti-clarin-1 AAV-delivered ribozyme induced apoptosis in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Aarnisalo, A A; Pietola, L; Joensuu, J; Isosomppi, J; Aarnisalo, P; Dinculescu, A; Lewin, A S; Flannery, J; Hauswirth, W W; Sankila, E-M; Jero, J

    2007-08-01

    Usher syndrome type 3 is caused by mutations in the USH3A gene, which encodes the protein clarin-1. Clarin-1 is a member of the tetraspanin superfamily (TM4SF) of transmembrane proteins, expressed in the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion cells of the mouse ear. We have examined whether the AAV-mediated anti-clarin ribozyme delivery causes apoptotic cell death in vivo in the organ of Corti. We used an AAV-2 vector delivered hammerhead ribozyme, AAV-CBA-Rz, which specifically recognizes and cleaves wild type mouse clarin-1 mRNA. Cochleae of CD-1 mice were injected either with 1mul of the AAV-CBA-Rz, or control AAV vectors containing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker gene (AAV-CBA-GFP). Additional controls were performed with saline only. At one-week and one-month post-injection, the animals were sacrificed and the cochleae were studied by histology and fluorescence imaging. Mice injected with AAV-CBA-GFP displayed GFP reporter expression of varying fluorescence intensity throughout the length of the cochlea in the outer and inner hair cells and stria vascularis, and to a lesser extent, in vestibular epithelial cells. GFP expression was not detectable in the spiral ganglion. The pro-apoptotic effect of AAV-CBA-delivered anti-clarin-1 ribozymes was evaluated by TUNEL-staining. We observed in the AAV-CBA-Rz, AAV-CBA-GFP and saline control groups apoptotic nuclei in the outer and inner hair cells and in the stria vascularis one week after the microinjection. The vestibular epithelium was also observed to contain apoptotic cells. No TUNEL-positive spiral ganglion neurons were detected. After one-month post-injection, the AAV-CBA-Rz-injected group had significantly more apoptotic outer and inner hair cells and cells of the stria vascularis than the AAV-CBA-GFP group. In this study, we demonstrate that AAV-CBA mediated clarin-1 ribozyme may induce apoptosis of the cochlear hair cells and cells of the stria vascularis. Surprisingly, we did not observe apoptosis in

  14. Hepatorenal correction in murine glycogen storage disease type I with a double-stranded adeno-associated virus vector.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Hall, Gentzon; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Lavin, Peter J; Winn, Michelle P; Kemper, Alex R; Brown, Talmage T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (-/-) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (-/-) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (-/-) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism. PMID:21730973

  15. Hepatorenal Correction in Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type I With a Double-stranded Adeno-associated Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Hall, Gentzon; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Lavin, Peter J; Winn, Michelle P; Kemper, Alex R; Brown, Talmage T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (−/−) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2/7, dsAAV2/8, and dsAAV2/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2/7 and dsAAV2/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (−/−) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (−/−) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism. PMID:21730973

  16. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  17. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  18. Systemic Gene Transfer of a Hexosaminidase Variant Using an scAAV9.47 Vector Corrects GM2 Gangliosidosis in Sandhoff Mice.

    PubMed

    Osmon, Karlaina J L; Woodley, Evan; Thompson, Patrick; Ong, Katalina; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Keimel, John G; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S

    2016-07-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by β-hexosaminidase A (HexA) enzyme deficiency. There is currently no cure. HexA is composed of two similar, nonidentical subunits, α and β, which must interact with the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), a substrate-specific cofactor, to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. Mutations in either subunit or the activator can result in the accumulation of GM2 ganglioside within neurons throughout the central nervous system. The resulting neuronal cell death induces the primary symptoms of the disease: motor impairment, seizures, and sensory impairments. This study assesses the long-term effects of gene transfer in a Sandhoff (β-subunit knockout) mouse model. The study utilized a modified human β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (μ-subunit) that contains critical sequences from the β-subunit that enables formation of a stable homodimer (HexM) and interaction with GM2AP to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. We investigated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral (scAAV) vector expressing HexM, through intravenous injections of the neonatal mice. We monitored one cohort for 8 weeks and another cohort long-term for survival benefit, behavioral, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Untreated Sandhoff disease (SD) control mice reached a humane endpoint at approximately 15 weeks, whereas treated mice had a median survival age of 40 weeks, an approximate 2.5-fold survival advantage. On behavioral tests, the treated mice outperformed their knockout age-matched controls and perform similarly to the heterozygous controls. Through the enzymatic and GM2 ganglioside analyses, we observed a significant decrease in the GM2 ganglioside level, even though the enzyme levels were not significantly increased. Molecular analyses revealed a global distribution of the vector between brain and spinal cord regions. In conclusion, the neonatal delivery of a novel viral vector expressing the human HexM enzyme is effective in ameliorating the SD

  19. Intramuscular delivery of p75NTR ectodomain by an AAV vector attenuates cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Hua; Wang, Ye-Ran; Zhang, Tao; Jiao, Shu-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hui; Zeng, Fan; Li, Jing; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    The neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR) is a receptor for amyloid-beta (Aβ) and mediates Aβ-induced neurodegenerative signals. The ectodomain of p75NTR (p75ECD) is a physiological protective factor against Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously demonstrated that the shedding of p75ECD from the cell surface is down-regulated in AD brains and restoration of the p75ECD level in the brain, through intracranial administration of p75ECD by adeno-associated virus vectors, attenuates AD-like pathologies in an AD mouse model. In this study, we further investigated the feasibility and efficacy of peripheral administration of AAV-p75ECD on brain amyloid burden and associated pathogenesis. We found that intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD increased the level of p75ECD in the blood, significantly improved the behavioral phenotype of amyloid precursor protein/PS1 transgenic mice, and reduced brain amyloid burden, attenuated Tau hyperphosphorylation, and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD was well tolerated. Our results indicate that peripheral delivery of p75ECD represents a safe and effective therapeutic strategy for AD. The ectodomain of p75NTR (p75ECD) is a physiological protective factor against amyloid-beta (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD increased the p75ECD levels in the blood, reduced brain amyloid burden through a 'peripheral sink' mechanism and alleviates AD-type pathologies. Peripheral delivery of p75ECD represents a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:26991827

  20. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  1. Rapid, scalable, and low-cost purification of recombinant adeno-associated virus produced by baculovirus expression vector system

    PubMed Central

    Buclez, Pierre-Olivier; Dias Florencio, Gabriella; Relizani, Karima; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Benchaouir, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) are largely used for gene transfer in research, preclinical developments, and clinical trials. Their broad in vivo biodistribution and long-term efficacy in postmitotic tissues make them good candidates for numerous gene transfer applications. Upstream processes able to produce large amounts of rAAV were developed, particularly those using baculovirus expression vector system. In parallel, downstream processes present a large panel of purification methods, often including multiple and time consuming steps. Here, we show that simple tangential flow filtration, coupled with an optimized iodixanol-based isopycnic density gradient, is sufficient to purify several liters of crude lysate produced by baculovirus expression vector system in only one working day, leading to high titers and good purity of rAAV products. Moreover, we show that the viral vectors retain their in vitro and in vivo functionalities. Our results demonstrate that simple, rapid, and relatively low-cost methods can easily be implemented for obtaining a high-quality grade of gene therapy products based on rAAV technology. PMID:27226971

  2. AAVPG: A vigilant vector where transgene expression is induced by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Medrano, Ruan F.V.; Carvalho, Anna Carolina P.V.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2013-12-15

    Using p53 to drive transgene expression from viral vectors may provide on demand expression in response to physiologic stress, such as hypoxia or DNA damage. Here we introduce AAVPG, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector where a p53-responsive promoter, termed PG, is used to control transgene expression. In vitro assays show that expression from the AAVPG-luc vector was induced specifically in the presence of functional p53 (1038±202 fold increase, p<0.001). The AAVPG-luc vector was an effective biosensor of p53 activation in response to hypoxia (4.48±0.6 fold increase in the presence of 250 µM CoCl{sub 2}, p<0.001) and biomechanical stress (2.53±0.4 fold increase with stretching, p<0.05). In vivo, the vigilant nature of the AAVPG-luc vector was revealed after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with doxorubicin (pre-treatment, 3.4×10{sup 5}±0.43×10{sup 5} photons/s; post-treatment, 6.6×10{sup 5}±2.1×10{sup 5} photons/s, p<0.05). These results indicate that the AAVPG vector is an interesting option for detecting p53 activity both in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • AAV vector where transgene expression is controlled by the tumor suppressor p53. • The new vector, AAVPG, shown to function as a biosensor of p53 activity, in vitro and in vivo. • The p53 activity monitored by the AAVPG vector is relevant to cancer and other diseases. • AAVPG reporter gene expression was activated upon DNA damage, hypoxia and mechanical stress.

  3. Correction of glycogen storage disease type II by an adeno-associated virus vector containing a muscle-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Schneider, Ayn; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure due to acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) deficiency. An AAV2 vector pseudotyped as AAV6 (AAV2/6 vector) transiently expressed high-level human GAA in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice without reducing glycogen storage; however, in immunodeficient GAA-KO/SCID mice the AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced the glycogen content of the injected muscle for 24 weeks. A CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrate was observed in response to the AAV2/6 vector in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. When a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter was substituted for the CB promoter (AAV-MCKhGAApA), that AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced glycogen content in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. Muscle-restricted expression of hGAA provoked only a humoral (not cellular) immune response. Intravenous administration of a high number of particles of AAV-MCKhGAApA as AAV2/7 reduced the glycogen content of the heart and skeletal muscle and corrected individual myofibers in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice 24 weeks postinjection. In summary, persistent correction of muscle glycogen content was achieved with an AAV vector containing a muscle-specific promoter in GAA-KO mice, and this approach should be considered for muscle-targeted gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:15922959

  4. Tyrosine triple mutated AAV2-BDNF gene therapy in a rat model of transient IOP elevation

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Maika; Kameya, Shuhei; Fujimoto, Chiaki; Nakamoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Hisatomo; Igarashi, Toru; Miyake, Noriko; Iijima, Osamu; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the neuroprotective effects of exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which provides protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rodents, in a model of transient intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation using a mutant (triple Y-F) self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 2 vector encoding BDNF (tm-scAAV2-BDNF). Methods The tm-scAAV2-BDNF or control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP; tm-scAAV2-GFP) was intravitreally administered to rats, which were then divided into four groups: control, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury only, I/R injury with tm-scAAV2-GFP, and tm-scAAV2-BDNF. I/R injury was then induced by transiently increasing IOP, after which the rats were euthanized to measure the inner retinal thickness and cell counts in the RGC layer. Results Intravitreous injection of tm-scAAV2-BDNF resulted in high levels of BDNF expression in the neural retina. Histological analysis showed that the inner retinal thickness and cell numbers in the RGC layer were preserved after transient IOP elevation in eyes treated with tm-scAAV2-BDNF but not in the other I/R groups. Significantly reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining after I/R injury in the rats that received tm-scAAV2-BDNF indicated reduced retinal stress, and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis confirmed preservation of retinal function in the tm-scAAV2-BDNF group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of neuroprotective gene therapy using tm-scAAV2-BDNF to protect the inner retina from transiently high intraocular pressure. An in vivo gene therapeutic approach to the clinical management of retinal diseases in conditions such as glaucoma, retinal artery occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, and diabetic retinopathy thus appears feasible. PMID:27440998

  5. Role of cellular FKBP52 protein in intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Weihong; Wu Jianqing ||; Zhong Li; Chen Linyuan; Weigel-Kelley, Kirsten A. |; Qing Keyun; Larsen, Steven H.; Shou Weinian; Warrington, Kenneth H. |; Srivastava, Arun |. E-mail: asrivastava@gtc.ufl.edu

    2006-09-30

    We have reported that tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of a cellular protein, FKBP52, inhibit the second-strand DNA synthesis of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), leading to inefficient transgene expression from recombinant AAV vectors. To further explore the role of FKBP52 in AAV-mediated transduction, we established murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cultures from FKBP52 wild-type (WT), heterozygous (HE), and knockout (KO) mice. Conventional AAV vectors failed to transduce WT MEFs efficiently, and the transduction efficiency was not significantly increased in HE or KO MEFs. AAV vectors failed to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in these cells. Treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) increased the transduction efficiency of conventional AAV vectors by {approx}25-fold in WT MEFs, but only by {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs. The use of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, which bypass the requirement of viral second-strand DNA synthesis, revealed that HU treatment increased the transduction efficiency {approx}23-fold in WT MEFs, but only {approx}4-fold in KO MEFs, indicating that the lack of HU treatment-mediated increase in KO MEFs was not due to failure of AAV to undergo viral second-strand DNA synthesis. Following HU treatment, {approx}59% of AAV genomes were present in the nuclear fraction from WT MEFs, but only {approx}28% in KO MEFs, indicating that the pathway by which HU treatment mediates nuclear transport of AAV was impaired in KO MEFs. When KO MEFs were stably transfected with an FKBP52 expression plasmid, HU treatment-mediated increase in the transduction efficiency was restored in these cells, which correlated directly with improved intracellular trafficking. Intact AAV particles were also shown to interact with FKBP52 as well as with dynein, a known cellular protein involved in AAV trafficking. These studies suggest that FKBP52, being a cellular chaperone protein, facilitates intracellular trafficking of AAV, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant

  6. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  7. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R. Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  8. Homologous recombination is required for AAV-mediated gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Ana; Linden, R. Michael; Jessberger, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    High frequencies of gene targeting can be achieved by infection of mammalian cells with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors [D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (1998) Nature Genet., 18, 325–330; D. W. Russell and R. K. Hirata (2000) J. Virol., 74, 4612–4620; R. Hirata et al. (2002) Nat. Biotechnol., 20, 735–738], but the mechanism of targeting is unclear and random integration often occurs in parallel. We assessed the role of specific DNA repair and recombination pathways in rAAV gene targeting by measuring correction of a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in cells where homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) had been suppressed by RNAi. EGFP-negative cells were transduced with rAAV vectors carrying a different inactivating deletion in the EGFP, and in parallel with rAAV vectors carrying red fluorescent protein (RFP). Expression of RFP accounted for viral transduction efficiency and long-term random integration. Approximately 0.02% of the infected GFP-negative cells were stably converted to GFP positive cells. Silencing of the essential NHEJ component DNA-PK had no significant effect on the frequency of targeting at any time point examined. Silencing of the SNF2/SWI2 family members RAD54L or RAD54B, which are important for HR, reduced the rate of stable rAAV gene targeting ∼5-fold. Further, partial silencing of the Rad51 paralogue XRCC3 completely abolished stable long-term EGFP expression. These results show that rAAV gene targeting requires the Rad51/Rad54 pathway of HR. PMID:16822856

  9. AAV capsid CD8+ T-cell epitopes are highly conserved across AAV serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Daniel J; Edmonson, Shyrie C; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Pien, Gary C; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Camire, Rodney M; Ertl, Hildegund; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become one of the most promising vectors in gene transfer in the last 10 years with successful translation to clinical trials in humans and even market approval for a first gene therapy product in Europe. Administration to humans, however, revealed that adaptive immune responses against the vector capsid can present an obstacle to sustained transgene expression due to the activation and expansion of capsid-specific T cells. The limited number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from samples within clinical trials allows for little more than monitoring of T-cell responses. We were able to identify immunodominant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes for common human leukocyte antigen (HLA) types by using spleens isolated from subjects undergoing splenectomy for non-malignant indications as a source of large numbers of lymphocytes and restimulating them with single AAV capsid peptides in vitro. Further experiments confirmed that these epitopes are naturally processed and functionally relevant. The design of more effective and less immunogenic AAV vectors, and precise immune monitoring of vector-infused subjects, are facilitated by these findings. PMID:26445723

  10. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated high-efficiency, transient expression of the murine cationic amino acid transporter (ecotropic retroviral receptor) permits stable transduction of human HeLa cells by ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, J; Miller, J L; Yang, Y; Fenimore-Justman, A; Rueda, F; Vanin, E F; Nienhuis, A W

    1996-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus has a broad host range, is nonpathogenic, and integrates into a preferred location on chromosome 19, features that have fostered development of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) as gene transfer vectors for therapeutic applications. We have used an rAAV to transfer and express the murine cationic amino acid transporter which functions as the ecotropic retroviral receptor, thereby rendering human cells conditionally susceptible to infection by an ecotropic retroviral vector. The proportion of human HeLa cells expressing the receptor at 60 h varied as a function of the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the rAAV. Cells expressing the ecotropic receptor were efficiently transduced with an ecotropic retroviral vector encoding a nucleus-localized form of beta-galactosidase. Cells coexpressing the ecotropic receptor and nucleus-localized beta-galactosidase were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and cell lines were recovered by cloning at limiting dilution. After growth in culture, all clones contained the retroviral vector genome, but fewer than 10% (3 of 47) contained the rAAV genome and continued to express the ecotropic receptor. The ecotropic receptor coding sequences in the rAAV genome were under the control of a tetracycline-modulated promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, receptor expression was low and the proportion of cells transduced by the ecotropic retroviral vector was decreased. Modulation of receptor expression was achieved with both an episomal and an integrated form of the rAAV genome. These data establish that functional gene expression from an rAAV genome can occur transiently without genome integration. PMID:8794313

  11. AAV9-mediated central nervous system–targeted gene delivery via cisterna magna route in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lukashchuk, Vera; Lewis, Katherine E; Coldicott, Ian; Grierson, Andrew J; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2016-01-01

    Current barriers to the use of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) in clinical trials for treating neurological disorders are its high expression in many off-target tissues such as liver and heart, and lack of cell specificity within the central nervous system (CNS) when using ubiquitous promoters such as human cytomegalovirus (CMV) or chicken-β-actin hybrid (CAG). To enhance targeting the transgene expression in CNS cells, self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors, scAAV9-GFP vectors carrying neuronal Hb9 and synapsin 1, and nonspecific CMV and CAG promoters were constructed. We demonstrate that synapsin 1 and Hb9 promoters exclusively targeted neurons in vitro, although their strengths were up to 10-fold lower than that of CMV. In vivo analyses of mouse tissue after scAAV9-GFP vector delivery via the cisterna magna revealed a significant advantage of synapsin 1 promoter over both Hb9 variants in targeting neurons throughout the brain, since Hb9 promoters were driving gene expression mainly within the motor-related areas of the brain stem. In summary, this study demonstrates that cisterna magna administration is a safe alternative to intracranial or intracerebroventricular vector delivery route using scAAV9, and introduces a novel utility of the Hb9 promoter for the targeted gene expression for both in vivo and in vitro applications. PMID:26942208

  12. Self-Complementary Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors Improve Transduction Efficiency of Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gruenert, Anja K.; Czugala, Marta; Mueller, Chris; Schmeer, Marco; Schleef, Martin; Kruse, Friedrich E.; Fuchsluger, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of a donor cornea to restore vision is the most frequently performed transplantation in the world. Corneal endothelial cells (CEC) are crucial for the outcome of a graft as they maintain corneal transparency and avoid graft failure due to corneal opaqueness. Given the characteristic of being a monolayer and in direct contact with culture medium during cultivation in eye banks, CEC are specifically suitable for gene therapeutic approaches prior to transplantation. Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2) vectors represent a promising tool for gene therapy of CEC. However, high vector titers are needed to achieve sufficient gene expression. One of the rate-limiting steps for transgene expression is the conversion of single-stranded (ss-) DNA vector genome into double-stranded (ds-) DNA. This step can be bypassed by using self-complementary (sc-) AAV2 vectors. Aim of this study was to compare for the first time transduction efficiencies of ss- and scAAV2 vectors in CEC. For this purpose AAV2 vectors containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) as transgene were used. Both in CEC and in donor corneas, transduction with scAAV2 resulted in significantly higher transgene expression compared to ssAAV2. The difference in transduction efficiency decreased with increasing vector titer. In most cases, only half the vector titer of scAAV2 was required for equal or higher gene expression rates than those of ssAAV2. In human donor corneas, GFP expression was 64.7±11.3% (scAAV) and 38.0±8.6% (ssAAV) (p<0.001), respectively. Furthermore, transduced cells maintained their viability and showed regular morphology. Working together with regulatory authorities, a translation of AAV2 vector-mediated gene therapy to achieve a temporary protection of corneal allografts during cultivation and transplantation could therefore become more realistic. PMID:27023329

  13. The state of the art of adeno-associated virus-based vectors in gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Renata dos Santos; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2007-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) has rapidly gained popularity in gene therapy since the establishment of the first AAV2 infectious clone, in 1982, due to some of their distinguishing characteristics such as lack of pathogenicity, wide range of infectivity, and ability to establish long-term transgene expression. Notably over the past decade, this virus has attracted considerable interest as a gene therapy vector, and about 85% of the currently available 2,041 PubMed references on adeno-associated viruses have been published during this time. The exponential progress of AAV-based vectors has been made possible by the advances in the knowledge of the virology and biology of this virus, which allows great improvement in AAV vectors construction and a better comprehension of their operation. Moreover, with the recent discovery of novel AAV serotypes, there is virtually one preferred serotype for nearly every organ or tissue to target. Thus, AAV-based vectors have been successfully overcoming the main gene therapy challenges such as transgene maintenance, safety and host immune response, and meeting the desirable vector system features of high level of safety combined with clinical efficacy and versatility in terms of potential applications. Consequently, AAV is increasingly becoming the vector of choice for a wide range of gene therapy approaches. This report will highlight the state of the art of AAV-based vectors studies and the advances on the use of AAV vectors for several gene therapy approaches. PMID:17939872

  14. Modular adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors used for cellular virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Sven; Baumann, Tobias; Wagner, Hanna J; Morath, Volker; Kaufmann, Beate; Fischer, Adrian; Bergmann, Stefan; Schindler, Patrick; Arndt, Katja M; Müller, Kristian M

    2014-01-01

    The pre-clinical and clinical development of viral vehicles for gene transfer increased in recent years, and a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) drug took center stage upon approval in the European Union. However, lack of standardization, inefficient purification methods and complicated retargeting limit general usability. We address these obstacles by fusing rAAV-2 capsids with two modular targeting molecules (DARPin or Affibody) specific for a cancer cell-surface marker (EGFR) while simultaneously including an affinity tag (His-tag) in a surface-exposed loop. Equipping these particles with genes coding for prodrug converting enzymes (thymidine kinase or cytosine deaminase) we demonstrate tumor marker specific transduction and prodrug-dependent apoptosis of cancer cells. Coding terminal and loop modifications in one gene enabled specific and scalable purification. Our genetic parts for viral production adhere to a standardized cloning strategy facilitating rapid prototyping of virus directed enzyme prodrug therapy (VDEPT). PMID:24457557

  15. Current Challenges and Future Directions in Recombinant AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    Various characteristics of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors with long-term safe expression have made it an exciting transduction tool for clinical gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although host immune reactions against the vector as well as transgene products were detected in some instances of the clinical studies, there have been promising observations. Methods of producing AAV vectors for considerable in vivo experimentation and clinical investigations have been developed and a number of studies with AAV vector-mediated muscle transduction were attempted. Notably, an intravenous limb perfusion transduction technique enables extensive transgene expression in the skeletal muscles without noticeable adverse events. Furthermore, cardiac transduction by the rAAV9-microdystrophin would be promising to prevent development of cardiac dysfunction. Recent achievements in transduction technology suggest that long-term transgene expression with therapeutic benefits in DMD treatment would be achieved by the rAAV-mediated transduction strategy with an adequate regimen to regulate host immune response. PMID:24276316

  16. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 replication and packaging is entirely supported by a herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon expressing Rep and Cap.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, J E; Zolotukhin, S; Muzyczka, N; Hayward, G S; Byrne, B J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 (rAAV) vectors have recently been shown to have great utility as gene transfer agents both in vitro and in vivo. One of the problems associated with the use of rAAV vectors has been the difficulty of large-scale vector production. Low-efficiency plasmid transfection of the rAAV vector and complementing AAV type 2 (AAV-2) functions (rep and cap) followed by superinfection with adenovirus has been the standard approach to rAAV production. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the ability of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon expressing AAV-2 Rep and Cap to support replication and packaging of rAAV vectors. HSV-1 amplicon vectors were constructed which contain the AAV-2 rep and cap genes under control of their native promoters (p5, p19, and p40). An HSV-1 amplicon vector, HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27, was generated by supplying helper functions with either wild-type HSV-1 (KOS strain) or the ICP27-deleted mutant of HSV-1, d27-1, respectively. Replication of the amplicon stocks is not inhibited by the presence of AAV-2 Rep proteins, which highlights important differences between HSV-1 and adenovirus replication and the mechanism of providing helper function for productive AAV infection. Coinfection of rAAV and HSV-RC/KOS resulted in the replication and amplification of rAAV genomes. Similarly, rescue and replication of rAAV genomes occurred when rAAV vector plasmids were transfected into cells followed by HSV-RC/KOS infection and when two rAAV proviral cell lines were infected with HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27. Production of infectious rAAV by rescue from two rAAV proviral cell lines has also been achieved with HSV-RC/KOS and HSV-RC/d27. The particle titer of rAAV produced with HSV-RC/d27 is equal to that achieved by supplying rep and cap by transfection followed by adenovirus superinfection. Importantly, no detectable wild-type AAV-2 is generated with this approach. These results demonstrate

  17. A Molecular Toolbox for Rapid Generation of Viral Vectors to Up- or Down-Regulate Neuronal Gene Expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    White, Melanie D.; Milne, Ruth V. J.; Nolan, Matthew F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins, and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV) or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1, and Kir3.2) and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miRNA). We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miRNA produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miRNA with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience. PMID:21772812

  18. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vector: use for transgene expression and anterograde tract tracing in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlin, Nancy L.; Du, Bin; de Lacalle, Sonsoles; Saper, Clifford B.

    2016-01-01

    We used a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (AAV) to deliver a foreign gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), into mature neurons in adult rat CNS in vivo. Microinjections of AAV as small as 50 nl transduced hundreds of neurons at the injection site. There was virtually no retrograde transport as fewer than one neuron per brain was found distant from the injection site that exhibited GFP immunoreactivity. The gene product, GFP, filled the entire neuronal cytoplasmic compartment; GFP immunoreactivity was robust in cell bodies, axons, and nerve terminals. There was no tissue damage at the injection sites or pathogenicity indicated by changes in astrocytic or microglial markers. There was no inflammatory response as judged by leukocytic invasion. Gene expression in transduced cells was robust and apparently permanent: there was no evidence of phenotypic reversion up to 12 weeks following infection. AAV is an excellent vector for introducing foreign genes into mature CNS neurons. Not only might it be an ideal vehicle for gene therapy, but also the GFP-containing AAV presents a new strategy for tracing long axonal pathways in the CNS, which is difficult with current tracers (PHAL, biotinylated dextrans). PMID:9630611

  19. Impact of Preexisting Vector Immunity on the Efficacy of Adeno-Associated Virus-Based HIV-1 Gag Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianping; Calcedo, Roberto; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Figueredo, Joanita M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Vectors based on primate-derived adeno-associated virus (AAV) are being considered in the development of genetic vaccines against a number of diseases including infection with HIV-1. Preexisting immunity to the vaccine carrier as a result of natural infections could potentially compromise vaccine efficacy. This study evaluates the impact of neutralizing antibodies against AAV capsids on the ability of HIV-1 Gag-expressing vectors to elicit transgene-specific T and B cell responses. Mice were passively transferred with pooled human immunoglobulin at various doses to simulate human antivector humoral immunity. Vectors based on serotype 2, which were evaluated in the clinic, were compared with those created from the novel monkey isolates AAV7 and AAV8. Inhibition of AAV2-directed Gag responses occurred at doses of human immunoglobulin 10- to 20-fold less than was required to inhibit immunogenicity of AAV7 and AAV8 vectors. Cynomolgus macaques were screened for preexisting immunity to AAV7 and AAV8 and sera from individual animals were passively transferred into mice that were analyzed for AAV vaccine efficacy. There was a correlation between the level of preexisting capsid neutralizing titers and diminution of vaccine efficacy; sera from a number of animals with no detectable neutralizing antibodies showed partial vaccine inhibition, suggesting that the in vitro assay is less sensitive than the in vivo passive transfer assay for detecting neutralizing antibodies to AAV. PMID:18549307

  20. Enhanced Transgene Expression from Recombinant Single-Stranded D-Sequence-Substituted Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors in Human Cell Lines In Vitro and in Murine Hepatocytes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Lina; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.; Aslanidi, George V.; Li, Baozheng; Cheng, Binbin; Ma, Wenqin; Lentz, Thomas; Ling, Changquan; Xiao, Xiao; Samulski, R. Jude; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously reported that the removal of a 20-nucleotide sequence, termed the D sequence, from both ends of the inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) in the adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) genome significantly impairs rescue, replication, and encapsidation of the viral genomes (X. S. Wang, S. Ponnazhagan, and A. Srivastava, J Mol Biol 250:573–580, 1995; X. S. Wang, S. Ponnazhagan, and A. Srivastava, J Virol 70:1668–1677, 1996). Here we describe that replacement of only one D sequence in either ITR restores each of these functions, but DNA strands of only single polarity are encapsidated in mature progeny virions. Since most commonly used recombinant AAV vectors contain a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which is transcriptionally inactive, efficient transgene expression from AAV vectors is dependent upon viral second-strand DNA synthesis. We have also identified a transcription suppressor sequence in one of the D sequences, which shares homology with the binding site for the cellular NF-κB-repressing factor (NRF). The removal of this D sequence from, and replacement with a sequence containing putative binding sites for transcription factors in, single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) vectors significantly augments transgene expression both in human cell lines in vitro and in murine hepatocytes in vivo. The development of these genome-modified ssAAV vectors has implications not only for the basic biology of AAV but also for the optimal use of these vectors in human gene therapy. IMPORTANCE The results of the studies described here not only have provided novel insights into some of the critical steps in the life cycle of a human virus, the adeno-associated virus (AAV), that causes no known disease but have also led to the development of novel recombinant AAV vectors which are more efficient in allowing increased levels of gene expression. Thus, these studies have significant implications for the potential use of these novel AAV vectors in human gene therapy

  1. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Vivian W; Bigelow, Chad E; McGee, Terri L; Gujar, Akshata N; Li, Hui; Hanks, Shawn M; Vrouvlianis, Joanna; Maker, Michael; Leehy, Barrett; Zhang, Yiqin; Aranda, Jorge; Bounoutas, George; Demirs, John T; Yang, Junzheng; Ornberg, Richard; Wang, Yu; Martin, Wendy; Stout, Kelly R; Argentieri, Gregory; Grosenstein, Paul; Diaz, Danielle; Turner, Oliver; Jaffee, Bruce D; Police, Seshidhar R; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs) composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein). A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types) at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1) had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone) and photopic (cone) electroretinograms (ERGs). The effect was still present after 1 year. PMID:26199951

  2. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W; Bigelow, Chad E; McGee, Terri L; Gujar, Akshata N; Li, Hui; Hanks, Shawn M; Vrouvlianis, Joanna; Maker, Michael; Leehy, Barrett; Zhang, Yiqin; Aranda, Jorge; Bounoutas, George; Demirs, John T; Yang, Junzheng; Ornberg, Richard; Wang, Yu; Martin, Wendy; Stout, Kelly R; Argentieri, Gregory; Grosenstein, Paul; Diaz, Danielle; Turner, Oliver; Jaffee, Bruce D; Police, Seshidhar R; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs) composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein). A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types) at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1) had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone) and photopic (cone) electroretinograms (ERGs). The effect was still present after 1 year. PMID:26199951

  3. scAAV-Mediated Gene Transfer of Interleukin 1-Receptor Antagonist to Synovium and Articular Cartilage in Large Mammalian Joints

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rachael S.; Broome, Ted A.; Levings, Padraic P.; Rice, Bret L.; Kay, Jesse D.; Smith, Andrew D.; Gouze, Elvire; Gouze, Jean-Noel; Dacanay, E. Anthony; Hauswirth, William W.; Nickerson, David M.; Dark, Michael J.; Colahan, Patrick T.; Ghivizzani, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    With the long-term goal of developing a gene-based treatment for osteoarthritis (OA), we performed studies to evaluate the equine joint as a model for AAV-mediated gene transfer to large, weight-bearing human joints. A self-complementary AAV2 vector containing the coding regions for human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hIL-1Ra) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) was packaged in AAV capsid serotypes 1, 2, 5, 8 and 9. Following infection of human and equine synovial fibroblasts in culture, we found that both were only receptive to transduction with AAV1, 2 and 5. For these serotypes, however, transgene expression from the equine cells was consistently at least 10-fold higher. Analyses of AAV surface receptor molecules and intracellular trafficking of vector genomes implicate enhanced viral uptake by the equine cells. Following delivery of 1 × 1011 vector genomes of serotypes 2, 5 and 8 into the forelimb joints of the horse, all three enabled hIL-1Ra expression at biologically relevant levels and effectively transduced the same cell types, primarily synovial fibroblasts and, to a lesser degree, chondrocytes in articular cartilage. These results provide optimism that AAV vectors can be effectively adapted for gene delivery to large human joints affected by OA. PMID:23151520

  4. Differential Effects of AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3 in the Deafened Adult Guinea Pig Ear

    PubMed Central

    Budenz, Cameron L.; Wong, Hiu Tung; Swiderski, Donald L.; Shibata, Seiji B.; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear hair cell loss results in secondary regression of peripheral auditory fibers (PAFs) and loss of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). The performance of cochlear implants (CI) in rehabilitating hearing depends on survival of SGNs. Here we compare the effects of adeno-associated virus vectors with neurotrophin gene inserts, AAV.BDNF and AAV.Ntf3, on guinea pig ears deafened systemically (kanamycin and furosemide) or locally (neomycin). AAV.BDNF or AAV.Ntf3 was delivered to the guinea pig cochlea one week following deafening and ears were assessed morphologically 3 months later. At that time, neurotrophins levels were not significantly elevated in the cochlear fluids, even though in vitro and shorter term in vivo experiments demonstrate robust elevation of neurotrophins with these viral vectors. Nevertheless, animals receiving these vectors exhibited considerable re-growth of PAFs in the basilar membrane area. In systemically deafened animals there was a negative correlation between the presence of differentiated supporting cells and PAFs, suggesting that supporting cells influence the outcome of neurotrophin over-expression aimed at enhancing the cochlear neural substrate. Counts of SGN in Rosenthal's canal indicate that BDNF was more effective than NT-3 in preserving SGNs. The results demonstrate that a transient elevation in neurotrophin levels can sustain the cochlear neural substrate in the long term. PMID:25726967

  5. Engineering AAV receptor footprints for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Victoria J; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently at the forefront of human gene therapy clinical trials as recombinant vectors. Significant progress has been made in elucidating the structure, biology and tropisms of different naturally occurring AAV isolates in the past decade. In particular, a spectrum of AAV capsid interactions with host receptors have been identified and characterized. These studies have enabled a better understanding of key determinants of AAV cell recognition and entry in different hosts. This knowledge is now being applied toward engineering new, lab-derived AAV capsids with favorable transduction profiles. The current review conveys a structural perspective of capsid-glycan interactions and provides a roadmap for generating synthetic strains by engineering AAV receptor footprints. PMID:27262111

  6. Correction of Murine Diabetic Hyperglycaemia With A Single Systemic Administration of An AAV2/8 Vector Containing A Novel Codon Optimized Human Insulin Gene.

    PubMed

    Uin, Gan Shu; Maria, Notaridou; Ying, Fu Zhen; Kok Onn, Lee; Chuan, Sia Kian; Chunilal, Nathwani Amit; Marco, Della Peruta; Yorke, Calne Roy

    2016-01-01

    We report the correction of hyperglycemia of STZ induced diabetic mice using one intravenous systemic administration of a single stranded serotype 8 pseudotyped adeno-associated virus (ssAAV2/8) vector encoding the human proinsulin gene under a constitutive liver specific promoter. In vivo dose titration experiments were carried out and we identified an optimal range that achieved maintenance of euglycaemia or a mild diabetic condition for at least 9 months and ongoing to beyond 1 year for some animals, accompanied by human C-peptide secretion and weight gain. Further DNA codon optimization of the insulin gene construct resulted in approximately 3-10 times more human C-peptide secreted in the blood of codon optimized treated animals thereby reducing the number of vector particles required to achieve the same extent of reduction in blood glucose levels as the non-codon optimized vector. The constitutive secretion of insulin achieved with a single administration of the vector could be of therapeutic value for some diabetic patients. PMID:26795016

  7. AAV vector encoding human VEGF165–transduced pectineus muscular flaps increase the formation of new tissue through induction of angiogenesis in an in vivo chamber for tissue engineering: A technique to enhance tissue and vessels in microsurgically engineered tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moimas, Silvia; Manasseri, Benedetto; Cuccia, Giuseppe; Stagno d’Alcontres, Francesco; Geuna, Stefano; Pattarini, Lucia; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Colonna, Michele R

    2015-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, new approaches are required for the creation of tissue substitutes, and the interplay between different research areas, such as tissue engineering, microsurgery and gene therapy, is mandatory. In this article, we report a modification of a published model of tissue engineering, based on an arterio-venous loop enveloped in a cross-linked collagen–glycosaminoglycan template, which acts as an isolated chamber for angiogenesis and new tissue formation. In order to foster tissue formation within the chamber, which entails on the development of new vessels, we wondered whether we might combine tissue engineering with a gene therapy approach. Based on the well-described tropism of adeno-associated viral vectors for post-mitotic tissues, a muscular flap was harvested from the pectineus muscle, inserted into the chamber and transduced by either AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 or AAV vector expressing the reporter gene β-galactosidase, as a control. Histological analysis of the specimens showed that muscle transduction by AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 resulted in enhanced tissue formation, with a significant increase in the number of arterioles within the chamber in comparison with the previously published model. Pectineus muscular flap, transduced by adeno-associated viral vectors, acted as a source of the proangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, thus inducing a consistent enhancement of vessel growth into the newly formed tissue within the chamber. In conclusion, our present findings combine three different research fields such as microsurgery, tissue engineering and gene therapy, suggesting and showing the feasibility of a mixed approach for regenerative medicine. PMID:26848383

  8. Fetal Brain-directed AAV Gene Therapy Results in Rapid, Robust, and Persistent Transduction of Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marie Reine; Donsante, Anthony; Zerfas, Patricia; Kaler, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Fetal brain-directed gene addition represents an under-appreciated tool for investigating novel therapeutic approaches in animal models of central nervous system diseases with early prenatal onset. Choroid plexuses (CPs) are specialized neuroectoderm-derived structures that project into the brain's ventricles, produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and regulate CSF biochemical composition. Targeting the CP may be advantageous for adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy for central nervous system disorders due to its immunoprivileged location and slow rate of epithelial turnover. Yet the capacity of AAV vectors to transduce CP has not been delineated precisely. We performed intracerebroventricular injections of recombinant AAV serotype 5-green fluorescent protein (rAAV5-GFP) or rAAV9-GFP in embryonic day 15 (E15) embryos of CD-1 and C57BL/6 pregnant mice and quantified the percentages of GFP expression in CP epithelia (CPE) from lateral and fourth ventricles on E17, postnatal day 2 (P2), and P22. AAV5 was selective for CPE and showed significantly higher transduction efficiency in C57BL/6 mice (P = 0.0128). AAV9 transduced neurons and glial cells in both the mouse strains, in addition to CPE. We documented GFP expression in CPE on E17, within just 48 hours of rAAV administration to the fetal lateral ventricle, and expression by both the serotypes persisted at P130. Our results indicate that prenatal administration of rAAV5 and rAAV9 enables rapid, robust, and sustained transduction of mouse CPE and buttress the rationale for experimental therapeutics targeting the CP.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e101; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.27; published online 25 June 2013. PMID:23799375

  9. Gene therapy for hemophilia B mice with scAAV8-LP1-hFIX.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Zhou, Qingzhang; Yang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Gu, Yexing; Shen, Qi; Xue, Jinglun; Dong, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia B is a hemorrhagic disease caused by the deficiency of clotting factor IX (FIX). Gene therapy might be the ultimate strategy for the disease. However, two main problems that should be solved in gene therapy for hemophilia B are immunity and safety. Self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (scAAV8), a non-human primate AAV featuring low immunogenicity and high transfection efficiency in liver cells, might be a potential vector for hemophilia B gene therapy. A strong liver-specific promoter-1 (LP1) was inserted and mutant human FIX Arg338Ala was introduced into plasmid scAAV8-LP1 to develop an optimized AAV8 vector that expresses human clotting factor FIX (hFIX). The efficiency of scAAV8-LP1-hFIX administered through normal systemic injection or hydrodynamic injection was compared. A high expression was achieved using hydrodynamic injection, and the peak hFIX expression levels in the 5 × 10(11) and 1 × 10(11) virus genome (vg) cohorts were 31.94% and 25.02% of normal level, respectively, at 60 days post-injection. From the perspective of long-term (200 days) expression, both injection methods presented promising results with the concentration value maintained above 4% of normal plasma. The results were further verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and activated partial thromboplastin time. Our study provides a potential gene therapy method for hemophilia B. PMID:27052253

  10. Bacteriophage lambda-based expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A C

    2001-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda has been in use as a cloning vector for over 25 years, and has been used extensively as an expression vector. The efficiency of packaging and infection, and the simplicity of plaque screening are advantages of lambda as a cloning vector. A number of ingenious modifications help overcome the disadvantages associated with its mode of growth and its size. Some lambda vectors have been designed to be readily converted into plasmids or phagemids, and there are a variety of promoters and fusions that can be used to drive expression of foreign genes. Screening lambda libraries with antibodies or ligands is a powerful way of identifying novel genes. PMID:11434310

  11. AAV ancestral reconstruction library enables selection of broadly infectious viral variants.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Ortiz, J; Ojala, D S; Westesson, O; Weinstein, J R; Wong, S Y; Steinsapir, A; Kumar, S; Holmes, I; Schaffer, D V

    2015-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. However, enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties and to gain insights into AAV's evolutionary history, we computationally designed and experimentally constructed a putative ancestral AAV library. Combinatorial variations at 32 amino acid sites were introduced to account for uncertainty in their identities. We then analyzed the evolutionary flexibility of these residues, the majority of which have not been previously studied, by subjecting the library to iterative selection on a representative cell line panel. The resulting variants exhibited transduction efficiencies comparable to the most efficient extant serotypes and, in general, ancestral libraries were broadly infectious across the cell line panel, indicating that they favored promiscuity over specificity. Interestingly, putative ancestral AAVs were more thermostable than modern serotypes and did not use sialic acids, galactose or heparan sulfate proteoglycans for cellular entry. Finally, variants mediated 19- to 31-fold higher gene expression in the muscle compared with AAV1, a clinically used serotype for muscle delivery, highlighting their promise for gene therapy. PMID:26186661

  12. Recombinant AAV as a Platform for Translating the Therapeutic Potential of RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Florie; Kay, Mark A; Mueller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference has become a ubiquitous biological tool, and is being harnessed for therapeutic purposes as well. Therapeutic posttranscriptional gene silencing takes advantage of the endogenous RNAi pathway through delivery of either chemically synthesized siRNAs, or transgenes expressing hairpin-based inhibitory RNAs (e.g., shRNAs and artificial miRNAs). RNAi has expanded the field of viral gene therapy from gene replacement to gene knockdown. Here, we review various noncoding RNAs such as shRNAs, miRNAs, and miRNA decoys which can be utilized for therapeutic applications when expressed from recombinant adeno-associated vectors (AAV), and present examples of their basic design. In addition the basis of exploiting cellular miRNA profiles for detargeting AAV expression from specific cells is described. Finally, an overview of AAV-mediated RNAi preclinical studies is presented, and current RNAi-based clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:24352214

  13. Preclinical Dose-Escalation Study of Intravitreal AAV-RS1 Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of X-linked Retinoschisis: Dose-Dependent Expression and Improved Retinal Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Colosi, Peter; Kjellstrom, Sten; Hiriyanna, Suja; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Santos, Maria; Li, Jinbo; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases has been shown to ameliorate functional and structural defects in both animal models and in human clinical trials. X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is an early-age onset macular dystrophy resulting from loss of an extracellular matrix protein (RS1). In preparation for a human clinical gene therapy trial, we conducted a dose-range efficacy study of the clinical vector, a self-complementary AAV delivering a human retinoschisin (RS1) gene under control of the RS1 promoter and an interphotoreceptor binding protein enhancer (AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS), in the retinoschisin knockout (Rs1-KO) mouse. The therapeutic vector at 1 × 10(6) to 2.5 × 10(9) (1E6-2.5E9) vector genomes (vg)/eye or vehicle was administered to one eye of 229 male Rs1-KO mice by intravitreal injection at 22 ± 3 days postnatal age (PN). Analysis of retinal function (dark-adapted electroretinogram, ERG), structure (cavities and outer nuclear layer thickness) by in vivo retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography, and retinal immunohistochemistry (IHC) for RS1 was done 3-4 months and/or 6-9 months postinjection (PI). RS1 IHC staining was dose dependent across doses ≥1E7 vg/eye, and the threshold for significant improvement in all measures of retinal structure and function was 1E8 vg/eye. Higher doses, however, did not produce additional improvement. At all doses showing efficacy, RS1 staining in Rs1-KO mouse was less than that in wild-type mice. Improvement in the ERG and RS1 staining was unchanged or greater at 6-9 months than at 3-4 months PI. This study demonstrates that vitreal administration of AAV8 scRS/IRBPhRS produces significant improvement in retinal structure and function in the mouse model of XLRS over a vector dose range that can be extended to a human trial. It indicates that a fully normal level of RS1 expression is not necessary for a therapeutic effect. PMID:27036983

  14. AAV Natural Infection Induces Broad Cross-Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Multiple AAV Serotypes in Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to seronegative nonhuman primates that is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified 3 distinct groups of animals: those that never seroconverted to AAV (naïve), those that were persistently seropositive (chronic), and those that seroconverted during the 10-year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad seroresponse characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes. PMID:27314914

  15. Intra-Amniotic rAAV-Mediated Microdystrophin Gene Transfer Improves Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy and May Induce Immune Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Hironori; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Chiyo, Tomoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe congenital disease due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. Supplementation of dystrophin using recombinant adenoassociated virus vector has promise as a treatment of DMD, although therapeutic benefit of the truncated dystrophin still remains to be elucidated. Besides, host immune responses against the vector as well as transgene products have been denoted in the clinical gene therapy studies. Here, we transduced dystrophic dogs fetuses to investigate the therapeutic effects of an AAV vector expressing microdystrophin under conditions of immune tolerance. rAAV-CMV-microdystrophin and a rAAV-CAG-luciferase were injected into the amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. We also reinjected rAAV9-CMV-microdystrophin into the jugular vein of an infant dystrophic dog to induce systemic expression of microdystrophin. Gait and cardiac function significantly improved in the rAAV-microdystrophin-injected dystrophic dog, suggesting that an adequate treatment of rAAV-microdystrophin with immune modulation induces successful long-term transgene expression to analyze improved dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25586688

  16. Immunodominant Liver-Specific Expression Suppresses Transgene-Directed Immune Responses in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R.; Clay, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression

  17. Immunodominant liver-specific expression suppresses transgene-directed immune responses in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R; Clay, Timothy M; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-05-01

    Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression might best

  18. Impact of Age at Administration, Lysosomal Storage, and Transgene Regulatory Elements on AAV2/8-Mediated Rat Liver Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotugno, Gabriella; Annunziata, Patrizia; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Karali, Marianthi; Banfi, Sandro; Auricchio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Liver-directed gene transfer is being investigated for the treatment of systemic or liver-specific diseases. Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) efficiently transduce liver cells allowing long term transgene expression after a single administration in animal models and in patients. We evaluated the impact on AAV2/8-mediated rat liver transduction of the following variables: i) age at vector administration, ii) presence of lysosomal storage in liver cells, and iii) regulatory elements included in the transgene expression cassette. We found that systemic administration of AAV2/8 to newborn rats results in vector genome dilution and reduced transduction efficacy when compared to adult injected animals, presumably due to hepatocyte proliferation. Accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes does not impact on levels and distribution of AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction. Transgene expression occurs in hepatocytes but not in Kupffer or liver endothelial cells when the liver-specific thyroxine-binding-globulin promoter is used. However, extra-hepatic transduction is observed in the spleen and kidney of animals injected at birth. The use of target sequences for the hematopoietic-specific microRNA miR142-3p does not improve liver transduction efficacy neither reduce immune responses to the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase B. The inclusion of a variant of the Woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE-m) decreases AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction levels. As AAV2/8-mediated liver gene transfer is entering in the clinical arena, these data will provide relevant information to the design of efficient AAV2/8-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:22428010

  19. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant NT4-NAP/AAV Exerts Potential Antidepressant Effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xian-Cang; Chu, Zheng; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Jiang, Wen-Hui; Jia, Min; Dang, Yong-Hui; Gao, Cheng-Ge

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to construct a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) which can express NAP in the brain and examine whether this virus can produce antidepressant effects on C57 BL/6 mice that had been subjected to open field test and forced swimming test, via nose-to-brain pathway. When the recombinant plasmid pGEM-T Easy/NT4-NAP was digested by EcoRI, 297 bp fragments can be obtained and NT4-NAP sequence was consistent with the designed sequence confirmed by DNA sequencing. When the recombinant plasmid pSSCMV/NT4-NAP was digested by EcoRI, 297 bp fragments is visible. Immunohistochemical staining of fibroblasts revealed that expression of NAP was detected in NT4-NAP/AAV group. Intranasal delivery of NT4-NAP/AAV significantly reduced immobility time when the FST was performed after 1 day from the last administration. The effects observed in the FST could not be attributed to non-specific increases in activity since intranasal delivery of NT4-NAP/AAV did not alter the behavior of the mice during the open field test. The results indicated that a recombinant AAV vector which could express NAP in cells was successfully constructed and NAP may be a potential target for therapeutic action of antidepressant treatment. PMID:26846142

  20. Evaluation of Vascular Delivery Methodologies to Enhance rAAV6-mediated Gene Transfer to Canine Striated Musculature

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Schultz, Brian R; Allen, James M; Halldorson, Jeffrey B; Blankinship, Michael J; Meznarich, Norman A; Kuhr, Christian S; Doremus, Caitlin; Finn, Eric; Liggitt, Denny; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the development of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for delivery of gene expression cassettes to striated musculature as a method of treating severe neuromuscular conditions. However, it is unclear whether delivery protocols that achieve extensive gene transfer in mice can be adapted to produce similarly extensive gene transfer in larger mammals and ultimately patients. Consequently, we sought to investigate methodological modifications that would facilitate rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the striated musculature of canines. A simple procedure incorporating acute (i) occlusion of limb blood flow, (ii) exsanguination via compression bandage, and (iii) vector “dwell” time of <20 minutes, markedly enhanced the transduction of limb muscles, compared with a simple bolus limb infusion of vector. A complementary method whereby vector was infused into the jugular vein led to efficient transduction of cardiomyocytes and to a lesser degree the diaphragm. Together these methods can be used to achieve transgene expression in heart, diaphragm, and limb muscles of juvenile dogs using rAAV6 vectors. These results establish that rAAV-mediated gene delivery is a viable approach to achieving systemic transduction of striated musculature in mammals approaching the dimensions of newborn humans. PMID:19471246

  1. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  2. Neonatal Systemic AAV Induces Tolerance to CNS Gene Therapy in MPS I Dogs and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Gloria; Choa, Ruth; Gurda, Brittney L; Bagel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Patricia; Sikora, Tracey; Ruane, Therese; Wang, Ping; Tarantal, Alice F; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Wilson, James M

    2015-08-01

    The potential host immune response to a nonself protein poses a fundamental challenge for gene therapies targeting recessive diseases. We demonstrate in both dogs and nonhuman primates that liver-directed gene transfer using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in neonates induces a persistent state of immunological tolerance to the transgene product, substantially improving the efficacy of subsequent vector administration targeting the central nervous system (CNS). We applied this approach to a canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), a progressive neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient activity of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA). MPS I dogs treated systemically in the first week of life with a vector expressing canine IDUA did not develop antibodies against the enzyme and exhibited robust expression in the CNS upon intrathecal AAV delivery at 1 month of age, resulting in complete correction of brain storage lesions. Newborn rhesus monkeys treated systemically with AAV vector expressing human IDUA developed tolerance to the transgene, resulting in high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IDUA expression and no antibody induction after subsequent CNS gene therapy. These findings suggest that inducing tolerance to the transgene product during a critical period in immunological development can improve the efficacy and safety of gene therapy. PMID:26022732

  3. Frequency and Spectrum of Genomic Integration of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Vector in Neonatal Mouse Liver▿

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Katsuya; Piao, Chuncheng; Kotchey, Nicole M.; Wu, Xiaolin; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Neonatal injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (rAAV8) vectors results in widespread transduction in multiple organs and therefore holds promise in neonatal gene therapy. On the other hand, insertional mutagenesis causing liver cancer has been implicated in rAAV-mediated neonatal gene transfer. Here, to better understand rAAV integration in neonatal livers, we investigated the frequency and spectrum of genomic integration of rAAV8 vectors in the liver following intraperitoneal injection of 2.0 × 1011 vector genomes at birth. This dose was sufficient to transduce a majority of hepatocytes in the neonatal period. In the first approach, we injected mice with a β-galactosidase-expressing vector at birth and quantified rAAV integration events by taking advantage of liver regeneration in a chronic hepatitis animal model and following partial hepatectomy. In the second approach, we performed a new, quantitative rAAV vector genome rescue assay by which we identified rAAV integration sites and quantified integrations. As a result, we find that at least ∼0.05% of hepatocytes contained rAAV integration, while the average copy number of integrated double-stranded vector genome per cell in the liver was ∼0.2, suggesting concatemer integration. Twenty-three of 34 integrations (68%) occurred in genes, but none of them were near the mir-341 locus, the common rAAV integration site found in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, rAAV8 vector integration occurs preferentially in genes at a frequency of 1 in approximately 103 hepatocytes when a majority of hepatocytes are once transduced in the neonatal period. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the relationship between vector dose and integration frequency or spectrum. PMID:18614641

  4. AAV ANCESTRAL RECONSTRUCTION LIBRARY ENABLES SELECTION OF BROADLY INFECTIOUS VIRAL VARIANTS

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge; Ojala, David S.; Westesson, Oscar; Weinstein, John R.; Wong, Sophie Y.; Steinsapir, Andrew; Kumar, Sanjay; Holmes, Ian; Schaffer, David V.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have achieved clinical efficacy in treating several diseases. Enhanced vectors are required to extend these landmark successes to other indications, however, and protein engineering approaches may provide the necessary vector improvements to address such unmet medical needs. To generate new capsid variants with potentially enhanced infectious properties, and to gain insights into AAV’s evolutionary history, we computationally designed and experimentally constructed a putative ancestral AAV library. Combinatorial variations at 32 amino acid sites were introduced to account for uncertainty in their identities. We then analyzed the evolutionary flexibility of these residues, the majority of which have not been previously studied, by subjecting the library to iterative selection on a representative cell line panel. The resulting variants exhibited transduction efficiencies comparable to the most efficient extant serotypes, and in general ancestral libraries were broadly infectious across the cell line panel, indicating that they favored promiscuity over specificity. Interestingly, putative ancestral AAVs were more thermostable than modern serotypes and did not utilize sialic acids, galactose, or heparan sulfate proteoglycans for cellular entry. Finally, variants mediated 19–31 fold higher gene expression in muscle compared to AAV1, a clinically utilized serotype for muscle delivery, highlighting their promise for gene therapy. PMID:26186661

  5. AAV-based Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A: Long-Term Correction and Avoidance of Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chuhong; Lipshutz, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy has been hampered by immune responses to vector-associated antigens and by neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors to the factor VIII (FVIII) protein; these ‘inhibitors’ more commonly effect hemophilia A patients than those with hemophilia B. A gene replacement strategy beginning in the neonatal period may avoid the development of these immune responses and lead to prolonged expression with correction of phenotype thereby avoiding long-term consequences. Serotype rh10 AAV was developed splitting the FVIII coding sequence into heavy and light chains with the chicken β-actin promoter/CMV enhancer for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery. Coinjection of virions of each FVIII chain intravenously to mice on the second day of life was performed. Mice express sustained FVIII antigen levels of ≥5% to 22 months of life without the development of antibodies to FVIII. Phenotypic correction was manifest in all AAV-FVIII-treated mice as demonstrated by functional assay and reduction in bleeding time. This study demonstrates the use of AAV in a gene replacement strategy in neonatal mice that establishes both long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A and lack of antibody development to FVIII in this disease model where AAV is administered shortly after birth. These studies support consideration of gene replacement therapy for diseases that are diagnosed in utero or in the early neonatal period. PMID:22241178

  6. Intramuscular scAAV9-SMN injection mediates widespread gene delivery to the spinal cord and decreases disease severity in SMA mice.

    PubMed

    Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Besse, Aurore; Roda, Marianne; Duque, Sandra; Astord, Stéphanie; Carcenac, Romain; Marais, Thibaut; Barkats, Martine

    2013-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated the remarkable efficiency of self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors for central nervous system (CNS) gene transfer following intravenous delivery in mice and larger animals. Here, we investigated whether gene delivery to motor neurons (MNs) could also be achieved via intramuscular (i.m.) scAAV9 injection and subsequent retrograde transport along the MNs axons. Unexpectedly, we found that a single injection of scAAV9 into the adult mouse gastrocnemius (GA) mediated widespread MN transduction along the whole spinal cord, without limitation to the MNs connected to the injected muscle. Spinal cord astrocytes and peripheral organs were also transduced, indicating vector spread from the injected muscle to both the CNS and the periphery through release into the blood circulation. Moreover, we showed that i.m. injection of scAAV9 vectors expressing "survival of motor neuron" (Smn) in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) mice mediated high survival motor neuron (SMN) expression levels at both the CNS and the periphery, and increased the median lifespan from 12 days to 163 days. These findings represent to date the longest extent in survival obtained in SMA mice following i.m. viral vector gene delivery, and might generate a renewed interest in the use of i.m. adeno-associated viruses (AAV) delivery for the development of gene therapy strategies for MN diseases. PMID:23295949

  7. Evasion of immune responses to introduced human acid alpha-glucosidase by liver-restricted expression in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Sun, Baodong; Yang, Xiaoyi; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Schneider, Ayn; Brown, Talmage; Young, Sarah P; Clay, Timothy M; Amalfitano, Andrea; Chen, Y T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease) is caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) and manifests as muscle weakness, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus vectors containing either a liver-specific promoter (LSP) (AAV-LSPhGAApA) or a hybrid CB promoter (AAV-CBhGAApA) to drive human GAA expression were pseudotyped as AAV8 and administered to immunocompetent GAA-knockout mice. Secreted hGAA was detectable in plasma between 1 day and 12 weeks postadministration with AAV-LSPhGAApA and only from 1 to 8 days postadministration for AAV-CBGAApA. No anti-GAA antibodies were detected in response to AAV-LSPhGAApA (<1:200), whereas AAV-CBhGAApA provoked an escalating antibody response starting 2 weeks postadministration. The LSP drove approximately 60-fold higher GAA expression than the CB promoter in the liver by 12 weeks following vector administration. Furthermore, the detected cellular immunity was provoked by AAV-CBhGAApA, as detected by ELISpot and CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte immunodetection. GAA activity was increased to higher than normal and glycogen content was reduced to essentially normal levels in the heart and skeletal muscle following administration of AAV-LSPhGAApA. Therefore, liver-restricted GAA expression with an AAV vector evaded immunity and enhanced efficacy in GSD-II mice. PMID:16005263

  8. Manufacturing of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Nathalie; Grieger, Joshua C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to elicit robust and long-term transgene expression in vivo together with minimal immunogenicity and little to no toxicity are only a few features that make recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors ideally suited for many gene therapy applications. Successful preclinical studies have encouraged the use of rAAV for therapeutic gene transfer to patients in the clinical setting. Nevertheless, the use of rAAV in clinical trials has underscored the need for production and purification systems capable of generating large amounts of highly pure rAAV particles. To date, generating vector quantities sufficient to meet the expanding clinical demand is still a hurdle when using current production systems. In this chapter, we will provide a description of the current methods to produce clinical grade of rAAV under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) settings. PMID:27014711

  9. Multilineage transduction of resident lung cells in vivo by AAV2/8 for α1-antitrypsin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Julia G; Takahashi, Ayuko; Higgins, Michelle I; Porter, Emily L; Suki, Bela; Balazs, Alejandro; Wilson, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery has long represented an appealing potential treatment approach for monogenic diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) but has proven challenging to achieve in practice. Alternate pseudotyping of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is producing vectors with increasingly heterogeneous tropic specificity, giving researchers the ability to target numerous end-organs affected by disease. Herein, we describe sustained pulmonary transgene expression for at least 52 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation of AAV2/8 and characterize the multiple cell types transduced within the lung utilizing this approach. We demonstrate that lung-directed AAV2/8 is able to achieve therapeutic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protein levels within the lung epithelial lining fluid and that AAT gene delivery ameliorates the severity of experimental emphysema in mice. We find that AAV2/8 efficiently transduces hepatocytes in vivo after intratracheal administration, a finding that may have significance for AAV-based human gene therapy studies. These results support direct transgene delivery to the lung as a potential alternative approach to achieve the goal of developing a gene therapy for AATD. PMID:27408904

  10. Factors Influencing Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Transfer to Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells: Comparison with Adenovirus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, S.; Bartlett, J. S.; McCarty, D.; Xiao, X.; Samulski, R. J.; Boucher, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors appear promising for use in gene therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, yet many features of AAV-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelial cells are not well understood. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV vectors and adenovirus (Ad) vectors in immortalized cell lines from CF patients and in nasal epithelial primary cultures from normal humans and CF patients. Similar dose-dependent relationships between the vector multiplicities of infection and the efficiencies of lacZ gene transfer were observed. However, levels of transduction for both Ad and recombinant AAV (rAAV) were significantly lower in the airway epithelial cell than in the control cell lines HeLa and HEK 293. Transduction efficiencies differed among cultured epithelial cell types, with poorly differentiated cells transducing more efficiently than well-differentiated cells. A time-dependent increase in gene expression was observed after infection for both vectors. For Ad, but not for AAV, this increase was dependent on prolonged incubation of cells with the vector. Furthermore, for rAAV (but not for rAd), the delay in maximal transduction could be abrogated by wild-type Ad helper infection. Thus, although helper virus is not required for maximal transduction, it increases the kinetics by which this is achieved. Expression of Ad E4 open reading frame 6 or addition of either hydroxyurea or camptothecin resulted in increased AAV transduction, as previously demonstrated for nonairway cells (albeit to lower final levels), suggesting that second-strand synthesis may not be the sole cause of inefficient transduction. Finally, the efficiency of AAV-mediated ex vivo gene transfer to lung cells was similar to that previously described for Ad vectors in that transduction was limited to regions of epithelial injury and preferentially targeted basal-like cells. These studies address the primary factors influencing rAAV infection of human airway cells and should

  11. Factors influencing adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer to human cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells: comparison with adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, S; Bartlett, J S; McCarty, D; Xiao, X; Samulski, R J; Boucher, R C

    1998-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors appear promising for use in gene therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, yet many features of AAV-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelial cells are not well understood. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV vectors and adenovirus (Ad) vectors in immortalized cell lines from CF patients and in nasal epithelial primary cultures from normal humans and CF patients. Similar dose-dependent relationships between the vector multiplicities of infection and the efficiencies of lacZ gene transfer were observed. However, levels of transduction for both Ad and recombinant AAV (rAAV) were significantly lower in the airway epithelial cell than in the control cell lines HeLa and HEK 293. Transduction efficiencies differed among cultured epithelial cell types, with poorly differentiated cells transducing more efficiently than well-differentiated cells. A time-dependent increase in gene expression was observed after infection for both vectors. For Ad, but not for AAV, this increase was dependent on prolonged incubation of cells with the vector. Furthermore, for rAAV (but not for rAd), the delay in maximal transduction could be abrogated by wild-type Ad helper infection. Thus, although helper virus is not required for maximal transduction, it increases the kinetics by which this is achieved. Expression of Ad E4 open reading frame 6 or addition of either hydroxyurea or camptothecin resulted in increased AAV transduction, as previously demonstrated for nonairway cells (albeit to lower final levels), suggesting that second-strand synthesis may not be the sole cause of inefficient transduction. Finally, the efficiency of AAV-mediated ex vivo gene transfer to lung cells was similar to that previously described for Ad vectors in that transduction was limited to regions of epithelial injury and preferentially targeted basal-like cells. These studies address the primary factors influencing rAAV infection of human airway cells and should

  12. Adeno-associated virus vectors: potential applications for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengwen; Bowles, Dawn E; van Dyke, Terry; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2006-01-01

    Augmenting cancer treatment by protein and gene delivery continues to gain momentum based on success in animal models. The primary hurdle of fully exploiting the arsenal of molecular targets and therapeutic transgenes continues to be efficient delivery. Vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are of particular interest as they are capable of inducing transgene expression in a broad range of tissues for a relatively long time without stimulation of a cell-mediated immune response. Perhaps the most important attribute of AAV vectors is their safety profile in phase I clinical trials ranging from CF to Parkinson’s disease. The utility of AAV vectors as a gene delivery agent in cancer therapy is showing promise in preclinical studies. In this review, we will focus on the basic biology of AAV as well as recent progress in the use of this vector in cancer gene therapy. PMID:15962012

  13. Systemic gene delivery following intravenous administration of AAV9 to fetal and neonatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Wong, Andrew M S; Hoefer, Klemens; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Howe, Steven J; Cooper, Jonathan D; Waddington, Simon N; Chan, Jerry K Y; Rahim, Ahad A

    2015-09-01

    Several acute monogenic diseases affect multiple body systems, causing death in childhood. The development of novel therapies for such conditions is challenging. However, improvements in gene delivery technology mean that gene therapy has the potential to treat such disorders. We evaluated the ability of the AAV9 vector to mediate systemic gene delivery after intravenous administration to perinatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates (NHPs). Titer-matched single-stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were intravenously administered to fetal and neonatal mice, with noninjected age-matched mice used as the control. Extensive GFP expression was observed in organs throughout the body, with the epithelial and muscle cells being particularly well transduced. ssAAV9 carrying the WPRE sequence mediated significantly more gene expression than its sc counterpart, which lacked the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) sequence. To examine a realistic scale-up to larger models or potentially patients for such an approach, AAV9 was intravenously administered to late-gestation NHPs by using a clinically relevant protocol. Widespread systemic gene expression was measured throughout the body, with cellular tropisms similar to those observed in the mouse studies and no observable adverse events. This study confirms that AAV9 can safely mediate systemic gene delivery in small and large animal models and supports its potential use in clinical systemic gene therapy protocols. PMID:26062602

  14. Plant Virus Expression Vector Development: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hefferon, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Plant made biologics have elicited much attention over recent years for their potential in assisting those in developing countries who have poor access to modern medicine. Additional applications such as the stockpiling of vaccines against pandemic infectious diseases or potential biological warfare agents are also under investigation. Plant virus expression vectors represent a technology that enables high levels of pharmaceutical proteins to be produced in a very short period of time. Recent advances in research and development have brought about the generation of superior virus expression systems which can be readily delivered to the host plant in a manner that is both efficient and cost effective. This review presents recent innovations in plant virus expression systems and their uses for producing biologics from plants. PMID:24745025

  15. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA. PMID:27404480

  16. Targeted genetic manipulations of neuronal subtypes using promoter-specific combinatorial AAVs in wild-type animals

    PubMed Central

    Gompf, Heinrich S.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Bass, Caroline E.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques to genetically manipulate the activity of defined neuronal subpopulations have been useful in elucidating function, however applicability to translational research beyond transgenic mice is limited. Subtype targeted transgene expression can be achieved using specific promoters, but often currently available promoters are either too large to package into many vectors, in particular adeno-associated virus (AAV), or do not drive expression at levels sufficient to alter behavior. To permit neuron subtype specific gene expression in wildtype animals, we developed a combinatorial AAV targeting system that drives, in combination, subtype specific Cre-recombinase expression with a strong but non-specific Cre-conditional transgene. Using this system we demonstrate that the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre-AAV) restricted expression of channelrhodopsin-2 (EF1α-DIO-ChR2-EYFP-AAV) to the rat ventral tegmental area (VTA), or an activating DREADD (hSyn-DIO-hM3Dq-mCherry-AAV) to  the  rat  locus  coeruleus  (LC). High expression levels were achieved in both regions. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed the majority of ChR2+ neurons (>93%) colocalized with TH in the VTA, and optical stimulation evoked striatal dopamine release. Activation of TH neurons in the LC produced sustained EEG and behavioral arousal. TH-specific hM3Dq expression in the LC was further compared with: (1) a Cre construct driven by a strong but non-specific promoter (non-targeting); and (2) a retrogradely-transported WGA-Cre delivery mechanism (targeting a specific projection). IHC revealed that the area of c-fos activation after CNO treatment in the LC and peri-LC neurons appeared proportional to the resulting increase in wakefulness (non-targeted > targeted > ACC to LC projection restricted). Our dual AAV targeting system effectively overcomes the large size and weak activity barrier prevalent with many subtype specific promoters by functionally separating subtype specificity from

  17. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H.; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 1012 viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30–50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients. PMID:23681067

  18. Safety and liver transduction efficacy of rAAV5-cohPBGD in nonhuman primates: a potential therapy for acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pañeda, Astrid; Lopez-Franco, Esperanza; Kaeppel, Christine; Unzu, Carmen; Gil-Royo, Ana Gloria; D'Avola, Delia; Beattie, Stuart G; Olagüe, Cristina; Ferrero, Roberto; Sampedro, Ana; Mauleon, Itsaso; Hermening, Stephan; Salmon, Florence; Benito, Alberto; Gavira, Juan Jose; Cornet, María Eugenia; del Mar Municio, María; von Kalle, Christof; Petry, Harald; Prieto, Jesus; Schmidt, Manfred; Fontanellas, Antonio; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2013-12-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) results from haplo-insufficient activity of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and is characterized clinically by life-threatening, acute neurovisceral attacks. To date, liver transplantation is the only curative option for AIP. The aim of the present preclinical nonhuman primate study was to determine the safety and transduction efficacy of an adeno-associated viral vector encoding PBGD (recombinant AAV serotype 5-codon-optimized human porphobilinogen deaminase, rAAV5-cohPBGD) administered intravenously as part of a safety program to start a clinical study in patients with AIP. Macaques injected with either 1 × 10(13) or 5 × 10(13) vector genomes/kg of clinical-grade rAAV5-cohPBGD were monitored by standardized clinical parameters, and vector shedding was analyzed. Liver transduction efficacy, biodistribution, vector integration, and histopathology at day 30 postvector administration were determined. There was no evidence of acute toxicity, and no adverse effects were observed. The vector achieved efficient and homogenous hepatocellular transduction, reaching transgenic PBGD expression levels equivalent to 50% of the naturally expressed PBGD mRNA. No cellular immune response was detected against the human PBGD or AAV capsid proteins. Integration site analysis in transduced liver cells revealed an almost random integration pattern supporting the good safety profile of rAAV5-cohPBGD. Together, data obtained in nonhuman primates indicate that rAAV5-cohPBGD represents a safe therapy to correct the metabolic defect present in AIP patients. PMID:24070415

  19. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Gortan Cappellari, Gianluca; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  20. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  1. BALB/c Mice Show Impaired Hepatic Tolerogenic Response Following AAV Gene Transfer to the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Breous, Ekaterina; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Wilson, James M

    2010-01-01

    Following adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer to the liver, both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice show long-term expression of nonself transgene antigens along with the absence of a transgene-specific immune response. However, in this study, we report that despite the equal ability to induce T-cell tolerance to vector-encoded antigens, the underlying mechanisms are entirely different in these two strains. We have previously shown that in C57BL/6 mice, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to systemic AAV-delivered antigens are suppressed by combined actions of hepatic regulatory T cells (Tregs), Kupffer cells, and hepatic suppressive cytokines. In stark contrast, our present findings reveal that such tolerogenic response is not induced in the liver of BALB/c mice systemically administered with AAV. As a result, these mice fail to suppress a transgene-specific CTL response induced by a strong immunogenic challenge and express dramatically reduced levels of AAV-encoded antigen. Interestingly, there was active B-cell tolerance to the transgene antigen, which was mediated by splenic Tregs. We conclude that lack of tolerance induction in the liver renders BALB/c mice susceptible to CTL-mediated clearance of transduced hepatocytes. PMID:20068550

  2. Large-Scale Production of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Serotype-9 Carrying the Human Survival Motor Neuron Gene.

    PubMed

    Rashnonejad, Afrooz; Chermahini, Gholamhossein Amini; Li, Shaoyong; Ozkinay, Ferda; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors are a suitable vector for gene therapy studies because of desired characteristics such as low immunogenicity, transfection of non-dividing and dividing cells, and long-term expression of the transgene. In this study, the large-scale production of single stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the human survival motor neuron (SMN) gene (AAV9-SMN) suitable for in vivo gene therapy studies of SMA was described. SMN cDNA has been cloned into pAAV-CB6-PI and pAAVsc-CB6-PI with and without its specific UTRs, respectively. Both plasmids bear CMV enhancer/beta-actin (CB) promoter, CMV IE enhancer, and polyadenylation signal sequences. 2.5 μg of constructed pAAV-CB6-PI-SMN and pAAVsc-CB6-PI-SMN cause to, respectively, 4.853- and 2.321-fold increases in SMN protein levels in transfected cells compared to untransfected cells. Ss and scAAV9-SMN vectors were also produced from these plasmids by transient transfection of HEK293 cells using CaCl2 solution. The silver staining and electron microscopy analysis demonstrated good quality of both isolated vectors, ssAAV9-SMN and scAAV9-SMN, with the titers of 2.00E+13 and 1.00E+13 GC/ml. The results of this study show that, the plasmid containing UTR elements causes to twice more SMN gene expression in transfected cells. The quality control results show that both produced ss and scAAV9-SMN are suitable for in vivo studies. PMID:26607476

  3. Large-Scale Production of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Serotype-9 Carrying the Human Survival Motor Neuron Gene

    PubMed Central

    RASHNONEJAD, Afrooz; CHERMAHINI, Gholamhossein AMINI; Li, Shaoyong; OZKINAY, Ferda; GAO, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors are a suitable vector for gene therapy studies because of desired characteristics such as low immunogenicity, transfection of non-dividing and dividing cells, and long-term expression of the transgene. In this study, the large-scale production of single stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the human survival motor neuron (SMN) gene (AAV9-SMN) suitable for in vivo gene therapy studies of SMA was described. SMN cDNA has been cloned into pAAV-CB6-PI and pAAVsc-CB6-PI with and without its specific UTRs, respectively. Both plasmids bear CMV enhancer/beta-actin (CB) promoter, CMV IE enhancer, and polyadenylation signal sequences. 2.5 μg of constructed pAAV-CB6-PI-SMN and pAAVsc-CB6-PI-SMN cause to, respectively, 4.853- and 2.321-fold increases in SMN protein levels in transfected cells compared to untransfected cells. Ss and scAAV9-SMN vectors were also produced from these plasmids by transient transfection of HEK293 cells using CaCl2 solution. The silver staining and electron microscopy analysis demonstrated good quality of both isolated vectors, ssAAV9-SMN and scAAV9- SMN, with the titers of 2.00E+13 and 1.00E+13 GC/ml. The results of this study show that, the plasmid containing UTR elements causes to twice more SMN gene expression in transfected cells. The quality control results show that both produced ss and scAAV9-SMN are suitable for in vivo studies. PMID:26607476

  4. Sexually Dimorphic Patterns of Episomal rAAV Genome Persistence in the Adult Mouse Liver and Correlation With Hepatocellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dane, Allison P; Cunningham, Sharon C; Graf, Nicole S; Alexander, Ian E

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAVs) show exceptional promise for liver-targeted gene therapy, with phenotype correction in small and large animal disease models being reported with increasing frequency. Success in humans, however, remains a considerable challenge that demands greater understanding of host–vector interactions, notably those governing the efficiency of initial gene transfer and subsequent long-term persistence of gene expression. In this study, we examined long-term enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genome persistence in the mouse liver after rAAV2/8-mediated gene transfer in early adulthood. Two intriguing findings emerged of considerable scientific and clinical interest. First, adult female and male mice showed distinctly different patterns of persistence of eGFP expression across the hepatic lobule after exhibiting similar patterns initially. Female mice retained a predominantly perivenous pattern of expression, whereas male mice underwent inversion of this pattern with preferential loss of perivenous expression and relative retention of periportal expression. Second, these changing patterns of expression correlated with sexually dimorphic patterns of genome persistence that appear linked both spatially and temporally to underlying hepatocellular proliferation. Observation of the equivalent phenomenon in man could have significant implications for the long-term therapeutic efficacy of rAAV-mediated gene transfer, particularly in the context of correction of liver functions showing metabolic zonation. PMID:19568224

  5. Improved Induction of Immune Tolerance to Factor IX by Hepatic AAV-8 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Mario; Nayak, Sushrusha; Hoffman, Brad E.; Terhorst, Cox; Cao, Ou

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Gene therapy for hemophilia B has been shown to result in long-term expression and immune tolerance to factor IX (F.IX) after in vivo transduction of hepatocytes with adeno-associated viral (AAV-2) vectors in experimental animals. An optimized protocol was effective in several strains of mice with a factor 9 gene deletion (F9−/−). However, immune responses against F.IX were repeatedly observed in C3H/HeJ F9−/− mice. We sought to establish a gene transfer protocol that results in sustained expression without a requirement for additional manipulation of the immune system. Compared with AAV-2, AAV-8 was more efficient in transgene expression and induction of tolerance to F.IX in three different strains of wild-type mice. At equal vector doses, AAV-8 induced transgene product-specific regulatory CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells at significantly higher frequency. Moreover, sustained correction of hemophilia B in C3H/HeJ F9−/− mice without antibody formation was documented in all animals treated with ≥4 × 1011 vector genomes (VG)/kg and in 80% of mice treated with 8 × 1010 VG/kg. Therefore, it is possible to develop a gene transfer protocol that reliably induces tolerance to F.IX largely independent of genetic factors. A comparison with other studies suggests that additional parameters besides plateau levels of F.IX expression contributed to the improved success rate of tolerance induction. PMID:19309290

  6. Feasibility and Safety of Systemic rAAV9-hNAGLU Delivery for Treating Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB: Toxicology, Biodistribution, and Immunological Assessments in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Murrey, Darren A.; Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Duncan, F. Jason; Meadows, Aaron S.; Ware, Tierra A.; Campbell, Katie J.; Bremer, William G.; Walker, Christopher M.; Goodchild, Laurie; Bolon, Brad; La Perle, Krista; Flanigan, Kevin M.; McBride, Kim L.; McCarty, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease caused by autosomal recessive defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In anticipation of a clinical gene therapy treatment for MPS IIIB in humans, we tested the rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU vector administration to cynomolgus monkeys (n=8) at 1E13 vg/kg or 2E13 vg/kg via intravenous injection. No adverse events or detectable toxicity occurred over a 6-month period. Gene delivery resulted in persistent global central nervous system and broad somatic transduction, with NAGLU activity detected at 2.9–12-fold above endogenous levels in somatic tissues and 1.3–3-fold above endogenous levels in the brain. Secreted rNAGLU was detected in serum. Low levels of preexisting anti-AAV9 antibodies (Abs) did not diminish vector transduction. Importantly, high-level preexisting anti-AAV9 Abs lead to reduced transduction in liver and other somatic tissues, but had no detectable impact on transgene expression in the brain. Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay showed Ab responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in treated animals. Serum anti-hNAGLU Abs, but not anti-AAV9 Abs, correlated with the loss of circulating rNAGLU enzyme. However, serum Abs did not affect tissue rNAGLU activity levels. Weekly or monthly peripheral blood interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assays detected a CD4+ T-cell (Th-1) response to rNAGLU only at 4 weeks postinjection in one treated subject, without observable correlation to tissue transduction levels. The treatment did not result in detectable CTL responses to either AAV9 or rNAGLU. Our data demonstrate an effective and safe profile for systemic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector delivery in nonhuman primates, supporting its clinical potential in humans. PMID:24720466

  7. The upstream enhancer elements of the G6PC promoter are critical for optimal G6PC expression in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mok; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Koeberl, Dwight D; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2013-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type-Ia (GSD-Ia) patients deficient in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) manifest impaired glucose homeostasis characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidemia. Two efficacious recombinant adeno-associated virus pseudotype 2/8 (rAAV8) vectors expressing human G6Pase-α have been independently developed. One is a single-stranded vector containing a 2864-bp of the G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-GPE) and the other is a double-stranded vector containing a shorter 382-bp minimal G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-miGPE). To identify the best construct, a direct comparison of the rAAV8-GPE and the rAAV8-miGPE vectors was initiated to determine the best vector to take forward into clinical trials. We show that the rAAV8-GPE vector directed significantly higher levels of hepatic G6Pase-α expression, achieved greater reduction in hepatic glycogen accumulation, and led to a better toleration of fasting in GSD-Ia mice than the rAAV8-miGPE vector. Our results indicated that additional control elements in the rAAV8-GPE vector outweigh the gains from the double-stranded rAAV8-miGPE transduction efficiency, and that the rAAV8-GPE vector is the current choice for clinical translation in human GSD-Ia. PMID:23856420

  8. The Upstream enhancer elements of the G6PC promoter are critical for optimal G6PC expression in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Mok; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Koeberl, Dwight D.; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type-Ia (GSD-Ia) patients deficient in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) manifest impaired glucose homeostasis characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidemia. Two efficacious recombinant adeno-associated virus pseudotype 2/8 (rAAV8) vectors expressing human G6Pase-α have been independently developed. One is a single-stranded vector containing a 2864-bp of the G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-GPE) and the other is a double-stranded vector containing a shorter 382-bp minimal G6PC promoter/enhancer (rAAV8-miGPE). To identify the best construct, a direct comparison of the rAAV8-GPE and the rAAV8-miGPE vectors was initiated to determine the best vector to take forward into clinical trials. We show that the rAAV8-GPE vector directed significantly higher levels of hepatic G6Pase-α expression, achieved greater reduction in hepatic glycogen accumulation, and led to a better toleration of fasting in GSD-Ia mice than the rAAV8-miGPE vector. Our results indicated that additional control elements in the rAAV8-GPE vector outweigh the gains from the double-stranded rAAV8-miGPE transduction efficiency, and that the rAAV8-GPE vector is the current choice for clinical translation in human GSD-Ia. PMID:23856420

  9. Human Treg responses allow sustained recombinant adeno-associated virus–mediated transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Christian; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Humphries, Margaret; Carey, Brenna; Sandhaus, Robert A.; McElvaney, Noel G.; Messina, Louis; Tang, Qiushi; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Fu, Ann Dongtao; Yachnis, Anthony; Knop, David R.; Ye, Guo-jie; Brantly, Mark; Calcedo, Roberto; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Richman, Lee P.; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Hulme, Maigan A.; Brusko, Todd M.; Wilson, James M.; Flotte, Terence R.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have shown promise for the treatment of several diseases; however, immune-mediated elimination of transduced cells has been suggested to limit and account for a loss of efficacy. To determine whether rAAV vector expression can persist long term, we administered rAAV vectors expressing normal, M-type α-1 antitrypsin (M-AAT) to AAT-deficient subjects at various doses by multiple i.m. injections. M-specific AAT expression was observed in all subjects in a dose-dependent manner and was sustained for more than 1 year in the absence of immune suppression. Muscle biopsies at 1 year had sustained AAT expression and a reduction of inflammatory cells compared with 3 month biopsies. Deep sequencing of the TCR Vβ region from muscle biopsies demonstrated a limited number of T cell clones that emerged at 3 months after vector administration and persisted for 1 year. In situ immunophenotyping revealed a substantial Treg population in muscle biopsy samples containing AAT-expressing myofibers. Approximately 10% of all T cells in muscle were natural Tregs, which were activated in response to AAV capsid. These results suggest that i.m. delivery of rAAV type 1–AAT (rAAV1-AAT) induces a T regulatory response that allows ongoing transgene expression and indicates that immunomodulatory treatments may not be necessary for rAAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24231351

  10. Protective CD8+ T-cell responses to cytomegalovirus driven by rAAV/GFP/IE1 loading of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuefei; Pilgrim, Petra; Yan, Juqiang; Zhou, Wei; Jenkins, Marjorie; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Bumm, Klaus; Cannon, Martin; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Kast, W Martin; Cobos, Everardo; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent studies demonstrate that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-based antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) generates in vitro, significant and rapid cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral antigens. Methods We used the rAAV system to induce specific CTLs against CVM antigens for the development of cytomegalovirus HCMV) gene therapy. As an extension of the versatility of the rAAV system, we incorporated immediate-early 1 (IE1), expressed in HCMV. Our rAAV vector induced a strong stimulation of CTLs directed against the HCMV antigen IE1. We then investigated the efficiency of the CTLs in killing IE1 targeted cells. Results A significant MHC Class I-restricted, anti-IE1-specific CTL killing was demonstrated against IE1 positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after one, in vitro, stimulation. Conclusion In summary, single PBMC stimulation with rAAV/IE1 pulsed DCs induces strong antigen specific-CTL generation. CTLs were capable to lyse low doses of peptides pulsed into target cells. These data suggest that AAV-based antigen loading of DCs is highly effective for generating human CTL responses against HCMV antigens. PMID:18834548

  11. Recombinant AAV9-TLK1B Administration Ameliorates Fractionated Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Prakash Srinivasan Timiri; Dayton, Robert D.; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Abreo, Fleurette; Caldito, Gloria; Klein, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Salivary glands are highly susceptible to radiation, and patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy invariably suffer from its distressing side effect, salivary hypofunction. The reduction in saliva disrupts oral functions, and significantly impairs oral health. Previously, we demonstrated that adenoviral-mediated expression of Tousled-like kinase 1B (TLK1B) in rat submandibular glands preserves salivary function after single-dose ionizing radiation. To achieve long-term transgene expression for protection of salivary gland function against fractionated radiation, this study examines the usefulness of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector for TLK1B delivery. Lactated Ringers or AAV2/9 with either TLK1B or GFP expression cassette were retroductally delivered to rat submandibular salivary glands (1011 vg/gland), and animals were exposed, or not, to 20 Gy in eight fractions of 2.5 Gy/day. AAV2/9 transduced predominantly the ductal cells, including the convoluted granular tubules of the submandibular glands. Transgene expression after virus delivery could be detected within 5 weeks, and stable gene expression was observed till the end of study. Pilocarpine-stimulated saliva output measured at 8 weeks after completion of radiation demonstrated >10-fold reduction in salivary flow in saline- and AAV2/9-GFP-treated animals compared with the respective nonirradiated groups (90.8% and 92.5% reduction in salivary flow, respectively). Importantly, there was no decrease in stimulated salivary output after irradiation in animals that were pretreated with AAV2/9-TLK1B (121.5% increase in salivary flow; p<0.01). Salivary gland histology was better preserved after irradiation in TLK1B-treated group, though not significantly, compared with control groups. Single preemptive delivery of AAV2/9-TLK1B averts salivary dysfunction resulting from fractionated radiation. Although AAV2/9 transduces mostly the ductal cells of the gland, their protection

  12. Extracorporeal delivery of rAAV with metabolic exchange and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Bieber, Scott; Halldorson, Jeffrey B; Finn, Eric; Ahmad, Suhail; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Odom, Guy L

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade much progress has been made towards the treatment of disease with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors, ranging from cancer to muscular dystrophies, and autoimmune diseases to cystic fibrosis. Given inherent challenges of vector delivery we developed a system incorporating commercially available dialysis equipment. This concept was evaluated in vitro utilizing rAAV expressing the reporter gene human placental alkaline phosphatase. A number of pre-circulating conditions were assessed. Vector recovery was evaluated by quantitative vector genome analysis and cellular transduction assays. A dialysis circulation time course was established, and results were recorded across varied conditions ranging from approximately 2 to 90% retention of viable vector. This approach is unique in that it focuses on efficient localized, isolated and continual delivery of vector to target tissues, provides for the preservation of tissue integrity with dialysis for metabolic exchange and allows for the transfer of oxygen through a secondary membrane post-dialysis. PMID:23528884

  13. The potential of adeno-associated viral vectors for gene delivery to muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, M Abu; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Muscle-directed gene therapy is rapidly gaining attention primarily because muscle is an easily accessible target tissue and is also associated with various severe genetic disorders. Localized and systemic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors of several serotypes results in very efficient transduction of skeletal and cardiac muscles, which has been achieved in both small and large animals, as well as in humans. Muscle is the target tissue in gene therapy for many muscular dystrophy diseases, and may also be exploited as a biofactory to produce secretory factors for systemic disorders. Current limitations of using rAAVs for muscle gene transfer include vector size restriction, potential safety concerns such as off-target toxicity and the immunological barrier composing of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies and CD8+ T-cell response against AAV capsid in humans. Areas covered In this article, we will discuss basic AAV vector biology and its application in muscle-directed gene delivery, as well as potential strategies to overcome the aforementioned limitations of rAAV for further clinical application. Expert opinion Delivering therapeutic genes to large muscle mass in humans is arguably the most urgent unmet demand in treating diseases affecting muscle tissues throughout the whole body. Muscle-directed, rAAV-mediated gene transfer for expressing antibodies is a promising strategy to combat deadly infectious diseases. Developing strategies to circumvent the immune response following rAAV administration in humans will facilitate clinical application. PMID:24386892

  14. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate. PMID:25108114

  15. Impact of Pre-Existing Immunity on Gene Transfer to Nonhuman Primate Liver with Adeno-Associated Virus 8 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Calcedo, Roberto; Bell, Peter; Lin, Jianping; Grant, Rebecca L; Siegel, Don L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vectors based on the primate-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) are being evaluated in preclinical and clinical models. Natural infections with related AAVs activate memory B cells that produce antibodies capable of modulating the efficacy and safety of the vector. We have evaluated the biology of AAV8 gene transfer in macaque liver, with a focus on assessing the impact of pre-existing humoral immunity. Twenty-one macaques with various levels of AAV neutralizing antibody (NAb) were injected intravenously with AAV8 vector expressing green fluorescent protein. Pre-existing antibody titers in excess of 1:10 substantially diminished hepatocyte transduction that, in the absence of NAbs, was highly efficient. Vector-specific NAb diminished liver deposition of genomes and unexpectedly increased genome distribution to the spleen. The majority of animals showed high-level and stable sequestration of vector capsid protein by follicular dendritic cells of splenic germinal centers. These studies illustrate how natural immunity to a virus that is related to a vector can impact the efficacy and potential safety of in vivo gene therapy. We propose to use the in vitro transduction inhibition assay to evaluate research subjects before gene therapy and to preclude from systemic AAV8 trials those that have titers in excess of 1:10. PMID:21476868

  16. Hydrostatic Isolated Limb Perfusion with Adeno-associated Virus Vectors Enhances Correction of Skeletal Muscle in Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) stems from the inherited deficiency of acid-α-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase; EC 3.2.1.20), which primarily involves cardiac and skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that hydrostatic isolated limb perfusion (ILP) administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing a muscle specific promoter could achieve relatively higher transgene expression in the hindlimb muscles of GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice, in comparison with intravenous (IV) administration. ILP adminstration of AAV2/8 vectors encoding alkaline phosphatase or human GAA transduced skeletal muscles of the hindlimb widely, despite the relatively low number of vector particles administered (1×1011), and IV administration of an equivalent vector dose failed to transduce skeletal muscle detectably. Similarly, ILP administration of fewer vector particles of the AAV2/9 vector encoding human GAA (3×1010) transduced skeletal muscles of the hindlimb widely and significantly reduced glycogen content to, in comparison with IV administration. The only advantage for IV administration was moderately high level transduction of cardiac muscle, which demonstrated compellingly that ILP administration sequestered vector particles within the perfused limb. Reduction of glycogen storage in the extensor digitorum longus demonstrated the potential advantage of ILP-mediated delivery of AAV vectors in Pompe disease, because type II myofibers are resistant to enzyme replacement therapy. Thus, ILP will enhance AAV transduction of multiple skeletal muscles while reducing the required dosages in terms of vector particle numbers. PMID:20686508

  17. Modulation of tolerance to the transgene product in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-mediated gene transfer to liver

    PubMed Central

    Mingozzi, Federico; Hasbrouck, Nicole C.; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Edmonson, Shyrie A.; Hui, Daniel J.; Sabatino, Denise E.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J. Fraser; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2007-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)–mediated gene transfer of factor IX (F.IX) to the liver results in long-term expression of transgene in experimental animals, but only short-term expression in humans. Loss of F.IX expression is likely due to a cytotoxic immune response to the AAV capsid, which results in clearance of transduced hepatocytes. We used a nonhuman primate model to assess the safety of AAV gene transfer coupled with an anti–T-cell regimen designed to block this immune response. Administration of a 3-drug regimen consisting of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), sirolimus, and the anti–IL-2 receptor antibody daclizumab consistently resulted in formation of inhibitory antibodies to human F.IX following hepatic artery administration of an AAV-hF.IX vector, whereas a 2-drug regimen consisting only of MMF and sirolimus did not. Administration of daclizumab was accompanied by a dramatic drop in the population of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that choice of immunosuppression (IS) regimen can modulate immune responses to the transgene product upon hepatic gene transfer in subjects not fully tolerant; and that induction of transgene tolerance may depend on a population of antigen-specific Tregs. PMID:17609423

  18. α-Synuclein induced toxicity in brain stem serotonin neurons mediated by an AAV vector driven by the tryptophan hydroxylase promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Oi Wan; Shin, Eunju; Mattsson, Bengt; Caudal, Dorian; Svenningsson, Per; Björklund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We studied the impact of α-synuclein overexpression in brainstem serotonin neurons using a novel vector construct where the expression of human wildtype α-synuclein is driven by the tryptophan hydroxylase promoter, allowing expression of α-synuclein at elevated levels, and with high selectivity, in serotonergic neurons. α-Synuclein induced degenerative changes in axons and dendrites, displaying a distorted appearance, suggesting accumulation and aggregation of α-synuclein as a result of impaired axonal transport, accompanied by a 40% loss of terminals, as assessed in the hippocampus. Tissue levels of serotonin and its major metabolite 5-HIAA remained largely unaltered, and the performance of the α-synuclein overexpressing rats in tests of spatial learning (water maze), anxiety related behavior (elevated plus maze) and depressive-like behavior (forced swim test) was not different from control, suggesting that the impact of the developing axonal pathology on serotonin neurotransmission was relatively mild. Overexpression of α-synuclein in the raphe nuclei, combined with overexpression in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, resulted in more pronounced axonal pathology and significant impairment in the elevated plus maze. We conclude that α-synuclein pathology in serotonergic or cholinergic neurons alone is not sufficient to impair non-motor behaviors, but that it is their simultaneous involvement that determines severity of such symptoms. PMID:27211987

  19. α-Synuclein induced toxicity in brain stem serotonin neurons mediated by an AAV vector driven by the tryptophan hydroxylase promoter.

    PubMed

    Wan, Oi Wan; Shin, Eunju; Mattsson, Bengt; Caudal, Dorian; Svenningsson, Per; Björklund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We studied the impact of α-synuclein overexpression in brainstem serotonin neurons using a novel vector construct where the expression of human wildtype α-synuclein is driven by the tryptophan hydroxylase promoter, allowing expression of α-synuclein at elevated levels, and with high selectivity, in serotonergic neurons. α-Synuclein induced degenerative changes in axons and dendrites, displaying a distorted appearance, suggesting accumulation and aggregation of α-synuclein as a result of impaired axonal transport, accompanied by a 40% loss of terminals, as assessed in the hippocampus. Tissue levels of serotonin and its major metabolite 5-HIAA remained largely unaltered, and the performance of the α-synuclein overexpressing rats in tests of spatial learning (water maze), anxiety related behavior (elevated plus maze) and depressive-like behavior (forced swim test) was not different from control, suggesting that the impact of the developing axonal pathology on serotonin neurotransmission was relatively mild. Overexpression of α-synuclein in the raphe nuclei, combined with overexpression in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, resulted in more pronounced axonal pathology and significant impairment in the elevated plus maze. We conclude that α-synuclein pathology in serotonergic or cholinergic neurons alone is not sufficient to impair non-motor behaviors, but that it is their simultaneous involvement that determines severity of such symptoms. PMID:27211987

  20. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of AAV for pain: evidence from human AAV studies and from the pharmacology of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) has advanced in the last few years from promising results in animal models to >100 clinical trials (reported or under way). While vector availability was a substantial hurdle a decade ago, innovative new production methods now routinely match the scale of AAV doses required for clinical testing. These advances may become relevant to translational research in the chronic pain field. AAV for pain targeting the peripheral nervous system was proven to be efficacious in rodent models several years ago, but has not yet been tested in humans. The present review addresses the steps needed for translation of AAV for pain from the bench to the bedside focusing on pre-clinical toxicology. We break the potential toxicities into three conceptual categories of risk: First, risks related to the delivery procedure used to administer the vector. Second, risks related to AAV biology, i.e., effects of the vector itself that may occur independently of the transgene. Third, risks related to the effects of the therapeutic transgene. To identify potential toxicities, we consulted the existing evidence from AAV gene therapy for other nervous system disorders (animal toxicology and human studies) and from the clinical pharmacology of conventional analgesic drugs. Thereby, we identified required preclinical studies and charted a hypothetical path towards a future phase I/II clinical trial in the oncology-palliative care setting. PMID:25183392

  1. Large-scale adeno-associated viral vector production using a herpesvirus-based system enables manufacturing for clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Clément, Nathalie; Knop, David R; Byrne, Barry J

    2009-08-01

    The ability of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors to exhibit minimal immunogenicity and little to no toxicity or inflammation while eliciting robust, multiyear gene expression in vivo are only a few of the salient features that make them ideally suited for many gene therapy applications. A major hurdle for the use of rAAV in sizeable research and clinical applications is the lack of efficient and versatile large-scale production systems. Continued progression toward flexible, scalable production techniques is a prerequisite to support human clinical evaluation of these novel biotherapeutics. This review examines the current state of large-scale production methods that employ the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) platform to produce rAAV vectors for gene delivery. Improvements have substantially advanced the HSV/AAV hybrid method for large-scale rAAV manufacture, facilitating the generation of highly potent, clinical-grade purity rAAV vector stocks. At least one human clinical trial employing rAAV generated via rHSV helper-assisted replication is poised to commence, highlighting the advances and relevance of this production method. PMID:19569968

  2. Adeno-associated virus expresses transgenes in hair follicles and epidermis.

    PubMed

    Hengge, U R; Mirmohammadsadegh, A

    2000-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are nonpathogenic, integrating DNA vectors capable of transducing dividing and nondividing cells with the potential of long-term expression. Evaluating this interesting vector system in the skin for the first time, we found that an AAV vector containing the lacZ gene (AAVlacZ) led to the expression of beta-galactosidase for more than 6 weeks following in vivo injection. Interestingly, expression was present not only in dividing and postmitotic epidermal keratinocytes but also in hair follicle epithelial cells and eccrine sweat glands. However, expression upon readministration was limited. Functional studies in swine using human erythropoietin were hampered by immunogenicity. Thus, AAV seems to be the only vector to date that efficiently targets hair follicle epithelial cells. It may also be useful when longer term expression in keratinocytes than that achievable by direct injection of plasmid DNA is desired. PMID:10985948

  3. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LIJUN; HAO, YUEWEN; NIE, XIAOWEI; ZHANG, XUEXIN; YANG, GUANGXIAO; WANG, QUANYING

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  4. The impact of minimally oversized adeno-associated viral vectors encoding human factor VIII on vector potency in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kyostio-Moore, Sirkka; Berthelette, Patricia; Piraino, Susan; Sookdeo, Cathleen; Nambiar, Bindu; Jackson, Robert; Burnham, Brenda; O’Riordan, Catherine R; Cheng, Seng H; Armentano, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors containing oversized genomes provide transgene expression despite low efficiency packaging of complete genomes. Here, we characterized the properties of oversized rAAV2/8 vectors (up to 5.4 kb) encoding human factor VIII (FVIII) under the transcriptional control of three liver promoters. All vectors provided sustained production of active FVIII in mice for 7 months and contained comparable levels of vector genomes and complete expression cassettes in liver. Therefore, for the 5.4 kb genome size range, a strong expression cassette was more important for FVIII production than the vector genome size. To evaluate the potency of slightly oversized vectors, a 5.1 kb AAVrh8R/FVIII vector was compared to a 4.6 kb (wild-type size) vector with an identical expression cassette (but containing a smaller C1-domain deleted FVIII) for 3 months in mice. The 5.1 kb vector had twofold to threefold lower levels of plasma FVIII protein and liver vector genomes than that obtained with the 4.6 kb vector. Vector genomes for both vectors persisted equally and existed primarily as high molecular weight concatemeric circular forms in liver. Taken together, these results indicate that the slightly oversized vectors containing heterogeneously packaged vector genomes generated a functional transgene product but exhibited a twofold to threefold lower in vivo potency. PMID:26958574

  5. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 1 (AAV1)- and AAV5-Antibody Complex Structures Reveal Evolutionary Commonalities in Parvovirus Antigenic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Gurda, Brittney L.; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Afione, Sandra; Chiorini, John A.; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical utility of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery system has been validated by the regulatory approval of an AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) vector for the treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency. However, neutralization from preexisting antibodies is detrimental to AAV transduction efficiency. Hence, mapping of AAV antigenic sites and engineering of neutralization-escaping vectors are important for improving clinical efficacy. We report the structures of four AAV-monoclonal antibody fragment complexes, AAV1-ADK1a, AAV1-ADK1b, AAV5-ADK5a, and AAV5-ADK5b, determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction to a resolution of ∼11 to 12 Å. Pseudoatomic modeling mapped the ADK1a epitope to the protrusions surrounding the icosahedral 3-fold axis and the ADK1b and ADK5a epitopes, which overlap, to the wall between depressions at the 2- and 5-fold axes (2/5-fold wall), and the ADK5b epitope spans both the 5-fold axis-facing wall of the 3-fold protrusion and portions of the 2/5-fold wall of the capsid. Combined with the six antigenic sites previously elucidated for different AAV serotypes through structural approaches, including AAV1 and AAV5, this study identified two common AAV epitopes: one on the 3-fold protrusions and one on the 2/5-fold wall. These epitopes coincide with regions with the highest sequence and structure diversity between AAV serotypes and correspond to regions determining receptor recognition and transduction phenotypes. Significantly, these locations overlap the two dominant epitopes reported for autonomous parvoviruses. Thus, rather than the amino acid sequence alone, the antigenic sites of parvoviruses appear to be dictated by structural features evolved to enable specific infectious functions. IMPORTANCE The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors for in vivo therapeutic gene delivery, with more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials that

  6. Quantitative, noninvasive, in vivo longitudinal monitoring of gene expression in the brain by co-AAV transduction with a PET reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sea Young; Gay-Antaki, Carlos; Ponde, Datta E; Poptani, Harish; Vite, Charles H; Wolfe, John H

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of vector transgene expression would be particularly valuable for repetitive monitoring of therapy in the brain, where invasive tissue sampling is contraindicated. We evaluated adeno-associated virus vector expression of a dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) mutant (D2R80A) by positron emission tomography in the brains of mice and cats. D2R80A is inactivated for intracellular signaling and binds subphysiologic amounts of the radioactive [18F]-fallypride analog of dopamine. The [18F]-fallypride signal bound to D2R80A in the injection site was normalized to the signal from endogenous D2R in the striatum and showed stable levels of expression within individual animals. A separate adeno-associated virus type 1 vector with identical gene expression control elements, expressing green fluorescent protein or a therapeutic gene, was coinjected with the D2R80A vector at equal doses into specific sites. Both transgenes had similar levels of gene expression by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and quantitative PCR assays, demonstrating that D2R80A is a faithful surrogate measure for expression of a gene of interest. This dual vector approach allows the D2R80A gene to be used with any therapeutic gene and to be injected into a single site for monitoring while the therapeutic gene can be distributed more widely as needed in each disease. PMID:26015960

  7. Hygromycin-resistance vectors for gene expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjie; Nie, Lei; Chen, Biao; Liu, Yingmiao; Kong, Yimeng; Wang, Haibin; Diao, Liuyang

    2014-04-01

    Pichia pastoris is a common host organism for heterologous protein expression and metabolic engineering. Zeocin-, G418-, nourseothricin- and blasticidin-resistance genes are the only dominant selectable markers currently available for selecting P. pastoris transformants. We describe here new P. pastoris expression vectors that confer a hygromycin resistance base on the Klebsiella pneumoniae hph gene. To demonstrate the application of the vectors for intracellular and secreted protein expression, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human serum albumin (HSA) were cloned into the vectors and transformed into P. pastoris cells. The resulting strains expressed GFP and HSA constitutively or inducibly. The hygromycin resistance marker was also suitable for post-transformational vector amplication (PTVA) for obtaining strains with high plasmid copy numbers. A strain with multiple copies of the HSA expression cassette after PTVA had increased HSA expression compared with a strain with a single copy of the plasmid. To demonstrate compatibility of the new vectors with other vectors bearing antibiotic-resistance genes, P. pastoris was transformed with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes GSH1, GSH2 or SAM2 on plasmids containing genes for resistance to Zeocin, G418 or hygromycin. The resulting strain produced glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine at levels approximately twice those of the parent strain. The new hygromycin-resistance vectors allow greater flexibility and potential applications in recombinant protein production and other research using P. pastoris. PMID:24822243

  8. [Methods for construction of transgenic plant expression vector: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangpu; Yang, Shushen

    2015-03-01

    Construction of recombinant plasmid vector for gene expression is a key step in making transgenic plants and important to study gene function and plant genetic engineering. A right choice of gene construction method can be cost-effective and achieve more diverse recombinant plasmids. In addition to the traditional methods in construction of plant gene expression vectors, such as Gateway technology, three DNA method and one step cloning, a few novel methods have been developed in recent years. These methods include oligonucleotide synthesis-based construction of small fragment gene expression vectors via competitive connection; construction of small RNA expression vector using pre-microRNA; recombination-fusion PCR method which inserts DNA fragments of multiple restriction sites into the target vector; and insertion of a DNA fragment into any region of a linear vector via In-Fusion Kit. Construction of complex vectors with many fragments uses sequence and ligation-independent cloning method, Gibson isothermal assembly or Golden Gate assembly. This paper summarizes our working experience in the area of recombinant vector construction and reports from others with an intention to disseminate ideas about currently widely used DNA recombination methods for plant transformation. PMID:26204753

  9. Viral vectors: from virology to transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouard, D; Alazard-Dany, N; Cosset, F-L

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1970s, it was predicted that gene therapy would be applied to humans within a decade. However, despite some success, gene therapy has still not become a routine practise in medicine. In this review, we will examine the problems, both experimental and clinical, associated with the use of viral material for transgenic insertion. We shall also discuss the development of viral vectors involving the most important vector types derived from retroviruses, adenoviruses, herpes simplex viruses and adeno-associated viruses. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:18776913

  10. Analyzing Cellular Immunity to AAV in a Canine Model Using ELISpot Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zejing; Storb, Rainer; Tapscott, Stephen J; Riddell, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) mediated gene transfer represents a promising gene replacement strategy for treating various genetic diseases. One obstacle in using viral-derived vectors for in vivo gene delivery is the development of host immune responses to the vector. Recent studies have demonstrated cellular immune responses specific to capsid proteins of various AAV serotypes in animal models and in human trials for different diseases. We developed a canine specific ELISpot assay to detect such immunity in dogs received AAV treatment. Here, we describe in detail the use of a constructed panel of overlapping peptides spanning the entire VP1 sequence of AAV capsid protein to detect specific T cell responses in peripheral blood in dogs following intra-muscular injection of AAV. This high-throughput method allows the identification of T cell epitopes without the need for large cell numbers and the need for MHC matched cell lines. PMID:21956501

  11. AAV6-βARKct gene delivery mediated by molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD) in sheep results in robust gene expression and increased adrenergic reserve

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Swain, JaBaris D.; Tomasulo, Catherine E.; Ciccarelli, Michele; Huang, Z. Maggie; Rabinowitz, Joseph E.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetic modulation of heart function is a novel therapeutic strategy. We investigated the effect of molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD)–mediated carboxyl-terminus of the β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARKct) gene transfer on cardiac mechanoenergetics and β-adrenoreceptor (βAR) signaling. Methods After baseline measurements, sheep underwent MCARD-mediated delivery of 1014 genome copies of self-complimentary adeno-associated virus (scAAV6)-βARKct. Four and 8 weeks after MCARD, mechanoenergetic studies using magnetic resonance imaging were performed. Tissues were analyzed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blotting. βAR density, cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, and physiologic parameters were evaluated. Results There was a significant increase in dP/dtmax at 4 weeks: 1384 ± 76 versus 1772 ± 182 mm Hg/s; and the increase persisted at 8 weeks in response to isoproterenol (P <.05). Similarly, the magnitude of dP/dtmin increased at both 4 weeks and 8 weeks with isoproterenol stimulation (P <.05). At 8 weeks, potential energy was conserved, whereas in controls there was a decrease in potential energy (P <.05) in response to isoproterenol. RT-qPCR confirmed robustness of βARKct expression throughout the left ventricle and undetectable expression in extracardiac tissues. Quantitative Western blot data confirmed higher expression of βARKct in the left ventricle: 0.46 ± 0.05 versus 0.00 in lung and liver (P <.05). Survival was 100%and laboratory parameters of major organ function were within normal limits. Conclusions MCARD-mediated βARKct delivery is safe, results in robust cardiac-specific gene expression, enhances cardiac contractility and lusitropy, increases adrenergic reserve, and improves energy utilization efficiency in a preclinical large animal model. PMID:22143102

  12. AAV-mediated Liver-specific MPV17 Expression Restores mtDNA Levels and Prevents Diet-induced Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bottani, Emanuela; Giordano, Carla; Civiletto, Gabriele; Di Meo, Ivano; Auricchio, Alberto; Ciusani, Emilio; Marchet, Silvia; Lamperti, Costanza; d'Amati, Giulia; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in human MPV17 cause a hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS) hallmarked by early-onset liver failure, leading to premature death. Liver transplantation and frequent feeding using slow-release carbohydrates are the only available therapies, although surviving patients eventually develop slowly progressive peripheral and central neuropathy. The physiological role of Mpv17, including its functional link to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance, is still unclear. We show here that Mpv17 is part of a high molecular weight complex of unknown composition, which is essential for mtDNA maintenance in critical tissues, i.e. liver, of a Mpv17 knockout mouse model. On a standard diet, Mpv17−/− mouse shows hardly any symptom of liver dysfunction, but a ketogenic diet (KD) leads these animals to liver cirrhosis and failure. However, when expression of human MPV17 is carried out by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene replacement, the Mpv17 knockout mice are able to reconstitute the Mpv17-containing supramolecular complex, restore liver mtDNA copy number and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proficiency, and prevent liver failure induced by the KD. These results open new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of MPV17-related liver-specific MDS. PMID:24247928

  13. Humoral immunity to AAV-6, 8, and 9 in normal and dystrophic dogs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Smith, Bruce; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-6, 8, and 9 are promising gene-delivery vectors for testing novel Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model. Humoral immunity greatly influences in vivo AAV transduction. However, neutralizing antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9 have not been systemically examined in normal and dystrophic dogs. To gain information on the seroprevalence of antibodies to AAV-6, 8, and 9, we measured neutralizing antibody titers using an in vitro transduction inhibition assay. We examined 72 naive serum samples and 26 serum samples obtained from dogs that had received AAV gene transfer. Our data demonstrated that AAV-6 neutralizing antibody was the most prevalent antibody in dogs irrespective of age, gender, disease status (dystrophic or not), and prior parvovirus vaccination history. Surprisingly, high-level anti-AAV-6 antibody was detected at birth in newborn puppies. Further, a robust antibody response was induced in affected, but not normal newborn dogs following systemic AAV gene transfer. Taken together, our data have provided an important baseline on the seroprevalence of AAV-6, 8, and 9 neutralizing antibodies in normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs. These results will help guide translational AAV gene-therapy studies in dog models of muscular dystrophy. PMID:22040468

  14. Immune Responses to Intramuscular Administration of Alipogene Tiparvovec (AAV1-LPLS447X) in a Phase II Clinical Trial of Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Jaap; Kwikkers, Karin; Aronica, Eleonora; Brisson, Diane; Methot, Julie; Petry, Harald; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular immune responses to adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors used for gene therapy have been linked to attenuated transgene expression and loss of efficacy. The impact of such cellular immune responses on the clinical efficacy of alipogene tiparvovec (Glybera; AAV1-LPLS447X; uniQure), a gene therapy consisting of intramuscular administration of a recombinant AAV1 mediating muscle-directed expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), was investigated. Five subjects with LPL deficiency (LPLD) were administered intramuscularly with a dose of 1×1012 gc/kg alipogene tiparvovec. All subjects were treated with immune suppression starting shortly before administration of alipogene tiparvovec and maintained until 12 weeks after administration. Systemic antibody and T cell responses against AAV1 and LPLS447X, as well as local cellular immune responses in the injected muscle, were investigated in five LPLD subjects. Long-term transgene expression was demonstrated despite a transient systemic cellular response and a stable humoral immune response against the AAV1 capsid protein. Cellular infiltrates were found in four of the five subjects but were not associated with adverse clinical events or elevation of inflammation markers. Consistent herewith, CD8+ T cells in the infiltrates lacked cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, FoxP3+/CD4+ T cells were found in the infiltrates, suggesting that multiple mechanisms contribute to local tolerance. Systemic and local immune responses induced by intramuscular injection of alipogene tiparvovec did not appear to have an impact on safety and did not prevent LPL transgene expression. These findings support the use of alipogene tiparvovec in individuals with LPLD and indicate that muscle-directed AAV-based gene therapy remains a promising approach for the treatment of human diseases. PMID:24299335

  15. Intracisternal delivery of NFκB-inducible scAAV2/9 reveals locoregional neuroinflammation induced by systemic kainic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Bockstael, Olivier; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Dalkara, Deniz; Melas, Catherine; De Witte, Olivier; Levivier, Marc; Chtarto, Abdelwahed

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated disease-dependent gene delivery in the brain using an AAV vector responding to NFκB activation as a probe for inflammatory responses. This vector, injected focally in the parenchyma prior to a systemic kainic acid (KA) injection mediated inducible transgene expression in the hippocampus but not in the cerebellum, regions, respectively, known to be affected or not by the pathology. However, such a focal approach relies on previous knowledge of the model parameters and does not allow to predict the whole brain response to the disease. Global brain gene delivery would allow to predict the regional distribution of the pathology as well as to deliver therapeutic factors in all affected brain regions. We show that self-complementary AAV2/9 (scAAV2/9) delivery in the adult rat cisterna magna allows a widespread but not homogenous transduction of the brain. Indeed, superficial regions, i.e., cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum were more efficiently transduced than deeper regions, such as striatum, and substantia nigra. These data suggest that viral particles penetration from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the brain is a limiting factor. Interestingly, AAV2/9-2YF a rationally designed capsid mutant (affecting surface tyrosines) increased gene transfer efficiency approximately fivefold. Neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, but not microglia, were transduced in varying proportions depending on the brain region and the type of capsid. Finally, after a single intracisternal injection of scAAV2/9-2YF using the NFκB-inducible promoter, KA treatment induced transgene expression in the hippocampus and cortex but not in the cerebellum, corresponding to the expression of the CD11b marker of microglial activation. These data support the use of disease-inducible vectors administered in the cisterna magna as a tool to characterize the brain pathology in systemic drug-induced or transgenic disease models. However, further improvements are

  16. Global CNS gene delivery and evasion of anti-AAV-neutralizing antibodies by intrathecal AAV administration in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Gray, S J; Nagabhushan Kalburgi, S; McCown, T J; Jude Samulski, R

    2013-04-01

    Injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers a means to achieve widespread transgene delivery to the central nervous system, where the doses can be readily translated from small to large animals. In contrast to studies with other serotypes (AAV2, AAV4 and AAV5) in rodents, we report that a naturally occurring capsid (AAV9) and rationally engineered capsid (AAV2.5) are able to achieve broad transduction throughout the brain and spinal cord parenchyma following a single injection into the CSF (via cisterna magna or lumbar cistern) in non-human primates (NHP). Using either vector at a dose of ∼2 × 10(12) vector genome (vg) per 3-6 kg animal, approximately 2% of the entire brain and spinal cord was transduced, covering all regions of the central nervous system (CNS). AAV9 in particular displayed efficient transduction of spinal cord motor neurons. The peripheral organ biodistribution was highly reduced compared with intravascular delivery, and the presence of circulating anti-AAV-neutralizing antibodies up to a 1:128 titer had no inhibitory effect on CNS gene transfer. Intra-CSF delivery effectively translates from rodents to NHPs, which provides encouragement for the use of this approach in humans to treat motor neuron and lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23303281

  17. AAV-mediated intramuscular delivery of myotubularin corrects the myotubular myopathy phenotype in targeted murine muscle and suggests a function in plasma membrane homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buj-Bello, Anna; Fougerousse, Françoise; Schwab, Yannick; Messaddeq, Nadia; Spehner, Danièle; Pierson, Christopher R; Durand, Muriel; Kretz, Christine; Danos, Olivier; Douar, Anne-Marie; Beggs, Alan H; Schultz, Patrick; Montus, Marie; Denèfle, Patrice; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-15

    Myotubular myopathy (XLMTM, OMIM 310400) is a severe congenital muscular disease due to mutations in the myotubularin gene (MTM1) and characterized by the presence of small myofibers with frequent occurrence of central nuclei. Myotubularin is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoinositide phosphatase with a muscle-specific role in man and mouse that is poorly understood. No specific treatment exists to date for patients with myotubular myopathy. We have constructed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing myotubularin in order to test its therapeutic potential in a XLMTM mouse model. We show that a single intramuscular injection of this vector in symptomatic Mtm1-deficient mice ameliorates the pathological phenotype in the targeted muscle. Myotubularin replacement in mice largely corrects nuclei and mitochondria positioning in myofibers and leads to a strong increase in muscle volume and recovery of the contractile force. In addition, we used this AAV vector to overexpress myotubularin in wild-type skeletal muscle and get insight into its localization and function. We show that a substantial proportion of myotubularin associates with the sarcolemma and I band, including triads. Myotubularin overexpression in muscle induces the accumulation of packed membrane saccules and presence of vacuoles that contain markers of sarcolemma and T-tubules, suggesting that myotubularin is involved in plasma membrane homeostasis of myofibers. This study provides a proof-of-principle that local delivery of an AAV vector expressing myotubularin can improve the motor capacities of XLMTM muscle and represents a novel approach to study myotubularin function in skeletal muscle. PMID:18434328

  18. Novel adeno-associated viral vector delivering the utrophin gene regulator jazz counteracts dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Georgios; Corbi, Nicoletta; Pisani, Cinzia; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Gabanella, Francesca; Monaco, Lucia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Over-expression of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin represents a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The strategy is based on the ability of utrophin to functionally replace defective dystrophin. We developed the artificial zinc finger transcription factor "Jazz" that up-regulates both the human and mouse utrophin promoter. We observed a significant recovery of muscle strength in dystrophic Jazz-transgenic mdx mice. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of an experimental gene therapy based on the systemic delivery of Jazz gene in mdx mice by adeno-associated virus (AAV). AAV serotype 8 was chosen on the basis of its high affinity for skeletal muscle. Muscle-specific expression of the therapeutic Jazz gene was enhanced by adding the muscle α-actin promoter to the AAV vector (mAAV). Injection of mAAV8-Jazz viral preparations into mdx mice resulted in muscle-specific Jazz expression coupled with up-regulation of the utrophin gene. We show a significant recovery from the dystrophic phenotype in mAAV8-Jazz-treated mdx mice. Histological and physiological analysis revealed a reduction of fiber necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration associated with functional recovery in muscle contractile force. The combination of ZF-ATF technology with the AAV delivery can open a new avenue to obtain a therapeutic strategy for treatment of DMD. PMID:24469912

  19. Widespread gene transfer in the central nervous system of cynomolgus macaques following delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Vite, Charles H; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Grant, Rebecca; Bote, Erin; Yu, Hongwei; Pukenas, Bryan; Hurst, Robert; Wilson, James M

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors have recently been shown to transduce cells throughout the central nervous system of nonhuman primates when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a finding which could lead to a minimally invasive approach to treat genetic and acquired diseases affecting the entire CNS. We characterized the transduction efficiency of two routes of vector administration into the CSF of cynomolgus macaques-lumbar puncture, which is typically used in clinical practice, and suboccipital puncture, which is more commonly used in veterinary medicine. We found that delivery of vector into the cisterna magna via suboccipital puncture is up to 100-fold more efficient for achieving gene transfer to the brain. In addition, we evaluated the inflammatory response to AAV9-mediated GFP expression in the nonhuman primate CNS. We found that while CSF lymphocyte counts increased following gene transfer, there were no clinical or histological signs of immune toxicity. Together these data indicate that delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna is an effective method for achieving gene transfer in the CNS, and suggest that adapting this uncommon injection method for human trials could vastly increase the efficiency of gene delivery. PMID:26052519

  20. Retroviral vectors for the transduction of autoregulated, bidirectional expression cassettes.

    PubMed

    Unsinger, J; Kröger, A; Hauser, H; Wirth, D

    2001-11-01

    Regulated transgene expression is increasingly used in research but is also needed for certain therapies. Regulatory systems are usually composed of two expression units, one bearing the gene of interest under control of a regulatable promoter and the other, a constitutively expressed transactivator that modulates the activity of the regulatable promoter. Because the cotransfer of two independent elements is not efficient in primary cells, single transduction step vectors conferring regulatable gene expression cassettes would be helpful. We have developed retroviral vectors containing an autoregulatory bidirectional expression cassette that encodes all components necessary for regulated expression of a gene of interest. The influence of the orientation of the reporter gene with respect to the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) and the effect of transcriptionally inactive LTRs were investigated using mouse leukemia virus (MLV) and self-inactivating (SIN)-based retroviral vectors. Strict regulation was observed when the reporter was inserted in antisense orientation with respect to the LTR, whereas a sense arrangement of the reporter resulted in a loss of regulation capacity. Expression and regulation of the antisense-orientated reporter gene were homogenous in infected cell pools and investigated cell clones. Long-term observations of infected cells over a period of 30 passages revealed stable expression and regulation. These autoregulated, bidirectional retroviral vectors combine the advantages of single-step transduction with strict regulation of the gene of interest in the infected target cells. PMID:11708885

  1. The AAV9 receptor and its modification to improve in vivo lung gene transfer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christie L.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Bell, Peter; Limberis, Maria P.; Gao, Guang-Ping; Van Vliet, Kim; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 9 are candidates for in vivo gene delivery to many organs, but the receptor(s) mediating these tropisms have yet to be defined. We evaluated AAV9 uptake by glycans with terminal sialic acids (SAs), a common mode of cellular entry for viruses. We found, however, that AAV9 binding increased when terminal SA was enzymatically removed, suggesting that galactose, which is the most commonly observed penultimate monosaccharide to SA, may mediate AAV9 transduction. This was confirmed in mutant CHO Pro-5 cells deficient in the enzymes involved in glycoprotein biogenesis, as well as lectin interference studies. Binding of AAV9 to glycans with terminal galactose was demonstrated via glycan binding assays. Co-instillation of AAV9 vector with neuraminidase into mouse lung resulted in exposure of terminal galactose on the apical surface of conducting airway epithelial cells, as shown by lectin binding and increased transduction of these cells, demonstrating the possible utility of this vector in lung-directed gene transfer. Increasing the abundance of the receptor on target cells and improving vector efficacy may improve delivery of AAV vectors to their therapeutic targets. PMID:21576824

  2. Novel rat Alzheimer's disease models based on AAV-mediated gene transfer to selectively increase hippocampal Aβ levels

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Patricia A; Bland, Ross J; Das, Pritam; Price, Robert W; Holloway, Vallie; Smithson, Lisa; Dicker, Bridget L; During, Matthew J; Young, Deborah; Golde, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a decline in cognitive function and accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in extracellular plaques. Mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins alter APP metabolism resulting in accumulation of Aβ42, a peptide essential for the formation of amyloid deposits and proposed to initiate the cascade leading to AD. However, the role of Aβ40, the more prevalent Aβ peptide secreted by cells and a major component of cerebral Aβ deposits, is less clear. In this study, virally-mediated gene transfer was used to selectively increase hippocampal levels of human Aβ42 and Aβ40 in adult Wistar rats, allowing examination of the contribution of each to the cognitive deficits and pathology seen in AD. Results Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding BRI-Aβ cDNAs were generated resulting in high-level hippocampal expression and secretion of the specific encoded Aβ peptide. As a comparison the effect of AAV-mediated overexpression of APPsw was also examined. Animals were tested for development of learning and memory deficits (open field, Morris water maze, passive avoidance, novel object recognition) three months after infusion of AAV. A range of impairments was found, with the most pronounced deficits observed in animals co-injected with both AAV-BRI-Aβ40 and AAV-BRI-Aβ42. Brain tissue was analyzed by ELISA and immunohistochemistry to quantify levels of detergent soluble and insoluble Aβ peptides. BRI-Aβ42 and the combination of BRI-Aβ40+42 overexpression resulted in elevated levels of detergent-insoluble Aβ. No significant increase in detergent-insoluble Aβ was seen in the rats expressing APPsw or BRI-Aβ40. No pathological features were noted in any rats, except the AAV-BRI-Aβ42 rats which showed focal, amorphous, Thioflavin-negative Aβ42 deposits. Conclusion The results show that AAV-mediated gene transfer is a valuable tool to model aspects of AD pathology in vivo, and demonstrate that

  3. Heat-shock Treatment-mediated Increase in Transduction by Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus 2 Vectors Is Independent of the Cellular Heat-shock Protein 90*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li; Qing, Keyun; Si, Yue; Chen, Linyuan; Tan, Mengqun; Srivastava, Arun

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) vectors transduction efficiency varies greatly in different cell types. We have described that a cellular protein, FKBP52, in its phosphorylated form interacts with the D-sequence in the viral inverted terminal repeat, inhibits viral second strand DNA synthesis, and limits transgene expression. Here we investigated the role of cellular heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in AAV transduction because FKBP52 forms a complex with HSP90, and because heat-shock treatment augments AAV transduction efficiency. Heat-shock treatment of HeLa cells resulted in tyrosine dephosphorylation of FKBP52, led to stabilization of the FKBP52-HSP90 complex, and resulted in ∼6-fold increase in AAV transduction. However, when HeLa cells were pre-treated with tyrphostin 23, a specific inhibitor of cellular epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates FKBP52 at tyrosine residues, heat-shock treatment resulted in a further 18-fold increase in AAV transduction. HSP90 was shown to be a part of the FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex, but HSP90 by itself did not bind to the D-sequence. Geldanamycin treatment, which disrupts the HSP90-FKBP52 complex, resulted in >22-fold increase in AAV transduction in heat-shock-treated cells compared with heat shock alone. Deliberate overexpression of the human HSP90 gene resulted in a significant decrease in AAV-mediated transduction in tyrphostin 23-treated cells, whereas down-modulation of HSP90 levels led to a decrease in HSP90-FKBP52-AAV D-sequence complex formation, resulting in a significant increase in AAV transduction following pre-treatment with tyrphostin 23. These studies suggest that the observed increase in AAV transduction efficiency following heat-shock treatment is unlikely to be mediated by HSP90 alone and that increased levels of HSP90, in the absence of heat shock, facilitate binding of FKBP52 to the AAV D-sequence, thereby leading to inhibition of AAV-mediated transgene expression

  4. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-Yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  5. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  6. Proof of concept for AAV2/5-mediated gene therapy in iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelium of a choroideremia patient

    PubMed Central

    Cereso, Nicolas; Pequignot, Marie O; Robert, Lorenne; Becker, Fabienne; De Luca, Valerie; Nabholz, Nicolas; Rigau, Valerie; De Vos, John; Hamel, Christian P; Kalatzis, Vasiliki

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) comprise a large group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases that lead to progressive vision loss, for which a paucity of disease-mimicking animal models renders preclinical studies difficult. We sought to develop pertinent human cellular IRD models, beginning with choroideremia, caused by mutations in the CHM gene encoding Rab escort protein 1 (REP1). We reprogrammed REP1-deficient fibroblasts from a CHM-/y patient into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which we differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This iPSC-derived RPE is a polarized monolayer with a classic morphology, expresses characteristic markers, is functional for fluid transport and phagocytosis, and mimics the biochemical phenotype of patients. We assayed a panel of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector serotypes and showed that AAV2/5 is the most efficient at transducing the iPSC-derived RPE and that CHM gene transfer normalizes the biochemical phenotype. The high, and unmatched, in vitro transduction efficiency is likely aided by phagocytosis and mimics the scenario that an AAV vector encounters in vivo in the subretinal space. We demonstrate the superiority of AAV2/5 in the human RPE and address the potential of patient iPSC–derived RPE to provide a proof-of-concept model for gene replacement in the absence of an appropriate animal model. PMID:26015956

  7. Effect of nuclear factor κB inhibition on serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) minidystrophin gene transfer to the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Reay, Daniel P; Niizawa, Gabriela A; Watchko, Jon F; Daood, Molly; Reay, Ja'Nean C; Raggi, Eugene; Clemens, Paula R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy studies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have focused on viral vector-mediated gene transfer to provide therapeutic protein expression or treatment with drugs to limit dystrophic changes in muscle. The pathological activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway has emerged as an important cause of dystrophic muscle changes in muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB may inhibit gene transfer by promoting inflammation in response to the transgene or vector. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of pathological NF-κB activation in muscle would complement the therapeutic benefits of dystrophin gene transfer in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Systemic gene transfer using serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) vectors is promising for treatment of preclinical models of DMD because of vector tropism to cardiac and skeletal muscle. In quadriceps of C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J (mdx) mice, the addition of octalysine (8K)-NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)-binding domain (8K-NBD) peptide treatment to AAV9 minidystrophin gene delivery resulted in increased levels of recombinant dystrophin expression suggesting that 8K-NBD treatment promoted an environment in muscle tissue conducive to higher levels of expression. Indices of necrosis and regeneration were diminished with AAV9 gene delivery alone and to a greater degree with the addition of 8K-NBD treatment. In diaphragm muscle, high-level transgene expression was achieved with AAV9 minidystoophin gene delivery alone; therefore, improvements in histological and physiological indices were comparable in the two treatment groups. The data support benefit from 8K-NBD treatment to complement gene transfer therapy for DMD in muscle tissue that receives incomplete levels of transduction by gene transfer, which may be highly significant for clinical applications of muscle gene delivery. PMID:22231732

  8. Construction and gene expression analysis of a single-stranded DNA minivector based on an inverted terminal repeat of adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Ping, Han; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhu, Dongqin; Li, Taiming; Zhang, Chun

    2015-04-01

    The plasmid vectors currently used for nonviral gene transfer have the disadvantage of carrying a bacterial backbone and an antibiotic resistance gene, which may cause side effects. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome is a linear single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule with palindromic inverted terminal repeat (ITR) sequences forming double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) hairpin (HP) structures at each end. Based on the AAV genome, we constructed an AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector that consists of a GFP expression cassette flanked by both ITR sequences of 125 nucleotides. The minivectors were produced by digestion of the parental plasmids followed by denaturation. The self-complementary inverted T-shaped HP structure of the minivector was automatically formed. The HEK 293T cells were transfected with the AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector, plasmid, and dsDNA expression cassette. The results showed that AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector had relatively low gene expression efficiency in vitro. However, we found that the GFP expression efficiency of the D sequence-deleted AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector was significantly increased and was similar to those obtained with the plasmid and dsDNA expression cassette. Our data suggest that the AAV-ITR ssDNA minivector may be a new type of gene expression vector for gene therapy besides the virus and plasmid. PMID:25555376

  9. Identification of adeno-associated viral vectors suitable for intestinal gene delivery and modulation of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Steven; Mach, Annette; Porvasnik, Stacy; Dixon, Lisa; Conlon, Thomas; Erger, Kirsten E; Acosta, Andres; Wright, Amy J; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Zolotukhin, Irene; Wasserfall, Clive; Mah, Cathryn

    2012-02-01

    Effective gene transfer with sustained gene expression is an important adjunct to the study of intestinal inflammation and future therapy in inflammatory bowel disease. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are ideal for gene transfer and long-term transgene expression. The purpose of our study was to identify optimal AAV pseudotypes for transduction of the epithelium in the small intestine and colon, which could be used for studies in experimental colitis. The tropism and transduction efficiencies of AAV pseudotypes 1-10 were examined in murine small intestine and colon 8 wk after administration by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. The clinical and histopathological effects of IL-10-mediated intestinal transduction delivered by AAVrh10 were examined in the murine IL-10⁻/⁻ enterocolitis model. Serum IL-10 levels and IL-10 expression were followed by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. AAV pseudotypes 4, 7, 8, 9, and 10 demonstrated optimal intestinal transduction. Transgene expression was sustained 8 wk after administration and was frequently observed in enteroendocrine cells. Long-term IL-10 gene expression and serum IL-10 levels were observed following AAV transduction in an IL-10-/- model of enterocolitis. Animals treated with AAVrh10-IL-10 had lower disease activity index scores, higher colon weight-to-length ratios, and lower microscopic inflammation scores. This study identifies novel AAV pseudotypes with small intestine and colon tropism and sustained transgene expression capable of modulating mucosal inflammation in a murine model of enterocolitis. PMID:22114116

  10. Local Administration of AAV-BDNF to Subventricular Zone Induces Functional Recovery in Stroke Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Jin; Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Shen, Hui; Harvey, Brandon K.; Airavaara, Mikko; Wang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Migration of new neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs) from the subventricular zone (SVZ) plays an important role in neurorepair after injury. Previous studies have shown that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances the migration of NPCs from SVZ explants in neonatal mice in vitro. The purpose of this study was to identify the role of BDNF in SVZ cells using AAV-BDNF in an animal model of stroke. BDNF protein production after AAV‐BDNF infection was verified in primary neuronal culture. AAV-BDNF or AAV-RFP was injected into the left SVZ region of adult rats at 14 days prior to right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). SVZ tissues were collected from the brain and placed in Metrigel cultures 1 day after MCAo. Treatment with AAV-BDNF significantly increased the migration of SVZ cells in the stroke brain in vitro. In another set of animals, AAV-GFP was co-injected with AAV-BDNF or AAV-RFP to label cells in left SVZ prior to right MCAo. Local administration of AAV-BDNF significantly enhanced recovery of locomotor function and migration of GFP-positive cells from the SVZ toward the lesioned hemisphere in stroke rats. Our data suggest that focal administration of AAV-BDNF to the SVZ increases behavioral recovery post stroke, possibly through the enhancement of migration of cells from SVZ in stroke animals. Regional manipulation of BDNF expression through AAV may be a novel approach for neurorepair in stroke brains. PMID:24312581

  11. Brain delivery of AAV9 expressing an anti-PrP monovalent antibody delays prion disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Moda, Fabio; Vimercati, Chiara; Campagnani, Ilaria; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Morbin, Michela; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Zucca, Ileana; Legname, Giuseppe; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by a conformational modification of the cellular prion protein (PrP (C)) into disease-specific forms, termed PrP (Sc), that have the ability to interact with PrP (C) promoting its conversion to PrP (Sc). In vitro studies demonstrated that anti-PrP antibodies inhibit this process. In particular, the single chain variable fragment D18 antibody (scFvD18) showed high efficiency in curing chronically prion-infected cells. This molecule binds the PrP (C) region involved in the interaction with PrP (Sc) thus halting further prion formation. These findings prompted us to test the efficiency of scFvD18 in vivo. A recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral vector serotype 9 was used to deliver scFvD18 to the brain of mice that were subsequently infected by intraperitoneal route with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain RML. We found that the treatment was safe, prolonged the incubation time of scrapie-infected animals and decreased the burden of total proteinase-resistant PrP (Sc) in the brain, suggesting that scFvD18 interferes with prion replication in vivo. This approach is relevant for designing new therapeutic strategies for prion diseases and other disorders characterized by protein misfolding. PMID:22842862

  12. A shortened adeno-associated virus expression cassette for CFTR gene transfer to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H; Lashmit, Philip; Afione, Sandra; Schmidt, Michael; Zabner, Joseph; Stinski, Mark F; Chiorini, Jay A; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-22

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) such as AAV5 that transduce airway epithelia from the apical surface are attractive vectors for gene transfer in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, their utility in CF has been limited because packaging of the insert becomes inefficient when its length exceeds approximately 4,900-5,000 bp. To partially circumvent this size constraint, we previously developed a CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) transgene that deleted a portion of the R domain (CFTRDeltaR). In this study, we focused on shortening the other elements in the AAV expression cassette. We found that portions of the CMV immediate/early (CMVie) enhancer/promoter could be deleted without abolishing activity. We also tested various intervening sequences, poly(A) signals, and an intron to develop an expression cassette that meets the size restrictions imposed by AAV. We then packaged these shortened elements with the CFTRDeltaR transgene into AAV5 and applied them to the apical surface of differentiated CF airway epithelia. Two to 4 weeks later, the AAV5 vectors partially corrected the CF Cl(-) transport defect. These results demonstrate that a single AAV vector can complement the CF defect in differentiated airway epithelia and thereby further the development of effective CF gene transfer. PMID:15703296

  13. A shortened adeno-associated virus expression cassette for CFTR gene transfer to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Karp, Philip H.; Lashmit, Philip; Afione, Sandra; Schmidt, Michael; Zabner, Joseph; Stinski, Mark F.; Chiorini, Jay A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) such as AAV5 that transduce airway epithelia from the apical surface are attractive vectors for gene transfer in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, their utility in CF has been limited because packaging of the insert becomes inefficient when its length exceeds ≈4,900–5,000 bp. To partially circumvent this size constraint, we previously developed a CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) transgene that deleted a portion of the R domain (CFTRΔR). In this study, we focused on shortening the other elements in the AAV expression cassette. We found that portions of the CMV immediate/early (CMVie) enhancer/promoter could be deleted without abolishing activity. We also tested various intervening sequences, poly(A) signals, and an intron to develop an expression cassette that meets the size restrictions imposed by AAV. We then packaged these shortened elements with the CFTRΔR transgene into AAV5 and applied them to the apical surface of differentiated CF airway epithelia. Two to 4 weeks later, the AAV5 vectors partially corrected the CF Cl– transport defect. These results demonstrate that a single AAV vector can complement the CF defect in differentiated airway epithelia and thereby further the development of effective CF gene transfer. PMID:15703296

  14. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  15. Producing a Mammalian GFP Expression Vector Containing Neomycin Resistance Gene.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Manizheh; Abiri, Maryam; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) was originally isolated from the Jellyfish Aequorea Victoria that fluoresces green when exposed to blue light. GFP protein is composed of 238 amino acids with the molecular mass of 26.9 kD. The GFP gene is frequently used in cellular and molecular biology as a reporter gene. To date, many bacterial, yeast, fungal, plants, fly and mammalian cells, including human, have been created which express GFP. Martin Chalfie, Osamu Shimomura, and Roger Tsien were awarded the 2008 noble prize in chemistry for their discovery and development of GFP. In many studies on mammalian cells, GFP gene is introduced into cells using vector-based systems or a recombinant virus to track the location of a target protein or to study the expression level of the gene of interest, but in these studies there is no selection marker to normalize transfection. According to the importance of neomycin gene as a selection marker in mammalian cells, we aimed to produce a GFP expression vector that contains neomycin gene. GFP gene was separated from pEGFP-N1 vector and was inserted in the back-bone of pCDNA3.1/His/LacZ vector that contained the neomycin gene. The resulted vector contained GFP beside neomycin gene. PMID:23407141

  16. Regulated Expression of Adenoviral Vectors-Based Gene Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Muhammad, A. K. M.; Kroeger, Kurt; Mondkar, Sonali; Liu, Chunyan; Bondale, Niyati; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Regulatable promoter systems allow gene expression to be tightly controlled in vivo. This is highly desirable for the development of safe, efficacious adenoviral vectors that can be used to treat human diseases in the clinic. Ideally, regulatable cassettes should have minimal gene expression in the “OFF” state, and expression should quickly reach therapeutic levels in the “ON” state. In addition, the components of regulatable cassettes should be non-toxic at physiological concentrations and should not be immunogenic, especially when treating chronic illness that requires long-lasting gene expression. In this chapter, we will describe in detail protocols to develop and validate first generation (Ad) and high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors that express therapeutic genes under the control of the TetON regulatable system. Our laboratory has successfully used these protocols to regulate the expression of marker genes, immune stimulatory genes, and toxins for cancer gene therapeutics, i.e., glioma that is a deadly form of brain cancer. We have shown that this third generation TetON regulatable system, incorporating a doxycycline (DOX)-sensitive rtTA2S-M2 inducer and tTSKid silencer, is non-toxic, relatively non-immunogenic, and can tightly regulate reporter transgene expression downstream of a TRE promoter from adenoviral vectors in vitro and also in vivo. PMID:18470649

  17. Zinc Finger Nuclease-Expressing Baculoviral Vectors Mediate Targeted Genome Integration of Reprogramming Factor Genes to Facilitate the Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Rui-Zhe; Tay, Felix Chang; Goh, Sal-Lee; Lau, Cia-Hin; Zhu, Haibao; Tan, Wee-Kiat; Liang, Qingle; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Li, Zhendong; Tay, Johan Chin-Kang; Wu, Chunxiao; Zeng, Jieming; Fan, Weimin; Toh, Han Chong

    2013-01-01

    Integrative gene transfer using retroviruses to express reprogramming factors displays high efficiency in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), but the value of the method is limited because of the concern over mutagenesis associated with random insertion of transgenes. Site-specific integration into a preselected locus by engineered zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology provides a potential way to overcome the problem. Here, we report the successful reprogramming of human fibroblasts into a state of pluripotency by baculoviral transduction-mediated, site-specific integration of OKSM (Oct3/4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-myc) transcription factor genes into the AAVS1 locus in human chromosome 19. Two nonintegrative baculoviral vectors were used for cotransduction, one expressing ZFNs and another as a donor vector encoding the four transcription factors. iPSC colonies were obtained at a high efficiency of 12% (the mean value of eight individual experiments). All characterized iPSC clones carried the transgenic cassette only at the ZFN-specified AAVS1 locus. We further demonstrated that when the donor cassette was flanked by heterospecific loxP sequences, the reprogramming genes in iPSCs could be replaced by another transgene using a baculoviral vector-based Cre recombinase-mediated cassette exchange system, thereby producing iPSCs free of exogenous reprogramming factors. Although the use of nonintegrating methods to generate iPSCs is rapidly becoming a standard approach, methods based on site-specific integration of reprogramming factor genes as reported here hold the potential for efficient generation of genetically amenable iPSCs suitable for future gene therapy applications. PMID:24167318

  18. Impaired clearance of accumulated lysosomal glycogen in advanced Pompe disease despite high-level vector-mediated transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Bird, Andrew; Li, Songtao; Young, Sarah P.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile-onset glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease; MIM 232300) causes death early in childhood from cardiorespiratory failure in absence of effective treatment, whereas late-onset Pompe disease causes a progressive skeletal myopathy. The limitations of enzyme replacement therapy could potentially be addressed with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy. Methods AAV vectors containing tissue-specific regulatory cassettes, either liver-specific or muscle-specific, were administered to 12 and 17 month old Pompe disease mice to evaluate the efficacy of gene therapy in advanced Pompe disease. Biochemical correction was evaluated through GAA activity and glycogen content analyses of the heart and skeletal muscle. Western blotting, urinary biomarker, and Rotarod performance were evaluated following vector administration. Results The AAV vector containing the liver-specific regulatory cassette secreted high-level hGAA into the blood and corrected glycogen storage in the heart and diaphragm. The biochemical correction of the heart and diaphragm was associated with efficacy, as reflected by increased Rotarod performance; however, the clearance of glycogen from skeletal muscles was relatively impaired, in comparison with younger Pompe disease mice. An alternative vector containing a muscle-specific regulatory cassette transduced skeletal muscle with high efficiency, but also failed to achieve complete clearance of accumulated glycogen. Decreased transduction of the heart and liver in older mice, especially in females, was implicated as a cause for reduced efficacy in advanced Pompe disease. Conclusion The impaired efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene therapy in old Pompe disease mice emphasized the need for early treatment to achieve full efficacy. PMID:19621331

  19. In Vivo Selection Yields AAV-B1 Capsid for Central Nervous System and Muscle Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sourav R; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Harris, Anne F; Maitland, Stacy A; Ferreira, Jennifer S; Zhang, Yuanfan; Ma, Shan; Sharma, Rohit B; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Johnson, Jacob A; Johnson, Aime K; Alonso, Laura C; Punzo, Claudio; Wagner, Kathryn R; Maguire, Casey A; Kotin, Robert M; Martin, Douglas R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have shown promise as a platform for gene therapy of neurological disorders. Achieving global gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is key for development of effective therapies for many of these diseases. Here we report the isolation of a novel CNS tropic AAV capsid, AAV-B1, after a single round of in vivo selection from an AAV capsid library. Systemic injection of AAV-B1 vector in adult mice and cat resulted in widespread gene transfer throughout the CNS with transduction of multiple neuronal subpopulations. In addition, AAV-B1 transduces muscle, β-cells, pulmonary alveoli, and retinal vasculature at high efficiency. This vector is more efficient than AAV9 for gene delivery to mouse brain, spinal cord, muscle, pancreas, and lung. Together with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by antibodies in pooled human sera, the broad transduction profile of AAV-B1 represents an important improvement over AAV9 for CNS gene therapy. PMID:27117222

  20. Split-Intron Retroviral Vectors: Enhanced Expression with Improved Safety

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Said I.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Kingsman, Alan J.; Uden, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The inclusion of retrovirus-derived introns within retrovirus-based expression vectors leads to a fraction of the resulting transcripts being spliced. Such splicing has been shown to markedly improve expression (W. J. Krall et al., Gene Ther. 3:37–48, 1996). One way to improve upon this still further might involve the use of more efficient introns instead of those from the provirus. Currently, however, incorporation of such introns remains self-defeating since they are removed in the nucleus of the producer cell. In the past, elaborate ways to overcome this problem have included the use of alphaviruses to make the vector transcripts within the cytoplasm, thus avoiding the nuclear splicing machinery during vector production (K. J. Li and H. Garoff, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:3650–3654, 1998). We now present a novel design for the inclusion of introns within a retroviral vector. In essence, this is achieved by exploiting the retroviral replication process to copy not only the U3 promoter but also a synthetic splice donor to the 5′-long-terminal-repeat position during reverse transcription. Once copied, synthesized transcripts then contain a splice donor at their 5′ end capable of interacting with a consensus splice acceptor engineered downstream of the packaging signal. Upon transduction, we demonstrate these vectors to produce enhanced expression from near fully spliced (and thus packaging signal minus) transcripts. The unique design of these high titer and high-expression retroviral vectors may be of use in a number of gene therapy applications. PMID:10666267

  1. Split-intron retroviral vectors: enhanced expression with improved safety.

    PubMed

    Ismail, S I; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Uden, M

    2000-03-01

    The inclusion of retrovirus-derived introns within retrovirus-based expression vectors leads to a fraction of the resulting transcripts being spliced. Such splicing has been shown to markedly improve expression (W. J. Krall et al., Gene Ther. 3:37-48, 1996). One way to improve upon this still further might involve the use of more efficient introns instead of those from the provirus. Currently, however, incorporation of such introns remains self-defeating since they are removed in the nucleus of the producer cell. In the past, elaborate ways to overcome this problem have included the use of alphaviruses to make the vector transcripts within the cytoplasm, thus avoiding the nuclear splicing machinery during vector production (K. J. Li and H. Garoff, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:3650-3654, 1998). We now present a novel design for the inclusion of introns within a retroviral vector. In essence, this is achieved by exploiting the retroviral replication process to copy not only the U3 promoter but also a synthetic splice donor to the 5'-long-terminal-repeat position during reverse transcription. Once copied, synthesized transcripts then contain a splice donor at their 5' end capable of interacting with a consensus splice acceptor engineered downstream of the packaging signal. Upon transduction, we demonstrate these vectors to produce enhanced expression from near fully spliced (and thus packaging signal minus) transcripts. The unique design of these high titer and high-expression retroviral vectors may be of use in a number of gene therapy applications. PMID:10666267

  2. Multipurpose modular lentiviral vectors for RNA interference and transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Kesireddy, Venu; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O

    2010-07-01

    We have created a multipurpose modular lentiviral vector system for expressing both transgenes and miRNA 30-based short hairpins (shRNAmirs) for RNAi. The core of the resulting vector system, pLVmir, allows a simple two step cloning procedure for expressing shRNAmirs under the control of a Pol II promoter in both a constitutive and conditional manner. The adapted cloning method includes a PCR-free method for transferring shRNAmir based RNAi clones from a publicly available library (Open Biosystems). The addition of a Pol II promoter-driven shRNAmir cassette and broadening the choice of Pol III promoters and silencing triggers offers great flexibility to this system. The combination of several preexisting and additional modules created here caters to common needs of researchers. Our modular vector system was validated regarding functionality of promoters, inducibility and reversibility. We successfully applied the system to knockdown Xirp2 mRNA expression in H2kb-tsA58 muscle cells and determined that this had no spurious effect on the expression of a closely related protein. Finally, our set of lentiviral vectors may be used to achieve synergistic effects, for simultaneous knockdown of two genes, as a rescue plasmid and for studying mutant proteins in a physiological context. PMID:19798586

  3. AAV-mediated gene targeting methods for human cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Iram F; Hirata, Roli K; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types, with targeting frequencies ranging from 10−5 to 10−2 per infected cell. these targeting frequencies are 1–4 logs higher than those obtained by conventional transfection or electroporation approaches. a wide variety of different types of mutations can be introduced into chromosomal loci with high fidelity and without genotoxicity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for gene targeting in human cells with AAV vectors. We describe methods for vector design, stock preparation and titration. optimized transduction protocols are provided for human pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts and transformed cell lines, as well as a method for identifying targeted clones by southern blots. this protocol (from vector design through a single round of targeting and screening) can be completed in ~10 weeks; each subsequent round of targeting and screening should take an additional 7 weeks. PMID:21455185

  4. Reduced retinal transduction and enhanced transgene-directed immunogenicity with intravitreal delivery of rAAV following posterior vitrectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R F; Boye, S L; Conlon, T J; Erger, K E; Sledge, D G; Langohr, I M; Hauswirth, W W; Komáromy, A M; Boye, S E; Petersen-Jones, S M; Bartoe, J T

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-based gene therapy is a promising treatment strategy for delivery of neurotrophic transgenes to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma patients. Retinal distribution of transgene expression following intravitreal injection (IVT) of AAV is variable in animal models and the vitreous humor may represent a barrier to initial vector penetration. The primary goal of our study was to investigate the effect of prior core vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid membrane peeling on pattern and efficiency of transduction of a capsid amino acid substituted AAV2 vector, carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter transgene following IVT in dogs. When progressive intraocular inflammation developed starting 4 weeks post IVT, the study plan was modified to allow detailed characterization of the etiology as a secondary goal. Unexpectedly, surgical vitrectomy was found to significantly limit transduction, whereas in non-vitrectomized eyes transduction efficiency reached upwards to 37.3% of RGC layer cells. The developing retinitis was characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates resulting from a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, which we suspect was directed at the GFP transgene. Our results, in a canine large animal model, support caution when considering surgical vitrectomy before IVT for retinal gene therapy in patients, as prior vitrectomy appears to significantly reduce transduction efficiency and may predispose the patient to development of vector-induced immune reactions. PMID:27052802

  5. Reduced retinal transduction and enhanced transgene-directed immunogenicity with intravitreal delivery of rAAV following posterior vitrectomy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, RF; Boye, SL; Conlon, TJ; Erger, KE; Sledge, DG; Langohr, IM; Hauswirth, WW; Komáromy, AM; Boye, SE; Petersen-Jones, SM; Bartoe, JT

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-based gene therapy is a promising treatment strategy for delivery of neurotrophic transgenes to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma patients. Retinal distribution of transgene expression following intravitreal injection (IVT) of AAV is variable in animal models and the vitreous humor may represent a barrier to initial vector penetration. The primary goal of our study was to investigate the effect of prior core vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid membrane peeling on pattern and efficiency of transduction of a capsid amino acid substituted AAV2 vector, carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter transgene following IVT in dogs. When progressive intraocular inflammation developed starting 4 weeks post IVT, the study plan was modified to allow detailed characterization of the etiology as a secondary goal. Unexpectedly, surgical vitrectomy was found to significantly limit transduction, whereas in non-vitrectomized eyes transduction efficiency reached upwards to 37.3% of RGC layer cells. The developing retinitis was characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates resulting from a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, which we suspect was directed at the GFP transgene. Our results, in a canine large animal model, support caution when considering surgical vitrectomy before IVT for retinal gene therapy in patients, as prior vitrectomy appears to significantly reduce transduction efficiency and may predispose the patient to development of vector-induced immune reactions. PMID:27052802

  6. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, Darren R; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T; Weiss, Michael D; Chamberlain, Joel R

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUG(exp)) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUG(exp) mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSA(LR)) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSA(LR) mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSA(LR) mice, including a reduction in the CUG(exp) mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUG(exp) mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSA(LR) mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  7. Generation and in vivo evaluation of IL10-treated dendritic cells in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-based gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Vandamme, Céline; Segovia, Mercedes; Devaux, Marie; Guilbaud, Mickaël; Tilly, Gaëlle; Jaulin, Nicolas; Le Duff, Johanne; Cherel, Yan; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Anegon, Ignacio; Moullier, Philippe; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Adjali, Oumeya

    2014-01-01

    Preventing untoward immune responses against a specific antigen is a major challenge in different clinical settings such as gene therapy, transplantation, or autoimmunity. Following intramuscular delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-derived vectors, transgene rejection can be a roadblock to successful clinical translation. Specific immunomodulation strategies potentially leading to sustained transgene expression while minimizing pharmacological immunosuppression are desirable. Tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDC) are potential candidates but have not yet been evaluated in the context of gene therapy, to our knowledge. Following intramuscular delivery of rAAV-derived vectors expressing an immunogenic protein in the nonhuman primate model, we assessed the immunomodulating potential of autologous bone marrow-derived TolDC generated in the presence of IL10 and pulsed with the transgene product. TolDC administered either intradermally or intravenously were safe and well tolerated. While the intravenous route showed a modest ability to modulate host immunity against the transgene product, intradermally delivery resulted in a robust vaccination of the macaques when associated to intramuscular rAAV-derived vectors-based gene transfer. These findings demonstrate the critical role of TolDC mode of injection in modulating host immunity. This study also provides the first evidence of the potential of TolDC-based immunomodulation in gene therapy. PMID:26015970

  8. Oversized AAV Transductifon Is Mediated via a DNA-PKcs-independent, Rad51C-dependent Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Bellon, Isabella; Yin, Chaoying; Chavala, Sai; Pryadkina, Marina; Richard, Isabelle; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the DNA packaging restriction of the viral capsid (<4.7 kb). Recent observations demonstrate oversized AAV genome transduction through an unknown mechanism. Herein, AAV production using an oversized reporter (6.2 kb) resulted in chloroform and DNase-resistant particles harboring distinct “fragment” AAV (fAAV) genomes (5.0, 2.4, and 1.6 kb). Fractionation experiments determined that only the larger “fragments” mediated transduction in vitro, and relatively efficient transduction was also demonstrated in the muscle, the eye, and the liver. In contrast with concatemerization-dependent large-gene delivery by split AAV, fAAV transduction is independent of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in vitro and in vivo while disproportionately reliant on the DNA strand–annealing protein Rad51C. Importantly, fAAV's unique dependence on DNA repair proteins, compared with intact AAV, strongly suggests that the majority of oversized AAV transduction is mediated by fragmented genomes. Although fAAV transduction is less efficient than intact AAV, it is enhanced fourfold in muscle and sevenfold in the retina compared with split AAV transduction. Furthermore, fAAV carrying codon-optimized therapeutic dysferlin cDNA in a 7.5 kb expression cassette restored dysferlin levels in a dystrophic model. Collectively, oversized AAV genome transduction requires unique DNA repair pathways and offers an alternative, more efficient strategy for large-gene therapy. PMID:23939025

  9. Transgene regulation using the tetracycline-inducible TetR-KRAB system after AAV-mediated gene transfer in rodents and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Le Guiner, Caroline; Stieger, Knut; Toromanoff, Alice; Guilbaud, Mickaël; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Devaux, Marie; Guigand, Lydie; Cherel, Yan; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne; Adjali, Oumeya

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of the Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-based gene delivery platform in vivo. The control of transgene expression in many protocols is highly desirable for therapeutic applications and/or safety reasons. To date, the tetracycline and the rapamycin dependent regulatory systems have been the most widely evaluated. While the long-term regulation of the transgene has been obtained in rodent models, the translation of these studies to larger animals, especially to nonhuman primates (NHP), has often resulted in an immune response against the recombinant regulator protein involved in transgene expression regulation. These immune responses were dependent on the target tissue and vector delivery route. Here, using AAV vectors, we evaluated a doxycyclin-inducible system in rodents and macaques in which the TetR protein is fused to the human Krüppel associated box (KRAB) protein. We demonstrated long term gene regulation efficiency in rodents after subretinal and intramuscular administration of AAV5 and AAV1 vectors, respectively. However, as previously described for other chimeric transactivators, the TetR-KRAB-based system failed to achieve long term regulation in the macaque after intramuscular vector delivery because of the development of an immune response. Thus, immunity against the chimeric transactivator TetR-KRAB emerged as the primary limitation for the clinical translation of the system when targeting the skeletal muscle, as previously described for other regulatory proteins. New developments in the field of chimeric drug-sensitive transactivators with the potential to not trigger the host immune system are still needed. PMID:25248159

  10. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-05-24

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  11. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-02-05

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  12. Expression vectors for the construction of hybrid Ty-VLPs.

    PubMed

    Adams, S E; Richardson, S M; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1994-04-01

    Purification of expressed proteins can be facilitated by expressing the recombinant protein as a fusion with a carrier protein that assembles into particulate structures. This article describes the use of expression vectors in producing a hybrid of the yeast retrotransposon Ty, which self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs). Hybrid VLPs can be used in such laboratory applications as the production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, structure/function analyses, the detection of important antigenic determinants, and epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies. PMID:7859156

  13. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  14. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  15. AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy in the Guanylate Cyclase (RetGC1/RetGC2) Double Knockout Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Sanford L.; Peshenko, Igor V.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Min, Seok Hong; McDoom, Issam; Kay, Christine N.; Liu, Xuan; Dyka, Frank M.; Foster, Thomas C.; Umino, Yumiko; Karan, Sukanya; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Dizhoor, Alexander; Hauswirth, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are associated with recessive Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes photoreceptor-specific, retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (RetGC1). Reports of retinal degeneration in LCA1 are conflicting; some describe no obvious degeneration and others report loss of both rods and cones. Proof of concept studies in models representing the spectrum of phenotypes is warranted. We have previously demonstrated adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RetGC1 is therapeutic in GC1ko mice, a model exhibiting loss of cones only. The purpose of this study was to characterize AAV-mediated gene therapy in the RetGC1/RetGC2 double knockout (GCdko) mouse, a model lacking rod and cone function and exhibiting progressive loss of both photoreceptor subclasses. Use of this model also allowed for the evaluation of the functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 isozyme. Subretinal delivery of AAV8(Y733F) vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter driving murine Gucy2e was performed in GCdko mice at various postnatal time points. Treatment resulted in restoration of rod and cone function at all treatment ages and preservation of retinal structure in GCdko mice treated as late as 7 weeks of age. Functional gains and structural preservation were stable for at least 1 year. Treatment also conferred cortical- and subcortical-based visually-guided behavior. Functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 was indistinguishable from that of endogenous isozyme in congenic wild-type (WT) mice. This study clearly demonstrates AAV-mediated RetGC1 expression restores function to and preserves structure of rod and cone photoreceptors in a degenerative model of retinal guanylate cyclase deficiency, further supporting development of an AAV-based vector for treatment of LCA1. PMID:23210611

  16. AAV9-mediated gene transfer of desmin ameliorates cardiomyopathy in desmin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M B; Bauer, R; Jungmann, A; Winter, L; Rapti, K; Strucksberg, K-H; Clemen, C S; Li, Z; Schröder, R; Katus, H A; Müller, O J

    2016-08-01

    Mutations of the human desmin (DES) gene cause autosomal dominant and recessive myopathies affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue. Desmin knockout mice (DES-KO), which develop progressive myopathy and cardiomyopathy, mirror rare human recessive desminopathies in which mutations on both DES alleles lead to a complete ablation of desmin protein expression. Here, we investigated whether an adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of wild-type desmin cDNA (AAV-DES) attenuates cardiomyopathy in these mice. Our approach leads to a partial reconstitution of desmin protein expression and the de novo formation of the extrasarcomeric desmin-syncoilin network in cardiomyocytes of treated animals. This finding was accompanied by reduced fibrosis and heart weights and improved systolic left-ventricular function when compared with control vector-treated DES-KO mice. Since the re-expression of desmin protein in cardiomyocytes of DES-KO mice restores the extrasarcomeric desmin-syncoilin cytoskeleton, attenuates the degree of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and improves contractile function, AAV-mediated desmin gene transfer may be a novel and promising therapeutic approach for patients with cardiomyopathy due to the complete lack of desmin protein expression. PMID:27101257

  17. Overcoming expression and purification problems of RhoGDI using a family of "parallel" expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, P; Garrard, S; Derewenda, Z

    1999-02-01

    We describe the construction of expression vectors based on three of the most frequently used gene fusion affinity tags [glutathione S-transferase (GST), maltose binding protein (MBP), and the His6 peptide]. The polylinkers of pGEX4T1, pMal-c2, and a pET vector were replaced with the polylinker isolated from the baculovirus expression plasmid pFastBac. Once appropriate restriction sites have been introduced into a gene, it can be fused to all three affinity tags with little effort, allowing expression-screening experiments to be performed efficiently. We discuss the development and use of these vectors with respect to overcoming purification problems encountered for the RhoA GDP/GTP nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) and their advantages over commercially available expression vectors. PMID:10024467

  18. Designer Gene Delivery Vectors: Molecular Engineering and Evolution of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors for Enhanced Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Inchan

    2007-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are highly promising due to several desirable features of this parent virus, including a lack of pathogenicity, efficient infection of dividing and non-dividing cells, and sustained maintenance of the viral genome. However, several problems should be addressed to enhance the utility of AAV vectors, particularly those based on AAV2, the best characterized AAV serotype. First, altering viral tropism would be advantageous for broadening its utility in various tissue or cell types. In response to this need, vector pseudotyping, mosaic capsids, and targeting ligand insertion into the capsid have shown promise for altering AAV specificity. In addition, library selection and directed evolution have recently emerged as promising approaches to modulate AAV tropism despite limited knowledge of viral structure–function relationships. Second, pre-existing immunity to AAV must be addressed for successful clinical application of AAV vectors. “Shielding” polymers, site-directed mutagenesis, and alternative AAV serotypes have shown success in avoiding immune neutralization. Furthermore, directed evolution of the AAV capsid is a high throughput approach that has yielded vectors with substantial resistance to neutralizing antibodies. Molecular engineering and directed evolution of AAV vectors therefore offer promise for generating ‘designer’ gene delivery vectors with enhanced properties. PMID:17763830

  19. Intrathecal AAV serotype 9-mediated delivery of shRNA against TRPV1 attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takashi; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Kaburagi, Hidetoshi; Sotome, Shinichi; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Ukegawa, Madoka; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yamamoto, Mariko; Tajiri, Mio; Miyata, Haruka; Hirai, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Okawa, Atsushi; Yokota, Takanori

    2014-02-01

    Gene therapy for neuropathic pain requires efficient gene delivery to both central and peripheral nervous systems. We previously showed that an adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) could suppress target molecule expression in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord upon intrathecal injection. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of this approach, we constructed an AAV9 vector encoding shRNA against vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1), which is an important target gene for acute pain, but its role in chronic neuropathic pain remains unclear. We intrathecally injected it into the subarachnoid space at the upper lumbar spine of mice 3 weeks after spared nerve injury (SNI). Delivered shTRPV1 effectively suppressed mRNA and protein expression of TRPV1 in the DRG and spinal cord, and it attenuated nerve injury-induced thermal allodynia 10-28 days after treatment. Our study provides important evidence for the contribution of TRPV1 to thermal hypersensitivity in neuropathic pain and thus establishes intrathecal AAV9-mediated gene delivery as an investigative and potentially therapeutic platform for the nervous system. PMID:24322332

  20. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII

    PubMed Central

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII. PMID:26447927

  1. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    PubMed

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII. PMID:26447927

  2. Continuous DOPA synthesis from a single AAV: dosing and efficacy in models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Cederfjäll, Erik; Nilsson, Nathalie; Sahin, Gurdal; Chu, Yaping; Nikitidou, Elisabeth; Björklund, Tomas; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Kirik, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    We used a single adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector co-expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) to investigate the relationship between vector dose, and the magnitude and rate of recovery in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Intrastriatal injections of >1E10 genomic copies (gc) of TH-GCH1 vector resulted in complete recovery in drug-naïve behavior tests. Lower vector dose gave partial to no functional improvement. Stereological quantification revealed no striatal NeuN+ cell loss in any of the groups, whereas a TH-GCH1 dose of >1E11 gc resulted in cell loss in globus pallidus. Thus, a TH-GCH1 dose of 1E10 gc gave complete recovery without causing neuronal loss. Safety and efficacy was also studied in non-human primates where the control vector resulted in co-expression of the transgenes in caudate-putamen. In the TH-GCH1 group, GCH1 expression was robust but TH was not detectable. Moreover, TH-GCH1 treatment did not result in functional improvement in non-human primates. PMID:23831692

  3. Data presenting a modified bacterial expression vector for expressing and purifying Nus solubility-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Heng; Terman, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are the predominant source for producing recombinant proteins but while many exogenous proteins are expressed, only a fraction of those are soluble. We have found that a new actin regulatory enzyme Mical is poorly soluble when expressed in bacteria but the use of a Nus fusion protein tag greatly increases its solubility. However, available vectors containing a Nus tag have been engineered in a way that hinders the separation of target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. We have now used recombinant DNA approaches to overcome these issues and reengineer a Nus solubility tag-containing bacterial expression vector. The data herein present a modified bacterial expression vector useful for expressing proteins fused to the Nus solubility tag and separating such target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. PMID:27547802

  4. Disease Rescue and Increased Lifespan in a Model of Cardiomyopathy and Muscular Dystrophy by Combined AAV Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Carmen; Faraso, Stefania; Sorrentino, Nicolina Cristina; Di Salvo, Giovanni; Nusco, Edoardo; Nigro, Gerardo; Cutillo, Luisa; Calabrò, Raffaele; Auricchio, Alberto; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Background The BIO14.6 hamster is an excellent animal model for inherited cardiomyopathy, because of its lethal and well-documented course, due to a spontaneous deletion of delta-sarcoglycan gene promoter and first exon. The muscle disease is progressive and average lifespan is 11 months, because heart slowly dilates towards heart failure. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on the ability of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to transduce heart together with skeletal muscle following systemic administration, we delivered human delta-sarcoglycan cDNA into male BIO14.6 hamsters by testing different ages of injection, routes of administration and AAV serotypes. Body-wide restoration of delta-SG expression was associated with functional reconstitution of the sarcoglycan complex and with significant lowering of centralized nuclei and fibrosis in skeletal muscle. Motor ability and cardiac functions were completely rescued. However, BIO14.6 hamsters having less than 70% of fibers recovering sarcoglycan developed cardiomyopathy, even if the total rescued protein was normal. When we used serotype 2/8 in combination with serotype 2/1, lifespan was extended up to 22 months with sustained heart function improvement. Conclusions/Significance Our data support multiple systemic administrations of AAV as a general therapeutic strategy for clinical trials in cardiomyopathies and muscle disorders. PMID:19333401

  5. Successful Interference with Cellular Immune Responses to Immunogenic Proteins Encoded by Recombinant Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Sarukhan, Adelaida; Camugli, Sabine; Gjata, Bernard; von Boehmer, Harald; Danos, Olivier; Jooss, Karin

    2001-01-01

    Vectors derived from the adeno-associated virus (AAV) have been successfully used for the long-term expression of therapeutic genes in animal models and patients. One of the major advantages of these vectors is the absence of deleterious immune responses following gene transfer. However, AAV vectors, when used in vaccination studies, can result in efficient humoral and cellular responses against the transgene product. It is therefore important to understand the factors which influence the establishment of these immune responses in order to design safe and efficient procedures for AAV-based gene therapies. We have compared T-cell activation against a strongly immunogenic protein, the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is synthesized in skeletal muscle following gene transfer with an adenovirus (Ad) or an AAV vector. In both cases, cellular immune responses resulted in the elimination of transduced muscle fibers within 4 weeks. However, the kinetics of CD4+ T-cell activation were markedly delayed when AAV vectors were used. Upon recombinant Ad (rAd) gene transfer, T cells were activated both by direct transduction of dendritic cells and by cross-presentation of the transgene product, while upon rAAV gene transfer T cells were only activated by the latter mechanism. These results suggested that activation of the immune system by the transgene product following rAAV-mediated gene transfer might be easier to control than that following rAd-mediated gene transfer. Therefore, we tested protocols aimed at interfering with either antigen presentation by blocking the CD40/CD40L pathway or with the T-cell response by inducing transgene-specific tolerance. Long-term expression of the AAV-HA was achieved in both cases, whereas immune responses against Ad-HA could not be prevented. These data clearly underline the importance of understanding the mechanisms by which vector-encoded proteins are recognized by the immune system in order to specifically interfere with them and

  6. Highly Efficient Delivery of Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors to the Primate Retina.

    PubMed

    Boye, Shannon E; Alexander, John J; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Clark, Mark E; Sandefer, Kristen J; Girkin, Chris A; Hauswirth, William W; Gamlin, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the preferred vector for targeting gene expression to the retina. Subretinally injected AAV can efficiently transduce retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors in primate retina. Inner and middle primate retina can be transduced by intravitreally delivered AAV, but with low efficiency. This is due to dilution of vector, potential neutralization of capsid because it is not confined to the immune-privileged retinal compartment, and the presence of the inner limiting membrane (ILM), a barrier separating the vitreous from the neural retina. We here describe a novel "subILM" injection method that addresses all three issues. Specifically, vector is placed in a surgically induced, hydrodissected space between the ILM and neural retina. In an initial experiment, we injected viscoelastic (Healon(®)), a substance we confirmed was biocompatible with AAV, to create a subILM bleb and subsequently injected AAV2-GFP into the bleb after irrigation with basic salt solution. For later experiments, we used a Healon-AAV mixture to place single, subILM injections. In all cases, subILM delivery of AAV was well tolerated-no inflammation or gross structural changes were observed by ophthalmological examination or optical coherence tomography. In-life fluorescence imaging revealed profound transgene expression within the area of the subILM injection bleb that persisted for the study duration. Uniform and extensive transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was achieved in the areas beneath the subILM bleb. Transduction of Müller glia, ON bipolar cells, and photoreceptors was also observed. Robust central labeling from green fluorescent protein-expressing RGCs confirmed their continued survival, and was observed in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the superior colliculus, and the pretectum. Our results confirm that the ILM is a major barrier to transduction by AAV in primate retina and that, when it is circumvented, the efficiency and

  7. Molecular cloning and expression vector construction of bovine TRIM28.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Zhai, Z C; Zhang, M L; Song, B H; Zhu, Y R; Yang, S B; Dong, X Q; Su, L Y; Wang, C F; Ma, H X; Luan, W M

    2016-01-01

    The bovine TRIM28 gene was amplified from ovary tissue by using RT-PCR. The TRIM28 gene was inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP and transfected into bovine fetal fibroblasts by using Lipofectamine 3000. TRIM28 mRNA and protein were detected by fluorescence microscope and western blotting. The results showed that the full length of TRIM28 was cloned and pIRES2-EGFP-TRIM28 was constructed successfully. EGFP expression was observed, and the pIRES2-EGFP-TRIM28 transfected group expressed more TRIM28 protein than that by the pIRES2-EGFP group. The TIMR28 gene has been successfully transferred into bovine fetal fibroblasts. PMID:27420979

  8. The baculovirus expression vector system: A commercial manufacturing platform for viral vaccines and gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Felberbaum, Rachael S

    2015-05-01

    The baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) platform has become an established manufacturing platform for the production of viral vaccines and gene therapy vectors. Nine BEVS-derived products have been approved - four for human use (Cervarix(®), Provenge(®), Glybera(®) and Flublok(®)) and five for veterinary use (Porcilis(®) Pesti, BAYOVAC CSF E2(®), Circumvent(®) PCV, Ingelvac CircoFLEX(®) and Porcilis(®) PCV). The BEVS platform offers many advantages, including manufacturing speed, flexible product design, inherent safety and scalability. This combination of features and product approvals has previously attracted interest from academic researchers, and more recently from industry leaders, to utilize BEVS to develop next generation vaccines, vectors for gene therapy, and other biopharmaceutical complex proteins. In this review, we explore the BEVS platform, detailing how it works, platform features and limitations and important considerations for manufacturing and regulatory approval. To underscore the growth in opportunities for BEVS-derived products, we discuss the latest product developments in the gene therapy and influenza vaccine fields that follow in the wake of the recent product approvals of Glybera(®) and Flublok(®), respectively. We anticipate that the utility of the platform will expand even further as new BEVS-derived products attain licensure. Finally, we touch on some of the areas where new BEVS-derived products are likely to emerge. PMID:25800821

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-03-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  11. Hydrostatic isolated limb perfusion with adeno-associated virus vectors enhances correction of skeletal muscle in Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Li, S; Bird, A; Koeberl, D D

    2010-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease; MIM 232300) stems from the inherited deficiency of acid-α-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase; EC 3.2.1.20), which primarily involves cardiac and skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that hydrostatic isolated limb perfusion (ILP) administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing a muscle-specific promoter could achieve relatively higher transgene expression in the hindlimb muscles of GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice, in comparison with intravenous (IV) administration. ILP administration of AAV2/8 vectors encoding alkaline phosphatase or human GAA-transduced skeletal muscles of the hindlimb widely, despite the relatively low number of vector particles administered (1 × 10¹¹), and IV administration of an equivalent vector dose failed to transduce skeletal muscle detectably. Similarly, ILP administration of fewer vector particles of the AAV2/9 vector encoding human GAA (3 × 10¹⁰) transduced skeletal muscles of the hindlimb widely and significantly reduced glycogen content to, in comparison with IV administration. The only advantage for IV administration was moderately high-level transduction of cardiac muscle, which demonstrated compellingly that ILP administration sequestered vector particles within the perfused limb. Reduction of glycogen storage in the extensor digitorum longus demonstrated the potential advantage of ILP-mediated delivery of AAV vectors in Pompe disease, because type II myofibers are resistant to enzyme replacement therapy. Thus, ILP will enhance AAV transduction of multiple skeletal muscles while reducing the required dosages in terms of vector particle numbers. PMID:20686508

  12. Viral Vector-Based Dissection of Marmoset GFAP Promoter in Mouse and Marmoset Brains

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobutaka; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kishi, Shoji; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are small in diameter, diffuse easily in the brain, and represent a highly efficient means by which to transfer a transgene to the brain of a large animal. A major demerit of AAV vectors is their limited accommodation capacity for transgenes. Thus, a compact promoter is useful when delivering large transgenes via AAV vectors. In the present study, we aimed to identify the shortest astrocyte-specific GFAP promoter region that could be used for AAV-vector-mediated transgene expression in the marmoset brain. The 2.0-kb promoter region upstream of the GFAP gene was cloned from the marmoset genome, and short promoters (1.6 kb, 1.4 kb, 0.6 kb, 0.3 kb and 0.2 kb) were obtained by progressively deleting the original 2.0-kb promoter from the 5’ end. The short promoters were screened in the mouse cerebellum in terms of their strength and astrocyte specificity. We found that the 0.3-kb promoter maintained 40% of the strength of the original 2.0-kb promoter, and approximately 90% of its astrocyte specificity. These properties were superior to those of the 1.4-kb, 0.6-kb (20% promoter strength) and 0.2-kb (70% astrocyte specificity) promoters. Then, we verified whether the 0.3-kb GFAP promoter retained astrocyte specificity in the marmoset cerebral cortex. Injection of viral vectors carrying the 0.3-kb marmoset GFAP promoter specifically transduced astrocytes in both the cerebral cortex and cerebellar cortex of the marmoset. These results suggest that the compact 0.3-kb promoter region serves as an astrocyte-specific promoter in the marmoset brain, which permits us to express a large gene by AAV vectors that have a limited accommodation capacity. PMID:27571575

  13. Dual Transgene Expression in Murine Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons by Viral Transduction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Marie K.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Ornitz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV), serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo. PMID:25093726

  14. Improved Survival and Reduced Phenotypic Severity Following AAV9/MECP2 Gene Transfer to Neonatal and Juvenile Male Mecp2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Kamal KE; Bailey, Mark ES; Spike, Rosemary C; Ross, Paul D; Woodard, Kenton T; Kalburgi, Sahana Nagabhushan; Bachaboina, Lavanya; Deng, Jie V; West, Anne E; Samulski, R Jude; Gray, Steven J; Cobb, Stuart R

    2013-01-01

    Typical Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pediatric disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. The demonstrated reversibility of RTT-like phenotypes in mice suggests that MECP2 gene replacement is a potential therapeutic option in patients. We report improvements in survival and phenotypic severity in Mecp2-null male mice after neonatal intracranial delivery of a single-stranded (ss) AAV9/chicken β-actin (CBA)-MECP2 vector. Median survival was 16.6 weeks for MECP2-treated versus 9.3 weeks for green fluorescent protein (GFP)-treated mice. ssAAV9/CBA-MECP2–treated mice also showed significant improvement in the phenotype severity score, in locomotor function, and in exploratory activity, as well as a normalization of neuronal nuclear volume in transduced cells. Wild-type (WT) mice receiving neonatal injections of the same ssAAV9/CBA-MECP2 vector did not show any significant deficits, suggesting a tolerance for modest MeCP2 overexpression. To test a MECP2 gene replacement approach in a manner more relevant for human translation, a self-complementary (sc) adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector designed to drive MeCP2 expression from a fragment of the Mecp2 promoter was injected intravenously (IV) into juvenile (4–5 weeks old) Mecp2-null mice. While the brain transduction efficiency in juvenile mice was low (~2–4% of neurons), modest improvements in survival were still observed. These results support the concept of MECP2 gene therapy for RTT. PMID:23011033

  15. AAV8-mediated Gene Therapy Prevents Induced Biochemical Attacks of Acute Intermittent Porphyria and Improves Neuromotor Function

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Makiko; Bishop, David F; Fowkes, Mary; Cheng, Seng H; Gan, Lin; Desnick, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant hepatic porphyria due to half-normal hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase) activity, is manifested by life-threatening acute neurological attacks that are precipitated by factors that induce heme biosynthesis. The acute attacks are currently treated with intravenous hemin, but a more continuous therapy is needed, particularly for patients experiencing frequent attacks. Thus, a recombinant AAV8-based serotype vector expressing murine HMB-synthase driven by liver-specific regulatory elements was generated and its effectiveness to prevent the biochemical induction of an acute attack was evaluated in an AIP mouse model. Intraperitoneal administration of the adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector resulted in a rapid and dose-dependent increase of HMB-synthase activity that was restricted to the liver. Stable expression of hepatic HMB-synthase was achieved and wild-type or greater levels were sustained for 36 weeks. When heme synthesis was periodically induced by a series of phenobarbital injections, the treated mice did not accumulate urinary δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or porphobilinogen (PBG), indicating that the expressed enzyme was functional in vivo and prevented induction of the acute attack. Further, rotarod performance and footprint analyses improved significantly. Thus, liver-directed gene therapy provided successful long-term correction of the hepatic metabolic abnormalities and improved neuromotor function in the murine model of human AIP. PMID:19861948

  16. Insert sequence length determines transfection efficiency and gene expression levels in bicistronic mammalian expression vectors

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Andrew J; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kaja, Simon; Koulen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Bicistronic expression vectors have been widely used for co-expression studies since the initial discovery of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) about 25 years ago. IRES sequences allow the 5’ cap-independent initiation of translation of multiple genes on a single messenger RNA strand. Using a commercially available mammalian expression vector containing an IRES sequence with a 3’ green fluorescent protein fluorescent marker, we found that sequence length of the gene of interest expressed 5’ of the IRES site influences both expression of the 3’ fluorescent marker and overall transfection efficiency of the vector construct. Furthermore, we generated a novel construct expressing two distinct fluorescent markers and found that high expression of one gene can lower expression of the other. Observations from this study indicate that caution is warranted in the design of experiments utilizing an IRES system with a short 5’ gene of interest sequence (<300 bp), selection of single cells based on the expression profile of the 3’ optogenetic fluorescent marker, and assumptions made during data analysis. PMID:24380024

  17. [Expression and identification of eukaryotic expression vectors of Brucella melitensis lipoprotein OMP19].

    PubMed

    He, Zuoping; Luo, Peifang; Hu, Feihuan; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Chengyao

    2016-04-01

    Objective To construct eukaryotic expression vectors carrying Brucella melitensis outer membrane protein 19 (OMP19), express them in transfected Huh7.5.1 and JEG-3 cells, and analyze their role in cell apoptosis. Methods Brucella melitensis lipidated OMP19 (L-OMP19) gene and unlipidated OMP19 (U-OMP19) gene were amplified by PCR and inserted into the vector pZeroBack/blunt. The correct L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 genes verified by XbaI and BamHI double digestion and sequencing were cloned into the lentivirus expression vector pHAGE-CMV-MCS-IZsGreen to construct vectors pHAGE-L-OMP19 and pHAGE-U-OMP19, which were separately transfected into 293FT cells, Huh7.5.1 and JEG-3 cells. L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 in the cells were detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence technique. Flow cytometry combined with annexin V-PE/7-AAD staining was used to detect the cell apoptosis. Results The lentiviral vectors pHAGE-L-OMP19 and pHAGE-U-OMP19 were constructed correctly and the recombinant lipoproteins L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 expressed in the above cells were well recognized by the specific antibodies against L-OMP19 in Western blotting and immunofluorescence technique. L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 induced JEG-3 cell death, but did not induce the apoptosis of Huh7.5.1 cells. Conclusion The eukaryotic expression vectors of L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 have been constructed successfully. Recombinant lipoproteins L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 expressed in cells have a good antigenicity, which could be used as experimental materials for the research on the relationship between host cells and lipoproteins in Brucella infection. PMID:27053612

  18. Effect of dual Bt-expression transformation vectors on transgene expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, L N; Dong, Y; Zhang, J; Wang, R X; Liu, H M; Yang, Q; Yang, M S

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of vector structure on dual Bt gene expression and establish an efficient expression vector using Cry1Ac and Cry3A genes. Four vectors (N4, N5, N10, and S23) were developed and used for genetic transformation of tobacco to obtain insect-resistant transgenic lines. The vectors were constructed using the MAR structure, applying different promoter and enhancer sequences, and changing the transgene open-reading frame sequence. The average Cry1Ac toxalbumin expression quantity was 67 times higher in N5 than in N4 transgenic lines (8.77 and 0.13 μg/g, respectively). In contrast, the average Cry3A toxalbumin expression quantity was 1.5 times higher in N4 than in N5 lines (12.70 and 8.21 μg/g, respectively). The sequences of both Bt genes significantly influenced toxalbumin expression, although upstream Bt genes presented lower expression levels. The average Cry1Ac toxalbumin content was 13 times higher in the transgenic lines of AtADH 5'-non-translated sequence N5 (8.77 mg/g) than in the omega N10 lines (0.67 mg/g). Furthermore, the average Cry1Ac toxalbumin content was 5 times higher in MAR N5 than in non-MAR S23 lines (8.77 and 1.63 mg/g, respectively). The average Cry3A toxalbumin content was 1.3 times higher in N5 than in S23 lines (8.21 and 6.48 mg/g, respectively). Moreover, toxalbumin expression levels differed significantly among the S23-transformed lines. The MAR structure applied on both ends of the genes increased both the level and stability of exogenous gene expression. In conclusion, N5 was the most optimal of the four tested vectors. PMID:27525887

  19. [Immune efficacy of rabies virus glycoprotein expressed by baculovirus vector].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Liu, Ye; Fu, Yun-Hong; Sun, Cheng-Long; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ting; Song, Fei-Fei; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2012-09-01

    To construct a recombinant baculovirus expressing glycoprotein (GP) of RV SRV9 strain and test the immunological efficacy in mice, open reading frame of rabies virus GP gene of SRV9 strain was cloned into the shuttle vector Bacmid to construct the recombinant shuttle plasmid Bacmid-G and transfection was performed into S f9 cells with the recombinant shuttle plasmid. CPE appeared in cell cultures was identified by electronmicroscopy. Western-blot, IFA and immunity tests in mice were performed to identify the immunoreactivity and immunogenicity of the expression products. Our results showed a recombinant baculovirus expressing GP protein of rabies virus SRV9 was obtained. The expression products possessed a favorable immunogenicity and fall immunized mice could develop 100% protective level of anti-rabies neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, The SRV9 glycoprotein expressed by the recombinant baculovirus in this study had good immunogenicity and could induce anti-rabies neutralizing antibody, which laid the foundation of further development of rabies subunit vaccine. PMID:23233923

  20. Novel redox nanomedicine improves gene expression of polyion complex vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Kazuko; Yoshitomi, Toru; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy has generated worldwide attention as a new medical technology. While non-viral gene vectors are promising candidates as gene carriers, they have several issues such as toxicity and low transfection efficiency. We have hypothesized that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affects gene expression in polyplex supported gene delivery systems. The effect of ROS on the gene expression of polyplex was evaluated using a nitroxide radical-containing nanoparticle (RNP) as an ROS scavenger. When polyethyleneimine (PEI)/pGL3 or PEI alone was added to the HeLa cells, ROS levels increased significantly. In contrast, when (PEI)/pGL3 or PEI was added with RNP, the ROS levels were suppressed. The luciferase expression was increased by the treatment with RNP in a dose-dependent manner and the cellular uptake of pDNA was also increased. Inflammatory cytokines play an important role in ROS generation in vivo. In particular, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α caused intracellular ROS generation in HeLa cells and decreased gene expression. RNP treatment suppressed ROS production even in the presence of TNF-α and increased gene expression. This anti-inflammatory property of RNP suggests that it may be used as an effective adjuvant for non-viral gene delivery systems.

  1. Deficiency in MyD88 Signaling Results in Decreased Antibody Responses to an Adeno-Associated Virus Vector in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Luo, Xiaoyan; Bird, Andrew; Li, Songtao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that antibody and T cell responses limit the efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) pseudotype 8 (2/8) vector containing the universally active cytomegalovirus enhancer/chicken β-actin regulatory cassette (AAV2/8-CBhGAA) in treating murine Pompe disease. However, the innate immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated acute immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA and the role of MyD88/TRIF signaling pathway in shaping adaptive immune responses to this vector. We showed here that a small and transient increase in CXCL-1 and IL-1β expression in livers of acid-α-glucosidase knockout (GAAKO) mice 6 h following injection with AAV2/8-CBhGAA. There was a robust antibody response to GAA in wild-type mice injected with this vector. In contrast, the anti-GAA IgG1 response was diminished in MyD88KO mice, and showed a trend toward a decrease in TRIFKO mice. In addition, the vector genome and GAA activity were significantly higher in MyD88KO livers compared with wild-type livers, suggesting reduced cytotoxic T cell responses. Importantly, elevated CD4+ T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in MyD88KO livers. When adoptively transferred to wild-type mice, these CD4+ T cells have an ability to suppress antibody responses against AAV2/8-CBhGAA and to prevent further immunization against rhGAA. Our study suggests that the MyD88 deficiency leads to the suppression of deleterious immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA, which has implications for gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23514839

  2. Deficiency in MyD88 Signaling Results in Decreased Antibody Responses to an Adeno-Associated Virus Vector in Murine Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Luo, Xiaoyan; Bird, Andrew; Li, Songtao; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-06-01

    We have previously shown that antibody and T cell responses limit the efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) pseudotype 8 (2/8) vector containing the universally active cytomegalovirus enhancer/chicken β-actin regulatory cassette (AAV2/8-CBhGAA) in treating murine Pompe disease. However, the innate immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated acute immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA and the role of MyD88/TRIF signaling pathway in shaping adaptive immune responses to this vector. We showed here that a small and transient increase in CXCL-1 and IL-1β expression in livers of acid-α-glucosidase knockout (GAAKO) mice 6 h following injection with AAV2/8-CBhGAA. There was a robust antibody response to GAA in wild-type mice injected with this vector. In contrast, the anti-GAA IgG1 response was diminished in MyD88KO mice, and showed a trend toward a decrease in TRIFKO mice. In addition, the vector genome and GAA activity were significantly higher in MyD88KO livers compared with wild-type livers, suggesting reduced cytotoxic T cell responses. Importantly, elevated CD4(+) T cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in MyD88KO livers. When adoptively transferred to wild-type mice, these CD4(+) T cells have an ability to suppress antibody responses against AAV2/8-CBhGAA and to prevent further immunization against rhGAA. Our study suggests that the MyD88 deficiency leads to the suppression of deleterious immune responses to AAV2/8-CBhGAA, which has implications for gene therapy in Pompe disease. PMID:23514839

  3. Functional correction of neurological and somatic disorders at later stages of disease in MPS IIIA mice by systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiyan; Cataldi, Marcela P; Ware, Tierra A; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Meadows, Aaron S; Murrey, Darren A; McCarty, Douglas M

    2016-01-01

    The reversibility of neuropathic lysosomal storage diseases, including MPS IIIA, is a major goal in therapeutic development, due to typically late diagnoses and a large population of untreated patients. We used self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) serotype 9 vector expressing human N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH) to test the efficacy of treatment at later stages of the disease. We treated MPS IIIA mice at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 months of age with an intravenous injection of scAAV9-U1a-hSGSH vector, leading to restoration of SGSH activity and reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and somatic tissues at a dose of 5E12 vg/kg. Treatment up to 3 months age improved learning ability in the Morris water maze at 7.5 months, and lifespan was normalized. In mice treated at 6 months age, behavioral performance was impaired at 7.5 months, but did not decline further when retested at 12 months, and lifespan was increased, but not normalized. Treatment at 9 months did not increase life-span, though the GAG storage pathology in the CNS was improved. The study suggests that there is potential for gene therapy intervention in MPS IIIA at intermediate stages of the disease, and extends the clinical relevance of our systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery approach. PMID:27331076

  4. Functional correction of neurological and somatic disorders at later stages of disease in MPS IIIA mice by systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiyan; Cataldi, Marcela P; Ware, Tierra A; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Meadows, Aaron S; Murrey, Darren A; McCarty, Douglas M

    2016-01-01

    The reversibility of neuropathic lysosomal storage diseases, including MPS IIIA, is a major goal in therapeutic development, due to typically late diagnoses and a large population of untreated patients. We used self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) serotype 9 vector expressing human N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH) to test the efficacy of treatment at later stages of the disease. We treated MPS IIIA mice at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 months of age with an intravenous injection of scAAV9-U1a-hSGSH vector, leading to restoration of SGSH activity and reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and somatic tissues at a dose of 5E12 vg/kg. Treatment up to 3 months age improved learning ability in the Morris water maze at 7.5 months, and lifespan was normalized. In mice treated at 6 months age, behavioral performance was impaired at 7.5 months, but did not decline further when retested at 12 months, and lifespan was increased, but not normalized. Treatment at 9 months did not increase life-span, though the GAG storage pathology in the CNS was improved. The study suggests that there is potential for gene therapy intervention in MPS IIIA at intermediate stages of the disease, and extends the clinical relevance of our systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery approach. PMID:27331076

  5. Intramammary expression and therapeutic effect of a human lysozyme-expressing vector for treating bovine mastitis*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huai-Chang; Xue, Fang-Ming; Qian, Ke; Fang, Hao-Xia; Qiu, Hua-Lei; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yin, Zhao-Hua

    2006-01-01

    To develop a gene therapy strategy for treating bovine mastitis, a new mammary-specific vector containing human lysozyme (hLYZ) cDNA and kanamycin resistance gene was constructed for intramammary expression and clinical studies. After one time acupuncture or intracisternal infusion of healthy cows with 400 μg of the p215C3LYZ vector, over 2.0 μg/ml of rhLYZ could be detected by enzymatic assay for about 3 weeks in the milk samples. Western blotting showed that rhLYZ secreted into milk samples from the vector-injected cows had molecular weight similar to that of the natural hLYZ in human colostrums. Twenty days after the primary injection, the quarters were re-injected with the same vector by quarter acupuncture and even higher concentrations of rhLYZ could be detected. Indirect competitive ELISA of milk samples showed that the vector injection did not induce detectable humoral immune response against hLYZ. Clinical studies showed that twice acupuncture of quarters with the p215C3LYZ vector had overt therapeutic effect on clinical and subclinical mastitis previously treated with antibiotics, including disappearance of clinical symptoms and relatively high microbiological cure rates. These data provide a solid rationale for using the vector to develop gene therapy for treating bovine mastitis. PMID:16532537

  6. Controlling AAV Tropism in the Nervous System with Natural and Engineered Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Michael J.; Turunen, Heikki T.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wolfe, John H.

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred naturally occurring variants of adeno-associated virus (AAV) have been identified, and this library has been further expanded by an array of techniques for modification of the viral capsid. AAV capsid variants possess unique antigenic profiles and demonstrate distinct cellular tropisms driven by differences in receptor binding. AAV capsids can be chemically modified to alter tropism, can be produced as hybrid vectors that combine the properties of multiple serotypes, and can carry peptide insertions that introduce novel receptor-binding activity. Furthermore, directed evolution of shuffled genome libraries can identify engineered variants with unique properties, and rational modification of the viral capsid can alter tropism, reduce blockage by neutralizing antibodies, or enhance transduction efficiency. This large number of AAV variants and engineered capsids provides a varied toolkit for gene delivery to the CNS and retina, with specialized vectors available for many applications, but selecting a capsid variant from the array of available vectors can be difficult. This chapter describes the unique properties of a range of AAV variants and engineered capsids, and provides a guide for selecting the appropriate vector for specific applications in the CNS and retina. PMID:26611584

  7. Recombinant adeno-associated virus targets passenger gene expression to cones in primate retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Katherine; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Connor, Thomas B., Jr.; Mauck, Matthew C.; Kinsella, James J.; Hauswirth, William W.; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy of photoreceptor-based diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that rAAV serotypes 2 and 5 can transduce both rod and cone photoreceptors in rodents and dogs, and it can target rods, but not cones in primates. Here we report that using a human cone-specific enhancer and promoter to regulate expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in an rAAV-5 vector successfully targeted expression of the reporter gene to primate cones, and the time course of GFP expression was able to be monitored in a living animal using the RetCam II digital imaging system.

  8. AAV-Mediated Cone Rescue in a Naturally Occurring Mouse Model of CNGA3-Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Lei, Bo; Everhart, Drew; Umino, Yumiko; Li, Jie; Zhang, Keqing; Mao, Song; Boye, Sanford L.; Liu, Li; Chiodo, Vince A.; Liu, Xuan; Shi, Wei; Tao, Ye; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3) are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia. PMID:22509403

  9. Enhancement of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2-Mediated Transgene Expression in a Lung Epithelial Cell Line by Inhibition of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew D.; Collaco, Roy F.; Trempe, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) have attracted considerable interest as gene delivery systems because they show long-term expression in vivo and transduce numerous cell types. Limitations to successful gene transduction from rAAVs have prompted investigations of a variety of treatments to enhance transgene expression from rAAV vectors. Tyrphostin-1, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dramatically enhances rAAV transgene expression. Elegant studies have demonstrated that a single-strand D-sequence-binding protein (ssDBP) is phosphorylated by EGFR and binds to the D sequence element in the AAV terminal repeat (TR). Binding of the Tyr-phosphorylated ssDBP prevents conversion of single-stranded vector DNA to a double-strand conformation. We observed dramatic increases in transgene expression in lung epithelial cells (IB3) with tyrphostin treatment. Gel shift analysis of ssDBP revealed that its DNA binding characteristics were unchanged after tyrphostin treatment or adenovirus infection. Tyrphostin stimulated rAAV transgene expression to a greater extent than adenovirus coinfection. Southern hybridizations revealed that the vector DNA remained in the single-strand conformation in tyrphostin-treated cells but double-stranded replicative form monomer DNA was most abundant in adenovirus-infected cells. Northern analyses revealed that tyrphostin treatment enhanced mRNA accumulation more than in adenovirus-infected cultures even though replicative form DNA was undetectable. Analysis of the JNK, ERK, and p38K mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways revealed that tyrphostin treatment stimulated the activity of JNK and p38K. Our data suggest that tyrphostin-induced alteration of stress response pathways results in dramatic enhancement of transcription on linear vector DNA templates in the IB3 cell line. These results expand the downstream targets of the EGFR in regulating rAAV transduction. PMID:12743297

  10. Inducible long-term gene expression in brain with adeno-associated virus gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Haberman, R P; McCown, T J; Samulski, R J

    1998-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors hold promise for treating a number of neurological disorders due to the ability to deliver long-term gene expression without toxicity or immune response. Critical to these endeavors will be controlled expression of the therapeutic gene in target cells. We have constructed and tested a dual cassette rAAV vector carrying a reporter gene under the control of the tetracycline-responsive system and the tetracycline transactivator. Transduction in vitro resulted in stable expression from the vector that can be suppressed 20-fold by tetracycline treatment. In vivo experiments, carried out to 6 weeks, demonstrated that vector-transduced expression is sustained until doxycycline administration upon which reporter gene expression is reduced. Moreover, the suppression of vector-driven expression can be reversed by removal of the drug. These studies demonstrate long-term regulated gene expression from rAAV vectors. This system will provide a valuable approach for controlling vector gene expression both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:10023439

  11. Transient foreign gene expression in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells after biolistic delivery of chloroplast vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, H; Vivekananda, J; Nielsen, B L; Ye, G N; Tewari, K K; Sanford, J C

    1990-01-01

    Expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) by suitable vectors in chloroplasts of cultured tobacco cells, delivered by high-velocity microprojectiles, is reported here. Several chloroplast expression vectors containing bacterial cat genes, placed under the control of either psbA promoter region from pea (pHD series) or rbcL promoter region from maize (pAC series) have been used in this study. In addition, chloroplast expression vectors containing replicon fragments from pea, tobacco, or maize chloroplast DNA have also been tested for efficiency and duration of cat expression in chloroplasts of tobacco cells. Cultured NT1 tobacco cells collected on filter papers were bombarded with tungsten particles coated with pUC118 (negative control), 35S-CAT (nuclear expression vector), pHD312 (repliconless chloroplast expression vector), and pHD407, pACp18, and pACp19 (chloroplast expression vectors with replicon). Sonic extracts of cells bombarded with pUC118 showed no detectable cat activity in the autoradiograms. Nuclear expression of cat reached two-thirds of the maximal 48 hr after bombardment and the maximal at 72 hr. Cells bombarded with chloroplast expression vectors showed a low level of expression until 48 hr of incubation. A dramatic increase in the expression of cat was observed 24 hr after the addition of fresh medium to cultured cells in samples bombarded with pHD407; the repliconless vector pHD312 showed about 50% of this maximal activity. The expression of nuclear cat and the repliconless chloroplast vector decreased after 72 hr, but a high level of chloroplast cat expression was maintained in cells bombarded with pHD407. Organelle-specific expression of cat in appropriate compartments was checked by introducing various plasmid constructions into tobacco protoplasts by electroporation. Although the nuclear expression vector 35S-CAT showed expression of cat, no activity was observed with any chloroplast vectors. Images PMID:2404285

  12. Use of a three-dimensional humanized liver model for the study of viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anke; Röhrs, Viola; Materne, Eva-Maria; Hiller, Thomas; Kedzierski, Radoslaw; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2015-10-20

    Reconstituted three-dimensional (3D) liver models obtained by engrafting hepatic cells into an extracellular matrix (ECM) are valuable tools to study tissue regeneration, drug action and toxicology ex vivo. The aim of the present study was to establish a system for the functional investigation of a viral vector in a 3D liver model composed of human HepG2 cells on a rat ECM. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing the Emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against human cyclophilin b (hCycB) was injected into the portal vein of 3D liver models. Application of the vector did not exert toxic effects, as shown by analysis of metabolic parameters. Six days after transduction, fluorescence microscopy analysis of EmGFP production revealed widespread distribution of the AAV vectors. After optimization of the recellularization and transduction conditions, averages of 55 and 90 internalized vector genomes per cell in two replicates of the liver model were achieved, as determined by quantitative PCR analysis. Functionality of the AAV vector was confirmed by efficient shRNA-mediated knockdown of hCycB by 70-90%. Our study provides a proof-of-concept that a recellularized biological ECM provides a valuable model to study viral vectors ex vivo. PMID:26356676

  13. Recombinant baculovirus vectors expressing glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Jowett, J B; Jones, I M

    1993-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses are a popular means of producing heterologous protein in eukaryotic cells. Purification of recombinant proteins away from the insect cell background can, however, remain an obstacle for many developments. Recently, prokaryotic fusion protein expression systems have been developed allowing single-step purification of the heterologous protein and specific proteolytic cleavage of the affinity tag moiety from the desired antigen. Here we report the introduction of these attributes to the baculovirus system. "Baculo-GEX" vectors enable baculovirus production of fusion proteins with the above advantages, but in a eukaryotic post-translational processing environment. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusions are stable cytoplasmic proteins in insect cells and may therefore be released by sonication alone, avoiding the solubility problems and detergent requirements of bacterial systems. Thus large amounts of authentic antigen may be purified in a single, non-denaturing step. PMID:7763917

  14. A small regulatory element from chromosome 19 enhances liver-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Hirsch, M; Carter, P; Asokan, A; Zhou, X; Wu, Z; Samulski, RJ

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific promoters for gene therapy are typically too big for adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors; thus, the exploration of small effective non-viral regulatory elements is of particular interest. Wild-type AAV can specifically integrate into a region on human chromosome 19 termed AAVS1. Earlier work has determined that a 347 bp fragment (Chr19) of AAVS1 has promoter and transcriptional enhancer activities. In this study, we further characterized this genetic regulation and investigated its application to AAV gene therapy in vitro and in vivo. The Chr19 347 bp fragment was dissected into three regulatory elements in human embryonic kidney cells: (i) TATA-independent promoter activity distributed throughout the fragment regardless of orientation, (ii) an orientation-dependent insulator function near the 5′ end and (iii) a 107 bp enhancer region near the 3′ end. The small enhancer region, coupled to the mini-CMV promoter, was used to drive the expression of several reporters following transduction by AAV2. In vivo data demonstrated enhanced transgene expression from the Chr19-mini-CMV promoter cassette after tail vein injection primarily in the liver at levels comparable to the chicken β-actin promoter and higher than the liver-specific TTR promoter (>2-fold). However, we did not observe this increase after muscle injection, suggesting tissue-specific enhancement. All of the results support identification of a small DNA fragment (347 bp) from AAV Chr19 integration site capable of providing efficient and enhanced liver-specific transcription when used in recombinant AAV vectors. PMID:18701910

  15. Rapid construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosomal (BAC) expression vector using designer DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Xinqing; Jin, Yingyu; Zhao, Zongbao Kent; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) vectors are increasingly being used in cloning large DNA fragments containing complex biosynthetic pathways to facilitate heterologous production of microbial metabolites for drug development. To express inserted genes using Streptomyces species as the production hosts, an integration expression cassette is required to be inserted into the BAC vector, which includes genetic elements encoding a phage-specific attachment site, an integrase, an origin of transfer, a selection marker and a promoter. Due to the large sizes of DNA inserted into the BAC vectors, it is normally inefficient and time-consuming to assemble these fragments by routine PCR amplifications and restriction-ligations. Here we present a rapid method to insert fragments to construct BAC-based expression vectors. A DNA fragment of about 130 bp was designed, which contains upstream and downstream homologous sequences of both BAC vector and pIB139 plasmid carrying the whole integration expression cassette. In-Fusion cloning was performed using the designer DNA fragment to modify pIB139, followed by λ-RED-mediated recombination to obtain the BAC-based expression vector. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this method by rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector with an insert of about 120 kb that contains the entire gene cluster for biosynthesis of immunosuppressant FK506. The empty BAC-based expression vector constructed in this study can be conveniently used for construction of BAC libraries using either microbial pure culture or environmental DNA, and the selected BAC clones can be directly used for heterologous expression. Alternatively, if a BAC library has already been constructed using a commercial BAC vector, the selected BAC vectors can be manipulated using the method described here to get the BAC-based expression vectors with desired gene clusters for heterologous expression. The rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector facilitates

  16. Retinal transduction profiles by high-capacity viral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puppo, Agostina; Cesi, Giulia; Marrocco, Elena; Piccolo, Pasquale; Jacca, Sarah; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M.; Parks, Robin J.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Colloca, Stefano; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Ng, Philip; Donofrio, Gaetano; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is safe and effective in humans. However, the limited cargo capacity of AAV prevents their use for therapy of those inherited retinopathies (IRs) due to mutations in large (>5kb) genes. Viral vectors derived from Adenovirus (Ad), Lentivirus (LV) and Herpesvirus (HV) can package large DNA sequences but do not target efficiently retinal photoreceptors (PRs) where the majority of genes responsible for IRs are expressed. Here, we have evaluated the mouse retinal transduction profiles of vectors derived from 16 different Ad serotypes, 7 LV pseudotypes, and from a bovine HV. Most of the vectors tested transduced efficiently the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We found that LV-GP64 tends to transduce more PRs than the canonical LV-VSVG albeit this was restricted to a narrow region. We observed more extensive PR transduction with HdAd1, 2 and 5/F35++ than with LV, although none of them outperformed the canonical HdAd5 or matched the extension of PR transduction achieved with AAV2/8. PMID:24989814

  17. Efficacy of an adeno-associated virus 8-pseudotyped vector in glycogen storage disease type II.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Young, Sarah P; Schneider, Ayn; Bird, Andrew; Amalfitano, Andrea; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II; Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure. The underlying deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) can be corrected by liver-targeted gene therapy in GSD-II, if secretion of GAA is accompanied by receptor-mediated uptake in cardiac and skeletal muscle. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding human (h) GAA was pseudotyped as AAV8 (AAV2/8) and injected intravenously into immunodeficient GSD-II mice. High levels of hGAA were maintained in plasma for 24 weeks following AAV2/8 vector administration. A marked increase in vector copy number in the liver was demonstrated for the AAV2/8 vector compared to the analogous AAV2/2 vector. GAA deficiency in the heart and skeletal muscle was corrected with the AAV2/8 vector in male GSD-II mice, consistent with receptor-mediated uptake of hGAA. Male GSD-II mice demonstrated complete correction of glycogen storage in heart and diaphragm with the AAV2/8 vector, while female GSD-II mice had correction only in the heart. A biomarker for GSD-II was reduced in both sexes following AAV2/8 vector administration. Therefore, GAA production with an AAV2/8 vector in a depot organ, the liver, generated evidence for efficacious gene therapy in a mouse model for GSD-II. PMID:15585406

  18. Human melanopsin-AAV2/8 transfection to retina transiently restores visual function in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Dai, Jia-Man; Liu, Wen-Yi; Zhao, Cong-Jian; Lin, Bin; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore whether ectopic expression of human melanopsin can effectively and safely restore visual function in rd1 mice. METHODS Hematoxylin-eosin staining of retinal sections from rd1 mice was used to detect the thickness of the outer nuclear layer to determine the timing of surgery. We constructed a human melanopsin-AAV2/8 viral vector and injected it into the subretinal space of rd1 mice. The Phoenix Micron IV system was used to exclude the aborted injections, and immunohistochemistry was used to validate the ectopic expression of human melanopsin. Furthermore, visual electrophysiology and behavioral tests were used to detect visual function 30 and 45d after the injection. The structure of the retina was compared between the human melanopsin-injected group and phosphate buffer saline (PBS)-injected group. RESULTS Retinas of rd1 mice lost almost all of their photoreceptors on postnatal day 28 (P28). We therefore injected the human melanopsin-adeno-associated virus (AAV) 2/8 viral vector into P30 rd1 mice. After excluding aborted injections, we used immunohistochemistry of the whole mount retina to confirm the ectopic expression of human melanopsin by co-expression of human melanopsin and YFP that was carried by a viral vector. At 30d post-injection, visual electrophysiology and the behavioral test significantly improved. However, restoration of vision disappeared 45d after human melanopsin injection. Notably, human melanopsin-injected mice did not show any structural differences in their retinas compared with PBS-injected mice. CONCLUSION Ectopic expression of human melanopsin effectively and safely restores visual function in rd1 mice. PMID:27275417

  19. Enhanced antitumor effect and reduced vector dissemination with fiber-modified adenovirus vectors expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takao

    2002-03-01

    There are at least two hurdles confronting the use of the adenovirus (Ad)-mediated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system for the treatment of cancer. One is inefficient Ad vector-mediated gene transfer into tumor cells lacking the primary receptor, i.e., the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The other is hepatotoxicity due to unwanted vector spread into the liver, even when Ad vectors are injected intratumorally. Herein, we present an attractive strategy for overcoming such limitations based on use of a fiber-modified Ad vector containing an RGD peptide motif in the fiber knob. HSVtk-expressing Ad vectors containing mutant fiber (AdRGD-tk) or wild-type fiber (Ad-tk) were injected intratumorally into CAR-negative B16 melanoma cells inoculated into mice, after which GCV was injected intraperitoneally for 10 days. AdRGD-tk showed approximately 25 times more antitumor activity than Ad-tk. Histopathological studies suggested that liver damage in mice injected with AdRGD-tk was significantly lower than that in mice injected with Ad-tk. Intratumoral administration of luciferase-expressing Ad vectors containing the mutant fiber (AdRGD-L2) resulted in nearly 40 times more luciferase production in the tumor, but 8 times less production in the liver than the conventional Ad vectors (Ad-L2). These results indicate that combination of fiber-modified vectors and a HSVtk/GCV system is a potentially useful and safe approach for the treatment of tumors lacking CAR expression, and that fiber-modified vectors could be of great utility for gene therapy and gene transfer experiments. PMID:11896439

  20. In vivo model of adeno-associated virus vector persistence and rescue.

    PubMed Central

    Afione, S A; Conrad, C K; Kearns, W G; Chunduru, S; Adams, R; Reynolds, T C; Guggino, W B; Cutting, G R; Carter, B J; Flotte, T R

    1996-01-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on human DNA viruses could be mobilized or rescued from individuals who are subsequently infected with the corresponding wild-type (wt) helper viruses. This phenomenon has been effectively modeled in vitro with both adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors but has not previously been studied in vivo. In the current study, we have developed an in vivo model to study the interactions of a recombinant AAV vector (AAV-CFTR) with wt AAV type 2 (AAV2) and a host range mutant Ad (Ad2HR405) for which monkey cells are permissive (D.E.Brough, S.A.Rice, S.Sell, and D.F.Klessig, J. Virol. 55:206-212, 1985). AAV-CFTR was administered to the respiratory epithelium of the nose or lung of rhesus macaques. Primary cells were harvested from the infusion site at time points up to 3 months after vector administration to confirm vector DNA persistence. Vector DNA was present in episomal form and could be rescued in vitro only by addition of wt AAV2 and Ad. In in vivo rescue studies, vector was administered before or after wt-AAV2 and Ad2HR405 infection, and the shedding of AAV-CFTR was examined. Ad2HR405 and wt-AAV2 infections were established in the nose with concomitant administration. wt-AAV2 replication occurred in the lung when virus was administered directly at a high titer to the lower respiratory tract. AAV-CFTR vector rescue was also observed in the latter setting. Although these studies were performed with small numbers of animals within each group, it appears that AAV-CFTR DNA persists in the primate respiratory tract and that this model may be useful for studies of recombinant AAV vector rescue. PMID:8627804

  1. High Capsid–Genome Correlation Facilitates Creation of AAV Libraries for Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; van Bakel, Harm; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) through successive rounds of phenotypic selection is a powerful method to isolate variants with improved properties from large libraries of capsid mutants. Importantly, AAV libraries used for directed evolution are based on the “natural” AAV genome organization where the capsid proteins are encoded in cis from replicating genomes. This is necessary to allow the recovery of the capsid DNA after each step of phenotypic selection. For directed evolution to be used successfully, it is essential to minimize the random mixing of capsomers and the encapsidation of nonmatching viral genomes during the production of the viral libraries. Here, we demonstrate that multiple AAV capsid variants expressed from Rep/Cap containing viral genomes result in near-homogeneous capsids that display an unexpectedly high capsid–DNA correlation. Next-generation sequencing of AAV progeny generated by bulk transfection of a semi-random peptide library showed a strong counter-selection of capsid variants encoding premature stop codons, which further supports a strong capsid–genome identity correlation. Overall, our observations demonstrate that production of “natural” AAVs results in low capsid mosaicism and high capsid–genome correlation. These unique properties allow the production of highly diverse AAV libraries in a one-step procedure with a minimal loss in phenotype–genotype correlation. PMID:25586687

  2. Gene gymnastics: Synthetic biology for baculovirus expression vector system engineering.

    PubMed

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi S; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B; Edelweiss, Evelina; Gupta, Kapil; Maier, Josef; Gordeliy, Valentin; Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Most essential activities in eukaryotic cells are catalyzed by large multiprotein assemblies containing up to ten or more interlocking subunits. The vast majority of these protein complexes are not easily accessible for high resolution studies aimed at unlocking their mechanisms, due to their low cellular abundance and high heterogeneity. Recombinant overproduction can resolve this bottleneck and baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have emerged as particularly powerful tools for the provision of eukaryotic multiprotein complexes in high quality and quantity. Recently, synthetic biology approaches have begun to make their mark in improving existing BEVS reagents by de novo design of streamlined transfer plasmids and by engineering the baculovirus genome. Here we present OmniBac, comprising new custom designed reagents that further facilitate the integration of heterologous genes into the baculovirus genome for multiprotein expression. Based on comparative genome analysis and data mining, we herein present a blueprint to custom design and engineer the entire baculovirus genome for optimized production properties using a bottom-up synthetic biology approach. PMID:23328086

  3. Plasmid vector with temperature-controlled gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, V.V.; Yamshchikov, V.F.; Pletnev, A.G.

    1986-02-01

    In plasmid pBR327, a fragment 169 b.p. long including promotor p/sub 3/ of the bla gene has been deleted. The deletional derivative so obtained (pSP2) has been used to construct a recombinant plasmid bearing a fragment of phage lambda DNA with the p/sub R/ promotor and the gene of the temperature-sensitive repressor cI. It has been shown that the plasmid vector so constructed (pCE119) with promotor cR performs repressor-cI-controlled transcription of the bla gene, as a result of which induction for an hour at 42/sup 0/C leads to an almost 100-fold increase in the amount of product of the bla gene as compared with that at 32/sup 0/C. The possibility of the use of plasmid cPE119 for the expression of other genes has been demonstrated for the case of the semisynthetic ..beta..-galactosidase gene of E. coli. In this case, on induction of the cells with recombinant plasmid pCEZ12 for 3 hours at 42/sup 0/C, a 300-fold increase in the amount of active ..beta..-galactosidase, as compared with that at 32/sup 0/C, was observed. It is important to point out that under these conditions (at 42/sup 0/C), at least 99% of the cells containing the plasmid retain the phenotype lacZ/sup +/, which indicates the stability of the proposed vector system

  4. AAV-mediated gene delivery in a feline model of Sandhoff disease corrects lysosomal storage in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Hannah E; McCurdy, Victoria J; Eaton, Samuel C; Wilson, Diane U; Johnson, Aime K; Randle, Ashley N; Bradbury, Allison M; Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Baker, Henry J; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Seyfried, Thomas N; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system. Myelin-enriched glycolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, are also decreased in SD corresponding with dysmyelination. At present, no treatment exists for SD. Previous studies have shown the therapeutic benefit of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy in the treatment of SD in murine and feline models. In this study, we treated presymptomatic SD cats with AAVrh8 vectors expressing feline Hex in the thalamus combined with intracerebroventricular (Thal/ICV) injections. Treated animals showed clearly improved neurologic function and quality of life, manifested in part by prevention or attenuation of whole-body tremors characteristic of untreated animals. Hex activity was significantly elevated, whereas storage of GM2 and GA2 was significantly decreased in tissue samples taken from the cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, and cervical spinal cord. Treatment also increased levels of myelin-enriched cerebrosides and sulfatides in the cortex and thalamus. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of AAV for feline SD and suggests a similar potential for human SD patients. PMID:25873306

  5. AAV-Mediated Gene Delivery in a Feline Model of Sandhoff Disease Corrects Lysosomal Storage in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Hannah E.; McCurdy, Victoria J.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Wilson, Diane U.; Johnson, Aime K.; Randle, Ashley N.; Bradbury, Allison M.; Gray-Edwards, Heather L.; Baker, Henry J.; Hudson, Judith A.; Cox, Nancy R.; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system. Myelin-enriched glycolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, are also decreased in SD corresponding with dysmyelination. At present, no treatment exists for SD. Previous studies have shown the therapeutic benefit of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy in the treatment of SD in murine and feline models. In this study, we treated presymptomatic SD cats with AAVrh8 vectors expressing feline Hex in the thalamus combined with intracerebroventricular (Thal/ICV) injections. Treated animals showed clearly improved neurologic function and quality of life, manifested in part by prevention or attenuation of whole-body tremors characteristic of untreated animals. Hex activity was significantly elevated, whereas storage of GM2 and GA2 was significantly decreased in tissue samples taken from the cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, and cervical spinal cord. Treatment also increased levels of myelin-enriched cerebrosides and sulfatides in the cortex and thalamus. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of AAV for feline SD and suggests a similar potential for human SD patients. PMID:25873306

  6. Highly inducible expression from vectors containing multiple GRE's in CHO cells overexpressing the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Israel, D I; Kaufman, R J

    1989-01-01

    A conditional glucocorticoid-responsive expression vector system is described for highly inducible expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells. This host-vector system requires high level expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein in the host cell and multiple copies of the receptor binding site within the expression vector. Transfection and selection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with expression vectors encoding the rat GR yielded cell lines which express functional receptor at high levels. Insertion of multiple copies of the MMTV enhancer (glucocorticoid responsive element, GRE) into an Adenovirus major late promoter (AdMLP) based expression vector yielded greater than 1000-fold inducible expression by dexamethasone (dex) in transient DNA transfection assays. The induced expression level was 7-fold greater than that obtained with an AdMLP based vector containing an SV40 enhancer, but lacking GRE's. Vectors containing the SV40 enhancer in combination with multiple GRE's exhibited elevated basal expression in the absence of dex, but retained inducibility in both transient assays and after integration and amplification in the CHO genome. This expression system should be of general utility for studying gene regulation and for expressing heterologous genes in a regulatable fashion. Images PMID:2546123

  7. Computational and molecular tools for scalable rAAV-mediated genome editing.

    PubMed

    Stoimenov, Ivaylo; Ali, Muhammad Akhtar; Pandzic, Tatjana; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-03-11

    The rapid discovery of potential driver mutations through large-scale mutational analyses of human cancers generates a need to characterize their cellular phenotypes. Among the techniques for genome editing, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene targeting is suited for knock-in of single nucleotide substitutions and to a lesser degree for gene knock-outs. However, the generation of gene targeting constructs and the targeting process is time-consuming and labor-intense. To facilitate rAAV-mediated gene targeting, we developed the first software and complementary automation-friendly vector tools to generate optimized targeting constructs for editing human protein encoding genes. By computational approaches, rAAV constructs for editing ~71% of bases in protein-coding exons were designed. Similarly, ~81% of genes were predicted to be targetable by rAAV-mediated knock-out. A Gateway-based cloning system for facile generation of rAAV constructs suitable for robotic automation was developed and used in successful generation of targeting constructs. Together, these tools enable automated rAAV targeting construct design, generation as well as enrichment and expansion of targeted cells with desired integrations. PMID:25488813

  8. Anti-Human α-Synuclein N-Terminal Peptide Antibody Protects against Dopaminergic Cell Death and Ameliorates Behavioral Deficits in an AAV-α-Synuclein Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahaduzzaman, Md; Nash, Kevin; Hudson, Charles; Sharif, Masroor; Grimmig, Bethany; Lin, Xiaoyang; Bai, Ge; Liu, Hui; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Cao, Chuanhai; Bickford, Paula C.

    2015-01-01

    The protein α-synuclein (α-Syn) has a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and immunotherapeutic approaches targeting this molecule have shown promising results. In this study, novel antibodies were generated against specific peptides from full length human α-Syn and evaluated for effectiveness in ameliorating α-Syn-induced cell death and behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-Syn expressing rat model of PD. Fisher 344 rats were injected with rAAV vector into the right substantia nigra (SN), while control rats received an AAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Beginning one week after injection of the AAV-α-Syn vectors, rats were treated intraperitoneally with either control IgG or antibodies against the N-terminal (AB1), or central region (AB2) of α-Syn. An unbiased stereological estimation of TH+, NeuN+, and OX6 (MHC-II) immunostaining revealed that the α-Syn peptide antibodies (AB1 and AB2) significantly inhibited α-Syn-induced dopaminergic cell (DA) and NeuN+ cell loss (one-way ANOVA (F (3, 30) = 5.8, p = 0.002 and (F (3, 29) = 7.92, p = 0.002 respectively), as well as decreasing the number of activated microglia in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F = 14.09; p = 0.0003). Antibody treated animals also had lower levels of α-Syn in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F (7, 37) = 9.786; p = 0.0001) and demonstrated a partial intermediate improvement of the behavioral deficits. Our data suggest that, in particular, an α-Syn peptide antibody against the N-terminal region of the protein can protect against DA neuron loss and, to some extent behavioral deficits. As such, these results may be a potential therapeutic strategy for halting the progression of PD. PMID:25658425

  9. Comprehensive Small RNA-Seq of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-Infected Human Cells Detects Patterns of Novel, Non-Coding AAV RNAs in the Absence of Cellular miRNA Regulation.

    PubMed

    Stutika, Catrin; Mietzsch, Mario; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Weger, Stefan; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Wei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses express small regulatory RNAs, which interfere with viral or cellular gene expression. For adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small ssDNA virus with a complex biphasic life cycle miRNAs or other small regulatory RNAs have not yet been described. This is the first comprehensive Illumina-based RNA-Seq analysis of small RNAs expressed by AAV alone or upon co-infection with helper adenovirus or HSV. Several hotspots of AAV-specific small RNAs were detected mostly close to or within the AAV-ITR and apparently transcribed from the newly identified anti-p5 promoter. An additional small RNA hotspot was located downstream of the p40 promoter, from where transcription of non-coding RNAs associated with the inhibition of adenovirus replication were recently described. Parallel detection of known Ad and HSV miRNAs indirectly validated the newly identified small AAV RNA species. The predominant small RNAs were analyzed on Northern blots and by human argonaute protein-mediated co-immunoprecipitation. None of the small AAV RNAs showed characteristics of bona fide miRNAs, but characteristics of alternative RNA processing indicative of differentially regulated AAV promoter-associated small RNAs. Furthermore, the AAV-induced regulation of cellular miRNA levels was analyzed at different time points post infection. In contrast to other virus groups AAV infection had virtually no effect on the expression of cellular miRNA, which underscores the long-established concept that wild-type AAV infection is apathogenic. PMID:27611072

  10. A Large U3 Deletion Causes Increased In Vivo Expression from a Nonintegrating Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Matthew; Kantor, Boris; Cockrell, Adam; Ma, Hong; Zeithaml, Brian; Li, Xiangping; McCown, Thomas; Kafri, Tal

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of employing nonintegrating lentiviral vectors has been demonstrated by recent studies showing the ability of nonintegrating lentiviral vectors to maintain transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HIV-1 vectors packaged with a mutated integrase were able to correct retinal disease in a mouse model. Interestingly, these results differ from earlier studies in which first-generation nonintegrating lentiviral vectors yielded insignificant levels of transduction. However, to date a rigorous characterization of transgene expression from the currently used self-inactivating (SIN) nonintegrating lentiviral vectors has not been published. Here we characterize transgene expression from SIN nonintegrating lentiviral vectors. Overall, we found that nonintegrating vectors express transgenes at a significantly lower level than their integrating counterparts. Expression from nonintegrating vectors was improved upon introducing a longer deletion in the vector’s U3 region. A unique shuttle-vector assay indicated that the relative abundance of the different episomal forms was not altered by the longer U3 deletion. Interestingly, the longer U3 deletion did not enhance expression in the corpus callosum of the rat brain, suggesting that the extent of silencing of episomal transcription is influenced by tissue-specific factors. Finally, and for the first time, episomal expression in the mouse liver was potent and sustained. PMID:18797449

  11. RSF1010-based shuttle vectors for cloning and expression in Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Lee, M D; Henk, A D

    1997-03-01

    The broad host-range cloning vectors, pJRD215 and pMMB67EH, were evaluated for stability and cloning efficiency in Pasteurella multocida. Transformation of P. multocida by electroporation was unreliable and poorly efficient regardless of whether the transforming DNA was isolated from E. coli or P. multocida. Both vectors contain a mob site that enabled transfer by conjugation from E. coli to P. multocida with high efficiency. Kanamycin, streptomycin, and ampicillin resistance encoded by the vectors were expressed in P. multocida. LacZ was cloned in pMMB67EH, an expression vector, and was transferred to P. multocida by conjugation. The transconjugants expressed a functional beta-galactosidase as determined by o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) test. We propose the use of these cosmid and expression vectors as a shuttle vectors for cloning in P. multocida. PMID:9100336

  12. Construction of novel shuttle expression vectors for gene expression in Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huanhuan; Cao, Qinghua; Zhao, Hongyan; Tan, Xuemei; Feng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A native plasmid (pSU01) was detected by genome sequencing of Bacillus subtilis strain S1-4. Two pSU01-based shuttle expression vectors pSU02-AP and pSU03-AP were constructed enabling stable replication in B. subtilis WB600. These vectors contained the reporter gene aprE, encoding an alkaline protease from Bacillus pumilus BA06. The expression vector pSU03-AP only possessed the minimal replication elements (rep, SSO, DSO) and exhibited more stability on structure, suggesting that the rest of the genes in pSU01 (ORF1, ORF2, mob, hsp) were unessential for the structural stability of plasmid in B. subtilis. In addition, recombinant production of the alkaline protease was achieved more efficiently with pSU03-AP whose copy number was estimated to be more than 100 per chromosome. Furthermore, pSU03-AP could also be used to transform and replicate in B. pumilus BA06 under selective pressure. In conclusion, pSU03-AP is expected to be a useful tool for gene expression in Bacillus subtilis and B. pumilus. PMID:26377132

  13. Producing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus in Foster Cells: Overcoming Production Limitations Using a Baculovirus–Insect Cell Expression Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Tamas; Cecchini, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Establishing pharmacological parameters, such as efficacy, routes of administration, and toxicity, for recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors is a prerequisite for gaining acceptance for clinical applications. In fact, even a therapeutic window, that is, the dose range between therapeutic efficacy and toxicity, has yet to be determined for rAAV in vivo. Multiphase clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of recombinant AAV-based therapeutics will require unprecedented vector production capacity to meet the needs of preclinical toxicology studies, and the progressive clinical protocol phases of safety/dose escalation (phase I), efficacy (phase II), and high-enrollment, multicenter evaluations (phase III). Methods of rAAV production capable of supporting such trials must be scalable, robust, and efficient. We have taken advantage of the ease of scalability of nonadherent cell culture techniques coupled with the inherent efficiency of viral infection to develop an rAAV production method based on recombinant baculovirus-mediated expression of AAV components in insect-derived suspension cells. PMID:19604040

  14. Expression patterns of cotton chloroplast genes during development: implications for development of plastid transformation vectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to express genes of interest in plastids, transformation vectors must be developed that include appropriate promoters to drive expression at effective levels in both green and non-green tissues. Typically, chloroplasts are transformed with vectors that contain ribosomal RNA promoters for h...

  15. Yeast vectors and assays for expression of cloned genes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A; Lundblad, V; Dorris, D; Keaveney, M

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes some of the most commonly used yeast vectors, as well as the cloned yeast genes that form the basis for these plasmids. Yeast vectors can be grouped into five general classes, based on their mode of replication in yeast: YIp, YRp, YCp, YEp, and YLp plasmids. With the exception of the YLp plasmids (yeast linear plasmids), all of these plasmids can be maintained in E. coli as well as in S. cerevisiae and thus are referred to as shuttle vectors. The nomenclature of different classes of yeast vectors, as well as details about their mode of replication in yeast are discussed. PMID:18265101

  16. AAV8-Mediated In Vivo Overexpression of miR-155 Enhances the Protective Capacity of Genetically Attenuated Malarial Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hentzschel, Franziska; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Börner, Kathleen; Heiss, Kirsten; Knapp, Bettina; Sattler, Julia M; Kaderali, Lars; Castoldi, Mirco; Bindman, Julia G; Malato, Yann; Willenbring, Holger; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, caused by protozoan Plasmodium parasites, remains a prevalent infectious human disease due to the lack of an efficient and safe vaccine. This is directly related to the persisting gaps in our understanding of the parasite's interactions with the infected host, especially during the clinically silent yet essential liver stage of Plasmodium development. Previously, we and others showed that genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) that arrest in the liver induce sterile immunity, but only upon multiple administrations. Here, we comprehensively studied hepatic gene and miRNA expression in GAP-injected mice, and found both a broad activation of IFNγ-associated pathways and a significant increase of murine microRNA-155 (miR-155), that was especially pronounced in non-parenchymal cells including liver-resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Remarkably, ectopic upregulation of this miRNA in the liver of mice using robust hepatotropic adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) vectors enhanced GAP's protective capacity substantially. In turn, this AAV8-mediated miR-155 expression permitted a reduction of GAP injections needed to achieve complete protection against infectious parasite challenge from previously three to only one. Our study highlights a crucial role of mammalian miRNAs in Plasmodium liver infection in vivo and concurrently implies their great potential as future immune-augmenting agents in improved vaccination regimes against malaria and other diseases. PMID:25189739

  17. A set of ligation-independent expression vectors for co-expression of proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Pranab K; Edris, Wade A; Kennedy, Jeffrey D

    2006-05-01

    A set of ligation-independent expression vectors system has been developed for co-expression of proteins in Escherichia coli. These vectors contain a strong T7 promoter, different drug resistant genes, and an origin of DNA replication from a different incompatibility group, allowing combinations of these plasmids to be stably maintained together. In addition, these plasmids also contain the lacI gene, a transcriptional terminator, and a 3' polyhistidine (6x His) affinity tag (H6) for easy purification of target proteins. All of these vectors contain an identical transportable cassette flanked by suitable restriction enzyme cleavage sites for easy cloning and shuttling among different vectors. This cassette incorporates a ligation-independent cloning (LIC) site for LIC manipulations, an optimal ribosome binding site for efficient protein translation, and a 6x His affinity tag for protein purification Therefore, any E. coli expression vector of choice can be easily converted to LIC type expression vectors by shuttling the cassette using the restriction enzyme cleavage sites at the ends. We have demonstrated the expression capabilities of these vectors by co-expressing three bacterial (dsbA, dsbG, and Trx) and also two other mammalian proteins (KChIP1 and Kv4.3). We further show that co-expressed KChIP1/Kv4.3 forms soluble protein complexes that can be purified for further studies. PMID:16325426

  18. A new method to customize protein expression vectors for fast, efficient and background free parallel cloning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Expression and purification of correctly folded proteins typically require screening of different parameters such as protein variants, solubility enhancing tags or expression hosts. Parallel vector series that cover all variations are available, but not without compromise. We have established a fast, efficient and absolutely background free cloning approach that can be applied to any selected vector. Results Here we describe a method to tailor selected expression vectors for parallel Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning. SLIC cloning enables precise and sequence independent engineering and is based on joining vector and insert with 15–25 bp homologies on both DNA ends by homologous recombination. We modified expression vectors based on pET, pFastBac and pTT backbones for parallel PCR-based cloning and screening in E.coli, insect cells and HEK293E cells, respectively. We introduced the toxic ccdB gene under control of a strong constitutive promoter for counterselection of insert less vector. In contrast to DpnI treatment commonly used to reduce vector background, ccdB used in our vector series is 100% efficient in killing parental vector carrying cells and reduces vector background to zero. In addition, the 3’ end of ccdB functions as a primer binding site common to all vectors. The second shared primer binding site is provided by a HRV 3C protease cleavage site located downstream of purification and solubility enhancing tags for tag removal. We have so far generated more than 30 different parallel expression vectors, and successfully cloned and expressed more than 250 genes with this vector series. There is no size restriction for gene insertion, clone efficiency is > 95% with clone numbers up to 200. The procedure is simple, fast, efficient and cost-effective. All expression vectors showed efficient expression of eGFP and different target proteins requested to be produced and purified at our Core Facility services. Conclusion This new

  19. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery in stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nolan J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2015-11-01

    The past 30 years have witnessed the development of cell and gene therapies for the treatment of diverse human diseases. Each of these approaches has inherent advantages and disadvantages; however, the two methods align in that, essentially, they are both methods of foreign DNA delivery to complement, eradicate, or supplement nucleotide sequences important for human health. As discussed herein, the combination of these therapies (gene therapy in stem cells), particularly in an ex vivo context, offers powerful genetic engineering which is applicable to the treatment of both genetic and acquired maladies ranging from blood diseases to the treatment of HIV infection. Of the existing gene therapy approaches, including non-viral and viral vectors, those based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently at the forefront as they have been safely used in hundreds of clinical trials and have demonstrated remarkable success in treating blindness and hemophilia B. However, AAV vectors used in combination with cell-based therapies have not transitioned to the clinic. Instead, adenoviral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors are the preferred choice for the modification of stem cells prior to patient infusion. This review provides a general background of AAV gene therapy and cell therapies, and highlights reports demonstrating apparently conflicting data of productive transduction and vector-induced toxicity using recombinant AAV in stem and stem-like cells. PMID:26645905

  20. Comparison of Transduction Efficiency of Recombinant AAV Serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 8 in the Rat Nigrostriatal System

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced delivery and expression of genes in specific neuronal systems is critical for the development of genetic models of neurodegenerative disease and potential gene therapy. Recent discovery of new recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) capsid serotypes has resulted in improved transduction efficiency, but expression levels, spread of transgene, and potential toxicity can differ depending on brain region and among species. We compared the transduction efficiency of titer-matched rAAV 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 to the commonly used rAAV2/2 in the rat nigrostriatal system via expression of the reporter transgene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Newer rAAV serotypes 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 demonstrated marked increase in transduction and spread of EGFP expression in dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons and projections to the striatum and globus pallidus compared to rAAV2/2 at 2 weeks post injection. The number of nigral cells transduced was greatest for rAAV2/1, but for serotypes 2/5 and 2/8 was still 2 to 3-fold higher than that for 2/2. Enhanced transduction did not cause an increase in glial cell response or toxicity. New rAAV serotypes thus promise improved gene delivery to nigrostriatal system with the potential for better models and therapeutics for Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19250335

  1. Virus-Derived Vectors for the Expression of Multiple Proteins in Plants.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pooja; Thuenemann, Eva C; Sainsbury, Frank; Lomonossoff, George P

    2016-01-01

    This chapter constitutes a practical guide to using the "pEAQ" vector series for transient or stable expression of one or more protein(s) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The pEAQ vectors are a series of small binary vectors designed for controlled expression of multiple proteins in plants. To achieve high levels of expression, an expression system based on translational enhancement by the untranslated regions of RNA-2 from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), named CPMV-HT, is used. The expression vector pEAQ-HT combines the user-friendly pEAQ plasmid with CPMV-HT to provide a system for high-level expression of proteins in plants. PMID:26614280

  2. A Hypoxia-Regulated Adeno-Associated Virus Vector for Cancer-Specific Gene Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hangjun; Su, Hua; Hu, Lily; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Kan, YW; Deen, Dennis F

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The presence of hypoxic cells in human brain tumors is an important factor leading to resistance to radiation therapy. However, this physiological difference between normal tissues and tumors also provides the potential for designing cancer-specific gene therapy. We compared the increase of gene expression under anoxia (<0.01% oxygen) produced by 3, 6, and 9 copies of hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE) from the erythropoietin gene (Epo), which are activated through the transcriptional complex hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Under anoxic conditions, nine copies of HRE (9XHRE) yielded 27- to 37-fold of increased gene expression in U-251 MG and U-87 MG human brain tumor cell lines. Under the less hypoxic conditions of 0.3% and 1% oxygen, gene activation by 9XHRE increased expression 11- to 18-fold in these cell lines. To generate a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in which the transgene can be regulated by hypoxia, we inserted the DNA fragment containing 9XHRE and the LacZ reporter gene into an AAV vector. Under anoxic conditions, this vector produced 79- to 110-fold increase in gene expression. We believe this hypoxia-regulated rAAV vector will provide a useful delivery vehicle for cancer-specific gene therapy. PMID:11494119

  3. Short-lived recombinant adeno-associated virus transgene expression in dystrophic muscle is associated with oxidative damage to transgene mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Tournaire, Benoit; Georger, Christophe; Marolleau, Béatrice; Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Ledevin, Mireille; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Lecomte, Emilie; Cogné, Benjamin; Dubreil, Laurence; Larcher, Thibaut; Gjata, Bernard; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Le Guiner, Caroline; Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Snyder, Richard O; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical gene therapy strategies using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have shown dramatic phenotype improvements, but long-lasting efficacy remains questionable. It is believed that in dystrophic muscles, transgene persistence is hampered, notably by the progressive loss of therapeutic vector genomes resulting from muscle fibers degeneration. Intracellular metabolic perturbations resulting from dystrophin deficiency could also be additional factors impacting on rAAV genomes and transgene mRNA molecular fate. In this study, we showed that rAAV genome loss is not the only cause of reduced transgene mRNA level and we assessed the contribution of transcriptional and post-transcriptional factors. We ruled out the implication of transgene silencing by epigenetic mechanisms and demonstrated that rAAV inhibition occurred mostly at the post-transcriptional level. Since Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) physiopathology involves an elevated oxidative stress, we hypothesized that in dystrophic muscles, transgene mRNA could be damaged by oxidative stress. In the mouse and dog dystrophic models, we found that rAAV-derived mRNA oxidation was increased. Interestingly, when a high expression level of a therapeutic transgene is achieved, oxidation is less pronounced. These findings provide new insights into rAAV transductions in dystrophic muscles, which ultimately may help in the design of more effective clinical trials. PMID:26029721

  4. Benefits of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV)-Mediated Insulinlike Growth Factor I (IGF-I) Overexpression for the Long-Term Reconstruction of Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage by Modulation of the IGF-I Axis

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Anja; Madry, Henning; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Schmitt, Gertrud; Frisch, Janina; Wezel, Anna; Jung, Jochen; Kohn, Dieter; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Trippel, Stephen B; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2012-01-01

    Administration of therapeutic genes to human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage is a potential approach to generate effective, durable treatments against this slow, progressive disorder. Here, we tested the ability of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated overexpression of human insulinlike growth factor (hIGF)-I to reproduce an original surface in human OA cartilage in light of the pleiotropic activities of the factor. We examined the proliferative, survival and anabolic effects of the rAAV-hIGF-I treatment in primary human normal and OA chondrocytes in vitro and in explant cultures in situ compared with control (reporter) vector delivery. Efficient, prolonged IGF-I secretion via rAAV stimulated the biological activities of OA chondrocytes in all the systems evaluated over extended periods of time, especially in situ, where it allowed for the long-term reconstruction of OA cartilage (at least for 90 d). Remarkably, production of high, stable amounts of IGF-I in OA cartilage using rAAV advantageously modulated the expression of central effectors of the IGF-I axis by downregulating IGF-I inhibitors (IGF binding protein [IGFBP]-3 and IGFBP4) while up-regulating key potentiators (IGFBP5, the IGF-I receptor and downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 [MAPK/ERK-1/2] and phosphatidylinisitol-3/Akt [PI3K/Akt] signal transduction pathways), probably explaining the enhanced responsiveness of OA cartilage to IGF-I treatment. These findings show the benefits of directly providing an IGF-I sequence to articular cartilage via rAAV for the future treatment of human osteoarthritis. PMID:22160392

  5. The Use of Chromatin Insulators to Improve the Expression and Safety of Integrating Gene Transfer Vectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The therapeutic application of recombinant retroviruses and other integrating gene transfer vectors has been limited by problems of vector expression and vector-mediated genotoxicity. These problems arise in large part from the interactions between vector sequences and the genomic environment surrounding sites of integration. Strides have been made in overcoming both of these problems through the modification of deleterious vector sequences, the inclusion of better enhancers and promoters, and the use of alternative virus systems. However, these modifications often add other restrictions on vector design, which in turn can further limit therapeutic applications. As an alternative, several groups have been investigating a class of DNA regulatory elements known as chromatin insulators. These elements provide a means of blocking the interaction between an integrating vector and the target cell genome in a manner that is independent of the vector transgene, regulatory elements, or virus of origin. This review outlines the background, rationale, and evidence for using chromatin insulators to improve the expression and safety of gene transfer vectors. Also reviewed are topological factors that constrain the use of insulators in integrating gene transfer vectors, alternative sources of insulators, and the role of chromatin insulators as one of several components for optimal vector design. PMID:21247248

  6. Slow AAV2 clearance from the brain of nonhuman primates and anti-capsid immune response.

    PubMed

    Samaranch, L; Hadaczek, P; Kells, A P; Bringas, J R; Stockinger, D; San Sebastian, W; Macayan, M; Samineni, S; Pivirotto, P; Forsayeth, J; Bankiewicz, K S

    2016-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) has previously been reported to be a slowly uncoating virus in peripheral tissues, but persistence of intact vector in primate brain has not been explored. Because some neurological gene therapies may require re-administration of the same vector to patients, it seems important to understand the optimal timeframe in which to consider such repeat intervention. Surprisingly, convection-enhanced delivery of AAV2 into the thalamus of nonhuman primates (NHPs) resulted in robust staining of neurons with A20 antibody that detected intact AAV2 particles at ∼1.5 months after infusion. However, by 2.5 months, no A20 staining was visible. These data confirmed earlier findings of persistence of intact AAV2 particles in ocular and hepatic tissues. In order to probe the potential consequences of this persistence, we infused AAV2-human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase into left and right thalamus of three NHPs, with a 3-month delay between infusions. During that interval, we immunized each animal subcutaneously with AAV2 virus-like particles (empty vector) in order to induce strong anti-capsid humoral immunity. Various high neutralizing antibody titers were achieved. The lowest titer animal showed infiltration of B lymphocytes and CD8(+) T cells into both the secondary and primary infusion sites. In the other two animals, extremely high titers resulted in no transduction of the second site and, therefore, no lymphocytic infiltration. However, such infiltration was prominent at the primary infusion site in each animal and was associated with overt neuronal loss and inflammation. PMID:26510688

  7. A versatile system for USER cloning-based assembly of expression vectors for mammalian cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Petersen, Maja Borup Kjær; Rank, Julie; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2014-01-01

    A new versatile mammalian vector system for protein production, cell biology analyses, and cell factory engineering was developed. The vector system applies the ligation-free uracil-excision based technique--USER cloning--to rapidly construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple DNA fragments and with maximum flexibility, both for choice of vector backbone and cargo. The vector system includes a set of basic vectors and a toolbox containing a multitude of DNA building blocks including promoters, terminators, selectable marker- and reporter genes, and sequences encoding an internal ribosome entry site, cellular localization signals and epitope- and purification tags. Building blocks in the toolbox can be easily combined as they contain defined and tested Flexible Assembly Sequence Tags, FASTs. USER cloning with FASTs allows rapid swaps of gene, promoter or selection marker in existing plasmids and simple construction of vectors encoding proteins, which are fused to fluorescence-, purification-, localization-, or epitope tags. The mammalian expression vector assembly platform currently allows for the assembly of up to seven fragments in a single cloning step with correct directionality and with a cloning efficiency above 90%. The functionality of basic vectors for FAST assembly was tested and validated by transient expression of fluorescent model proteins in CHO, U-2-OS and HEK293 cell lines. In this test, we included many of the most common vector elements for heterologous gene expression in mammalian cells, in addition the system is fully extendable by other users. The vector system is designed to facilitate high-throughput genome-scale studies of mammalian cells, such as the newly sequenced CHO cell lines, through the ability to rapidly generate high-fidelity assembly of customizable gene expression vectors. PMID:24879460

  8. A Versatile System for USER Cloning-Based Assembly of Expression Vectors for Mammalian Cell Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Petersen, Maja Borup Kjær; Rank, Julie; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2014-01-01

    A new versatile mammalian vector system for protein production, cell biology analyses, and cell factory engineering was developed. The vector system applies the ligation-free uracil-excision based technique – USER cloning – to rapidly construct mammalian expression vectors of multiple DNA fragments and with maximum flexibility, both for choice of vector backbone and cargo. The vector system includes a set of basic vectors and a toolbox containing a multitude of DNA building blocks including promoters, terminators, selectable marker- and reporter genes, and sequences encoding an internal ribosome entry site, cellular localization signals and epitope- and purification tags. Building blocks in the toolbox can be easily combined as they contain defined and tested Flexible Assembly Sequence Tags, FASTs. USER cloning with FASTs allows rapid swaps of gene, promoter or selection marker in existing plasmids and simple construction of vectors encoding proteins, which are fused to fluorescence-, purification-, localization-, or epitope tags. The mammalian expression vector assembly platform currently allows for the assembly of up to seven fragments in a single cloning step with correct directionality and with a cloning efficiency above 90%. The functionality of basic vectors for FAST assembly was tested and validated by transient expression of fluorescent model proteins in CHO, U-2-OS and HEK293 cell lines. In this test, we included many of the most common vector elements for heterologous gene expression in mammalian cells, in addition the system is fully extendable by other users. The vector system is designed to facilitate high-throughput genome-scale studies of mammalian cells, such as the newly sequenced CHO cell lines, through the ability to rapidly generate high-fidelity assembly of customizable gene expression vectors. PMID:24879460

  9. Safety and Tolerability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Convection-Enhanced Delivery of AAV2-hAADC with a Novel Delivery Platform in Nonhuman Primate Striatum

    PubMed Central

    San Sebastian, Waldy; Richardson, R. Mark; Kells, Adrian P.; Lamarre, Clementine; Bringas, John; Pivirotto, Philip; Salegio, Ernesto A.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Forsayeth, John

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Degeneration of nigrostriatal neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) causes progressive loss of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), the enzyme that converts levodopa (l-DOPA) into dopamine in the striatum. Because loss of this enzyme appears to be a major driver of progressive impairment of response to the mainstay drug, l-DOPA, one promising approach has been to use gene therapy to restore AADC activity in the human putamen and thereby restore normal l-DOPA response in patients with PD. An open-label phase I clinical trial of this approach in patients with PD provided encouraging signs of improvement in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores and reductions in antiparkinsonian medications. However, such improvement was modest compared with the results previously reported in parkinsonian rhesus macaques. The reason for this discrepancy may have been that the relatively small volume of vector infused in the clinical study restricted the distribution of AADC expression, such that only about 20% of the postcommissural putamen was covered, as revealed by l-[3-18F]-α-methyltyrosine-positron emission tomography. To achieve more quantitative distribution of vector, we have developed a visual guidance system for parenchymal infusion of AAV2. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the combined magnetic resonance imaging-guided delivery system with AAV2-hAADC under conditions that approximate the intended clinical protocol. Our data indicate that this approach directed accurate cannula placement and effective vector distribution without inducing any untoward effects in nonhuman primates infused with a high dose of AAV2-hAADC. PMID:22017504

  10. Whole body skeletal muscle transduction in neonatal dogs with AAV-9.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy of muscular dystrophy requires systemic gene delivery to all muscles in the body. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been shown to lead to body-wide muscle transduction after a single intravascular injection. Proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Before initiating clinical trials, it is important to validate these promising results in large animal models. More than a dozen canine muscular dystrophy models have been developed. Here, we outline a protocol for performing systemic AAV gene transfer in neonatal dogs. Implementing this technique in dystrophic dogs will accelerate translational muscular dystrophy research. PMID:21194038

  11. Inner Limiting Membrane Barriers to AAV-mediated Retinal Transduction From the Vitreous

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Caporale, Natalia; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral gene therapy has shown great promise in treating retinal disorders, with three promising clinical trials in progress. Numerous adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes can infect various cells of the retina when administered subretinally, but the retinal detachment accompanying this injection induces changes that negatively impact the microenvironment and survival of retinal neurons. Intravitreal administration could circumvent this problem, but only AAV2 can infect retinal cells from the vitreous, and transduction is limited to the inner retina. We therefore sought to investigate and reduce barriers to transduction from the vitreous. We fluorescently labeled several AAV serotype capsids and followed their retinal distribution after intravitreal injection. AAV2, 8, and 9 accumulate at the vitreoretinal junction. AAV1 and 5 show no accumulation, indicating a lack of appropriate receptors at the inner limiting membrane (ILM). Importantly, mild digestion of the ILM with a nonspecific protease enabled substantially enhanced transduction of multiple retinal cell types from the vitreous, with AAV5 mediating particularly remarkable expression in all retinal layers. This protease treatment has no effect on retinal function as shown by electroretinogram (ERG) and visual cortex cell population responses. These findings may help avoid limitations, risks, and damage associated with subretinal injections currently necessary for clinical gene therapy. PMID:19672248

  12. An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive disease linked to expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein and characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive and motor function. We show that expression of a mutant human huntingtin exon-1-GFP fusion construct results in nonspecific gene dysregulation that is significantly reduced by 50% due to coexpression of INT41, an intrabody specific for the proline-rich region of the huntingtin protein. Using stable PC12 cell lines expressing either inducible human mutant huntingtin (mHtt, Q73) or normal huntingtin (nHtt, Q23), we investigated the effect of rAAV6-INT41, an adeno-associated virus vector with the INT41 coding sequence, on the subcellular distribution of Htt. Compartmental fractionation 8 days after induction of Htt showed a 6-fold increased association of a dominate N-terminal mHtt fragment with DNA compared to N-terminal nHtt. Transduction with rAAV6-INT41 reduced DNA binding of N-terminal mHtt 6.5-fold in the nucleus and reduced nuclear translocation of the detected fragments. Subsequently, when rAAV6-INT41 is delivered to the striatum in the R6/2 mouse model, treated female mice exhibited executive function statistically indistinguishable from wild type, accompanied by reductions in Htt aggregates in the striatum, suggesting that rAAV6-INT41 is promising as a gene therapy for Huntington's disease. PMID:27595037

  13. An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Amaro, I Alexandra; Henderson, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive disease linked to expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein and characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive and motor function. We show that expression of a mutant human huntingtin exon-1-GFP fusion construct results in nonspecific gene dysregulation that is significantly reduced by 50% due to coexpression of INT41, an intrabody specific for the proline-rich region of the huntingtin protein. Using stable PC12 cell lines expressing either inducible human mutant huntingtin (mHtt, Q73) or normal huntingtin (nHtt, Q23), we investigated the effect of rAAV6-INT41, an adeno-associated virus vector with the INT41 coding sequence, on the subcellular distribution of Htt. Compartmental fractionation 8 days after induction of Htt showed a 6-fold increased association of a dominate N-terminal mHtt fragment with DNA compared to N-terminal nHtt. Transduction with rAAV6-INT41 reduced DNA binding of N-terminal mHtt 6.5-fold in the nucleus and reduced nuclear translocation of the detected fragments. Subsequently, when rAAV6-INT41 is delivered to the striatum in the R6/2 mouse model, treated female mice exhibited executive function statistically indistinguishable from wild type, accompanied by reductions in Htt aggregates in the striatum, suggesting that rAAV6-INT41 is promising as a gene therapy for Huntington's disease. PMID:27595037

  14. Efficient Transduction of Corneal Stroma by Adeno-Associated Viral Serotype Vectors for Implications in Gene Therapy of Corneal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Ai, Jianzhong; Gessler, Dominic; Su, Qin; Tran, Karen; Zheng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Gao, Guangping

    2016-08-01

    Corneal disease is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for corneal diseases, but currently underdeveloped. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have emerged as a highly promising gene therapy platform. This study aims to identify rAAV vectors that can efficiently transduce corneal stroma for potential applications in studying pathophysiology of corneal diseases and therapeutic development. We characterized 14 rAAV serotypes expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), for cell specificity and transduction efficiency after either intrastromal injection or topical administration in mouse corneas in vivo. Our results show that intrastromal injections of rAAVrh.8, rAAVrh.10, rAAVrh.39, and rAAVrh.43 efficiently transduce mouse corneal stroma in vivo, and that topical administrations of rAAVrh.10 and rAAVrh.39 subsequent to epithelial scraping generate detectable transgene expression. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that transgene expression became detectable by 1 week postadministration, peaked at 2 weeks, and lasted for the duration of the study (i.e., 4 weeks). Both rAAVrh.10 and rAAVrh.39 transduced more than 50% of keratocytes, the major cell type in the corneal stroma, by intrastromal injection and 30% by topical administration. Histopathology indicated that rAAV transduction of cornea caused no morphological adverse effects. Overall, our findings suggest that some rAAV serotype vectors can efficiently transduce corneal stroma in vivo, constituting a potentially powerful and safe gene delivery platform for gene therapy of corneal diseases. PMID:27001051

  15. Serial bone marrow transplantation reveals in vivo expression of the pCLPG retroviral vector

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene therapy in the hematopoietic system remains promising, though certain aspects of vector design, such as transcriptional control elements, continue to be studied. Our group has developed a retroviral vector where transgene expression is controlled by p53 with the intention of harnessing the dynamic and inducible nature of this tumor suppressor and transcription factor. We present here a test of in vivo expression provided by the p53-responsive vector, pCLPG. For this, we used a model of serial transplantation of transduced bone marrow cells. Results We observed, by flow cytometry, that the eGFP transgene was expressed at higher levels when the pCLPG vector was used as compared to the parental pCL retrovirus, where expression is directed by the native MoMLV LTR. Expression from the pCLPG vector was longer lasting, but did decay along with each sequential transplant. The detection of eGFP-positive cells containing either vector was successful only in the bone marrow compartment and was not observed in peripheral blood, spleen or thymus. Conclusions These findings indicate that the p53-responsive pCLPG retrovirus did offer expression in vivo and at a level that surpassed the non-modified, parental pCL vector. Our results indicate that the pCLPG platform may provide some advantages when applied in the hematopoietic system. PMID:20096105

  16. Long-Term Sex-Biased Correction of Circulating Propionic Acidemia Disease Markers by Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Guenzel, Adam J.; Collard, Renata; Kraus, Jan P.; Matern, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Propionic academia (PA) occurs because of mutations in the PCCA or PCCB genes encoding the two subunits of propionyl-CoA carboxylase, a pivotal enzyme in the breakdown of certain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids. There is no cure for PA, but dietary protein restriction and liver transplantation can attenuate its symptoms. We show here that a single intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus 2/8 (AAV8) or AAVrh10 expressing PCCA into PA hypomorphic mice decreased systemic propionylcarnitine and methyl citrate for up to 1.5 years. However, long-term phenotypic correction was always better in male mice. AAV-mediated PCCA expression was similar in most tissues in males and females at early time points and differed only in the liver. Over 1.5 years, luciferase and PCCA expression remained elevated in cardiac tissue for both sexes. In contrast, transgene expression in the liver and skeletal muscles of female, but not male, mice waned—suggesting that these tissues were major sinks for systemic phenotypic correction. These data indicate that single systemic intravenous therapy by AAV vectors can mediate long-term phenotype correction for PA. However, tissue-specific loss of expression in females reduces efficacy when compared with males. Whether similar sex-biased AAV effects occur in human gene therapy remains to be determined. PMID:25654275

  17. Long-term sex-biased correction of circulating propionic acidemia disease markers by adeno-associated virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Guenzel, Adam J; Collard, Renata; Kraus, Jan P; Matern, Dietrich; Barry, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Propionic academia (PA) occurs because of mutations in the PCCA or PCCB genes encoding the two subunits of propionyl-CoA carboxylase, a pivotal enzyme in the breakdown of certain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids. There is no cure for PA, but dietary protein restriction and liver transplantation can attenuate its symptoms. We show here that a single intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus 2/8 (AAV8) or AAVrh10 expressing PCCA into PA hypomorphic mice decreased systemic propionylcarnitine and methyl citrate for up to 1.5 years. However, long-term phenotypic correction was always better in male mice. AAV-mediated PCCA expression was similar in most tissues in males and females at early time points and differed only in the liver. Over 1.5 years, luciferase and PCCA expression remained elevated in cardiac tissue for both sexes. In contrast, transgene expression in the liver and skeletal muscles of female, but not male, mice waned—suggesting that these tissues were major sinks for systemic phenotypic correction. These data indicate that single systemic intravenous therapy by AAV vectors can mediate long-term phenotype correction for PA. However, tissue-specific loss of expression in females reduces efficacy when compared with males. Whether similar sex-biased AAV effects occur in human gene therapy remains to be determined. PMID:25654275

  18. BioVector, a flexible system for gene specific-expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional genomic research always needs to assemble different DNA fragments into a binary vector, so as to express genes with different tags from various promoters with different levels. The cloning systems available bear similar disadvantages, such as promoters/tags are fixed on a binary vector, which is generally with low cloning efficiency and limited for cloning sites if a novel promoter/tag is in need. Therefore, it is difficult both to assemble a gene and a promoter together and to modify the vectors in hand. Another disadvantage is that a long spacer from recombination sites, which may be detrimental to the protein function, exists between a gene and a tag. Multiple GATEWAY system only resolves former problem at the expense of very low efficiency and expensive for multiple LR reaction. Results To improve efficiency and flexibility for constructing expression vectors, we developed a platform, BioVector, by combining classical restriction enzyme/ligase strategy with modern Gateway DNA recombination system. This system included a series of vectors for gene cloning, promoter cloning, and binary vector construction to meet various needs for plant functional genomic study. Conclusion This BioVector platform makes it easy to construct any vectors to express a target gene from a specific promoter with desired intensity, and it is also waiting to be freely modified by researchers themselves for ongoing demands. This idea can also be transferred to the different fields including animal or yeast study. PMID:24304941

  19. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A somatic transformation vector, pDP9, was constructed that provides a simplified means of producing permanently transformed cultured insect cells that support high levels of protein expression of foreign genes. The pDP9 plasmid vector incorporates DNA sequences from the Junonia coenia densovirus th...

  20. Adeno-associated virus 2-mediated antiangiogenic cancer gene therapy: long-term efficacy of a vector encoding angiostatin and endostatin over vectors encoding a single factor.

    PubMed

    Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Mahendra, Gandham; Kumar, Sanjay; Shaw, Denise R; Stockard, Cecil R; Grizzle, William E; Meleth, Sreelatha

    2004-03-01

    Angiogenesis is characteristic of solid tumor growth and a surrogate marker for metastasis in many human cancers. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis using antiangiogenic drugs and gene transfer approaches has suggested the potential of this form of therapy in controlling tumor growth. However, for long-term tumor-free survival by antiangiogenic therapy, the factors controlling tumor neovasculature need to be systemically maintained at stable therapeutic levels. Here we show sustained expression of the antiangiogenic factors angiostatin and endostatin as secretory proteins by recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer. Both vectors provided significant protective efficacy in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Stable transgene persistence and systemic levels of both angiostatin and endostatin were confirmed by in situ hybridization of the vector-injected tissues and by serum ELISA measurements, respectively. Whereas treatment with rAAV containing either endostatin or angiostatin alone resulted in moderate to significant protection, the combination of endostatin and angiostatin gene transfer from a single vector resulted in a complete protection. These data suggest that AAV-mediated long-term expression of both endostatin and angiostatin may have clinical utility against recurrence of cancers after primary therapies and may represent rational adjuvant therapies in combination with radiation or chemotherapy. PMID:14996740

  1. Treatment with Trehalose Prevents Behavioral and Neurochemical Deficits Produced in an AAV α-Synuclein Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Koprich, James B; Wang, Ying; Yu, Wen-Bo; Xiao, Bao-Guo; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein in dopamine (DA) neurons is believed to be of major importance in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Animal models of PD, based on viral-vector-mediated over-expression of α-synuclein, have been developed and show evidence of dopaminergic toxicity, providing us a good tool to investigate potential therapies to interfere with α-synuclein-mediated pathology. An efficient disease-modifying therapeutic molecule should be able to interfere with the neurotoxicity of α-synuclein aggregation. Our study highlighted the ability of an autophagy enhancer, trehalose (at concentrations of 5 and 2 % in drinking water), to protect against A53T α-synuclein-mediated DA degeneration in an adeno-associated virus serotype 1/2 (AAV1/2)-based rat model of PD. Behavioral tests and neurochemical analysis demonstrated a significant attenuation in α-synuclein-mediated deficits in motor asymmetry and DA neurodegeneration including impaired DA neuronal survival and DA turnover, as well as α-synuclein accumulation and aggregation in the nigrostriatal system by commencing 5 and 2 % trehalose at the same time as delivery of AAV. Trehalose (0.5 %) was ineffective on the above behavioral and neurochemical deficits. Further investigation showed that trehalose enhanced autophagy in the striatum by increasing formation of LC3-II. This study supports the concept of using trehalose as a novel therapeutic strategy that might prevent/reverse α-synuclein aggregation for the treatment of PD. PMID:25972237

  2. Multiple shRNA expressions in a single plasmid vector improve RNAi against the XPA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Akihiro; Zhao, Xia; Takegami, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Matsui, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2008-05-30

    To improve the efficiency of stable knockdown with short hairpin RNA (shRNA), we inserted multiple shRNA expression sequences into a single plasmid vector. In this study, the DNA repair factor XPA was selected as a target gene since it is not essential for cell viability and it is easy to check the functional knockdown of this gene. The efficiency of knockdown was compared among single and triple expression vectors. The single shRNA-expressing vector caused limited knockdown of the target protein in stable transfectants, however, the multiple expression vectors apparently increased the frequency of knockdown transfectants. There were correlations between the knockdown level and marker expression in multiple-expressing transfectants, whereas poorer correlations were observed in single vector transfectants. Multiple-transfectants exhibited reduced efficiency of repair of UV-induced DNA damage and an increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light-irradiation. We propose that multiple shRNA expression vectors might be a useful strategy for establishing knockdown cells.

  3. Optimization of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression for Large Transgenes, Using a Synthetic Promoter and Tandem Array Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ziying; Sun, Xingshen; Feng, Zehua; Li, Guiying; Fisher, John T; Stewart, Zoe A; Engelhardt, John F

    2015-06-01

    The packaging capacity of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors limits the size of the promoter that can be used to express the 4.43-kb cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA. To circumvent this limitation, we screened a set of 100-mer synthetic enhancer elements, composed of ten 10-bp repeats, for their ability to augment CFTR transgene expression from a short 83-bp synthetic promoter in the context of an rAAV vector designed for use in the cystic fibrosis (CF) ferret model. Our initial studies assessing transcriptional activity in monolayer (nonpolarized) cultures of human airway cell lines and primary ferret airway cells revealed that three of these synthetic enhancers (F1, F5, and F10) significantly promoted transcription of a luciferase transgene in the context of plasmid transfection. Further analysis in polarized cultures of human and ferret airway epithelia at an air-liquid interface (ALI), as well as in the ferret airway in vivo, demonstrated that the F5 enhancer produced the highest level of transgene expression in the context of an AAV vector. Furthermore, we demonstrated that increasing the size of the viral genome from 4.94 to 5.04 kb did not significantly affect particle yield of the vectors, but dramatically reduced the functionality of rAAV-CFTR vectors because of small terminal deletions that extended into the CFTR expression cassette of the 5.04-kb oversized genome. Because rAAV-CFTR vectors greater than 5 kb in size are dramatically impaired with respect to vector efficacy, we used a shortened ferret CFTR minigene with a 159-bp deletion in the R domain to construct an rAAV vector (AV2/2.F5tg83-fCFTRΔR). This vector yielded an ∼17-fold increase in expression of CFTR and significantly improved Cl(-) currents in CF ALI cultures. Our study has identified a small enhancer/promoter combination that may have broad usefulness for rAAV-mediated CF gene therapy to the airway. PMID:25763813

  4. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T

  5. In Silico Reconstruction of the Viral Evolutionary Lineage Yields a Potent Gene Therapy Vector.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Eric; Pacouret, Simon; Khaychuk, Vadim; Turunen, Heikki T; Carvalho, Livia S; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Shah, Samiksha; Shelke, Rajani; Maurer, Anna C; Plovie, Eva; Xiao, Ru; Vandenberghe, Luk H

    2015-08-11

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have emerged as a gene-delivery platform with demonstrated safety and efficacy in a handful of clinical trials for monogenic disorders. However, limitations of the current generation vectors often prevent broader application of AAV gene therapy. Efforts to engineer AAV vectors have been hampered by a limited understanding of the structure-function relationship of the complex multimeric icosahedral architecture of the particle. To develop additional reagents pertinent to further our insight into AAVs, we inferred evolutionary intermediates of the viral capsid using ancestral sequence reconstruction. In-silico-derived sequences were synthesized de novo and characterized for biological properties relevant to clinical applications. This effort led to the generation of nine functional putative ancestral AAVs and the identification of Anc80, the predicted ancestor of the widely studied AAV serotypes 1, 2, 8, and 9, as a highly potent in vivo gene therapy vector for targeting liver, muscle, and retina. PMID:26235624

  6. PVv3, a new shuttle vector for gene expression in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Klevanskaa, Karina; Bier, Nadja; Stingl, Kerstin; Strauch, Eckhard; Hertwig, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    An efficient electroporation procedure for Vibrio vulnificus was designed using the new cloning vector pVv3 (3,107 bp). Transformation efficiencies up to 2 × 10(6) transformants per μg DNA were achieved. The vector stably replicated in both V. vulnificus and Escherichia coli and was also successfully introduced into Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae. To demonstrate the suitability of the vector for molecular cloning, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene and the vvhBA hemolysin operon were inserted into the vector and functionally expressed in Vibrio and E. coli. PMID:24362421

  7. Elucidating the Potential of Plant Rhabdoviruses as Vector Expressions Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) is a member of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus that is transmitted by the leafhopper Graminella nigrifons. The virus replicates in both its maize host and its insect vector. To determine whether Drosophila S2 cells support the production of full-length MFSV proteins, we ...

  8. Genetic engineering techniques for lactic acid bacteria: construction of a stable shuttle vector and expression vector for β-glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shiao-Ming; Yan, Tsong-Rong

    2014-02-01

    The shuttle vector, pUL6erm, was constructed by using a replicon from pL2, a multiple cloning site, colE1 ori, the ori of Gram-negative bacteria from vector pUC19, and the erythromycin resistance gene from pVA838 as a selection marker. pUL6erm could be transformed easily and maintained stably in Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei. Transformation assays of pUL6erm indicated that it had a narrow host range. β-Glucuronidase was induced in the presence of 0.3 M NaCl and 50 mM glutamate and expressed at 2.4 U mg(-1) with the expression vector (pUL6erm-gadR-GUS) constructed based on pUL6erm carrying β-glucuronidase gene wuth a chloride-inducible (gadR) expression cassette using Pgad as promoter. Therefore, pUL6erm and pUL6erm-gadR-GUS might be a safe and useful genetic tool for the improvement of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:24101246

  9. Expression-independent gene trap vectors for random and targeted mutagenesis in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Anestis; Tzouanacou, Elena; Rahman, Afifah; Colby, Douglas; Axton, Richard; Chambers, Ian; Wilson, Valerie; Forrester, Lesley; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Promoterless gene trap vectors have been widely used for high-efficiency gene targeting and random mutagenesis in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Unfortunately, such vectors are only effective for genes expressed in ES cells and this has prompted the development of expression-independent vectors. These polyadenylation (poly A) trap vectors employ a splice donor to capture an endogenous gene's polyadenylation sequence and provide transcript stability. However, the spectrum of mutations generated by these vectors appears largely restricted to the last intron of target loci due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) making them unsuitable for gene targeting applications. Here, we present novel poly A trap vectors that overcome the effect of NMD and also employ RNA instability sequences to improve splicing efficiency. The set of random insertions generated with these vectors show a significantly reduced insertional bias and the vectors can be targeted directly to a 5′ intron. We also show that this relative positional independence is linked to the human β-actin promoter and is most likely a result of its transcriptional activity in ES cells. Taken together our data indicate that these vectors are an effective tool for insertional mutagenesis that can be used for either gene trapping or gene targeting. PMID:19692586

  10. Virus-Derived Gene Expression and RNA Interference Vector for Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Elizabeth G.; Peremyslov, Valera V.; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Miller, Marilyn; Carrington, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The improvement of the agricultural and wine-making qualities of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is hampered by adherence to traditional varieties, the recalcitrance of this plant to genetic modifications, and public resistance to genetically modified organism (GMO) technologies. To address these challenges, we developed an RNA virus-based vector for the introduction of desired traits into grapevine without heritable modifications to the genome. This vector expresses recombinant proteins in the phloem tissue that is involved in sugar transport throughout the plant, from leaves to roots to berries. Furthermore, the vector provides a powerful RNA interference (RNAi) capability of regulating the expression of endogenous genes via virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS) technology. Additional advantages of this vector include superb genetic capacity and stability, as well as the swiftness of technology implementation. The most significant applications of the viral vector include functional genomics of the grapevine and disease control via RNAi-enabled vaccination against pathogens or invertebrate pests. PMID:22438553

  11. [Adeno-associated viral vectors: methods for production and purification for gene therapy applications].

    PubMed

    Mena-Enriquez, Mayra; Flores-Contreras, Lucia; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Viral vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are widely used in gene therapy protocols, because they have characteristics that make them valuable for the treatment of genetic and chronic degenerative diseases. AAV2 serotype had been the best characterized to date. However, the AAV vectors developed from other serotypes is of special interest, since they have organ-specific tropism which increases their potential for transgene delivery to target cells for performing their therapeutic effects. This article summarizes AAV generalities, methods for their production and purification. It also discusses the use of these vectors in vitro, in vivo and their application in gene therapy clinical trials. PMID:23544311

  12. Determination of anti-adeno-associated virus vector neutralizing antibody titer with an in vitro reporter system.

    PubMed

    Meliani, Amine; Leborgne, Christian; Triffault, Sabrina; Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Veron, Philippe; Mingozzi, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are a platform of choice for in vivo gene transfer applications. However, neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to AAV can be found in humans and some animal species as a result of exposure to the wild-type virus, and high-titer NAb develop following AAV vector administration. In some conditions, anti-AAV NAb can block transduction with AAV vectors even when present at low titers, thus requiring prescreening before vector administration. Here we describe an improved in vitro, cell-based assay for the determination of NAb titer in serum or plasma samples. The assay is easy to setup and sensitive and, depending on the purpose, can be validated to support clinical development of gene therapy products based on AAV vectors. PMID:25819687

  13. The ANCA Vasculitis Questionnaire (AAV-PRO©)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA); Wegener Granulomatosis (WG); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV); Vasculitis

  14. [Construction of a set of secreting expression vectors for Saccharomyces cerevisiea].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingyi; Liang, Shizhong; Huang, Kun; Huang, Ribo

    2002-08-01

    The DNA fragment ecoding the Signal peptide of inulinase of Kluyveromyces smarxianu was synthesized chemically. This fragment was cloned in-frame in the expression vector pYES2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in a set of new secreting expression vectors pYES2 I, pYES2 II, pYES2 III. The L-Asparaginase gene (ASN) of E. coli and alpha-acetylactate decarboxylase gene (ALDC) of B. brevis which were amplified by PCR and cloned into the new vectors respectively were transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisia, and most of enzyme activities were secreted into the medium. The new secreting expression vectors still have excellent segregational stability even after growth for 100 h in the absence of selective pressure. PMID:12557548

  15. Construction of vectors for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Duong, Tri; Miller, Michael J; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2011-05-01

    Microarray analysis of the genome of Lactobacillus acidophilus identified a number of operons that were differentially expressed in response to carbohydrate source or constitutively expressed regardless of carbohydrate source. These included operons implicated in the transport and catabolism of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), lactose (lac), trehalose (tre) and genes directing glycolysis. Analysis of these operons identified a number of putative promoter and repressor elements, which were used to construct a series of expression vectors for use in lactobacilli, based on the broad host range pWV01 replicon. A β-glucuronidase (GusA3) reporter gene was cloned into each vector to characterize expression from each promoter. GUS reporter assays showed FOS, lac and tre based vectors to be highly inducible by their specific carbohydrate and repressed by glucose. Additionally, a construct based on the phosphoglycerate mutase (pgm) promoter was constitutively highly expressed. To demonstrate the potential utility of these vectors, we constructed a plasmid for the overexpression of the oxalate degradation pathway (Frc and Oxc) of L. acidophilus NCFM. This construct was able to improve oxalate degradation by L. gasseri ATCC 33323 and compliment a L. acidophilus oxalate-deficient mutant. Development of these expression vectors could support several novel applications, including the expression of enzymes, proteins, vaccines and biotherapeutics by intestinal lactobacilli. PMID:21375708

  16. Effects of G-gene Deletion and Replacement on Rabies Virus Vector Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Ohara, Shinya; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein-gene (G gene) -deleted rabies virus (RV) vector is a powerful tool to examine the function and structure of neural circuits. We previously reported that the deletion of the G gene enhances the transgene expression level of the RV vector. However, the mechanism of this enhancement remains to be clarified. We presume that there are two possible factors for this enhancement. The first factor is the glycoprotein of RV, which shows cytotoxicity; thus, may cause a dysfunction in the translation process of infected cells. The second possible factor is the enhanced expression of the L gene, which encodes viral RNA polymerase. In the RV, it is known that the gene expression level is altered depending on the position of the gene. Since G-gene deletion displaces the L gene in the genome, the expression of the L gene and viral transcription may be enhanced. In this study, we compared the transgene expression level and viral transcription of three recombinant RV vectors. The effect of glycoprotein was examined by comparing the viral gene expression of G-gene-intact RV and G-gene-replaced RV. Despite the fact that the L-gene transcription level of these two RV vectors was similar, the G-gene-replaced RV vector showed higher viral transcription and transgene expression level than the G-gene-intact RV vector. To examine the effect of the position of the L gene, we compared the viral gene expression of the G-gene-deleted RV and G-gene-replaced RV. The G-gene-deleted RV vector showed higher L-gene transcription, viral transcription, and transgene expression level than the G-gene-replaced RV vector. These results indicate that G-gene deletion enhances the transgene expression level through at least two factors, the absence of glycoprotein and enhancement of L-gene expression. These findings enable investigators to design a useful viral vector that shows a controlled desirable transgene expression level in applications. PMID:26023771

  17. Hybrid nonviral/viral vector systems for improved piggyBac DNA transposon in vivo delivery.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Ashley L; Singh, Brajesh K; Sinn, Patrick L

    2015-04-01

    The DNA transposon piggyBac is a potential therapeutic agent for multiple genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Recombinant piggyBac transposon and transposase are typically codelivered by plasmid transfection; however, plasmid delivery is inefficient in somatic cells in vivo and is a barrier to the therapeutic application of transposon-based vector systems. Here, we investigate the potential for hybrid piggyBac/viral vectors to transduce cells and support transposase-mediated genomic integration of the transposon. We tested both adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as transposon delivery vehicles. An Ad vector expressing hyperactive insect piggyBac transposase (iPB7) was codelivered. We show transposase-dependent transposition activity and mapped integrations in mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo from each viral vector platform. We also demonstrate efficient and persistent transgene expression following nasal delivery of piggyBac/viral vectors to mice. Furthermore, using piggyBac/Ad expressing Cystic Fibrosis transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR), we show persistent correction of chloride current in well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells derived from CF patients. Combining the emerging technologies of DNA transposon-based vectors with well-studied adenoviral and AAV delivery provides new tools for in vivo gene transfer and presents an exciting opportunity to increase the delivery efficiency for therapeutic genes such as CFTR. PMID:25557623

  18. In vivo adeno-associated viral vector-mediated genetic engineering of white and brown adipose tissue in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Veronica; Muñoz, Sergio; Casana, Estefania; Mallol, Cristina; Elias, Ivet; Jambrina, Claudia; Ribera, Albert; Ferre, Tura; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue is pivotal in the regulation of energy homeostasis through the balance of energy storage and expenditure and as an endocrine organ. An inadequate mass and/or alterations in the metabolic and endocrine functions of adipose tissue underlie the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. To fully understand the metabolic and molecular mechanism(s) involved in adipose dysfunction, in vivo genetic modification of adipocytes holds great potential. Here, we demonstrate that adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, especially serotypes 8 and 9, mediated efficient transduction of white (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult lean and obese diabetic mice. The use of short versions of the adipocyte protein 2 or uncoupling protein-1 promoters or micro-RNA target sequences enabled highly specific, long-term AAV-mediated transgene expression in white or brown adipocytes. As proof of concept, delivery of AAV vectors encoding for hexokinase or vascular endothelial growth factor to WAT or BAT resulted in increased glucose uptake or increased vessel density in targeted depots. This method of gene transfer also enabled the secretion of stable high levels of the alkaline phosphatase marker protein into the bloodstream by transduced WAT. Therefore, AAV-mediated genetic engineering of adipose tissue represents a useful tool for the study of adipose pathophysiology and, likely, for the future development of new therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes. PMID:24043756

  19. Safety and biodistribution assessment of sc-rAAV2.5IL-1Ra administered via intra-articular injection in a mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gensheng; Evans, Christopher H; Benson, Janet M; Hutt, Julie A; Seagrave, JeanClare; Wilder, Julie A; Grieger, Joshua C; Samulski, R Jude; Terse, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA), and gene transfer of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) holds promise for OA treatment. A preclinical safety and biodistribution study evaluated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral vector carrying rat IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5rIL-1Ra) at 5 × 108, 5 × 109, or 5 × 1010 vg/knee, or human IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5hIL-1Ra) at 5 × 1010 vg/knee, in Wistar rats with mono-iodoacetate (MIA)–induced OA at days 7, 26, 91, 180, and 364 following intra-articular injection. The MIA-induced OA lesions were consistent with the published data on this model. The vector genomes persisted in the injected knees for up to a year with only limited vector leakage to systemic circulation and uptake in tissues outside the knee. Low levels of IL-1Ra expression and mitigation of OA lesions were observed in the vector-injected knees, albeit inconsistently. Neutralizing antibodies against the vector capsid developed in a dose-dependent manner, but only the human vector induced a small splenic T-cell immune response to the vector capsid. No local or systemic toxicity attributable to vector administration was identified in the rats as indicated by clinical signs, body weight, feed consumption, clinical pathology, and gross and microscopic pathology through day 364. Taken together, the gene therapy vector demonstrated a favorable safety profile. PMID:26817025

  20. Regulation of adeno-associated virus gene expression in 293 cells: control of mRNA abundance and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Trempe, J.P.; Carter, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) rep gene on the control of gene expression from the AAV p/sub 40/ promoter in 293 cells in the absence of an adenovirus coinfection. AAV vectors containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene were used to measure the levels of cat expression and steady-state mRNA from p/sub 40/. When the rep gene was present in cis or in trans, cat expression from p/sub 40/ was decreased 3- to 10-fold, but there was a 2- to 10-fold increase in the level of p/sub 40/ mRNA. Conversely, cat expression increased and the p/sub 40/ mRNA level decreased in the absence of the rep gene. Both wild-type and carboxyl-terminal truncated Rep proteins were capable of eliciting both effects. These data suggest two roles for the pleiotropic AAV rep gene: as a translational inhibitor and as a positive regulator of p/sub 40/ mRNA levels. They also provide additional evidence for a cis-acting negative regulatory region which decreases RNA from the AAV p/sub 5/ promoter in a fashion independent of rep.

  1. Viral-mediated RdCVF and RdCVFL expression protects cone and rod photoreceptors in retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Leah C.; Dalkara, Deniz; Luna, Gabriel; Fisher, Steven K.; Clérin, Emmanuelle; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry; Flannery, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of nucleoredoxin-like 1 (Nxnl1) results in 2 isoforms of the rod-derived cone viability factor. The truncated form (RdCVF) is a thioredoxin-like protein secreted by rods that promotes cone survival, while the full-length isoform (RdCVFL), which contains a thioredoxin fold, is involved in oxidative signaling and protection against hyperoxia. Here, we evaluated the effects of these different isoforms in 2 murine models of rod-cone dystrophy. We used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express these isoforms in mice and found that both systemic and intravitreal injection of engineered AAV vectors resulted in RdCVF and RdCVFL expression in the eye. Systemic delivery of AAV92YF vectors in neonates resulted in earlier onset of RdCVF and RdCVFL expression compared with that observed with intraocular injection using the same vectors at P14. We also evaluated the efficacy of intravitreal injection using a recently developed photoreceptor-transducing AAV variant (7m8) at P14. Systemic administration of AAV92YF-RdCVF improved cone function and delayed cone loss, while AAV92YF-RdCVFL increased rhodopsin mRNA and reduced oxidative stress by-products. Intravitreal 7m8-RdCVF slowed the rate of cone cell death and increased the amplitude of the photopic electroretinogram. Together, these results indicate different functions for Nxnl1 isoforms in the retina and suggest that RdCVF gene therapy has potential for treating retinal degenerative disease. PMID:25415434

  2. Adeno-associated Virus as a Mammalian DNA Vector

    PubMed Central

    SALGANIK, MAX; HIRSCH, MATTHEW L.; SAMULSKI, RICHARD JUDE

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly five decades since its accidental discovery, adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a highly versatile vector system for both research and clinical applications. A broad range of natural serotypes, as well as an increasing number of capsid variants, has combined to produce a repertoire of vectors with different tissue tropisms, immunogenic profiles and transduction efficiencies. The story of AAV is one of continued progress and surprising discoveries in a viral system that, at first glance, is deceptively simple. This apparent simplicity has enabled the advancement of AAV into the clinic, where despite some challenges it has provided hope for patients and a promising new tool for physicians. Although a great deal of work remains to be done, both in studying the basic biology of AAV and in optimizing its clinical application, AAV vectors are currently the safest and most efficient platform for gene transfer in mammalian cells. PMID:26350320

  3. Tightly regulated vectors for the cloning and expression of toxic genes.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Larry C; Suzuki, Hideki; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2004-08-01

    A series of low-copy expression vectors that permits the stable maintenance and regulated expression of highly toxic gene products has been developed. These vectors utilize the lactose promoter/operator system, and protect against read-through transcription from other promoters on the plasmid by placement of the rrnB T1T2 terminators upstream of the lactose promoter. For additional regulatory control, the vectors utilize low-copy origins of replication. Either the pMPP6 origin (pSC101-derived) is used for cloning into Escherichia coli or related species, or the broad-host-range RK2 origin of replication is utilized for cloning into the majority of Gram-negative bacteria. The resulting plasmids have no detectable leaky expression. To test these vectors, the genes for the bacteriocidal colicins D, E3, and E7 were cloned and stably maintained in the absence of their immunity genes. Upon induction with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), cell death was observed, indicating expression of each colicin. These low-copy expression vectors will be useful for the cloning and expression of toxic genes in bacterial systems. PMID:15234522

  4. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  5. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  6. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Seaborn, Craig P.; Turney, Colin M.; Xue, Jianli; Shang, Hui; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA) has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS). In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter) transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt), and gp37). In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications). PMID:26659470

  7. Intracisternal delivery of AAV9 results in oligodendrocyte and motor neuron transduction in the whole central nervous system of cats

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, T; Dubreil, L; Colle, M-A; Maquigneau, M; Deniaud, J; Ledevin, M; Moullier, P; Joussemet, B

    2014-01-01

    Systemic and intracerebrospinal fluid delivery of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to achieve widespread gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). However, after systemic injection, the neurotropism of the vector has been reported to vary according to age at injection, with greater neuronal transduction in newborns and preferential glial cell tropism in adults. This difference has not yet been reported after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) delivery. The present study analyzed both neuronal and glial cell transduction in the CNS of cats according to age of AAV9 CSF injection. In both newborns and young cats, administration of AAV9-GFP in the cisterna magna resulted in high levels of motor neurons (MNs) transduction from the cervical (84±5%) to the lumbar (99±1%) spinal cord, demonstrating that the remarkable tropism of AAV9 for MNs is not affected by age at CSF delivery. Surprisingly, numerous oligodendrocytes were also transduced in the brain and in the spinal cord white matter of young cats, but not of neonates, indicating that (i) age of CSF delivery influences the tropism of AAV9 for glial cells and (ii) AAV9 intracisternal delivery could be relevant for both the treatment of MN and demyelinating disorders. PMID:24572783

  8. Use of intron-disrupted polyadenylation sites to enhance expression and safety of retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ismail, S I; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Uden, M

    2001-01-01

    Normal mRNA polyadenylation signals are composed of an AAUAAA motif and G/U box spaced 20 to 30 bp apart. If this spacing is increased further, then polyadenylation is disrupted. Previously it has been demonstrated that insertion of an intron will similarly disrupt this signal even though such introns are removed during a nuclear splicing reaction (X. Liu and J. Mertz, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:5256-5263, 1993). This observation has led to the suggestion that polyadenylation site selection is undertaken prior to intron excision. We now present results that both support and extend these observations and in doing so create a novel class of retroviral expression vector with improved qualities. We found that when an intron-disrupted polyadenylation signal is inserted within a retroviral expression vector, such a signal, although reformed in the producer cell, remains benign until transduction, where it is then preferentially used. Thus, we demonstrate that upon transduction these vectors now produce a majority of shortened subgenomic species and as a consequence have a reduced tendency for subsequent mobilization from transduced cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the use of this internal signal leads to enhanced expression from such vectors and that this is achieved without any loss in titer. Therefore, split polyadenylation signals confer enhanced performance and improved safety upon retroviral expression vectors into which they are inserted. Such split signals may prove useful for the future optimization of retroviral vectors in gene therapy. PMID:11119589

  9. Use of Intron-Disrupted Polyadenylation Sites To Enhance Expression and Safety of Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Said I.; Rohll, Jonathan B.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Kingsman, Alan J.; Uden, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Normal mRNA polyadenylation signals are composed of an AAUAAA motif and G/U box spaced 20 to 30 bp apart. If this spacing is increased further, then polyadenylation is disrupted. Previously it has been demonstrated that insertion of an intron will similarly disrupt this signal even though such introns are removed during a nuclear splicing reaction (X. Liu and J. Mertz, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:5256–5263, 1993). This observation has led to the suggestion that polyadenylation site selection is undertaken prior to intron excision. We now present results that both support and extend these observations and in doing so create a novel class of retroviral expression vector with improved qualities. We found that when an intron-disrupted polyadenylation signal is inserted within a retroviral expression vector, such a signal, although reformed in the producer cell, remains benign until transduction, where it is then preferentially used. Thus, we demonstrate that upon transduction these vectors now produce a majority of shortened subgenomic species and as a consequence have a reduced tendency for subsequent mobilization from transduced cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the use of this internal signal leads to enhanced expression from such vectors and that this is achieved without any loss in titer. Therefore, split polyadenylation signals confer enhanced performance and improved safety upon retroviral expression vectors into which they are inserted. Such split signals may prove useful for the future optimization of retroviral vectors in gene therapy. PMID:11119589

  10. Induction of humoral responses to BHV-1 glycoprotein D expressed by HSV-1 amplicon vectors

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Andrea Maria; Berois, Mabel Beatriz; Tomé, Lorena Magalí; Epstein, Alberto L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are versatile and useful tools for transferring genes into cells that are capable of stimulating a specific immune response to their expressed antigens. In this work, two HSV-1-derived amplicon vectors were generated. One of these expressed the full-length glycoprotein D (gD) of bovine herpesvirus 1 while the second expressed the truncated form of gD (gDtr) which lacked the trans-membrane region. After evaluating gD expression in the infected cells, the ability of both vectors to induce a specific gD immune response was tested in BALB/c mice that were intramuscularly immunized. Specific serum antibody responses were detected in mice inoculated with both vectors, and the response against truncated gD was higher than the response against full-length gD. These results reinforce previous findings that HSV-1 amplicon vectors can potentially deliver antigens to animals and highlight the prospective use of these vectors for treating infectious bovine rhinotracheitis disease. PMID:22437537

  11. [Construction of PPENK-MIDGE-NLS gene vector and the expression in rat].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xu, Xuemin; Peng, Xijuan; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Linong

    2015-02-01

    Increasing the production and secretion of endogenous opioid peptide by immune cell can significantly induce myocardial protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Gene therapy is promising to increase endogenous enkephalin (ENK). However, classical viral and plasmid vectors for gene delivery are hampered by immunogenicity, gene recombination, oncogene activation, the production of antibacterial antibody and changes in physiological gene expression. Minimalistic immunologically defined gene expression (MIDGE) can overcome all the deficients of viral and plasmid vectors. The exon of rat's preproenkephalin (PPENK) gene was amplified by PCR and the fragments were cloned into pEGFP-N1 plasmids. The recombined plasmids were digested with enzymes to obtain a linear vector contained promoter, preproenkephalin gene, RNA stable sequences and oligodesoxy nucleotides (ODNs) added to both ends of the gene vector to protect gene vector from exonuclease degradation. A nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was attached to an ODN to ensure the effective transport to the nucleus and transgene expression. Flow cytometry, laser confocal microscopy and Western blotting demonstrated that PPENK-MIDGE-NLS can transfect leukocyte of rat in vivo, increase the expression of proenkephalin (PENK) in tissue, and the transfection efficiency depends on gene vector's dosage. These results indicate that PPENK-MIDGE-NLS could be an innovative method to protect and treatment of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26062347

  12. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji . E-mail: si360405@med.shimane-u.ac.jp; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-13

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor {alpha}-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use.

  13. In silico reconstruction of the viral evolutionary lineage yields a potent gene therapy vector

    PubMed Central

    Zinn, Eric; Pacouret, Simon; Khaychuk, Vadim; Turunen, Heikki T.; Carvalho, Livia S.; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Shah, Samiksha; Shelke, Rajani; Maurer, Anna C.; Plovie, Eva; Xiao, Ru; Vandenberghe, Luk H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have emerged as a gene delivery platform with demonstrated safety and efficacy in a handful of clinical trials for monogenic disorders. However, limitations of the current generation vectors often prevent broader application of AAV gene therapy. Efforts to engineer AAV have been hampered by a limited understanding of the structure-function relationship of the complex multimeric icosahedral architecture of the particle. To develop additional reagents pertinent to furt