Science.gov

Sample records for aav-mediated gene delivery

  1. AAV-mediated gene delivery attenuates neuroinflammation in feline Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Allison M; Peterson, Tiffany A; Gross, Amanda L; Wells, Stephen Z; McCurdy, Victoria J; Wolfe, Karen G; Dennis, John C; Brunson, Brandon L; Gray-Edwards, Heather; Randle, Ashley N; Johnson, Aime K; Morrison, Edward E; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2017-01-06

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the absence of hydrolytic enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), which results in storage of GM2 ganglioside in neurons and unremitting neurodegeneration. Neuron loss initially affects fine motor skills, but rapidly progresses to loss of all body faculties, a vegetative state, and death by five years of age in humans. A well-established feline model of SD allows characterization of the disease in a large animal model and provides a means to test the safety and efficacy of therapeutic interventions before initiating clinical trials. In this study, we demonstrate a robust central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory response in feline SD, primarily marked by expansion and activation of the microglial cell population. Quantification of major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) labeling revealed significant up-regulation throughout the CNS with areas rich in white matter most severely affected. Expression of the leukocyte chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α) was also up-regulated in the brain. SD cats were treated with intracranial delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing feline Hex, with a study endpoint 16weeks post treatment. AAV-mediated gene delivery repressed the expansion and activation of microglia and normalized MHC-II and MIP-1α levels. These data reiterate the profound inflammatory response in SD and show that neuroinflammation is abrogated after AAV-mediated restoration of enzymatic activity.

  2. AAV-mediated gene delivery of BDNF or GDNF is neuroprotective in a model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kells, Adrian P; Fong, Dahna M; Dragunow, Mike; During, Matthew J; Young, Deborah; Connor, Bronwen

    2004-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that results in the progressive loss of GABAergic medium spiny projection neurons in the striatum. Neurotrophic factors have demonstrated neuroprotective actions on striatal neurons, suggesting that increased neurotrophic factor expression may prevent or reduce neuronal loss in the HD brain. We investigated whether enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), achieved by adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene delivery, could protect striatal neurons in the quinolinic acid (QA) rodent model of HD. Adult Wistar rats received unilateral intrastriatal injections of AAV-BDNF, AAV-GDNF, AAV-GFP, or PBS. Three weeks later, the rats were lesioned with QA, a toxin that induces striatal neuron death by an excitotoxic process. Both AAV-BDNF and AAV-GDNF significantly reduced the loss of both NeuN- and calbindin-immunopositive striatal neurons 2 weeks after lesion compared to controls. AAV-BDNF also provided significant neurotrophic support to NOS-immunopositive striatal interneurons, while AAV-GDNF-treated rats demonstrated significant protection of parvalbumin-immunopositive striatal interneurons compared to controls. These results indicate that AAV-mediated gene transfer of BDNF or GDNF into the striatum provides neuronal protection in a rodent model of HD.

  3. Evaluation of lateral spread of transgene expression following subretinal AAV-mediated gene delivery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bruewer, Ashlee R; Mowat, Freya M; Bartoe, Joshua T; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Dog models with spontaneously occurring mutations in retinal dystrophy genes are an invaluable resource for preclinical development of retinal gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been most successful; to target the outer retina and RPE they are delivered by subretinal injection, causing a temporary retinal detachment with some potential for retinal morbidity. A recent reporter gene study using an AAV2/8 vector in dogs reported transgene expression beyond the boundary of the subretinal bleb. This could be a desirable feature which increases the area of retina treated while minimizing the retinal detachment and any associated morbidity. We performed a detailed study of the lateral spread of transgene expression beyond the subretinal injection site following subretinally delivered AAV vectors in normal dogs. Vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) using a small chicken beta-actin promoter. AAV2/2 (quadruple tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant), self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 (single Y-F capsid mutant) and a scAAV2/5 were used. We found that in all eyes GFP expression involved retina beyond the initial post-injection subretinal bleb boundary. In all eyes there was post-injection spread of the retinal detachment within the first 3 days post procedure and prior to retinal reattachment. In 11/16 eyes this accounted for the entire "lateral spread" of GFP expression while in 5/16 eyes a very slight extension of GFP expression beyond the final boundary of the subretinal bleb could be detected. All 3 AAV constructs induced GFP expression in the nerve fiber layer with spread to the optic nerve. Patients treated by subretinal injection should be monitored for possible expansion of the subretinal injection bleb prior to reattachment. Injections in the para-foveal region may expand to lead to a foveal detachment that may be undesirable. Cell-specific promoters may be required to limit spread of expressed transgene to the brain with these

  4. AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H

    2016-01-01

    Transferring genetic molecules into the peripheral sensory nervous system to manipulate nociceptive pathophysiology is a powerful approach for experimental modulation of sensory signaling and potentially for translation into therapy for chronic pain. This can be efficiently achieved by the use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in conjunction with nociceptor-specific regulatory transgene cassettes. Among different routes of delivery, direct injection into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the most efficient AAV-mediated gene transfer selectively into the peripheral sensory nervous system. Here, we briefly discuss the advantages and applications of intraganglionic microinjection, and then provide a detailed approach for DRG injection, including a list of the necessary materials and description of a method for performing DRG microinjection experiments. We also discuss our experience with several adeno-associated virus (AAV) options for in vivo transgene expression in DRG neurons.

  5. AAV-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Couto, Linda B; Pierce, Glenn F

    2003-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia has been contemplated since the coagulation Factor genes responsible for the disease were cloned 20 years ago. Multiple approaches towards the delivery of Factors VIII or IX, the defective genes in the most common forms of hemophilia, have resulted in positive results in animals, and largely equivocal results in human clinical testing. Use of vectors based on adeno-associated virus has led to robust and sustained cures in hemophilic mice and dogs, and intriguing preliminary results in small or ongoing clinical trials. As more clinical experience is gained, solving delivery issues will be of paramount importance and will lead to more clinical success. This success will permit hemophilia to be cured following a single injection of the normal gene.

  6. Efficiency and Safety of AAV-Mediated Gene Delivery of the Human ND4 Complex I Subunit in the Mouse Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Guy, John; Qi, Xiaoping; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Arguello, Tania; Chou, Tsung-Han; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Lewin, Alfred S.; Hauswirth, William W.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the efficiency and safety of AAV-mediated gene delivery of a normal human ND4 complex I subunit in the mouse visual system. METHODS A nuclear encoded human ND4 subunit fused to the ATPc mitochondrial targeting sequence and FLAG epitope were packaged in AAV2 capsids that were injected into the right eyes of mice. AAV-GFP was injected into the left eyes. One month later, pattern electroretinography (PERG), rate of ATP synthesis, gene expression, and incorporation of the human ND4 subunit into the murine complex I were evaluated. Quantitative analysis of ND4FLAG-injected eyes was assessed compared with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-injected eyes. RESULTS Rates of ATP synthesis and PERG amplitudes were similar in ND4FLAG- and GFP-inoculated eyes. PERG latency was shorter in eyes that received ND4FLAG. Immunoprecipitated murine complex I gave the expected 52-kDa band of processed human ND4FLAG. Confocal microscopy revealed perinuclear expression of FLAG colocalized with mitochondria-specific fluorescent dye. Transmission electron microscopy revealed FLAG immunogold within mitochondria. Compared with Thy1.2-positive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), quantification was 38% for FLAG-positive RGCs and 65% for GFP-positive RGCs. Thy1.2 positive-RGC counts in AAV-ND4FLAG were similar to counts in control eyes injected with AAV-GFP. CONCLUSIONS Human ND4 was properly processed and imported into the mitochondria of RGCs and axons of mouse optic nerve after intravitreal injection. Although it had approximately two-thirds the efficiency of GFP, the expression of normal human ND4 in murine mitochondria did not induce the loss of RGCs, ATP synthesis, or PERG amplitude, suggesting that allotopic ND4 may be safe for the treatment of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. PMID:19387075

  7. AAV-Mediated Gene Delivery in a Feline Model of Sandhoff Disease Corrects Lysosomal Storage in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Hannah E.; McCurdy, Victoria J.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Wilson, Diane U.; Johnson, Aime K.; Randle, Ashley N.; Bradbury, Allison M.; Gray-Edwards, Heather L.; Baker, Henry J.; Hudson, Judith A.; Cox, Nancy R.; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), resulting in the inability to catabolize ganglioside GM2 within the lysosomes. SD presents with an accumulation of GM2 and its asialo derivative GA2, primarily in the central nervous system. Myelin-enriched glycolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, are also decreased in SD corresponding with dysmyelination. At present, no treatment exists for SD. Previous studies have shown the therapeutic benefit of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy in the treatment of SD in murine and feline models. In this study, we treated presymptomatic SD cats with AAVrh8 vectors expressing feline Hex in the thalamus combined with intracerebroventricular (Thal/ICV) injections. Treated animals showed clearly improved neurologic function and quality of life, manifested in part by prevention or attenuation of whole-body tremors characteristic of untreated animals. Hex activity was significantly elevated, whereas storage of GM2 and GA2 was significantly decreased in tissue samples taken from the cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, and cervical spinal cord. Treatment also increased levels of myelin-enriched cerebrosides and sulfatides in the cortex and thalamus. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of AAV for feline SD and suggests a similar potential for human SD patients. PMID:25873306

  8. AAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal disorders in large animal models.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Lhériteau, Elsa; Lhéariteau, Elsa; Moullier, Phillip; Rolling, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of inherited and noninherited blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. The most widely used vectors for ocular gene delivery are based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) because they elicit minimal immune responses and mediated long-term transgene expression in a variety of retinal cell types. Extensive preclinical evaluation of new strategies in large animal models is key to the development of successful gene-based therapies for the retina. Because of differences in the retinal structures among species and unique structures such as the macula and fovea in the primate retina, nonhuman primates are widely used as preclinical animal models. But the observation of inherited retinal degenerations in dogs, which share a number of clinical and pathologic similarities with humans, has led to the characterization of several canine models for retinal diseases, one of which has already responded successfully to AAV-mediated gene therapy. This article presents a review and detailed discussion of the various large animal models available for the study of AAV-mediated gene-based therapies in the retina.

  9. Induction and prevention of severe hyperammonemia in the spfash mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency using shRNA and rAAV-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Sharon C; Kok, Cindy Y; Dane, Allison P; Carpenter, Kevin; Kizana, Eddy; Kuchel, Philip W; Alexander, Ian E

    2011-05-01

    Urea cycle defects presenting early in life with hyperammonemia remain difficult to treat and commonly necessitate liver transplantation. Gene therapy has the potential to prevent hyperammonemic episodes while awaiting liver transplantation, and possibly also to avert the need for transplantation altogether. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, the most prevalent urea cycle disorder, provides an ideal model for the development of liver-targeted gene therapy. While we and others have successfully cured the spf(ash) mouse model of OTC deficiency using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, a major limitation of this model is the presence of residual OTC enzymatic activity which confers a mild phenotype without clinically significant hyperammonemia. To better model severe disease we devised a strategy involving AAV2/8-mediated delivery of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to specifically knockdown residual endogenous OTC messenger RNA (mRNA). This strategy proved highly successful with vector-treated mice developing severe hyperammonemia and associated neurological impairment. Using this system, we showed that the dose of an AAV rescue construct encoding the murine OTC (mOTC) cDNA required to prevent hyperammonemia is fivefold lower than that required to control orotic aciduria. This result is favorable for clinical translation as it indicates that the threshold for therapeutic benefit is likely to be lower than indicated by earlier studies.

  10. Recombinant AAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina: gene therapy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rolling, F

    2004-10-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as retinal macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa constitute a broad group of diseases that all share one critical feature, the progressive apoptotic loss of cells in the retina. There is currently no effective treatment available by which the course of these disorders can be modified, and visual dysfunction often progresses to total blindness. Gene therapy represents an attractive approach to treating retinal degeneration because the eye is easily accessible and allows local application of therapeutic vectors with reduced risk of systemic effects. Furthermore, transgene expression within the retina and effects of treatments may be monitored by a variety of noninvasive examinations. An increasing number of strategies for molecular treatment of retinal disease rely on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a therapeutic gene delivery vector. Before rAAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal degeneration becomes a reality, there are a number of important requirements that include: (1) evaluation of different rAAV serotypes, (2) screening of vectors in large animals in order to ensure that they mediate safe and long-term gene expression, (3) appropriate regulation of therapeutic gene expression, (4) evaluation of vectors carrying a therapeutic gene in relevant animal models, (5) identification of suitable patients, and finally (6) manufacture of clinical grade vector. All these steps towards gene therapy are still being explored. Outcomes of these studies will be discussed in the order in which they occur, from vector studies to preclinical assessment of the therapeutic potential of rAAV in animal models of retinal degeneration.

  11. Triptolide T10 enhances AAV-mediated gene transfer in mice striatum.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xinmiao; Zhang, Ting; Hu, Jing; Ding, Wei; Wang, Xiaomin

    2010-08-02

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated gene transfer has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). Triptolide T10 is a monomeric compound isolated from tripterygium wilfordii Hook.f. (Thunder God vine), a traditional Chinese herb for anti-inflammatory medications. In the present study, we co-administered T10 with recombinant AAV2 in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and in the striatum of C57BL/6 mice, and then evaluated the AAV-mediated gene expression levels. The results have shown that T10 significantly augmented the expression of AAV-mediated gene in a dose-dependent fashion without detectable cytotoxicity. As growing evidence indicated that inflammation contributed to the progression of PD, and the anti-inflammatory effect of T10 was shown in our previous studies, our data of T10 to enhance AAV transduction suggest that T10 might be potentially used as a facilitating reagent for the AAV gene therapy applications in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. AAV-Mediated Liver-Directed Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is directly or indirectly involved in many essential processes and is affected by numerous inherited diseases. Therefore, many inherited diseases could be effectively treated by targeting the liver using gene transfer approaches. The challenges associated with liver-directed gene therapy are efficient targeting of hepatocytes, stability of the vector genome, and persistent high level expression. Many of these obstacles can be overcome with adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer vectors. The first AAV gene transfer vector developed for in vivo use was based on the AAV2 serotype. AAV2 has a broad tropism and transduces many cell types, including hepatocytes, relatively efficiently in vivo. The capsid protein confers the serological profile and at least 12 primate AAV serotypes have already been characterized. Importantly, pseudotyping a recombinant AAV vector with different capsid proteins can dramatically alter the tropism. Both AAV8 and AAV9 have higher affinities for hepatocytes when compared to AAV2. In particular, AAV8 can transduce 3–4 fold more hepatocytes and deliver 3–4 fold more genomes per transduced cell when compared to AAV2. Depending on the dose, AAV8 can transduce up to 90–95% of hepatocytes in the mouse liver following intraportal vein injection. Interestingly, comparable levels of transduction can be achieved following intravenous injection. Direct intraparenchymal injection of an AAV vector also mediates relatively high level long term expression. Additional specificity can be conferred by using liver-specific promoters in conjunction with AAV8 capsid proteins. In addition to treating primary hepatocyte defects, immune reactions to transgene products can be minimized by circumventing the fixed tissue macrophages of the liver, Kupffer cells, and limiting expression to hepatocytes. The ability to target hepatocytes by virtue of the AAV serotype and the use of liver-specific promoters allows investigators to test novel therapeutic

  13. Immunology of AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Keirnan; Bennett, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The eye has been at the forefront of translational gene therapy largely owing to suitable disease targets, anatomic accessibility, and well-studied immunologic privilege. These advantages have fostered research culminating in several clinical trials and adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the vector of choice for many ocular therapies. Pre-clinical and clinical investigations have assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses to a variety of naturally occurring and engineered AAV serotypes as well as their delivered transgenes and these data have been correlated to potential clinical sequelae. Encouragingly, AAV appears safe and effective with clinical follow-up surpassing 5 years in some studies. As disease targets continue to expand for AAV in the eye, thorough and deliberate assessment of immunologic safety is critical. With careful study, the development of these technologies should concurrently inform the biology of the ocular immune response. PMID:24009613

  14. Outer Plexiform Layer Structures Are Not Altered Following AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in Healthy Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Giers, Bert C.; Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Isiegas, Carolina; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2017-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy approaches have been developed for a variety of different diseases. In particular, clinical gene therapy trials for RPE65 mutations, X-linked retinoschisis, and choroideremia have been conducted at different centers in recent years, showing that adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is safe, but limitations exist as to the therapeutic benefit and long-term duration of the treatment. The technique of vector delivery to retinal cells relies on subretinal injection of the vector solution, causing a transient retinal detachment. Although retinal detachments are known to cause remodeling of retinal neuronal structures as well as significant cell loss, the possible effects of this short-term therapeutic retinal detachment on retinal structure and circuitry have not yet been studied in detail. In this study, retinal morphology and apoptotic status were examined in healthy rat retinas following AAV-mediated gene transfer via subretinal injection with AAV2/5.CMV.d2GFP or sham injection with fluorescein. Outer plexiform layer (OPL) morphology was assessed by immunohistochemical labeling, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and electron microscopy. The number of synaptic contacts in the OPL was quantified after labeling with structural markers. To assess the apoptotic status, inflammatory and pro-apoptotic markers were tested and TUNEL assay for the detection of apoptotic nuclei was performed. Pre- and postsynaptic structures in the OPL, such as synaptic ribbons or horizontal and bipolar cell processes, did not differ in size or shape in injected versus non-injected areas and control retinas. Absolute numbers of synaptic ribbons were not altered. No signs of relevant gliosis were detected. TUNEL labeling of retinal cells did not vary between injected and non-injected areas, and apoptosis-inducing factor was not delocalized to the nucleus in transduced areas. The neuronal circuits in the OPL of healthy rat retinas undergoing AAV-mediated gene

  15. Outer Plexiform Layer Structures Are Not Altered Following AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in Healthy Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Giers, Bert C; Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Isiegas, Carolina; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2017-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy approaches have been developed for a variety of different diseases. In particular, clinical gene therapy trials for RPE65 mutations, X-linked retinoschisis, and choroideremia have been conducted at different centers in recent years, showing that adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is safe, but limitations exist as to the therapeutic benefit and long-term duration of the treatment. The technique of vector delivery to retinal cells relies on subretinal injection of the vector solution, causing a transient retinal detachment. Although retinal detachments are known to cause remodeling of retinal neuronal structures as well as significant cell loss, the possible effects of this short-term therapeutic retinal detachment on retinal structure and circuitry have not yet been studied in detail. In this study, retinal morphology and apoptotic status were examined in healthy rat retinas following AAV-mediated gene transfer via subretinal injection with AAV2/5.CMV.d2GFP or sham injection with fluorescein. Outer plexiform layer (OPL) morphology was assessed by immunohistochemical labeling, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and electron microscopy. The number of synaptic contacts in the OPL was quantified after labeling with structural markers. To assess the apoptotic status, inflammatory and pro-apoptotic markers were tested and TUNEL assay for the detection of apoptotic nuclei was performed. Pre- and postsynaptic structures in the OPL, such as synaptic ribbons or horizontal and bipolar cell processes, did not differ in size or shape in injected versus non-injected areas and control retinas. Absolute numbers of synaptic ribbons were not altered. No signs of relevant gliosis were detected. TUNEL labeling of retinal cells did not vary between injected and non-injected areas, and apoptosis-inducing factor was not delocalized to the nucleus in transduced areas. The neuronal circuits in the OPL of healthy rat retinas undergoing AAV-mediated gene

  16. A novel needleless liquid jet injection methodology for improving direct cardiac gene delivery: An optimization of parameters, AAV mediated therapy and investigation of host responses in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargnoli, Anthony Samuel

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with 22 million new patients diagnosed annually. Essentially, all present therapies have significant cost burden to the healthcare system, yet fail to increase survival rates. One key employed strategy is the genetic reprogramming of cells to increase contractility via gene therapy, which has advanced to Phase IIb Clinical Trials for advanced heart failure patients. It has been argued that the most significant barrier preventing FDA approval are resolving problems with safe, efficient myocardial delivery, whereby direct injection in the infarct and remote tissue areas is not clinically feasible. Here, we aim to: (1) Improve direct cardiac gene delivery through the development of a novel liquid jet device approach (2) Compare the new method against traditional IM injection with two different vector constructions and evaluate outcome (3) Evaluate the host response resulting from both modes of direct cardiac injection, then advance a drug/gene combination with controlled release nanoparticle formulations.

  17. AAV-mediated delivery of optogenetic constructs to the macaque brain triggers humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Skyler D; El-Shamayleh, Yasmine; Horwitz, Gregory D

    2017-02-15

    Gene delivery to the primate central nervous system via recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) allows neurophysiologists to control and observe neural activity precisely. A current limitation of this approach is variability in vector transduction efficiency. Low levels of transduction can foil experimental manipulations, prompting vector readministration. The ability to make multiple vector injections into the same animal, even in cases where successful vector transduction has already been achieved, is also desirable. However, vector readministration has consequences for humoral immunity and gene delivery that depend on vector dosage and route of administration in complex ways. As part of optogenetic experiments in rhesus monkeys, we analyzed blood sera collected before and after AAV injections into the brain and quantified neutralizing antibodies to AAV using an in vitro assay. We found that injections of AAV1 and AAV9 vectors elevated neutralizing antibody titers consistently. These immune responses were specific to the serotype injected and were long lasting. These results demonstrate that optogenetic manipulations in monkeys trigger immune responses to AAV capsids, suggesting that vector readministration may have a higher likelihood of success by avoiding serotypes injected previously.

  18. rAAV-mediated delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes neurite outgrowth and protects neurodegeneration in focal ischemic model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Yu, Zhigang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zichao; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Luran; Zhao, Jiexu

    2011-06-20

    Stroke is one of the neurological diseases which lead to permanently neuronal damage after temporary or long-term occlusion of vessels or after heart attack. However, there are few efficient strategies to prevent or treat this kind of insult in clinical because the consequence is irreversible and could be long-lasting after the onset of stroke. Gene therapy especially using viral system has long been addressed to be of great potential to reduce the damage. Here, we generated recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Cells infected with rAAV-BDNF could be able to produce functional BDNF which promoted neurite outgrowth and protected neurons from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Further more, single injection of rAAV showed neuroprotection against cell death in focal ischemic model. These results showed that rAAV-mediated gene delivery is functional, which shed light to the future application of viral system-based gene therapy in clinical.

  19. Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Mediated Dystrophin Gene Transfer Studies and Exon Skipping Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Kawecka, Klaudia; Theodoulides, Michael; Hasoglu, Yalin; Jarmin, Susan; Kymalainen, Hanna; Le-Heron, Anita; Popplewell, Linda; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Athanasopoulos, Takis

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked inherited musclewasting disease primarily affecting young boys with prevalence of between1:3,500- 1:5,000, is a rare genetic disease caused by defects in the gene for dystrophin. Dystrophin protein is critical to the stability of myofibers in skeletal and cardiac muscle. There is currently no cure available to ameliorate DMD and/or its patho-physiology. A number of therapeutic strategies including molecular-based therapeutics that replace or correct the missing or nonfunctional dystrophin protein have been devised to correct the patho-physiological consequences induced by dystrophin absence. We will review the current in vivo experimentation status (including preclinical models and clinical trials) for two of these approaches, namely: 1) Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated (micro) dystrophin gene augmentation/ supplementation and 2) Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping strategies.

  20. Modulation of tolerance to the transgene product in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-mediated gene transfer to liver.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Hasbrouck, Nicole C; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Edmonson, Shyrie A; Hui, Daniel J; Sabatino, Denise E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A

    2007-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer of factor IX (F.IX) to the liver results in long-term expression of transgene in experimental animals, but only short-term expression in humans. Loss of F.IX expression is likely due to a cytotoxic immune response to the AAV capsid, which results in clearance of transduced hepatocytes. We used a nonhuman primate model to assess the safety of AAV gene transfer coupled with an anti-T-cell regimen designed to block this immune response. Administration of a 3-drug regimen consisting of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), sirolimus, and the anti-IL-2 receptor antibody daclizumab consistently resulted in formation of inhibitory antibodies to human F.IX following hepatic artery administration of an AAV-hF.IX vector, whereas a 2-drug regimen consisting only of MMF and sirolimus did not. Administration of daclizumab was accompanied by a dramatic drop in the population of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that choice of immunosuppression (IS) regimen can modulate immune responses to the transgene product upon hepatic gene transfer in subjects not fully tolerant; and that induction of transgene tolerance may depend on a population of antigen-specific Tregs.

  1. Long-term Amelioration of Feline Mucopolysaccharidosis VI After AAV-mediated Liver Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Cotugno, Gabriella; Annunziata, Patrizia; Tessitore, Alessandra; O'Malley, Thomas; Capalbo, Anita; Faella, Armida; Bartolomeo, Rosa; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Russo, Fabio; Sleeper, Meg M; Knox, Van W; Fernandez, Steven; Levanduski, Leah; Hopwood, John; De Leonibus, Elvira; Haskins, Mark; Auricchio, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is caused by deficient arylsulfatase B (ARSB) activity resulting in lysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). MPS VI is characterized by dysostosis multiplex, organomegaly, corneal clouding, and heart valve thickening. Gene transfer to a factory organ like liver may provide a lifetime source of secreted ARSB. We show that intravascular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) 2/8-TBG-felineARSB in MPS VI cats resulted in ARSB expression up to 1 year, the last time point of the study. In newborn cats, normal circulating ARSB activity was achieved following delivery of high vector doses (6 × 1013 genome copies (gc)/kg) whereas delivery of AAV2/8 vector doses as low as 2 × 1012 gc/kg resulted in higher than normal serum ARSB levels in juvenile MPS VI cats. In MPS VI cats showing high serum ARSB levels, independent of the age at treatment, we observed: (i) clearance of GAG storage, (ii) improvement of long bone length, (iii) reduction of heart valve thickness, and (iv) improvement in spontaneous mobility. Thus, AAV2/ 8-mediated liver gene transfer represents a promising therapeutic strategy for MPS VI patients. PMID:21119624

  2. The AAV-mediated and RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system for gene therapy of DMD and BMD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Wu, Peng; Shi, Zhi-Min; Xu, Yan-Li; Liu, Zhi-Jun

    2017-04-05

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (Dmd) result in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), which afflict many newborn boys. In 2016, Brain and Development published several interesting articles on DMD treatment with antisense oligonucleotide, kinase inhibitor, and prednisolone. Even more strikingly, three articles in the issue 6271 of Science in 2016 provide new insights into gene therapy of DMD and BMD via the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9). In brief, adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors transport guided RNAs (gRNAs) and Cas9 into mdx mouse model, gRNAs recognize the mutated Dmd exon 23 (having a stop codon), and Cas9 cut the mutated exon 23 off the Dmd gene. These manipulations restored expression of truncated but partially functional dystrophin, improved skeletal and cardiac muscle function, and increased survival of mdx mice significantly. This review concisely summarized the related advancements and discussed their primary implications in the future gene therapy of DMD, including AAV-vector selection, gRNA designing, Cas9 optimization, dystrophin-restoration efficiency, administration routes, and systemic and long-term therapeutic efficacy. Future orientations, including off-target effects, safety concerns, immune responses, precision medicine, and Dmd-editing in the brain (potentially blocked by the blood-brain barrier) were also elucidated briefly. Collectively, the AAV-mediated and RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has major superiorities compared with traditional gene therapy, and might contribute to the treatment of DMD and BMD substantially in the near future.

  3. AAV-mediated gene transfer of the obesity-associated gene Etv5 in rat midbrain does not affect energy balance or motivated behavior.

    PubMed

    Boender, Arjen J; Koning, Nivard A; van den Heuvel, José K; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; van Rozen, Andrea J; la Fleur, Susanne E; Adan, Roger A H

    2014-01-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have implicated the transcription factor E-twenty- six version 5 (Etv5) in the regulation of body mass index. Further substantiating the role of Etv5 in feeding behavior are the findings that targeted disruption of Etv5 in mice leads to decreased body weight gain and that expression of Etv5 is decreased in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNpc) after food restriction. As Etv5 has been suggested to influence dopaminergic neurotransmission by driving the expression of genes that are responsible for the synthesis and release of dopamine, we investigated if expression levels of Etv5 are dependent on nutritional state and subsequently influence the expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase. While it was shown that Etv5 expression in the VTA/SNpc increases after central administration of leptin and that Etv5 was able to drive expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vitro, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 into the VTA/SNpc of rats did not alter expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vivo. Moreover, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc did not affect measures of energy balance or performances in a progressive ratio schedule. Thus, these data do not support a role for increased expression of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc in the regulation of feeding behavior.

  4. The treatment of hemophilia A: from protein replacement to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Youjin, Shen; Jun, Yin

    2009-03-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is an essential component in blood coagulation, a deficiency of which causes the serious bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Recently, with the development of purification level and recombinant techniques, protein replacement treatment to hemophiliacs is relatively safe and can prolong their life expectancy. However, because of the possibility of unknown contaminants in plasma-derived FVIII and recombinant FVIII, and high cost for hemophiliacs to use these products, gene therapy for hemophilia A is an attractive alternative to protein replacement therapy. Thus far, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy. Further improvement of the virus for clinical application depends on better understanding of the molecular structure and fate of the vector genome. It is likely that hemophilia will be the first genetic disease to be cured by somatic cell gene therapy.

  5. AAV-mediated Gene Therapy Halts Retinal Degeneration in PDE6β-deficient Dogs.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Hulin, Philippe; Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Biget, Marine; Ameline, Baptiste; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that subretinal injection of AAV2/5 RK.cpde6β allowed long-term preservation of photoreceptor function and vision in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency. The present study builds on these earlier findings to provide a detailed assessment of the long-term effects of gene therapy on the spatiotemporal pattern of retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs treated at 20 days of age. We analyzed the density distribution of the retinal layers and of particular photoreceptor cells in 3.5-year-old treated and untreated rcd1 dogs. Whereas no rods were observed outside the bleb or in untreated eyes, gene transfer halted rod degeneration in all vector-exposed regions. Moreover, while gene therapy resulted in the preservation of cones, glial cells and both the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers, no cells remained in vector-unexposed retinas, except in the visual streak. Finally, the retinal structure of treated 3.5-year-old rcd1 dogs was identical to that of unaffected 4-month-old rcd1 dogs, indicating near complete preservation. Our findings indicate that gene therapy arrests the degenerative process even if intervention is initiated after the onset of photoreceptor degeneration, and point to significant potential of this therapeutic approach in future clinical trials.

  6. Mitigation of cerebellar neuropathy in globoid cell leukodystrophy mice by AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Lee, Allan Yueh-Luen; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Hsu, Jui-Cheng; Huang, Zon-Darr; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Ming-Fu

    2015-10-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The absence of GALC activity leads to the accumulation of the toxic substance psychosine and the preferential loss of myelinating cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Profound demyelination, astrogliosis and axonopathy are the hallmarks of the pathogenesis of GLD, and cerebellar ataxia is one of the dominant manifestations in adolescents and adults affected with GLD. To date, studies regarding cerebellar degeneration in GLD are limited. In this study, the efficacy of cerebellum-targeted gene therapy on the cerebellar neuropathology in twitcher mice (a murine model of GLD) has been validated. We observed degeneration of Purkinje cells, Bergmann glia, and granule cells in addition to astrocytosis and demyelination in the cerebellum of the twitcher mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dark cell degeneration and disintegration of the cellular composition of Purkinje cells in untreated twitcher mice. In addition, the expressions of neurotrophic factors CNTF, GDNF and IGF-I were up-regulated and the expression of BDNF was down-regulated. Intracerebellar-mediated gene therapy efficiently corrected enzymatic deficiency by direct transduction to Purkinje cells and cross-correction in other cell types in the cerebellum, leading to the amelioration of both neuroinflammation and demyelination. The population, dendritic territory, and axonal processes of Purkinje cells remained normal in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, where radial fibers of Bergmann glia spanned the molecular layer and collateral branches ensheathed the dendritic processes of Purkinje cells. Moreover, the aberrant expressions of neurotrophic factors were mitigated in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, indicating the preservation of cellular function in addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture. The life span of the

  7. Systemic Correction of Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV by an AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Zhang, Quan; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yang, Chunyu; Thurberg, Beth L; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-11-10

    Deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) causes glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV), which is characterized by the accumulation of a less branched, poorly soluble form of glycogen called polyglucosan (PG) in multiple tissues. This study evaluates the efficacy of gene therapy with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector in a mouse model of adult form of GSD IV (Gbe1(ys/ys)). An AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) vector containing a human GBE expression cassette (AAV-GBE) was intravenously injected into 14-day-old Gbe1(ys/ys) mice at a dose of 5 × 10(11) vector genomes per mouse. Mice were euthanized at 3 and 9 months of age. In the AAV-treated mice at 3 months of age, GBE enzyme activity was highly elevated in heart, which is consistent with the high copy number of the viral vector genome detected. GBE activity also increased significantly in skeletal muscles and the brain, but not in the liver. The glycogen content was reduced to wild-type levels in muscles and significantly reduced in the liver and brain. At 9 months of age, though GBE activity was only significantly elevated in the heart, glycogen levels were significantly reduced in the liver, brain, and skeletal muscles of the AAV-treated mice. In addition, the AAV treatment resulted in an overall decrease in plasma activities of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and creatine kinase, and a significant increase in fasting plasma glucose concentration at 9 months of age. This suggests an alleviation of damage and improvement of function in the liver and muscles by the AAV treatment. This study demonstrated a long-term benefit of a systemic injection of an AAV-GBE vector in Gbe1(ys/ys) mice.

  8. Recent tissue engineering-based advances for effective rAAV-mediated gene transfer in the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-04-01

    Musculoskeletal tissues are diverse and significantly different in their ability to repair upon injury. Current treatments often fail to reproduce the natural functions of the native tissue, leading to an imperfect healing. Gene therapy might improve the repair of tissues by providing a temporarily and spatially defined expression of the therapeutic gene(s) at the site of the injury. Several gene transfer vehicles have been developed to modify various human cells and tissues from musculoskeletal system among which the non-pathogenic, effective, and relatively safe recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors that have emerged as the preferred gene delivery system to treat human disorders. Adapting tissue engineering platforms to gene transfer approaches mediated by rAAV vectors is an attractive tool to circumvent both the limitations of the current therapeutic options to promote an effective healing of the tissue and the natural obstacles from these clinically adapted vectors to achieve an efficient and durable gene expression of the therapeutic sequences within the lesions.

  9. Safety and efficacy of AAV-mediated calpain 3 gene transfer in a mouse model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Marc; Roudaut, Carinne; Martin, Samia; Fougerousse, Françoise; Suel, Laurence; Poupiot, Jérôme; Gicquel, Evelyne; Noulet, Fanny; Danos, Olivier; Richard, Isabelle

    2006-02-01

    Calpainopathy (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, LGMD2A) is a recessive muscular disorder caused by deficiency in the calcium-dependent cysteine protease calpain 3. To date, no treatment exists for this disease. We evaluated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors for gene therapy in a murine model for LGMD2A. To drive the expression of calpain 3, we used rAAV2/1 pseudotyped vectors and muscle-specific promoters to avoid calpain 3 cell toxicity. We report efficient and stable transgene expression in muscle with restoration of the proteolytic activity and without evident toxicity. In addition, calpain 3 was correctly targeted to the sarcomere. Moreover, its presence resulted in improvement of the histological features and in therapeutic efficacy at the physiological levels, including correction of atrophy and full rescue of the contractile force deficits. Our results establish the feasibility of AAV-mediated calpain 3 gene transfer as a therapeutic approach.

  10. AAV-Mediated Clarin-1 Expression in the Mouse Retina: Implications for USH3A Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dinculescu, Astra; Stupay, Rachel M; Deng, Wen-Tao; Dyka, Frank M; Min, Seok-Hong; Boye, Sanford L; Chiodo, Vince A; Abrahan, Carolina E; Zhu, Ping; Li, Qiuhong; Strettoi, Enrica; Novelli, Elena; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W Clay; Hauswirth, William W

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3A) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in clarin-1 (CLRN1) gene, leading to progressive retinal degeneration and sensorineural deafness. Efforts to develop therapies for preventing photoreceptor cell loss are hampered by the lack of a retinal phenotype in the existing USH3 mouse models and by conflicting reports regarding the endogenous retinal localization of clarin-1, a transmembrane protein of unknown function. In this study, we used an AAV-based approach to express CLRN1 in the mouse retina in order to determine the pattern of its subcellular localization in different cell types. We found that all major classes of retinal cells express AAV-delivered CLRN1 driven by the ubiquitous, constitutive small chicken β-actin promoter, which has important implications for the design of future USH3 gene therapy studies. Within photoreceptor cells, AAV-expressed CLRN1 is mainly localized at the inner segment region and outer plexiform layer, similar to the endogenous expression of other usher proteins. Subretinal delivery using a full strength viral titer led to significant loss of retinal function as evidenced by ERG analysis, suggesting that there is a critical limit for CLRN1 expression in photoreceptor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CLRN1 expression is potentially supported by a variety of retinal cells, and the right combination of AAV vector dose, promoter, and delivery method needs to be selected to develop safe therapies for USH3 disorder.

  11. Long-term restoration of rod and cone vision by single dose rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina in a canine model of childhood blindness.

    PubMed

    Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2005-12-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations.

  12. Long-Term Restoration of Rod and Cone Vision by Single Dose rAAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to the Retina in a Canine Model of Childhood Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Maguire, Albert M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2010-01-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. PMID:16226919

  13. Unique Roles of TLR9- and MyD88-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Adaptive Immune Responses to AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Suzuki, Masataka; Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Morel, Laurence M; Lee, Brendan; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-01-01

    The immune system represents a significant barrier to successful gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. In particular, adaptive immune responses to the viral capsid or the transgene product are of concern. The sensing of AAV by toll-like receptors (TLRs) TLR2 and TLR9 has been suggested to play a role in innate immunity to the virus and may also shape subsequent adaptive immune responses. Here, we investigated the functions of TLR2, TLR9 and the downstream signaling adaptor MyD88 in antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses. Antibody formation against the transgene product occurred largely independently of TLR signaling following gene transfer with AAV1 or AAV2 vectors, whereas loss of signaling through the TLR9-MyD88 pathway substantially reduced CD8+ T-cell responses. In contrast, MyD88 (but neither of the TLRs) regulated antibody responses to capsid. B cell-intrinsic MyD88 was required for the formation of anti-capsid IgG2c independently of vector serotype or route of administration. However, MyD88(-/-) mice instead produced anti-capsid IgG1 that emerged with delayed kinetics but nonetheless completely prevented in vivo readministration. We conclude that there are distinct roles for TLR9 and MyD88 in promoting adaptive immune responses to AAV-mediated gene transfer and that there are redundant MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent mechanisms that stimulate neutralizing antibody formation against AAV.

  14. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W; Bigelow, Chad E; McGee, Terri L; Gujar, Akshata N; Li, Hui; Hanks, Shawn M; Vrouvlianis, Joanna; Maker, Michael; Leehy, Barrett; Zhang, Yiqin; Aranda, Jorge; Bounoutas, George; Demirs, John T; Yang, Junzheng; Ornberg, Richard; Wang, Yu; Martin, Wendy; Stout, Kelly R; Argentieri, Gregory; Grosenstein, Paul; Diaz, Danielle; Turner, Oliver; Jaffee, Bruce D; Police, Seshidhar R; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs) composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein). A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types) at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1) had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone) and photopic (cone) electroretinograms (ERGs). The effect was still present after 1 year. PMID:26199951

  15. Improved Intravitreal AAV-Mediated Inner Retinal Gene Transduction after Surgical Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Miyake, Koichi; Kobayashi, Maika; Yaguchi, Chiemi; Iijima, Osamu; Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki; Katakai, Yuko; Miyake, Noriko; Kameya, Shuhei; Shimada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okada, Takashi

    2017-01-04

    The retina is an ideal target for gene therapy because of its easy accessibility and limited immunological response. We previously reported that intravitreally injected adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduced the inner retina with high efficiency in a rodent model. In large animals, however, the efficiency of retinal transduction was low, because the vitreous and internal limiting membrane (ILM) acted as barriers to transduction. To overcome these barriers in cynomolgus monkeys, we performed vitrectomy (VIT) and ILM peeling before AAV vector injection. Following intravitreal injection of 50 μL triple-mutated self-complementary AAV serotype 2 vector encoding EGFP, transduction efficiency was analyzed. Little expression of GFP was detected in the control and VIT groups, but in the VIT+ILM group, strong GFP expression was detected within the peeled ILM area. To detect potential adverse effects, we monitored the retinas using color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and electroretinography. No serious side effects associated with the pretreatment were observed. These results indicate that surgical ILM peeling before AAV vector administration would be safe and useful for efficient transduction of the nonhuman primate retina and provide therapeutic benefits for the treatment of retinal diseases.

  16. Intrinsic transgene immunogenicity gears CD8(+) T-cell priming after rAAV-mediated muscle gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Maxime; Lorain, Stéphanie; Chappert, Pascal; Lalfer, Mélanie; Hardet, Romain; Urbain, Dominique; Peccate, Cécile; Adriouch, Sahil; Garcia, Luis; Davoust, Jean; Gross, David-Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    Antitransgene CD8(+) T-cell responses are an important hurdle after recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer. Indeed, depending on the mutational genotype of the host, transgene amino-acid sequences of foreign origin can elicit deleterious cellular and humoral responses. We compared here two different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes of an engineered ovalbumin transgene delivered in muscle tissue by rAAV1 vector and found very different strength of CD8 responses, muscle destruction being correlated with the course of the immunodominant response. We further demonstrate that robust CD8(+) T-cell priming can occur through the cross-presentation pathway but requires the presence of either a strong MHC class II epitope or antibodies to the transgene product. Finally, manipulating transgene subcellular localization, we found that provided we avoid transgene expression in antigen presenting cells, the poorly accessible cytosolic form of ovalbumin transgene lacking strong MHC II epitope, evades CD8(+) T-cell priming and remains permanently expressed in muscle with no immune cell infiltration. Our results demonstrate that the intrinsic immunogenicity of transgenes delivered with rAAV vector in muscle can be manipulated in a rational manner to avoid adverse immune responses.

  17. Intrinsic Transgene Immunogenicity Gears CD8(+) T-cell Priming After rAAV-Mediated Muscle Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Maxime; Lorain, Stéphanie; Chappert, Pascal; Lalfer, Mélanie; Hardet, Romain; Urbain, Dominique; Peccate, Cécile; Adriouch, Sahil; Garcia, Luis; Davoust, Jean; Gross, David-Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    Antitransgene CD8(+) T-cell responses are an important hurdle after recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer. Indeed, depending on the mutational genotype of the host, transgene amino-acid sequences of foreign origin can elicit deleterious cellular and humoral responses. We compared here two different major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes of an engineered ovalbumin transgene delivered in muscle tissue by rAAV1 vector and found very different strength of CD8 responses, muscle destruction being correlated with the course of the immunodominant response. We further demonstrate that robust CD8(+) T-cell priming can occur through the cross-presentation pathway but requires the presence of either a strong MHC class II epitope or antibodies to the transgene product. Finally, manipulating transgene subcellular localization, we found that provided we avoid transgene expression in antigen presenting cells, the poorly accessible cytosolic form of ovalbumin transgene lacking strong MHC II epitope, evades CD8(+) T-cell priming and remains permanently expressed in muscle with no immune cell infiltration. Our results demonstrate that the intrinsic immunogenicity of transgenes delivered with rAAV vector in muscle can be manipulated in a rational manner to avoid adverse immune responses.

  18. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zuleta, Amparo; Vidal, Rene L.; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Hetz, Claudio

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

  19. AAV-mediated photoreceptor transduction of the pig cone-enriched retina

    PubMed Central

    Mussolino, C; della Corte, M; Rossi, S; Viola, F; Di Vicino, U; Marrocco, E; Neglia, S; Doria, M; Testa, F; Giovannoni, R; Crasta, M; Giunti, M; Villani, E; Lavitrano, M; Bacci, M L; Ratiglia, R; Simonelli, F; Auricchio, A; Surace, E M

    2011-01-01

    Recent success in clinical trials supports the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene therapy of retinal diseases caused by defects in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In contrast, evidence of the efficacy of AAV-mediated gene transfer to retinal photoreceptors, the major site of inherited retinal diseases, is less robust. In addition, although AAV-mediated RPE transduction appears efficient, independently of the serotype used and species treated, AAV-mediated photoreceptor gene transfer has not been systematically investigated thus so far in large animal models, which also may allow identifying relevant species-specific differences in AAV-mediated retinal transduction. In the present study, we used the porcine retina, which has a high cone/rod ratio. This feature allows to properly evaluate both cone and rod photoreceptors transduction and compare the transduction characteristics of AAV2/5 and 2/8, the two most efficient AAV vector serotypes for photoreceptor targeting. Here we show that AAV2/5 and 2/8 transduces both RPE and photoreceptors. AAV2/8 infects and transduces photoreceptor more efficiently than AAV2/5, similarly to what we have observed in the murine retina. The use of the photoreceptor-specific rhodopsin promoter restricts transgene expression to porcine rods and cones, and results in photoreceptor transduction levels similar to those obtained with the ubiquitous promoters tested. Finally, immunological, toxicological and biodistribution studies support the safety of AAV subretinal administration to the large porcine retina. The data presented here on AAV-mediated transduction of the cone-enriched porcine retina may affect the development of gene-based therapies for rare and common severe photoreceptor diseases. PMID:21412286

  20. Systemic gene delivery to the central nervous system using Adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Dutheil, Nathalie; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery has emerged as an effective and safe tool for both preclinical and clinical studies of neurological disorders. The recent discovery that several serotypes are able to cross the blood-brain barrier when administered systemically has been a real breakthrough in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. Widespread transgene expression after systemic injection could spark interest as a therapeutic approach. Such strategy will avoid invasive brain surgery and allow non-focal gene therapy promising for CNS diseases affecting large portion of the brain. Here, we will review the recent results achieved through different systemic routes of injection generated in the last decade using systemic AAV-mediated delivery and propose a brief assessment of their values. In particular, we emphasize how the methods used for virus engineering could improve brain transduction after peripheral delivery.

  1. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content. Images PMID:7524085

  2. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  3. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  4. Amelioration of both functional and morphological abnormalities in the retina of a mouse model of ocular albinism following AAV-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Surace, Enrico Maria; Domenici, Luciano; Cortese, Katia; Cotugno, Gabriella; Di Vicino, Umberto; Venturi, Consuelo; Cellerino, Alessandro; Marigo, Valeria; Tacchetti, Carlo; Ballabio, Andrea; Auricchio, Alberto

    2005-10-01

    X-linked recessive ocular albinism type I (OA1) is due to mutations in the OA1 gene (approved gene symbol GPR143), which is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The Oa1 (Gpr143) knockout mouse (Oa1(-/-)) model recapitulates many of the OA1 retinal morphological anomalies, including a lower number of melanosomes of increased size in the RPE. The Oa1(-/-) mouse also displays some of the retinal developmental abnormalities observed in albino patients such as misrouting of the optic tracts. Here, we show that these anomalies are associated with retinal electrophysiological abnormalities, including significant decrease in a- and b-wave amplitude and delayed recovery of b-wave amplitude from photoreceptor desensitization following bright light exposure. This suggests that lack of Oa1 in the RPE impacts on photoreceptor activity. More interestingly, adeno-associated viral vector-mediated Oa1 gene transfer to the retina of the Oa1(-/-) mouse model results in significant recovery of its retinal functional abnormalities. In addition, Oa1 retinal gene transfer increases the number of melanosomes in the Oa1(-/-) mouse RPE. Our data show that gene transfer to the adult retina unexpectedly rescues both functional and morphological abnormalities in a retinal developmental disorder, opening novel potential therapeutic perspectives for this and other forms of albinism.

  5. Life-Long Correction of Hyperbilirubinemia with a Neonatal Liver-Specific AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Lethal Mouse Model of Crigler–Najjar Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentillin, Lorena; Vaníkova, Jana; Bockor, Luka; Bellarosa, Cristina; Mancarella, Antonio; Vianello, Eleonora; Tiribelli, Claudio; Giacca, Mauro; Vitek, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Null mutations in the UGT1A1 gene result in Crigler–Najjar syndrome type I (CNSI), characterized by severe hyperbilirubinemia and constant risk of developing neurological damage. Phototherapy treatment lowers plasma bilirubin levels, but its efficacy is limited and liver transplantation is required. To find alternative therapies, we applied AAV liver-specific gene therapy to a lethal mouse model of CNSI. We demonstrated that a single neonatal hUGT1A1 gene transfer was successful and the therapeutic effect lasted up to 17 months postinjection. The therapeutic effect was mediated by the presence of transcriptionally active double-stranded episomes. We also compared the efficacy of two different gene therapy approaches: liver versus skeletal muscle transgene expression. We observed that 5–8% of normal liver expression and activity levels were sufficient to significantly reduce bilirubin levels and maintain lifelong low plasma bilirubin concentration (3.1±1.5 mg/dl). In contrast, skeletal muscle was not able to efficiently lower bilirubin (6.4±2.0 mg/dl), despite 20–30% of hUgt1a1 expression levels, compared with normal liver. We propose that this remarkable difference in gene therapy efficacy could be related to the absence of the Mrp2 and Mrp3 transporters of conjugated bilirubin in muscle. Taken together, our data support the concept that liver is the best organ for efficient and long-term CNSI gene therapy, and suggest that the use of extra-hepatic tissues should be coupled to the presence of bilirubin transporters. PMID:25072305

  6. AAV-Mediated Transduction and Targeting of Retinal Bipolar Cells with Improved mGluR6 Promoters in Rodents and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, TH; Ivanova, E; Cheng, JG; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell-type specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the para-fovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies. PMID:27115727

  7. AAV-mediated transduction and targeting of retinal bipolar cells with improved mGluR6 promoters in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, T H; Ivanova, E; Cheng, J G; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell type-specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the parafovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies.

  8. Computational and molecular tools for scalable rAAV-mediated genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Stoimenov, Ivaylo; Ali, Muhammad Akhtar; Pandzic, Tatjana; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The rapid discovery of potential driver mutations through large-scale mutational analyses of human cancers generates a need to characterize their cellular phenotypes. Among the techniques for genome editing, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene targeting is suited for knock-in of single nucleotide substitutions and to a lesser degree for gene knock-outs. However, the generation of gene targeting constructs and the targeting process is time-consuming and labor-intense. To facilitate rAAV-mediated gene targeting, we developed the first software and complementary automation-friendly vector tools to generate optimized targeting constructs for editing human protein encoding genes. By computational approaches, rAAV constructs for editing ∼71% of bases in protein-coding exons were designed. Similarly, ∼81% of genes were predicted to be targetable by rAAV-mediated knock-out. A Gateway-based cloning system for facile generation of rAAV constructs suitable for robotic automation was developed and used in successful generation of targeting constructs. Together, these tools enable automated rAAV targeting construct design, generation as well as enrichment and expansion of targeted cells with desired integrations. PMID:25488813

  9. Improved Immunological Tolerance Following Combination Therapy with CTLA-4/Ig and AAV-Mediated PD-L1/2 Muscle Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Adriouch, Sahil; Franck, Emilie; Drouot, Laurent; Bonneau, Carole; Jolinon, Nelly; Salvetti, Anna; Boyer, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Initially thought as being non-immunogenic, recombinant AAVs have emerged as efficient vector candidates for treating monogenic diseases. It is now clear however that they induce potent immune responses against transgene products which can lead to destruction of transduced cells. Therefore, developing strategies to circumvent these immune responses and facilitate long-term expression of transgenic therapeutic proteins is a main challenge in gene therapy. We evaluated herein a strategy to inhibit the undesirable immune activation that follows muscle gene transfer by administration of CTLA-4/Ig to block the costimulatory signals required early during immune priming and by using gene transfer of PD-1 ligands to inhibit T cell functions at the tissue sites. We provide the proof of principle that this combination immunoregulatory therapy targeting two non-redundant checkpoints of the immune response, i.e., priming and effector functions, can improve persistence of transduced cells in experimental settings where cytotoxic T cells escape initial blockade. Therefore, CTLA-4/Ig plus PD-L1/2 combination therapy represents a candidate approach to circumvent the bottleneck of immune responses directed toward transgene products. PMID:22046170

  10. Intra-amniotic rAAV-mediated microdystrophin gene transfer improves canine X-linked muscular dystrophy and may induce immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Hironori; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Chiyo, Tomoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe congenital disease due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. Supplementation of dystrophin using recombinant adenoassociated virus vector has promise as a treatment of DMD, although therapeutic benefit of the truncated dystrophin still remains to be elucidated. Besides, host immune responses against the vector as well as transgene products have been denoted in the clinical gene therapy studies. Here, we transduced dystrophic dogs fetuses to investigate the therapeutic effects of an AAV vector expressing microdystrophin under conditions of immune tolerance. rAAV-CMV-microdystrophin and a rAAV-CAG-luciferase were injected into the amniotic fluid surrounding fetuses. We also reinjected rAAV9-CMV-microdystrophin into the jugular vein of an infant dystrophic dog to induce systemic expression of microdystrophin. Gait and cardiac function significantly improved in the rAAV-microdystrophin-injected dystrophic dog, suggesting that an adequate treatment of rAAV-microdystrophin with immune modulation induces successful long-term transgene expression to analyze improved dystrophic phenotype.

  11. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bisset, Darren R.; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A.; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T.; Weiss, Michael D.; Chamberlain, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUGexp) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUGexp mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSALR) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSALR mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSALR mice, including a reduction in the CUGexp mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUGexp mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSALR mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  12. Sustained correction of FVII deficiency in dogs using AAV-mediated expression of zymogen FVII.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Contreras, Oscar A; Smith, Shannon M; Bellinger, Dwight A; Raymer, Robin A; Merricks, Elizabeth; Faella, Armida; Pavani, Giulia; Zhou, Shangzhen; Nichols, Timothy C; High, Katherine A; Margaritis, Paris

    2016-02-04

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder treated by infusion of fresh-frozen plasma, plasma-derived FVII concentrates and low-dose recombinant activated FVII. Clinical data suggest that a mild elevation of plasma FVII levels (>10% normal) results in improved hemostasis. Research dogs with a G96E missense FVII mutation (FVII-G96E) have <1% FVII activity. By western blot, we show that they have undetectable plasmatic antigen, thus representing the most prevalent type of human FVII deficiency (low antigen/activity). In these dogs, we determine the feasibility of a gene therapy approach using liver-directed, adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotype 8 vector delivery of a canine FVII (cFVII) zymogen transgene. FVII-G96E dogs received escalating AAV doses (2E11 to 4.95E13 vector genomes [vg] per kg). Clinically therapeutic expression (15% normal) was attained with as low as 6E11 vg/kg of AAV and has been stable for >1 year (ongoing) without antibody formation to the cFVII transgene. Sustained and supraphysiological expression of 770% normal was observed using 4.95E13 vg/kg of AAV (2.6 years, ongoing). No evidence of pathological activation of coagulation or detrimental animal physiology was observed as platelet counts, d-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and serum chemistries remained normal in all dogs (cumulative 6.4 years). We observed a transient and noninhibitory immunoglobulin G class 2 response against cFVII only in the dog receiving the highest AAV dose. In conclusion, in the only large-animal model representing the majority of FVII mutation types, our data are first to demonstrate the feasibility, safety, and long-term duration of AAV-mediated correction of FVII deficiency.

  13. Imaging gene delivery in a mouse model of congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Pike, L S; Tannous, B A; Deliolanis, N C; Hsich, G; Morse, D; Tung, C-H; Sena-Esteves, M; Breakefield, X O

    2011-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene replacement for lysosomal disorders have been spurred by the ability of some serotypes to efficiently transduce neurons in the brain and by the ability of lysosomal enzymes to cross-correct among cells. Here, we explored enzyme replacement therapy in a knock-out mouse model of congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), the most severe of the NCLs in humans. The missing protease in this disorder, cathepsin D (CathD) has high levels in the central nervous system. This enzyme has the potential advantage for assessing experimental therapy in that it can be imaged using a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe activated by CathD. Injections of an AAV2/rh8 vector-encoding mouse CathD (mCathD) into both cerebral ventricles and peritoneum of newborn knock-out mice resulted in a significant increase in lifespan. Successful delivery of active CathD by the AAV2/rh8-mCathD vector was verified by NIRF imaging of mouse embryonic fibroblasts from knock-out mice in culture, as well as by ex vivo NIRF imaging of the brain and liver after gene transfer. These studies support the potential effectiveness and imaging evaluation of enzyme replacement therapy to the brain and other organs in CathD null mice via AAV-mediated gene delivery in neonatal animals.

  14. Evaluation of Vascular Delivery Methodologies to Enhance rAAV6-mediated Gene Transfer to Canine Striated Musculature

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Schultz, Brian R; Allen, James M; Halldorson, Jeffrey B; Blankinship, Michael J; Meznarich, Norman A; Kuhr, Christian S; Doremus, Caitlin; Finn, Eric; Liggitt, Denny; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the development of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for delivery of gene expression cassettes to striated musculature as a method of treating severe neuromuscular conditions. However, it is unclear whether delivery protocols that achieve extensive gene transfer in mice can be adapted to produce similarly extensive gene transfer in larger mammals and ultimately patients. Consequently, we sought to investigate methodological modifications that would facilitate rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the striated musculature of canines. A simple procedure incorporating acute (i) occlusion of limb blood flow, (ii) exsanguination via compression bandage, and (iii) vector “dwell” time of <20 minutes, markedly enhanced the transduction of limb muscles, compared with a simple bolus limb infusion of vector. A complementary method whereby vector was infused into the jugular vein led to efficient transduction of cardiomyocytes and to a lesser degree the diaphragm. Together these methods can be used to achieve transgene expression in heart, diaphragm, and limb muscles of juvenile dogs using rAAV6 vectors. These results establish that rAAV-mediated gene delivery is a viable approach to achieving systemic transduction of striated musculature in mammals approaching the dimensions of newborn humans. PMID:19471246

  15. Intratumoral decorin gene delivery by AAV vector inhibits brain glioblastomas and prolongs survival of animals by inducing cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hsin-I; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Shui, Hao-Ai; Han, Jun-Ming; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Ming-Teh; Yang, Yi-Ping

    2014-03-12

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant cancer in the central nervous system with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of an anti-cancer protein, decorin, by delivering it into a xenograft U87MG glioma tumor in the brain of nude mice through an adeno-associated viral (AAV2) gene delivery system. Decorin expression from the AAV vector in vitro inhibited cultured U87MG cell growth by induction of cell differentiation. Intracranial injection of AAV-decorin vector to the glioma-bearing nude mice in vivo significantly suppressed brain tumor growth and prolonged survival when compared to control non-treated mice bearing the same U87MG tumors. Proteomics analysis on protein expression profiles in the U87MG glioma cells after AAV-mediated decorin gene transfer revealed up- and down-regulation of important proteins. Differentially expressed proteins between control and AAV-decorin-transduced cells were identified through MALDI-TOF MS and database mining. We found that a number of important proteins that are involved in apoptosis, transcription, chemotherapy resistance, mitosis, and fatty acid metabolism have been altered as a result of decorin overexpression. These findings offer valuable insight into the mechanisms of the anti-glioblastoma effects of decorin. In addition, AAV-mediated decorin gene delivery warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach for brain tumors.

  16. The potential of adeno-associated viral vectors for gene delivery to muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, M Abu; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Muscle-directed gene therapy is rapidly gaining attention primarily because muscle is an easily accessible target tissue and is also associated with various severe genetic disorders. Localized and systemic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors of several serotypes results in very efficient transduction of skeletal and cardiac muscles, which has been achieved in both small and large animals, as well as in humans. Muscle is the target tissue in gene therapy for many muscular dystrophy diseases, and may also be exploited as a biofactory to produce secretory factors for systemic disorders. Current limitations of using rAAVs for muscle gene transfer include vector size restriction, potential safety concerns such as off-target toxicity and the immunological barrier composing of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies and CD8+ T-cell response against AAV capsid in humans. Areas covered In this article, we will discuss basic AAV vector biology and its application in muscle-directed gene delivery, as well as potential strategies to overcome the aforementioned limitations of rAAV for further clinical application. Expert opinion Delivering therapeutic genes to large muscle mass in humans is arguably the most urgent unmet demand in treating diseases affecting muscle tissues throughout the whole body. Muscle-directed, rAAV-mediated gene transfer for expressing antibodies is a promising strategy to combat deadly infectious diseases. Developing strategies to circumvent the immune response following rAAV administration in humans will facilitate clinical application. PMID:24386892

  17. Robust Cardiomyocyte-Specific Gene Expression Following Systemic Injection of AAV: In Vivo Gene Delivery Follows a Poisson Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Konkal-Matt R.; Xu, Yaqin; Yang, Zequan; Acton, Scott T.; French, Brent A

    2010-01-01

    Newly-isolated serotypes of AAV readily cross the endothelial barrier to provide efficient transgene delivery throughout the body. However, tissue-specific expression is preferred in most experimental studies and gene therapy protocols. Previous efforts to restrict gene expression to the myocardium often relied on direct injection into heart muscle or intracoronary perfusion. Here, we report an AAV vector system employing the cardiac troponin T promoter (cTnT). Using luciferase and eGFP, the efficiency and specificity of cardiac reporter gene expression using AAV serotype capsids: AAV-1, 2, 6, 8 or 9 were tested after systemic administration to 1 week old mice. Luciferase assays showed that the cTnT promoter worked in combination with each of the AAV serotype capsids to provide cardiomyocyte-specific gene expression, but AAV-9 followed closely by AAV-8 was the most efficient. AAV9-mediated gene expression from the cTnT promoter was 640-fold greater in the heart compared to the next highest tissue (liver). eGFP fluorescence indicated a transduction efficiency of 96% using AAV-9 at a dose of only 3.15×1010 viral particles per mouse. Moreover, the intensity of cardiomyocyte eGFP fluorescence measured on a cell-by-cell basis revealed that AAV-mediated gene expression in the heart can be modeled as a Poisson distribution; requiring an average of nearly two vector genomes per cell to attain an 85% transduction efficiency. PMID:20703310

  18. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  19. Development of Safer Gene Delivery Systems to Minimize the Risk of Insertional Mutagenesis-Related Malignancies: A Critical Issue for the Field of Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    Integrating gene delivery systems allow for a more stable transgene expression in mammalian cells than the episomal ones. However, the integration of the shuttle vector within the cellular chromosomal DNA is associated with the risk of insertional mutagenesis, which, in turn, may cause malignant cell transformation. The use of a retroviral-derived vector system was responsible for the development of leukemia in five children, who participated in various clinical trials for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) in France and in the United Kingdom. Unfortunately, the hematological malignancy claimed the life of one patient in 2004, who was enrolled in the French clinical trial. In addition, adeno-associated-viral-(AAV-) mediated gene transfer induced tumors in animal models, whereas the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon system was associated with insertional mutagenesis events in cell culture systems. On these grounds, it is necessary to develop safer gene delivery systems for the genetic manipulation of mammalian cells. This paper discusses the latest achievements that have been reported in the field of vector design. PMID:23209944

  20. Multifunctional nanorods for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Aliasger K.; Searson, Peter C.; Leong, Kam W.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of gene therapy is to introduce foreign genes into somatic cells to supplement defective genes or provide additional biological functions, and can be achieved using either viral or synthetic non-viral delivery systems. Compared with viral vectors, synthetic gene-delivery systems, such as liposomes and polymers, offer several advantages including ease of production and reduced risk of cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, but their use has been limited by the relatively low transfection efficiency. This problem mainly stems from the difficulty in controlling their properties at the nanoscale. Synthetic inorganic gene carriers have received limited attention in the gene-therapy community, the only notable example being gold nanoparticles with surface-immobilized DNA applied to intradermal genetic immunization by particle bombardment. Here we present a non-viral gene-delivery system based on multisegment bimetallic nanorods that can simultaneously bind compacted DNA plasmids and targeting ligands in a spatially defined manner. This approach allows precise control of composition, size and multifunctionality of the gene-delivery system. Transfection experiments performed in vitro and in vivo provide promising results that suggest potential in genetic vaccination applications.

  1. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  2. Composite Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated gene and siRNA delivery has been an appealing area to gene therapists when they attempt to treat the diseases by manipulating the genetic information in the target cells. However, the advances in materials science could not keep up with the demand for multifunctional nanomaterials to achieve desired delivery efficiency. Researchers have thus taken an alternative approach to incorporate various materials into single composite nanoparticle using different fabrication methods. This approach allows nanoparticles to possess defined nanostructures as well as multiple functionalities to overcome the critical extracellular and intracellular barriers to successful gene delivery. This chapter will highlight the advances of fabrication methods that have the most potential to translate nanoparticles from bench to bedside. Furthermore, a major class of composite nanoparticle–lipid-based composite nanoparticles will be classified based on the components and reviewed in details. PMID:25409605

  3. Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sha; Leach, John C.; Ye, Kaiming

    Nonviral gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. Although the efficacy of DNA transfection, which is a major concern, is low in nonviral vector-mediated gene transfer compared with viral ones, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to prepare, less immunogenic and oncogenic, and have no potential of virus recombination and no limitation on the size of a transferred gene. The ability to incorporate genetic materials such as plasmid DNA, RNA, and siRNA into functionalized nanoparticles with little toxicity demonstrates a new era in pharmacotherapy for delivering genes selectively to tissues and cells. In this chapter, we highlight the basic concepts and applications of nonviral gene delivery using super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized silica nanoparticles. The experimental protocols related to these topics are described in the chapter.

  4. Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors Serotype 8 for Cell-Specific Delivery of Therapeutic Genes in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, Diego; Sucunza, Diego; Vanrell, Lucia; Lopez-Franco, Esperanza; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G.; Vales, Africa; Hommel, Mirja; Rico, Alberto J.; Lanciego, Jose L.; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have become highly promising tools for research and clinical applications in the central nervous system (CNS). However, specific delivery of genes to the cell type of interest is essential for the success of gene therapy and therefore a correct selection of the promoter plays a very important role. Here, AAV8 vectors carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) as reporter gene under the transcriptional control of different CNS-specific promoters were used and compared with a strong ubiquitous promoter. Since one of the main limitations of AAV-mediated gene delivery lies in its restricted cloning capacity, we focused our work on small-sized promoters. We tested the transduction efficacy and specificity of each vector after stereotactic injection into the mouse striatum. Three glia-specific AAV vectors were generated using two truncated forms of the human promoter for glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) as well as a truncated form of the murine GFAP promoter. All three vectors resulted in predominantly glial expression; however we also observed eGFP expression in other cell-types such as oligodendrocytes, but never in neurons. In addition, robust and neuron-specific eGFP expression was observed using the minimal promoters for the neural protein BM88 and the neuronal nicotinic receptor β2 (CHRNB2). In summary, we developed a set of AAV vectors designed for specific expression in cells of the CNS using minimal promoters to drive gene expression when the size of the therapeutic gene matters. PMID:28239341

  5. Decationized polyplexes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Novo, Luís; Mastrobattista, Enrico; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy has received much attention in the field of drug delivery. Synthetic, nonviral gene delivery systems have gained increasing attention as vectors for gene therapy mainly due to a favorable immunogenicity profile and ease of manufacturing as compared to viral vectors. The great majority of these formulations are based on polycationic structures, due to their ability to interact with negatively charged nucleic acids to spontaneously form nanoparticles. In recent years, several polycationic systems have demonstrated high transfection in vitro. However, progress toward clinical applications has been slow, mainly because the cationic nature of these systems leads to intolerable toxicity levels, inappropriate biodistribution and unsatisfactory efficiency in vivo, particularly after systemic administration. Decationized polyplexes are a new class of gene delivery systems that have been developed as an alternative for conventional polycation-based systems. The major innovation introduced by decationized polyplexes is that these systems are based on neutral polymers, without any detrimental effect on the physicochemical stability or encapsulation ability, due to the transient presence of cationic charge and disulfide cross-links between the polymer chains by which the nucleic acids are physically entrapped in the particles. This editorial summarizes the most important features of decationized polyplexes and discusses potential implications for the development of new safe and efficient gene delivery systems.

  6. Adeno-Associated Virus-Based Gene Therapy for CNS Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hocquemiller, Michaël; Giersch, Laura; Audrain, Mickael; Parker, Samantha; Cartier, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is at the cusp of a revolution for treating a large spectrum of CNS disorders by providing a durable therapeutic protein via a single administration. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer is of particular interest as a therapeutic tool because of its safety profile and efficiency in transducing a wide range of cell types. The purpose of this review is to describe the most notable advancements in preclinical and clinical research on AAV-based CNS gene therapy and to discuss prospects for future development based on a new generation of vectors and delivery. PMID:27267688

  7. Gene Delivery to Intestinal Epithelial Cells In vitro and In vivo with Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Types 1, 2 and 5

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Cathryn; Porvasnik, Stacy; Herlihy, John-David; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Byrne, Barry J.; Valentine, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) result in chronic illness requiring lifelong therapy. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene delivery to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Human colon epithelial cell lines and colon biopsies were transduced using AAV pseudotypes 2/1, 2/2, and 2/5 encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP). Mice were administered the same vectors through oral, enema, intraperitoneal (IP) injection and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) injection routes. Tropism and efficiency were determined by microscopy, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and PCR. Caco2 cells were more permissive to AAV transduction. Human colon epithelial cells in organ culture were more effectively transduced by AAV2/2. SMA injection provided the most effective means of vector gene transfer to small intestine and colonic epithelial cells in vivo. Transgene detection 80 days post AAV treatment suggests transduction of crypt progenitor cells. This study shows the feasibility of AAV-mediated intestinal gene delivery, applicable for the investigation of IBD pathogenesis and novel therapeutic options, but also revealed the need for further studies to identify more efficient pseudotypes. PMID:17934813

  8. AAV-mediated liver-specific MPV17 expression restores mtDNA levels and prevents diet-induced liver failure.

    PubMed

    Bottani, Emanuela; Giordano, Carla; Civiletto, Gabriele; Di Meo, Ivano; Auricchio, Alberto; Ciusani, Emilio; Marchet, Silvia; Lamperti, Costanza; d'Amati, Giulia; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in human MPV17 cause a hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS) hallmarked by early-onset liver failure, leading to premature death. Liver transplantation and frequent feeding using slow-release carbohydrates are the only available therapies, although surviving patients eventually develop slowly progressive peripheral and central neuropathy. The physiological role of Mpv17, including its functional link to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance, is still unclear. We show here that Mpv17 is part of a high molecular weight complex of unknown composition, which is essential for mtDNA maintenance in critical tissues, i.e. liver, of a Mpv17 knockout mouse model. On a standard diet, Mpv17-/- mouse shows hardly any symptom of liver dysfunction, but a ketogenic diet (KD) leads these animals to liver cirrhosis and failure. However, when expression of human MPV17 is carried out by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene replacement, the Mpv17 knockout mice are able to reconstitute the Mpv17-containing supramolecular complex, restore liver mtDNA copy number and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proficiency, and prevent liver failure induced by the KD. These results open new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of MPV17-related liver-specific MDS.

  9. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  10. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    PubMed

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place.

  11. Adeno-associated virus-mediated cancer gene therapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jingfeng; Luo, Yuxuan; Sun, Jihong; Zhou, Yurong; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-28

    Gene therapy is one of the frontiers of modern medicine. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is becoming a promising approach to treat a variety of diseases and cancers. AAV-mediated cancer gene therapies have rapidly advanced due to their superiority to other gene-carrying vectors, such as the lack of pathogenicity, the ability to transfect both dividing and non-dividing cells, low host immune response, and long-term expression. This article reviews and provides up to date knowledge on AAV-mediated cancer gene therapy.

  12. Lipid Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Nonviral vectors which offer a safer and versatile alternative to viral vectors have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. However, their transfection efficacy or level of expression is substantially lower than viral vectors. Among various nonviral gene vectors, lipid nanoparticles are an ideal platform for the incorporation of safety and efficacy into a single delivery system. In this chapter, we highlight current lipidic vectors that have been developed for gene therapy of tumors and other diseases. The pharmacokinetic, toxic behaviors and clinic trials of some successful lipids particles are also presented. PMID:25409602

  13. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    PubMed

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII.

  14. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  15. Viral and nonviral delivery systems for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nayerossadat, Nouri; Maedeh, Talebi; Ali, Palizban Abas

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is the process of introducing foreign genomic materials into host cells to elicit a therapeutic benefit. Although initially the main focus of gene therapy was on special genetic disorders, now diverse diseases with different patterns of inheritance and acquired diseases are targets of gene therapy. There are 2 major categories of gene therapy, including germline gene therapy and somatic gene therapy. Although germline gene therapy may have great potential, because it is currently ethically forbidden, it cannot be used; however, to date human gene therapy has been limited to somatic cells. Although numerous viral and nonviral gene delivery systems have been developed in the last 3 decades, no delivery system has been designed that can be applied in gene therapy of all kinds of cell types in vitro and in vivo with no limitation and side effects. In this review we explain about the history of gene therapy, all types of gene delivery systems for germline (nuclei, egg cells, embryonic stem cells, pronuclear, microinjection, sperm cells) and somatic cells by viral [retroviral, adenoviral, adeno association, helper-dependent adenoviral systems, hybrid adenoviral systems, herpes simplex, pox virus, lentivirus, Epstein–Barr virus)] and nonviral systems (physical: Naked DNA, DNA bombardant, electroporation, hydrodynamic, ultrasound, magnetofection) and (chemical: Cationic lipids, different cationic polymers, lipid polymers). In addition to the above-mentioned, advantages, disadvantages, and practical use of each system are discussed. PMID:23210086

  16. Race, genes and preterm delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    High rates of preterm delivery (PTD) among African Americans are the leading cause of excess infant mortality among African Americans. Failure to fully explain racial disparity in PTD has led to speculation that genetic factors might contribute to this disparity. Current evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute to PTD, but this does not imply that genetic factors contribute to racial disparity in PTD. Environmental factors clearly contribute to PTD. Many of these factors acting over a women's life prior to pregnancy disproportionately affect African Americans and contribute significantly to racial disparity in PTD. Thus, inferring genetic contribution to racial disparity in PTD by attempting to control for environmental factors measured at a single point in time is flawed. There is emerging evidence of gene-environment interactions for PTD, some of which disproportionately affect African Americans. There is also evidence of racial differences in the prevalence of polymorphisms potentially related to PTD. However, to date there is no direct evidence that these differences contribute significantly to racial disparity in PTD. Given the complexity of polygenic conditions such as PTD, the possibility of any single gene contributing substantially to racial disparity in PTD seems remote. PMID:16334498

  17. Intrastriatal gene delivery of GDNF persistently attenuates methamphetamine self-administration and relapse in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yijin; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Nitta, Atsumi; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Ozawa, Keiya; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2013-08-01

    Relapse of drug abuse after abstinence is a major challenge to the treatment of addicts. In our well-established mouse models of methamphetamine (Meth) self-administration and reinstatement, bilateral microinjection of adeno-associated virus vectors expressing GDNF (AAV-Gdnf) into the striatum significantly reduced Meth self-administration, without affecting locomotor activity. Moreover, the intrastriatal AAV-Gdnf attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of Meth-seeking behaviour in a sustainable manner. In addition, this manipulation showed that Meth-primed reinstatement of Meth-seeking behaviour was reduced. These findings suggest that the AAV vector-mediated Gdnf gene transfer into the striatum is an effective and sustainable approach to attenuate Meth self-administration and Meth-associated cue-induced relapsing behaviour and that the AAV-mediated Gdnf gene transfer in the brain may be a valuable gene therapy against drug dependence and protracted relapse in clinical settings.

  18. Microneedles: an innovative platform for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Joanne; Donnelly, Ryan F; McCarthy, Helen O

    2015-08-01

    The advent of microneedle (MN) technology has provided a revolutionary platform for the delivery of therapeutic agents, particularly in the field of gene therapy. For over 20 years, the area of gene therapy has undergone intense innovation and progression which has seen advancement of the technology from an experimental concept to a widely acknowledged strategy for the treatment and prevention of numerous disease states. However, the true potential of gene therapy has yet to be achieved due to limitations in formulation and delivery technologies beyond parenteral injection of the DNA. Microneedle-mediated delivery provides a unique platform for the delivery of DNA therapeutics clinically. It provides a means to overcome the skin barriers to gene delivery and deposit the DNA directly into the dermal layers, a key site for delivery of therapeutics to treat a wide range of skin and cutaneous diseases. Additionally, the skin is a tissue rich in immune sentinels, an ideal target for the delivery of a DNA vaccine directly to the desired target cell populations. This review details the advancement of MN-mediated DNA delivery from proof-of-concept to the delivery of DNA encoding clinically relevant proteins and antigens and examines the key considerations for the improvement of the technology and progress into a clinically applicable delivery system.

  19. History of Polymeric Gene Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wagner, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    As an option for genetic disease treatment and an alternative for traditional cancer chemotherapy, gene therapy achieves significant attention. Nucleic acid delivery, however, remains a main challenge in human gene therapy. Polymer-based delivery systems offer a safer and promising route for therapeutic gene delivery. Over the past five decades, various cationic polymers have been optimized for increasingly effective nucleic acid transfer. This resulted in a chemical evolution of cationic polymers from the first-generation polycations towards bioinspired multifunctional sequence-defined polymers and nanocomposites. With the increasing of knowledge in molecular biological processes and rapid progress of macromolecular chemistry, further improvement of polymeric nucleic acid delivery systems will provide effective tool for gene-based therapy in the near future.

  20. Stimuli-responsive polymers in gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Erhan

    2005-07-01

    Recent interest in clinical therapy has been directed to deliver nucleic acids (DNA, RNA or short-chain oligonucleotides) that alter gene expression within a specific cell population, thereby manipulating cellular processes and responses, which in turn stimulate immune responses or tissue regeneration, or blocks expression at the level of transcription or translation for treatment of several diseases. Both ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery can be achieved mostly by using a delivery system (vector). Viral vectors exhibit high gene expression, but also have very significant side effects. Mainly cationic polymeric systems are used as nonviral vectors, although usually with low levels of transfection. Through the use of stimuli-responsive polymers as novel vectors for gene delivery, two benefits can be obtained: high gene expression efficiency and more selective gene expression.

  1. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  2. AAV-mediated cone rescue in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3-achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ji-jing; Deng, Wen-Tao; Dai, Xufeng; Lei, Bo; Everhart, Drew; Umino, Yumiko; Li, Jie; Zhang, Keqing; Mao, Song; Boye, Sanford L; Liu, Li; Chiodo, Vince A; Liu, Xuan; Shi, Wei; Tao, Ye; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3) are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia.

  3. Current status of haemophilia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    High, K H; Nathwani, A; Spencer, T; Lillicrap, D

    2014-05-01

    After many reports of successful gene therapy studies in small and large animal models of haemophilia, we have, at last, seen the first signs of success in human patients. These very encouraging results have been achieved with the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in patients with severe haemophilia B. Following on from these initial promising studies, there are now three ongoing trials of AAV-mediated gene transfer in haemophilia B all aiming to express the factor IX gene from the liver. Nevertheless, as discussed in the first section of this article, there are still a number of significant hurdles to overcome if haemophilia B gene therapy is to become more widely available. The second section of this article deals with the challenges relating to factor VIII gene transfer. While the recent results in haemophilia B are extremely encouraging, there is, as yet, no similar data for factor VIII gene therapy. It is widely accepted that this therapeutic target will be significantly more problematic for a variety of reasons including accommodating the larger factor VIII cDNA, achieving adequate levels of transgene expression and preventing the far more frequent complication of antifactor VIII immunity. In the final section of the article, the alternative approach of lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer is discussed. While AAV-mediated approaches to transgene delivery have led the way in clinical haemophilia gene therapy, there are still a number of potential advantages of using an alternative delivery vehicle including the fact that ex vivo host cell transduction will avoid the likelihood of immune responses to the vector. Overall, these are exciting times for haemophilia gene therapy with the likelihood of further clinical successes in the near future.

  4. Diseases originate and terminate by genes: unraveling nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Khan, Wahid; Ramakrishna, Sistla

    2013-12-01

    The world is driving in to the era of transformation of chemical therapeutic molecules to biological genetic material therapeutics, and that is where the biological drugs especially "genes" come into existence. These genes worked as "magical bullets" to specifically silence faulty genes responsible for progression of diseases. Viral gene delivery research is far ahead of nonviral gene delivery technique. However, with more advancement in polymer science, new ways are opening for better and efficient nonviral gene delivery. But efficient delivery method is always considered as a bottleneck for gene delivery as success of which will decide the fate of gene in cells. During the past decade, it became evident that extracellular as well as intracellular barriers compromise the transfection efficiency of nonviral vectors. The challenge for gene therapy research is to pinpoint the rate-limiting steps in this complex process and implement strategies to overcome the biological physiochemical and metabolic barriers encountered during targeting. The synergy between studies that investigate the mechanism of breaking in and breaking out of nonviral gene delivery carrier through various extracellular and intracellular barriers with desired characteristics will enable the rational design of vehicles and revolutionize the treatment of various diseases.

  5. Intracellular trafficking of hybrid gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Rahul K; Lazebnik, Mihael; Pack, Daniel W

    2015-06-10

    Viral and non-viral gene delivery vectors are in development for human gene therapy, but both exhibit disadvantages such as inadequate efficiency, lack of cell-specific targeting or safety concerns. We have recently reported the design of hybrid delivery vectors combining retrovirus-like particles with synthetic polymers or lipids that are efficient, provide sustained gene expression and are more stable compared to native retroviruses. To guide further development of this promising class of gene delivery vectors, we have investigated their mechanisms of intracellular trafficking. Moloney murine leukemia virus-like particles (M-VLPs) were complexed with chitosan (Chi) or liposomes (Lip) comprising DOTAP, DOPE and cholesterol to form the hybrid vectors (Chi/M-VLPs and Lip/M-VLPs, respectively). Transfection efficiency and cellular internalization of the vectors were quantified in the presence of a panel of inhibitors of various endocytic pathways. Intracellular transport and trafficking kinetics of the hybrid vectors were dependent on the synthetic component and used a combination of clathrin- and caveolar-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Chi/M-VLPs were slower to transfect compared to Lip/M-VLPs due to the delayed detachment of the synthetic component. The synthetic component of hybrid gene delivery vectors plays a significant role in their cellular interactions and processing and is a key parameter for the design of more efficient gene delivery vehicles.

  6. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation.

  7. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation. PMID:26225356

  8. Long-term luciferase expression monitored by bioluminescence imaging after adeno-associated virus-mediated fetal gene delivery in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I

    2010-02-01

    The safety and efficiency of fetal adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery in rhesus monkeys and long-term monitoring of transgene expression by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were evaluated. Early second-trimester fetal monkeys were administered AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10 vector supernatant preparations expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter, using an intrathoracic (n = 6) or intramyocardial (n = 6) approach and established ultrasound-guided techniques. Postnatal BLI was performed monthly up to 6 months postnatal age (n = 12) and then every 3 months thereafter to monitor transgene expression up to 24 months postnatal age (27 months after gene transfer; n = 6). All AAV serotypes showed greater than 1.0 x 10(9) photons/sec at all time points evaluated with limited biodistribution to nontargeted anatomical sites. The highest levels of bioluminescence (photons per second) observed were noted with AAV2/9 and AAV2/10 when the three vector constructs were compared. To correlate in vivo findings at the tissue level, specimens were collected from selected animals and analyzed. Three-dimensional reconstruction showed that firefly luciferase expression was consistent with imaging and morphometric measures. These findings suggest that (1) high levels of AAV-mediated firefly luciferase expression can be found after fetal AAV gene transfer and without any evidence of adverse effects; (2) the intercostal muscles, myocardium, and muscular component of the diaphragm of developing fetuses are readily transduced with AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10; and (3) postnatal outcomes and long-term luciferase expression can be effectively monitored by BLI in young rhesus monkeys.

  9. Polysaccharide-based Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Huh, Myung Sook; Lee, Eun Jung; Koo, Heebeom; Yhee, Ji Young; Oh, Keun Sang; Son, Sohee; Lee, Sojin; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles based on nanotechnology and biotechnology have emerged as efficient carriers for various biopharmaceutical agents including proteins and genes. In particular, polysaccharides have attracted interest of many researchers in the drug delivery field due to their advantages such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity, and ease of modification. A number of polysaccharides including chitosan, hyaluronic acid, and dextran, and their derivatives have been widely used as polymeric backbones for the formation of nanoparticles, which can be provided as valuable gene delivery carriers. In this review, we introduce the chemical and physical natures of different polysaccharides particularly used in biomedical applications, and then discuss recent progress in the development of polysaccharide-based nanoparticles for gene delivery.

  10. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  11. Cardiac gene therapy: optimization of gene delivery techniques in vivo.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Swain, JaBaris D; White, Jennifer D; Low, David; Stedman, Hansell; Bridges, Charles R

    2010-04-01

    Vector-mediated cardiac gene therapy holds tremendous promise as a translatable platform technology for treating many cardiovascular diseases. The ideal technique is one that is efficient and practical, allowing for global cardiac gene expression, while minimizing collateral expression in other organs. Here we survey the available in vivo vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery methods--including transcutaneous, intravascular, intramuscular, and cardiopulmonary bypass techniques--with consideration of the relative merits and deficiencies of each. Review of available techniques suggests that an optimal method for vector-mediated gene delivery to the large animal myocardium would ideally employ retrograde and/or anterograde transcoronary gene delivery,extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation, an increased myocardial transcapillary gradient using physical methods, increased endothelial permeability with pharmacological agents, minimal collateral gene expression by isolation of the cardiac circulation from the systemic, and have low immunogenicity.

  12. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Soo; George Priya Doss, C.; Yagihara, Shin; Kim, Do-Young

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole. PMID:25250340

  13. Non-viral gene delivery using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ditto, Andrew J; Shah, Parth N; Yun, Yang H

    2009-11-01

    Although the potential benefits of gene therapy for the treatment of acquired and inherited genetic diseases have been demonstrated through preclinical studies, the results of human gene therapy trials have been disappointing. Recombinant viruses are the primary vectors of choice because of their ability to protect genetic materials, cross cellular membranes, escape from endosomes and transport their genetic materials into the nucleus. Unfortunately, viral vectors have been unable to gain widespread clinical application because of their toxicity and immunogenicity. Consequently, the need for safer alternatives has led to the development of liposomes, cationic polyplexes, microparticles and nanoparticles. Although these alternative vectors have shown promise, degradable nanoparticles are the only non-viral vectors that can provide a targeted intracellular delivery with controlled release properties. Furthermore, the potential advantage of degradable nanoparticles over their non-degradable counterparts is the reduced toxicity and the avoidance of accumulation within the target tissue after repeated administration. In this article, current non-viral gene delivery devices are reviewed with a special emphasis on nanoparticle gene delivery systems. Also, the authors highlight their philosophy and efforts on the development of l-tyrosine-based polyphosphate nanoparticle-based non-viral gene delivery systems and assess the potential benefits and shortcomings of their approach.

  14. Modified montmorillonite as vector for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Cheng, Winston T K; Kuo, Tzang-Fu

    2006-06-01

    Currently, gene delivery systems can be divided into two parts: viral or non-viral vectors. In general, viral vectors have a higher efficiency on gene delivery. However, they may sometimes provoke mutagenesis and carcinogenesis once re-activating in human body. Lots of non-viral vectors have been developed that tried to solve the problems happened on viral vectors. Unfortunately, most of non-viral vectors showed relatively lower transfection rate. The aim of this study is to develop a non-viral vector for gene delivery system. Montmorillonite (MMT) is one of clay minerals that consist of hydrated aluminum with Si-O tetrahedrons on the bottom of the layer and Al-O(OH)2 octahedrons on the top. The inter-layer space is about 12 A. The room is not enough to accommodate DNA for gene delivery. In the study, the cationic hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) will be intercalated into the interlayer of MMT as a layer expander to expand the layer space for DNA accommodation. The optimal condition for the preparation of DNA-HDTMA-MMT is as follows: 1 mg of 1.5CEC HDTMA-MMT was prepared under pH value of 10.7 and with soaking time for 2 h. The DNA molecules can be protected from nuclease degradation, which can be proven by the electrophoresis analysis. DNA was successfully transfected into the nucleus of human dermal fibroblast and expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene with green fluorescence emission. The HDTMA-MMT has a great potential as a vector for gene delivery in the future.

  15. Efficacy and safety of long-term prophylaxis in severe hemophilia A dogs following liver gene therapy using AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Denise E; Lange, Amy M; Altynova, Ekaterina S; Sarkar, Rita; Zhou, Shangzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Franck, Helen G; Nichols, Timothy C; Arruda, Valder R; Kazazian, Haig H

    2011-03-01

    Developing adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia A (HA) has been challenging due to the large size of the factor VIII (FVIII) complementary DNA and the concern for the development of inhibitory antibodies to FVIII in HA patients. Here, we perform a systematic study in HA dogs by delivering a canine FVIII (cFVIII) transgene either as a single chain or two chains in an AAV vector. An optimized cFVIII single chain delivered using AAV serotype 8 (AAV8) by peripheral vein injection resulted in a dose-response with sustained expression of FVIII up to 7% (n = 4). Five HA dogs administered two-chain delivery using either AAV8 or AAV9 via the portal vein expressed long-term, vector dose-dependent levels of FVIII activity (up to 10%). In the two-chain approach, circulating cFVIII antigen levels were more than fivefold higher than activity. Notably, no long-term immune response to FVIII was observed in any of the dogs (1/9 dogs had a transient inhibitor). Long-term follow-up of the dogs showed a remarkable reduction (>90%) of bleeding episodes in a combined total of 24 years of observation. These data demonstrate that both approaches are safe and achieve dose-dependent therapeutic levels of FVIII expression, which supports translational studies of AAV-mediated delivery for HA.

  16. Novel Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Rachel Jennifer

    The lung is an important target for gene and drug therapy of many diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), tubuerculosis (TB) and lung cancer. In fact, the pulmonary route has been employed as a means of delivering drugs for centuries, dating back 4000 years to India where inhaled vapors were used for medicinal purpose. Currently, pulmonary administration of small, hydrophobic drugs leads to rapid local and systemic absorption. However, delivery of large biomacromolecules, such as therapeutic genes, has not yet been accomplished. Here, I test the hypothesis that a rationally engineered nanoparticle (NP) vector can improve delivery of large biomacromolecules. . In this dissertation I tested this hypothesis using a hybrid NP delivery system consisting of a blend of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE), a cationic polymer that is particularly useful for delivery of nucleic acids.. PBAE/PLGA nanoparticles (15% PBAE) loaded with plasmid DNA were surface modified with cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) via a PEGylated phospholipid linker. This optimized NP formulation was able to induce substantial intracellular uptake and transfect lung epithelial cells in vitro while imparting minimal cellular toxicity. In order to determine the most effective method to deliver these NPs to the lung I used fluorescently labeled particles to study the biodistribution of particles after administration to the lung of mice via various administration routes. I determined that the intranasal route was most effective. I further investigated this route and determined that an average of 37.1 +/- 15.1 % of lung cells had NP association after 4hrs. I also investigated the association of particles with different lung cell types like macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells and determined that our best particle formulations associated with approximately 80% of both of these cell types. To demonstrate the ability of the

  17. Polymers for gene delivery across length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, David

    2006-06-01

    A number of human diseases stem from defective genes. One approach to treating such diseases is to replace, or override, the defective genes with normal genes, an approach called 'gene therapy'. However, the introduction of correctly functioning DNA into cells is a non-trivial matter, and cells must be coaxed to internalize, and then use, the DNA in the desired manner. A number of polymer-based synthetic systems, or 'vectors', have been developed to entice cells to use exogenous DNA. These systems work across the nano, micro and macro length scales, and have been under continuous development for two decades, with varying degrees of success. The design criteria for the construction of more-effective delivery vectors at each length scale are continually evolving. This review focuses on the most recent developments in polymer-based vector design at each length scale.

  18. RANGE: Gene Transfer of Reversibly Controlled Polycistronic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiwei; Cao, Liji; Luo, Chonglin; Ditzel, Désirée AW; Peter, Jörg; Sprengel, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    We developed a single vector recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) expression system for spatial and reversible control of polycistronic gene expression. Our approach (i) integrates the advantages of the tetracycline (Tet)-controlled transcriptional silencer tTSKid and the self-cleaving 2A peptide bridge, (ii) combines essential regulatory components as an autoregulatory loop, (iii) simplifies the gene delivery scheme, and (iv) regulates multiple genes in a synchronized manner. Controlled by an upstream Tet-responsive element (TRE), both the ubiquitous chicken β-actin promoter (CAG) and the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter (Syn) could regulate expression of tTSKid together with two 2A-linked reporter genes. Transduction in vitro exhibited maximally 50-fold regulation by doxycycline (Dox). Determined by gene delivery method as well as promoter, highly specific tissues were transduced in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) visualized reversible “ON/OFF” gene switches over repeated “Doxy-Cycling” in living mice. Thus, the reversible rAAV-mediated N-cistronic gene expression system, termed RANGE, may serve as a versatile tool to achieve reversible polycistronic gene regulation for the study of gene function as well as gene therapy. PMID:23571608

  19. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  20. FUNCTIONAL NANOPARTICLES FOR MOLECULAR IMAGING GUIDED GENE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy has great potential to bring tremendous changes in treatment of various diseases and disorders. However, one of the impediments to successful gene therapy is the inefficient delivery of genes to target tissues and the inability to monitor delivery of genes and therapeutic responses at the targeted site. The emergence of molecular imaging strategies has been pivotal in optimizing gene therapy; since it can allow us to evaluate the effectiveness of gene delivery noninvasively and spatiotemporally. Due to the unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials, numerous functional nanoparticles show promise in accomplishing gene delivery with the necessary feature of visualizing the delivery. In this review, recent developments of nanoparticles for molecular imaging guided gene delivery are summarized. PMID:22473061

  1. Fetal muscle gene therapy/gene delivery in large animals.

    PubMed

    Abi-Nader, Khalil N; David, Anna L

    2011-01-01

    Gene delivery to the fetal muscles is a potential strategy for the early treatment of muscular dystrophies. In utero muscle gene therapy can also be used to treat other genetic disorders such as hemophilia, where the missing clotting proteins may be secreted from the treated muscle. In the past few years, studies in small animal models have raised the hopes that a phenotypic cure can be obtained after fetal application of gene therapy. Studies of efficacy and safety in large animals are, however, essential before clinical application can be considered in the human fetus. For this reason, the development of clinically applicable strategies for the delivery of gene therapy to the fetal muscles is of prime importance. In this chapter, we describe the protocols for in utero ultrasound-guided gene delivery to the ovine fetal muscle in early gestation. In particular, procedures to inject skeletal muscle groups such as the thigh and thoracic musculature and targeting the diaphragm in the fetus are described in detail.

  2. Synthetic virology: engineering viruses for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Caitlin M; Kuypers, Brianna E; Lam, Michael T; Robinson, Tawana M; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or 'bionic' viruses, feature engineered components, or 'parts', that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies--rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational--have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavors will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine.

  3. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    From the studies performed during the last one year, we determined the effects of AAV-mediated anti-angiogenic gene therapy as a combination therapy...angiogenic gene therapy in combination with chemotherapy. In the next year, we will determine whether such a combination therapy would provide regression of established tumors.

  4. [Developments in gene delivery vectors for ocular gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Khabou, Hanen; Dalkara, Deniz

    2015-05-01

    Gene therapy is quickly becoming a reality applicable in the clinic for inherited retinal diseases. Its remarkable success in safety and efficacy, in clinical trials for Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) type II generated significant interest and opened up possibilities for a new era of retinal gene therapies. Success in these clinical trials was mainly due to the favorable characteristics of the retina as a target organ. The eye offers several advantages as it is readily accessible and has some degree of immune privilege making it suitable for application of viral vectors. The viral vectors most frequently used for retinal gene delivery are lentivirus, adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Here we will discuss the use of these viral vectors in retinal gene delivery with a strong focus on favorable properties of AAV. Thanks to its small size, AAV diffuses well in the inter-neural matrix making it suitable for applications in neural retina. Building on this initial clinical success with LCA II, we have now many opportunities to extend this proof-of-concept to other retinal diseases using AAV as a vector. This article will discuss what are some of the most imminent cellular targets for such therapies and the AAV toolkit that has been built to target these cells successfully. We will also discuss some of the challenges that we face in translating AAV-based gene therapies to the clinic.

  5. Microfluidic methods for non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wing-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is a compelling technology that shows considerable promise in applications ranging from gene expression profiling to cell-based assays. Owing to its capacity to enable generation of single droplets and multiple droplet arrays with precisely controlled composition and a narrow size distribution, recently microfluidics has been exploited for delivery of genes. This article provides an overview of recent advances in microfluidic gene delivery, and speculates the prospects for further research. The objectives of this article are to illustrate the potential roles played by microfluidics in gene delivery research, and to shed new light on strategies to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy.

  6. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  7. Production and clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Zhaopei; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy for specific treatment of numerous gene-associated human diseases by intentionally altering the gene expression in pathological cells. A successful clinical application of gene-based therapy depends on an efficient gene delivery system. Many efforts have been attempted to improve the safety and efficiency of gene-based therapies. Nanoparticles have been proved to be the most promising vehicles for clinical gene therapy due to their tunable size, shape, surface, and biological behaviors. In this review, the clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery will be particularly highlighted. Several promising candidates, which are closest to clinical applications, will be briefly reviewed. Then, the recent developments of nanoparticles for clinical gene therapy will be identified and summarized. Finally, the development of nanoparticles for clinical gene delivery in future will be prospected. PMID:27088105

  8. Gene delivery in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Y L; Chen, X G; W T, Godbey

    2015-11-01

    As a promising strategy to aid or replace tissue/organ transplantation, gene delivery has been used for regenerative medicine applications to create or restore normal function at the cell and tissue levels. Gene delivery has been successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo in these applications. Excellent proliferation capabilities and differentiation potentials render certain cells as excellent candidates for ex vivo gene delivery for regenerative medicine applications, which is why multipotent and pluripotent cells have been intensely studied in this vein. In this review, gene delivery is discussed in detail, along with its applications to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A definition of a stem cell is compared to a definition of a stem property, and both provide the foundation for an in-depth look at gene delivery investigations from a germ lineage angle.

  9. Getting the most from gene delivery by repeated DNA transfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montani, Maura; Marchini, Cristina; Badillo Pazmay, Gretta Veronica; Andreani, Cristina; Bartolacci, Caterina; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular delivery of reporter genes causes cells to be luminescent or fluorescent, this condition being of tremendous relevance in applied physics research. Potential applications range from the study of spatial distribution and dynamics of plasma membrane and cytosolic proteins up to the rational design of nanocarriers for gene therapy. Since efficiency of gene delivery is the main limit in most biophysical studies, versatile methods that can maximize gene expression are urgently needed. Here, we describe a robust methodology based on repeated gene delivery in mammalian cells. We find this procedure to be much more efficient than the more traditional route of gene delivery making it possible to get high-quality data without affecting cell viability. Implications for biophysical investigations are discussed.

  10. Investigation of a thiolated polymer in gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalocostantis, Irene

    Thiol-containing bioreducible polymers show significant potential as delivery vectors in gene therapy, a rapidly growing field which seeks to treat genetic-based disorders by delivering functional synthetic genes to diseased cells. Studies have shown that thiolated polymers exhibit improved biodegradability and prolonged in vivo circulation times over non-thiolated polymers. However, the extent to which thiol concentrations impact the carrier's delivery potential has not been well explored. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate how relative concentrations of free thiols and disulfide crosslinks impact a polymeric carriers delivery performance with respect to DNA packaging, complex stability, cargo protection, gene release, internalization efficiency and cytotoxicity. To accomplish this goal, several fluorescent polymers containing varying concentrations of thiol groups were synthesized by conjugating thiol-pendant chains onto the primary amines of cationic poly(allylamine). In vitro delivery assays and characterization techniques were employed to assess the effect of thiols in gene delivery.

  11. Cardiac Gene Delivery in Large Animal Models: Antegrade Techniques.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shin; Leonardson, Lauren; Hajjar, Roger J; Ishikawa, Kiyotake

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous antegrade coronary injection is among the least invasive cardiac selective gene delivery methods. However, transduction efficiency is quite low with a simple bolus antegrade injection. In order to improve the transduction efficiency using antegrade delivery, several additional approaches have been proposed.In this chapter, we briefly discuss important elements associated with intracoronary delivery methods and present protocols for three different catheter-based antegrade delivery techniques in a preclinical large animal model. Despite the lower transduction efficacy relative to more invasive delivery techniques, antegrade techniques have the advantage of being clinically well established and having safer profiles which is important when treating patients with cardiac disease.

  12. Recent progresses in gene delivery-based bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Yu-Han; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Li, Kuei-Chang; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Gene therapy has converged with bone engineering over the past decade, by which a variety of therapeutic genes have been delivered to stimulate bone repair. These genes can be administered via in vivo or ex vivo approach using either viral or nonviral vectors. This article reviews the fundamental aspects and recent progresses in the gene therapy-based bone engineering, with emphasis on the new genes, viral vectors and gene delivery approaches.

  13. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part I. Gene delivery technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product (Glybera) has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy finally realized the promise that genes can be medicines. The diverse gene delivery techniques available today have laid the foundation for gene therapy applications in treating a wide range of human diseases. Some of the most urgent unmet medical needs, such as cancer and pandemic infectious diseases, have been tackled by gene therapy strategies with promising results. Furthermore, combining gene transfer with other breakthroughs in biomedical research and novel biotechnologies opened new avenues for gene therapy. Such innovative therapeutic strategies are unthinkable until now, and are expected to be revolutionary. In part I of this review, we introduced recent development of non-viral and viral gene delivery technology platforms. As cell-based gene therapy blossomed, we also summarized the diverse types of cells and vectors employed in ex vivo gene transfer. Finally, challenges in current gene delivery technologies for human use were discussed.

  14. Overcoming Nonviral Gene Delivery Barriers: Perspective and Future

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Charles H.; Chen, Chih-Kaung; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Rane, Snehal; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2013-01-01

    A key end goal of gene delivery research is to develop clinically-relevant vectors that can be used to combat elusive diseases such as AIDS. Despite promising engineering strategies, efficiency and ultimately gene modulation efficacy of nonviral vectors have been hindered by numerous in vitro and in vivo barriers that have resulted in sub-viral performance. In this perspective, we concentrate on the gene delivery barriers associated with the two most common classes of nonviral vectors, cationic-based lipids and polymers. We present the existing delivery barriers and summarize current vector-specific strategies to overcome said barriers. PMID:24093932

  15. Transient photoreceptor deconstruction by CNTF enhances rAAV-mediated cone functional rescue in late stage CNGB3-achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, András M; Rowlan, Jessica S; Corr, Amanda T Parton; Reinstein, Shelby L; Boye, Sanford L; Cooper, Ann E; Gonzalez, Amaliris; Levy, Britt; Wen, Rong; Hauswirth, William W; Beltran, William A; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-06-01

    Achromatopsia is a genetic disorder of cones, and one of the most common forms is a channelopathy caused by mutations in the β-subunit, CNGB3, of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel. Recombinant adeno-associated virus of serotype 5 (rAAV5)-mediated gene transfer of human CNGB3 cDNA to mutant dog cones results in functional and structural rescue in dogs <0.5 years of age, but treatment is minimally effective in dogs >1 year. We now test a new therapeutic concept by combining gene therapy with the administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Intravitreal CNTF causes transient dedifferentiation of photoreceptors, a process called deconstruction, whereby visual cells become immature with short outer segments, and decreased retinal function and gene expression that subsequently return to normal. Cone function was successfully rescued in all mutant dogs treated between 14 and 42 months of age with this strategy. CNTF-mediated deconstruction and regeneration of the photoreceptor outer segments prepares the mutant cones optimally for gene augmentation therapy.

  16. AAV-mediated transfer of RhoA shRNA and CNTF promotes retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cen, Ling-Ping; Liang, Jia-Jian; Chen, Jian-Huan; Harvey, Alan R; Ng, Tsz Kin; Zhang, Mingzhi; Pang, Chi Pui; Cui, Qi; Fan, You-Ming

    2017-02-20

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) mediated transfer of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and RhoA shRNA has additive effects on promoting the survival and axon regeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve crush (ONC). Silencing effects of AAV-RhoA shRNA were confirmed by examining neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and by quantifying RhoA expression levels with western blotting. Young adult Fischer rats received an intravitreal injection of (i) saline, (ii) AAV green fluorescent protein (GFP), (iii) AAV-CNTF, (iv) AAV-RhoA shRNA, or (v) a combination of both AAV-CNTF and AAV-RhoA shRNA. Two weeks later, the ON was completely crushed. Three weeks after ONC, RGC survival was estimated by counting βIII-tubulin-positive neurons in retinal whole mounts. Axon regeneration was evaluated by counting GAP-43-positive axons in the crushed ON. It was found that AAV-RhoA shRNA decreased RhoA expression levels and promoted neurite outgrowth in vitro. In the ONC model, AAV-RhoA shRNA by itself had only weak beneficial effects on RGC axon regeneration. However, when combined with AAV-CNTF, AAV-RhoA shRNA significantly improved the therapeutic effect of AAV-CNTF on axon regeneration by nearly two fold, even though there was no significant change in RGC viability. In sum, this combination of vectors increases the regenerative response and can lead to more successful therapeutic outcomes following neurotrauma.

  17. AAV Mediated GDNF Secretion From Retinal Glia Slows Down Retinal Degeneration in a Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Guerin, Karen I; Hoffmann, Natalie V; Visel, Meike; Klimczak, Ryan R; Schaffer, David V; Flannery, John G

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in over 80 identified genes can induce apoptosis in photoreceptors, resulting in blindness with a prevalence of 1 in 3,000 individuals. This broad genetic heterogeneity of disease impacting a wide range of photoreceptor functions renders the design of gene-specific therapies for photoreceptor degeneration impractical and necessitates the development of mutation-independent treatments to slow photoreceptor cell death. One promising strategy for photoreceptor neuroprotection is neurotrophin secretion from Müller cells, the primary retinal glia. Müller glia are excellent targets for secreting neurotrophins as they span the entire tissue, ensheath all neuronal populations, are numerous, and persist through retinal degeneration. We previously engineered an adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant (ShH10) capable of efficient and selective glial cell transduction through intravitreal injection. ShH10-mediated glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) secretion from glia, generates high GDNF levels in treated retinas, leading to sustained functional rescue for over 5 months. This GDNF secretion from glia following intravitreal vector administration is a safe and effective means to slow the progression of retinal degeneration in a rat model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and shows significant promise as a gene therapy to treat human retinal degenerations. These findings also demonstrate for the first time that glia-mediated secretion of neurotrophins is a promising treatment that may be applicable to other neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:21522134

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  19. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-11-29

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome. PMID:27898094

  1. AAV-mediated Sirt1 overexpression in skeletal muscle activates oxidative capacity but does not prevent insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Vilà, Laia; Roca, Carles; Elias, Ivet; Casellas, Alba; Lage, Ricardo; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by triglyceride accumulation and reduced lipid oxidation capacity in skeletal muscle. SIRT1 is a key protein in the regulation of lipid oxidation and its expression is reduced in the skeletal muscle of insulin resistant mice. In this tissue, Sirt1 up-regulates the expression of genes involved in oxidative metabolism and improves mitochondrial function mainly through PPARGC1 deacetylation. Here we examined whether Sirt1 overexpression mediated by adeno-associated viral vectors of serotype 1 (AAV1) specifically in skeletal muscle can counteract the development of insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet in mice. AAV1-Sirt1-treated mice showed up-regulated expression of key genes related to β-oxidation together with increased levels of phosphorylated AMP protein kinase. Moreover, SIRT1 overexpression in skeletal muscle also increased basal phosphorylated levels of AKT. However, AAV1-Sirt1 treatment was not enough to prevent high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Although Sirt1 gene transfer to skeletal muscle induced changes at the muscular level related with lipid and glucose homeostasis, our data indicate that overexpression of SIRT1 in skeletal muscle is not enough to improve whole-body insulin resistance and that suggests that SIRT1 has to be increased in other metabolic tissues to prevent insulin resistance. PMID:27909699

  2. Biodegradable polyphosphoester micelles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Mao, Hai-Quan; Li, Weiping; Lin, Kevin Y; Leong, Kam W

    2004-08-01

    A new biodegradable polyphosphoester, poly[[(cholesteryl oxocarbonylamido ethyl) methyl bis(ethylene) ammonium iodide] ethyl phosphate] (PCEP) was synthesized and investigated for gene delivery. Carrying a positive charge in its backbone and a lipophilic cholesterol structure in the side chain, PCEP self-assembled into micelles in aqueous buffer at room temperature with an average size of 60-100 nm. It could bind and protect plasmid DNA from nuclease digestion. Cell proliferation assay indicated a lower cytotoxicity for PCEP than for poly-L-lysine and Lipofectamine. The IC50 determined by the WST-1 assay was 69.8, 51.6, and 12.1 microg/mL for PCEP, Lipofectamine, and poly-L-lysine, respectively. PCEP efficiently delivered DNA to several cell lines such as HEK293, Caco-2, and HeLa. The highest efficiency was achieved when PCEP/DNA complex was prepared in Opti-MEM with a +/- charge ratio of 1.5-2. The transfection efficiency did not change significantly when the complex was used 3 days after preparation. The addition of chloroquine to the formulation increased transfection efficiency 10- to 50-fold compared to the complex alone. In vivo studies showed a luciferase expression by PCEP/DNA complexes in muscle increasing with time during 3 months, although the expression level was lower than that by direct injection of naked DNA. In addition to biodegradability and lower toxicity, the PCEP micelle carrier offers structural versatility. The backbone charge density and the side chain lipophilicity are two parameters that can be varied through copolymerization and monomer variation to optimize the transfection efficiency.

  3. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-01

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds’ escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds’ cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  4. Gene transfer in the liver using recombinant adeno-associated virus

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Seemin Seher; Li, Jia; Godwin, Jonathan; Gao, Guangping; Zhong, Li

    2013-01-01

    Liver-directed gene transfer and gene therapy are rapidly gaining attention primarily because the liver is centrally involved in a variety of metabolic functions that are affected in various inherited disorders. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a popular gene delivery vehicle for gene therapy and intravenous delivery of some rAAV serotypes results in very efficient transduction of the liver. rAAV-mediated and liver-directed gene transfer can help in creating somatic transgenic animals or disease models and studying the function of various genes and miRNAs. The liver is the target tissue for gene therapy of many inborn metabolic diseases and may also be exploited as a “bio-factory” for the production of coagulation factors, insulin and growth hormones and other non-hepatic proteins. Hence efficient delivery of transgenes and small RNAs to the liver by rAAV vectors has been of long-standing interest to research scientists and clinicians alike. PMID:23686826

  5. Theranostic agents for intracellular gene delivery with spatiotemporal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peters, Jonathan T.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the modification of gene expression to treat a disease. However, efficient intracellular delivery and monitoring of gene therapeutic agents is an ongoing challenge. Use of theranostic agents with suitable targeted, controlled delivery and imaging modalities has the potential to greatly advance gene therapy. Inorganic nanoparticles including magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been shown to be effective theranostic agents for the delivery and spatiotemporal tracking of oligonucleotides in vitro and even a few cases in vivo. Major concerns remain to be addressed including cytotoxicity, particularly of quantum dots; effective dosage of nanoparticles for optimal theranostic effect; development of real-time in vivo imaging; and further improvement of gene therapy efficacy. PMID:23606894

  6. Nanoscale structure of protamine/DNA complexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Simona; Brocca, Paola; Del Favero, Elena; Rondelli, Valeria; Cantù, Laura; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the internal packing of gene carriers is a key-factor to realize both gene protection during transport and de-complexation at the delivery site. Here, we investigate the structure of complexes formed by DNA fragments and protamine, applied in gene delivery. We found that complexes are charge- and size-tunable aggregates, depending on the protamine/DNA ratio, hundred nanometers in size. Their compactness and fractal structure depend on the length of the DNA fragments. Accordingly, on the local scale, the sites of protamine/DNA complexation assume different morphologies, seemingly displaying clumping ability for the DNA network only for shorter DNA fragments.

  7. Intraneural convection enhanced delivery of AAVrh20 for targeting primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Pleticha, Josef; Jeng-Singh, Christian; Rezek, Rahaf; Zaibak, Manal; Beutler, Andreas S

    2014-05-01

    Gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is an attractive strategy to treat disorders of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), such as chronic pain or peripheral neuropathies. Although intrathecal (IT) administration of AAV has been the standard in the field for targeting the PNS, it lacks anatomical specificity and results in wide rostro-caudal distribution of the vector. An alternative approach is to deliver AAV directly to the peripheral nerve axon. The present study employed convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of a novel AAV serotype, AAVrh20, expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into rat sciatic nerve investigating its efficacy, anatomical selectivity, and safety, compared to the IT route. Intraneural CED resulted in transduction confined to the ipsilateral L4 and L5 DRG while IT administration led to promiscuous DRG transduction encompassing the entire lumbar region bilaterally. The transduction rate for intraneural AAV administration was similar to IT delivery (24% for L4 and 31.5% for L5 DRG versus 50% for L4 and 19.5% for L5 DRG). The use of hyperosmotic diluent did not further improve the transduction efficiency. AAVrh20 was superior to reference serotypes previously described to be most active for each route. Intraneural CED of AAV was associated with transient allodynia that resolved spontaneously. These findings establish intraneural CED as an alternative to IT administration for AAV mediated gene transfer to the PNS and, based on a reference rodent model, suggest AAVrh20 as a superior serotype for targeting the PNS.

  8. Smart Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The massive amount of human genetic information already available has accelerated the identification of target genes, making gene and nucleic acid therapy the next generation of medicine. Nanoparticle (NP)-based anticancer gene therapy treatment has received significant interest in this evolving field. Recent advances in vector technology have improved gene transfection efficiencies of nonviral vectors to a level similar to viruses. This review serves as an introduction to surface modifications of NPs based on polymeric structural improvements and target moieties. A discussion regarding the future perspective of multifunctional NPs in cancer therapy is also included. PMID:25531409

  9. Au nanoinjectors for electrotriggered gene delivery into the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mijeong; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of exogenous materials is an essential technique required for many fundamental biological researches and medical treatments. As our understanding of cell structure and function has been improved and diverse therapeutic agents with a subcellular site of action have been continuously developed, there is a demand to enhance the performance of delivering devices. Ideal intracellular delivery devices should convey various kinds of exogenous materials without deteriorating cell viability regardless of cell type and, furthermore, precisely control the location and the timing of delivery as well as the amount of delivered materials for advanced researches.In this chapter the development of a new intracellular delivery device, a nanoinjector made of a Au (gold) nanowire (a Au nanoinjector) is described in which delivery is triggered by external application of an electric pulse. As a model study, a gene was delivered directly into the nucleus of a neuroblastoma cell, and successful delivery without cell damage was confirmed by the expression of the delivered gene. The insertion of a Au nanoinjector directly into a cell can be generally applied to any kind of cell, and a high degree of surface modification of Au allows attachment of diverse materials such as proteins, small molecules, or nanoparticles as well as genes on Au nanoinjectors. This expands their applicability, and it is expected that they will provide important information on the effects of delivered exogenous materials and consequently contribute to the development of related therapeutic or clinical technologies.

  10. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-05-15

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering.

  11. Vitreal delivery of AAV vectored Cnga3 restores cone function in CNGA3-/-/Nrl-/- mice, an all-cone model of CNGA3 achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Tao, Ye; Deng, Wen-Tao; Zhu, Ping; Li, Jie; Dai, Xufeng; Zhang, Yuxin; Shi, Wei; Liu, Xuan; Chiodo, Vince A; Ding, Xi-Qin; Zhao, Chen; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Zhang, Zuoming; Qu, Jia; Hauswirth, William W; Pang, Ji-Jing

    2015-07-01

    The CNGA3(-/-)/Nrl(-/-) mouse is a cone-dominant model with Cnga3 channel deficiency, which partially mimics the all cone foveal structure of human achromatopsia 2 with CNGA3 mutations. Although subretinal (SR) AAV vector administration can transfect retinal cells efficiently, the injection-induced retinal detachment can cause retinal damage, particularly when SR vector bleb includes the fovea. We therefore explored whether cone function-structure could be rescued in CNGA3(-/-)/Nrl(-/-) mice by intravitreal (IVit) delivery of tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant AAV8. We find that AAV-mediated CNGA3 expression can restore cone function and rescue structure following IVit delivery of AAV8 (Y447, 733F) vector. Rescue was assessed by restoration of the cone-mediated electroretinogram (ERG), optomotor responses, and cone opsin immunohistochemistry. Demonstration of gene therapy in a cone-dominant mouse model by IVit delivery provides a potential alternative vector delivery mode for safely transducing foveal cones in achromatopsia patients and in other human retinal diseases affecting foveal function.

  12. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  13. Practical delivery of genes to the marketplace.

    PubMed

    Fischhoff, David A; Cline, Molly N

    2009-01-01

    Although new technologies in genomics are powerful tools for discovering genes and gaining insight into their function, discovery of a gene itself does not ensure its practical application. Commercialization of transgenic crop plants has now taken place for more than a decade. Plant biotechnology, which can be seen as an extension of traditional plant breeding for crop improvement, offers one way to boost food, feed, fiber, and fuel production and has provided significant environmental and economic benefits. Like plant breeding, biotechnology introduces new traits with specific benefits into plants, and does so in a selective, precise, and controlled manner. Several steps are necessary before commercializing a crop with a biotechnology trait, including not only gene discovery and product development but also regulatory clearance, stewardship evaluation, and stakeholder dialogue. Examples will be drawn from the work at Monsanto on the development and commercialization of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans, which is representative of the first wave of agronomic traits.

  14. Ex Vivo Culture of Patient Tissue & Examination of Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the use of patient tissue as an ex vivo model for the study of gene delivery. Fresh patient tissue obtained at the time of surgery is sliced and maintained in culture. The ex vivo model system allows for the physical delivery of genes into intact patient tissue and gene expression is analysed by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS detection system. The bioluminescent detection system demonstrates rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression within individual slices without the need for tissue sacrifice. This slice tissue culture system may be used in a variety of tissue types including normal and malignant tissue and allows us to study the effects of the heterogeneous nature of intact tissue and the high degree of variability between individual patients. This model system could be used in certain situations as an alternative to animal models and as a complementary preclinical mode prior to entering clinical trial. PMID:21326169

  15. Physical non-viral gene delivery methods for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Adam J; Forrest, M Laird; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The integration of gene therapy into tissue engineering to control differentiation and direct tissue formation is not a new concept; however, successful delivery of nucleic acids into primary cells, progenitor cells, and stem cells has proven exceptionally challenging. Viral vectors are generally highly effective at delivering nucleic acids to a variety of cell populations, both dividing and non-dividing, yet these viral vectors are marred by significant safety concerns. Non-viral vectors are preferred for gene therapy, despite lower transfection efficiencies, and possess many customizable attributes that are desirable for tissue engineering applications. However, there is no single non-viral gene delivery strategy that "fits-all" cell types and tissues. Thus, there is a compelling opportunity to examine different non-viral vectors, especially physical vectors, and compare their relative degrees of success. This review examines the advantages and disadvantages of physical non-viral methods (i.e., microinjection, ballistic gene delivery, electroporation, sonoporation, laser irradiation, magnetofection, and electric field-induced molecular vibration), with particular attention given to electroporation because of its versatility, with further special emphasis on Nucleofection™. In addition, attributes of cellular character that can be used to improve differentiation strategies are examined for tissue engineering applications. Ultimately, electroporation exhibits a high transfection efficiency in many cell types, which is highly desirable for tissue engineering applications, but electroporation and other physical non-viral gene delivery methods are still limited by poor cell viability. Overcoming the challenge of poor cell viability in highly efficient physical non-viral techniques is the key to using gene delivery to enhance tissue engineering applications.

  16. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Tokareva, Olena; Varone, Antonio; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery research has gained momentum with the use of lipophilic vectors that mimic viral systems to increase transfection efficiency. However, maintaining cell viability with these systems remains a major challenge. Therefore biocompatible and nontoxic biopolymers that are designed by combining non-immunological viral mimicking components with suitable carriers have been explored to address these limitations. In the present study recombinant DNA technology was used to design a multi-functional gene delivery system for nuclear targeting, while also supporting cell viability. Spider dragline silk recombinant proteins were modified with DNA condensing units and the proton sponge endosomal escape pathway was utilized for enhanced delivery. Short-term transfection efficiency in a COS-7 cell line (adherent kidney cells isolated from African green monkey) was enhanced compared to lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine (PEI), as was cell viability with these recombinant bio-polyplexes. Endosomal escape and consequent nuclear targeting were shown with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24889658

  17. Intramuscular viral delivery of paraplegin rescues peripheral axonopathy in a model of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Pirozzi, Marinella; Quattrini, Angelo; Andolfi, Gennaro; Dina, Giorgia; Malaguti, Maria Chiara; Auricchio, Alberto; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of peripheral motor axons is a common feature of several debilitating diseases including complicated forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia. One such form is caused by loss of the mitochondrial energy-dependent protease paraplegin. Paraplegin-deficient mice display a progressive degeneration in several axonal tracts, characterized by the accumulation of morphological abnormal mitochondria. We show that adenoassociated virus–mediated (AAV-mediated) intramuscular delivery of paraplegin halted the progression of neuropathological changes and rescued mitochondrial morphology in the peripheral nerves of paraplegin-deficient mice. One single injection before onset of symptoms improved the motor performance of paraplegin-deficient mice for up to 10 months, indicating that the peripheral neuropathy contributes to the clinical phenotype. This study provides a proof of principle that gene transfer may be an effective therapeutic option for patients with paraplegin deficiency and demonstrates that AAV vectors can be successfully employed for retrograde delivery of an intracellular protein to spinal motor neurons, opening new perspectives for several hereditary axonal neuropathies of the peripheral nerves. PMID:16357941

  18. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa caused by MFRP mutations: human phenotype and preliminary proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C; Aleman, Tomas S; Schwartz, Sharon B; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L; Cideciyan, Artur V; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2012-04-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy.

  19. Gene Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by MFRP Mutations: Human Phenotype and Preliminary Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A.; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy. PMID:22142163

  20. Delivery of gene-expressing fragments using quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Hanada, Sanshiro; Fujioka, Kouki; Yasuhara, Masato; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach to supplement a deficient gene function. Although there has been some success with specific gene delivery using various methods including viral vectors and liposomes, most of these methods have a limited efficiency or also carry a risk for oncogenesis. Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), have potential to be applied to molecular biology and bioimaging, since some nanocrystals emit higher and longer lasting fluorescence than conventional organic probes do. We herein report that quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLSP) successfully introduced the gene-fragments with promoter elements, which promoted the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene in mammalian cells. The expression of eGFP protein was observed when the QD/geneconstruct was added to the culture media. The gene-expression efficiency varied depending on multiple factors around QDs, such as 1) the reading direction of gene fragments, 2) the quantity of gene fragments attached on the surface of QD-constructs, 3) the surface electronic charges varied according to the structure of QD/gene-constructs, and 4) the particle size of QD/gene complex varied according to the structure and amounts of gene fragments. Using this QD/geneconstruct system, eGFP protein could be detected 28 days after the gene-introduction whereas the fluorescence of QDs was disappeared. This system therefore provides another method for the intracellular delivery of gene-fragments without using either viral vectors or specific liposomes. These results suggest that inappropriate treatment and disposal of QDs may still have risks to the environmental pollution including human health under certain conditions. Here we propose the further research for the immune and physiological responses in not only immune cells but also other cells, in order to clear the effect of all other nanoscale products as well as nanocrystal

  1. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-05-21

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study.

  2. Application of Ferriferous Oxide Modified by Chitosan in Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yu; Yuan, Tun; Zhang, Zhongwei; Li, Mingyuan; Yang, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to improve the traditional gene carriers are still required. Here we explore Fe3O4 modified with degradable polymers that enhances gene delivery and target delivery using permanent magnetic field. Two magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with chitosan (CTS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were synthesized by means of controlled chemical coprecipitation. Plasmid pEGFP was encapsulated as a reported gene. The ferriferous oxide complexes were approximately spherical; surface charge of CTS-Fe3O4 and PEG-Fe3O4 was about 20 mv and 0 mv, respectively. The controlled release of DNA from the CTS-Fe3O4 nanoparticles was observed. Concurrently, a desired Fe3O4 concentration of less than 2 mM was verified as safe by means of a cytotoxicity test in vitro. Presence of the permanent magnetic field significantly increased the transfection efficiency. Furthermore, the passive target property and safety of magnetic nanoparticles were also demonstrated in an in vivo test. The novel gene delivery system was proved to be an effective tool required for future target expression and gene therapy in vivo. PMID:23326667

  3. Novel gemini cationic lipids with carbamate groups for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhang, Shu-Biao; Cui, Shao-Hui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Hui-Ying; Lv, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    To obtain efficient non-viral vectors, a series of Gemini cationic lipids with carbamate linkers between headgroups and hydrophobic tails were synthesized. They have the hydrocarbon chains of 12, 14, 16 and 18 carbon atoms as tails, designated as G12, G14, G16 and G18, respectively. These Gemini cationic lipids were prepared into cationic liposomes for the study of the physicochemical properties and gene delivery. The DNA-bonding ability of these Gemini cationic liposomes was much better than their mono-head counterparts (designated as M12, M14, M16 and M18, respectively). In the same series of liposomes, bonding ability declined with an increase in tail length. They were tested for their gene-transferring capabilities in Hep-2 and A549 cells. They showed higher transfection efficiency than their mono-head counterparts and were comparable or superior in transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity to the commercial liposomes, DOTAP and Lipofectamine 2000. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the gene-transferring capabilities of these cationic lipids depended on hydrocarbon chain length. Gene transfection efficiency was maximal at a chain length of 14, as G14 can silence about 80 % of luciferase in A549 cells. Cell uptake results indicate that Gemini lipid delivery systems could be internalised by cells very efficiently. Thus, the Gemini cationic lipids could be used as synthetic non-viral gene delivery carriers for further study. PMID:25045521

  4. Chitosan nanoparticles for oral drug and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Katherine; Leong, Kam W

    2006-01-01

    Chitosan is a widely available, mucoadhesive polymer that is able to increase cellular permeability and improve the bioavailability of orally administered protein drugs. It can also be readily formed into nanoparticles able to entrap drugs or condense plasmid DNA. Studies on the formulation and oral delivery of such chitosan nanoparticles have demonstrated their efficacy in enhancing drug uptake and promoting gene expression. This review summarizes some of these findings and highlights the potential of chitosan as a component of oral delivery systems. PMID:17722528

  5. Baculovirus-mediated Gene Delivery and RNAi Applications

    PubMed Central

    Makkonen, Kaisa-Emilia; Airenne, Kari; Ylä-Herttulala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Baculoviruses are widely encountered in nature and a great deal of data is available about their safety and biology. Recently, these versatile, insect-specific viruses have demonstrated their usefulness in various biotechnological applications including protein production and gene transfer. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies exist and support their use as gene delivery vehicles in vertebrate cells. Recently, baculoviruses have also demonstrated high potential in RNAi applications in which several advantages of the virus make it a promising tool for RNA gene transfer with high safety and wide tropism. PMID:25912715

  6. New approaches to gene and cell therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, T; Mizukami, H; Ozawa, K; Sakata, Y; Nishimura, S

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia is considered suitable for gene therapy because it is caused by a single gene abnormality, and therapeutic coagulation factor levels may vary across a broad range. Recent success of hemophilia B gene therapy with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in a clinical trial showed the real prospect that, through gene therapy, a cure for hemophilia may become a reality. However, AAV-mediated gene therapy is not applicable to patients with hemophilia A at present, and neutralizing antibodies against AAV reduce the efficacy of AAV-mediated strategies. Because patients that benefit from AAV treatment (hemophilia B without neutralizing antibodies) are estimated to represent only 15% of total patients with hemophilia, the development of basic technologies for hemophilia A and those that result in higher therapeutic effects are critical. In this review, we present an outline of gene therapy methods for hemophilia, including the transition of technical developments thus far and our novel techniques.

  7. Reducible, dibromomaleimide-linked polymers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, James-Kevin Y; Choi, Jennifer L; Wei, Hua; Schellinger, Joan G; Pun, Suzie H

    2015-01-01

    Polycations have been successfully used as gene transfer vehicles both in vitro and in vivo; however, their cytotoxicity has been associated with increasing molecular weight. Polymers that can be rapidly degraded after internalization are typically better tolerated by mammalian cells compared to their non-degradable counterparts. Here, we report the use of a dibromomaleimide-alkyne (DBM-alkyne) linking agent to reversibly bridge cationic polymer segments for gene delivery and to provide site-specific functionalization by azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry. A panel of reducible and non-reducible, statistical copolymers of (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) were synthesized and evaluated. When complexed with plasmid DNA, the reducible and non-reducible polymers had comparable DNA condensation properties, sizes, and transfection efficiencies. When comparing cytotoxicity, the DBM-linked, reducible polymers were significantly less toxic than the non-reducible polymers. To demonstrate polymer functionalization by click chemistry, the DBM-linked polymers were tagged with an azide-fluorophore and were used to monitor cellular uptake. Overall, this polymer system introduces the use of a reversible linker, DBM-alkyne, to the area of gene delivery and allows for facile, orthogonal, and site-specific functionalization of gene delivery vehicles.

  8. Preclinical studies on specific gene therapy for recessive retinal degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Chauveau, Christine; Rolling, Fabienne

    2010-10-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are non-lethal and have a wide level of genetic heterogeneity. Many of the genes involved have now been identified and their function elucidated, providing a major step towards the development of gene-based treatments. The most widely used vectors for ocular gene delivery are based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) because they mediate long-term transgene expression in a variety of retinal cell types and elicit minimal immune responses. Extensive preclinical evaluation of gene transfer strategies in small and large animal models is key to the development of successful gene-based therapies for the retina. These preclinical studies have already allowed the field to reach the point where gene therapy to treat inherited blindness has been brought to clinical trial. In this manuscript, we focus on recombinant AAV-mediated specific gene therapy for recessive retinal degenerative diseases we describe the preclinical studies for the treatment of retinal degeneration caused by retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells or photoreceptor defects and the immune response induced by retinal rAAV gene transfer.

  9. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy.

  10. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  11. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  12. Characterization of novel cationic amphiphiles for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiang

    Gene therapy has drawn vast interest for treating, preventing, or controlling a myriad of diseases. The two most common methods for gene delivery use either synthetic or viral vectors. Viral vectors (infection) are by far the most effective and efficient means of DNA delivery, but their use is tempered by safety and immunogenicity concerns. Consequently, there has been a significant effort to develop and evaluate non- viral vectors, which include cationic amphiphiles and polymers, and more recently anionic amphiphiles. Non-viral vectors have the advantages of ease of production, better stability and low immunogenicity. At the same time, they also have a number of limitations, including low in vitro and in vivo transfection efficiencies, and cytotoxicity in many instances. My research project has been focused on design, development and characterizations of novel amphiphilic lipids for gene delivery. Through rational design and characterization of the amphiphile structures, it not only yielded vectors showing high transfection activities, but also provided information of the structure-activity relationship. These results provide us with a better understanding on the transfection process and future directions to further optimize the amphiphile structures. More specifically, my dissertation research included the following three parts: (i) characterization of novel lipopeptides possessing di- or tri- peptide head groups; (ii) determination of the effect of spacer (between the cationic domain and the hydrophobic domain of charge-reversal amphiphiles) length, rigidity and hydrophilicity on gene delivery; (iii) identification of the cellular uptake pathway and the transfection mechanism of a known enzyme-sensitive charge-reversal amphiphile.

  13. In utero gene therapy rescues vision in a murine model of congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Dejneka, Nadine S; Surace, Enrico M; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lyubarsky, Arkady; Savchenko, Andrey; Redmond, T Michael; Tang, Waixing; Wei, Zhangyong; Rex, Tonia S; Glover, Ernest; Maguire, Albert M; Pugh, Edward N; Jacobson, Samuel G; Bennett, Jean

    2004-02-01

    The congenital retinal blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) can be caused by mutations in the RPE65 gene. RPE65 plays a critical role in the visual cycle that produces the photosensitive pigment rhodopsin. Recent evidence from human studies of LCA indicates that earlier rather than later intervention may be more likely to restore vision. We determined the impact of in utero delivery of the human RPE65 cDNA to retinal pigment epithelium cells in a murine model of LCA, the Rpe65(-/-) mouse, using a serotype 2 adeno-associated virus packaged within an AAV1 capsid (AAV2/1). Delivery of AAV2/1-CMV-hRPE65 to fetuses (embryonic day 14) resulted in efficient transduction of retinal pigment epithelium, restoration of visual function, and measurable rhodopsin. The results demonstrate AAV-mediated correction of the deficit and suggest that in utero retinal gene delivery may be a useful approach for treating a variety of blinding congenital retinal diseases.

  14. New serine-derived gemini surfactants as gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-01-01

    Gemini surfactants have been extensively used for in vitro gene delivery. Amino acid-derived gemini surfactants combine the special aggregation properties characteristic of the gemini surfactants with high biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, novel serine-derived gemini surfactants, differing in alkyl chain lengths and in the linker group bridging the spacer to the headgroups (amine, amide and ester), were evaluated for their ability to mediate gene delivery either per se or in combination with helper lipids. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge, stability in aqueous buffer and ability to protect DNA. Efficient formulations, able to transfect up to 50% of the cells without causing toxicity, were found at very low surfactant/DNA charge ratios (1/1-2/1). The most efficient complexes presented sizes suitable for intravenous administration and negative surface charge, a feature known to preclude potentially adverse interactions with serum components. This work brings forward a new family of gemini surfactants with great potential as gene delivery systems.

  15. Enhanced athletic performance on multisite AAV-IGF1 gene transfer coincides with massive modification of the muscle proteome.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Antero; Moriggi, Manuela; Vasso, Michele; De Palma, Sara; Sturnega, Mauro; Friso, Giorgio; Gelfi, Cecilia; Giacca, Mauro; Zacchigna, Serena

    2012-02-01

    Progress in gene therapy has hinted at the potential misuse of gene transfer in sports to achieve better athletic performance, while escaping from traditional doping detection methods. Suitable animal models are therefore required in order to better define the potential effects and risks of gene doping. Here we describe a mouse model of gene doping based on adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) cDNA to multiple muscles. This treatment determined marked muscle hypertrophy, neovascularization, and fast-to-slow fiber type transition, similar to endurance exercise. In functional terms, treated mice showed impressive endurance gain, as determined by an exhaustive swimming test. The proteomic profile of the transduced muscles at 15 and 30 days after gene delivery revealed induction of key proteins controlling energy metabolism. At the earlier time point, enzymes controlling glycogen mobilization and anaerobic glycolysis were induced, whereas they were later replaced by proteins required for aerobic metabolism, including enzymes related to the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. These modifications coincided with the induction of several structural and contractile proteins, in agreement with the observed histological and functional changes. Collectively, these results give important insights into the biological response of muscles to continuous IGF-I expression in vivo and warn against the potential misuse of AAV-IGF1 as a doping agent.

  16. Hybrid Nanomaterial Complexes for Advanced Phage-guided Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yata, Teerapong; Lee, Koon-Yang; Dharakul, Tararaj; Songsivilai, Sirirurg; Bismarck, Alexander; Mintz, Paul J; Hajitou, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Developing nanomaterials that are effective, safe, and selective for gene transfer applications is challenging. Bacteriophages (phage), viruses that infect bacteria only, have shown promise for targeted gene transfer applications. Unfortunately, limited progress has been achieved in improving their potential to overcome mammalian cellular barriers. We hypothesized that chemical modification of the bacteriophage capsid could be applied to improve targeted gene delivery by phage vectors into mammalian cells. Here, we introduce a novel hybrid system consisting of two classes of nanomaterial systems, cationic polymers and M13 bacteriophage virus particles genetically engineered to display a tumor-targeting ligand and carry a transgene cassette. We demonstrate that the phage complex with cationic polymers generates positively charged phage and large aggregates that show enhanced cell surface attachment, buffering capacity, and improved transgene expression while retaining cell type specificity. Moreover, phage/polymer complexes carrying a therapeutic gene achieve greater cancer cell killing than phage alone. This new class of hybrid nanomaterial platform can advance targeted gene delivery applications by bacteriophage. PMID:25118171

  17. Hyaluronic acid enhances gene delivery into the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Seiji B; Cortez, Sarah R; Wiler, James A; Swiderski, Donald L; Raphael, Yehoash

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear gene therapy can be a new avenue for the treatment of severe hearing loss by inducing regeneration or phenotypic rescue. One necessary step to establish this therapy is the development of a safe and feasible inoculation surgery, ideally without drilling the bony cochlear wall. The round window membrane (RWM) is accessible in the middle-ear space, but viral vectors placed on this membrane do not readily cross the membrane to the cochlear tissues. In an attempt to enhance permeability of the RWM, we applied hyaluronic acid (HA), a nontoxic and biodegradable reagent, onto the RWM of guinea pigs, prior to delivering an adenovirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter gene (Ad-eGFP) at the same site. We examined distribution of eGFP in the cochlea 1 week after treatment, comparing delivery of the vector via the RWM, with or without HA, to delivery by a cochleostomy into the perilymph. We found that cochlear tissue treated with HA-assisted delivery of Ad-eGFP demonstrated wider expression of transgenes in cochlear cells than did tissue treated by cochleostomy injection. HA-assisted vector delivery facilitated expression in cells lining the scala media, which are less accessible and not transduced after perilymphatic injection. We assessed auditory function by measuring auditory brainstem responses and determined that thresholds were significantly better in the ears treated with HA-assisted Ad-eGFP placement on the RWM as compared with cochleostomy. Together, these data demonstrate that HA-assisted delivery of viral vectors provides an atraumatic and clinically feasible method to introduce transgenes into cochlear cells, thereby enhancing both research methods and future clinical application.

  18. Rationale for the selection of an aerosol delivery system for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Yvonne K; Anchordoquy, Thomas J; Lengsfeld, Corinne S

    2006-01-01

    Genetic therapeutics show great promise toward the treatment of illnesses associated with the lungs; however, current methods of delivery such as jet and ultrasonic nebulization decrease the activity and effectiveness of these treatments. Extremely low transfection rates exhibited by non-complexed plasmid DNA in these nebulizers have been primarily attributed to poor translocation and loss of molecular integrity as a consequence of shear-induced degradation. Current research focusing on methods to increase transfection rates via the pulmonary delivery route has largely concentrated on the incorporation of carbon dioxide in the air stream to increase breath depth as well as the addition of cationic agents that condense DNA into compact, ordered complexes. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of several classic as well as the latest atomization devices on the structure of non-complexed DNA. Various sizes of plasmid and cosmid DNA were processed through an electrostatic spray, ultrasonic nebulizer, vibrating mesh nebulizer, and jet nebulizer. Results varied dramatically based upon atomization device as well as DNA size. This may explain the inefficiency experienced by genetic therapeutics during pulmonary delivery. More importantly, this suggests that the selection of an atomization device should consider DNA size in order to achieve optimal gene delivery to the lungs.

  19. AAV-mediated gene therapy in Dystrophin-Dp71 deficient mouse leads to blood-retinal barrier restoration and oedema reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Ophélie; Charles-Messance, Hugo; El Mathari, Brahim; Sene, Abdoulaye; Barbe, Peggy; Fouquet, Stéphane; Aragón, Jorge; Darche, Marie; Giocanti-Aurégan, Audrey; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Tadayoni, Ramin; Montañez, Cecilia; Dalkara, Deniz; Rendon, Alvaro

    2016-07-15

    Dystrophin-Dp71 being a key membrane cytoskeletal protein, expressed mainly in Müller cells that provide a mechanical link at the Müller cell membrane by direct binding to actin and a transmembrane protein complex. Its absence has been related to blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability through delocalization and down-regulation of the AQP4 and Kir4.1 channels (1). We have previously shown that the adeno-associated virus (AAV) variant, ShH10, transduces Müller cells in the Dp71-null mouse retina efficiently and specifically (2,3). Here, we use ShH10 to restore Dp71 expression in Müller cells of Dp71 deficient mouse to study molecular and functional effects of this restoration in an adult mouse displaying retinal permeability. We show that strong and specific expression of exogenous Dp71 in Müller cells leads to correct localization of Dp71 protein restoring all protein interactions in order to re-establish a proper functional BRB and retina homeostasis thus preventing retina from oedema. This study is the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in dealing with diseases with BRB breakdown and macular oedema such as diabetic retinopathy (DR).

  20. Therapeutic Efficacy of Bone Marrow Transplant, Intracranial AAV-mediated Gene Therapy, or Both in the Mouse Model of MPS IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Heldermon, Coy D; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Herzog, Erik D; Vogler, Carole; Qin, Elizabeth; Wozniak, David F; Tan, Yun; Orrock, John L; Sands, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from a deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. In an attempt to correct the disease in the murine model of MPS IIIB, neonatal mice were treated with intracranial AAV2/5-NAGLU (AAV), syngeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT), or both (AAV/BMT). All treatments resulted in some improvement in clinical phenotype. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) treatment resulted in improvements in lifespan, motor function, hearing, time to activity onset, and daytime activity level, but no reduction of lysosomal storage. BMT resulted in improved hearing by 9 months, and improved circadian measures, but had no effect on lifespan, motor function, or central nervous system (CNS) lysosomal storage. AAV/BMT treatment resulted in improvements in hearing, time to activity onset, motor function, and reduced CNS lysosomal storage, but had no effect on lifespan. Combination therapy compared to either therapy alone resulted in synergistic effects on hearing and CNS lysosomal inclusions but antagonistic effects on motor function and lifespan. AAV alone is more efficacious than BMT or AAV/BMT treatment for lifespan. BMT was the least efficacious treatment by all measures. CNS-directed AAV treatment alone appears to be the preferred treatment, combining the most efficacy with the least toxicity of the approaches assessed. PMID:20179679

  1. Successful attenuation of humoral immunity to viral capsid and transgenic protein following AAV-mediated gene transfer with a non-depleting CD4 antibody and cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, J H; Cochrane, M; Cobbold, S; Waldmann, H; Nathwani, S A; Davidoff, A M; Nathwani, A C

    2012-01-01

    The ability of transient immunosuppression with a combination of a non-depleting anti-CD4 (NDCD4) antibody and cyclosporine (CyA) to abrogate immune reactivity to both adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) and its transgene product was evaluated. This combination of immunosuppressants resulted in a 20-fold reduction in the resulting anti-AAV8 antibody titres, to levels in naïve mice, following intravenous administration of 2 × 10(12) AAV8 vector particles per kg to immunocompetent mice. This allowed efficient transduction upon secondary challenge with vector pseudotyped with the same capsid. Persistent tolerance did not result, however, as an anti-AAV8 antibody response was elicited upon rechallenge with AAV8 without immunosuppression. The route of vector administration, vector dose, AAV serotype or the concomitant administration of adenoviral vector appeared to have little impact on the ability of the NDCD4 antibody and CyA combination to moderate the primary humoral response to AAV capsid proteins. The combination of NDCD4 and CyA also abrogated the humoral response to the transgene product, that otherwise invariably would occur, following intramuscular injection of AAV5, leading to stable transgene expression. These observations could significantly improve the prospects of using rAAV vectors for chronic disorders by allowing for repeated vector administration and avoiding the development of antibodies to the transgene product.

  2. Multivalent dendrimer vectors with DNA intercalation motifs for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Kenny; Coulter, Alexa; Tang, Shengzhuang; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2014-11-10

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers constitute an important class of nonviral, cationic vectors in gene delivery. Here we report on a new concept for dendrimer vector design based on the incorporation of dual binding motifs: DNA intercalation, and receptor recognition for targeted delivery. We prepared a series of dendrimer conjugates derived from a fifth generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimer, each conjugated with multiple folate (FA) or riboflavin (RF) ligands for cell receptor targeting, and with 3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridinium ("DAPP")-derived ligands for anchoring a DNA payload. Polyplexes of each dendrimer with calf thymus dsDNA were made and characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement. These studies provided evidence supporting polyplex formation based on the observation of tight DNA-dendrimer adhesion, and changes in particle size and surface charge upon coincubation. Further SPR studies to investigate the adhesion of the polyplex to a model surface immobilized with folate binding protein (FBP), demonstrated that the DNA payload has only a minimal effect on the receptor binding activity of the polyplex: KD = 0.22 nM for G5(FA)(DAPP) versus 0.98 nM for its polyplex. Finally, we performed in vitro transfection assays to determine the efficiency of conjugate mediated delivery of a luciferase-encoding plasmid into the KB cancer cell line and showed that RF-conjugated dendrimers were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude more effective in enhancing luciferase gene transfection than a plasmid only control. In summary, this study serves as a proof of concept for DNA-ligand intercalation as a motif in the design of multivalent dendrimer vectors for targeted gene delivery.

  3. Novel adeno-associated viral vectors for retinal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, L H; Auricchio, A

    2012-02-01

    Vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently the most promising vehicles for therapeutic gene delivery to the retina. Recently, subretinal administration of AAV2 has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in patients with a rare form of inherited childhood blindness, suggesting that AAV-mediated retinal gene therapy may be successfully extended to other blinding conditions. This is further supported by the great versatility of AAV as a vector platform as there are a large number of AAV variants and many of these have unique transduction characteristics useful for targeting different cell types in the retina including glia, epithelium and many types of neurons. Naturally occurring, rationally designed or in vitro evolved AAV vectors are currently being utilized to transduce several different cell types in the retina and to treat a variety of animal models of retinal disease. The continuous and creative development of AAV vectors provides opportunities to overcome existing challenges in retinal gene therapy such as efficient transfer of genes exceeding AAV's cargo capacity, or the targeting of specific cells within the retina or transduction of photoreceptors following routinely used intravitreal injections. Such developments should ultimately advance the treatment of a wide range of blinding retinal conditions.

  4. Modification of nanostructured calcium carbonate for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Wang, Chao-Qun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a facile method to modify nanostructured calcium carbonate (CaCO3) gene delivery systems by adding calcium phosphate (CaP) component was developed. CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation of Ca(2+) ions with plasmid DNA in the presence of carbonate and phosphate ions. For comparison, CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates were also prepared. The effects of carbonate ion/phosphate ion (CO3(2-)/PO4(3-)) ratio on the particle size and gene delivery efficiency were investigated. With an appropriate CO3(2-)/PO4(3-) ratio, the co-existence of carbonate and phosphate ions could control the size of co-precipitates effectively, and CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles with a decreased size and improved stability could be obtained. The in vitro gene transfections mediated by different nanoparticles in 293T cells and HeLa cells were carried out, using pGL3-Luc as a reporter plasmid. The gene transfection efficiency of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles could be significantly improved as compared with CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles and CaP/DNA co-precipitates. The confocal microscopy study indicated that the cellular uptake and nuclear localization of CaCO3/CaP/DNA nanoparticles were significantly enhanced as compared with unmodified CaCO3/DNA nanoparticles.

  5. Retargeted adenoviruses for radiation-guided gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliberov, S A; Kaliberova, L N; Yan, H; Kapoor, V; Hallahan, D E

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiation with radiosensitizing gene delivery or oncolytic viruses promises to provide an advantage that could improve the therapeutic results for glioblastoma. X-rays can induce significant molecular changes in cancer cells. We isolated the GIRLRG peptide that binds to radiation-inducible 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is overexpressed on the plasma membranes of irradiated cancer cells and tumor-associated microvascular endothelial cells. The goal of our study was to improve tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene delivery by selectively targeting the adenovirus binding to this radiation-inducible protein. We employed an adenoviral fiber replacement approach to conduct a study of the targeting utility of GRP78-binding peptide. We have developed fiber-modified adenoviruses encoding the GRP78-binding peptide inserted into the fiber-fibritin. We have evaluated the reporter gene expression of fiber-modified adenoviruses in vitro using a panel of glioma cells and a human D54MG tumor xenograft model. The obtained results demonstrated that employment of the GRP78-binding peptide resulted in increased gene expression in irradiated tumors following infection with fiber-modified adenoviruses, compared with untreated tumor cells. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of adenoviral retargeting using the GRP78-binding peptide that selectively recognizes tumor cells responding to radiation treatment. PMID:27492853

  6. Nanomedicines for Back of the Eye Drug Delivery, Gene Delivery, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday B.; Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Ravi, Rashmi Pacha; Durazo, Shelley A.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment and management of diseases of the posterior segment of the eye such as diabetic retinopathy, retinoblastoma, retinitis pigmentosa, and choroidal neovascularization is a challenging task due to the anatomy and physiology of ocular barriers. For instance, traditional routes of drug delivery for therapeutic treatment are hindered by poor intraocular penetration and/or rapid ocular elimination. One possible approach to improve ocular therapy is to employ nanotechnology. Nanomedicines, products of nanotechnology, having at least one dimension in the nanoscale include nanoparticles, micelles, nanotubes, and dendrimers, with and without targeting ligands, are making a significant impact in the fields of ocular drug delivery, gene delivery, and imaging, the focus of this review. Key applications of nanotechnology discussed in this review include a) bioadhesive nanomedicines; b) functionalized nanomedicines that enhance target recognition and/or cell entry; c) nanomedicines capable of controlled release of the payload; d) nanomedicines capable of enhancing gene transfection and duration of transfection; f) nanomedicines responsive to stimuli including light, heat, ultrasound, electrical signals, pH, and oxidative stress; g) diversely sized and colored nanoparticles for imaging, and h) nanowires for retinal prostheses. Additionally, nanofabricated delivery systems including implants, films, microparticles, and nanoparticles are described. Although the above nanomedicines may be administered by various routes including topical, intravitreal, intravenous, transscleral, suprachoroidal, and subretinal routes, each nanomedicine should be tailored for the disease, drug, and site of administration. In addition to the nature of materials used in nanomedicine design, depending on the site of nanomedicine administration, clearance and toxicity are expected to differ. PMID:23603534

  7. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Niclas E.; Hall, John K.; Odom, Guy L.; Phelps, Michael P.; Andrus, Colin R.; Hawkins, R. David; Hauschka, Stephen D.; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx4cv mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:28195574

  8. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Niclas E; Hall, John K; Odom, Guy L; Phelps, Michael P; Andrus, Colin R; Hawkins, R David; Hauschka, Stephen D; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-14

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx(4cv) mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders.

  9. Hydrogels: a journey from diapers to gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Pooja; Srivastava, Alok Ranjan; Pandey, Priyanka; Chawla, Viney

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogels are the biomaterials comprising network of natural or synthetic polymers capable of absorbing large amount of water. Hydrogels are "Smart Gels" or "Intelligent Gels" which can be made to respond to the various environmental conditions like temperature, pH, magnetic/electric field, ionic strength, inflammation, external stress etc. There are numerous potential applications of hydrogels in modern day life ranging from a diaper to gene delivery. This review succinctly describes the classification, properties and preparation methods along with numerous diverse applications of hydrogels like agricultural hydrogels, hydrogel for drug delivery, sensing, dental adhesives, wound healing and tissue regeneration, diet aid and gastric retention and in tissue engineering etc. Hydrogels can be regarded as highly valuable biomaterials for human-beings.

  10. Gene delivery: intelligent but just at the beginning.

    PubMed

    Pişkin, E; Dinçer, S; Türk, M

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is used to treat genetic disorders, which may be achieved both ex vivo and in vivo. Gene-delivery systems usually include a carrier system which both protects the gene expression plasmid and allows its extracellular and intracellular trafficking. Viruses are used in most of the clinical trials today; however, they do have important drawbacks. Non-viral vectors based on lipids, water-soluble polycations, other non-condensing polymers and nano- or microparticles/capsules have been proposed. Cationic polymers, especially carrying novel targeting ligands. are receiving increasing attention. Intelligent polymers with temperature, pH, and light sensitivities for a controllable and effective non-viral transfection have recently been introduced but are just at the beginning. Our preliminary studies showed that block copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylic acid with poly(ethylene imine) could be one example of these novel non-viral vectors.

  11. Dual delivery systems based on polyamine analog BENSpm as prodrug and gene delivery vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu

    Combination drug and gene therapy shows promise in cancer treatment. However, the success of such strategy requires careful selection of the therapeutic agents, as well as development of efficient delivery vectors. BENSpm (N 1, N11-bisethylnorspermine), a polyamine analogue targeting the intracellular polyamine pathway, draws our special attention because of the following reasons: (1) polyamine pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancer; (2) BENSpm exhibits multiple functions to interfere with the polyamine pathway, such as to up-regulate polyamine metabolism enzymes and down-regulate polyamine biosynthesis enzymes. Therefore BENSpm depletes all natural polyamines and leads to apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in a wide range of cancers; (3) preclinical studies proved that BENSpm can act synergistically with various chemotherapy agents, making it a promising candidate in combination therapy; (4) multiple positive charges in BENSpm enable it as a suitable building block for cationic polymers, which can be further applied to gene delivery. In this dissertation, our goal was to design dual-function delivery vector based on BENSpm that can function as a gene delivery vector and, after intracellular degradation, as an active anticancer agent targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism. We first demonstrated strong synergism between BENSpm and a potential therapeutic gene product TRAIL. Strong synergism was obtained in both estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Significant dose reduction of TRAIL in combination with BENSpm in MDA-MB-231 cells, together with the fact that BENSpm rendered MCF-7 cells more sensitive to TRAIL treatment verified our rationale of designing BENSpm-based delivery platform. This was expected to be beneficial for overcoming drug resistance in chemotherapy, as well as boosting the therapeutic effect of therapeutic genes. We first designed a lipid-based BENSpm dual vector (Lipo

  12. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy.

  13. Arginoplexes: an arginine-anchored nanoliposomal carrier for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ketan; Tyagi, Monica; Monpara, Jasmin; Vora, Lalit; Gupta, Sanjay; Vavia, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    There is a need of an efficient and safe non-viral gene delivery carrier due to promising future of nucleic acid-based therapeutics in the treatment of intractable diseases. Cytotoxicity and cost are the major concerns with current quaternary ammonium-based cationic liposomes. The major aim of current research work was development and in vitro evaluation of arginine-anchored nanoliposomes for gene delivery. l-Arginine-fatty acid conjugate was synthesized and characterized using IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. Synthesized conjugate—lauroyl arginine ethyl ester (LAE) was successfully incorporated into liposomes. Effect of nanocarrier composition on DNA binding was evaluated by preparing solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and self nanoemulsifying system (SNES) using same LAE concentration. Effect of cationic head on DNA binding was also evaluated. Arginine-anchored nanoliposomes—arginoplexes (APX) showed superior DNA-binding affinity. Surface PEG was expected to cause hindrance in DNA binding in SLNs and SNES. Guanidino group was found to be a better cationic head for DNA binding compared to primary amine or quaternary amine. Gel retardation assay was performed to optimize the ratio of DNA to LAE in nanocarrier. Serum stability, haemolysis, cytotoxicity, and transfection studies were carried out to evaluate APX. Binding of DNA to APX was found to be stable in the presence of serum, and no degradation of DNA was observed. APX containing 2 mg/ml LAE which exhibited particle size of 72 nm with zeta potential of +57.5 mV, showed lower cytotoxicity and better transfection. APX can be a promising carrier for gene delivery.

  14. Design of serum compatible tetrary complexes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Bahadur K C, Remant; Thapa, Bindu; Xu, Peisheng

    2012-05-01

    A novel gene delivery system, called PoSC, consisting of PEI, PSP, and HA is described. In contrast to the DNA/PEI/HA ternary system whose transfection efficiency decreases significantly with increasing serum concentration, PoSC exhibits a high transfection efficiency of about 51 and 87% for NIH3T3 and HCT116 cells, respectively, at 50% serum concentration. Furthermore, PoSC shows no cytotoxic effect at its working concentration. The overall results suggest that HA adsorption on cationic complexes enhances the transfection efficiency, while PSP is essential for high transfection efficiency at higher serum concentration.

  15. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  16. AAV2-mediated gene delivery to monkey putamen: Evaluation of an infusion device and delivery parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sanftner, Laura M.; Sommer, Jurg M.; Suzuki, Brian M.; Smith, Peter H.; Vijay, Sharmila; Vargas, Joseph A.; Forsayeth, John R.; Cunningham, Janet; Bankiewicz, Krys S.; Kao, Haihwa; Bernal, Jan; Pierce, Glenn F.; Johnson, Kirk W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a modified infusion procedure and a novel infusion device designed for use in humans (Clinical Device B) were evaluated for delivery of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV2) to brain. The device is composed of 1.2 m of fused silica inserted through a 24.6-cm surgical steel cannula designed to fit a standard Leksell® clinical stereotaxic frame and micro-infusion syringe pump. AAV2 encoding the human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene (AAV-hAADC-2) was infused into the putamen of 4 normal rhesus monkeys as a supportive study for a clinical trial in Parkinson&apos ;s disease (PD) patients. Two infusion protocols were tested: a ramped procedure (slow stepwise increases in rate from 0.2 μL/min to 1μL/min), thought to be essential for convection-enhanced delivery (CED), and a non-ramped infusion at a constant rate of 1 μL/min. The primary endpoints were safety evaluation of the infusion procedures and assessment of transgene expression at 5.5 weeks post-infusion. Clinical observations after vector infusions revealed no behavioral abnormalities during the study period. No differences in gross pathology with either the ramped or non-ramped infusion procedure were observed. Histopathology of the putamen was comparable with both procedures, and revealed only minimal localized inflammatory tissue reaction along the needle track in response to cannula placement and vector infusion. AADC immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vector was distributed throughout the putamen, with no significant difference in volume of immunostaining with either infusion procedure. Serum antibody levels against AAV2 vector exhibited a minor increase after infusion. These results validate the clinical utility of this new infusion device and non-ramped infusion conditions for intraputamenal gene therapy, and have the potential to impact a number of human diseases in which delivery of therapeutics to brain is indicated. PMID:16022872

  17. Modified pectin-based carrier for gene delivery: Cellular barriers in gene delivery course

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of biodegradable and biocompatible polysaccharides as DNA carriers has high potential for gene therapy applications. Pectin is a structural plant polysaccharide heterogeneous with respect to its chemical structure. It contains branches rich in galactose residues which serve as potential liga...

  18. Gemini surfactants mediate efficient mitochondrial gene delivery and expression.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Cardoso, Ana L; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-03-02

    Gene delivery targeting mitochondria has the potential to transform the therapeutic landscape of mitochondrial genetic diseases. Taking advantage of the nonuniversal genetic code used by mitochondria, a plasmid DNA construct able to be specifically expressed in these organelles was designed by including a codon, which codes for an amino acid only if read by the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the present work, gemini surfactants were shown to successfully deliver plasmid DNA to mitochondria. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were taken up by cells through a variety of routes, including endocytic pathways, and showed propensity for inducing membrane destabilization under acidic conditions, thus facilitating cytoplasmic release of DNA. Furthermore, the complexes interacted extensively with lipid membrane models mimicking the composition of the mitochondrial membrane, which predicts a favored interaction of the complexes with mitochondria in the intracellular environment. This work unravels new possibilities for gene therapy toward mitochondrial diseases.

  19. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-06-30

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations.

  20. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-01-01

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations. PMID:18474406

  1. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  2. Supernova: A Versatile Vector System for Single-Cell Labeling and Gene Function Studies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenshu; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Iwata, Ryohei; Nakazawa, Shingo; Yasuda, Kosuke; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe “Supernova” series of vector systems that enable single-cell labeling and labeled cell-specific gene manipulation, when introduced by in utero electroporation (IUE) or adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery. In Supernova, sparse labeling relies on low TRE leakage. In a small population of cells with over-threshold leakage, initial tTA-independent weak expression is enhanced by tTA/TRE-positive feedback along with a site-specific recombination system (e.g., Cre/loxP, Flpe/FRT). Sparse and bright labeling by Supernova with little background enables the visualization of the morphological details of individual neurons in densely packed brain areas such as the cortex and hippocampus, both during development and in adulthood. Sparseness levels are adjustable. Labeled cell-specific gene knockout was accomplished by introducing Cre/loxP-based Supernova vectors into floxed mice. Furthermore, by combining with RNAi, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, IUE-based Supernova achieved labeled cell-specific gene knockdown and editing/knockout without requiring genetically altered mice. Thus, Supernova system is highly extensible and widely applicable for single-cell analyses in complex organs, such as the mammalian brain. PMID:27775045

  3. Supernova: A Versatile Vector System for Single-Cell Labeling and Gene Function Studies in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenshu; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Iwata, Ryohei; Nakazawa, Shingo; Yasuda, Kosuke; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2016-10-24

    Here we describe "Supernova" series of vector systems that enable single-cell labeling and labeled cell-specific gene manipulation, when introduced by in utero electroporation (IUE) or adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery. In Supernova, sparse labeling relies on low TRE leakage. In a small population of cells with over-threshold leakage, initial tTA-independent weak expression is enhanced by tTA/TRE-positive feedback along with a site-specific recombination system (e.g., Cre/loxP, Flpe/FRT). Sparse and bright labeling by Supernova with little background enables the visualization of the morphological details of individual neurons in densely packed brain areas such as the cortex and hippocampus, both during development and in adulthood. Sparseness levels are adjustable. Labeled cell-specific gene knockout was accomplished by introducing Cre/loxP-based Supernova vectors into floxed mice. Furthermore, by combining with RNAi, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, IUE-based Supernova achieved labeled cell-specific gene knockdown and editing/knockout without requiring genetically altered mice. Thus, Supernova system is highly extensible and widely applicable for single-cell analyses in complex organs, such as the mammalian brain.

  4. Characterization of reducible peptide oligomers as carriers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton; Egorova, Anna; Laukkanen, Antti; Baranov, Vladislav; Urtti, Arto

    2013-01-30

    The stability of DNA-polyplexes and intracellular DNA release are important features of gene delivery systems. To study these features, we have evaluated reducible cysteine-flanked linear lysine and arginine-rich peptides, modified with histidine residues. The reducible disulfide bonds in cysteine flanked peptides and histidine residues should augment DNA release from the peptide-DNA complexes upon disintegration of the reducible bonds. Template polymerization and oxidative polycondensation were applied to obtain peptide oligomers used for DNA-polyplex preparation. The peptides and DNA-peptide complexes were investigated with physical, chemical and transfection measurements. Physicochemical and transfection properties of DNA-polyplexes depended on the amino acid sequence of the peptidic polymers and type of the polymerization. MALDI-TOF analysis of oxidatively polycondensed products revealed several forms of peptide oligomers corresponding to 5-8 amino acid monomers. DNA-peptide particles based on template-polymerized complexes were more resistant to relaxation by negatively charged heparan sulfate than polyplexes formed with oxidatively condensed peptides. Complexes of DNA with the polycations prepared by oxidative polycondensation exhibited a 100-1000-fold higher level of gene expression compared to DNA/template-polymerized peptide complexes. The most efficient transgene expression was shown with arginine-rich polyplexes. Transfection efficacy of the arginine-rich polyplexes was even 10-fold better than that of DNA/PEI complexes. On average, polyplexes based on cysteine-flanked peptide oligomers showed lower cytotoxicity than non-reducible high molecular weight polylysine/DNA particles. We conclude that reducible peptide oligomers provide efficient DNA transfection and have the potential as vehicles for gene delivery.

  5. Surface immobilization of hexa-histidine-tagged adeno-associated viral vectors for localized gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jang, J-H; Koerber, J T; Gujraty, K; Bethi, S R; Kane, R S; Schaffer, D V

    2010-11-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, which are undergoing broad exploration in clinical trials, have significant promise for therapeutic gene delivery because of their safety and delivery efficiency. Gene delivery technologies capable of mediating localized gene expression may further enhance the potential of AAV in a variety of therapeutic applications by reducing spread outside a target region, which may thereby reduce off-target side effects. We have genetically engineered an AAV variant capable of binding to surfaces with high affinity through a hexa-histidine metal-binding interaction. This immobilized AAV vector system mediates high-efficiency delivery to cells that contact the surface and thus may have promise for localized gene delivery, which may aid numerous applications of AAV delivery to gene therapy.

  6. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  7. Functionalized nanoparticles for AMF-induced gene and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Souvik

    The properties and broad applications of nano-magnetic colloids have generated much interest in recent years. Specially, Fe3O4 nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention since their magnetic properties can be used for hyperthermia treatment or drug targeting. For example, enhanced levels of intracellular gene delivery can be achieved using Fe3O4 nano-vectors in the presence of an external magnetic field, a process known as 'magnetofection'. The low cytotoxicity, tunable particle size, ease of surface functionalization, and ability to generate thermal energy using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF) are properties have propelled Fe3O4 research to the forefront of nanoparticle research. The strategy of nanoparticle-mediated, AMF-induced heat generation has been used to effect intracellular hyperthermia. One application of this 'magnetic hyperthermia' is heat activated local delivery of a therapeutic effector (e.g.; drug or polynucleotide). This thesis describes the development of a magnetic nano-vector for AMF-induced, heat-activated pDNA and small molecule delivery. The use of heat-inducible vectors, such as heat shock protein ( hsp) genes, is a promising mode of gene therapy that would restrict gene expression to a local region by focusing a heat stimulus only at a target region. We thus aimed to design an Fe3O4 nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer vehicle for AMF-induced localized gene expression. We opted to use 'click' oximation techniques to assemble the magnetic gene transfer vector. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis, characterization, and transfection studies of the oxime ether lipid-based nano-magnetic vectors MLP and dMLP. The synthesis and characterization of a novel series of quaternary ammonium aminooxy reagents (2.1--2.4) is described. These cationic aminooxy compounds were loaded onto nanoparticles for ligation with carbonyl groups and also to impart a net positive charge on the nanoparticle surface. Our studies indicated that the

  8. Strategies for retargeted gene delivery using vectors derived from lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Cosset, Francois-Loic

    2004-12-01

    With the development of the first viral vector systems 20 years ago [Mann et al., 1983; Watanabe and Temin, 1983] gene therapy strategies have come to the forefront of novel therapeutics [Cavazzana-Calvo et al., 2000]. A deeper understanding of vector biology and the molecular mechanisms of disease alongside tremendous advances in vector technology have significantly advanced the field of human gene therapy. Over the last few years several challenges needed to be overcome in order to bring gene therapy strategies closer to the clinic. These hurdles include the preparation of large amounts of stable, high titre vectors, minimising vector-related immunology and last but not least targeting infection and transgene expression to tissue or cells, which in many cases are not or only slowly dividing. Viral vectors are useful vehicles for the delivery of foreign genes into target cells, and retroviral vectors have been popular because of their ability to integrate into the host cell genome and maintain persistent gene expression. Moreover, lentiviruses, members of the retroviral family, have the ability to infect cells at both mitotic and post-mitotic stages of the cell cycle thus opening up the possibility to target non-dividing target cells and tissues. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) based vectors have been used in vitro and in vivo in a number of situations, however, safety concerns still exist, and therefore the development of vector systems based on primate as well as non-primate lentiviruses is ongoing. Concomitantly with lentiviral vector design, much has been learned about the incorporation of heterologous env proteins on lentiviral cores in order to combine specific targeting properties of envelope glycoproteins with the biological properties of lentiviral vectors. In this review article we will give an overview over advantages lentiviral vector systems offer. We will then discuss the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral

  9. AAV Hybrid Serotypes: Improved Vectors for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian W.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, significant efforts have been made on studying and engineering adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid, in order to increase efficiency in targeting specific cell types that are non-permissive to wild type (wt) viruses and to improve efficacy in infecting only the cell type of interest. With our previous knowledge of the viral properties of the naturally occurring serotypes and the elucidation of their capsid structures, we can now generate capsid mutants, or hybrid serotypes, by various methods and strategies. In this review, we summarize the studies performed on AAV retargeting, and categorize the available hybrid serotypes to date, based on the type of modification: 1) transcapsidation, 2) adsorption of bi-specific antibody to capsid surface, 3) mosaic capsid, and 4) chimeric capsid. Not only these hybrid serotypes could achieve high efficiency of gene delivery to a specific targeted cell type, which can be better-tailored for a particular clinical application, but also serve as a tool for studying AAV biology such as receptor binding, trafficking and genome delivery into the nucleus. PMID:15975007

  10. A novel gene delivery system for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Brian; Duffy, Angela M; Gould Fogerite, Susan; Krause-Elsmore, Sara; Lu, Ruying; Shang, Gaofeng; Chen, Zi-Wei; Mannino, Raphael J; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Harmey, Judith H

    2004-01-01

    Although gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of both acquired and genetic diseases, its development has been limited by practical considerations. Non-viral efficacy of delivery remains quite poor. We are investigating the feasibility of a novel lipid-based delivery system, cochleates, to deliver transgenes to mammalian cells. Rhodamine-labelled empty cochleates were incubated with two cell-lines (4T1 adenocarcinoma and H36.12 macrophage hybridoma) and primary macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Cochleates containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression plasmid were incubated with 4T1 adenocarcinoma cells. Cellular uptake of labelled cochleates or transgene GFP expression were visualised with fluorescence microscopy. 4T1 and H36.12 lines showed 39% and 23.1% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates, respectively. Human monocyte-derived macrophages and mouse peritoneal macrophages had 48+/-5.38% and 51.46+/-15.6% uptake of rhodamine-cochleates in vitro. In vivo 25.69+/-0.127% of peritoneal macrophages were rhodamine-positive after intra-peritoneal injection of rhodamine-cochleates. 19.49+/-10.12% of 4T1 cells expressed GFP. Cochleates may therefore be an effective, non-toxic and non-immunogenic method to introduce transgenes in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Cyclen-based lipidic oligomers as potential gene delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Qiang; Ren, Laifeng; Chen, Qian-Ming; Guo, Liandi; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-03-01

    A series of cyclen-based linear oligomers bearing hydrophobic long chains (lipopolymers Cy-LC, where Cy and LC represent cyclen-based linear backbone and hydrophobic long chain substituents, respectively) were designed and synthesized. The effects of type and degree of substitution (DS) of hydrophobic long chains on the transfection efficiency were systematically studied. The nitrogen atoms with relatively strong basicity on the cyclen ensure their good DNA binding ability, which was confirmed by gel retardation and ethidium bromide exclusion assays. Lipopolyplexes could be formed as nanoparticles with suitable sizes and zeta potentials for gene transfection. In vitro gene delivery experiments revealed that the linoleic acid (LIN) substituted material Cy-LIN has better transfection efficiency than 25 kDa polyethylenimine in the absence or in the presence of serum. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and hemolysis assays showed low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility of the lipopolyplexes. Fluorescent labeled DNA was used to study the cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of transfected DNA. Flow cytometry results suggested that a long chain is necessary for efficient cellular uptake, and images from confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that after 4h transfection, most of the fluorescent labeled DNA accumulated in the perinuclear region, which was required for efficient gene expression. Moreover, it was also found that the DS of the hydrophobic moiety can adjust the balance between DNA binding ability and dissociation of polyplexes, significantly affecting the transfection efficiency.

  12. Electrosonic ejector microarray for drug and gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zarnitsyn, Vladimir G; Meacham, J Mark; Varady, Mark J; Hao, Chunhai; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2008-04-01

    We report on development and experimental characterization of a novel cell manipulation device-the electrosonic ejector microarray-which establishes a pathway for drug and/or gene delivery with control of biophysical action on the length scale of an individual cell. The device comprises a piezoelectric transducer for ultrasound wave generation, a reservoir for storing the sample mixture and a set of acoustic horn structures that form a nozzle array for focused application of mechanical energy. The nozzles are micromachined in silicon or plastic using simple and economical batch fabrication processes. When the device is driven at a particular resonant frequency of the acoustic horn structures, the sample mixture of cells and desired transfection agents/molecules suspended in culture medium is ejected from orifices located at the nozzle tips. During sample ejection, focused mechanical forces (pressure and shear) are generated on a microsecond time scale (dictated by nozzle size/geometry and ejection velocity) resulting in identical "active" microenvironments for each ejected cell. This process enables a number of cellular bioeffects, from uptake of small molecules and gene delivery/transfection to cell lysis. Specifically, we demonstrate successful calcein uptake and transfection of DNA plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) into human malignant glioma cells (cell line LN443) using electrosonic microarrays with 36, 45 and 50 mum diameter nozzle orifices and operating at ultrasound frequencies between 0.91 and 0.98 MHz. Our results suggest that efficacy and the extent of bioeffects are mainly controlled by nozzle orifice size and the localized intensity of the applied acoustic field.

  13. Persistent expression of biologically active anti-HER2 antibody by AAVrh.10-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Qiu, J; Wang, R; Krause, A; Boyer, J L; Hackett, N R; Crystal, R G

    2010-08-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against an extracellular region of the human epidermal growth-factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein. We hypothesized that a single adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated genetic delivery of an anti-HER2 antibody should be effective in mediating long-term production of anti-HER2 and in suppressing the growth of human tumors in a xenograft model in nude mice. The adeno-associated virus gene transfer vector AAVrh.10alphaHER2 was constructed based on a non-human primate AAV serotype rh.10 to express the complementary DNAs for the heavy and light chains of mAb 4D5, the murine precursor to trastuzumab. The data show that genetically transferred anti-HER2 selectively bound human HER2 protein and suppressed the proliferation of HER2(+) tumor cell lines. A single administration of AAVrh.10alphaHER2 provided long-term therapeutic levels of anti-HER2 antibody expression without inducing an anti-idiotype response, suppressed the growth of HER2(+) tumors and increased the survival of tumor bearing mice. In the context that trastuzumab therapy requires frequent and repeated administration, this strategy might be developed as an alternate platform for delivery of anti-HER2 therapy.

  14. Biological delivery approaches for gene therapy: strategies to potentiate efficacy and enhance specificity.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Elham; Rafati, Sima

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays many therapeutic agents such as suicide genes, anti-angiogenesis agents, cytokines, chemokines and other therapeutic genes were delivered to cancer cells. Various biological delivery systems have been applied for directing therapeutic gene to target cells. Some of these successful preclinical studies, steps forward to clinical trials and a few are examined in phase III clinical trials. In this review, the biological gene delivery systems were categorized into microorganism and cell based delivery systems. Viral, bacterial, yeast and parasite are among microorganism based delivery systems which are expanded in this review. In cell based approach, different strategies such as tumor cells, stem cells, dendritic cells and sertoli cells will be discussed. Different drawbacks are associated with each delivery system; therefore, many strategies have been improved and potentiated their direction toward specific target cells. Herein, further to the principle of each delivery system, the progresses of these approaches for development of newer generation are discussed.

  15. Direct Cytosolic Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-Ribonucleoprotein for Efficient Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Lee, Yi-Wei; Tay, Tristan; Sasaki, Kanae; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-03-28

    Genome editing through the delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-ribonucleoprotein (Cas9-RNP) reduces unwanted gene targeting and avoids integrational mutagenesis that can occur through gene delivery strategies. Direct and efficient delivery of Cas9-RNP into the cytosol followed by translocation to the nucleus remains a challenge. Here, we report a remarkably highly efficient (∼90%) direct cytoplasmic/nuclear delivery of Cas9 protein complexed with a guide RNA (sgRNA) through the coengineering of Cas9 protein and carrier nanoparticles. This construct provides effective (∼30%) gene editing efficiency and opens up opportunities in studying genome dynamics.

  16. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as Efficient Drug and Gene Delivery Systems: Recent Breakthroughs

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely applied as advanced drug and gene delivery nanosystems. Among them, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have attracted great attention as colloidal drug delivery systems for incorporating hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs and various macromolecules as well as proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, SLNs offer great promise for controlled and site specific drug and gene delivery. This article includes general information about SLN structures and properties, production procedures, characterization. In addition, recent progress on development of drug and gene delivery systems using SLNs was reviewed. PMID:26236652

  17. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction. PMID:27045209

  18. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-04-05

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction.

  19. In vitro non-viral gene delivery with nanofibrous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dehai; Luu, Yen K.; Kim, Kwangsok; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Chu, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular and intracellular barriers typically prevent non-viral gene vectors from having an effective transfection efficiency. Formulation of a gene delivery vehicle that can overcome the barriers is a key step for successful tissue regeneration. We have developed a novel core-shelled DNA nanoparticle by invoking solvent-induced condensation of plasmid DNA (β-galactosidase or GFP) in a solvent mixture [94% N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) + 6% 1× TE buffer] and subsequent encapsulation of the condensed DNA globule in a triblock copolymer, polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactide (L8E78L8), in the same solvent environment. The polylactide shell protects the encapsulated DNA from degradation during electrospinning of a mixture of encapsulated DNA nanoparticles and biodegradable PLGA (a random copolymer of lactide and glycolide) to form a nanofibrous non-woven scaffold using the same solution mixture. The bioactive plasmid DNA can then be released in an intact form from the scaffold with a controlled release rate and transfect cells in vitro. PMID:16269820

  20. Lentivirus-Based Stable Gene Delivery into Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Maru, Yoshiaki; Orihashi, Kaoru; Hippo, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Lentivirus-based gene delivery works efficiently for the majority of mammalian cells cultured under standard two-dimensional conditions. By contrast, intestinal epithelial organoids embedded into three-dimensional extracellular matrix appear to be resistant to lentiviral transduction. We observed that Matrigel, a matrix that reconstitutes a basement membrane and is indispensable for cell survival and proliferation, prevents lentiviruses from binding to intestinal cells. In this chapter, we describe a simple method of a highly efficient gene transduction into intestinal organoids. This method involves organoid dispersion into single intestinal epithelial cells, mixing these individual cells with lentiviral particles, plating on Matrigel, and subsequent re-embedding into Matrigel. Under these conditions, the majority of the cells are exposed to the virus in the absence of the matrix barrier while remaining attached to the matrix. Using a GFP-labeled lentivirus, we demonstrate that this method allows for highly efficient infection of intestinal organoids after overnight incubation of Matrigel-attached cells with lentiviral particles.

  1. Gene delivery systems by the combination of lipid bubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Yoichi; Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2016-11-28

    Gene therapy is promising for the treatment of many diseases including cancers and genetic diseases. From the viewpoint of safety, ultrasound (US)-mediated gene delivery with nano/ microbubbles was recently developed as a novel non-viral vector system. US-mediated gene delivery using nano/microbubbles are able to produce transient changes in the permeability of the cell membrane after US-induced cavitation while reducing cellular damage and enables the tissue-specific or the site-specific intracellular delivery of gene both in vitro and in vivo. We have recently developed novel lipid nanobubbles (Lipid Bubbles). These nanobubbles can also be used to enhance the efficacy of the US-mediated genes (plasmid DNA, siRNA, and miRNA etc.) delivery. In this review, we describe US-mediated delivery systems combined with nano/microbubbles and discuss their feasibility as non-viral vector systems.

  2. Molecular Recognition Enables Nanosubstrate-Mediated Delivery of Gene-Encapsulated Nanoparticles with High Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Substrate-mediated gene delivery is a promising method due to its unique ability to preconcentrate exogenous genes onto designated substrates. However, many challenges remain to enable continuous and multiround delivery of the gene using the same substrates without depositing payloads and immobilizing cells in each round of delivery. Herein we introduce a gene delivery system, nanosubstrate-mediated delivery (NSMD) platform, based on two functional components with nanoscale features, including (1) DNA⊂SNPs, supramolecular nanoparticle (SNP) vectors for gene encapsulation, and (2) Ad-SiNWS, adamantane (Ad)-grafted silicon nanowire substrates. The multivalent molecular recognition between the Ad motifs on Ad-SiNWS and the β-cyclodextrin (CD) motifs on DNA⊂SNPs leads to dynamic assembly and local enrichment of DNA⊂SNPs from the surrounding medium onto Ad-SiNWS. Subsequently, once cells settled on the substrate, DNA⊂SNPs enriched on Ad-SiNWS were introduced through the cell membranes by intimate contact with individual nanowires on Ad-SiNWS, resulting in a highly efficient delivery of exogenous genes. Most importantly, sequential delivery of multiple batches of exogenous genes on the same batch cells settled on Ad-SiNWS was realized by sequential additions of the corresponding DNA⊂SNPs with equivalent efficiency. Moreover, using the NSMD platform in vivo, cells recruited on subcutaneously transplanted Ad-SiNWS were also efficiently transfected with exogenous genes loaded into SNPs, validating the in vivo feasibility of this system. We believe that this nanosubstrate-mediated delivery platform will provide a superior system for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery and can be further used for the encapsulation and delivery of other biomolecules. PMID:24708312

  3. Barriers to Liposomal Gene Delivery: from Application Site to the Target

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mostafa; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a therapeutic approach to deliver genetic material into cells to alter their function in entire organism. One promising form of gene delivery system (DDS) is liposomes. The success of liposome-mediated gene delivery is a multifactorial issue and well-designed liposomal systems might lead to optimized gene transfection particularly in vivo. Liposomal gene delivery systems face different barriers from their site of application to their target, which is inside the cells. These barriers include presystemic obstacles (epithelial barriers), systemic barriers in blood circulation and cellular barriers. Epithelial barriers differ depending on the route of administration. Systemic barriers include enzymatic degradation, binding and opsonisation. Both of these barriers can act as limiting hurdles that genetic material and their vector should overcome before reaching the cells. Finally liposomes should overcome cellular barriers that include cell entrance, endosomal escape and nuclear uptake. These barriers and their impact on liposomal gene delivery will be discussed in this review. PMID:28228799

  4. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  5. Gene Therapy Prolongs Survival and Restores Function in Murine and Canine Models of Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Childers, Martin K; Joubert, Romain; Poulard, Karine; Moal, Christelle; Grange, Robert W; Doering, Jonathan A; Lawlor, Michael W; Rider, Branden E.; Jamet, Thibaud; Danièle, Nathalie; Martin, Samia; Rivière, Christel; Soker, Thomas; Hammer, Caroline; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Lockard, Mandy; Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa; Mitchell, Erin; Barber, Jane; Williams, J. Koudy; Mack, David L; Furth, Mark E; Vignaud, Alban; Masurier, Carole; Mavilio, Fulvio; Moullier, Philippe; Beggs, Alan H; Buj-Bello, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the myotubularin gene (MTM1) cause X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a fatal, congenital pediatric disease that affects the entire skeletal musculature. Systemic administration of a single dose of a recombinant serotype-8 adeno-associated virus (AAV8) vector expressing murine myotubularin to Mtm1-deficient knockout mice at the onset or at late stages of the disease resulted in robust improvement in motor activity and contractile force, corrected muscle pathology and prolonged survival throughout a 6-month study. Similarly, single-dose intravascular delivery of a canine AAV8-MTM1 vector in XLMTM dogs markedly improved severe muscle weakness and respiratory impairment, and prolonged lifespan to more than one year in the absence of toxicity, humoral and cell-mediated immune response. These results demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of AAV-mediated gene therapy for myotubular myopathy in small and large animal models, and provide proof of concept for future clinical trials in XLMTM patients. PMID:24452262

  6. Gene therapy prolongs survival and restores function in murine and canine models of myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Childers, Martin K; Joubert, Romain; Poulard, Karine; Moal, Christelle; Grange, Robert W; Doering, Jonathan A; Lawlor, Michael W; Rider, Branden E; Jamet, Thibaud; Danièle, Nathalie; Martin, Samia; Rivière, Christel; Soker, Thomas; Hammer, Caroline; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Lockard, Mandy; Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa; Mitchell, Erin; Barber, Jane; Williams, J Koudy; Mack, David L; Furth, Mark E; Vignaud, Alban; Masurier, Carole; Mavilio, Fulvio; Moullier, Philippe; Beggs, Alan H; Buj-Bello, Anna

    2014-01-22

    Loss-of-function mutations in the myotubularin gene (MTM1) cause X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a fatal, congenital pediatric disease that affects the entire skeletal musculature. Systemic administration of a single dose of a recombinant serotype 8 adeno-associated virus (AAV8) vector expressing murine myotubularin to Mtm1-deficient knockout mice at the onset or at late stages of the disease resulted in robust improvement in motor activity and contractile force, corrected muscle pathology, and prolonged survival throughout a 6-month study. Similarly, single-dose intravascular delivery of a canine AAV8-MTM1 vector in XLMTM dogs markedly improved severe muscle weakness and respiratory impairment, and prolonged life span to more than 1 year in the absence of toxicity or a humoral or cell-mediated immune response. These results demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of AAV-mediated gene therapy for myotubular myopathy in small- and large-animal models, and provide proof of concept for future clinical trials in XLMTM patients.

  7. Gold Nanoparticle Approach to the Selective Delivery of Gene Silencing in Cancer—The Case for Combined Delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Rita; Fernandes, Alexandra R.; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy arises as a great promise for cancer therapeutics due to its potential to silence genes involved in tumor development. In fact, there are some pivotal gene drivers that suffer critical alterations leading to cell transformation and ultimately to tumor growth. In this vein, gene silencing has been proposed as an active tool to selectively silence these molecular triggers of cancer, thus improving treatment. However, naked nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences are reported to have a short lifetime in the body, promptly degraded by circulating enzymes, which in turn speed up elimination and decrease the therapeutic potential of these drugs. The use of nanoparticles for the effective delivery of these silencers to the specific target locations has allowed researchers to overcome this issue. Particularly, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used as attractive vehicles for the target-specific delivery of gene-silencing moieties, alone or in combination with other drugs. We shall discuss current trends in AuNP-based delivery of gene-silencing tools, considering the promising road ahead without overlooking existing concerns for their translation to clinics. PMID:28257109

  8. Ultrasound-targeted HSVtk and Timp3 gene delivery for synergistically enhanced antitumor effects in hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, B-F; Wu, J; Zhang, Y; Sung, H-W; Xie, J; Li, R-K

    2013-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy has great potential for decreasing tumor-induced mortality but has been clinically limited by non-targeted and insufficient gene transfer. We evaluated gene therapy targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSVtk/GCV) suicide gene system and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (Timp3) gene. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) targeted gene delivery to the tumor tissue, and the α-fetoprotein promoter targeted HSVtk expression to the HCC cells. Human HepG2 cells transfected with the HSVtk or Timp3 gene demonstrated a reduction in cell viability by >40% compared with the vector control. Cell viability was further inhibited by over 50% with co-transfection of the genes. HepG2 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into athymic mice to induce tumors. UTMD-mediated delivery of HSVtk or Timp3 suppressed tumor growth by >45% and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals (P<0.01 vs vector control). Co-delivery of the genes resulted in a further 30% improvement in tumor suppression and significant extension of animal survival (P<0.01 vs vector control). Targeted gene delivery increased the number of apoptotic cells and decreased the vascular density of the tumors. Targeted co-delivery of the genes synergistically improved the antitumor effects and may provide an effective therapy for HCC.

  9. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and delivered alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using impalefection on spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs). The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. Following impalefection and tetracycline induction, 53.1% 10.4% of impalefected cells were fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  10. Discovery of Cationic Polymers for Non-viral Gene Delivery using Combinatorial Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Sutapa; Ramos, James; Potta, Thrimoorthy; Taylor, David; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Montanez, Gabriela; Rege, Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive treatment option for diseases of genetic origin, including several cancers and cardiovascular diseases. While viruses are effective vectors for delivering exogenous genes to cells, concerns related to insertional mutagenesis, immunogenicity, lack of tropism, decay and high production costs necessitate the discovery of non-viral methods. Significant efforts have been focused on cationic polymers as non-viral alternatives for gene delivery. Recent studies have employed combinatorial syntheses and parallel screening methods for enhancing the efficacy of gene delivery, biocompatibility of the delivery vehicle, and overcoming cellular level barriers as they relate to polymer-mediated transgene uptake, transport, transcription, and expression. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in combinatorial syntheses and parallel screening of cationic polymer libraries for the discovery of efficient and safe gene delivery systems. PMID:21843141

  11. Temporally controlled multiple-gene delivery in scaffolds: A promising strategy to enhance bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Xu, Lihua; Li, Yiming; Ma, Jianfeng

    2011-02-01

    Bone defects sometimes require more effective repair regimens than conventional clinical therapies can provide. On account of this, tissue-engineered scaffolds have emerged as a promising alternative. Scaffolds that release genes encoding growth factors (GFs) offer additional benefits for bone regeneration in comparison with scaffolds providing protein delivery. The present gene delivery systems focus on unitary or dual genes delivery without controlled release. In the meantime, evidences indicate that bone formation is a complex cascade of events, in which time-dependent expression of multiple growth factors is involved. In our hypothesis, a temporally controlled, multi-gene delivery system embedded in a scaffold matrix can be fabricated; such a system is capable of mimicking the expression of growth factor profile in osteogenesis. Consequently, bone regeneration can be promoted by sequential gene expression of multiple growth factors.

  12. Image-Guided Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Yokoo, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ogawa, Kohei; Shinagawa, Yoko; Inoue, Ryosuke; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamics-based delivery has been used as an experimental tool to express transgene in small animals. This in vivo gene transfer method is useful for functional analysis of genetic elements, therapeutic effect of oligonucleotides, and cancer cells to establish the metastatic cancer animal model for experimental research. Recent progress in the development of image-guided procedure for hydrodynamics-based gene delivery in large animals directly supports the clinical applicability of this technique. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of hydrodynamics-based gene delivery and discusses the future directions for its clinical application. PMID:26308044

  13. Baculovirus as a gene delivery vector for cartilage and bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Lu, Chia-Hsin; Luo, Wen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Han; Sung, Li-Yu; Chiu, Hsin-Yi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2010-06-01

    Baculovirus is an effective vector for gene delivery into various mammalian cells, including chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and has been employed for diverse applications. By gene delivery and expression of the growth factor, recombinant baculovirus has been shown to modulate the differentiation state of the cells and stimulates the production of extracellular matrix and tissue formation, hence repairing the damaged cartilage and bone in vivo. This article reviews the studies pertaining to the applications of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery in cartilage and bone tissue engineering and discusses recent progress, future applications and potential hurdles.

  14. Image-guided, Intravascular Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery to Skeletal Muscle in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2009-01-01

    Development of an effective, safe, and convenient method for gene delivery to muscle is a critical step toward gene therapy for muscle-associated diseases. Toward this end, we have explored the possibility of combining the image-guided catheter insertion technique with the principle of hydrodynamic delivery to achieve muscle-specific gene transfer in pigs. We demonstrate that gene transfer efficiency of the procedure is directly related to flow rate, injection pressure, and injection volume. The optimal gene delivery was achieved at a flow rate of 15 ml/second with injection pressure of 300 psi and injection volume equal to 1.5% of body weight. Under such a condition, hydrodynamic injection of saline containing pCMV-Luc (100 µg/ml) resulted in luciferase activity of 106 to 107 relative light units (RLU)/mg of proteins extracted from the targeted muscle 5 days after hydrodynamic gene delivery. Result from immunohistochemical analysis revealed 70–90% transfection efficiency of muscle groups in the hindlimb and persistent reporter gene expression for 2 months in transfected cells. With an exception of transient edema and elevation of creatine phosphokinase, no permanent tissue damage was observed. These results suggest that the image-guided, intravenous hydrodynamic delivery is an effective and safe method for gene delivery to skeletal muscle. PMID:19738603

  15. In Vivo Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 for Therapeutic Gene Editing: Progress and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Mout, Rubul; Ray, Moumita; Lee, Yi-Wei; Scaletti, Federica; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-03-17

    The successful use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-based gene editing for therapeutics requires efficient in vivo delivery of the CRISPR components. There are, however, major challenges on the delivery front. In this Topical Review, we will highlight recent developments in CRISPR delivery, and we will present hurdles that still need to be overcome to achieve effective in vivo editing.

  16. Cationic liposome–nucleic acid complexes for gene delivery and gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Kai K.; Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Leal, Cecília

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are studied worldwide as carriers of DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) for gene delivery and gene silencing, and related clinical trials are ongoing. Optimization of transfection efficiency and silencing efficiency by cationic liposome carriers requires a comprehensive understanding of the structures of CL–nucleic acid complexes and the nature of their interactions with cell membranes as well as events leading to release of active nucleic acids within the cytoplasm. Synchrotron x-ray scattering has revealed that CL–nucleic acid complexes spontaneously assemble into distinct liquid crystalline phases including the lamellar, inverse hexagonal, hexagonal, and gyroid cubic phases, and fluorescence microscopy has revealed CL–DNA pathways and interactions with cells. The combining of custom synthesis with characterization techniques and gene expression and silencing assays has begun to unveil structure–function relations in vitro. As a recent example, this review will briefly describe experiments with surface-functionalized PEGylated CL–DNA nanoparticles. The functionalization, which is achieved through custom synthesis, is intended to address and overcome cell targeting and endosomal escape barriers to nucleic acid delivery faced by PEGylated nanoparticles designed for in vivo applications. PMID:25587216

  17. Gene transfer to the CNS is efficacious in immune-primed mice harboring physiologically relevant titers of anti-AAV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Treleaven, Christopher M; Tamsett, Thomas J; Bu, Jie; Fidler, Jonathan A; Sardi, S Pablo; Hurlbut, Gregory D; Woodworth, Lisa A; Cheng, Seng H; Passini, Marco A; Shihabuddin, Lamya S; Dodge, James C

    2012-09-01

    Central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy with recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been used effectively to slow disease course in mouse models of several neurodegenerative diseases. However, these vectors were typically tested in mice without prior exposure to the virus, an immunological scenario unlikely to be duplicated in human patients. Here, we examined the impact of pre-existing immunity on AAV-mediated gene delivery to the CNS of normal and diseased mice. Antibody levels in brain tissue were determined to be 0.6% of the levels found in systemic circulation. As expected, transgene expression in brains of mice with relatively high serum antibody titers was reduced by 59-95%. However, transduction activity was unaffected in mice that harbored more clinically relevant antibody levels. Moreover, we also showed that markers of neuroinflammation (GFAP, Iba1, and CD3) and histopathology (hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)) were not enhanced in immune-primed mice (regardless of pre-existing antibody levels). Importantly, we also demonstrated in a mouse model of Niemann Pick Type A (NPA) disease that pre-existing immunity did not preclude either gene transfer to the CNS or alleviation of disease-associated neuropathology. These findings support the continued development of AAV-based therapies for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  18. Factors affecting drug and gene delivery: effects of interaction with blood components.

    PubMed

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems have been used extensively to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic activities of a wide variety of drugs and genes. In this article, we summarize the factors determining the tissue disposition of delivery systems: the physicochemical and biological characteristics of the delivery system and the anatomic and physiological characteristics of the tissues. There are several modes of drug and gene targeting, ranging from passive to active targeting, and each of these can be achieved by optimizing the design of the delivery system to suit a specific aim. After entering the systemic circulation, either by an intravascular injection or through absorption from an administration site, however, a delivery system encounters a variety of blood components, including blood cells and a range of serum proteins. These components are by no means inert as far as interaction with the delivery system is concerned, and they can sometimes markedly effect its tissue disposition. The interaction with blood components is known to occur with particulate delivery systems, such as liposomes, or with cationic charge-mediated delivery systems for genes. In addition to these rather nonspecific ones, interactions via the targeting ligand of the delivery system can occur. We recently found that mannosylated carriers interact with serum mannan binding protein, greatly altering their tissue disposition in a number of ways that depend on the properties of the carriers involved.

  19. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevents type I diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Goudy, K; Campbell-Thompson, M; Wasserfall, C; Scott-Jorgensen, M; Wang, J; Tang, Q; Crawford, J M; Ellis, T M; Atkinson, M A; Flotte, T R

    2004-01-01

    Type I diabetes results from an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Although the exact immunologic processes underlying this disease are unclear, increasing evidence suggests that immunosuppressive, immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory agents can interrupt the progression of the disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that also displays a wide range of anti-inflammatory properties. To test the ability of AAT to modulate the development of type I diabetes, we performed a series of investigations involving recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery of human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) to nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recombinant AAV-expressing hAAT (rAAV2-CB-AT) was administered intramuscularly to 4-week-old female NOD mice (1 x 10(10) i.u./mouse). A single injection of this vector reduced the intensity of insulitis, the levels of insulin autoantibodies, and the frequency of overt type I diabetes (30% (3/10) at 32 weeks of age versus 70% (7/10) in controls). Transgene expression at the injection sites was confirmed by immunostaining. Interestingly, antibodies against hAAT were present in a majority of the vector-injected mice and circulating hAAT was undetectable when assessed 10 weeks postinjection. This study suggests a potential therapeutic role for AAT in preventing type I diabetes as well as the ability of AAV gene therapy-based approaches to ameliorate disease effectively.

  20. Current Progress in Gene Delivery Technology Based on Chemical Methods and Nano-carriers

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lian; Zeng, Xin; Liu, Ming; Deng, Yan; He, Nongyue

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer methods are promising in the field of gene therapy. Current methods for gene transfer include three major groups: viral, physical and chemical methods. This review mainly summarizes development of several types of chemical methods for gene transfer in vitro and in vivo by means of nano-carriers like; calcium phosphates, lipids, and cationic polymers including chitosan, polyethylenimine, polyamidoamine dendrimers, and poly(lactide-co-glycolide). This review also briefly introduces applications of these chemical methods for gene delivery. PMID:24505233

  1. Biosensor-controlled gene therapy/drug delivery with nanoparticles for nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Rose, William A.; Wang, Nan; Reece, Lisa M.; Lvov, Yuri; Leary, James F.

    2005-04-01

    Nanomedicine involves cell-by-cell regenerative medicine, either repairing cells one at a time or triggering apoptotic pathways in cells that are not repairable. Multilayered nanoparticle systems are being constructed for the targeted delivery of gene therapy to single cells. Cleavable shells containing targeting, biosensing, and gene therapeutic molecules are being constructed to direct nanoparticles to desired intracellular targets. Therapeutic gene sequences are controlled by biosensor-activated control switches to provide the proper amount of gene therapy on a single cell basis. The central idea is to set up gene therapy "nanofactories" inside single living cells. Molecular biosensors linked to these genes control their expression. Gene delivery is started in response to a biosensor detected problem; gene delivery is halted when the cell response indicates that more gene therapy is not needed. Cell targeting of nanoparticles, both nanocrystals and nanocapsules, has been tested by a combination of fluorescent tracking dyes, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Intracellular targeting has been tested by confocal microscopy. Successful gene delivery has been visualized by use of GFP reporter sequences. DNA tethering techniques were used to increase the level of expression of these genes. Integrated nanomedical systems are being designed, constructed, and tested in-vitro, ex-vivo, and in small animals. While still in its infancy, nanomedicine represents a paradigm shift in thinking-from destruction of injured cells by surgery, radiation, chemotherapy to cell-by-cell repair within an organ and destruction of non-repairable cells by natural apoptosis.

  2. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems. PMID:26579443

  3. Destination Brain: the Past, Present, and Future of Therapeutic Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Chaitanya R; Labhasetwar, Vinod; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2017-03-01

    Neurological diseases and disorders (NDDs) present a significant societal burden and currently available drug- and biological-based therapeutic strategies have proven inadequate to alleviate it. Gene therapy is a suitable alternative to treat NDDs compared to conventional systems since it can be tailored to specifically alter select gene expression, reverse disease phenotype and restore normal function. The scope of gene therapy has broadened over the years with the advent of RNA interference and genome editing technologies. Consequently, encouraging results from central nervous system (CNS)-targeted gene delivery studies have led to their transition from preclinical to clinical trials. As we shift to an exciting gene therapy era, a retrospective of available literature on CNS-associated gene delivery is in order. This review is timely in this regard, since it analyzes key challenges and major findings from the last two decades and evaluates future prospects of brain gene delivery. We emphasize major areas consisting of physiological and pharmacological challenges in gene therapy, function-based selection of a ideal cellular target(s), available therapy modalities, and diversity of viral vectors and nanoparticles as vehicle systems. Further, we present plausible answers to key questions such as strategies to circumvent low blood-brain barrier permeability and most suitable CNS cell types for targeting. We compare and contrast pros and cons of the tested viral vectors in the context of delivery systems used in past and current clinical trials. Gene vector design challenges are also evaluated in the context of cell-specific promoters. Key challenges and findings reported for recent gene therapy clinical trials, assessing viral vectors and nanoparticles are discussed from the perspective of bench to bedside gene therapy translation. We conclude this review by tying together gene delivery challenges, available vehicle systems and comprehensive analyses of

  4. Portal vein delivery of viral vectors for gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Alexandra; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cooper, Mario; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Herzog, Roland W; Nichols, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a very complex organ with a large variety of functions, making it an attractive organ for gene replacement therapy. Many genetic disorders can be corrected by delivering gene products directly into the liver using viral vectors. In this chapter, we will describe gene delivery via portal vein administration in mice and dogs to correct the blood coagulation disorder hemophilia B. Although there are multiple delivery routes for both viral and non-viral vectors in animals, portal vein administration delivers vectors directly and efficiently into the liver. Complete correction of murine hemophilia B and multi-year near-correction of canine hemophilia B have been achieved following portal vein delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing factor IX from hepatocyte-specific promoters. Peripheral vein injection can lead to increased vector dissemination to off-target organ such as the lung and spleen. Below, we will describe portal vein injection delivery route via laparotomy.

  5. A promising gene delivery system developed from PEGylated MoS2 nanosheets for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy. PMID:25386104

  6. Bioplex technology: novel synthetic gene delivery pharmaceutical based on peptides anchored to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Svahn, Mathias G; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Lundin, Karin E; Smith, C I E

    2005-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is an important approach in order to establish safe in vivo gene therapy in the clinic. Although viral vectors currently exhibit superior gene transfer efficacy, the safety aspect of viral gene delivery is a concern. In order to improve non-viral in vivo gene delivery we have designed a pharmaceutical platform called Bioplex (biological complex). The concept of Bioplex is to link functional entities via hybridising anchors, such as Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA), directly to naked DNA. In order to promote delivery functional entities consisting of biologically active peptides or carbohydrates, are linked to the PNA anchor. The PNA acts as genetic glue and hybridises with DNA in a sequence specific manner. By using functional entities, which elicit receptor-mediated endocytosis, improved endosomal escape and enhance nuclear entry we wish to improve the transfer of genetic material into the cell. An important aspect is that the functional entities should also have tissue-targeting properties in vivo. Examples of functional entities investigated to date are the Simian virus 40 nuclear localisation signal to improve nuclear uptake and different carbohydrate ligands in order to achieve receptor specific uptake. The delivery system is also endowed with regulatory capability, since the release of functional entities can be controlled. The aim is to create a safe, pharmaceutically defined and stable delivery system for nucleic acids with enhanced transfection properties that can be used in the clinic.

  7. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2015-02-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform.Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE

  8. A Photo-Degradable Gene Delivery System for Enhanced Nuclear Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hoyoung, Lee; Yeji, Kim; Patrick G., Schweickert; Stephen F., Konieczny; You-Yeon, Won

    2013-01-01

    There currently exists a significant gap in our understanding of how the detailed chemical characteristics of polycation gene carriers influence their delivery performances in overcoming an important cellular-level transport barrier, i.e., intranuclear gene transcription. In this study, a UV-degradable gene carrier material (ENE4-1) was synthesized by crosslinking low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI-2k) molecules using UV-cleavable o-nitrobenzyl urethane (NBU) as the linker molecule. NBU degrades upon exposure to mild UV irradiation. Therefore, this UV-degradable carrier allows us to control the chemical characteristics of the polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) particles at desired locations within the intracellular environment. By using this photolytic DNA carrier, we found that the exact timing of the UV degradation significantly influences the gene transfection efficiencies of ENE4-1/DNA(pGL2) polyplexes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, even if the polyplexes were UV-degraded at different intracellular locations/times, their nuclear entry efficiency was not influenced by the location/timing of UV degradation. The UV treatment did not influence the size or binding strength of the polyplexes. However, we confirmed that the degradation of the carrier molecules impacts the chemical characteristics of the polyplexes (it produces carbamic acid and nitrosobenzyl aldehyde groups on ENE4-1). We believe that these anionic acid groups enhance the interaction of the polyplexes with nuclear transcription proteins and thus the final gene expression levels; this effect was found to occur, even though UV irradiation itself has a general effect of reducing transfection efficiencies. Excess (uncomplexed) ENE4-1 polymers appear to not play any role in the UV-enhanced gene transcription phenomenon. PMID:24172855

  9. Microbubbles in Ultrasound-Triggered Drug and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hernot, Sophie; Klibanov, Alexander L.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents, in the form of gas-filled microbubbles, are becoming popular in perfusion monitoring; they are employed as molecular imaging agents. Microbubbles are manufactured from biocompatible materials, they can be injected intravenously, and some are approved for clinical use. Microbubbles can be destroyed by ultrasound irradiation. This destruction phenomenon can be applied to targeted drug delivery and enhancement of drug action. The ultrasonic field can be focused at the target tissues and organs; thus, selectivity of the treatment can be improved, reducing undesirable side effects. Microbubbles enhance ultrasound energy deposition in the tissues and serve as cavitation nuclei, increasing intracellular drug delivery. DNA delivery and successful tissue transfection is observed in the areas of the body where ultrasound is applied after intravascular administration of microbubbles and plasmid DNA. Accelerated blood clot dissolution in the areas of insonation by cooperative action of thrombolytic agents and microbubbles is demonstrated in several clinical trials. PMID:18486268

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

  11. Polymeric Carriers for Gene Delivery: Chitosan and Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingxing; Wang, Chi-Hwa; Pack, Daniel Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potential medical solution that promises new treatments and may hold the cure for many different types of diseases and disorders of the human race. However, gene therapy is still a growing medical field and the technology is still in its infancy. The main challenge for gene therapy is to find safe and effective vectors that are able to deliver genes to the specific cells and get them to express inside the cells. Due to safety concerns, synthetic delivery systems, rather than viral vectors, are preferred for gene delivery and significant efforts have been focused on the development of this field. However, we are faced with problems like low gene transfer efficiency, cytotoxicity and lack of cell-targeting capability for these synthetic delivery systems. Over the years, we have seen a variety of new and effective polymers which have been designed and synthesized specifically for gene delivery. Moreover, various strategies that aimed at enhancing their physicochemical properties, improving transfection efficiency, reducing cytotoxicity as well as incorporating functional groups that offer better targetability and higher cellular uptake are established. Here, we look at two potential polymeric carriers, chitosan and poly(amidoamine) dendrimers, which have been widely reported for gene delivery. For chitosan, the interest arises from their availability, excellent non-cytotoxicity profile, biodegradability and ease of modification. For poly(amidoamine) dendrimers, the interest arises from their ease of synthesis with controlled structure and size, minimal cytotoxicity, biodegradability and high transfection efficiencies. The latest developments on these polymers for gene delivery will be the main focus of this article. PMID:20618156

  12. Efficient intranuclear gene delivery by CdSe aqueous quantum dots electrostatically-coated with polyethyleneimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Giang H. T.; Y Shih, Wan; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanoparticles with photoluminescence properties that do not photobleach. Due to these advantages, using QDs for non-viral gene delivery has the additional benefit of being able to track the delivery of the genes in real time as it happens. We investigate the efficacy of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped CdSe aqueous quantum dots (AQDs) electrostatically complexed with branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) both as a non-viral gene delivery vector and as a fluorescent probe for tracking the delivery of genes into nuclei. The MPA-capped CdSe AQDs that were completely synthesized in water were the model AQDs. A nominal MPA:Cd:Se = 4:3:1 was chosen for optimal photoluminescence and zeta potential. The gene delivery study was carried out in vitro using a human colon cancer cell line, HT29 (ATCC). The model gene was a plasmid DNA (pDNA) that can express red fluorescent protein (RFP). Positively charged branched PEI was employed to provide a proton buffer to the AQDs to allow for endosomal escape. It is shown that by using a PEI-AQD complex with a PEI/AQD molar ratio of 300 and a nominal pDNA/PEI-AQD ratio of 6, we can achieve 75 ± 2.6% RFP expression efficiency with cell vitality remaining at 78 ± 4% of the control.

  13. Gene therapy following subretinal AAV5 vector delivery is not affected by a previous intravitreal AAV5 vector administration in the partner eye

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wensheng; Kong, Fansheng; Li, Xia; Dai, Xufeng; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Zheng, Qinxiang; Wu, Ronghan; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Li, Qiuhong; Hauswirth, William W.; Pang, Ji-jing

    2009-01-01

    statistically similar to those from the eyes that received the initial subretinal injection at a similar age. In C57BL/6J mice, GFP positive cells were detected in eyes following the first intravitreal injection around the injection site. Strong GFP expression in both the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor (PR) cells was detected in the partner eyes following the subsequent subretinal injection. Immunostaining of retinal sections with anti-RPE65 antibody showed strong RPE65 expression mainly in the RPE cells of subretinally injected eyes but not in the intravitreally injected eyes except minimally around the injection site. Conclusions These results show that an initial intravitreal injection of AAV vectors to one eye of a mouse does not influence AAV-mediated gene expression or related therapeutic effects in the other eye when vectors are administered to the subretinal space. This suggests that the subretinal space possesses a unique immune privilege relative to the vitreous cavity. PMID:19190735

  14. GFP expression by intracellular gene delivery of GFP-coding fragments using nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Yasuhara, Masato; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2008-12-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach to supplement a deficient gene function. Although there has been some success with specific gene delivery using various methods including viral vectors and liposomes, most of these methods have a limited efficiency or also carry a risk for oncogenesis. We herein report that quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLSP) successfully introduced gene-fragments with promoter elements, which promoted the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene in mammalian cells. The expression of eGFP protein was observed when the QD/gene-construct was added to the culture media. The gene-expression efficiency varied depending on multiple factors around QDs, such as (1) the reading direction of the gene-fragments, (2) the quantity of gene-fragments attached on the surface of the QD-constructs, (3) the surface electronic charges varied according to the structure of the QD/gene-constructs, and (4) the particle size of QD/gene complex varied according to the structure and amounts of gene-fragments. Using this QD/gene-construct system, eGFP protein could be detected 28 days after the gene-introduction whereas the fluorescence of QDs had disappeared. This system therefore provides another method for the intracellular delivery of gene-fragments without using either viral vectors or specific liposomes.

  15. Gene delivery to the neurulating embryo during culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modulating expression of specific genes during embryogenesis will help elucidate their role in development. Transient overexpression of specific genes can be accomplished by adding additional copies, or else antisense transcripts can be used to block expression. Manipulation of g...

  16. Role of nanotechnology and gene delivery systems in TRAIL-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Naoum, George E; Tawadros, Fady; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Qureshi, Muhammad Zahid; Tabassum, Sobia; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Arafat, Waleed

    2016-01-01

    Since its identification as a member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family, TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) has emerged as a new avenue in apoptosis-inducing cancer therapies. Its ability to circumvent the chemoresistance of conventional therapeutics and to interact with cancer stem cells (CSCs) self-renewal pathways, amplified its potential as a cancer apoptotic agent. Many recombinant preparations of this death ligand and monoclonal antibodies targeting its death receptors have been tested in monotherapy and combinational clinical trials. Gene therapy is a new approach for cancer treatment which implies viral or non-viral functional transgene induction of apoptosis in cancer cells or repair of the underlying genetic abnormality on a molecular level. The role of this approach in overcoming the traditional barriers of radiation and chemotherapeutics systemic toxicity, risk of recurrence, and metastasis made it a promising platform for cancer treatment. The recent first Food Drug Administration (FDA) approved oncolytic herpes virus for melanoma treatment brings forth the potency of the cancer gene therapy approach in the future. Many gene delivery systems have been studied for intratumoural TRAIL gene delivery alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents to produce synergistic cancer cytotoxicity. However, there still remain many obstacles to be conquered for this different gene delivery systems. Nanomedicine on the other hand offers a new frontier for clinical trials and biomedical research. The FDA approved nanodrugs motivates horizon exploration for other nanoscale designed particles’ implications in gene delivery. In this review we aim to highlight the molecular role of TRAIL in apoptosis and interaction with cancer stem cells (CSCs) self-renewal pathways. Finally, we also aim to discuss the different roles of gene delivery systems, mesenchymal cells, and nanotechnology designs in TRAIL gene delivery. PMID:27594905

  17. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed.

  18. Efficient gene delivery to pancreatic islets with ultrasonic microbubble destruction technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyuan; Ding, Jia-Huan; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Yang, Bing-Zhi; Shohet, Ralph V.; Johnston, Stephen A.; Hohmeier, Hans E.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2006-05-01

    This study describes a method of gene delivery to pancreatic islets of adult, living animals by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). The technique involves incorporation of plasmids into the phospholipid shell of gas-filled microbubbles, which are then infused into rats and destroyed within the pancreatic microcirculation with ultrasound. Specific delivery of genes to islet beta cells by UTMD was achieved by using a plasmid containing a rat insulin 1 promoter (RIP), and reporter gene expression was regulated appropriately by glucose in animals that received a RIP-luciferase plasmid. To demonstrate biological efficacy, we used UTMD to deliver RIP-human insulin and RIP-hexokinase I plasmids to islets of adult rats. Delivery of the former plasmid resulted in clear increases in circulating human C-peptide and decreased blood glucose levels, whereas delivery of the latter plasmid resulted in a clear increase in hexokinase I protein expression in islets, increased insulin levels in blood, and decreased circulating glucose levels. We conclude that UTMD allows relatively noninvasive delivery of genes to pancreatic islets with an efficiency sufficient to modulate beta cell function in adult animals. diabetes | gene therapy | ultrasound

  19. Development of a tailorable and tunable mechanism for cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blocker, Kory M.

    Due to the spatial and temporal control as well as the cell-type specificity necessary to extend gene delivery to therapeutic applications, there exists a need to create systems capable of gene transfer that are well-understood and easily manipulated. Furthermore, the creation of such materials will enable further exploration of the correlation between biochemical cues and the resulting cellular responses. In response to this as yet unmet need, a method to promote cell-responsive substrate-mediated gene delivery was developed for this dissertation. Through the use of non-viral gene delivery, flexibility of the vehicle design was incorporated into the system. Using PNA technology, pDNA was able to be specifically tethered to a self-assembled monolayer via an enzymatically-labile peptide tether. This construct was shown to promote cell-responsive delivery while retaining flexibility over the chemical and physical properties of the vehicle and substrate. By alteration of some design parameters including tether number, pDNA surface coverage, and complexation agent, temporal control over the release profile was demonstrated. Furthermore, the ability to extend the applicability of the system was detailed by transitioning to a poly-D-lysine coated substrate upon which the pDNA is immobilized. This dissertation details proof-of-principle work in the formation of a controlled release gene delivery mechanism that may be used to promote understanding of cellular responses to biochemical signaling as well as be extended to use in tissue engineering applications.

  20. Gene transfer to hemophilia A mice via oral delivery of FVIII-chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Katherine; Sarkar, Rita; Raut, Sanj; Leong, Kam W

    2008-12-18

    Effective oral delivery of a non-viral gene carrier would represent a novel and attractive strategy for therapeutic gene transfer. To evaluate the potential of this approach, we studied the oral gene delivery efficacy of DNA polyplexes composed of chitosan and Factor VIII DNA. Transgene DNA was detected in both local and systemic tissues following oral administration of the chitosan nanoparticles to hemophilia A mice. Functional factor VIII protein was detected in plasma by chromogenic and thrombin generation assays, reaching a peak level of 2-4% FVIII at day 22 after delivery. In addition, a bleeding challenge one month after DNA administration resulted in phenotypic correction in 13/20 mice given 250-600 microg of FVIII DNA in chitosan nanoparticles, compared to 1/13 mice given naked FVIII DNA and 0/6 untreated mice. While further optimization would be required to render this type of delivery system practical for hemophilia A gene therapy, the findings suggest the feasibility of oral, non-viral delivery for gene medicine applications.

  1. Effect of strontium ions substitution on gene delivery related properties of calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hanifi, A; Fathi, M H; Mir Mohammad Sadeghi, H

    2010-09-01

    Gene therapy has been considered a strategy for delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to a specific site. Calcium phosphates are one gene delivery vector group of interest. However, low transfection efficiency has limited the use of calcium phosphate in gene delivery applications. Present work aims at studying the fabrication of strontium substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles with improved gene delivery related properties. Strontium substituted calcium phosphate was prepared using a simple sol gel method. X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, specific surface area analysis, zeta potential measurement and ion release evaluation were used to characterize the samples. This characterization showed strontium and carbonate co-substituted calcium phosphate which resulted in nano size particles with low crystallinity, high specific surface area, positive surface charge, and a high dissolution rate. These improved properties could increase the DNA concentration on the vector as well as the endosomal escape of the complex that leads to higher transfection efficiency of this novel gene delivery vector.

  2. Intestinal delivery of non-viral gene therapeutics: physiological barriers and preclinical models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Martin J; Bourre, Ludovic; Melgar, Silvia; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2011-03-01

    The future of nucleic acid-based therapeutics is dependent on achieving successful delivery. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in delivery via the gastrointestinal tract. Gene therapy via this route has many advantages, including non-invasive access and the versatility to treat local diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, as well as systemic diseases, such as haemophilia. However, the intestine presents several distinct barriers and, therefore, the design of robust non-viral delivery systems is key to future success. Several non-viral delivery strategies have provided evidence of activity in vivo. To facilitate the design of more efficient and safe gene medicines, more physiologically relevant models, at both the in vitro and in vivo levels, are essential.

  3. Cell-specific targeting strategies for electroporation-mediated gene delivery in cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Dean, David A

    2013-10-01

    The use of electroporation to facilitate gene transfer is an extremely powerful and useful method for both in vitro and in vivo applications. One of its great strengths is that it induces functional destabilization and permeabilization of cell membranes throughout a tissue leading to widespread gene transfer to multiple cells and cell types within the electric field. While this is a strength, it can also be a limitation in terms of cell-specific gene delivery. The ability to restrict gene delivery and expression to particular cell types is of paramount importance for many types of gene therapy, since ectopic expression of a transgene could lead to deleterious host inflammatory responses or dysregulation of normal cellular functions. At present, there are relatively few ways to obtain cell-specific targeting of nonviral vectors, molecular probes, small molecules, and imaging agents. We have developed a novel means of restricting gene delivery to desired cell types based on the ability to control the transport of plasmids into the nuclei of desired cell types. In this article, we discuss the mechanisms of this approach and several applications in living animals to demonstrate the benefits of the combination of electroporation and selective nuclear import of plasmids for cell-specific gene delivery.

  4. Self-assembled pentablock copolymers for selective and sustained gene delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingqi

    2011-05-15

    The poly(diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDEAEM) - Pluronic F127 - PDEAEM pentablock copolymer (PB) gene delivery vector system has been found to possess an inherent selectivity in transfecting cancer cells over non-cancer cells in vitro, without attaching any targeting ligands. In order to understand the mechanism of this selective transfection, three possible intracellular barriers to transfection were investigated in both cancer and non-cancer cells. We concluded that escape from the endocytic pathway served as the primary intracellular barrier for PB-mediated transfection. Most likely, PB vectors were entrapped and rendered non-functional in acidic lysosomes of non-cancer cells, but survived in less acidic lysosomes of cancer cells. The work highlights the importance of identifying intracellular barriers for different gene delivery systems and provides a new paradigm for designing targeting vectors based on intracellular differences between cell types, rather than through the use of targeting ligands. The PB vector was further developed to simultaneously deliver anticancer drugs and genes, which showed a synergistic effect demonstrated by significantly enhanced gene expression in vitro. Due to the thermosensitive gelation behavior, the PB vector packaging both drug and gene was also investigated for its in vitro sustained release properties by using polyethylene glycol diacrylate as a barrier gel to mimic the tumor matrix in vivo. Overall, this work resulted in the development of a gene delivery vector for sustained and selective gene delivery to tumor cells for cancer therapy.

  5. Nacystelyn enhances adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery to mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Kushwah, R; Oliver, J R; Cao, H; Hu, J

    2007-08-01

    Adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery has been vastly investigated for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy; however, one of its drawbacks is the low efficiency of gene transfer, which is due to basolateral colocalization of viral receptors, immune responses to viral vectors and the presence of a thick mucus layer in the airways of CF patients. Therefore, enhancement of gene transfer can lead to reduction in the viral dosage, which could further reduce the acute toxicity associated with the use of adenoviral vectors. Nacystelyn (NAL) is a mucolytic agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and has been used clinically in CF patients to reduce mucus viscosity in the airways. In this study, we show that pretreatment of the airways with NAL followed by administration of adenoviral vectors in complex with DEAE-Dextran can significantly enhance gene delivery to the airways of mice without any harmful effects. Moreover, NAL pretreatment can reduce the airway inflammation, which is normally observed after delivery of adenoviral particles. Taken together, these results indicate that NAL pretreatment followed by adenoviral vector-mediated gene delivery can be beneficial to CF patients by increasing the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways, and reducing the acute toxicity associated with the administration of adenoviral vectors.

  6. Multifunctional nanocarrier based on clay nanotubes for efficient intracellular siRNA delivery and gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Shi, Yinfeng; Huang, Chusen; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiahui; Shen, Hebai; Jia, Nengqin

    2014-04-01

    RNA interference-mediated gene silencing relating to disease has recently emerged as a powerful method in gene therapy. Despite the promises, effective transport of siRNA with minimal side effects remains a challenge. Halloysites are cheap and naturally available aluminosilicate clay nanotubes with high mechanical strength and biocompatibility. In this study, a novel multifunctional nanocarrier based on functionalized halloysite nanotubes (f-HNTs) has been developed via electrostatic layer-by-layer assembling approach for loading and intracellular delivery of therapeutic antisurvivin siRNA and simultaneously tracking their intracellular transport, in which PEI-modified HNTs are used as gene vector, antisurvivin siRNA as gene therapeutic agent, and mercaptoacetic acid-capped CdSe quantum dots as fluorescent labeling probes. The successful assembly of the f-HNTs-siRNA complexes was systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible spectrophotometry, Zeta potential measurement, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Confocal microscopy, biological TEM, and flow cytometry studies revealed that the complexes enabled the efficient intracellular delivery of siRNA for cell-specific gene silencing. MTT assays exhibited that the complexes can enhance antitumor activity. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that f-HNTs-mediated siRNA delivery effectively knocked down gene expression of survivin and thereby decreased the levels of target proteins of PANC-1 cells. Therefore, this study suggested that the synthesized f-HNTs were a new effective drug delivery system for potential application in cancer gene therapy.

  7. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells†

    PubMed Central

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform. PMID:25213606

  8. A novel cationic liposome formulation for efficient gene delivery via a pulmonary route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Liu, Donghua; Sun, Xiaoli; Liu, Chunxi; Liu, Yongjun; Zhang, Na

    2011-06-01

    The clinical success of gene therapy for lung cancer is not only dependent on efficient gene carriers but also on a suitable delivery route. A pulmonary delivery route can directly deliver gene vectors to the lung which is more efficient than a systemic delivery route. For gene carriers, cationic liposomes have recently emerged as leading non-viral vectors in worldwide gene therapy clinical trials. However, cytotoxic effects or apoptosis are often observed which is mostly dependent on the cationic lipid used. Therefore, an efficient and safe cationic lipid, 6-lauroxyhexyl lysinate (LHLN), previously synthesized by our group was first used to prepare cationic liposomes. Physicochemical and biological properties of LHLN-liposomes were investigated. LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes showed positive surface charge, spherical morphology, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and strong DNA binding capability. Compared with Lipofectamine2000, the new cationic liposome formulation using LHLN exhibited not only lower cytotoxicity (P < 0.05) but also similar transfection efficiency in A549 and HepG2 lung cancer cells for in vitro tests. When administered by intratracheal instillation into rat lungs for in vivo evaluation, LHLN-liposome/DNA complexes exhibited higher pulmonary gene transfection efficiency than Lipofectamine2000/DNA complexes (P < 0.05). These results suggested that LHLN-liposomes may have great potential for efficient pulmonary gene delivery.

  9. The effects of a multifunctional oligomer and its incorporation strategies on the gene delivery efficiency of poly(L-lysine).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dezhong; Li, Congxin; Hu, Yuling; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Jiatong; Zhang, Zhengpu; Guo, Tianying

    2012-05-14

    A novel multifunctional oligomer is synthesized and incorporated to enhance the gene delivery efficiency of PLL via non-electrostatic assembly and covalent grafting strategies. The improvement of the gene delivery efficiency is dependent on the gene carrying complex properties, and the properties are dependent on the oligomer incorporation strategy.

  10. Ultrasound for drug and gene delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-06-30

    Noninvasive, transient, and local image-guided blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) has been demonstrated with focused ultrasound exposure in animal models. Most studies have combined low pressure amplitude and low time average acoustic power burst sonications with intravascular injection of pre-formed micro-bubbles to produce BBBD without damage to the neurons. The BBB has been shown to be healed within a few hours after the exposure. The combination of focused ultrasound beams with MR image guidance allows precise anatomical targeting as demonstrated by the delivery of several marker molecules in different animal models. This method may in the future have a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Most notably, the delivery of the chemotherapy agents (liposomal Doxorubicin and Herceptin) has been shown in a rat model.

  11. Cerebellomedullary Cistern Delivery for AAV-Based Gene Therapy: A Technical Note for Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Samaranch, Lluis; Bringas, John; Pivirotto, Philip; Sebastian, Waldy San; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2016-01-01

    Accessing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the craniocervical junction through the posterior atlanto-occipital membrane via cerebellomedullary injection (also known as cisternal puncture or cisterna magna injection) has become a standard procedure in preclinical studies. Such delivery provides broader coverage to the central and peripheral nervous system unlike local parenchymal delivery alone. As a clinical application, this approach offers a more reliable method for neurological gene replacement delivery in infants, where skull-mounted devices are not indicated. Here we describe a consistent, precise, and safe method for CSF injection with minimal equipment and technical skills. PMID:26757202

  12. Cerebellomedullary Cistern Delivery for AAV-Based Gene Therapy: A Technical Note for Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Samaranch, Lluis; Bringas, John; Pivirotto, Philip; Sebastian, Waldy San; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof

    2016-02-01

    Accessing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the craniocervical junction through the posterior atlanto-occipital membrane via cerebellomedullary injection (also known as cisternal puncture or cisterna magna injection) has become a standard procedure in preclinical studies. Such delivery provides broader coverage to the central and peripheral nervous system unlike local parenchymal delivery alone. As a clinical application, this approach offers a more reliable method for neurological gene replacement delivery in infants, where skull-mounted devices are not indicated. Here we describe a consistent, precise, and safe method for CSF injection with minimal equipment and technical skills.

  13. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  14. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate efficient gene transduction in cultured neonatal and adult microglia.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Kang, John; Sopher, Bryce; Gillespie, James; Aloi, Macarena S; Odom, Guy L; Hopkins, Stephanie; Case, Amanda; Wang, David B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are a specialized population of myeloid cells that mediate CNS innate immune responses. Efforts to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate microglia behaviors have been hampered by the lack of effective tools for manipulating gene expression. Cultured microglia are refractory to most chemical and electrical transfection methods, yielding little or no gene delivery and causing toxicity and/or inflammatory activation. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAVs) vectors are non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA vectors commonly used to transduce many primary cell types and tissues. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing rAAV serotype 2 (rAAV2) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia. rAAV2 yields high transduction and causes minimal toxicity or inflammatory response in both neonatal and adult microglia. To demonstrate that rAAV transduction can induce functional protein expression, we used rAAV2 expressing Cre recombinase to successfully excise a LoxP-flanked miR155 gene in cultured microglia. We further evaluated rAAV serotypes 5, 6, 8, and 9, and observed that all efficiently transduced cultured microglia to varying degrees of success and caused little or no alteration in inflammatory gene expression. These results provide strong encouragement for the application of rAAV-mediated gene expression in microglia for mechanistic and therapeutic purposes. Neonatal microglia are functionally distinct from adult microglia, although the majority of in vitro studies utilize rodent neonatal microglia cultures because of difficulties of culturing adult cells. In addition, cultured microglia are refractory to most methods for modifying gene expression. Here, we developed a novel protocol for culturing adult microglia and evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia.

  15. Engineering biodegradable and multifunctional peptide-based polymers for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The complex nature of in vivo gene transfer establishes the need for multifunctional delivery vectors capable of meeting these challenges. An additional consideration for clinical translation of synthetic delivery formulations is reproducibility and scale-up of materials. In this review, we summarize our work over the last five years in developing a modular approach for synthesizing peptide-based polymers. In these materials, bioactive peptides that address various barriers to gene delivery are copolymerized with a hydrophilic backbone of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) using reversible-addition fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. We demonstrate that this synthetic approach results in well-defined, narrowly-disperse polymers with controllable composition and molecular weight. To date, we have investigated the effectiveness of various bioactive peptides for DNA condensation, endosomal escape, cell targeting, and degradability on gene transfer, as well as the impact of multivalency and polymer architecture on peptide bioactivity. PMID:24156736

  16. Delivery methods for site-specific nucleases: Achieving the full potential of therapeutic gene editing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shui, Sai-Lan

    2016-12-28

    The advent of site-specific nucleases, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, provides researchers with the unprecedented ability to manipulate genomic sequences. These nucleases are used to create model cell lines, engineer metabolic pathways, produce transgenic animals and plants, perform genome-wide functional screen and, most importantly, treat human diseases that are difficult to tackle by traditional medications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to improving the efficiency and specificity of nucleases for clinical applications. However, safe and efficient delivery methods remain the major obstacle for therapeutic gene editing. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on nuclease delivery methods, highlight their impact on the outcomes of gene editing and discuss the potential of different delivery approaches for therapeutic gene editing.

  17. Mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Sandra S; Plank, Christian; Cotten, Matt; Wagner, Ernst; Zenke, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells and are unique in their ability to prime naïve T cells. Gene modification of dendritic cells is of particular interest for immunotherapy of diseases where the immune system has failed or is aberrantly regulated, such as in cancer or autoimmune disease, respectively. Dendritic cells abundantly express mannose receptor and mannose receptor-related receptors, and receptor-mediated gene transfer via mannose receptor offers a versatile tool for targeted gene delivery into these cells. Accordingly, mannose polyethylenimine DNA transfer complexes were generated and used for gene delivery into dendritic cells. Mannose receptor belongs to the group of scavenger receptors that allow dendritic cells to take up pathogenic material, which is directed for degradation and MHC class II presentation. Therefore, a limiting step of transgene expression by mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery is endosomal degradation of DNA. Several strategies have been explored to overcome this limitation including the addition of endosomolytic components to DNA transfer complexes like adenovirus particles and influenza peptides. Here, we review the current understanding of mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into dendritic cells and discuss strategies to identify appropriate endosomolytic agents to improve DNA transfer efficacy.

  18. Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin for targeted gene delivery of VEGF165-Ang-1 with PEI.

    PubMed

    Ma, Caili; Lv, Linlin; Liu, Yu; Yu, Yanni; You, Renchuan; Yang, Jicheng; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-06-01

    Vascularization is a crucial challenge in tissue engineering. One solution for this problem is to implant scaffolds that contain functional genes that promote vascularization by providing angiogenic growth factors via a gene delivery carrier. Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) is a gene delivery carrier with high transfection efficiency but with cytotoxicity. To solve this problem, we utilized Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (ASF), which has favorable cytocompatibility and biodegradability, RGD sequences and a negative charge, in conjunction with PEI, as the delivery vector for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 165-angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) dual gene simultaneous expression plasmid, creating an ASF/PEI/pDNA complex. The results suggested that the zeta potential of the ASF/PEI/pDNA complex was significantly lower than that of the PEI/pDNA complex. Decreased nitrogen and increased oxygen on the surface of the complex demonstrated that the ASF had successfully combined with the surface of the PEI/pDNA. Furthermore, the complexes resisted digestion by nucleic acid enzymes and degradation by serum. L929 cells were cultured and transfected in vitro and improved cytotoxicity was found when the cells were transfected with ASF/PEI/pDNA compared with PEI/pDNA. In addition, the transfection efficiency and VEGF secretion increased. In general, this study provides a novel method for decreasing the cytotoxicity of PEI gene delivery vectors and increasing transfection efficiency of angiogenesis-related genes.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Biodegradable HPMA-Oligolysine Copolymers for Improved Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Rob S.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive peptides, including DNA-binding, endosomal release and cell targeting peptides, have been integrated into synthetic gene carriers to improve delivery efficiencies by enabling the vectors to overcome barriers to gene delivery. Our overall goal is to develop multifunctional, peptide-based polymers that incorporate motifs to condense DNA and facilitate sequential trafficking steps. One approach is to polymerize vinyl-terminated peptides by radical polymerization. In this work, cationic oligolysine peptides were designed to contain vinyl termini with internal reducible linkers. These peptides were copolymerized with HPMA to form biodegradable, DNA-condensing copolymers for gene delivery. The polymerization conditions were optimized by varying the initiator to monomer ratios, macromonomer to comonomer ratios, and reactant concentrations. The synthesized copolymers were shown to possess several important properties required for in vivo gene delivery applications, including (i) efficient DNA binding and condensation, (ii) the ability to stabilize particles against salt-induced aggregation, (iii) the ability to resist extracellular polyplex unpackaging, (iv) biocompatibility and the potential to be degraded into nontoxic components after cellular uptake, and (v) efficient delivery of plasmid to cultured cells. PMID:19968270

  20. TrkB Gene Therapy by Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Recovery after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Zambrano, Juan M.; Diaz Soto, Juan C.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Gransee, Heather M.; Sieck, Gary C.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral cervical spinal cord hemisection at C2 (C2SH) interrupts descending bulbospinal inputs to phrenic motoneurons, paralyzing the diaphragm muscle. Recovery after C2SH is enhanced by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via the tropomyosin-related kinase subtype B (TrkB) receptor in phrenic motoneurons. The role for gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is not known. The present study determined the therapeutic efficacy of intrapleural delivery of AAV7 encoding for full-length TrkB (AAV-TrkB) to phrenic motoneurons 3 days post-C2SH. Diaphragm EMG was recorded chronically in male rats (n = 26) up to 21 days post-C2SH. Absent ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity was verified 3 days post-C2SH. A greater proportion of animals displayed recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity during eupnea by 14 and 21 days post-SH after AAV-TrkB (10/15) compared to AAV-GFP treatment (2/11; p = 0.031). Diaphragm EMG amplitude increased over time post-C2SH (p < 0.001), and by 14 days post-C2SH, AAV-TrkB treated animals displaying recovery achieved 48% of the pre-injury values compared to 27% in AAV-GFP treated animals. Phrenic motoneuron mRNA expression of glutamatergic AMPA and NMDA receptors revealed a significant, positive correlation (r2 = 0.82), with increased motoneuron NMDA expression evident in animals treated with AAV-TrkB and that displayed recovery after C2SH. Overall, gene therapy using intrapleural delivery of AAV-TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is sufficient to promote recovery of diaphragm activity, adding a novel potential intervention that can be administered after upper cervical spinal cord injury to improve impaired respiratory function. PMID:26607912

  1. TrkB gene therapy by adeno-associated virus enhances recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Zambrano, Juan M; Diaz Soto, Juan C; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-02-01

    Unilateral cervical spinal cord hemisection at C2 (C2SH) interrupts descending bulbospinal inputs to phrenic motoneurons, paralyzing the diaphragm muscle. Recovery after C2SH is enhanced by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via the tropomyosin-related kinase subtype B (TrkB) receptor in phrenic motoneurons. The role for gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is not known. The present study determined the therapeutic efficacy of intrapleural delivery of AAV7 encoding for full-length TrkB (AAV-TrkB) to phrenic motoneurons 3 days post-C2SH. Diaphragm EMG was recorded chronically in male rats (n=26) up to 21 days post-C2SH. Absent ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity was verified 3 days post-C2SH. A greater proportion of animals displayed recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity during eupnea by 14 and 21 days post-SH after AAV-TrkB (10/15) compared to AAV-GFP treatment (2/11; p=0.031). Diaphragm EMG amplitude increased over time post-C2SH (p<0.001), and by 14 days post-C2SH, AAV-TrkB treated animals displaying recovery achieved 48% of the pre-injury values compared to 27% in AAV-GFP treated animals. Phrenic motoneuron mRNA expression of glutamatergic AMPA and NMDA receptors revealed a significant, positive correlation (r(2)=0.82), with increased motoneuron NMDA expression evident in animals treated with AAV-TrkB and that displayed recovery after C2SH. Overall, gene therapy using intrapleural delivery of AAV-TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is sufficient to promote recovery of diaphragm activity, adding a novel potential intervention that can be administered after upper cervical spinal cord injury to improve impaired respiratory function.

  2. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  3. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Gene Delivery by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Limn, Chang Kwang; Yap, Chan Choo; Onishi, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Masami; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Okahashi, Nobuo; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Rie; Mochizuki, Rika; Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-01

    Although recombinant baculovirus vectors can be an efficient tool for gene transfer into mammalian cells in vitro, gene transduction in vivo has been hampered by the inactivation of baculoviruses by serum complement. Recombinant baculoviruses possessing excess envelope protein gp64 or other viral envelope proteins on the virion surface deliver foreign genes into a variety of mammalian cell lines more efficiently than the unmodified baculovirus. In this study, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo by recombinant baculoviruses possessing envelope proteins derived from either vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVG) or rabies virus. These recombinant viruses efficiently transferred reporter genes into neural cell lines, primary rat neural cells, and primary mouse osteal cells in vitro. The VSVG-modified baculovirus exhibited greater resistance to inactivation by animal sera than the unmodified baculovirus. A synthetic inhibitor of the complement activation pathway circumvented the serum inactivation of the unmodified baculovirus. Furthermore, the VSVG-modified baculovirus could transduce a reporter gene into the cerebral cortex and testis of mice by direct inoculation in vivo. These results suggest the possible use of the recombinant baculovirus vectors in combination with the administration of complement inhibitors for in vivo gene therapy. PMID:12941888

  5. Transient gene expression in epidermal cells of plant leaves by biolistic DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Shoko; Magori, Shimpei; Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    Transient gene expression is a useful approach for studying the functions of gene products. In the case of plants, Agrobacterium infiltration is a method of choice for transient introduction of genes for many species. However, this technique does not work efficiently in some species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, the infection of Agrobacterium is known to induce dynamic changes in gene expression patterns in the host plants, possibly affecting the function and localization of the proteins to be tested. These problems can be circumvented by biolistic delivery of the genes of interest. Here, we present an optimized protocol for biolistic delivery of plasmid DNA into epidermal cells of plant leaves, which can be easily performed using the Bio-Rad Helios gene gun system. This protocol allows efficient and reproducible transient expression of diverse genes in Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum, and is suitable for studies of the biological function and subcellular localization of the gene products directly in planta. The protocol also can be easily adapted to other species by optimizing the delivery gas pressure.

  6. Sonoporation increases therapeutic efficacy of inducible and constitutive BMP2/7 in vivo gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Georg A; Hofmann, Anna T; Slezak, Paul; Schuetzenberger, Sebastian; Kaipel, Martin; Schwartz, Ernst; Neef, Anne; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Nau, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; McHale, Anthony P; Redl, Heinz

    2014-02-01

    An ideal novel treatment for bone defects should provide regeneration without autologous or allogenous grafting, exogenous cells, growth factors, or biomaterials while ensuring spatial and temporal control as well as safety. Therefore, a novel osteoinductive nonviral in vivo gene therapy approach using sonoporation was investigated in ectopic and orthotopic models. Constitutive or regulated, doxycycline-inducible, bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7 coexpression plasmids were repeatedly applied for 5 days. Ectopic and orthotopic gene transfer efficacy was monitored by coapplication of a luciferase plasmid and bioluminescence imaging. Orthotopic plasmid DNA distribution was investigated using a novel plasmid-labeling method. Luciferase imaging demonstrated an increased trend (61% vs. 100%) of gene transfer efficacy, and micro-computed tomography evaluation showed significantly enhanced frequency of ectopic bone formation for sonoporation compared with passive gene delivery (46% vs. 100%) dependent on applied ultrasound power. Bone formation by the inducible system (83%) was stringently controlled by doxycycline in vivo, and no ectopic bone formation was observed without induction or with passive gene transfer without sonoporation. Orthotopic evaluation in a rat femur segmental defect model demonstrated an increased trend of gene transfer efficacy using sonoporation. Investigation of DNA distribution demonstrated extensive binding of plasmid DNA to bone tissue. Sonoporated animals displayed a potentially increased union rate (33%) without extensive callus formation or heterotopic ossification. We conclude that sonoporation of BMP2/7 coexpression plasmids is a feasible, minimally invasive method for osteoinduction and that improvement of bone regeneration by sonoporative gene delivery is superior to passive gene delivery.

  7. Sui generis: gene therapy and delivery systems for the treatment of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kane, J Robert; Miska, Jason; Young, Jacob S; Kanojia, Deepak; Kim, Julius W; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-03-01

    Gene therapy offers a multidimensional set of approaches intended to treat and cure glioblastoma (GBM), in combination with the existing standard-of-care treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy), by capitalizing on the ability to deliver genes directly to the site of neoplasia to yield antitumoral effects. Four types of gene therapy are currently being investigated for their potential use in treating GBM: (i) suicide gene therapy, which induces the localized generation of cytotoxic compounds; (ii) immunomodulatory gene therapy, which induces or augments an enhanced antitumoral immune response; (iii) tumor-suppressor gene therapy, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells; and (iv) oncolytic virotherapy, which causes the lysis of tumor cells. The delivery of genes to the tumor site is made possible by means of viral and nonviral vectors for direct delivery of therapeutic gene(s), tumor-tropic cell carriers expressing therapeutic gene(s), and "intelligent" carriers designed to increase delivery, specificity, and tumoral toxicity against GBM. These vehicles are used to carry genetic material to the site of pathology, with the expectation that they can provide specific tropism to the desired site while limiting interaction with noncancerous tissue. Encouraging preclinical results using gene therapies for GBM have led to a series of human clinical trials. Although there is limited evidence of a therapeutic benefit to date, a number of clinical trials have convincingly established that different types of gene therapies delivered by various methods appear to be safe. Due to the flexibility of specialized carriers and genetic material, the technology for generating new and more effective therapies already exists.

  8. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for gene therapy: a "ménage à trois" among nucleic acids, materials, and the biological environment. Stimuli-responsive gene delivery vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzoli, Daniele; Candiani, Gabriele

    2013-03-01

    Gene delivery is the science of transferring genetic material into cells by means of a vector to alter cellular function or structure at a molecular level. In this context, a number of nucleic acid-based drugs have been proposed and experimented so far and, as they act on distinct steps along the gene transcription-translation pathway, specific delivery strategies are required to elicit the desired outcome. Cationic lipids and polymers, collectively known as non-viral delivery systems, have thus made their breakthrough in basic and medical research. Albeit they are promising alternatives to viral vectors, their therapeutic application is still rather limited as high transfection efficiencies are normally associated to adverse cytotoxic side effects. In this scenario, drawing inspiration from processes naturally occurring in vivo, major strides forward have been made in the development of more effective materials for gene delivery applications. Specifically, smart vectors sensitive to a variety of physiological stimuli such as cell enzymes, redox status, and pH are substantially changing the landscape of gene delivery by helping to overcome some of the systemic and intracellular barriers that viral vectors naturally evade. Herein, after summarizing the state-of-the-art information regarding the use of nucleic acids as drugs, we review the main bottlenecks still limiting the overall effectiveness of non-viral gene delivery systems. Finally, we provide a critical outline of emerging stimuli-responsive strategies and discuss challenges still existing on the road toward conceiving more efficient and safer multifunctional vectors.

  9. Gastrointestinal gene delivery by cyclodextrins--in vitro quantification of extracellular barriers.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Martin J; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Byrne, Colin; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2013-11-18

    Local gene delivery represents a promising therapeutic approach for diseases of the intestine. However, the gastrointestinal tract poses significant challenges to successful gene delivery. Cyclodextrins (CDs) have been extensively investigated as non-viral vectors. Here, we assessed the suitability of an amphiphilic cationic CD for intestinal gene transfer, with particular focus on extracellular barriers. Stability and transfection efficiency of CD·DNA complexes were assessed post incubation in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, bile salts and mucin, or with intestinal enzymes to represent extracellular barriers to intestinal gene delivery. Stability was determined by gel electrophoresis and transfection was measured by luciferase expression in intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Transfection efficiency of CD·DNA complexes was enhanced after incubation in bile salts but was reduced after incubation in gastric and intestinal fluids and mucin. CD·DNA complexes were stable after incubation with pancreatic enzymes and with a model lower intestinal enzyme. Furthermore, the CD protected pDNA from degradation by DNase. In summary, physiologically relevant in vitro models were established and used to quantify the barriers posed by the intestinal extracellular environment to gene delivery. This systematic assessment identified the advantages and limitations of the CD vector and facilitated the proposal of formulation strategies to overcome these barriers.

  10. Advanced drug and gene delivery systems based on functional biodegradable polycarbonates and copolymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-09-28

    Biodegradable polymeric nanocarriers are one of the most promising systems for targeted and controlled drug and gene delivery. They have shown several unique advantages such as excellent biocompatibility, prolonged circulation time, passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, and degradation in vivo into nontoxic products after completing their tasks. The current biodegradable drug and gene delivery systems exhibit, however, typically low in vivo therapeutic efficacy, due to issues of low loading capacity, inadequate in vivo stability, premature cargo release, poor uptake by target cells, and slow release of therapeutics inside tumor cells. To overcome these problems, a variety of advanced drug and gene delivery systems has recently been designed and developed based on functional biodegradable polycarbonates and copolymers. Notably, polycarbonates and copolymers with diverse functionalities such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, amine, alkene, alkyne, halogen, azido, acryloyl, vinyl sulfone, pyridyldisulfide, and saccharide, could be readily obtained by controlled ring-opening polymerization. In this paper, we give an overview on design concepts and recent developments of functional polycarbonate-based nanocarriers including stimuli-sensitive, photo-crosslinkable, or active targeting polymeric micelles, polymersomes and polyplexes for enhanced drug and gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. These multifunctional biodegradable nanosystems might be eventually developed for safe and efficient cancer chemotherapy and gene therapy.

  11. Biodegradable Poly(aminoester)-Mediated p53 Gene Delivery for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shen, He; Liu, Min; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy in cancer treatment. However, efficient gene translation still remains challenging. In the previous work, a hydrolytically degradable poly(aminoester) with good biocompatibility was synthesized. Herein, the poly(aminoester) was explored as a vector for gene delivery and cancer therapy. The experiments revealed that the poly(aminoester) condensed plasmid DNA into nanosized particles via electrostatic interaction. The pEGFP-N1 and pGL-3 were first used as two reporter genes to study intracellular transfection. The poly(aminoester) showed higher GFP expression (33%) than PEI 25 kDa (21%). Intracellular trafficking of Cy3-labelled pGL-3 also indicated that the poly(aminoester) showed superior DNA delivery ability to nucleus compared to PEI 25 kDa. Furthermore, the therapeutic gene (p53) was translated into the breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), and then induced cell apoptosis. These results suggested that the degradable poly(aminoester) is a promising and efficient gene delivery vector for gene therapeutic applications.

  12. Myocardial gene delivery using molecular cardiac surgery with recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    White, J D; Thesier, D M; Swain, J B D; Katz, M G; Tomasulo, C; Henderson, A; Wang, L; Yarnall, C; Fargnoli, A; Sumaroka, M; Isidro, A; Petrov, M; Holt, D; Nolen-Walston, R; Koch, W J; Stedman, H H; Rabinowitz, J; Bridges, C R

    2011-06-01

    We use a novel technique that allows for closed recirculation of vector genomes in the cardiac circulation using cardiopulmonary bypass, referred to here as molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD). We demonstrate that this platform technology is highly efficient in isolating the heart from the systemic circulation in vivo. Using MCARD, we compare the relative efficacy of single-stranded (ss) adeno-associated virus (AAV)6, ssAAV9 and self-complimentary (sc)AAV6-encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein, driven by the constitutive cytomegalovirus promoter to transduce the ovine myocardium in situ. MCARD allows for the unprecedented delivery of up to 48 green fluorescent protein genome copies per cell globally in the sheep left ventricular (LV) myocardium. We demonstrate that scAAV6-mediated MCARD delivery results in global, cardiac-specific LV gene expression in the ovine heart and provides for considerably more robust and cardiac-specific gene delivery than other available delivery techniques such as intramuscular injection or intracoronary injection; thus, representing a potential, clinically translatable platform for heart failure gene therapy.

  13. A Promising Combo Gene Delivery System Developed from (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-Modified Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Cationic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zubin; Song, Lina; Dong, Jinlai; Guo, Dawei; Du, Xiaolin; Cao, Biyin; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Mao, Xinliang

    2013-05-01

    (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (APTES-IONPs) have been evaluated for various biomedical applications, including medical imaging and drug delivery. Cationic polymers (CPs) such as Lipofectamine and TurboFect are widely used for research in gene delivery, but their toxicity and low in vivo efficiency limited their further application. In the present study, we synthesized water-soluble APTES-IONPs and developed a combo gene delivery system based on APTES-IONPs and CPs. This system significantly increased gene-binding capacity, protected genes from degradation, and improved gene transfection efficiency for DNA and siRNA in both adherent and suspension cells. Because of its great biocompatibility, high gene-carrying ability, and very low cytotoxicity, this combo gene delivery system will be expected for a wide application, and it might provide a new method for gene therapy.

  14. Lipopolyplex for Therapeutic Gene Delivery and Its Application for the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolyplex is a core-shell structure composed of nucleic acid, polycation and lipid. As a non-viral gene delivery vector, lipopolyplex combining the advantages of polyplex and lipoplex has shown superior colloidal stability, reduced cytotoxicity, extremely high gene transfection efficiency. Following intravenous administration, there are many strategies based on lipopolyplex to overcome the complex biological barriers in systemic gene delivery including condensation of nucleic acids into nanoparticles, long circulation, cell targeting, endosomal escape, release to cytoplasm and entry into cell nucleus. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and severely influences the patients’ life quality. Current gene therapy clinical trials for PD employing viral vectors didn’t achieve satisfactory efficacy. However, lipopolyplex may become a promising alternative approach owing to its stability in blood, ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and specific targeting to diseased brain cells. PMID:27092073

  15. Lipopolyplex for Therapeutic Gene Delivery and Its Application for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolyplex is a core-shell structure composed of nucleic acid, polycation and lipid. As a non-viral gene delivery vector, lipopolyplex combining the advantages of polyplex and lipoplex has shown superior colloidal stability, reduced cytotoxicity, extremely high gene transfection efficiency. Following intravenous administration, there are many strategies based on lipopolyplex to overcome the complex biological barriers in systemic gene delivery including condensation of nucleic acids into nanoparticles, long circulation, cell targeting, endosomal escape, release to cytoplasm and entry into cell nucleus. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and severely influences the patients' life quality. Current gene therapy clinical trials for PD employing viral vectors didn't achieve satisfactory efficacy. However, lipopolyplex may become a promising alternative approach owing to its stability in blood, ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and specific targeting to diseased brain cells.

  16. In vivo rapid gene delivery into postmitotic neocortical neurons using iontoporation.

    PubMed

    De la Rossa, Andres; Jabaudon, Denis

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for directing the expression of genes of interest into postmitotic neocortical neurons in vivo. Microinjection of a DNA plasmid-amphiphilic molecule mix into the neocortex followed by delivery of an ad hoc electric pulse protocol during the first few days of life in mice allows rapid, focal and efficient expression of genes in postmitotic neurons. Compared with other gene delivery techniques such as in utero electroporation and viral infection, this method allows rapid (12 h), focal (50-200 μm), mosaic-like (50 to several hundred neurons) targeting of postmitotic neurons within existing circuits. This 'iontoporation' protocol, which can be completed within ∼20 min per mouse, allows straightforward assessment of genetic constructs in postmitotic cortical neurons and subsequent genetic, histological and physiological investigations of gene function.

  17. Multilayered Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery Used to Reprogram Human Foreskin Fibroblasts to Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andre; Ren, Liyun; Mixon, Amanda; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2015-01-01

    Polycationic nanocomplexes are a robust means for achieving nucleic acid condensation and efficient intracellular gene deliveries. To enhance delivery, a multilayered nanoparticle consisting of a core of electrostatically bound elements was used. These included a histone-mimetic peptides, poly-l-arginine and poly-d-glutamic acid was coated with silicate before surface functionalization with poly-l-arginine. Transfection efficiencies and duration of expression were similar when using green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmid DNA (pDNA) or GFP mRNA. These nanoparticles demonstrated significantly higher (>100%) and significantly longer (15 vs. 4 days) transfection efficiencies in comparison to a commercial transfection agent (Lipofectamine 2000). Reprogramming of human foreskin fibroblasts using mRNA to the Sox2 transcription factor resulted in three-fold higher neurosphere formation in comparison to the commercial reagent. These results demonstrate the potential of these nanoparticles as ideal vectors for gene delivery. PMID:25687130

  18. Ultrasound microbubble contrast agents: fundamentals and application to gene and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Katherine; Pollard, Rachel; Borden, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This review offers a critical analysis of the state of the art of medical microbubbles and their application in therapeutic delivery and monitoring. When driven by an ultrasonic pulse, these small gas bubbles oscillate with a wall velocity on the order of tens to hundreds of meters per second and can be deflected to a vessel wall or fragmented into particles on the order of nanometers. While single-session molecular imaging of multiple targets is difficult with affinity-based strategies employed in some other imaging modalities, microbubble fragmentation facilitates such studies. Similarly, a focused ultrasound beam can be used to disrupt delivery vehicles and blood vessel walls, offering the opportunity to locally deliver a drug or gene. Clinical translation of these vehicles will require that current challenges be overcome, where these challenges include rapid clearance and low payload. The technology, early successes with drug and gene delivery, and potential clinical applications are reviewed.

  19. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease: advances in vector development, targeting, and delivery for clinical translation

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, Melvin Y.; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of inherited and acquired cardiovascular diseases. The identification of the molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure and other associated cardiac diseases led to encouraging preclinical gene therapy studies in small and large animal models. However, the initial clinical results yielded only modest or no improvement in clinical endpoints. The presence of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses directed against the viral vector and/or the gene-modified cells, the insufficient gene expression levels, and the limited gene transduction efficiencies accounted for the overall limited clinical improvements. Nevertheless, further improvements of the gene delivery technology and a better understanding of the underlying biology fostered renewed interest in gene therapy for heart failure. In particular, improved vectors based on emerging cardiotropic serotypes of the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) are particularly well suited to coax expression of therapeutic genes in the heart. This led to new clinical trials based on the delivery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase protein (SERCA2a). Though the first clinical results were encouraging, a recent Phase IIb trial did not confirm the beneficial clinical outcomes that were initially reported. New approaches based on S100A1 and adenylate cyclase 6 are also being considered for clinical applications. Emerging paradigms based on the use of miRNA regulation or CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering open new therapeutic perspectives for treating cardiovascular diseases by gene therapy. Nevertheless, the continuous improvement of cardiac gene delivery is needed to allow the use of safer and more effective vector doses, ultimately bringing gene therapy for heart failure one step closer to reality. PMID:26239654

  20. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease: advances in vector development, targeting, and delivery for clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Melvin Y; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of inherited and acquired cardiovascular diseases. The identification of the molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure and other associated cardiac diseases led to encouraging preclinical gene therapy studies in small and large animal models. However, the initial clinical results yielded only modest or no improvement in clinical endpoints. The presence of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses directed against the viral vector and/or the gene-modified cells, the insufficient gene expression levels, and the limited gene transduction efficiencies accounted for the overall limited clinical improvements. Nevertheless, further improvements of the gene delivery technology and a better understanding of the underlying biology fostered renewed interest in gene therapy for heart failure. In particular, improved vectors based on emerging cardiotropic serotypes of the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) are particularly well suited to coax expression of therapeutic genes in the heart. This led to new clinical trials based on the delivery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase protein (SERCA2a). Though the first clinical results were encouraging, a recent Phase IIb trial did not confirm the beneficial clinical outcomes that were initially reported. New approaches based on S100A1 and adenylate cyclase 6 are also being considered for clinical applications. Emerging paradigms based on the use of miRNA regulation or CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering open new therapeutic perspectives for treating cardiovascular diseases by gene therapy. Nevertheless, the continuous improvement of cardiac gene delivery is needed to allow the use of safer and more effective vector doses, ultimately bringing gene therapy for heart failure one step closer to reality.

  1. Translational Advancement of Somatostatin Gene Delivery for Disease Modification and Cognitive Sparing in Intractable Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    viral vector; neurogenesis; i nflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: Progress during the reporting year is congruent with...in which we can test the effects of somatostatin gene delivery on aberrant neurogenesis, n euroinflammation and learning and memory . The studies

  2. Dependence of PEI and PAMAM Gene Delivery on Clathrin- and Caveolin-Dependent Trafficking Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mark E.; Keswani, Rahul K.; Pack, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Non-viral gene delivery vehicles such as polyethylenimine and polyamidoamine dendrimer effectively condense plasmid DNA, facilitate endocytosis, and deliver nucleic acid cargo to the nucleus in vitro. Better understanding of intracellular trafficking mechanisms involved in polymeric gene delivery is a prerequisite to clinical application. This study investigates the role of clathrin and caveolin endocytic pathways in cellular uptake and subsequent vector processing. Methods We formed 25-kD polyethylenimine (PEI) and generation 4 (G4) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) polyplexes at N/P 10 and evaluated internalization pathways and gene delivery in HeLa cells. Clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis inhibitors were used at varying concentrations to elucidate the roles of these important pathways. Results PEI and PAMAM polyplexes were internalized by both pathways. However, the amount of polyplex internalized poorly correlated with transgene expression. While the caveolin-dependent pathway generally led to effective gene delivery with both polymers, complete inhibition of the clathrin-dependent pathway was also deleterious to transfection with PEI polyplexes. Inhibition of one endocytic pathway may lead to an overall increase in uptake via unaffected pathways, suggesting the existence of compensatory endocytic mechanisms. Conclusions The well-studied clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis pathways are not necessarily independent, and perturbing one mechanism of trafficking influences the larger trafficking network. PMID:25511918

  3. Autophagy and formation of tubulovesicular autophagosomes provide a barrier against nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rebecca; Al-Jamal, Wafa' T; Whelband, Matthew; Thomas, Paul; Jefferson, Matthew; van den Bossche, Jeroen; Powell, Penny P; Kostarelos, Kostas; Wileman, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Cationic liposome (lipoplex) and polymer (polyplex)-based vectors have been developed for nonviral gene delivery. These vectors bind DNA and enter cells via endosomes, but intracellular transfer of DNA to the nucleus is inefficient. Here we show that lipoplex and polyplex vectors enter cells in endosomes, activate autophagy and generate tubulovesicular autophagosomes. Activation of autophagy was dependent on ATG5, resulting in lipidation of LC3, but did not require the PtdIns 3-kinase activity of PIK3C3/VPS34. The autophagosomes generated by lipoplex fused with each other, and with endosomes, resulting in the delivery of vectors to large tubulovesicular autophagosomes, which accumulated next to the nucleus. The tubulovesicular autophagosomes contained autophagy receptor protein SQSTM1/p62 and ubiquitin, suggesting capture of autophagy cargoes, but fusion with lysosomes was slow. Gene delivery and expression from both lipoplex and polyplex increased 8-fold in atg5 (-/-) cells unable to generate tubulovesicular autophagosomes. Activation of autophagy and capture within tubulovesicular autophagosomes therefore provides a new cellular barrier against efficient gene transfer and should be considered when designing efficient nonviral gene delivery vectors.

  4. DNA amplification in neutral liposomes for safe and efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Koo, Heebeom; Na, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeong, Seo Young; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-05-27

    In general, traditional gene carriers contain strong cationic charges to efficiently load anionic genes, but this cationic character also leads to destabilization of plasma membranes and causes severe cytotoxicity. Here, we developed a PCR-based nanofactory as a safe gene delivery system. A few template plasmid DNA can be amplified by PCR inside liposomes about 200 nm in diameter, and the quantity of loaded genes highly increased by more than 8.8-fold. The liposome membrane was composed of neutral lipids free from cationic charges. Consequently, this system is nontoxic, unlike other traditional cationic gene carriers. Intense red fluorescent protein (RFP) expression in CHO-K1 cells showed that the amplified genes could be successfully transfected to cells. Animal experiments with the luciferase gene also showed in vivo gene expression by our system without toxicity. We think that this PCR-based nanofactory system can overcome the toxicity problem that is the critical limitation of current gene delivery to clinical application.

  5. Recent Advances in Intravesical Drug/Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Wu, Pao-Chu; Chancellor, Michael; Yoshimura, Naoki; Huang, Leaf

    2008-01-01

    Targeting of the drugs administered systemically relies on the higher affinity of ligands for specific receptors to obtain selectivity in drug response. However, achieving the same goal inside the bladder is much easier with an intelligent pharmaceutical approach that restricts drug effects by exploiting the pelvic anatomical architecture of the human body. This regional therapy involves placement of drugs directly into the bladder through a urethral catheter. It is obvious that drug administration by this route holds advantage in chemotherapy of superficial bladder cancer and it has now become the most widely used treatment modality for this ailment. In recent years, the intravesical route has also been exploited either as an adjunct to an oral regimen or as a second-line treatment for neurogenic bladder 1, 2. Instillation of DNA via this route using different vectors has been able to restrict the transgene expression in organs other than bladder. The present review article will discuss the shortcomings of the current options available for intravesical drug delivery (IDD) and lay a perspective for future developments in this field. PMID:16889430

  6. Chitosan based oligoamine polymers: synthesis, characterization, and gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Wang, Chang-Fang; Wu, De-Qun; Li, Cao; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2009-07-01

    A series of chitosan-based oligoamine polymers was synthesized from N-maleated chitosan (NMC) via Michael addition with diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA), tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) and linear polyethylenimine (M(n) 423), respectively. The resulted polymers exhibited well binding ability to condense plasmid DNA to form complexes with size ranging from 200 to 600 nm when the polymer/DNA weight ratio was above 7. The polymer/DNA complexes observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) exhibited a compact and spherical morphology. The cytotoxicity assay showed that the synthesized polymers were less toxic than that of PEI(25 K). The gene transfection effect of resulted polymers was evaluated in 293T and HeLa cells, and the results showed that the gene transfection efficiency of these polymers was better than that of chitosan. Moreover, the transfection efficiency was dependent on the length of the oligoamine side chains and the molecular weight of the chitosan derivatives.

  7. Agroinfiltration as an Effective and Scalable Strategy of Gene Delivery for Production of Pharmaceutical Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Dent, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Current human biologics are most commonly produced by mammalian cell culture-based fermentation technologies. However, its limited scalability and high cost prevent this platform from meeting the ever increasing global demand. Plants offer a novel alternative system for the production of pharmaceutical proteins that is more scalable, cost-effective, and safer than current expression paradigms. The recent development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed rapid and high-level transient expression of recombinant proteins, and in turn, provided a preferred plant based production platform. One of the remaining challenges for the commercial application of this platform was the lack of a scalable technology to deliver the transgene into plant cells. Therefore, this review focuses on the development of an effective and scalable technology for gene delivery in plants. Direct and indirect gene delivery strategies for plant cells are first presented, and the two major gene delivery technologies based on agroinfiltration are subsequently discussed. Furthermore, the advantages of syringe and vacuum infiltration as gene delivery methodologies are extensively discussed, in context of their applications and scalability for commercial production of human pharmaceutical proteins in plants. The important steps and critical parameters for the successful implementation of these strategies are also detailed in the review. Overall, agroinfiltration based on syringe and vacuum infiltration provides an efficient, robust and scalable gene-delivery technology for the transient expression of recombinant proteins in plants. The development of this technology will greatly facilitate the realization of plant transient expression systems as a premier platform for commercial production of pharmaceutical proteins.

  8. Novel electric power-driven hydrodynamic injection system for gene delivery: safety and efficacy of human factor IX delivery in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, T; Kamimura, K; Suda, T; Kanefuji, T; Oda, M; Zhang, G; Liu, D; Aoyagi, Y

    2013-08-01

    The development of a safe and reproducible gene delivery system is an essential step toward the clinical application of the hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) method. For this purpose, we have developed a novel electric power-driven injection system called the HydroJector-EM, which can replicate various time-pressure curves preloaded into the computer program before injection. The assessment of the reproducibility and safety of gene delivery system in vitro and in vivo demonstrated the precise replication of intravascular time-pressure curves and the reproducibility of gene delivery efficiency. The highest level of luciferase expression (272 pg luciferase per mg of proteins) was achieved safely using the time-pressure curve, which reaches 30 mm Hg in 10 s among various curves tested. Using this curve, the sustained expression of a therapeutic level of human factor IX protein (>500 ng ml(-1)) was maintained for 2 months after the HGD of the pBS-HCRHP-FIXIA plasmid. Other than a transient increase in liver enzymes that recovered in a few days, no adverse events were seen in rats. These results confirm the effectiveness of the HydroJector-EM for reproducible gene delivery and demonstrate that long-term therapeutic gene expression can be achieved by automatic computer-controlled hydrodynamic injection that can be performed by anyone.

  9. CAGW Peptide- and PEG-Modified Gene Carrier for Selective Gene Delivery and Promotion of Angiogenesis in HUVECs in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Hao, Xuefang; Li, Qian; Akpanyung, Mary; Nejjari, Abdelilah; Neve, Agnaldo Luis; Ren, Xiangkui; Guo, Jintang; Feng, Yakai; Shi, Changcan; Zhang, Wencheng

    2017-02-08

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy for angiogenesis, but developing gene carriers with low cytotoxicity and high gene delivery efficiency in vivo is a key issue. In the present study, we synthesized the CAGW peptide- and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified amphiphilic copolymers. CAGW peptide serves as a targeting ligand for endothelial cells (ECs). Different amounts of CAGW peptide were effectively conjugated to the amphiphilic copolymer via heterofunctional poly(ethylene glycol). These CAG- and PEG-modified copolymers could form nanoparticles (NPs) by self-assembly method and were used as gene carriers for the pEGFP-ZNF580 (pZNF580) plasmid. CAGW and PEG modification coordinately improved the hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility of NPs. The results of cellular uptake showed significantly enhanced internalization efficiency of pZNF580 after CAGW modification. Gene expression at mRNA and protein levels demonstrated that EC-targeted NPs possessed high gene delivery efficiency, especially the NPs with higher content of CAGW peptide (1.16 wt %). Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo vascularization assays also showed outstanding vascularization ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated by the NP/pZNF580 complexes. This study demonstrates that the CAGW peptide-modified NP is a promising candidate for gene therapy in angiogenesis.

  10. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  11. Macrophage mannose receptor-specific gene delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Yao, Xing-Lei; Du, Anariwa; Tang, Gu-Ping; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and they exhibit great functional diversity. They have been extensively applied in anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-cancer therapies. However, the application of macrophages is limited by the efficiency of their engineering. The macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206), a C-type lectin receptor, is ubiquitously expressed on macrophages and has a high affinity for mannose oligosaccharides. In the present study, we developed a novel non-viral vehicle with specific affinity for MMR. Mannan was cationized with spermine at a grafted ratio of ∼12% to deliver DNA and was characterized as a stable system for delivery. This spermine-mannan (SM)-based delivery system was evaluated as a biocompatible vehicle with superior transfection efficiency on murine macrophages, up to 28.5-fold higher than spermine-pullulan, 11.5-fold higher than polyethylenimine and 3.0-fold higher than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We confirmed that the SM-based delivery system for macrophages transfection was MMR-specific and we described the intracellular transport of the delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first study using SM to demonstrate a mannose receptor-specific gene delivery system, thereby highlighting the potential of a novel specific non-viral delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

  12. The expanding role of aerosols in systemic drug delivery, gene therapy, and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Laube, Beth L

    2005-09-01

    Aerosolized medications have been used for centuries to treat respiratory diseases. Until recently, inhalation therapy focused primarily on the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the pressurized metered-dose inhaler was the delivery device of choice. However, the role of aerosol therapy is clearly expanding beyond that initial focus. This expansion has been driven by the Montreal protocol and the need to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from traditional metered-dose inhalers, by the need for delivery devices and formulations that can efficiently and reproducibly target the systemic circulation for the delivery of proteins and peptides, and by developments in medicine that have made it possible to consider curing lung diseases with aerosolized gene therapy and preventing epidemics of influenza and measles with aerosolized vaccines. Each of these drivers has contributed to a decade or more of unprecedented research and innovation that has altered how we think about aerosol delivery and has expanded the role of aerosol therapy into the fields of systemic drug delivery, gene therapy, and vaccination. During this decade of innovation, we have witnessed the coming of age of dry powder inhalers, the development of new soft mist inhalers, and improved pressurized metered-dose inhaler delivery as a result of the replacement of CFC propellants with hydrofluoroalkane. The continued expansion of the role of aerosol therapy will probably depend on demonstration of the safety of this route of administration for drugs that have their targets outside the lung and are administered long term (eg, insulin aerosol), on the development of new drugs and drug carriers that can efficiently target hard-to-reach cell populations within the lungs of patients with disease (eg, patients with cystic fibrosis or lung cancer), and on the development of devices that improve aerosol delivery to infants, so that early intervention in disease processes with aerosol

  13. Gene Delivery for the Generation of Bioartificial Pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Chan, Patrick K W; Li, Ronald A

    2017-01-01

    Electronic pacemakers have been used in patients with heart rhythm disorders for device-supported pacing. While effective, there are such shortcomings as limited battery life, permanent implantation of catheters, the lack of autonomic neurohumoral responses, and risks of lead dislodging. Here we describe protocols for establishing porcine models of sick sinus syndrome and complete heart block, and the generation of bioartificial pacemaker by delivering a strategically engineered form of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated pacemaker channel protein via somatic gene transfer to convert atrial or ventricular muscle cardiomyocytes into nodal-like cells that rhythmically fire action potentials.

  14. Current strategies in modification of PLGA-based gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Ebrahimian, Mahboubeh; Hashemi, Maryam

    2016-12-05

    The successful gene therapy has been limited by safe and efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the target cells. Poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are able to deliver drugs and gene efficiently. This formulation has several advantages in comparison with other formulations including improvement of solubility, stability, controlling of degradation and release of the entrapped agents. For application of PLGA as gene carrier, there exist many challenges. PLGA nanoparticles could protect the encapsulated DNA from in vivo degradation but the DNA release is slowl and their negative charge acts as a barrier to DNA incorporation and delivery. Also, during the preparation process, DNA could be exposed to high shear stress and organic solvents which could result in its inactivation. Moreover, PLGA NPs could be modified with different agents to reduce its cytotoxicity, to enhance the delivery efficiency and to target it to specific tissues/cells. This review summarizes different methods used for the preparation of PLGA NPs as gene carriers and recent strategies for modification of PLGA particles applied in gene therapy.

  15. Targeted gene transfection from microbubbles into vascular smooth muscle cells using focused, ultrasound-mediated delivery

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Linsey C.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a method for gene delivery to vascular smooth muscle cells using ultrasound triggered delivery of plasmid DNA from electrostatically coupled cationic microbubbles. Microbubbles carrying reporter plasmid DNA were acoustically ruptured in the vicinity of smooth muscle cells in vitro under a range of acoustic pressures (0–950 kPa) and pulse durations (0–100 cycles). No effect on gene transfection or viability was observed from application of microbubbles, DNA, or ultrasound alone. Microbubbles in combination with ultrasound (500 kPa, 1MHz, 50 cycle bursts at a Pulse Repetition Frequency [PRF] of 100 Hz) significantly reduced viability both with DNA (53 +/− 27%) and without (19 +/− 8%). Maximal gene transfection (~1% of cells) occurred using 50 cycle, 1 MHz pulses at 300 kPa which resulted in 40% viability of cells. We demonstrated that we can locally deliver DNA to vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro using microbubble carriers and focused ultrasound. PMID:20800174

  16. A novel glutathione modified chitosan conjugate for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Congxin; Guo, Tianying; Zhou, Dezhong; Hu, Yuling; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Shufang; Chen, Jiatong; Zhang, Zhengpu

    2011-09-05

    A novel non-viral gene vector based on poly[poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate] (PMPEG) and l-glutathione (GSH) grafted chitosan (CS) has been fabricated. First, well-defined brush-like PMPEG living polymers with dithioester residues were prepared by the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and grafted onto the allylchitosan via radical coupling method. Then, the tripeptide GSH was introduced onto the end of PMPEG chain to give a CS-PMPEG-GSH conjugate. In comparison with pristine chitosan, CS-PMPEG-GSH conjugate could not only condense plasmid DNA (pDNA) and prevent the condensed CS-PMPEG-GSH/pDNA nanoparticle self-aggregation, but also increase the binding ability to cell membrane efficiently and improve decondensed ability of pDNA from the nanoparticles in cytoplasm which thus has resulted in the higher transfection efficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (NIH3T3). In addition, cytotoxicity assays showed that the conjugate is less cytotoxic than CS, and still retain the cationic polyelectrolyte characteristic as chitosan. These results indicate that the non-viral vector is a promising candidate for gene therapy in clinical application.

  17. [Melanoma: surface markers as the first point of targeted delivery of therapeutic genes in multilevel gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Pleshkan, V V; Zinov'eva, M V; Sverdlov, E D

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most malignant tumors, aggressively metastasizing by lymphatic and hematogenous routes. Due to the resistance of melanoma cells to many types of chemotherapy, this disease causes high mortality rate. High hopes are pinned on gene therapeutic approaches to melanoma treatment. At present, one of the main problems of the efficient use of the post-genomic generation therapeutic means is the lack of optimal techniques of delivery of foreign genetic material to the patient's target cells. Surface specific markers of melanoma cells can be considered as promising therapeutic targets. This review describes currently known melanoma specific receptors and its stem cells, as well as contains data on melanoma antigens presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex proteins. The ability of surface proteins to internalize might be successfully used for the development of methods of targeted delivery of gene therapeutic constructs. In conclusion, a concept of multilevel gene therapy and the possible role therein of surface determinants as targets of gene systems delivery to the tumor are discussed.

  18. Split vector systems for ultra-targeted gene delivery: a contrivance to achieve ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2014-08-01

    Tightly controlled spatial localisation of therapeutic gene delivery is essential to maximize the benefits of somatic gene therapy in vivo and to reduce its undesired effects on the 'bystander' cell populations, most importantly germline cells. Indeed, complete ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy can only be achieved with ultra-targeted gene delivery, which excludes the risk of inadvertent germline gene transfer. Thus, it is desired to supplement existing strategies of physical focusing and biological (cell-specific) targeting of gene delivery with an additional principle for the rigid control over spread of gene transfer within the body. In this paper I advance the concept of 'combinatorial' targeting of therapeutic gene transfer in vivo. I hypothesize that it is possible to engineer complex gene delivery vector systems consisting of several components, each one of them capable of independent spread within the human body but incapable of independent facilitation of gene transfer. As the gene delivery augmented by such split vector systems would be reliant on the simultaneous availability of all the vector system components at a predetermined body site, it is envisaged that higher order reaction kinetics required for the assembly of the functional gene transfer configuration would sharpen spatial localisation of gene transfer via curtailing the blurring effect of the vector spread within the body. A particular implementation of such split vector system could be obtained through supplementing a viral therapeutic gene vector with a separate auxiliary vector carrying a non-integrative and non-replicative form of a gene (e.g., mRNA) coding for a cellular receptor of the therapeutic vector component. Gene-transfer-enabling components of the vector system, which would be delivered separately from the vector component loaded with the therapeutic gene cargo, could also be cell-membrane-insertion-proficient receptors, elements of artificial transmembrane channels

  19. Preparation and characterization of gelatin-based mucoadhesive nanocomposites as intravesical gene delivery scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ching-Wen; Chang, Li-Ching; Lin, Kai-Jen; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Tsai, Ching-Chung; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Tsai, Tong-Rong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop optimal gelatin-based mucoadhesive nanocomposites as scaffolds for intravesical gene delivery to the urothelium. Hydrogels were prepared by chemically crosslinking gelatin A or B with glutaraldehyde. Physicochemical and delivery properties including hydration ratio, viscosity, size, yield, thermosensitivity, and enzymatic degradation were studied, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out. The optimal hydrogels (H), composed of 15% gelatin A175, displayed an 81.5% yield rate, 87.1% hydration ratio, 42.9 Pa·s viscosity, and 125.8 nm particle size. The crosslinking density of the hydrogels was determined by performing pronase degradation and ninhydrin assays. In vitro lentivirus (LV) release studies involving p24 capsid protein analysis in 293T cells revealed that hydrogels containing lentivirus (H-LV) had a higher cumulative release than that observed for LV alone (3.7-, 2.3-, and 2.3-fold at days 1, 3, and 5, resp.). Lentivirus from lentivector constructed green fluorescent protein (GFP) was then entrapped in hydrogels (H-LV-GFP). H-LV-GFP showed enhanced gene delivery in AY-27 cells in vitro and to rat urothelium by intravesical instillation in vivo. Cystometrogram showed mucoadhesive H-LV reduced peak micturition and threshold pressure and increased bladder compliance. In this study, we successfully developed first optimal gelatin-based mucoadhesive nanocomposites as intravesical gene delivery scaffolds.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Gelatin-Based Mucoadhesive Nanocomposites as Intravesical Gene Delivery Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Wen; Chang, Li-Ching; Lin, Kai-Jen; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Tsai, Ching-Chung; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Tsai, Tong-Rong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop optimal gelatin-based mucoadhesive nanocomposites as scaffolds for intravesical gene delivery to the urothelium. Hydrogels were prepared by chemically crosslinking gelatin A or B with glutaraldehyde. Physicochemical and delivery properties including hydration ratio, viscosity, size, yield, thermosensitivity, and enzymatic degradation were studied, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out. The optimal hydrogels (H), composed of 15% gelatin A175, displayed an 81.5% yield rate, 87.1% hydration ratio, 42.9 Pa·s viscosity, and 125.8 nm particle size. The crosslinking density of the hydrogels was determined by performing pronase degradation and ninhydrin assays. In vitro lentivirus (LV) release studies involving p24 capsid protein analysis in 293T cells revealed that hydrogels containing lentivirus (H-LV) had a higher cumulative release than that observed for LV alone (3.7-, 2.3-, and 2.3-fold at days 1, 3, and 5, resp.). Lentivirus from lentivector constructed green fluorescent protein (GFP) was then entrapped in hydrogels (H-LV-GFP). H-LV-GFP showed enhanced gene delivery in AY-27 cells in vitro and to rat urothelium by intravesical instillation in vivo. Cystometrogram showed mucoadhesive H-LV reduced peak micturition and threshold pressure and increased bladder compliance. In this study, we successfully developed first optimal gelatin-based mucoadhesive nanocomposites as intravesical gene delivery scaffolds. PMID:25580433

  1. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:26814673

  2. High capacity nanoporous silicon carrier for systemic delivery of gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianliang; Xu, Rong; Mai, Junhua; Kim, Han-Cheon; Guo, Xiaojing; Qin, Guoting; Yang, Yong; Wolfram, Joy; Mu, Chaofeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Gu, Jianhua; Liu, Xuewu; Mao, Zong-Wan; Ferrari, Mauro; Shen, Haifa

    2013-11-26

    Gene silencing agents such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA offer the promise to modulate expression of almost every gene for the treatment of human diseases including cancer. However, lack of vehicles for effective systemic delivery to the disease organs has greatly limited their in vivo applications. In this study, we developed a high capacity polycation-functionalized nanoporous silicon (PCPS) platform comprised of nanoporous silicon microparticles functionalized with arginine-polyethyleneimine inside the nanopores for effective delivery of gene silencing agents. Incubation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells with PCPS loaded with STAT3 siRNA (PCPS/STAT3) or GRP78 siRNA (PCPS/GRP78) resulted in 91 and 83% reduction of STAT3 and GRP78 gene expression in vitro. Treatment of cells with a microRNA-18a mimic in PCPS (PCPS/miR-18) knocked down 90% expression of the microRNA-18a target gene ATM. Systemic delivery of PCPS/STAT3 siRNA in murine model of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer enriched particles in tumor tissues and reduced STAT3 expression in cancer cells, causing significant reduction of cancer stem cells in the residual tumor tissue. At the therapeutic dosage, PCPS/STAT3 siRNA did not trigger acute immune response in FVB mice, including changes in serum cytokines, chemokines, and colony-stimulating factors. In addition, weekly dosing of PCPS/STAT3 siRNA for four weeks did not cause signs of subacute toxicity based on changes in body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, and major organ histology. Collectively, the results suggest that we have developed a safe vehicle for effective delivery of gene silencing agents.

  3. Versatile types of polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Bingran; Liu, Fusheng; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2014-06-01

    Different polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycations were readily synthesized by assembling multiple β-cyclodextrin-cored star polycations with an adamantane-functionalized dextran via host-guest interaction in the absence or presence of bioreducible linkages. Compared with nanoplexes of the starting star polycation and pDNA, the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes exhibited similarly low cytotoxicity, improved cellular internalization and significantly higher gene transfection efficiencies. The incorporation of disulfide linkages imparted the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes with the advantage of intracellular bioreducibility, resulting in better gene delivery properties. In addition, the antitumor properties of supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes were also investigated using a suicide gene therapy system. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of cyclodextrin-cored polycations with adamantane-functionalized polysaccharides is an effective strategy for the production of new nanoplex delivery systems.Different polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycations were readily synthesized by assembling multiple β-cyclodextrin-cored star polycations with an adamantane-functionalized dextran via host-guest interaction in the absence or presence of bioreducible linkages. Compared with nanoplexes of the starting star polycation and pDNA, the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes exhibited similarly low cytotoxicity, improved cellular internalization and significantly higher gene transfection efficiencies. The incorporation of disulfide linkages imparted the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes with the advantage of intracellular bioreducibility, resulting in better gene delivery properties. In addition, the antitumor properties of supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes were also investigated using a suicide gene therapy system. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of cyclodextrin-cored polycations

  4. Design and Characterization of Novel Recombinant Listeriolysin O–Protamine Fusion Proteins for Enhanced Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO–protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems. PMID:25521817

  5. A Photoactivatable AIE Polymer for Light-Controlled Gene Delivery: Concurrent Endo/Lysosomal Escape and DNA Unpacking.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youyong; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Liu, Bin

    2015-09-21

    Endo/lysosomal escape of gene vectors and the subsequent unpacking of nucleic acids in cytosol are two major challenges for efficient gene delivery. Herein, we report a polymeric gene delivery vector, which consists of a photosensitizer (PS) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics and oligoethylenimine (OEI) conjugated via an aminoacrylate (AA) linker that can be cleaved by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aqueous media, the polymer could self-assemble into bright red fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), which can efficiently bind to DNA through electrostatic interaction for gene delivery. Upon visible light irradiation, the generated ROS can break the endo/lysosomal membrane and the polymer, resulting in light-controlled endo/lysosomal escape and unpacking of DNA for efficient gene delivery. The smart polymer represents the first successful gene vector to simultaneously address both challenges with a single light excitation process.

  6. Prolonged expression of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody to the female rhesus macaque lower genital tract by AAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Motal, U M; Harbison, C; Han, T; Pudney, J; Anderson, D J; Zhu, Q; Westmoreland, S; Marasco, W A

    2014-09-01

    Topical microbicides are a leading strategy for prevention of HIV mucosal infection to women; however, numerous pharmacokinetic limitations associated with coitally related dosing strategy have contributed to their limited success. Here we test the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated delivery of the b12 human anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody gene to the lower genital tract of female rhesus macaques (Rh) can provide prolonged expression of b12 minibodies in the cervical-vaginal secretions. Gene transfer studies demonstrated that, of various green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing AAV serotypes, AAV-6 most efficiently transduced freshly immortalized and primary genital epithelial cells (PGECs) of female Rh in vitro. In addition, AAV-6-b12 minibody transduction of Rh PGECs led to inhibition of SHIV162p4 transmigration and virus infectivity in vitro. AAV-6-GFP could also successfully transduce vaginal epithelial cells of Rh when applied intravaginally, including p63+ epithelial stem cells. Moreover, intravaginal application of AAV-6-b12 to female Rh resulted in prolonged minibody detection in their vaginal secretions throughout the 79-day study period. These data provide proof of principle that AAV-6-mediated delivery of anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody (BnAb) genes to the lower genital tract of female Rh results in persistent minibody detection for several months. This strategy offers promise that an anti-HIV-1 genetic microbicide strategy may be possible in which topical application of AAV vector, with periodic reapplication as needed, may provide sustained local BnAb expression and protection.

  7. Cyclen-Based Cationic Lipids for Highly Efficient Gene Delivery towards Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ren, Jiang; Fu, Yun; Zhang, Ji; Zhu, Wen; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene therapy has tremendous potential for both inherited and acquired diseases. However, delivery problems limited their clinical application, and new gene delivery vehicles with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency are greatly required. Methods In this report, we designed and synthesized three amphiphilic molecules (L1–L3) with the structures involving 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen), imidazolium and a hydrophobic dodecyl chain. Their interactions with plasmid DNA were studied via electrophoretic gel retardation assays, fluorescent quenching experiments, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro gene transfection assay and cytotoxicity assay were conducted in four cell lines. Results Results indicated that L1 and L3-formed liposomes could effectively bind to DNA to form well-shaped nanoparticles. Combining with neutral lipid DOPE, L3 was found with high efficiency in gene transfer in three tumor cell lines including A549, HepG2 and H460. The optimized gene transfection efficacy of L3 was nearly 5.5 times more efficient than that of the popular commercially available gene delivery agent Lipofectamine 2000™ in human lung carcinoma cells A549. In addition, since L1 and L3 had nearly no gene transfection performance in normal cells HEK293, these cationic lipids showed tumor cell-targeting property to a certain extent. No significant cytotoxicity was found for the lipoplexes formed by L1–L3, and their cytotoxicities were similar to or slightly lower than the lipoplexes prepared from Lipofectamine 2000™. Conclusion Novel cyclen-based cationic lipids for effective in vitro gene transfection were founded, and these studies here may extend the application areas of macrocyclic polyamines, especially for cyclen. PMID:21887233

  8. Gene delivery in conjunction with gold nanoparticle and tumor treating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Soo Lee, Yeon

    2013-08-01

    The advances in electrotherapy to treat the diseased biological cell instigate its extension in gene therapy through the delivery of gene into the nucleus. The objective of this study is to investigate the application of moderate intensity alternating electric field, also known as tumor treating electric field on a carrier system consisting of a charged gene complex conjugated to the surface of a gold nanoparticle. The gene delivery mechanism relies on the magnitude and direction of the induced electric field inside the cytoplasm in presence of carrier system. The induced electric field strength is significant in breaking the gene complex-gold nanoparticle bonding, and exerting an electric force pushing the charged gene into the nucleus. The electric force orientation is dependent on the aspect ratio (AR) of the gold nanoparticle and a relationship between them is studied via Maxwell two-dimensional (2D) finite element simulation analyzer. The development of charge density on the surface of carrier system and the required electric field strength to break the bonding are investigated utilizing the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame-Stern (GCGS) theoretical model. A carrier system having the aspect ratio of the gold nanoparticle in the range 1 < AR ≤ 5 and AR = 1 are substantial delivering cationic and anionic genes into the nucleus, respectively.

  9. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Hanes, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive gel that protects the lung airways, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eye and other mucosal surfaces. Most foreign particulates, including conventional particle-based drug delivery systems, are efficiently trapped in human mucus layers by steric obstruction and/or adhesion. Trapped particles are typically removed from the mucosal tissue within seconds to a few hours depending on anatomical location, thereby strongly limiting the duration of sustained drug delivery locally. A number of debilitating diseases could be treated more effectively and with fewer side effects if drugs and genes could be more efficiently delivered to the underlying mucosal tissues in a controlled manner. This review first describes the tenacious mucus barrier properties that have precluded the efficient penetration of therapeutic particles. It then reviews the design and development of new mucus-penetrating particles that may avoid rapid mucus clearance mechanisms, and thereby provide targeted or sustained drug delivery for localized therapies in mucosal tissues. PMID:19133304

  10. Chitosan-thioglycolic acid conjugate: an alternative carrier for oral nonviral gene delivery?

    PubMed

    Martien, Ronny; Loretz, Brigitta; Thaler, Marlene; Majzoob, Sayeh; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    Regarding safety concerns, nonviral gene delivery vehicles that have the required efficiency and safety for use in human gene therapy are being widely investigated. The aim of this study was to synthesize and evaluate a thiolated chitosan to improve the efficacy of oral gene delivery systems. Thiolated chitosan was synthesized by introducing thioglycolic acid (TGA) to chitosan via amide bond formation mediated by a carbodiimide. Based on this conjugate, nanoparticles with pDNA were generated at pH 4.0 and 5.0. Cytotoxicity of the thiolated chitosan/pDNA nanoparticles on Caco-2 cells was evaluated. The diameter of thiolated chitosan/pDNA nanoparticles was in the range of 100-200 nm. The zeta potential was determined to be 5-6 mV. Due to stability toward nucleases, the transfection rate of thiolated chitosan/pDNA nanoparticles was fivefold higher than that of unmodified chitosan/pDNA nanoparticles. Lactate dehydrogenase tests for thiolated chitosan/pDNA (pH 4.0 and 5.0) showed that (3.79 +/- 0.23)% and (2.9 +/- 0.13)% cell damage. According to these results, thiolated chitosan represents promising excipients for preparation DNA nanoparticles in nonviral gene delivery system.

  11. Hydrogel Design for Supporting Neurite Outgrowth and Promoting Gene Delivery to Maximize Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Stevans, Alyson C.; Holland, Samantha; Wang, Christine E.; Shikanov, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels capable of gene delivery provide a combinatorial approach for nerve regeneration, with the hydrogel supporting neurite outgrowth and gene delivery inducing the expression of inductive factors. This report investigates the design of hydrogels that balance the requirements for supporting neurite growth with those requirements for promoting gene delivery. Enzymatically-degradable PEG hydrogels encapsulating dorsal root ganglia explants, fibroblasts, and lipoplexes encoding nerve growth factor were gelled within channels that can physically guide neurite outgrowth. Transfection of fibroblasts increased with increasing concentration of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion sites and decreasing PEG content. The neurite length increased with increasing RGD concentration within 10% PEG hydrogels, yet was maximal within 7.5% PEG hydrogels at intermediate RGD levels. Delivering lipoplexes within the gel produced longer neurites than culture in NGF-supplemented media or co-culture with cells exposed to DNA prior to encapsulation. Hydrogels designed to support neurite outgrowth and deliver gene therapy vectors locally may ultimately be employed to address multiple barriers that limit regeneration. PMID:22038654

  12. Evaluation of Jeffamine®-cored PAMAM dendrimers as an efficient in vitro gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Zeynep; Akbas, Fahri; Senel, Mehmet; Koc, S Naci

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we investigated gene delivery properties of Jeffamine-cored polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (JCPDs). The effects of dendrimer concentration, generation, and core size on the gene delivery have been analyzed. The experimental results showed that the JCPD effectively delivered plasmid DNA inside the HeLa cells, and the transfection efficiency improved considerably as the number of generation increased. The cytotoxicity of JCPD in different concentration was tested for HeLa cell line. JCPD was complexed with a lacZ gene carrying plasmid and tested for transfection efficiency using quantitative β-galactosidase expression assay. Additionally, confocal microscopy results revealed that JCPD effectively delivered green fluorescent protein-expressing plasmid into HeLa cells and produced fluorescent signal with satisfactory efficiency. The highest transfection efficiency was obtained from JCPDs G4 and G5, which mixed with expression plasmid vectors at a 10/1 weight ratio. These results indicated that under optimized conditions, JCPD can be considered as an efficient transfection reagent and can be effectively used for gene delivery applications.

  13. Factorial Design and Development of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Radaic, Allan; de Paula, Eneida; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo

    2015-02-01

    Several scientific hurdles still have to be overcome before gene therapy becomes a reality. One of them is the development of safe and efficient gene delivery system. Here, we have employed factorial design to optimize the production of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for gene delivery. A 2 x 3 full-factorial experimental design was used for the optimization of SLNs formulations. The variables were defined by the components of the formulation: concentration of stearic acid, DOTAP, and Pluronic F68 at two levels (-1, 1) and 3 central points (0). Different SNL formulations were prepared by varying the amount of components and several properties were tested, including their capacity to accommodate DNA and protection against DNase degradation, colloidal stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency in prostate cancer cells. Finally, response Surface Methodology was used to select the most effective formulation for gene delivery to prostate cancer cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study revealed that stearic acid and Pluronic F68 were determinant to SLN size and stability, respectively, while small amounts of DOTAP are essential for a successful transfection.

  14. Endothelial lineage cell as a vehicle for systemic delivery of cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2010-09-01

    A major limitation of cancer gene therapy is the difficulty of delivering a therapeutic gene to distant sites of metastatic disease. A promising strategy to address this difficulty is to use expanded ex vivo cells to produce a therapeutic protein. As with other approaches to gene therapy, this strategy is attractive when the therapeutic protein is unstable ex vivo or has a short circulating half life in vivo. The initial step to develop a cancer gene therapy using autologous cell delivery is the identification of a cell type that migrates to the tumor site, is readily available for harvesting, and is manipulated easily ex vivo. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial progenitor, precursor, and blood outgrowth endothelial cells are attracted to the tumor vasculature by its angiogenic drive. Here, we review recent advances in the study of circulating endothelial cell-mediated tumor vasculogenesis and discuss the advantages and challenges of bringing endothelial lineage-based cancer gene therapy closer to clinical application.

  15. The effect of dexamethasone/cell-penetrating peptide nanoparticles on gene delivery for inner ear therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yang, Keum-Jin; Park, Shi-Nae; Kim, Dong-Kee; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex)-loaded PHEA-g-C18-Arg8 (PCA) nanoparticles (PCA/Dex) were developed for the delivery of genes to determine the synergistic effect of Dex on gene expression. The cationic PCA nanoparticles were self-assembled to create cationic micelles containing an octadecylamine (C18) core with Dex and an arginine 8 (Arg8) peptide shell for electrostatic complexation with nucleic acids (connexin 26 [Cx26] siRNA, green fluorescent protein [GFP] DNA or brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] pDNA). The PCA/Dex nanoparticles conjugated with Arg8, a cell-penetrating peptide that enhances permeability through a round window membrane in the inner ear for gene delivery, exhibited high uptake efficiency in HEI-OC1 cells. This potential carrier co-delivering Dex and the gene into inner ear cells has a diameter of 120–140 nm and a zeta potential of 20–25 mV. Different types of genes were complexed with the Dex-loaded PCA nanoparticle (PCA/Dex/gene) for gene expression to induce additional anti-inflammatory effects. PCA/Dex showed mildly increased expression of GFP and lower mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL1b, IL12, and INFr) than did Dex-free PCA nanoparticles and Lipofectamine® reagent in HEI-OC1 cells. In addition, after loading Cx26 siRNA onto the surface of PCA/Dex, Cx26 gene expression was downregulated according to real-time polymerase chain reaction for 24 h, compared with that using Lipofectamine reagent. After loading BDNF DNA into PCA/Dex, increased expression of BDNF was observed for 30 h, and its signaling pathway resulted in an increase in phosphorylation of Akt, observed by Western blotting. Thus, Dex within PCA/Dex/gene nanoparticles created an anti-inflammatory effect and enhanced gene expression. PMID:27895484

  16. Self-assembled triangular DNA nanoparticles are an efficient system for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingming; You, Zaichun; Du, Juan; Li, Hongli; Chen, Huaping; Li, Jingtong; Dong, Weijie; He, Binfeng; Mao, Chengde; Wang, Guansong

    2016-07-10

    Developing an advanced nucleic acid drug delivery system is of great significance in order to achieve optimal gene delivery. Self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles are an excellent platform for the delivery of nucleic acids and other small molecular drugs. In this study, we developed the efficient, three-stranded, RNA/DNA hybrid triangular self-assembled nanoparticles, namely, mTOR single-stranded siRNA-loaded triangular DNA nanoparticles (ssRNA-TNP). The ssRNA-TNP is formed by the complementary association of the above mentioned three components and is more stable in complete medium than standard duplex siRNA. It could be efficiently transfected into NCI-H292 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, resulting in high transfection efficiency. Furthermore, ssRNA-TNP uptake is dependent on macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathways. Interestingly, ssRNA-TNP is more efficient to inhibit the expression of mTOR. This ssRNA-TNP has a simpler structure, better stability, and higher transfection efficiency; therefore it may become a novel nonviral nanosystem for gene delivery.

  17. Ligands located within a cholesterol domain enhance gene delivery to the target tissue

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Long; Betker, Jamie; Yin, Hao; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted gene delivery provides enormous potential for clinical treatment of many incurable diseases. Liposomes formulated with targeting ligands have been tested extensively both in vitro and in vivo, and many studies have strived to identify more efficacious ligands. However, the environment of the ligand within the delivery vehicle is generally not considered, and this study assesses the effect of ligand micoenvironment by utilizing a lipoplex possessing a cholesterol domain. Our recent work has shown that the presence of the targeting ligand within the cholesterol domain promotes more productive transfection in cultured cells. In the present study, lipoplexes having the identical lipid composition were formulated with different conjugates of the folate ligand such that the ligand was included in, or excluded from, the cholesterol domain. The effect of locating the ligand within the cholesterol domain was then tested in a xenograft tumor model in mice. Lipoplexes that included the ligand within the cholesterol domain showed significantly higher luciferase expression and plasmid accumulation in tumors as compared to lipoplexes in which the ligand was excluded from the domain. These results demonstrate that the microenvironment of the ligand can affect gene delivery to tumors, and show that ligand-mediated delivery can be enhanced by locating targeting ligands within a cholesterol domain. PMID:22440429

  18. Non-viral gene delivery regulated by stiffness of cell adhesion substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Hyun Joon; Liu, Jodi; Riddle, Kathryn; Matsumoto, Takuya; Leach, Kent; Mooney, David J.

    2005-06-01

    Non-viral gene vectors are commonly used for gene therapy owing to safety concerns with viral vectors. However, non-viral vectors are plagued by low levels of gene transfection and cellular expression. Current efforts to improve the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery are focused on manipulations of the delivery vector, whereas the influence of the cellular environment in DNA uptake is often ignored. The mechanical properties (for example, rigidity) of the substrate to which a cell adheres have been found to mediate many aspects of cell function including proliferation, migration and differentiation, and this suggests that the mechanics of the adhesion substrate may regulate a cell's ability to uptake exogeneous signalling molecules. In this report, we present a critical role for the rigidity of the cell adhesion substrate on the level of gene transfer and expression. The mechanism relates to material control over cell proliferation, and was investigated using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. This study provides a new material-based control point for non-viral gene therapy.

  19. Real-time fluorescence tracking of gene delivery via multifunctional nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Bai, Min; Bai, Xilin; Wang, Leyu

    2014-11-18

    Fluorescence imaging of transduced cells and tissues is valuable in the development of gene vectors and the evaluation of gene therapy efficacy. We report here the simple and rational design of multifunctional nanocomposites (NCs) for simultaneous gene delivery and fluorescence tracking based on ZnS:Mn(2+) quantum dots (QDs) and positively charged polymer coating. The positively charged imidazole in the as-synthesized amphiphilic copolymer can be used for gene loading via electrostatic interaction. While the introduced poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can be used to reduce the binding of plasma proteins to nanovectors and minimize clearance by the reticuloendothelial system after intravenous administration. Most importantly, these multifunctional nanovectors showed much lower cellular toxicity than the commercial polyethylenimine (PEI) transfection vectors. On the basis of the red fluorescence of QDs, we can real-time track the gene delivery in cells, and the transfection efficacy of pDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) was monitored via the green fluorescence of the GFP expressed by the pDNA delivered into the nuclei. Fluorescence imaging analysis confirmed that the QDs-based nanovectors delivered pDNA into HepG2 cells efficiently. These new insights and capabilities pave a new way toward nanocomposite engineering for fluorescence imaging tracking of gene therapy.

  20. Low cytotoxicity fluorescent PAMAM dendrimer as gene carriers for monitoring the delivery of siRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Lingmei; Huang, Saipeng; Chen, Zhao; Li, Yanchao; Liu, Ke; Liu, Yang; Du, Libo

    2015-09-01

    Visual detection of gene vectors has attracted a great deal of attention due to the application of these vectors in monitoring and evaluating the effect of gene carriers in living cells. A non-viral vector, the fluorescent PAMAM dendrimer (F-PAMAM), was synthesized through conjugation of PAMAM dendrimers and fluorescein. In vitro and ex vivo experiments show that F-PAMAM exhibits superphotostability, low cytotoxicity and facilitates endocytosis by A549 cells. The vector has a high siRNA binding affinity and it increases the efficiency of cy5-siRNA delivery in A549 cells, in comparison with a cy5-siRNA monomer. Our results provide a new method for simultaneously monitoring the delivery of siRNA and its non-viral carriers in living cells.

  1. Distinct effects of endosomal escape and inhibition of endosomal trafficking on gene delivery via electrotransfection.

    PubMed

    Cervia, Lisa D; Chang, Chun-Chi; Wang, Liangli; Yuan, Fan

    2017-01-01

    A recent theory suggests that endocytosis is involved in uptake and intracellular transport of electrotransfected plasmid DNA (pDNA). The goal of the current study was to understand if approaches used previously to improve endocytosis of gene delivery vectors could be applied to enhancing electrotransfection efficiency (eTE). Results from the study showed that photochemically induced endosomal escape, which could increase poly-L-lysine (PLL)-mediated gene delivery, decreased eTE. The decrease could not be blocked by treatment of cells with endonuclease inhibitors (aurintricarboxylic acid and zinc ion) or antioxidants (L-glutamine and ascorbic acid). Chemical treatment of cells with an endosomal trafficking inhibitor that blocks endosome progression, bafilomycin A1, resulted in a significant decrease in eTE. However, treatment of cells with lysosomotropic agents (chloroquine and ammonium chloride) had little effects on eTE. These data suggested that endosomes played important roles in protecting and intracellular trafficking of electrotransfected pDNA.

  2. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells by non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Zhengdong; Lendlein, Andreas; Ma, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an ideal cell source for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as they possess self-renewal properties and multilineage differentiation potential. They can be isolated from various tissues and expanded easily through normal cell culture techniques. Genetic modifications of MSCs to further improve their therapeutic efficacy have been widely studied and extensively researched. Compared to viral gene delivery methods, non-viral methods generate less toxicity and immunogenicity and thus represent a promising and effective tool for the genetic engineering of MSCs. In the last decades, various non-viral gene delivery strategies have been developed and some of them have been applied for MSC transfection. This paper gives an overview of the techniques, influencing factors and potential applications of non-viral methods used for the genetic engineering of MSCs.

  3. Integrating mitosis, toxicity, and transgene expression in a telecommunications packet-switched network model of lipoplex-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy M; Wysocki, Beata J; Beyersdorf, Jared P; Wysocki, Tadeusz A; Pannier, Angela K

    2014-08-01

    Gene delivery systems transport exogenous genetic information to cells or biological systems with the potential to directly alter endogenous gene expression and behavior with applications in functional genomics, tissue engineering, medical devices, and gene therapy. Nonviral systems offer advantages over viral systems because of their low immunogenicity, inexpensive synthesis, and easy modification but suffer from lower transfection levels. The representation of gene transfer using models offers perspective and interpretation of complex cellular mechanisms,including nonviral gene delivery where exact mechanisms are unknown. Here, we introduce a novel telecommunications model of the nonviral gene delivery process in which the delivery of the gene to a cell is synonymous with delivery of a packet of information to a destination computer within a packet-switched computer network. Such a model uses nodes and layers to simplify the complexity of modeling the transfection process and to overcome several challenges of existing models. These challenges include a limited scope and limited time frame, which often does not incorporate biological effects known to affect transfection. The telecommunication model was constructed in MATLAB to model lipoplex delivery of the gene encoding the green fluorescent protein to HeLa cells. Mitosis and toxicity events were included in the model resulting in simulation outputs of nuclear internalization and transfection efficiency that correlated with experimental data. A priori predictions based on model sensitivity analysis suggest that increasing endosomal escape and decreasing lysosomal degradation, protein degradation, and GFP-induced toxicity can improve transfection efficiency by three-fold. Application of the telecommunications model to nonviral gene delivery offers insight into the development of new gene delivery systems with therapeutically relevant transfection levels.

  4. Gene Silencing in Adult Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes Through Oral Delivery of Double-Stranded RNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    insects is now common practice. With appropriately chosen targets, the RNAi pathway has also been exploited for insect control, typically through oral...of the naturally occurring phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) to study gene function in insects is now common practice. With appropriately chosen...targets, the RNAi pathway has also been exploited for insect control, typically through oral delivery of dsRNA. Adapting current methods to deliver

  5. Evaluation of polymeric gene delivery nanoparticles by nanoparticle tracking analysis and high-throughput flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Ron B; Bhise, Nupura S; Green, Jordan J

    2013-03-01

    Non-viral gene delivery using polymeric nanoparticles has emerged as an attractive approach for gene therapy to treat genetic diseases(1) and as a technology for regenerative medicine(2). Unlike viruses, which have significant safety issues, polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be non-toxic, non-immunogenic, non-mutagenic, easier to synthesize, chemically versatile, capable of carrying larger nucleic acid cargo and biodegradable and/or environmentally responsive. Cationic polymers self-assemble with negatively charged DNA via electrostatic interaction to form complexes on the order of 100 nm that are commonly termed polymeric nanoparticles. Examples of biomaterials used to form nanoscale polycationic gene delivery nanoparticles include polylysine, polyphosphoesters, poly(amidoamines)s and polyethylenimine (PEI), which is a non-degradable off-the-shelf cationic polymer commonly used for nucleic acid delivery(1,3) . Poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs) are a newer class of cationic polymers(4) that are hydrolytically degradable(5,6) and have been shown to be effective at gene delivery to hard-to-transfect cell types such as human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs)(7), mouse mammary epithelial cells(8), human brain cancer cells(9) and macrovascular (human umbilical vein, HUVECs) endothelial cells(10). A new protocol to characterize polymeric nanoparticles utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is described. In this approach, both the particle size distribution and the distribution of the number of plasmids per particle are obtained(11). In addition, a high-throughput 96-well plate transfection assay for rapid screening of the transfection efficacy of polymeric nanoparticles is presented. In this protocol, poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs) are used as model polymers and human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs) are used as model human cells. This protocol can be easily adapted to evaluate any polymeric nanoparticle and any cell type of interest in a multi

  6. A translatable, closed recirculation system for AAV6 vector-mediated myocardial gene delivery in the large animal.

    PubMed

    Swain, JaBaris D; Katz, Michael G; White, Jennifer D; Thesier, Danielle M; Henderson, Armen; Stedman, Hansell H; Bridges, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Current strategies for managing congestive heart failure are limited, validating the search for an alternative treatment modality. Gene therapy holds tremendous promise as both a practical and translatable technology platform. Its effectiveness is evidenced by the improvements in cardiac function observed in vector-mediated therapeutic transgene delivery to the murine myocardium. A large animal model validating these results is the likely segue into clinical application. However, controversy still exists regarding a suitable method of vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery that provides for efficient, global gene transfer to the large animal myocardium that is also clinically translatable and practical. Intramyocardial injection and catheter-based coronary delivery techniques are attractive alternatives with respect to their clinical applicability; yet, they are fraught with numerous challenges, including concerns regarding collateral gene expression in other organs, low efficiency of vector delivery to the myocardium, inhomogeneous expression, and untoward immune response secondary to gene delivery. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) delivery with dual systemic and isolated cardiac circuitry precludes these drawbacks and has the added advantage of allowing for control of the pharmacological milieu, multiple pass recirculation through the coronary circulation, the selective addition of endothelial permeabilizing agents, and an increase in vector residence time. Collectively, these mechanics significantly improve the efficiency of global, vector-mediated cardiac gene delivery to the large animal myocardium, highlighting a potential therapeutic strategy to be extended to some heart failure patients.

  7. Hydrodynamic gene delivery in human skin using a hollow microneedle device.

    PubMed

    Dul, M; Stefanidou, M; Porta, P; Serve, J; O'Mahony, C; Malissen, B; Henri, S; Levin, Y; Kochba, E; Wong, F S; Dayan, C; Coulman, S A; Birchall, J C

    2017-02-27

    Microneedle devices have been proposed as a minimally invasive delivery system for the intradermal administration of nucleic acids, both plasmid DNA (pDNA) and siRNA, to treat localised disease or provide vaccination. Different microneedle types and application methods have been investigated in the laboratory, but limited and irreproducible levels of gene expression have proven to be significant challenges to pre-clinical to clinical progression. This study is the first to explore the potential of a hollow microneedle device for the delivery and subsequent expression of pDNA in human skin. The regulatory approved MicronJet600® (MicronJet hereafter) device was used to deliver reporter plasmids (pCMVβ and pEGFP-N1) into viable excised human skin. Exogenous gene expression was subsequently detected at multiple locations that were distant from the injection site but within the confines of the bleb created by the intradermal bolus. The observed levels of gene expression in the tissue are at least comparable to that achieved by the most invasive microneedle application methods e.g. lateral application of a microneedle. Gene expression was predominantly located in the epidermis, although also evident in the papillary dermis. Optical coherence tomography permitted real time visualisation of the sub-surface skin architecture and, unlike a conventional intradermal injection, MicronJet administration of a 50μL bolus appears to create multiple superficial microdisruptions in the papillary dermis and epidermis. These were co-localised with expression of the pCMVβ reporter plasmid. We have therefore shown, for the first time, that a hollow microneedle device can facilitate efficient and reproducible gene expression of exogenous naked pDNA in human skin using volumes that are considered to be standard for intradermal administration, and postulate a hydrodynamic effect as the mechanism of gene delivery.

  8. Particle tracking in drug and gene delivery research: State-of-the-art applications and methods.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Benjamin S; Ensign, Laura M; Allan, Daniel B; Suk, Jung Soo; Hanes, Justin

    2015-08-30

    Particle tracking is a powerful microscopy technique to quantify the motion of individual particles at high spatial and temporal resolution in complex fluids and biological specimens. Particle tracking's applications and impact in drug and gene delivery research have greatly increased during the last decade. Thanks to advances in hardware and software, this technique is now more accessible than ever, and can be reliably automated to enable rapid processing of large data sets, thereby further enhancing the role that particle tracking will play in drug and gene delivery studies in the future. We begin this review by discussing particle tracking-based advances in characterizing extracellular and cellular barriers to therapeutic nanoparticles and in characterizing nanoparticle size and stability. To facilitate wider adoption of the technique, we then present a user-friendly review of state-of-the-art automated particle tracking algorithms and methods of analysis. We conclude by reviewing technological developments for next-generation particle tracking methods, and we survey future research directions in drug and gene delivery where particle tracking may be useful.

  9. Arginine-conjugated polypropylenimine dendrimer as a non-toxic and efficient gene delivery carrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Il; Baek, Jung-Un; Zhe Bai, Cheng; Park, Jong-Sang

    2007-04-01

    We synthesized arginine-conjugated polypropylenimine dendrimer G2 (DAB-8), PPI2-R for gene delivery systems. Synthesized PPI2-R could retard plasmid DNA at a weight ratio of 4 completely and PPI2-R polyplexes showed a fluorescence of less than 10% over a charge ratio of 2 by PicoGreen reagent assay, suggesting its good DNA condensing ability. The size of PPI2-R polyplex was measured to about 200nm at a charge ratio of 150. PPI2-R displayed 80-90% cell viability at even a 150microg/mL concentration. Transfection efficiency of PPI2-R was found to be high comparable to that of PEI25kD and to be 8-214 times higher than that of unmodified PPI2 on HeLa and 293 cells. Moreover, PPI2-R showed 4 times higher transfection efficiency than PEI25kD, treating with 10microg pDNA because of its low cytotoxicity on HeLa cells. Finally, PPI2-R showed a transfection efficiency 2-3 times higher than PEI25kD on HUVECs, showing its potency as a gene delivery carrier for primary cells. These results demonstrate that arginine-conjugation of PPI2 is successful in developing a low toxic and highly transfection efficient gene delivery carrier.

  10. Importin-4 Regulates Gene Delivery by Enhancing Nuclear Retention and Chromatin Deposition by Polyplexes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nikki L.; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2016-01-01

    For successful gene delivery, plasmid DNA must be able to access the nucleus in order to be transcribed. Numerous studies have shown that gene delivery occurs more readily in dividing cells, which is attributed to increased nuclear access when the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis; however, nonviral carriers continue to have low transfection efficiencies and require large quantities of DNA per cell to achieve reasonable gene transfer, even in dividing cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that using histone-derived nuclear localization sequences (NLS)s to target polyplexes might enhance nuclear delivery by facilitating interactions with histone effectors that mediate nuclear partitioning and retention during mitosis. We discovered a novel interaction between polyplexes linked to histone 3 (H3) N-terminal tail peptides and the histone nuclear import protein importin-4, as evidenced by strong spatial colocalization as well as significantly decreased transfection when importin-4 expression was reduced. A fraction of the histone-targeted polyplexes was also found to colocalize with the retrotranslocon of the endoplasmic reticulum, Sec61. Super resolution microscopy demonstrated a high level of polyplex binding to chromatin post-mitosis, and there also was a significant decrease in the amount of chromatin binding following importin-4 knockdown. These results provide evidence that natural histone effectors mediate both nuclear entry and deposition on chromatin by histone-targeted polyplexes, and a translocation event from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytosol may occur before mitosis to enable the polyplexes to interact with these essential cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:26465823

  11. Biopolymer-Based Nanoparticles for Drug/Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Sachiko Kaihara; Numata, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    There has been a great interest in application of nanoparticles as biomaterials for delivery of therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genes, and for tissue engineering. In particular, biopolymers are suitable materials as nanoparticles for clinical application due to their versatile traits, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. Biopolymers are polymers that are produced from living organisms, which are classified in three groups: polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids. It is important to control particle size, charge, morphology of surface and release rate of loaded molecules to use biopolymer-based nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery carriers. To obtain a nano-carrier for therapeutic purposes, a variety of materials and preparation process has been attempted. This review focuses on fabrication of biocompatible nanoparticles consisting of biopolymers such as protein (silk, collagen, gelatin, β-casein, zein and albumin), protein-mimicked polypeptides and polysaccharides (chitosan, alginate, pullulan, starch and heparin). The effects of the nature of the materials and the fabrication process on the characteristics of the nanoparticles are described. In addition, their application as delivery carriers of therapeutic drugs and genes and biomaterials for tissue engineering are also reviewed. PMID:23344060

  12. Ultrasound guided site specific gene delivery system using adenoviral vectors and commercial ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Howard, Candace M; Forsberg, Flemming; Minimo, Corrado; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2006-11-01

    We have evaluated if ultrasound imaging (US) and various commercially available contrast microbubbles can serve as a non-invasive systemically administered delivery vehicle for site-specific adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. The contrast agents were tested for their ability to enclose and to protect an adenoviral vector carrying the GFP marker gene (Ad-GFP) into the microbubbles. We have also evaluated the ability of the innate immune system to inactivate free adenoviruses as well as unenclosed viruses adsorbed on the surface of the contrast agents and in turn the ability of the microbubbles to enclose and to protect the viral vectors from such agents. In vitro as well as in vivo, innate components of the immune system were able to serve as inactivating agents to clear free viral particles and unenclosed adenoviruses adsorbed on the microbubbles' surface. Systemic delivery of Ad-GFP enclosed into microbubbles in the tail vein of nude mice resulted in specific targeting of the GFP transgene. Both fluorescence microscopy and GFP immunohistochemistry demonstrated US guided specific transduction in the targeted cells only, with no uptake in either heart, lungs or liver using complement-pretreated Ad-GFP microbubbles. This approach enhances target specificity of US microbubble destruction as a delivery vehicle for viral-mediated gene transfer.

  13. Nano-biomimetic carriers are implicated in mechanistic evaluation of intracellular gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Mohsen; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sheikhnejad, Reza; Cheraghi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    Several tissue specific non-viral carriers have been developed for gene delivery purposes. However, the inability to escape endosomes, undermines the efficacy of these carriers. Researchers inspired by HIV and influenza virus, have randomly used Gp41 and H5WYG fusogenic peptides in several gene delivery systems without any rational preference. Here for the first time, we have genetically engineered two Nano-biomimetic carriers composed of either HWYG (HNH) or Gp41 (GNH) that precisely provide identical conditions for the study and evaluation of these fusogenic peptides. The luciferase assay demonstrated a two-fold higher transfection efficiency of HNH compared to GNH. These nanocarriers also displayed equivalent properties in terms of DNA binding ability and DNA protection against serum nucleases and formed similar nanoparticles in terms of surface charge and size. Interestingly, hemolysis and cellular analysis demonstrated both of nanoparticles internalized into cells in similar rate and escaped from endosome with different efficiency. Furthermore, the structural analysis revealed the mechanisms responsible for the superior endosomal escaping capability of H5WYG. In conclusion, this study describes the rationale for using H5WYG peptide to deliver nucleic acids and suggests that using nano-biomimetic carriers to screen different endosomal release peptides, improves gene delivery significantly. PMID:28128339

  14. Microneedle delivery of plasmid DNA to living human skin: formulation coating, skin insertion and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pearton, Marc; Saller, Verena; Coulman, Sion A; Gateley, Chris; Anstey, Alexander V; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Birchall, James C

    2012-01-01

    Microneedle delivery of nucleic acids, in particular plasmid DNA (pDNA), to the skin represents a potential new approach for the clinical management of genetic skin diseases and cutaneous cancers, and for intracutaneous genetic immunization. In this study excised human skin explants were used to investigate and optimize key parameters that will determine stable and effective microneedle-facilitated pDNA delivery. These include (i) high dose-loading of pDNA onto microneedle surfaces, (ii) stability and functionality of the coated pDNA, (iii) skin penetration capability of pDNA-coated microneedles, and (iv) efficient gene expression in human skin. Optimization of a dip-coating method enabled significant increases in the loading capacity, up to 100 micrograms of pDNA per 5-microneedle array. Coated microneedles were able to reproducibly perforate human skin at low (<1 Newton) insertion forces. The physical stability of the coated pDNA was partially compromised on storage, although this was improved through the addition of saccharide excipients without detriment to the biological functionality of pDNA. The pDNA-coated microneedles facilitated reporter gene expression in viable human skin. The efficiency of gene expression from coated microneedles will depend upon suitable DNA loading, efficient and reproducible skin puncture and rapid in situ dissolution of the plasmid at the site of delivery. PMID:22516089

  15. In Vivo Fate of Carbon Nanotubes with Different Physicochemical Properties for Gene Delivery Applications.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Rius, Anna; Boase, Nathan R B; Font, Ines; Coronas, Nuria; Ramos-Perez, Victor; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Borrós, Salvador

    2017-04-05

    Gene therapy has arisen as a pioneering technique to treat diseases by direct employment of nucleic acids as medicine. The major historical problem is to develop efficient and safe systems for the delivery of therapeutic genes into the target cells. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have demonstrated considerable promise as delivery vectors due to their (i) high aspect ratio and (ii) capacity to translocate through plasma membranes, known as the nanoneedle effect. To leverage these advantages, close attention needs to be paid to the physicochemical characteristics of the CNTs used. CNTs with different diameters (thinner and thicker) were treated by chemical oxidation to produce shorter fragments. Rigid (thick) and flexible (thin) CNTs, and their shortened versions, were coated with polyallylamine (ppAA) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The ppAA coating leads to a positively charged CNT surface that is able to electrostatically bind the green fluorescent protein plasmid reporter. This study shows how rigidity and length can affect their (i) behavior in biological media, (ii) ability to transfect in vitro, and (iii) biodistribution in vivo. This study also generates a set of basic design rules for the development of more efficient CNT-based gene-delivery vectors.

  16. Nano-biomimetic carriers are implicated in mechanistic evaluation of intracellular gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Mohsen; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sheikhnejad, Reza; Cheraghi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    Several tissue specific non-viral carriers have been developed for gene delivery purposes. However, the inability to escape endosomes, undermines the efficacy of these carriers. Researchers inspired by HIV and influenza virus, have randomly used Gp41 and H5WYG fusogenic peptides in several gene delivery systems without any rational preference. Here for the first time, we have genetically engineered two Nano-biomimetic carriers composed of either HWYG (HNH) or Gp41 (GNH) that precisely provide identical conditions for the study and evaluation of these fusogenic peptides. The luciferase assay demonstrated a two-fold higher transfection efficiency of HNH compared to GNH. These nanocarriers also displayed equivalent properties in terms of DNA binding ability and DNA protection against serum nucleases and formed similar nanoparticles in terms of surface charge and size. Interestingly, hemolysis and cellular analysis demonstrated both of nanoparticles internalized into cells in similar rate and escaped from endosome with different efficiency. Furthermore, the structural analysis revealed the mechanisms responsible for the superior endosomal escaping capability of H5WYG. In conclusion, this study describes the rationale for using H5WYG peptide to deliver nucleic acids and suggests that using nano-biomimetic carriers to screen different endosomal release peptides, improves gene delivery significantly.

  17. Synthesis of Bisethylnorspermine Lipid Prodrug as Gene Delivery Vector Targeting Polyamine Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yanmei; Zhu, Yu; Li, Jing; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Wu, Chao; Oupický, David

    2013-01-01

    Progress in the development of nonviral gene delivery vectors continues to be hampered by low transfection activity and toxicity. Here we proposed to develop a lipid prodrug based on a polyamine analogue bisethylnorspermine (BSP) that can function dually as gene delivery vector and, after intracellular degradation, as active anticancer agent targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism. We synthesized a prodrug of BSP (LS-BSP) capable of intracellular release of BSP using thiolytically sensitive dithiobenzyl carbamate linker. Biodegradability of LS-BSP contributed to decreased toxicity compared with nondegradable control L-BSP. BSP showed a strong synergistic enhancement of cytotoxic activity of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in human breast cancer cells. Decreased enhancement of TRAIL activity was observed for LS-BSP when compared with BSP. LS-BSP formed complexes with plasmid DNA and mediated transfection activity comparable to DOTAP and L-BSP. Our results show that BSP-based vectors are promising candidates for combination drug/gene delivery. PMID:22545813

  18. Importin-4 Regulates Gene Delivery by Enhancing Nuclear Retention and Chromatin Deposition by Polyplexes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Nikki L; Sullivan, Millicent O

    2015-12-07

    For successful gene delivery, plasmid DNA must be able to access the nucleus in order to be transcribed. Numerous studies have shown that gene delivery occurs more readily in dividing cells, which is attributed to increased nuclear access when the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis; however, nonviral carriers continue to have low transfection efficiencies and require large quantities of DNA per cell to achieve reasonable gene transfer, even in dividing cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that using histone-derived nuclear localization sequences (NLS)s to target polyplexes might enhance nuclear delivery by facilitating interactions with histone effectors that mediate nuclear partitioning and retention during mitosis. We discovered a novel interaction between polyplexes linked to histone 3 (H3) N-terminal tail peptides and the histone nuclear import protein importin-4, as evidenced by strong spatial colocalization as well as significantly decreased transfection when importin-4 expression was reduced. A fraction of the histone-targeted polyplexes was also found to colocalize with the retrotranslocon of the endoplasmic reticulum, Sec61. Super resolution microscopy demonstrated a high level of polyplex binding to chromatin postmitosis, and there also was a significant decrease in the amount of chromatin binding following importin-4 knockdown. These results provide evidence that natural histone effectors mediate both nuclear entry and deposition on chromatin by histone-targeted polyplexes, and a translocation event from the endoplasmic reticulum into the cytosol may occur before mitosis to enable the polyplexes to interact with these essential cytoplasmic proteins.

  19. Prospects for Lentiviral Vector Mediated Prostaglandin F Synthase Gene Delivery in Monkey Eyes In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Suk; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Filla, Mark S.; Slauson, Sarah R.; Kolb, Aaron W.; Peters, Donna M.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Gabelt, B’Ann True; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most effective outflow drugs approved for clinical use are prostaglandin F2α analogues, but these require daily topical self-dosing and have various intraocular, ocular surface and extraocular side effects. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of the prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) gene, resulting in long-term reduction of IOP, may eliminate off-target tissue effects and the need for daily topical PGF2α self-administration. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of the PGFS gene to the anterior segment has been achieved in cats and non-human primates. Although these results are encouraging, our studies have identified a number of challenges that need to be overcome for prostaglandin gene therapy to be translated into the clinic. Using examples from our work in non-human primates, where we were able to achieve a significant reduction in IOP (2 mm Hg) for 5 months after delivery of the cDNA for bovine PGF synthase, we identify and discuss these issues and consider several possible solutions. PMID:24559478

  20. Biocleavable graphene oxide based-nanohybrids synthesized via ATRP for gene/drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinchao; Zhao, Nana; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2014-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been proven to be promising in many biomedical fields due to its biocompatibility, unique conjugated structure, easily tunable surface functionalization and facile synthesis. In this work, a flexible two-step method was first developed to introduce the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiation sites containing disulfide bonds onto GO surfaces. Surface-initiated ATRP of (2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was then employed to tailor the GO surfaces in a well-controlled manner, producing a series of organic-inorganic hybrids (termed as SS-GPDs) for highly efficient gene delivery. Under reducible conditions, the PDMAEMA side chains can be readily cleavable from the GO backbones, benefiting the resultant gene delivery process. Moreover, due to the conjugated structure of the graphene basal plane, SS-GPD can attach and absorb aromatic, water insoluble drugs, such as 10-hydroxycamptothecin (CPT), producing SS-GPD-CPT. The MTT assay and the simultaneous double-staining procedure revealed that SS-GPD-CPT possessed a high potency of killing cancer cells in vitro. With a high aqueous solubility and coulombic interaction with cell membrane, SS-GPDs may have great potential in gene/drug delivery fields.

  1. Polydnaviruses of Parasitic Wasps: Domestication of Viruses To Act as Gene Delivery Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Gaelen R.; Strand, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiosis is a common phenomenon in which associated organisms can cooperate in ways that increase their ability to survive, reproduce, or utilize hostile environments. Here, we discuss polydnavirus symbionts of parasitic wasps. These viruses are novel in two ways: (1) they have become non-autonomous domesticated entities that cannot replicate outside of wasps; and (2) they function as a delivery vector of genes that ensure successful parasitism of host insects that wasps parasitize. In this review we discuss how these novelties may have arisen, which genes are potentially involved, and what the consequences have been for genome evolution. PMID:26467950

  2. Instructive nanofibrous scaffold comprising runt-related transcription factor 2 gene delivery for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Ribeiro, Diana; Martins, Albino; Faria, Susana; Fonseca, Nuno A; Moreira, João N; Reis, Rui L; Neves, Nuno M

    2014-08-26

    Inducer molecules capable of regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into specific lineages have proven effective in basic science and in preclinical studies. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) is considered to be the central gene involved in the osteoblast phenotype induction, which may be advantageous for inducing bone tissue regeneration. This work envisions the development of a platform for gene delivery, combining liposomes as gene delivery devices, with electrospun nanofiber mesh (NFM) as a tissue engineering scaffold. pDNA-loaded liposomes were immobilized at the surface of functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) NFM. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) cultured on RUNX2-loaded liposomes immobilized at the surface of electrospun PCL NFM showed enhanced levels of metabolic activity and total protein synthesis. RUNX2-loaded liposomes immobilized at the surface of electrospun PCL NFMs induce a long-term gene expression of eGFP and RUNX2 by cultured hBMSCs. Furthermore, osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs was also achieved by the overexpression of other osteogenic markers in medium free of osteogenic supplementation. These findings demonstrate that surface immobilization of RUNX2 plasmid onto elestrospun PCL NFM can produce long-term gene expression in vitro, which may be employed to enhance the osteoinductive properties of scaffolds used for bone tissue engineering strategies.

  3. Human artificial chromosomes for gene delivery and the development of animal models.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2011-09-01

    Random integration of conventional gene delivery vectors such as viruses, plasmids, P1 phage-derived artificial chromosomes, bacterial artificial chromosomes and yeast artificial chromosomes can be associated with transgene silencing. Furthermore, integrated viral sequences can activate oncogenes adjacent to the insertion site resulting in cancer. Various human artificial chromosomes (HACs) exhibit several potential characteristics desired for an ideal gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance and the capacity to carry large genomic loci with their regulatory elements, thus allowing the physiological regulation of the introduced gene in a manner similar to that of native chromosomes. HACs have been generated mainly using either a "top-down approach" (engineered chromosomes), or a "bottom-up approach" (de novo artificial chromosomes). The recent emergence of stem cell-based tissue engineering has opened up new avenues for gene and cell therapies. This review describes the lessons learned and prospects identified mainly from studies in the construction of HACs and HAC-mediated gene expression systems in cultured cells, as well as in animals.

  4. A novel gene delivery composite system based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive hydrogel for sustained gene release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhao, Hang; Jia, Yanpeng; Guo, Qingfa; Qu, Ying; Su, Jing; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang; Qian, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    Local anti-oncogene delivery providing high local concentration of gene, increasing antitumor effect and decreasing systemic side effects is currently attracting interest in cancer therapy. In this paper, a novel local sustained anti-oncogene delivery system, PECE thermoresponsive hydrogel containing folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer/DNA (tumor suppressor) complexes, is demonstrated. First, a tumor-targeted biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer based on low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) was synthesized and characterized, and the application for targeted gene delivery was investigated. The polymer had slight cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency in vitro compared with PEI 25k, which indicated that FA-PEA was a potential vector for targeted gene delivery. Meanwhile, we successfully prepared a thermoresponsive PECE hydrogel composite containing FA-PEA/DNA complexes which could contain the genes and slowly release the genes into cells. We concluded the folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer would be useful for targeted gene delivery, and the novel gene delivery composite based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive PECE hydrogel showed potential for sustained gene release.

  5. A novel gene delivery composite system based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive hydrogel for sustained gene release.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Zhao, Hang; Jia, YanPeng; Guo, QingFa; Qu, Ying; Su, Jing; Lu, XiaoLing; Zhao, YongXiang; Qian, ZhiYong

    2016-02-17

    Local anti-oncogene delivery providing high local concentration of gene, increasing antitumor effect and decreasing systemic side effects is currently attracting interest in cancer therapy. In this paper, a novel local sustained anti-oncogene delivery system, PECE thermoresponsive hydrogel containing folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer/DNA (tumor suppressor) complexes, is demonstrated. First, a tumor-targeted biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer based on low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) was synthesized and characterized, and the application for targeted gene delivery was investigated. The polymer had slight cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency in vitro compared with PEI 25k, which indicated that FA-PEA was a potential vector for targeted gene delivery. Meanwhile, we successfully prepared a thermoresponsive PECE hydrogel composite containing FA-PEA/DNA complexes which could contain the genes and slowly release the genes into cells. We concluded the folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer would be useful for targeted gene delivery, and the novel gene delivery composite based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive PECE hydrogel showed potential for sustained gene release.

  6. A novel gene delivery composite system based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive hydrogel for sustained gene release

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Zhao, Hang; Jia, YanPeng; Guo, QingFa; Qu, Ying; Su, Jing; Lu, XiaoLing; Zhao, YongXiang; Qian, ZhiYong

    2016-01-01

    Local anti-oncogene delivery providing high local concentration of gene, increasing antitumor effect and decreasing systemic side effects is currently attracting interest in cancer therapy. In this paper, a novel local sustained anti-oncogene delivery system, PECE thermoresponsive hydrogel containing folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer/DNA (tumor suppressor) complexes, is demonstrated. First, a tumor-targeted biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer based on low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) was synthesized and characterized, and the application for targeted gene delivery was investigated. The polymer had slight cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency in vitro compared with PEI 25k, which indicated that FA-PEA was a potential vector for targeted gene delivery. Meanwhile, we successfully prepared a thermoresponsive PECE hydrogel composite containing FA-PEA/DNA complexes which could contain the genes and slowly release the genes into cells. We concluded the folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer would be useful for targeted gene delivery, and the novel gene delivery composite based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive PECE hydrogel showed potential for sustained gene release. PMID:26883682

  7. A novel magnetic crystal-lipid nanostructure for magnetically guided in vivo gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Yoshihisa; Namiki, Tamami; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yukiko; Tsubota, Akihito; Koido, Shigeo; Nariai, Kouichi; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Mabashi, Yasuo; Yumoto, Yoko; Hoshina, Sadayori; Fujise, Kiyotaka; Tada, Norio

    2009-09-01

    Cancer gene therapy requires a safe and effective gene delivery system. Polymer- and lipid-coated magnetic nanocrystals have been used to deliver silencing RNA, but synthesizing these magnetic vectors is difficult. Here, we show that a new nanoparticle formulation can be magnetically guided to deliver and silence genes in cells and tumours in mice. This formulation, termed LipoMag, consists of an oleic acid-coated magnetic nanocrystal core and a cationic lipid shell. When compared with the commercially available PolyMag formulation, LipoMag displayed more efficient gene silencing in 9 of 13 cell lines, and better anti-tumour effects when systemically administered to mice bearing gastric tumours. By delivering an optimized sequence of a silencing RNA that targets the epidermal growth factor receptor of tumour vessels, the intended therapeutic benefit was achieved with no evident adverse immune reaction or untoward side effects.

  8. Gene delivery to postnatal rat brain by non-ventricular plasmid injection and electroporation.

    PubMed

    Molotkov, Dmitry A; Yukin, Alexey Y; Afzalov, Ramil A; Khiroug, Leonard S

    2010-09-17

    Creation of transgenic animals is a standard approach in studying functions of a gene of interest in vivo. However, many knockout or transgenic animals are not viable in those cases where the modified gene is expressed or deleted in the whole organism. Moreover, a variety of compensatory mechanisms often make it difficult to interpret the results. The compensatory effects can be alleviated by either timing the gene expression or limiting the amount of transfected cells. The method of postnatal non-ventricular microinjection and in vivo electroporation allows targeted delivery of genes, siRNA or dye molecules directly to a small region of interest in the newborn rodent brain. In contrast to conventional ventricular injection technique, this method allows transfection of non-migratory cell types. Animals transfected by means of the method described here can be used, for example, for two-photon in vivo imaging or in electrophysiological experiments on acute brain slices.

  9. Rational design of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide-based nanoassemblies for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yiguang; Wang, Shuangmiao; Tong, Li; Du, Lina

    2015-02-01

    Nonviral gene vectors are a hot topic for gene delivery. High cost and low transfection efficiency hinder the application of them. The aim of this study was to find out the optimal gene vectors with lower cost and more effective gene delivery than commonly used gene vectors. A cheap cationic lipid, didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) was the basic component and the other components included oleic acid (OA), cholesterol (Chol), cholesteryl succinyl poly(ethylene glycol) 1500 (CHS-PEG), poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG). The combinations of DDAB/OA/Chol, DDAB/OA/CHS-PEG and DDAB/PLGA-PEG were adopted to prepare the nanoassemblies named CNA, CPNA and PPNA, respectively. The optimal component ratios were screened out according to their Langmuir monolayer behavior. The optimal preparation method of nanoassemblies involved firstly compressing DNA or siRNA with the cationic lipid (DDAB) and secondly being coated with the helper lipids (OA and CHS-PEG) or the helper polymer (PLGA-PEG). The complexes of genes and cationic lipids were encapsulated into the core of CPNA and PPNA. The optimal gene vectors (CPNA and PPNA) with small sizes, low negative surface charges and non-exposure of cationic lipids were achieved. They had the advantages of no cytotoxicity, high transfection efficiency and low cost. More importantly, CPNA and PPNA were not sensitive to serum and showed the similar or higher transfection efficiency of pDNA and siRNA compared to Lipofectamine 2000. CPNA could mainly enter cell plasma based on endocytosis. The rational design method is useful for the design and optimization of DDAB-based gene carriers and other cationic lipid-based carriers.

  10. Multiparameter evaluation of in vivo gene delivery using ultrasound-guided, microbubble-enhanced sonoporation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Galina; Wong, Andrew W; Bez, Maxim; Yang, Fang; Tam, Sarah; Even, Lisa; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Ben-David, Shiran; Tawackoli, Wafa; Pelled, Gadi; Ferrara, Katherine W; Gazit, Dan

    2016-02-10

    More than 1800 gene therapy clinical trials worldwide have targeted a wide range of conditions including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and monogenic diseases. Biological (i.e. viral), chemical, and physical approaches have been developed to deliver nucleic acids into cells. Although viral vectors offer the greatest efficiency, they also raise major safety concerns including carcinogenesis and immunogenicity. The goal of microbubble-mediated sonoporation is to enhance the uptake of drugs and nucleic acids. Insonation of microbubbles is thought to facilitate two mechanisms for enhanced uptake: first, deflection of the cell membrane inducing endocytotic uptake, and second, microbubble jetting inducing the formation of pores in the cell membrane. We hypothesized that ultrasound could be used to guide local microbubble-enhanced sonoporation of plasmid DNA. With the aim of optimizing delivery efficiency, we used nonlinear ultrasound and bioluminescence imaging to optimize the acoustic pressure, microbubble concentration, treatment duration, DNA dosage, and number of treatments required for in vivo Luciferase gene expression in a mouse thigh muscle model. We found that mice injected with 50μg luciferase plasmid DNA and 5×10(5) microbubbles followed by ultrasound treatment at 1.4MHz, 200kPa, 100-cycle pulse length, and 540 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) for 2min exhibited superior transgene expression compared to all other treatment groups. The bioluminescent signal measured for these mice on Day 4 post-treatment was 100-fold higher (p<0.0001, n=5 or 6) than the signals for controls treated with DNA injection alone, DNA and microbubble injection, or DNA injection and ultrasound treatment. Our results indicate that these conditions result in efficient gene delivery and prolonged gene expression (up to 21days) with no evidence of tissue damage or off-target delivery. We believe that these promising results bear great promise for the development of microbubble

  11. Targeted delivery of genes to endothelial cells and cell- and gene-based therapy in pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Suen, Colin M; Mei, Shirley H J; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Stewart, Duncan J

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that, despite significant advances in medical therapies over the last several decades, continues to have an extremely poor prognosis. Gene therapy is a method to deliver therapeutic genes to replace defective or mutant genes or supplement existing cellular processes to modify disease. Over the last few decades, several viral and nonviral methods of gene therapy have been developed for preclinical PAH studies with varying degrees of efficacy. However, these gene delivery methods face challenges of immunogenicity, low transduction rates, and nonspecific targeting which have limited their translation to clinical studies. More recently, the emergence of regenerative approaches using stem and progenitor cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have offered a new approach to gene therapy. Cell-based gene therapy is an approach that augments the therapeutic potential of EPCs and MSCs and may deliver on the promise of reversal of established PAH. These new regenerative approaches have shown tremendous potential in preclinical studies; however, large, rigorously designed clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety.

  12. Human CD64-targeted non-viral siRNA delivery system for blood monocyte gene modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Seok-Beom; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Chung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A subset of phagocytes including inflammatory monocytes in blood migrate and give rise to macrophages in inflammatory tissues which generated the idea that blood monocytes are the therapeutic targets for drug delivery. Fc gamma receptor I (CD64) is a membrane receptor for the Fc region of immunoglobulin G, primarily expressed on monocyte-lineage, and H22 a monoclonal antibody for human CD64 had shown rapid blood monocyte binding and occupation in clinical studies. Small interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing as a therapeutic has been proposed and is a promising strategy in terms of its “knock-down” ability on the target gene prior to translation. However, its instability and off-targeting effect must be overcome for success in clinical studies. In this study, we developed a non-viral delivery system composed of oligo-nona-arginine (9R) and anti-human CD64 single chain antibodies (H22) for human monocyte-specific siRNA delivery. A targeted and efficient siRNA delivery mediated by anti-CD64 scFv-9R was observed in CD64 positive human leukemia cells, THP-1. With primary human blood cells, anti-CD64 scFv-9R mediated gene silencing was quantitatively confirmed representing blood monocyte selective gene delivery. These results demonstrate the potential of anti-CD64 scFv-9R mediated siRNA delivery for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases via blood monocytes gene delivery. PMID:28169353

  13. BMP2 gene delivery to bone mesenchymal stem cell by chitosan-g-PEI nonviral vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jianhui; Wu, Jun; Liu, Di; Zhao, Xiaoli; Lu, William W.

    2015-04-01

    Nanotechnology has made a significant impact on the development of nanomedicine. Nonviral vectors have been attracting more attention for the advantage of biosafety in gene delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI)-conjugated chitosan (chitosan-g-PEI) emerged as a promising nonviral vector and has been demonstrated in many tumor cells. However, there is a lack of study focused on the behavior of this vector in stem cells which hold great potential in regenerative medicine. Therefore, in this study, in vitro gene delivering effect of chitosan-g-PEI was investigated in bone marrow stem cells. pIRES2-ZsGreen1-hBMP2 dual expression plasmid containing both the ZsGreen1 GFP reporter gene and the BMP2 functional gene was constructed for monitoring the transgene expression level. Chitosan-g-PEI-mediated gene transfer showed 17.2% of transfection efficiency and more than 80% of cell viability in stem cells. These values were higher than that of PEI. The expression of the delivered BMP2 gene in stem cells enhanced the osteogenic differentiation. These results demonstrated that chitosan-g-PEI is capable of applying in delivering gene to stem cells and providing potential applications in stem cell-based gene therapy.

  14. Spider silk-based gene carriers for tumor cell-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Reagan, Michaela R; Goldstein, Robert H; Rosenblatt, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2011-08-17

    The present study demonstrates pDNA complexes of recombinant silk proteins containing poly(L-lysine) and tumor-homing peptides (THPs), which are globular and approximately 150-250 nm in diameter, show significant enhancement of target specificity to tumor cells by additions of F3 and CGKRK THPs. We report herein the preparation and study of novel nanoscale silk-based ionic complexes containing pDNA able to home specifically to tumor cells. Particular focus was on how the THP, F3 (KDEPQRRSARLSAKPAPPKPEPKPKKAPAKK), and CGKRK, enhanced transfection specificity to tumor cells. Genetically engineered silk proteins containing both poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with pDNA and the THP to bind to specific tumor cells for target-specific pDNA delivery were prepared using Escherichia coli, followed by in vitro and in vivo transfection experiments into MDA-MB-435 melanoma cells and highly metastatic human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cells. Non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells were used as a control cell line for in vitro tumor-specific delivery studies. These results demonstrate that combination of the bioengineered silk delivery systems and THP can serve as a versatile and useful new platform for nonviral gene delivery.

  15. Modulation of Gene Expression by Polymer Nanocapsule Delivery of DNA Cassettes Encoding Small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Wen, Jing; Liang, Min; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2015-01-01

    Small RNAs, including siRNAs, gRNAs and miRNAs, modulate gene expression and serve as potential therapies for human diseases. Delivery to target cells remains the fundamental limitation for use of these RNAs in humans. To address this challenge, we have developed a nanocapsule delivery technology that encapsulates small DNA molecules encoding RNAs into a small (30 nm) polymer nanocapsule. For proof of concept, we transduced DNA expression cassettes for three small RNAs. In one application, the DNA cassette encodes an shRNA transcriptional unit that downregulates CCR5 and protects from HIV-1 infection. The DNA cassette nanocapsules were further engineered for timed release of the DNA cargo for prolonged knockdown of CCR5. Secondly, the nanocapsules provide an efficient means for delivery of gRNAs in the CRISPR/Cas9 system to mutate integrated HIV-1. Finally, delivery of microRNA-125b to mobilized human CD34+ cells enhances survival and expansion of the CD34+ cells in culture.

  16. Extracellular vesicles for nucleic acid delivery: progress and prospects for safe RNA-based gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Vader, P; Schiffelers, R M

    2017-03-01

    Nucleic acid-based drugs offer a potentially effective tool for treatment of a variety of diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders and infectious diseases. However, clinical applications are hindered by instability of RNA molecules in the circulation and lack of efficient vectors that can deliver RNAs to target tissues and into diseased target cells. Synthetic polymer and lipids as well as virus-based vectors are among the most widely explored vehicles for RNA delivery, but clinical progress has been limited as a result of issues related to toxicity, immunogenicity and low efficiency. Most recently, the discovery that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are endogenous RNA carriers, which may display better biocompatibility and higher delivery efficiency as compared with the synthetic systems, has provided a ray of hope in coping with the delivery dilemma, and EV-based gene therapy has already sparked general interest both in academia and industry. In this review, the current knowledge on EV biology and their role in cell-cell communication will be summarized. Promises of EVs as drug carriers and recent technologies on tailoring EVs' biological attributes will be included, and preclinical studies in which EVs have shown promise for therapeutic RNA delivery will be discussed.

  17. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.; Alexander, John J.; Rowlan, Jessica S.; Garcia, Monique M.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Kaya, Asli; Tanaka, Jacqueline C.; Acland, Gregory M.; Hauswirth, William W.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2010-01-01

    The successful restoration of visual function with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene replacement therapy in animals and humans with an inherited disease of the retinal pigment epithelium has ushered in a new era of retinal therapeutics. For many retinal disorders, however, targeting of therapeutic vectors to mutant rods and/or cones will be required. In this study, the primary cone photoreceptor disorder achromatopsia served as the ideal translational model to develop gene therapy directed to cone photoreceptors. We demonstrate that rAAV-mediated gene replacement therapy with different forms of the human red cone opsin promoter led to the restoration of cone function and day vision in two canine models of CNGB3 achromatopsia, a neuronal channelopathy that is the most common form of achromatopsia in man. The robustness and stability of the observed treatment effect was mutation independent, but promoter and age dependent. Subretinal administration of rAAV5–hCNGB3 with a long version of the red cone opsin promoter in younger animals led to a stable therapeutic effect for at least 33 months. Our results hold promise for future clinical trials of cone-directed gene therapy in achromatopsia and other cone-specific disorders. PMID:20378608

  18. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, András M; Alexander, John J; Rowlan, Jessica S; Garcia, Monique M; Chiodo, Vince A; Kaya, Asli; Tanaka, Jacqueline C; Acland, Gregory M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2010-07-01

    The successful restoration of visual function with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene replacement therapy in animals and humans with an inherited disease of the retinal pigment epithelium has ushered in a new era of retinal therapeutics. For many retinal disorders, however, targeting of therapeutic vectors to mutant rods and/or cones will be required. In this study, the primary cone photoreceptor disorder achromatopsia served as the ideal translational model to develop gene therapy directed to cone photoreceptors. We demonstrate that rAAV-mediated gene replacement therapy with different forms of the human red cone opsin promoter led to the restoration of cone function and day vision in two canine models of CNGB3 achromatopsia, a neuronal channelopathy that is the most common form of achromatopsia in man. The robustness and stability of the observed treatment effect was mutation independent, but promoter and age dependent. Subretinal administration of rAAV5-hCNGB3 with a long version of the red cone opsin promoter in younger animals led to a stable therapeutic effect for at least 33 months. Our results hold promise for future clinical trials of cone-directed gene therapy in achromatopsia and other cone-specific disorders.

  19. BDNF gene delivery mediated by neuron-targeted nanoparticles is neuroprotective in peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cátia D F; Gonçalves, Nádia P; Gomes, Carla P; Saraiva, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P

    2017-03-01

    Neuron-targeted gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat peripheral neuropathies. Here we propose the use of polymeric nanoparticles based on thiolated trimethyl chitosan (TMCSH) to mediate targeted gene delivery to peripheral neurons upon a peripheral and minimally invasive intramuscular administration. Nanoparticles were grafted with the non-toxic carboxylic fragment of the tetanus neurotoxin (HC) to allow neuron targeting and were explored to deliver a plasmid DNA encoding for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a peripheral nerve injury model. The TMCSH-HC/BDNF nanoparticle treatment promoted the release and significant expression of BDNF in neural tissues, which resulted in an enhanced functional recovery after injury as compared to control treatments (vehicle and non-targeted nanoparticles), associated with an improvement in key pro-regenerative events, namely, the increased expression of neurofilament and growth-associated protein GAP-43 in the injured nerves. Moreover, the targeted nanoparticle treatment was correlated with a significantly higher density of myelinated axons in the distal stump of injured nerves, as well as with preservation of unmyelinated axon density as compared with controls and a protective role in injury-denervated muscles, preventing them from denervation. These results highlight the potential of TMCSH-HC nanoparticles as non-viral gene carriers to deliver therapeutic genes into the peripheral neurons and thus, pave the way for their use as an effective therapeutic intervention for peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Delivery and therapeutic applications of gene editing technologies ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    LaFountaine, Justin S; Fathe, Kristin; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, several new genome editing technologies have been developed. Of these the zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided endonuclease system are the most widely described. Each of these technologies utilizes restriction enzymes to introduce a DNA double stranded break at a targeted location with the guide of homologous binding proteins or RNA. Such targeting is viewed as a significant advancement compared to current gene therapy methods that lack such specificity. Proof-of-concept studies have been performed to treat multiple disorders, including in vivo experiments in mammals and even early phase human trials. Careful consideration and investigation of delivery strategies will be required so that the therapeutic potential for gene editing is achieved. In this review, the mechanisms of each of these gene editing technologies and evidence of therapeutic potential will be briefly described and a comprehensive list of past studies will be provided. The pharmaceutical approaches of each of these technologies are discussed along with the current delivery obstacles. The topics and information reviewed herein provide an outline of the groundbreaking research that is being performed, but also highlights the potential for progress yet to be made using these gene editing technologies.

  1. Progranulin gene delivery protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M; Baranowski, David; Kay, Denis G

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia/bradykinesia resulting from the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. To date, only symptomatic treatment is available for PD patients, with no effective means of slowing or stopping the progression of the disease. Progranulin (PGRN) is a 593 amino acid multifunction protein that is widely distributed throughout the CNS, localized primarily in neurons and microglia. PGRN has been demonstrated to be a potent regulator of neuroinflammation and also acts as an autocrine neurotrophic factor, important for long-term neuronal survival. Thus, enhancing PGRN expression may strengthen the cells resistance to disease. In the present study, we have used the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD to investigate the possible use of PGRN gene delivery as a therapy for the prevention or treatment of PD. Viral vector delivery of the PGRN gene was an effective means of elevating PGRN expression in nigrostriatal neurons. When PGRN expression was elevated in the SNC, nigrostriatal neurons were protected from MPTP toxicity in mice, along with a preservation of striatal dopamine content and turnover. Further, protection of nigrostriatal neurons by PGRN gene therapy was accompanied by reductions in markers of MPTP-induced inflammation and apoptosis as well as a complete preservation of locomotor function. We conclude that PGRN gene therapy may have beneficial effects in the treatment of PD.

  2. Enhancing gene delivery of adeno-associated viruses by cell-permeable peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yarong; Kim, Young Joo; Ji, Man; Fang, Jinxu; Siriwon, Natnaree; Zhang, Li I; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is considered a promising gene delivery vector and has been extensively applied in several disease models; however, inefficient transduction in various cells and tissues has limited its widespread application in many areas of gene therapy. In this study, we have developed a general, but efficient, strategy to enhance viral transduction, both in vitro and in vivo, by incubating viral particles with cell-permeable peptides (CPPs). We show that CPPs increase internalization of viral particles into cells by facilitating both energy-independent and energy-dependent endocytosis. Moreover, CPPs can significantly enhance the endosomal escape process of viral particles, thus enhancing viral transduction to those cells that have exhibited very low permissiveness to AAV2 infection as a result of impaired intracellular viral processing. We also demonstrated that this approach could be applicable to other AAV serotypes. Thus, the membrane-penetrating ability of CPPs enables us to generate an efficient method for enhanced gene delivery of AAV vectors, potentially facilitating its applicability to human gene therapy. PMID:26015948

  3. Structure and function studies of cationic lipid non-viral gene delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Nelle Lynn

    Gene and drug delivery systems incorporating lipids mimic the biological environment and thus offer many advantages. In order to design successful gene or drug delivery vehicles based on lipid molecules an understanding of the affects of biopolymers on lipid membranes is necessary. We have examined the structures and interactions involved in two systems based on model biomembrane/biopolymer mixtures that are relevant for gene and drug delivery research. Liposomes incorporating PEG-lipids have shown great promise as drug carriers since they have proven to increase blood circulation times by evading the immune system. Previously, it was found that the addition of single-end-anchored (SEA)-PEG-surfactants to fluid lamellar membrane systems induces a novel hydrogel. As an extension of this work, we examine the affects of adding double-end-anchored (DEA)-PEG-surfactants to fluid membrane systems. The DEA-PEG-surfactants can adopt either a looping or bridging configuration which could deeply alter the microstructure of lamellar phases. We show that the DEA-PEG-surfactants induce gelation of fluid Lalpha phases in a way similar to that previously reported for SEA-PEG-surfactants. We also show, via x-ray diffraction, two striking differences between the SEA-and DEA-PEG-surfactant systems which demonstrate the existence of a large concentration of bridging polymers in the DEA system. The use of cationic liposomes (formed by mixtures of cationic and neutral lipids) as carriers of DNA for delivery in cells is a promising alternative to viral carriers for gene therapy. Using x-ray diffraction and biological assays, we show key parameters for optimizing gene transfer with these systems that are mediated by properties of the lipid. We have found cationic liposomes complexed with supercoiled plasmid DNA in solution self-assemble into a lamellar or an inverted hexagonal structure depending on lipid composition. Transfection efficiencies, determined by X-Gal and Luciferase assays

  4. Polydioxanone-based bio-materials for tissue engineering and drug/gene delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Goonoo, Nowsheen; Jeetah, Roubeena; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2015-11-01

    Since the commercialization of polydioxanone (PDX) as a biodegradable monofilament suture by Ethicon in 1981, the polymer has received only limited interest until recently. The limitations of polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) coupled with the growing need for materials with enhanced features and the advent of new fabrication techniques such as electrospinning have revived interest for PDX in medical devices, tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Electrospun PDX mats show comparable mechanical properties as the major structural components of native vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) i.e. collagen and elastin. In addition, PDX's unique shape memory property provides rebound and kink resistance when fabricated into vascular conduits. The synthesis of methyl dioxanone (MeDX) monomer and copolymers of dioxanone (DX) and MeDX have opened up new perspectives for poly(ester-ether)s, enabling the design of the next generation of tissue engineering scaffolds for application in regenerating such tissues as arteries, peripheral nerve and bone. Tailoring of polymer properties and their formulation as nanoparticles, nanomicelles or nanofibers have brought along important developments in the area of controlled drug or gene delivery. This paper reviews the synthesis of PDX and its copolymers and provides for the first time an exhaustive account of its applications in the (bio)medical field with focus on tissue engineering and drug/gene delivery.

  5. Multi-layered nanoparticles for combination gene and drug delivery to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ediriwickrema, Asiri; Zhou, Jiangbing; Deng, Yang; Saltzman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance and toxicity are major obstacles in cancer chemotherapy. Combination therapies can overcome resistance, and synergies can minimize dosing. Polymer nanocarriers are interesting vehicles for cancer therapeutics for their delivery and tumor targeting abilities. We synthesized a multilayered polymer nanoparticle (MLNP), comprising of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) with surface polyethyleneimine and functional peptides, for targeted drug and gene delivery. We confirmed the particle’s ability to inhibit tumor growth through synergistic action of the drug and gene product. MLNPs achieved transfection levels similar to lipofectamine, while maintaining minimal cytotoxicity. The particles delivered camptothecin (CPT), and plasmid encoding TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (pTRAIL) (CT MLNPs), and synergistically inhibited growth of multiple cancer cells in vitro. The synergy of co-delivering CPT and pTRAIL via CT MLNPs was confirmed using the Chou-Talalay method: the combination index (CI) values at 50% inhibition ranged between 0.31–0.53 for all cell lines. Further, co-delivery with MLNPs resulted in a 3.1–15 fold reduction in CPT and 4.7–8.0 fold reduction in pTRAIL dosing. CT MLNPs obtained significant HCT116 growth inhibition in vivo compared to monotherapy. These results support our hypothesis that MLNPs can deliver both small molecules and genetic agents towards synergistically inhibiting tumor growth. PMID:25112935

  6. Identifying Intracellular pDNA Losses From a Model of Nonviral Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Wysocki, Beata; Wysocki, Tadeusz; Pannier, Angela

    2015-01-23

    Nonviral gene delivery systems are a type of nano-communication system that transmit plasmid packets (i.e. pDNA packets) that are programmed at the nanoscale to biological systems at the microscopic cellular level. This engineered nano-communication system suffers large pDNA losses during transmission of the genetically encoded information, preventing its use in biotechnological and medical applications. The pDNA losses largely remain uncharacterized, and the ramifications of reducing pDNA loss from newly designed gene delivery systems remain difficult to predict. Here, the pDNA losses during primary and secondary transmission chains were identified utilizing a MATLAB model employing queuing theory simulating delivery of pEGFPLuc transgene to HeLa cells carried by Lipofectamine 2000 nonviral DNA carrier. Minimizing pDNA loss during endosomal escape of the primary transmission process results in increased number of pDNA in the nucleus with increased transfection, but with increased probability of cell death. The number of pDNA copies in the nucleus and the amount of time the pDNAs are in the nucleus directly correlates to improved transfection efficiency. During secondary transmission, pDNAs are degraded during distribution to daughter cells. Reducing pDNA losses improves transfection, but a balance in quantity of nuclear pDNA, mitosis, and toxicity must be considered in order to achieve therapeutically relevant transfection levels.

  7. Synthetic vectors for gene delivery: An overview of their evolution depending on routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Belmadi, Nawal; Midoux, Patrick; Loyer, Pascal; Passirani, Catherine; Pichon, Chantal; Le Gall, Tony; Jaffres, Paul-Alain; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan

    2015-09-01

    Nucleic acid delivery constitutes an emerging therapeutic strategy to cure various human pathologies. This therapy consists of introducing genetic material into the whole body or isolated cells to correct a cellular abnormality or disfunction. As with any drug, the main objective of nucleic acid delivery is to establish optimal balance between efficacy and tolerance. The methods of administration and the vectors used are selected depending on whether the goal of treatment is the production of an active protein; the replacement of a missing or inactive gene; or the combat of acquired diseases, such as cancer or AIDS. In that sense, synthetic vectors represent a valuable solution because they are well characterized, their structure can be fine tuned, and their potential toxicity can be reduced, since toxicity depends on the composition of the formulations. Here we review various synthetic vectors for gene delivery and address the question of their biodistribution as a function of the route of administration. We highlight the modifications to vectors structure and formulations necessary to overcome the major hurdles limiting the effectiveness of nucleic acid therapies.

  8. Enhancement of gene delivery using novel homodimeric tat peptide formed by disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Doh, Kyung-Oh

    2011-08-01

    Cationic liposomes have been actively used as gene delivery vehicle because of their minimal toxicity, but their relatively low efficiency of gene delivery is the major disadvantage of these vectors. Recently, cysteine residue incorporation to HIV-1 Tat peptide increased liposomemediated transfection compared with unmodified Tat peptide. Therefore, we designed a novel modified Tat peptide having a homodimeric (Tat-CTHD, Tat-NTHD) and closed structure (cyclic Tat) simply by using the disulfide bond between cysteines to develop a more efficient and safe nonviral gene delivery system. The mixing of Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD with DNA before mixing with lipofectamine increased the transfection efficiency compared with unmodified Tat peptide and lipofectamine only in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and rat vascular smooth muscle cells. However, cyclic Tat did not show any improvement in the transfection efficiency. In the gel retardation assay, Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD showed more strong binding with DNA than unmodified Tat and cyclic Tat peptide. This enhancement was only shown when Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD were mixed with DNA before mixing with lipofectamine. The effects of Tat- CTHD and Tat-NTHD were also valid in the experiment using DOTAP and DMRIE instead of lipofectamine. We could not find any significant cytotoxicity in the working concentration and more usage of these peptides. In conclusion, we have designed a novel transfection-enhancing peptide by easy homodimerization of Tat peptide, and the simple mix of these novel peptides with DNA increased the gene transfer of cationic lipids more efficiently with no additional cytotoxicity.

  9. Optimization of Brush-like Cationic Copolymers for Non-viral Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Pahang, JoshuelA; Pun, Suzie H.

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is one of the most broadly used polycations for gene delivery due to its high transfection efficiency and commercial availability but materials are cytotoxic and often polydisperse. The goal of current work is to develop an alternative family of polycations based on controlled living radical polymerization (CLRP) and to optimize the polymer structure for efficient gene delivery. In this study, well-defined poly(glycidyl methacrylate)(P(GMA)) homopolymers were synthesized using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization followed by decoration using three different types of oligoamines, i.e., tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), pentaethylenehexamine (PEHA), and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN), respectively, to generate various P(GMA-oligoamine) homopolycations. The effect of P(GMA) backbone length and structure of oligoamine on gene transfer efficiency was then determined. The optimal polymer, P(GMA-TEPA)50, provided comparable transfection efficiency but lower cytotoxicity than PEI. P(GMA-TEPA)50 was then used as the cationic block in di-block copolymers containing hydrophilic N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) and oligo(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA). Polyplexes of block copolymers were stable against aggregation in physiological salt condition and in Opti-MEM due to the shielding effect of P(HPMA) and P(OEGMA). However, the presence of the HPMA/OEGMA block significantly decreased the transfection efficacy of P(GMA-TEPA)50homopolycation. To compensate for reduced cell uptake caused by the hydrophilic shell of polyplex, the integrin-binding peptide, RGD, was conjugated to the hydrophilic chain end of P(OEGMA)15-b-P(GMA-TEPA)50 copolymer by Michael-type addition reaction. At low polymer to DNA ratios, the RGD-functionalized polymer showed increased gene delivery efficiency to HeLa cells compared to analogous polymers lacking RGD. PMID:23240866

  10. Spermine-modified Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as a gene delivery carrier

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yanni; Hu, Yongpei; Li, Xiufang; Liu, Yu; Li, Mingzhong; Yang, Jicheng; Sheng, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    The development of a novel cationized polymer used as a gene delivery carrier that can conveniently and effectively transfect cells resulting in a stably expressed target gene remains a challenge. Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (ASF) is a cytocompatible and biodegradable natural polymer, and it possesses Arg–Gly–Asp sequences but a negative charge. In order to render ASF amenable to packaging plasmid DNA (pDNA), spermine was used to modify ASF to synthesize cationized ASF (CASF), which was used as a gene delivery carrier. CASF was characterized using trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid assay, the zeta potential determination, and a Fourier transform infrared analysis, and the results of these characterizations indicated that the –NH2 in spermine effectively reacts with the –COOH in the side chains of ASF. Spermine grafted to the side chains of ASF resulted in the conversion of the negative charge of ASF to a positive charge. CASF packaged pDNA and formed CASF/pDNA complexes, which exhibited spherical morphology with average particle sizes of 215–281 nm and zeta potential of approximately +3.0 mV to +3.2 mV. The results of the MTT assay, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and flow cytometry analysis in a human endothelial cell line revealed that CASF/pDNA complexes exhibited lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency compared to the pDNA complexes of polyethyleneimine. These results indicate that our synthesized CASF, a cationized polymer, is a potential gene delivery carrier with the advantages of biodegradability and low cytotoxicity. PMID:27042056

  11. Cholesterol-Peptide Hybrids to Form Liposome-Like Vesicles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiong; Cao, Bin; Wu, Haiyan; Cheng, Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, four amphiphilic cholesterol-peptide conjugates (Ch-R5H5, Ch-R3H3, Ch-R5 and Ch-R5) were designed and synthesized, and their properties in gene delivery were evaluated in vitro with an aim of developing more efficient gene delivery carriers. These amphiphilic cholesterol-peptide conjugates are composed of hydrophobic cholesterol and positively charged peptides. They were able to self-assemble into micelles at low concentrations and their critical micelle concentrations in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) are ≤85 µg/mL. Amphiphilic cholesterol-peptide conjugates condensed DNA more efficiently than a hydrophilic cationic oligoarginine (R10) peptide with no hydrophobic segment. Their transfection efficiencies were at least two orders of magnitude greater than that of R10 peptide in HEK-293 cells. Moreover, the introduction of histidine residues in cholesterol-peptide conjugates led to higher gene expression efficiency compared with cholesterol-peptides without histidine (Ch-R5 and Ch-R3), and the luciferase expression level was comparable or even higher than that induced by PEI at its optimal N/P ratio. In particular, Ch-R5H5 condensed DNA into smaller nanoparticles than Ch-R3H3 at higher N/P ratios, and the minimum size of Ch-R5H5/DNA complexes was 180 nm with zeta potential of 23 mV, achieved at the N/P ratio of 30. This liposome-like vesicle may be a promising gene delivery carrier for intravenous therapy. PMID:23382899

  12. Electrotriggered, spatioselective, quantitative gene delivery into a single cell nucleus by Au nanowire nanoinjector.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Min; Kang, Mijeong; Kang, Taejoon; Kim, Dong Min; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Bongsoo

    2013-06-12

    Delivery of bioactive materials into a cell is highly important in the study of cell biology and medical treatments. Ideal nanoinjectors should be able to deliver biomaterials with high spatial resolution while causing minimum cell damage. We developed a Au nanowire (NW) nanoinjector that has the thinnest diameter (100–150 nm) among the DNA delivering devices as well as optimum mechanical properties, minimizing cell damage. Well-defined (111) single-crystalline Au surface and high electric conductivity of a Au NW nanoinjector allow precisely timed and efficient electrochemical release of DNA molecules attached on a Au NW surface. Both linear DNA and plasmid DNA were delivered separately and showed successful expression. The Au NW nanoinjector would find important biomedical applications in the fields such as gene therapy, DNA vaccination, targeted drug delivery, and probe/control of cell signaling events.

  13. Silk-based nanocomplexes with tumor-homing peptides for tumor-specific gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Mieszawska-Czajkowska, Aneta J; Kvenvold, Laura A; Kaplan, David L

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale complexes of recombinant silk molecules containing THPs with DNA are designed as less cytotoxic and highly target-specific gene carriers. Genetically engineered silk proteins containing poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with pDNA and the THP to bind to specific tumorigenic cells for target-specific pDNA delivery are prepared, followed by in vitro transfection into MDA-MB-435 melanoma cells, highly metastatic human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cells, and non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. The silk/poly(L-lysine) block copolymer containing Lyp1 (ML-Lyp1) shows significant differences from silk/poly(L-lysine) block copolymer containing F3 (ML-F3) in cytotoxicity to MCF10A cells. ML-F3 is the most promising candidate for target delivery into tumorigenic cells.

  14. Effect of adenoviral delivery of prodynorphin gene on experimental inflammatory pain induced by formalin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xionggang; Wang, Tingting; Lin, Caizhu; Chen, Baihong

    2014-01-01

    Circumstantial evidences suggest that dynorphins and their common precursor prodynorphin (PDYN) are involved in antinociception and neuroendocrine signaling. DREAM knockout mice had increased levels of PDYN and dynorphin expression, and reduced sensitivity to painful stimuli. However, some data support the notion that the up-regulation of spinal dynorphin expression is a common critical feature in neuropathic pain. It is not clear whether the production of dynorphin A can be increased when more PDYN is present. In this study we investigated the changes in pain behaviors, spinal PDYN mRNA expression and dynorphin A production on formalin-induced pain in rats receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN. Our results showed that the adenoviral transfer of PDYN gene was sufficient to reduce pain behaviors resulting from formalin injection, and the antinociceptive effect after receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN was mediated at the level of the spinal cord via KOR. PMID:25663984

  15. Comparison of different cationized proteins as biomaterials for nanoparticle-based ocular gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Giovanni K; Párraga, Jenny E; Seijo, Begoña; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Cationized polymers have been proposed as transfection agents for gene therapy. The present work aims to improve the understanding of the potential use of different cationized proteins (atelocollagen, albumin and gelatin) as nanoparticle components and to investigate the possibility of modulating the physicochemical properties of the resulting nanoparticle carriers by selecting specific protein characteristics in an attempt to improve current ocular gene-delivery approaches. The toxicity profiles, as well as internalization and transfection efficiency, of the developed nanoparticles can be modulated by modifying the molecular weight of the selected protein and the amine used for cationization. The most promising systems are nanoparticles based on intermediate molecular weight gelatin cationized with the endogenous amine spermine, which exhibit an adequate toxicological profile, as well as effective association and protection of pDNA or siRNA molecules, thereby resulting in higher transfection efficiency and gene silencing than the other studied formulations.

  16. Real-Time Imaging of Gene Delivery and Expression with DNA Nanoparticle Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenchao; Ziady, Assem G.

    The construction of safe, efficient, and modifiable synthetic DNA nanoparticles is an emerging technology that has achieved important milestones of success in the past 5 years. Advances in chemical conjugation, purification, and controlled synthesis have allowed researchers to produce uniform and stable particles, whose physical characteristics can be well characterized and monitored. As a result of these improvements, DNA nanoparticles have now been cleared for clinical testing, and show good potential for human gene therapy. A very important recent development in the study of DNA nanoparticles is the use of small-animal imaging. Real-time imaging has become a valuable technique for tracking particle biodistribution and gene transfer efficacy. In this chapter, we discuss how bioluminescent, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used separately or in concert to study particle delivery, localization, and magnitude of gene expression in vivo.

  17. Chitosan nanoparticles as a potential nonviral gene delivery for HPV-16 E7 into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tabarraei, Alijan; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Dinarvand, Meshkat; Kelishadi, Mishar; Ghaemi, Amir; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) were prepared as a carrier for Human papillomavirus type 16 HPV-16) E7 gene and their gene transfection ability were evaluated in vitro. The plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) was used as a reporter gene. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated full binding of CS NPs with the pDNA. The transfection of CS-pEGFP NPs was efficient in CHO cells and the expression of green fluorescent proteins was well observed. The expression of E7 proteins was confirmed under SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis. As a conclusion CS NPs may serve as an effective nonviral carrier for delivery of nucleotides into eukaryotic cells.

  18. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  19. Efficacious redox-responsive gene delivery in serum by ferrocenylated monomeric and dimeric cationic cholesterols.

    PubMed

    Vulugundam, Gururaja; Kumar, Krishan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2015-04-14

    Herein, we present the design and synthesis of new redox-active monomeric and dimeric (gemini) cationic lipids based on ferrocenylated cholesterol derivatives for gene delivery. The cationic cholesterols are shown to be transfection efficient after being formulated with the neutral helper lipid DOPE in the presence of serum (FBS). The redox activity of the resulting co-liposomes and their lipoplexes could be regulated using the alkanyl ferrocene moiety attached to the ammonium head groups of the cationic cholesterols. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements were performed to characterize the co-liposomal aggregates and their complexes with pDNA. The transfection efficiency of lipoplexes could be tuned by changing the oxidation state of the ferrocene moiety. The gene transfection capability was assayed in terms of green fluorescence protein (GFP) expression using pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA in three cell lines of different origins, namely Caco-2, HEK293T and HeLa, in the presence of serum. The vesicles possessing ferrocene in the reduced state induced an efficient transfection, even better than a commercial reagent Lipofectamine 2000 (Lipo 2000) as evidenced by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. All the co-liposomes containing the oxidized ferrocene displayed diminished levels of gene expression. Gene transfection events from the oxidized co-liposomes were further potentiated by introducing ascorbic acid (AA) as a reducing agent during lipoplex incubation with cells, leading to the resumption of transfection activity. Assessment of transfection capability of both reduced and oxidized co-liposomes was also undertaken following cellular internalization of labelled pDNA using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Overall, we demonstrate here controlled gene transfection activities using redox-driven, transfection efficient cationic monomeric and dimeric cholesterol lipids. Such systems could be used in gene

  20. Novel hyaluronic acid-chitosan nanoparticles as non-viral gene delivery vectors targeting osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua-Ding; Zhao, Hui-Qing; Wang, Kun; Lv, Lu-Lu

    2011-11-28

    Gene therapy is a promising new treatment strategy for common joint-disorders such as osteoarthritis. The development of safe, effective, targeted non-viral gene carriers is important for the clinical success of gene therapy. The present work describes the use of hybrid hyaluronic acid (HA)/chitosan (CS) nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene delivery vectors capable of transferring exogenous genes into primary chondrocytes for the treatment of joint diseases. HA/CS plasmid-DNA nanoparticles were synthesized through the complex coacervation of the cationic polymers with pEGFP. Particle size and zeta potential were related to the weight ratio of CS to HA, where increases in nanoparticle size and decreases in surface charge were observed as HA content increased. The particle size and the zeta potential varied according to pH. Transfection of primary chondrocytes was performed under different conditions to examine variations in the pH of the transfection medium, different N/P ratios, different plasmid concentrations, and different molecular weights of chitosan. Transfection efficiency was maximized for a medium pH of approximately 6.8, an N/P ratio of 5, plasmid concentration of 4 μg/ml, and a chitosan molecular weight of 50 kDa. The transfection efficiency of HA/CS-plasmid nanoparticles was significantly higher than that of CS-plasmid nanoparticles under the same conditions. The average viability of cells transfected with HA/CS-plasmid nanoparticles was over 90%. These results suggest that HA/CS-plasmid nanoparticles could be an effective non-viral vector suitable for gene delivery to chondrocytes.

  1. A novel synthetic peptide vector system for optimal gene delivery to bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Haitao, Pan; Qixin, Zheng; Xiaodong, Guo

    2007-03-01

    A 23-amino acid, bifunctional, integrin-targeted synthetic peptide was evaluated for ex vivo gene delivery to rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The peptide (K)(16)GRGDSPC consists of an amino terminal domain of 16 lysines for electrostatic binding of DNA, and a 7-amino acid integrin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal. PcDNA3-EGFP plasmids were transfected into BMSCs by (K)(16)GRGDSPC and the positive cells gave out a bright green fluorescence. High levels of gene delivery of pcDNA3-TGF-beta1 plasmids were obtained with 2 to 4 microg/ml DNA concentration, with (K)(16)GRGDSPC at an optimal peptide: DNA w/w ratio of 3:1, with a required exposure time of more than 4 h but shorter than 24 h for BMSC exposure to the peptide/DNA complexes with completely absent serum in the initial stage; with 100 microM chloroquine and at least 8 h exposure for BMSC exposure to chloroquine; with a fusogenic peptide at an optimal (K)(16)GRGDSPC/DNA/fusogenic peptide w/w ratio of 3:1:5; and with Lipofectamine 2000 at an optimal (K)(16)GRGDSPC/DNA/Lipofectamine 2000 w/w ratio of 3:1:2 at a constant DNA concentration of 2 microg/ml. Chloroquine, the fusogenic peptide and Lipofectamine 2000 all significantly promoted gene delivery, but chloroquine was more effective than the fusogenic peptide and had obvious synergistic effects with Lipofectamine 2000. Under optimal conditions, TGF-beta1 gene was transfected into BMSCs without observable toxicity, and the stable expression was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The stable transgenic cells showed obvious bands. This novel synthetic peptide, providing a new way for the use of polylysine and RGD motif in DNA vector system, is potentially well suited to ex vivo gene delivery to BMSCs for experimental and clinical applications in the field of bone tissue engineering.

  2. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hayase, Motoya; Monte, Federica del; Kawase, Yoshiaki; MacNeill, Briain D.; McGregor, Jennifer; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Hoshino, Kozo; Tsuji, Tsuyoshi; De Grand, Alec M.; Gwathmey, Judith K.; Frangioni, John V.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2005-01-01

    Hayase, Motoya, Federica del Monte, Yoshiaki Kawase, Brian D. MacNeill, Jennifer McGregor, Ryuichi Yoneyama, Kozo Hoshino, Tsuyoshi Tsuji, Alec M. De Grand, Judith K. Gwathmey, John V. Frangioni, and Roger J. Hajjar. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 288: H2995–H3000, 2005; doi:10.1152/ajpheart.00703.2004.—The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous antegrade myocardial gene transfer (PAMGT). A consistent and safe technique for in vivo gene transfer is required for clinical application of myocardial gene therapy. PAMGT with concomitant coronary venous blockade was performed in 12 swine. The myocardium was preconditioned with 1 min of occlusion of the left anterior descending and left circumflex arteries. The anterior interventricular vein was occluded during left anterior descending artery delivery, and the great cardiac vein at the entrance of the middle cardiac vein was occluded during left circumflex artery delivery. With arterial and venous balloons inflated (3 min) and after adenosine (25 μg) injection, PAMGT was performed by antegrade injection of an adenoviral solution (1 ml of 1011 plaque-forming units in each coronary artery) carrying β-galactosidase or saline through the center lumen of the angioplasty balloon. In one set of animals, PAMGT was performed with selective coronary vein blockade (n = 9); in another set of animals, PAMGT was performed without coronary vein blockade (n = 5). At 1 wk after gene delivery, the animals were killed. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis was performed in the left and right ventricular walls. PAMGT was successfully performed in all animals with and without concomitant occlusion of the coronary veins. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis showed that PAMGT with coronary blockade was superior to PAMGT without coronary blockade. β-Galactosidase activity increased significantly in the

  3. Delivery of human NKG2D-IL-15 fusion gene by chitosan nanoparticles to enhance antitumor immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Chen; Jie, Leng; Yongqi, Wang; Weiming, Xiao; Juqun, Xi; Yanbing, Ding; Li, Qian; Xingyuan, Pan; Mingchun, Ji; Weijuan, Gong

    2015-07-31

    Nanoparticles are becoming promising carriers for gene delivery because of their high capacity in gene loading and low cell cytotoxicity. In this study, a chitosan-based nanoparticle encapsulated within a recombinant pcDNA3.1-dsNKG2D-IL-15 plasmid was generated. The fused dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene fragment consisted of double extracellular domains of NKG2D with IL-15 gene at downstream. The average diameter of the gene nanoparticles ranged from 200 nm to 400 nm, with mean zeta potential value of 53.8 ± 6.56 mV. The nanoparticles which were loaded with the dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene were uptaken by tumor cells with low cytotoxicity. Tumor cells pre-transfected by gene nanopartilces stimulated NK and T cells in vitro. Intramuscular injection of gene nanoparticles suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice through activation of NK and CD8{sup +} T cells. Thus, chitosan-based nanoparticle delivery of dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene vaccine can be potentially used for tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Generation of a nanoparticle for delivery of dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene. • Characterization of the gene nanoparticle. • Antitumor activity mediated by the gene nanoparticle.

  4. Effects of hydrophobic and hydrophilic modifications on gene delivery of amphiphilic chitosan based nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingqing; He, Chunbai; Tang, Cui; Yin, Chunhua

    2011-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships between hydrophobic and hydrophilic modification on chitosan and resultant physicochemical properties along with performances in dealing with critical gene delivery barriers were investigated through amphiphilic linoleic acid(LA) and poly (β-malic acid) (PMLA) double grafted chitosan (LMC)/plasmid DNA (pDNA) nanocomplexes. LMC polymers with various LA and PMLA substitution degrees were synthesized and their hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity was characterized. Compared to chitosan, LMC nanoparticles retained the pDNA binding ability at pH 5.5 when they formed nanocomplexes with pDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) and the resultant complexes showed diameters below 300 nm. Hydrophobic LA and hydrophilic PMLA substitution contributed to suppressed non-specific adsorption, reduced interactions inside LMC/pDNA nanocomplexes, and enhanced pDNA dissociation. However, enzymatic degradation resistance, cell adsorption, and cellular uptake through clathrin-mediated pathway were promoted by hydrophobic LA grafting while being inhibited by hydrophilic PMLA substitution. In vitro transfection assay suggested the optimal LMC/pEGFP nanocomplexes mediated an 8.0-fold improved transfection compared to chitosan/pEGFP nanocomplexes. The 4.2-fold and 2.2-fold higher intramuscular gene expression in mice compared to chitosan/pEGFP and polyethyleneimine (PEI)/pEGFP nanocomplexes further demonstrated the superiority of LMC/pDNA nanocomplexes. Therefore, amphiphilic chitosan derivates with appropriate combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic modification would be promising gene delivery nanocarriers.

  5. Development of TMTP-1 targeted designer biopolymers for gene delivery to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McBride, John W; Massey, Ashley S; McCaffrey, J; McCrudden, Cian M; Coulter, Jonathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; Robson, Tracy; McCarthy, Helen O

    2016-03-16

    Designer biopolymers (DBPs) represent state of the art genetically engineered biomacromolecules designed to condense plasmid DNA, and overcome intra- and extra- cellular barriers to gene delivery. Three DBPs were synthesized, each with the tumor molecular targeting peptide-1 (TMTP-1) motif to specifically target metastases. Each DBP was complexed with a pEGFP-N1 reporter plasmid to permit physiochemical and biological assay analysis. Results indicated that two of the biopolymers (RMHT and RM3GT) effectively condensed pEGFP-N1 into cationic nanoparticles <100 nm and were capable of transfecting PC-3 metastatic prostate cancer cells. Conversely the anionic RMGT DBP nanoparticles could not transfect PC-3 cells. RMHT and RM3GT nanoparticles were stable in the presence of serum and protected the cargo from degradation. Additionally it was concluded that cell viability could recover post-transfection with these DBPs, which were less toxic than the commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine(®) 2000. With both DBPs, a higher transfection efficacy was observed in PC-3 cells than in the moderately metastatic, DU145, and normal, PNT2-C2, cell lines. Blocking of the TMTP-1 receptors inhibited gene transfer indicating internalization via this receptor. In conclusion RMHT and RM3GT are fully functional DBPs that address major obstacles to gene delivery and target metastatic cells expressing the TMTP-1 receptor.

  6. Efficient gene delivery with osmotically active and hyperbranched poly(ester amine)s.

    PubMed

    Arote, Rohidas B; Lee, Eun-Sun; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, You-Kyoung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Myung-Haing; Cho, Chong-Su

    2009-12-01

    Degradable and hyperbranched poly (ester amine)s (PEAs) were successfully synthesized by Michael addition reaction between hydrophilic glycerol triacrylate (GTA) and low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) and evaluated as nonviral gene carriers. PEAs effectively condensed DNA with particle sizes below 200 nm and suitable surface charges (15-45 mV), suitable for intracellular delivery. PEAs degraded in a controlled fashion showing half-lives of more than 12 days and were essentially nontoxic in three different cell lines. Elevated transfection levels by luciferase assay revealed the superiority of PEAs over PEI 25K and Lipofectamine. PEAs synthesized using 1:4 mol ratio of GTA to PEI [GTA/PEI-1.2(1:4)] showed highest transfection efficiency in HepG2 cells. PEAs showed significant gene expression in vitro as well as in vivo through aerosol administration. Reduction in packed cell volume (PCV) of cells when treated with polyplexes supported the hyperosmotic effect of PEAs. Effect of bafilomycin A1 on transfection efficiency of PEAs on 293T cells indicated its endosomal buffering capacity. High transfection efficiency was attributed to the synergism from hyperosmotic glycerol backbone in the PEAs and endosomal buffering capacity of PEI amine groups. Therefore, this convergence of osmotically active biodegradable PEAs suggests their potential as a safe and efficient gene delivery vector.

  7. Melittin-grafted HPMA-Oligolysine Based Copolymers for Improved Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schellinger, Joan G.; Pahang, Joshuel A.; Johnson, Russell N.; Chu, David S.H.; Sellers, Drew L.; Maris, Don O.; Convertine, Anthony J.; Stayton, Patrick S.; Horner, Philip J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery systems capable of transfecting cells in the brain are critical in realizing the potential impact of nucleic acid therapeutics for diseases of the central nervous system. In this study, the membrane-lytic peptide melittin was incorporated into block copolymers synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The first block, designed for melittin conjugation, was composed of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) and pyridyl disulfide methacrylamide (PDSMA) and the second block, designed for DNA binding, was composed of oligo-L-lysine (K10) and HPMA. Melittin modified with cysteine at the C-terminus was conjugated to the polymers through the pyridyl disulfide pendant groups via disulfide exchange. The resulting pHgMelbHK10 copolymers are more membrane-lytic than melittin-free control polymers, and efficiently condensed plasmid DNA into salt-stable particles (~ 100–200 nm). The melittin-modified polymers transfected both HeLa and neuron-like PC-12 cells more efficiently than melittin-free polymers although toxicity associated with the melittin peptide was observed. Optimized formulations containing the luciferase reporter gene were delivered to mouse brain by intraventricular brain injections. Melittin-containing polyplexes produced about 35-fold higher luciferase activity in the brain compared to polyplexes without melittin. Thus, the melittin-containing block copolymers described in this work are promising materials for gene delivery to the brain. PMID:23261217

  8. Close-field electroporation gene delivery using the cochlear implant electrode array enhances the bionic ear.

    PubMed

    Pinyon, Jeremy L; Tadros, Sherif F; Froud, Kristina E; Y Wong, Ann C; Tompson, Isabella T; Crawford, Edward N; Ko, Myungseo; Morris, Renée; Klugmann, Matthias; Housley, Gary D

    2014-04-23

    The cochlear implant is the most successful bionic prosthesis and has transformed the lives of people with profound hearing loss. However, the performance of the "bionic ear" is still largely constrained by the neural interface itself. Current spread inherent to broad monopolar stimulation of the spiral ganglion neuron somata obviates the intrinsic tonotopic mapping of the cochlear nerve. We show in the guinea pig that neurotrophin gene therapy integrated into the cochlear implant improves its performance by stimulating spiral ganglion neurite regeneration. We used the cochlear implant electrode array for novel "close-field" electroporation to transduce mesenchymal cells lining the cochlear perilymphatic canals with a naked complementary DNA gene construct driving expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The focusing of electric fields by particular cochlear implant electrode configurations led to surprisingly efficient gene delivery to adjacent mesenchymal cells. The resulting BDNF expression stimulated regeneration of spiral ganglion neurites, which had atrophied 2 weeks after ototoxic treatment, in a bilateral sensorineural deafness model. In this model, delivery of a control GFP-only vector failed to restore neuron structure, with atrophied neurons indistinguishable from unimplanted cochleae. With BDNF therapy, the regenerated spiral ganglion neurites extended close to the cochlear implant electrodes, with localized ectopic branching. This neural remodeling enabled bipolar stimulation via the cochlear implant array, with low stimulus thresholds and expanded dynamic range of the cochlear nerve, determined via electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This development may broadly improve neural interfaces and extend molecular medicine applications.

  9. A top-down approach for construction of hybrid polymer-virus gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joshua D; Vu, Halong N; Pack, Daniel W

    2010-05-21

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids remains the primary hurdle for human gene therapy. While many researchers have attempted to re-engineer viruses to be suited for gene delivery, others have sought to develop non-viral alternatives. We have developed a complementary approach in which viral and synthetic components are combined to form hybrid nanoparticulate vectors. In particular, we complexed non-infectious retrovirus-like particles lacking a viral envelope protein, from Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-VLP) or human immunodeficiency virus (H-VLP), with poly-L-lysine (PLL) or polyethylenimine (PEI) over a range of polymer/VLP ratios. At appropriate stoichiometry (75-250 microg polymer/10(6) VLP), the polymers replace the function of the viral envelope protein and interact with the target cell membrane, initiate cellular uptake and facilitate escape from endocytic vesicles. The viral particle, once in the cytosol, efficiently completes its normal infection process including integration of viral genes with the host genome as demonstrated by long-term (at least 5 weeks) transgene expression. In addition, hybrid vectors comprising H-VLP were shown to be capable of infecting non-dividing cells.

  10. A novel gene delivery method transduces porcine pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M A; Restrepo, M S; Abu-El-Haija, M; Wallen, T; Buchanan, E; Rokhlina, T; Chen, Y H; McCray, P B; Davidson, B L; Divekar, A; Uc, A

    2014-02-01

    Gene therapy offers the possibility to treat pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene; however, gene transfer to the pancreas is untested in humans. The pancreatic disease phenotype is very similar between humans and pigs with CF; thus, CF pigs create an excellent opportunity to study gene transfer to the pancreas. There are no studies showing efficient transduction of pig pancreas with gene-transfer vectors. Our objective is to develop a safe and efficient method to transduce wild-type (WT) porcine pancreatic ducts that express CFTR. We catheterized the umbilical artery of WT newborn pigs and delivered an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector expressing green-fluorescent protein (AAV9CMV.sceGFP) or vehicle to the celiac artery, the vessel that supplies major branches to the pancreas. This technique resulted in stable and dose-dependent transduction of pancreatic duct epithelial cells that expressed CFTR. Intravenous (IV) injection of AAV9CMV.sceGFP did not transduce the pancreas. Our technique offers an opportunity to deliver the CFTR gene to the pancreas of CF pigs. The celiac artery can be accessed via the umbilical artery in newborns and via the femoral artery at older ages--delivery approaches that can be translated to humans.

  11. A NOVEL GENE DELIVERY METHOD TRANSDUCES PORCINE PANCREATIC DUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle A.; Restrepo, M. Santiago; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Wallen, Tanner; Buchanan, Elizabeth; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Chen, Yong Hong; McCray, Paul B.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Divekar, Abhay; Uc, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy offers the possibility to treat pancreatic disease in Cystic Fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene; however gene transfer to the pancreas is untested in humans. The pancreatic disease phenotype is very similar between humans and pigs with CF, thus CF pigs create an excellent opportunity to study gene transfer to the pancreas. There are no studies showing efficient transduction of pig pancreas with gene transfer vectors. Our objective is to develop a safe and efficient method to transduce wild-type (WT) porcine pancreatic ducts that express CFTR. We catheterized the umbilical artery of WT newborn pigs and delivered an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector expressing green fluorescent protein (AAV9CMV.sceGFP) or vehicle to the celiac artery, the vessel that supplies major branches to the pancreas. This technique resulted in stable and dose-dependent transduction of pancreatic duct epithelial cells that expressed CFTR. Intravenous injection of AAV9CMV.sceGFP did not transduce the pancreas. Our technique offers an opportunity to deliver the CFTR gene to the pancreas of CF pigs. The celiac artery can be accessed via umbilical artery in newborns and via femoral artery at older ages; delivery approaches which can be translated to humans. PMID:24257348

  12. Macrophages in gene therapy: cellular delivery vehicles and in vivo targets.

    PubMed

    Burke, B; Sumner, S; Maitland, N; Lewis, C E

    2002-09-01

    The appearance and activation of macrophages are thought to be rapid events in the development of many pathological lesions, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, and arthritic joints. This has prompted recent attempts to use macrophages as novel cellular vehicles for gene therapy, in which macrophages are genetically modified ex vivo and then reintroduced into the body with the hope that a proportion will then home to the diseased site. Here, we critically review the efficacy of various gene transfer methods (viral, bacterial, protozoan, and various chemical and physical methods) in transfecting macrophages in vitro, and the results obtained when transfected macrophages are used as gene delivery vehicles. Finally, we discuss the use of various viral and nonviral methods to transfer genes to macrophages in vivo. As will be seen, definitive evidence for the use of macrophages as gene transfer vehicles has yet to be provided and awaits detailed trafficking studies in vivo. Moreover, although methods for transfecting macrophages have improved considerably in efficiency in recent years, targeting of gene transfer specifically to macrophages in vivo remains a problem. However, possible solutions to this include placing transgenes under the control of macrophage-specific promoters to limit expression to macrophages or stably transfecting CD34(+) precursors of monocytes/macrophages and then differentiating these cells into monocytes/macrophages ex vivo. The latter approach could conceivably lead to the bone marrow precursor cells of patients with inherited genetic disorders being permanently fortified or even replaced with genetically modified cells.

  13. Translational Advancement of Somatostatin Gene Delivery for Disease Modification and Cognitive Sparing in Intractable Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration;  hippocampus ,  memory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...associated viral vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project...generation in  hippocampus , with a bias toward non­neuronal phenotypes, and somatostatin gene  delivery uniformly suppressed this regardless of therapeutic

  14. Sonochemical preparation of silica nanorods for gene delivery using single-walled carbon nanotubes as templates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung G; Min, Jung Sun; Wi, Rinbok; Kim, Jin Chul; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Silica nanorods were fabricated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) via ultrasound. The diameter of the resulting SWCNT-silica particles ranged from 60 to 70 nm. The morphology of this composite material was investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The individual SWCNTs are uniformly coated with silica and formed a unique nanocomposite material. The important role of ultrasound and the mechanism of silica layer formation on SWCNTs were explained via the hydrolysis of the silica source and the adsorption of the siloxane groups on the SWCNT surfaces under ultrasound irradiation. The amino-functionalized silica nanorods were demonstrated as non-viral vectors for gene delivery.

  15. Hemophilia A gene therapy via intraosseous delivery of factor VIII-lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Carol H

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A (HemA) patients with repeated infusions of factor VIII (FVIII; abbreviated as F8 in constructs) is costly, inconvenient, and incompletely effective. In addition, approximately 25 % of treated patients develop anti-factor VIII immune responses. Gene therapy that can achieve long-term phenotypic correction without the complication of anti-factor VIII antibody formation is highly desired. Lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in stable integration of FVIII gene into the host genome, leading to persistent therapeutic effect. However, ex vivo HSC gene therapy requires pre-conditioning which is highly undesirable for hemophilia patients. The recently developed novel methodology of direct intraosseous (IO) delivery of LVs can efficiently transduce bone marrow cells, generating high levels of transgene expression in HSCs. IO delivery of E-F8-LV utilizing a ubiquitous EF1α promoter generated initially therapeutic levels of FVIII, however, robust anti-FVIII antibody responses ensued neutralized functional FVIII activity in the circulation. In contrast, a single IO delivery of G-FVIII-LV utilizing a megakaryocytic-specific GP1bα promoter achieved platelet-specific FVIII expression, leading to persistent, partial correction of HemA in treated animals. Most interestingly, comparable therapeutic benefit with G-F8-LV was obtained in HemA mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. Platelets is an ideal IO delivery vehicle since FVIII stored in α-granules of platelets is protected from high-titer anti-FVIII antibodies; and that even relatively small numbers of activated platelets that locally excrete FVIII may be sufficient to promote efficient clot formation during bleeding. Additionally, combination of pharmacological agents improved transduction of LVs and persistence of transduced cells and transgene expression. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV can generate long-term stable

  16. Myocardial β2-adrenoceptor gene delivery promotes coordinated cardiac adaptive remodelling and angiogenesis in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rengo, G; Zincarelli, C; Femminella, GD; Liccardo, D; Pagano, G; de Lucia, C; Altobelli, GG; Cimini, V; Ruggiero, D; Perrone-Filardi, P; Gao, E; Ferrara, N; Lymperopoulos, A; Koch, WJ; Leosco, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We investigated whether β2-adrenoceptor overexpression could promote angiogenesis and improve blood perfusion and left ventricular (LV) remodeling of the failing heart. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We explored the angiogenic effects of β2-adrenoceptor overexpression in a rat model of post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF). Cardiac adenoviral-mediated β2-adrenoceptor overexpression was obtained via direct intramyocardial injection 4-weeks post-MI. Adenovirus(Ad)-GFP and saline injected rats served as controls. Furthermore, we extended our observation to β2-adrenoceptor −/− mice undergoing MI. KEY RESULTS Transgenes were robustly expressed in the LV at 2 weeks post-gene therapy, whereas their expression was minimal at 4-weeks post-gene delivery. In HF rats, cardiac β2-adrenoceptor overexpression resulted in enhanced basal and isoprenaline-stimulated cardiac contractility at 2-weeks post-gene delivery. At 4 weeks post-gene transfer, Ad-β2-adrenoceptor HF rats showed improved LV remodeling and cardiac function. Importantly, β2-adrenoceptor overexpression was associated with a markedly increased capillary and arteriolar length density and enhanced in vivo myocardial blood flow and coronary reserve. At the molecular level, cardiac β2-adrenoceptor gene transfer induced the activation of the VEGF/PKB/eNOS pro-angiogenic pathway. In β2-adrenoceptor−/− mice, we found a ∼25% reduction in cardiac capillary density compared with β2-adrenoceptor+/+ mice. The lack of β2-adrenoceptors was associated with a higher mortality rate at 30 days and LV dilatation, and a worse global cardiac contractility compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION β2-Adrenoceptors play an important role in the regulation of the angiogenic response in HF. The activation of VEGF/PKB/eNOS pathway seems to be strongly involved in this mechanism. PMID:22452704

  17. Perspective on the Road toward Gene Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blits, Bas; Petry, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Many therapeutic strategies aimed at relieving symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are currently used for treatment of this disease. With a hallmark of progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, the absence of properly operational dopaminergic circuitry becomes a therapeutic target. Following diagnosis, dopamine replacement can be given in the form of L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). Even though it is recognized as standard of care, this treatment strategy does not prevent the affected neurons from degenerating. Therefore, studies have been performed using gene therapy (GT) to make dopamine (DA) available from within the brain using an artificial DA circuitry. One approach is to administer a GT aimed at delivering the key enzymes for DA synthesis using a lentiviral vector system (Palfi et al., 2014). A similar approach has been investigated with adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP-cyclohydrolase I (Bankiewicz et al., 2000), which are downregulated in PD. Another GT approach to mitigate symptoms of PD used AAV-mediated delivery of GAD-67 (glutamate decarboxylase) (Kaplitt et al., 2007). This approach mimics the inhibitory effect of DA neurons on their targets, in reducing motor abnormalities. Finally, disease modifying strategies have been undertaken using neurotrophic factors such as neurturin (NTN) (Marks et al., 2008; Bartus et al., 2013a) or are ongoing with the closely related Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Those approaches are aiming at rescuing the degenerating neurons. All of the above mentioned strategies have their own merits, but also some disadvantages. So far, none of clinical applied GT studies has resulted in significant clinical benefit, although some clinical studies are ongoing and results are expected over the next few years. PMID:28119578

  18. Multiple immediate-early gene-deficient herpes simplex virus vectors allowing efficient gene delivery to neurons in culture and widespread gene delivery to the central nervous system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lilley, C E; Groutsi, F; Han, Z; Palmer, J A; Anderson, P N; Latchman, D S; Coffin, R S

    2001-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has several potential advantages as a vector for delivering genes to the nervous system. The virus naturally infects and remains latent in neurons and has evolved the ability of highly efficient retrograde transport from the site of infection at the periphery to the site of latency in the spinal ganglia. HSV is a large virus, potentially allowing the insertion of multiple or very large transgenes. Furthermore, HSV does not integrate into the host chromosome, removing any potential for insertional activation or inactivation of cellular genes. However, the development of HSV vectors for the central nervous system that exploit these properties has been problematical. This has mainly been due to either vector toxicity or an inability to maintain transgene expression. Here we report the development of highly disabled versions of HSV-1 deleted for ICP27, ICP4, and ICP34.5/open reading frame P and with an inactivating mutation in VP16. These viruses express only minimal levels of any of the immediate-early genes in noncomplementing cells. Transgene expression is maintained for extended periods with promoter systems containing elements from the HSV latency-associated transcript promoter (J. A. Palmer et al., J. Virol. 74:5604-5618, 2000). Unlike less-disabled viruses, these vectors allow highly effective gene delivery both to neurons in culture and to the central nervous system in vivo. Gene delivery in vivo is further enhanced by the retrograde transport capabilities of HSV. Here the vector is efficiently transported from the site of inoculation to connected sites within the nervous system. This is demonstrated by gene delivery to both the striatum and substantia nigra following striatal inoculation; to the spinal cord, spinal ganglia, and brainstem following injection into the spinal cord; and to retinal ganglion neurons following injection into the superior colliculus and thalamus.

  19. CRISPR genome engineering and viral gene delivery: a case of mutual attraction.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian; Grimm, Dirk

    2015-02-01

    The adaptation of the CRISPR/Cas9 DNA engineering machinery for mammalian cells has revolutionized our approaches to low- or high-throughput genome annotation and paved the way for conceptually novel therapeutic strategies. A large part of the attraction of CRISPR stems from the small size of its two core components--Cas9 and gRNA--and hence its compatibility with virtually any available viral vector delivery system. As a result, over the past two years, four major classes of viral vectors have already been engineered and applied as CRISPR delivery tools--retroviruses, lentiviruses, adenoviruses, and adeno-associated viruses (AAVs). The juxtaposition of these two technologies reflects a case of tremendous mutual attraction and holds unprecedented promises for biology and medicine. Here, we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of this rapidly emerging field, from a comparative description of the principal vector designs, to a synopsis of some of the most exciting applications that were reported to date, including the use of viral CRISPR vectors for genome-wide loss-of-function screens, multiplexed gene editing or disease modeling in animals. Once specificity and safety have been improved further, viral vector-mediated in vitro/in vivo CRISPR delivery and expression promise to radically transform basic and applied biomedical research.

  20. Efficient gene delivery to the cone-enriched pig retina by dual AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Colella, P; Trapani, I; Cesi, G; Sommella, A; Manfredi, A; Puppo, A; Iodice, C; Rossi, S; Simonelli, F; Giunti, M; Bacci, M L; Auricchio, A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors is limited by AAV cargo capacity that prevents their application to the inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), such as Stargardt disease (STGD) or Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B), which are due to mutations in genes larger than 5 kb. Trans-splicing or hybrid dual AAV vectors have been successfully exploited to reconstitute large gene expression in the mouse retina. Here, we tested them in the large cone-enriched pig retina that closely mimics the human retina. We found that dual AAV trans-splicing and hybrid vectors transduce pig photoreceptors, the major cell targets for treatment of IRDs, to levels that were about two- to threefold lower than those obtained with a single AAV vector of normal size. This efficiency is significantly higher than that in mice, and is potentially due to the high levels of dual AAV co-transduction we observe in pigs. We also show that subretinal delivery in pigs of dual AAV trans-splicing and hybrid vectors successfully reconstitute, albeit at variable levels, the expression of the large genes ABCA4 and MYO7A mutated in STGD and USH1B, respectively. Our data support the potential of dual AAV vectors for large gene reconstitution in the cone-enriched pig retina that is a relevant preclinical model.

  1. Targeted Drug Delivery to the Peripheral Nervous System using Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Darren; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gene transfer to target delivery of neurotrophic factors to the primary sensory afferent for treatment of polyneuropathy, or of inhibitory neurotransmitters for relief of chronic pain, offers the possibility of a highly selective targeted release of bioactive molecules within the nervous system. Preclinical studies with non-replicating herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vectors injected into the skin to transduce neurons in the dorsal root ganglion have demonstrated efficacy in reducing-pain related behaviors in animal models of inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and pain caused by cancer, and in preventing progression of sensory neuropathy caused by toxins, chemotherapeutic drugs or resulting from diabetes. Successful completion of the first phase 1 clinical trial of HSV-mediated gene transfer in patients with intractable pain from cancer has set the stage for further clinical trials of this approach. PMID:22565023

  2. Gene delivery techniques for adult stem cell-based regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seog-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Seong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Hui; Wall, Ivan B; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-11-01

    Over the past decade, stem cells have been considered to be a promising resource to cure and regenerate damaged or diseased tissues with research extending from basic studies to clinical application. Furthermore, genetically modified stem cells have the potential to reduce tumorigenic risks and achieve safe tissue formation. Recent advances in genetic modification of stem cells have rendered these cells more accessible and stable. The successful genetic modification of stem cells relies heavily on designing vector systems, either viral or nonviral vectors, which can efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to the cells with minimum toxicity. Currently, viral vectors showing high transfection efficiencies still raise safety issues, whereas safer nonviral vectors exhibit extremely poor transfection in stem cells. Here, we attempt to review and discuss the main factors raising concern in previous reports, and devise strategies to solve the issues in gene delivery systems for successful stem cell-targeting regenerative therapy.

  3. Elastin-like recombinamers with acquired functionalities for gene-delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Piña, Maria J; Alex, Susan M; Arias, Francisco J; Santos, Mercedes; Rodriguez-Cabello, Jose C; Ramesan, Rekha M; Sharma, Chandra P

    2015-10-01

    In this work, well-defined elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs) were studied as a choice to the existing nonviral vectors due to their biocompatibility and ease of scale-up. Functional motifs, namely penetratin and LAEL fusogenic peptides were incorporated into a basic ELR sequence, and imidazole groups were subsequently covalently bound obtaining ELRs with new functionalities. Stable polyplexes composed of plasmid DNA and ELRs were formed. A particle size around 200 nm and a zeta potential up to nearly +24 mV made them suitable for gene delivery purposes. Additionally, viability and transfection assays with C6 rat glioma cell line showed an increase in the cellular uptake and transfection levels for the construction containing the LAEL motif. This study highlights the importance of controlling the polymer functionality using recombinant techniques and establishes the utility of ELRs as biocompatible nonviral systems for gene-therapy applications.

  4. Delivery of cationic polymer-siRNA nanoparticles for gene therapies in neural regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yanran; Liu, Zhonglin; Shuai, Xintao; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Jun; Bi, Wei; Wang, Chuanming; Jing, Xiuna; Liu, Yunyun; Tao, Enxiang

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nogo receptor can inhibit growth of injured axons, thus affecting neural regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The delivery of siRNA is crucial to inhibit NgR expression in NSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-viral vector PEG-PEI condensed siRNA targeting NgR into nanoscale particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEG-PEI/siRNA at N/P = 15 displayed high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEG-PEI has great potential in carrying siRNA to diminish the gene expression in NSCs. -- Abstract: The therapeutic applications of neural stem cells (NSCs) have potential to promote recovery in many obstinate diseases in central nervous system. Regulation of certain gene expressions using siRNA may have significant influence on the fate of NSC. To achieve the optimum gene silencing effect of siRNA, non-viral vector polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine (PEG-PEI) was investigated in the delivery of siRNA to NSCs. The characteristics of PEG-PEI/siRNA polyplexes were detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of nanoparticles on cell viability were measured via CCK-8 assay. In addition, the transfection efficiency was evaluated by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry, and real-time PCR and Western Blot were employed to detect the gene inhibition effect of siRNA delivered by PEG-PEI. The SEM micrographs showed that PEG-PEI could condense siRNA to form diffuse and spherical nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of PEG-PEI/siRNA nanocomplexes (N/P = 15) was significantly lower when compared with that of Lipofectamine 2000/siRNA (P < 0.05). Moreover, the highest transfection efficiency of PEG-PEI/siRNA nanoparticles was obtained at an N/P ratio of 15, which was better than that achieved in the transfection using Lipofectamine 2000 (P < 0.05). Finally, the gene knockdown effect of PEG-PEI/siRNA nanoparticles was verified at the levels of mRNA and protein. These results suggest that

  5. Hybrid polymer-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes for in vitro gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Antonio; Amsharov, Nadja; Guo, Chang; Van den Bossche, Jeroen; Santhosh, Padmanabhan; Karachalios, Theodoros K; Nitodas, Stephanos F; Burghard, Marko; Kostarelos, Kostas; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2010-10-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) consist of carbon atoms arranged in sheets of graphene rolled up into cylindrical shapes. This class of nanomaterials has attracted attention because of their extraordinary properties, such as high electrical and thermal conductivity. In addition, development in CNT functionalization chemistry has led to an enhanced dispersibility in aqueous physiological media which indeed broadens the spectrum for their potential biological applications including gene delivery. The aim of this study is to determine the capability of different cationic polymer-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) (polymer-g-MWNTs) to efficiently complex and transfer plasmid DNA (pCMV-βGal) in vitro without promoting cytotoxicity. Carboxylated MWNT is chemically conjugated to the cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), polyallylamine (PAA), or a mixture of the two polymers. In order to explore the potential of these polymer-g-MWNTs as gene delivery systems, we first study their capacity to complex plasmid DNA (pDNA) using agarose gel electrophoresis. Gel migration studies confirm pDNA binding to polymer-g-MWNT with different affinities, highest for PEI-g-MWNT and PEI/PAA-g-CNT constructs. β-galactosidase expression is assessed in human lung epithelial (A549) cells, and the cytotoxicity is determined by modified LDH assay after 24 h incubation period. Additionally, PEI-g-MWNT and/or PEI/PAA-g-MWNT reveal an improvement in gene expression when compared to the naked pDNA or to the equivalent amounts of PEI polymer alone. Mechanistically, pDNA was delivered by the polymer-g-MWNT constructs via a different pathway compared to those used by polyplexes. In conclusion, polymer-g-MWNTs may be considered in the future as a versatile tool for efficient gene transfer in cancer cells in vitro, provided their toxicological profile is established.

  6. Structural and Functional Consequences of Poly(ethylene glycol) Inclusion on DNA Condensation For Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Millili, Peter G.; Selekman, Joshua A.; Blocker, Kory M.; Johnson, David A.; Naik, Ulhas P.; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2010-01-01

    Polycationic polymers have been used to condense therapeutic DNA into sub-micron particles, offering protection from shear-induced or enzymatic degradation. However, the spontaneous nature of this self-assembly process gives rise to the formation of multimolecular aggregates, resulting in significant polyplex heterogeneity. Additionally, cytotoxicity issues and serum instability have limited the in vivo efficacy of such systems. One way these issues can be addressed is through the inclusion of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). PEG has known steric effects that inhibit polyplex self-aggregation. A variety of PEGylated gene delivery formulations have been previously pursued in an effort to take advantage of this material’s benefits. Due to such interest, our aim was to further explore the consequences of PEG inclusion on the structure and activity of gene delivery vehicle formulations. We explored the complexation of plasmid DNA with varying ratios of a PEGylated tri-lysine peptide (PEG-K3) and 25 kDa polyethylenimine (PEI). Atomic force and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to assess the polyplex size and shape, and revealed that a critical threshold of PEG was necessary to promote the formation of homogeneous polyplexes. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses suggested that the presence of PEG inhibited transfection efficiency as a consequence of changes in intracellular trafficking, and promoted an increased reliance on energy-independent mechanisms of cellular uptake. These studies provide new information on the role of PEG in delivery vehicle design and lay the foundation for future work aimed at elucidating the details of the intracellular transport of PEGylated polyplexes. PMID:20232467

  7. Delivery of interleukin-18 gene to lung cancer cells using cationic emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Suk; Jin, Shun-Ji; Myung, Chang-Seon; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Park, Jeong-Sook

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is known to reduce melanoma lung metastases through various mechanisms. For the delivery of IL-18 gene into the lung, three different cationic emulsions as non-viral vectors were formulated using the same components of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP), and Tween 80 with distinct oils. By using the small particle size of physicochemically stable E3, the complex of E3/plasmid DNA encoding IL-18 (16:2.5, w/w) was transfected into lung cancer cells, and the amount of plasmid DNA transferred and the expression of both mRNA and protein for IL-18 were measured. When compared with Lipofectamine/DNA complexes, an E3/DNA complex was less toxic and induced a comparable cellular level of plasmid DNA and expression levels of both mRNA and protein for IL-18. After injecting E3/DNA complexes into mice, the distribution of plasmid DNA was the highest in the lung and the liver. Especially, the administration of E3/DNA complexes induced a more rapid and prolonged distribution of plasmid DNA encoding IL-18 into the lung than that of Lipofectamine/DNA ones. These data demonstrated that cationic emulsion E3 containing castor oil could be useful for a delivery of IL-18 gene targeting the lung as well as the liver without an additional homing device, implying a potential IL-18 delivery system for the treatment of lung cancer.

  8. Quantitative 3D Tracing of Gene-delivery Viral Vectors in Human Cells and Animal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Li, Chengwen; Neumann, Aaron; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking through a variety of cellular structures and organelles is essential for the interaction between gene-delivery vectors (i.e., adeno-associated virus (AAV) and liposomes) and host cells/tissues. Here, we present a method of computer-assisted quantitative 3D biodistribution microscopy that samples the whole population of fluorescently-labeled vectors and document their trafficking routes. Using AAV as a working model, we first experimentally defined numerical parameters for the singularity of Cy5-labeled particles by combining confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We then developed a robust approach that integrates single-particle fluorescence imaging with 3D deconvolution and isosurface rendering to quantitate viral distribution and trafficking in human cells as well as animal tissues at the single-particle level. Using this quantitative method, we uncovered an as yet uncharacterized rate-limiting step during viral cell entry, while delineating nuclear accumulation of virions during the first 8 hours postinfection. Further, our studies revealed for the first time that following intramuscular injection, AAV spread progressively across muscle tissues through endomysium between myofibers instead of traversing through target cells. Such 3D resolution and quantitative dissection of vector–host interactions at the subcellular level should significantly improve our ability to resolve trafficking mechanisms of gene-delivery particles and facilitate the development of enhanced viral vectors. PMID:22108857

  9. Development and in vitro evaluation of a thiomer-based nanoparticulate gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Thierry; Bravo-Osuna, Irene; Vauthier, Christine; Ponchel, Gilles; Loretz, Brigitta; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Chitosan-thiobutylamidine was developed and evaluated as a novel tool for gene delivery. The conjugate, displaying 299.1+/-11.5 micromol free thiol groups per gram polymer, formed coacervates with pDNA at a mean size of 125 nm and a zeta potential of +9 mV. Thiol groups, being susceptible for oxidation, were immobilised on the polymeric backbone of chitosan in order to introduce the property of extracellular stability and intracellular pDNA release by forming reversible disulfide bonds. The integrity of the new particles was compared to unmodified chitosan under simulated physiological conditions. Within 10h, pDNA was completely released from chitosan-DNA particles while only 12% were released from the thiomer-based particles. At pH 7, the amount of thiol groups significantly (p<0.05) decreased by more than 25% within 6h. In contrast, in a reducing environment as found intracellularly, chitosan-thiobutylamidine-DNA nanoparticles dissociated continuously, liberating approximately 50% of pDNA within 3h. Transfection studies performed in a Caco2 cell culture evinced the highest efficiency for chitosan-thiobutylamidine-DNA nanoparticles in combination with a glycerol shock solution. The combination of improved stability, enhanced pDNA release under reducing conditions, and higher transfection efficiency identifies chitosan-thiobutylamidine as a promising new vector for gene delivery.

  10. Molecular engineering of dendritic polymers and their application as drug and gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Paleos, Constantinos M; Tsiourvas, Dimitris; Sideratou, Zili

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses the development of functional and multifunctional dendrimeric and hyperbranched polymers, collectively called dendritic polymers, with the objective of being applied as drug and gene delivery systems. In particular, using as starting materials known and well-characterized basic dendritic polymers, the review deals with the type of structural modifications to which these dendritic polymers were subjected for the development of drug carriers with low toxicity, high encapsulating capacity, a specificity for certain biological cells, and the ability to be transported through their membranes. Proceeding from functional to multifunctional dendritic polymers, one is able to prepare products that fulfill one or more of these requirements, which an effective drug carrier should exhibit. A common feature of the dendritic polymers is the exhibition of polyvalent interactions, while for multifunctional derivatives, a number of targeting ligands determine specificity, another type of group secures stability in biological milieu and prolonged circulation, while others facilitate their transport through cell membranes. Furthermore, dendritic polymers employed for gene delivery should be or become cationic in the biological environment for the formation of complexes with the negatively charged genetic material.

  11. Polyethylenimine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yangbo; Tang, Zhaomin; Shi, Chunli; Shi, Shuai; Qian, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shaobing

    2012-11-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery. The nanoparticles could provide the magnetic-targeting, and the cationic polymer PEI could condense DNA and avoid in vitro barriers. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, dynamic light scattering measurements, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and atomic force microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to asses DNA binding and perform a DNase I protection assay. The Alamar blue assay was used to evaluate negative effects on the metabolic activity of cells incubated with PEI modified magnetic nanoparticles and their complexes with DNA both in the presence or absence of an external magnetic field. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were also performed to investigate the transfection efficiency of the DNA-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in A549 and B16-F10 tumor cells with (+M) or without (-M) the magnetic field. The in vitro transfection efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles was improved obviously in a permanent magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles show considerable potential as nanocarriers for gene delivery.

  12. Safety and angiogenic effects of systemic gene delivery of a modified erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    de Lucas Cerrillo, Ana; Bond, Wesley S.; Rex, Tonia S.

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is critical for red blood cell production and is also an effective neuroprotective agent. However, it may also contribute to pathological angiogenesis. Here we investigate the angiogenic potential of EPO and a mutant form with attenuated erythropoietic activity, EPO-R76E, on primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMEC) and in the adult retina. Assays of death, proliferation, and tube-formation were performed on HRMECs exposed to EPO, EPO-R76E, or media alone. Postnatal day 9 wild-type mice were injected intramuscularly with adeno-associated virus vectors expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or EpoR76E. At 3 months, levels of EPO-R76E in the eye were quantified, and the health of the retinal vasculature was assessed by fluorescein angiography and isolectin immunolabeling. Immunohistochemistry, histology, and electroretinogram assessments were performed as measures of retinal health. Neither EPO nor EPO-R76E induced proliferation or tube-formation in HRMEC under the conditions used. EPO-R76E decreased HRMEC death in a dose-dependent manner. Long-term systemic gene delivery of EPO-R76E was safe in terms of retinal vasculature, histology, and the electroretinogram in vivo. Our results show that EPO-R76E can block HRMEC death, consistent with its role in erythropoiesis and neuroprotection. In addition, long-term gene delivery of EPO-R76E is safe in the adult retina. PMID:25716531

  13. Mapping the AAV Capsid Host Antibody Response toward the Development of Second Generation Gene Delivery Vectors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion, or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from MAbs, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  14. Nonviral gene-delivery by highly fluorinated gemini bispyridinium surfactant-based DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fisicaro, Emilia; Compari, Carlotta; Bacciottini, Franco; Contardi, Laura; Pongiluppi, Erika; Barbero, Nadia; Viscardi, Guido; Quagliotto, Pierluigi; Donofrio, Gaetano; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Biological and thermodynamic properties of a new homologous series of highly fluorinated bispyridinium cationic gemini surfactants, differing in the length of the spacer bridging the pyridinium polar heads in 1,1' position, are reported for the first time. Interestingly, gene delivery ability is closely associated with the spacer length due to a structural change of the molecule in solution. This conformation change is allowed when the spacer reaches the right length, and it is suggested by the trends of the apparent and partial molar enthalpies vs molality. To assess the compounds' biological activity, they were tested with an agarose gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), MTT proliferation assay and Transient Transfection assays on a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Data from atomic force microscopy (AFM) allow for morphological characterization of DNA nanoparticles. Dilution enthalpies, measured at 298K, enabled the determination of apparent and partial molar enthalpies vs molality. All tested compounds (except that with the longest spacer), at different levels, can deliver the plasmid when co-formulated with 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). The compound with a spacer formed by eight carbon atoms gives rise to a gene delivery ability that is comparable to that of the commercial reagent. The compound with the longest spacer compacts DNA in loosely condensed structures by forming bows, which are not suitable for transfection. Regarding the compounds' hydrogenated counterparts, the tight relationship between the solution thermodynamics data and their biological performance is amazing, making "old" methods the foundation to deeply understanding "new" applications.

  15. A Simple Zn2+ Complex-Based Composite System for Efficient Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhao, Yanjie; Meng, Xianggao; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Li; Liu, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Metal complexes might become a new type of promising gene delivery systems because of their low cytotoxicity, structural diversity, controllable aqua- and lipo-solubility, and appropriate density and distribution of positive charges. In this study, Zn2+ complexes (1–10) formed with a series of ligands contained benzimidazole(bzim)were prepared and characterized. They were observed to have different affinities for DNA, dependent on their numbers of positive charges, bzim groups, and coordination structures around Zn2+. The binding induced DNA to condensate into spherical nanoparticles with ~ 50 nm in diameter. The cell transfection efficiency of the DNA nanoparticles was poor, although they were low toxic. The sequential addition of the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) TAT(48–60) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) resulted in the large DNA condensates (~ 100 nm in diameter) and the increased cellular uptake. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis was found to be a key cellular uptake pathway of the nanoparticles formed with or without TAT(48–60) or/and PEG. The DNA nanoparticles with TAT(48–60) and PEG was found to have the cell transfection efficiency up to 20% of the commercial carrier Lipofect. These results indicated that a simple Zn2+-bzim complex-based composite system can be developed for efficient and low toxic gene delivery through the combination with PEG and CPPs such as TAT. PMID:27433798

  16. Distinct effects of endosomal escape and inhibition of endosomal trafficking on gene delivery via electrotransfection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Chi; Wang, Liangli; Yuan, Fan

    2017-01-01

    A recent theory suggests that endocytosis is involved in uptake and intracellular transport of electrotransfected plasmid DNA (pDNA). The goal of the current study was to understand if approaches used previously to improve endocytosis of gene delivery vectors could be applied to enhancing electrotransfection efficiency (eTE). Results from the study showed that photochemically induced endosomal escape, which could increase poly-L-lysine (PLL)-mediated gene delivery, decreased eTE. The decrease could not be blocked by treatment of cells with endonuclease inhibitors (aurintricarboxylic acid and zinc ion) or antioxidants (L-glutamine and ascorbic acid). Chemical treatment of cells with an endosomal trafficking inhibitor that blocks endosome progression, bafilomycin A1, resulted in a significant decrease in eTE. However, treatment of cells with lysosomotropic agents (chloroquine and ammonium chloride) had little effects on eTE. These data suggested that endosomes played important roles in protecting and intracellular trafficking of electrotransfected pDNA. PMID:28182739

  17. Asymmetric 1-Alkyl-2-acyl Phosphatidylcholine: a Helper Lipid for Enhanced Non-viral Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhaohua; Li, Weijun; Szoka, Francis C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationally designed asymmetrical alkylacyl phosphatidylcholines (APC) have been synthesized and evaluated as helper lipids for non-viral gene delivery. A long aliphatic chain (C22~C24) was introduced at the 1-position of glycerol backbone, a branched lipid chain (C18) at the 2-position, and a phosphocholine head group at the 3-position. The fusogenicity of APC depends on the length and degree of saturation of the alkyl chain. Cationic lipids were formulated with APC as either lipoplexes or nanolipoparticles, and evaluated for their stability, transfection efficiency, and cytotoxicity. APC mediated high in vitro transfection efficiency, and had low cytotoxicity. Small nanolipoparticles (less than 100 nm) can be obtained with APC by applying as low as 0.1% PEG-lipid. Our study extends the type of helper lipids that are suitable for gene transfer and points the way to improve non-viral nucleic acid delivery system other than the traditional cationic lipids optimization. This work is supported by NIH grant EB003008. PMID:21718766

  18. Physical Factors Affecting Plasmid DNA Compaction in Stearylamine-Containing Nanoemulsions Intended for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Silva, André Leandro; Júnior, Francisco Alexandrino; Verissimo, Lourena Mafra; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; Egito, Lucila Carmem Monte; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes; do Egito, Eryvaldo Socrates Tabosa

    2012-01-01

    Cationic lipids have been used in the development of non-viral gene delivery systems as lipoplexes. Stearylamine, a cationic lipid that presents a primary amine group when in solution, is able to compact genetic material by electrostatic interactions. In dispersed systems such as nanoemulsions this lipid anchors on the oil/water interface confering a positive charge to them. The aim of this work was to evaluate factors that influence DNA compaction in cationic nanoemulsions containing stearylamine. The influence of the stearylamine incorporation phase (water or oil), time of complexation, and different incubation temperatures were studied. The complexation rate was assessed by electrophoresis migration on agarose gel 0.7%, and nanoemulsion and lipoplex characterization was done by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The results demonstrate that the best DNA compaction process occurs after 120 min of complexation, at low temperature (4 ± 1 °C), and after incorporation of the cationic lipid into the aqueous phase. Although the zeta potential of lipoplexes was lower than the results found for basic nanoemulsions, the granulometry did not change. Moreover, it was demonstrated that lipoplexes are suitable vehicles for gene delivery. PMID:24281666

  19. Mapping the AAV Capsid Host Antibody Response toward the Development of Second Generation Gene Delivery Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2013-01-01

    The recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2). Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion, or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from MAbs, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed. PMID:24523720

  20. Biofunctionalized nanoparticles with pH-responsive and cell penetrating blocks for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, V. M.; Marques, J. G.; Sousa, F.; Louro, R. O.; Queiroz, J. A.; Correia, I. J.

    2013-07-01

    Bridging the gap between nanoparticulate delivery systems and translational gene therapy is a long sought after requirement in nanomedicine-based applications. However, recent developments regarding nanoparticle functionalization have brought forward the ability to synthesize materials with biofunctional moieties that mimic the evolved features of viral particles. Herein we report the versatile conjugation of both cell penetrating arginine and pH-responsive histidine moieties into the chitosan polymeric backbone, to improve the physicochemical characteristics of the native material. Amino acid coupling was confirmed by 2D TOCSY NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The synthesized chitosan-histidine-arginine (CH-H-R) polymer complexed plasmid DNA biopharmaceuticals, and spontaneously assembled into stable 105 nm nanoparticles with spherical morphology and positive surface charge. The functionalized delivery systems were efficiently internalized into the intracellular compartment, and exhibited remarkably higher transfection efficiency than unmodified chitosan without causing any cytotoxic effect. Additional findings regarding intracellular trafficking events reveal their preferential escape from degradative lysosomal pathways and nuclear localization. Overall, this assembly of nanocarriers with bioinspired moieties provides the foundations for the design of efficient and customizable materials for cancer gene therapy.

  1. Linear poly(ethylenimine) cross-linked by methyl-β-cyclodextrin for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wing-Fu; Green, David W; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) is a cationic polymer extensively exploited for non-viral gene delivery; however, its wide application has been impeded by its cytotoxicity. PEI can assume either a branched or linear configuration. Whereas branched PEI (bPEI) is more chemically reactive and can form smaller complexes with DNA under salt-containing conditions, lPEI is generally less toxic and exhibits higher transfection efficiency. In this study, we cross-linked low-molecularweight lPEI with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) to form MβCD-lPEI (MLP). The structure of MLP was successfully characterized by NMR, FT-IR, MALDI-TOF and elemental analysis. In the standard serum-free transfection environment, MLP could effectively transfect glioblastoma, melanoma and hepatocarcinoma cells. A high transfection efficiency was maintained in the presence of serum. Apart from its high transfection efficiency, MLP was found to have negligible cytotoxicity over a wide range of concentrations and to exhibit a low membrane disruptive capacity ex vivo. MLP warrants further development as a promising gene delivery system for future research.

  2. Physical factors affecting plasmid DNA compaction in stearylamine-containing nanoemulsions intended for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Silva, André Leandro; Alexandrino, Francisco; Verissimo, Lourena Mafra; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; Egito, Lucila Carmem Monte; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes; do Egito, Eryvaldo Socrates Tabosa

    2012-06-18

    Cationic lipids have been used in the development of non-viral gene delivery systems as lipoplexes. Stearylamine, a cationic lipid that presents a primary amine group when in solution, is able to compact genetic material by electrostatic interactions. In dispersed systems such as nanoemulsions this lipid anchors on the oil/water interface confering a positive charge to them. The aim of this work was to evaluate factors that influence DNA compaction in cationic nanoemulsions containing stearylamine. The influence of the stearylamine incorporation phase (water or oil), time of complexation, and different incubation temperatures were studied. The complexation rate was assessed by electrophoresis migration on agarose gel 0.7%, and nanoemulsion and lipoplex characterization was done by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The results demonstrate that the best DNA compaction process occurs after 120 min of complexation, at low temperature (4 ± 1 °C), and after incorporation of the cationic lipid into the aqueous phase. Although the zeta potential of lipoplexes was lower than the results found for basic nanoemulsions, the granulometry did not change. Moreover, it was demonstrated that lipoplexes are suitable vehicles for gene delivery.

  3. Influence of molecular weight upon mannosylated bio-synthetic hybrids for targeted antigen presenting cell gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles H; Gollakota, Akhila; Chen, Mingfu; Chung, Tai-Chun; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-07-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistant microbes, genetic vaccination is a promising prophylactic strategy that enables rapid design and manufacture. Facilitating this process is the choice of vector, which is often situationally-specific and limited in engineering capacity. Furthermore, these shortcomings are usually tied to an incomplete understanding of the structure-function relationships driving vector-mediated gene delivery. Building upon our initial report of a hybrid bacterial-biomaterial gene delivery vector, a comprehensive structure-function assessment was completed using a class of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters). Through a top-down screening methodology, an ideal polymer was selected on the basis of gene delivery efficacy and then used for the synthesis of a stratified molecular weight polymer library. By eliminating contributions of polymer chemical background, we were able to complete an in-depth assessment of gene delivery as a function of (1) polymer molecular weight, (2) relative mannose content, (3) polymer-membrane biophysical properties, (4) APC uptake specificity, and (5) serum inhibition. In summary, the flexibility and potential of the hybrid design featured in this work highlights the ability to systematically probe vector-associated properties for the development of translational gene delivery candidates.

  4. Combinational Spinal GAD65 Gene Delivery and Systemic GABA-Mimetic Treatment for Modulation of Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kakinohana, Osamu; Hefferan, Michael P.; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Nejime, Tetsuya; Marsala, Silvia; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Kucharova, Karolina; Strnadel, Jan; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Lazar, Peter; Galik, Jan; Vinay, Laurent; Marsala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Loss of GABA-mediated pre-synaptic inhibition after spinal injury plays a key role in the progressive increase in spinal reflexes and the appearance of spasticity. Clinical studies show that the use of baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with major side effects such as general sedation and progressive tolerance development. The goal of the present study was to assess if a combined therapy composed of spinal segment-specific upregulation of GAD65 (glutamate decarboxylase) gene once combined with systemic treatment with tiagabine (GABA uptake inhibitor) will lead to an antispasticity effect and whether such an effect will only be present in GAD65 gene over-expressing spinal segments. Methods/Principal Findings Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to transient spinal ischemia (10 min) to induce muscle spasticity. Animals then received lumbar injection of HIV1-CMV-GAD65 lentivirus (LVs) targeting ventral α-motoneuronal pools. At 2–3 weeks after lentivirus delivery animals were treated systemically with tiagabine (4, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg or vehicle) and the degree of spasticity response measured. In a separate experiment the expression of GAD65 gene after spinal parenchymal delivery of GAD65-lentivirus in naive minipigs was studied. Spastic SD rats receiving spinal injections of the GAD65 gene and treated with systemic tiagabine showed potent and tiagabine-dose-dependent alleviation of spasticity. Neither treatment alone (i.e., GAD65-LVs injection only or tiagabine treatment only) had any significant antispasticity effect nor had any detectable side effect. Measured antispasticity effect correlated with increase in spinal parenchymal GABA synthesis and was restricted to spinal segments overexpressing GAD65 gene. Conclusions/Significance These data show that treatment with orally bioavailable GABA-mimetic drugs if combined with spinal-segment-specific GAD65 gene overexpression can represent a novel

  5. Human serum albumin nanoparticles for efficient delivery of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase gene

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yun; Barnett, Micheal E.; Takemoto, Dolores; Davidson, Harriet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To assess the potential of human serum albumin nanoparticles (HSA NP) as a nonviral vector for ocular delivery of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. Methods Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene-encapsulated nanoparticles (NP) were developed using human serum albumin (HSA), an endogenous protein, by a desolvation-crosslinking method. The pSOD-loaded HSA NP was evaluated for in vitro release characteristics, stability against DNase I and vitreous humor degradation, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanisms, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo gene expression. In vitro studies employed cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells and in vivo studies employed a mouse model. For cell uptake analysis, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled human serum albumin (HSA) was used. Results Plasmid containing SOD1 gene was encapsulated in HSA by a desolvation-crosslinking method. Gene-loaded HSA NP has a mean size of 120 nm, zeta potential of -44 mV, and plasmid encapsulation efficiency of 84%. At high crosslinking degree, HSA NP sustained the in vitro release of plasmid over 6 days, and stabilized plasmid DNA against DNase I and vitreous humor degradation. No cytotoxicity was observed in ARPE 19 cells treated with blank HSA NP at concentrations up to 5 mg/ml for 96 h. Cellular uptake of HSA NP was via receptor-mediated endocytosis that involves primarily caveolae-pathways. Confocal analysis indicated rapid endo/lysosomal escape of HSA NP. Further, confocal studies indicated that HSA readily enters the cell nucleus. In vitro, pSOD-HSA NP resulted in more than 80% transfection efficiency in ARPE-19 cells, which was 5 fold higher than Lipofectamine. HSA NP-transfected cells exhibited enhanced SOD1 activity that was 5 fold higher than untreated cells, indicating the overexpression of the functional gene. Intravitreal injection of HSA NP to the mouse eye at a dose of 130 ng of plasmid produced detectable level of fusion protein expression at

  6. Phase I/II trial of adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-glucosidase gene therapy to the diaphragm for chronic respiratory failure in Pompe disease: initial safety and ventilatory outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barbara K; Collins, Shelley W; Conlon, Thomas J; Mah, Cathryn S; Lawson, Lee Ann; Martin, Anatole D; Fuller, David D; Cleaver, Brian D; Clément, Nathalie; Phillips, Dawn; Islam, Saleem; Dobjia, Nicole; Byrne, Barry J

    2013-06-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited neuromuscular disease caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) leading to glycogen accumulation in muscle and motoneurons. Cardiopulmonary failure in infancy leads to early mortality, and GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) results in improved survival, reduction of cardiac hypertrophy, and developmental gains. However, many children have progressive ventilatory insufficiency and need additional support. Preclinical work shows that gene transfer restores phrenic neural activity and corrects ventilatory deficits. Here we present 180-day safety and ventilatory outcomes for five ventilator-dependent children in a phase I/II clinical trial of AAV-mediated GAA gene therapy (rAAV1-hGAA) following intradiaphragmatic delivery. We assessed whether rAAV1-hGAA results in acceptable safety outcomes and detectable functional changes, using general safety measures, immunological studies, and pulmonary functional testing. All subjects required chronic, full-time mechanical ventilation because of respiratory failure that was unresponsive to both ERT and preoperative muscle-conditioning exercises. After receiving a dose of either 1×10(12) vg (n=3) or 5×10(12) vg (n=2) of rAAV1-hGAA, the subjects' unassisted tidal volume was significantly larger (median [interquartile range] 28.8% increase [15.2-35.2], p<0.05). Further, most patients tolerated appreciably longer periods of unassisted breathing (425% increase [103-851], p=0.08). Gene transfer did not improve maximal inspiratory pressure. Expected levels of circulating antibodies and no T-cell-mediated immune responses to the vector (capsids) were observed. One subject demonstrated a slight increase in anti-GAA antibody that was not considered clinically significant. These results indicate that rAAV1-hGAA was safe and may lead to modest improvements in volitional ventilatory performance measures. Evaluation of the next five patients will determine whether earlier intervention can

  7. trans-2-Aminocyclohexanol-based amphiphiles as highly efficient helper lipids for gene delivery by lipoplexes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Liu, Xin; Samoshina, Nataliya M; Samoshin, Vyacheslav V; Franz, Andreas H; Guo, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Lipidic amphiphiles equipped with the trans-2-aminocyclohexanol (TACH) moiety are promising pH-sensitive conformational switches ("flipids") that can trigger a lipid bilayer perturbation in response to increased acidity. Because pH-sensitivity was shown to improve the efficiency of several gene delivery systems, we expected that such flipids could significantly enhance the gene transfection by lipoplexes. Thus a series of novel lipids with various TACH-based head groups and hydrocarbon tails were designed, prepared and incorporated into lipoplexes that contain the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonio-propane (DOTAP) and plasmid DNA encoding a luciferase gene. B16F1 and HeLa cells were transfected with such lipoplexes in both serum-free and serum-containing media. The lipoplexes consisting of TACH-lipids exhibited up to two orders of magnitude better transfection efficiency and yet similar toxicity compared to the ones with the conventional helper lipids 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol. Thus, the TACH-lipids can be used as novel helper lipids for efficient gene transfection with low cytotoxicity.

  8. Seek and destroy: targeted adeno-associated viruses for gene delivery to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Bijay; Jayachandran, Aparna; Layton, Christopher J; Steel, Jason C

    2017-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of primary liver cancer with high incidence globally. Increasing mortality and morbidity rates combined with limited treatment options available for advanced HCC press for novel and effective treatment modalities. Gene therapy represents one of the most promising therapeutic options. With the recent approval of herpes simplex virus for advanced melanoma, the field of gene therapy has received a major boost. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is among the most widely used and effective viral vectors today with safety and efficacy demonstrated in a number of human clinical trials. This review identifies the obstacles for effective AAV based gene delivery to HCC which primarily include host immune responses and off-target effects. These drawbacks could be more pronounced for HCC because of the underlying liver dysfunction in most of the patients. We discuss approaches that could be adopted to tackle these shortcomings and manufacture HCC-targeted vectors. The combination of transductional targeting by modifying the vector capsid and transcriptional targeting using HCC-specific promoters has the potential to produce vectors which can specifically seek HCC and deliver therapeutic gene without significant side effects. Finally, the identification of novel HCC-specific ligands and promoters should facilitate and expedite this process.

  9. Controlled Striatal DOPA Production From a Gene Delivery System in a Rodent Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cederfjäll, Erik; Broom, Lauren; Kirik, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Conventional symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) with long-term L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is complicated with development of drug-induced side effects. In vivo viral vector-mediated gene expression encoding tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) provides a drug delivery strategy of DOPA with distinct advantages over pharmacotherapy. Since the brain alterations made with current gene transfer techniques are irreversible, the therapeutic approaches taken to the clinic should preferably be controllable to match the needs of each individual during the course of their disease. We used a recently described tunable gene expression system based on the use of destabilized dihydrofolate reductase (DD) and generated a N-terminally coupled GCH1 enzyme (DD-GCH1) while the TH enzyme was constitutively expressed, packaged in adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Expression of DD-GCH1 was regulated by the activating ligand trimethoprim (TMP) that crosses the blood–brain barrier. We show that the resulting intervention provides a TMP-dose-dependent regulation of DOPA synthesis that is closely linked to the magnitude of functional effects. Our data constitutes the first proof of principle for controlled reconstitution of dopamine capacity in the brain and suggests that such next-generation gene therapy strategies are now mature for preclinical development toward use in patients with PD. PMID:25592335

  10. Intracranial gene delivery of LV-NAGLU vector corrects neuropathology in murine MPS IIIB.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Carmela; Villani, Guglielmo R D; Di Napoli, Daniele; Nusco, Edoardo; Calì, Gaetano; Nitsch, Lucio; Di Natale, Paola

    2009-06-01

    Mucopolysacccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). The disease is characterized by mild somatic features and severe neurological involvement with high mortality. Although several therapeutic approaches have been applied to the murine model of the disease, no effective therapy is available for patients. In this study, we used the lentiviral-NAGLU vector to deliver the functional human NAGLU gene into the brain of young adult MPS IIIB mice. We report the restoration of active enzyme with a sustained expression throughout a large portion of the brain, and a significantly improved behavioral performance of treated animals. Moreover, we analyzed the effect of therapy on the expression profile of some genes related to neurotrophic signaling molecules and inflammatory cytokines previously found altered in MPS IIIB mice. At 1 month from treatment, the level of cerebellin 1 (Cbln1) was decreased while the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) expression was increased, both reaching normal values. At 6 months from treatment a significant reduction in the expression of all the inflammation- and oxidative stress-related genes was observed, as well as the maintenance of the correction of the Bdnf gene expression. These results indicate that NAGLU delivery from intracerebral sources has the capacity to alleviate most disease manifestations in MPS IIIB mice; furthermore, Bdnf might be a response-to-therapy biomarker for MPS IIIB.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles as gene delivery agents: enhanced transfection in the presence of oscillating magnet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBain, S. C.; Griesenbach, U.; Xenariou, S.; Keramane, A.; Batich, C. D.; Alton, E. W. F. W.; Dobson, J.

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle-based gene transfection has been shown to be effective in combination with both viral vectors and with non-viral agents. In these systems, therapeutic or reporter genes are attached to magnetic nanoparticles which are then focused to the target site/cells via high-field/high-gradient magnets. The technique has been shown to be efficient and rapid for in vitro transfection and compares well with cationic lipid-based reagents, producing good overall transfection levels with lower doses and shorter transfection times. In spite of its potential advantages (particularly for in vivo targeting), the overall transfection levels do not generally exceed those of other non-viral agents. In order to improve the overall transfection levels while maintaining the advantages inherent in this technique, we have developed a novel, oscillating magnet array system which adds lateral motion to the particle/gene complex in order to promote transfection. Experimental results indicate that the system significantly enhances overall in vitro transfection levels in human airway epithelial cells compared to both static field techniques (p<0.005) and the cationic lipids (p<0.001) tested. In addition, it has the previously demonstrated advantages of magnetofection—rapid transfection times and requiring lower levels of DNA than cationic lipid-based transfection agents. This method shows potential for non-viral gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Controlled Striatal DOPA Production From a Gene Delivery System in a Rodent Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cederfjäll, Erik; Broom, Lauren; Kirik, Deniz

    2015-05-01

    Conventional symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) with long-term L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is complicated with development of drug-induced side effects. In vivo viral vector-mediated gene expression encoding tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) provides a drug delivery strategy of DOPA with distinct advantages over pharmacotherapy. Since the brain alterations made with current gene transfer techniques are irreversible, the therapeutic approaches taken to the clinic should preferably be controllable to match the needs of each individual during the course of their disease. We used a recently described tunable gene expression system based on the use of destabilized dihydrofolate reductase (DD) and generated a N-terminally coupled GCH1 enzyme (DD-GCH1) while the TH enzyme was constitutively expressed, packaged in adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Expression of DD-GCH1 was regulated by the activating ligand trimethoprim (TMP) that crosses the blood-brain barrier. We show that the resulting intervention provides a TMP-dose-dependent regulation of DOPA synthesis that is closely linked to the magnitude of functional effects. Our data constitutes the first proof of principle for controlled reconstitution of dopamine capacity in the brain and suggests that such next-generation gene therapy strategies are now mature for preclinical development toward use in patients with PD.

  13. TITER AND PRODUCT AFFECTS THE DISTRIBUTION OF GENE EXPRESSION AFTER INTRAPUTAMINAL CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Emborg, Marina E.; Hurley, Samuel A.; Joers, Valerie; Tromp, Do P.M.; Swanson, Christine R.; Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Cummisford, Kyle; Sonnemans, Marc; Hermening, Stephan; Blits, Bas; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficacy and safety of intracerebral gene therapy for brain disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, depends on appropriate distribution of gene expression. Objectives To assess if the distribution of gene expression is affected by vector titer and protein type. Methods Four adult macaque monkeys seronegative for adeno-associated virus 5 (AAV5) received in the right and left ventral postcommisural putamen 30μl inoculation of a high or low titer suspension of AAV5 encoding glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Inoculations were performed using convection enhanced delivery and intraoperative MRI (IMRI). Results IMRI confirmed targeting and infusion cloud irradiating from the catheter tip into surrounding area. Postmortem analysis six weeks after surgery revealed GFP and GDNF expression ipsilateral to the injection side that had a titer-dependent distribution. GFP and GDNF expression was also observed in fibers in the Substantia Nigra (SN) pars reticulata (pr), demonstrating anterograde transport. Few GFP-positive neurons were present in the SN pars compacta (pc), possibly by direct retrograde transport of the vector. GDNF was present in many SNpc and SNpr neurons. Conclusions After controlling for target and infusate volume, intracerebral distribution of gene product is affected by vector titer and product biology. PMID:24943657

  14. Efficient gene delivery and silencing of mouse and human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In view of the importance of beta cells in glucose homeostasis and the profound repercussions of beta cell pathology on human health, the acquisition of tools to study pancreatic islet function is essential for the design of alternative novel therapies for diabetes. One promising approach toward this goal involves the modification of gene expression profile of beta cells. Results This study describes a new method of gene and siRNA delivery into human pancreatic islets by microporation technology. We demonstrated that mild islet distention with accutase greatly enhanced the transfection efficiency without compromising in vitro function (secretion, apoptosis and viability). As an example, the recently identified gene involved in type 2 diabetes, ZnT8, can be over-expressed or silenced by RNA interference using this technology. Microporation can also be used on rodent islets. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate that microporation technology can be used to modify gene expression in whole rodent and human islets without altering their in vitro function and will be key to the elucidation of the factors responsible for proper islet function. PMID:20353585

  15. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  16. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Vectors in Liver-directed Gene Delivery of LDLR and VLDLR for Gene Therapy of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Turunen, Tytteli A K; Kurkipuro, Jere; Heikura, Tommi; Vuorio, Taina; Hytönen, Elisa; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors were developed and used to deliver genes for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR and VLDLR, respectively) or lacZ reporter into liver of an LDLR-deficient mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). SB transposase, SB100x, was used to integrate the therapeutic transposons into mice livers for evaluating the feasibility of the vectors in reducing high blood cholesterol and the progression of atherosclerosis. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of transposon-VLDLR into the livers of the mice resulted in initial 17–19% reductions in plasma cholesterol, and at the later time points, in a significant stabilization of the cholesterol level for the 6.5-month duration of the study compared to the control mice. Transposon-LDLR-treated animals also demonstrated a trend of stabilization in the cholesterol levels in the long term. Vector-treated mice had slightly less lipid accumulation in the liver and reduced aortic atherosclerosis. Clinical chemistry and histological analyses revealed normal liver function and morphology comparable to that of the controls during the follow-up with no safety issues regarding the vector type, transgenes, or the gene transfer method. The study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of the SB transposon vectors in the treatment of FH. PMID:26670130

  17. Splenic gene delivery system using self-assembling nano-complex with phosphatidylserine analog.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Nakasone, Chihiro; Kodama, Yukinobu; Egashira, Kanoko; Harasawa, Hitomi; Muro, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Hiroo; Kitahara, Takashi; Higuchi, Norihide; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of phosphatidylserine on the erythrocyte membrane mediates erythrophagocytosis by resident spleen macrophages. The application of phosphatidylserine to a gene vector may be a novel approach for splenic drug delivery. Therefore, we chose 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serin (DOPS) as an analogue of phosphatidylserine for splenic gene delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA). In the present study, we successfully prepared a stable pDNA ternary complex using DOPS and polyethyleneimine (PEI) and evaluated its efficacy and safety. The pDNA/PEI complex had a positive charge and showed high transgene efficacy, although it caused cytotoxicity and agglutination. The addition of DOPS changed the ζ-potential of the pDNA/PEI complex to negative. It is known that anionic complexes are not taken up well by cells. Surprisingly, however, the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex showed relatively high transgene efficacy in vitro. Fluorescence microscope observation revealed that the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex internalized the cells while maintaining the complex formation. The injection of the pDNA/PEI complex killed most mice within 24 h at high doses, although all mice in the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex group survived. The ternary complex with DOPS showed markedly better safety compared with the pDNA/PEI complex. The pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex showed high gene expression selectively in the spleen after intravenous injection into mice. Thus the ternary complex with DOPS can be used to deliver pDNA to the spleen, in which immune cells are abundant. It appears to have an excellent safety level, although further study to determine the mechanism of action is necessary.

  18. Gene therapy delivery systems for enhancing viral and nonviral vectors for cardiac diseases: current concepts and future applications.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Williams, Richard D; Bridges, Charles R

    2013-11-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most promising fields for developing new treatments for the advanced stages of ischemic and monogenetic, particularly autosomal or X-linked recessive, cardiomyopathies. The remarkable ongoing efforts in advancing various targets have largely been inspired by the results that have been achieved in several notable gene therapy trials, such as the hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. Rate-limiting problems preventing successful clinical application in the cardiac disease area, however, are primarily attributable to inefficient gene transfer, host responses, and the lack of sustainable therapeutic transgene expression. It is arguable that these problems are directly correlated with the choice of vector, dose level, and associated cardiac delivery approach as a whole treatment system. Essentially, a delicate balance exists in maximizing gene transfer required for efficacy while remaining within safety limits. Therefore, the development of safe, effective, and clinically applicable gene delivery techniques for selected nonviral and viral vectors will certainly be invaluable in obtaining future regulatory approvals. The choice of gene transfer vector, dose level, and the delivery system are likely to be critical determinants of therapeutic efficacy. It is here that the interactions between vector uptake and trafficking, delivery route means, and the host's physical limits must be considered synergistically for a successful treatment course.

  19. Robust Lentiviral Gene Delivery But Limited Transduction Capacity of Commonly Used Adeno-Associated Viral Serotypes in Xenotransplanted Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Maria; Askou, Anne Louise; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jensen, Thomas G; Corydon, Thomas J; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Aagaard, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for the treatment of skin diseases. Although we have previously documented potent lentiviral gene delivery to human skin, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) rank among the most promising gene delivery tools for in vivo purposes. Thus, we compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue outside of the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin graft only. The study demonstrates the limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo.

  20. Robust Lentiviral Gene Delivery But Limited Transduction Capacity of Commonly Used Adeno-Associated Viral Serotypes in Xenotransplanted Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Maria; Askou, Anne Louise; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jensen, Thomas G.; Corydon, Thomas J.; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Aagaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for the treatment of skin diseases. Although we have previously documented potent lentiviral gene delivery to human skin, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) rank among the most promising gene delivery tools for in vivo purposes. Thus, we compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue outside of the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin graft only. The study demonstrates the limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo. PMID:26204415

  1. Association with Amino Acids Does Not Enhance Efficacy of Polymerized Liposomes As a System for Lung Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Elga; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Chiaramoni, Nadia; Ferreira, Débora; Fernandez-Ruocco, Maria J.; Prieto, Maria J.; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Perrotta, Ramiro M.; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.; Alonso, Silvia del Valle; Morales, Marcelo M.

    2016-01-01

    Development of improved drug and gene delivery systems directly into the lungs is highly desirable given the important burden of respiratory diseases. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of liposomes composed of photopolymerized lipids [1,2-bis-(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine] associated with amino acids as vectors for gene delivery into the lungs of healthy animals. Lipopolymer vesicles, in particular, are more stable than other types of liposomes. In this study, lipopolymers were associated with l-arginine, l-tryptophan, or l-cysteine. We hypothesized that the addition of these amino acids would enhance the efficacy of gene delivery to the lungs by the lipopolymers. l-Arginine showed the highest association efficiency due to its positive charge and better surface interactions. None of the formulations caused inflammation or altered lung mechanics, suggesting that these lipopolymers can be safely administered as aerosols. All formulations were able to induce eGFP mRNA expression in lung tissue, but the addition of amino acids reduced delivery efficacy when compared with the simple lipopolymer particle. These results indicate that this system could be further explored for gene or drug delivery targeting lung diseases. PMID:27199766

  2. Targeting metastatic cancer from the inside: a new generation of targeted gene delivery vectors enables personalized cancer vaccination in situ.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Erlinda M; Levy, John P; Reed, Rebecca A; Petchpud, W Nina; Liu, Liqiong; Wendler, Carlan B; Hall, Frederick L

    2008-10-01

    The advent of pathotropic (disease-seeking) targeting technologies, combined with advanced gene delivery vectors, provides a unique opportunity for the systemic delivery of immunomodulatory cytokine genes to remote sites of cancer metastasis. When injected intravenously, such pathotropic nanoparticles seek out and accumulate selectively at sites of tumor invasion and neo-angiogenesis, resulting in enhanced gene delivery, and thus cytokine production, within the tumor nodules. Used in conjunction with a primary tumoricidal agent (e.g., Rexin-G) that exposes tumor neoantigens, the tumor-targeted immunotherapy vector is intended to promote the recruitment and activation of host immune cells into the metastastic site(s), thereby initiating cancer immunization in situ. In this study, we examine the feasibility of cytokine gene delivery to cancerous lesions in vivo using intravenously administered pathotropically targeted nanoparticles bearing the gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; i.e., Reximmune-C). In vitro, transduction of target cancer cells with Reximmune-C resulted in the quantitative production of bioactive and immunoreactive GM-CSF protein. In tumor-bearing nude mice, intravenous infusions of Reximmune-C-induced GM-CSF production by transduced cancer cells and paracrine secretion of the cytokine within the tumor nodules, which promoted the recruitment of host mononuclear cells, including CD40+ B cells and CD86+ dendritic cells, into the tumors. With the first proofs of principle established in preclinical studies, we generated an optimized vector configuration for use in advanced clinical trial designs, and extended the feasibility studies to the clinic. Targeted delivery and localized expression of the GM-CSF transgene was confirmed in a patient with metastatic cancer, as was the recruitment of significant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Taken together, these studies provide the first demonstrations of cytokine gene

  3. Functional study of dextran-graft-poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) gene delivery vector for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Bin; Yuan, Wei; Xu, Fu-Jian; Zhao, Chen; Ma, Jie; Zhan, Qi-Min

    2013-07-01

    The obstacle of gene therapy is the shortage of efficient delivery system. The development of the gene delivery system with high transfection efficiency and low toxicity appears to be crucial. Recently, we reported that the dextran-graft-poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate) (DPD) can be potentially used as efficient gene vector. Herein, DPD was systematically studied for its potential in tumor gene therapy. DPD was synthesized and characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, particle size and zeta potential. The particle size and zeta potential of the DPD/enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) plasmid complexes at various N/P ratios were 130-150 nm and about 40 mV, respectively. The results showed that DPD exhibit a higher transfection effect compared with Lipofectamine 2K (Lipo 2K), a commercialized vector. The possibility of DPD in gene therapy was evaluated using p53, a gene that has been wildly applied in the research of cancer gene therapy. DPD/pEGFP-C1-p53 complex was found to be able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, the tumor growth was found to be restrained when DPD/pEGFP-C1-p53 complex was used in a xenograft MCF7 tumor model in vivo. These observations indicated that DPD/pEGFP-C1-p53 complex may be considered to be an efficient delivery system for tumor gene therapy.

  4. Systemic gene delivery following intravenous administration of AAV9 to fetal and neonatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Wong, Andrew M S; Hoefer, Klemens; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Howe, Steven J; Cooper, Jonathan D; Waddington, Simon N; Chan, Jerry K Y; Rahim, Ahad A

    2015-09-01

    Several acute monogenic diseases affect multiple body systems, causing death in childhood. The development of novel therapies for such conditions is challenging. However, improvements in gene delivery technology mean that gene therapy has the potential to treat such disorders. We evaluated the ability of the AAV9 vector to mediate systemic gene delivery after intravenous administration to perinatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates (NHPs). Titer-matched single-stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were intravenously administered to fetal and neonatal mice, with noninjected age-matched mice used as the control. Extensive GFP expression was observed in organs throughout the body, with the epithelial and muscle cells being particularly well transduced. ssAAV9 carrying the WPRE sequence mediated significantly more gene expression than its sc counterpart, which lacked the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) sequence. To examine a realistic scale-up to larger models or potentially patients for such an approach, AAV9 was intravenously administered to late-gestation NHPs by using a clinically relevant protocol. Widespread systemic gene expression was measured throughout the body, with cellular tropisms similar to those observed in the mouse studies and no observable adverse events. This study confirms that AAV9 can safely mediate systemic gene delivery in small and large animal models and supports its potential use in clinical systemic gene therapy protocols.

  5. Regulated Non-Viral Gene Delivery from Coaxial Electrospun Fiber Mesh Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Anita; Baggett, L. Scott; Raphael, Robert M.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to add to the versatility of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering applications, recent experimental designs are incorporating biological molecules such as plasmids and proteins within the scaffold structure. Such scaffolds act as reservoirs for the biological molecules of interest while regulating their release over various durations of time. Here, we describe the use of coaxial electrospinning as a means for the fabrication of fiber mesh scaffolds and the encapsulation and subsequent release of a non-viral gene delivery vector over a period of up to 60 days. Various fiber mesh scaffolds containing plasmid DNA (pDNA) within the core and the non-viral gene delivery vector poly(ethylenimine)-hyaluronic acid (PEI-HA) within the sheath of coaxial fibers were fabricated based on a fractional factorial design that investigated the effects of four processing parameters at two levels. Poly(ε-caprolactone) sheath polymer concentration, poly(ethylene glycol) core polymer molecular weight and concentration, and the concentration of pDNA were investigated for their effects on average fiber diameter, release kinetics of PEI-HA, and transfection efficiency. It was determined that increasing the values of each of the investigated parameters caused an increase in the average diameter of the fibers. The release kinetics of PEI-HA from the fibers were affected by the loading concentration of pDNA (with PEI-HA concentration adjusted accordingly to maintain a constant nitrogen to phosphorous (N:P) ratio within the complexes). Two-dimensional cell culture experiments with model fibroblast-like cells demonstrated that complexes of pDNA with PEI-HA released from fiber mesh scaffolds could successfully transfect cells and induce expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Peak EGFP expression varied with the investigated processing parameters, and the average transfection observed was a function of poly(ethylene glycol) (core) molecular weight and

  6. Regulated non-viral gene delivery from coaxial electrospun fiber mesh scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Anita; Baggett, L Scott; Raphael, Robert M; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2010-04-02

    In an effort to add to the versatility of three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering applications, recent experimental designs are incorporating biological molecules such as plasmids and proteins within the scaffold structure. Such scaffolds act as reservoirs for the biological molecules of interest while regulating their release over various durations of time. Here, we describe the use of coaxial electrospinning as a means for the fabrication of fiber mesh scaffolds and the encapsulation and subsequent release of a non-viral gene delivery vector over a period of up to 60 days. Various fiber mesh scaffolds containing plasmid DNA (pDNA) within the core and the non-viral gene delivery vector poly(ethylenimine)-hyaluronic acid (PEI-HA) within the sheath of coaxial fibers were fabricated based on a fractional factorial design that investigated the effects of four processing parameters at two levels. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) sheath polymer concentration, poly(ethylene glycol) core polymer molecular weight and concentration, and the concentration of pDNA were investigated for their effects on average fiber diameter, release kinetics of PEI-HA, and transfection efficiency. It was determined that increasing the values of each of the investigated parameters caused an increase in the average diameter of the fibers. The release kinetics of PEI-HA from the fibers were affected by the loading concentration of pDNA (with PEI-HA concentration adjusted accordingly to maintain a constant nitrogen to phosphorous (N:P) ratio within the complexes). Two-dimensional cell culture experiments with model fibroblast-like cells demonstrated that complexes of pDNA with PEI-HA released from fiber mesh scaffolds could successfully transfect cells and induce expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Peak EGFP expression varied with the investigated processing parameters, and the average transfection observed was a function of poly(ethylene glycol) (core) molecular weight

  7. Efficient, dual-stimuli responsive cytosolic gene delivery using a RGD modified disulfide-linked polyethylenimine functionalized gold nanorod.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feihu; Shen, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wenjun; Li, Min; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Dejian; Guo, Shengrong

    2014-12-28

    Controlled-release systems capable of responding to external stimuli and/or unique internal environments have received great interests in site-specific gene and/or drug delivery. In this work, a functionalized gene nanocarrier for dual-stimuli triggered cytosolic gene delivery is developed and showing high gene delivery efficacy with low cytotoxicity. The nanocarrier is prepared by conjugating gold nanorod (GNR) with multiple disulfide cross-linked short PEIs to harness the advantageous properties of GNR based near infrared (NIR) laser induced photothermal heating and intracellular stimuli-triggered degradability of disulfide cross-linked short PEIs (DSPEI). The DSPEI is further grafted with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) section to afford high carrier stability in cell cult