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Sample records for aav-mediated rnai knockdown

  1. RNAi knockdown of parafusin inhibits the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Satir, Birgit H

    2011-10-01

    Several glycolytic enzymes and their isoforms have been found to be important in cell signaling unrelated to glycolysis. The involvement of parafusin (PFUS), a member of the phosphoglucomutase (PGM) superfamily with no phosphoglucomutase activity, in Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis has been controversial. This protein was first described in Paramecium tetraurelia, but is widely found. Earlier work showed that parafusin is a secretory vesicle scaffold component with unusual post-translational modifications (cyclic phosphorylation and phosphoglucosylation) coupled to stages in the exocytic process. Using RNAi, we demonstrate that parafusin synthesis can be reversibly blocked, with minor or no effect on other PGM isoforms. PFUS knockdown produces an inhibition of dense core secretory vesicle (DCSV) synthesis leading to an exo(-) phenotype. Although cell growth is unaffected, vesicle content is not packaged properly and no new DCSVs are formed. We conclude that PFUS and its orthologs are necessary for proper scaffold maturation. Because of this association, parafusin is an important signaling component for regulatory control of the secretory pathway.

  2. RNAi-mediated gene knockdown and in vivo diuresis assay in adult female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Drake, Lisa L; Price, David P; Aguirre, Sarah E; Hansen, Immo A

    2012-07-14

    This video protocol demonstrates an effective technique to knockdown a particular gene in an insect and conduct a novel bioassay to measure excretion rate. This method can be used to obtain a better understanding of the process of diuresis in insects and is especially useful in the study of diuresis in blood-feeding arthropods that are able to take up huge amounts of liquid in a single blood meal. This RNAi-mediated gene knockdown combined with an in vivo diuresis assay was developed by the Hansen lab to study the effects of RNAi-mediated knockdown of aquaporin genes on Aedes aegypti mosquito diuresis. The protocol is setup in two parts: the first demonstration illustrates how to construct a simple mosquito injection device and how to prepare and inject dsRNA into the thorax of mosquitoes for RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. The second demonstration illustrates how to determine excretion rates in mosquitoes using an in vivo bioassay.

  3. Fruitless RNAi knockdown in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, influences male fertility.

    PubMed

    Boerjan, Bart; Tobback, Julie; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Huybrechts, Roger; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-02-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the male-specific splice isoform of the fruitless gene (Fru(M)) encodes a set of transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of male courtship and copulation. Recent insights from non-drosophilid insects suggest a conserved evolutionary role for the transcription factor Fruitless. In the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria and the German cockroach, Blatella germanica, both orthopteran insects, a conserved functional role for fruitless has been proposed. Fru specific RNAi knockdown in the third nymphal stage of male Schistocera gregaria delays copulation initiation and results in reduced progeny. In order to identify the origin of the observed phenotypic effects following a fruitless RNAi treatment in the male, we show that the fru knockdown has no detectable effect on spermio- or spermatogenesis and on the transfer of spermatozoa during copulation. Nevertheless, it is clear that the male seminal vesicles contain significantly less spermatozoa after fru RNAi as compared to gfp RNAi controls. We conclude that a lowered male fertility, caused by the fru knockdown in male desert locusts may be the direct cause for the reduction of the progeny numbers in their naïve female copulation partners.

  4. Kin5 knockdown in Tetrahymena thermophila using RNAi blocks cargo transport of Gef1.

    PubMed

    Awan, Aashir; Bell, Aaron J; Satir, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A critical process that builds and maintains the eukaryotic cilium is intraflagellar transport (IFT). This process utilizes members of the kinesin-2 superfamily to transport cargo into the cilium (anterograde transport) and a dynein motor for the retrograde traffic. Using a novel RNAi knockdown method, we have analyzed the function of the homodimeric IFT kinesin-2, Kin5, in Tetrahymena ciliary transport. In RNAi transformants, Kin5 was severely downregulated and disappeared from the cilia, but cilia did not resorb, although tip structure was affected. After deciliation of the knockdown cell, cilia regrew and cells swam, which suggested that Kin5 is not responsible for the trafficking of axonemal precursors to build the cilium, but could be transporting molecules that act in ciliary signal transduction, such as guanine nucleotide exchange proteins (GEFs). Gef1 is a Tetrahymena ciliary protein, and current coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies showed that it is absent in regrowing cilia of the knockdown cells lacking ciliary Kin5. We suggest that one important cargo of Kin5 is Gef1 and knockdown of Kin5 results in cell lethality.

  5. RNAi-mediated double gene knockdown and gustatory perception measurement in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Baker, Nicholas; Amdam, Gro V

    2013-07-25

    This video demonstrates novel techniques of RNA interference (RNAi) which downregulate two genes simultaneously in honey bees using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) injections. It also presents a protocol of proboscis extension response (PER) assay for measuring gustatory perception. RNAi-mediated gene knockdown is an effective technique downregulating target gene expression. This technique is usually used for single gene manipulation, but it has limitations to detect interactions and joint effects between genes. In the first part of this video, we present two strategies to simultaneously knock down two genes (called double gene knockdown). We show both strategies are able to effectively suppress two genes, vitellogenin (vg) and ultraspiracle (usp), which are in a regulatory feedback loop. This double gene knockdown approach can be used to dissect interrelationships between genes and can be readily applied in different insect species. The second part of this video is a demonstration of proboscis extension response (PER) assay in honey bees after the treatment of double gene knockdown. The PER assay is a standard test for measuring gustatory perception in honey bees, which is a key predictor for how fast a honey bee's behavioral maturation is. Greater gustatory perception of nest bees indicates increased behavioral development which is often associated with an earlier age at onset of foraging and foraging specialization in pollen. In addition, PER assay can be applied to identify metabolic states of satiation or hunger in honey bees. Finally, PER assay combined with pairing different odor stimuli for conditioning the bees is also widely used for learning and memory studies in honey bees.

  6. RNAi-based targeted gene knockdown in the model oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li; Xin, Yi; Wang, Qintao; Yang, Juan; Hu, Hanhua; Xu, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Microalgae are promising feedstock for renewable fuels such as biodiesel, yet development of industrial oleaginous strains has been hindered by the paucity and inefficiency of reverse genetics tools. Here we established an efficient RNAi-based targeted gene-knockdown method for Nannochloropsis spp., which are emerging model organisms for industrial microalgal oil production. The method achieved a 40-80% success rate in Nannochloropsis oceanica strain IMET1. When transcript level of one carbonic anhydrase (CA) was inhibited by 62-83% via RNAi, mutant cells exhibited photosynthetic oxygen evolution (POE) rates that were 68-100% higher than wild-type (WT) at pH 6.0, equivalent to WT at pH 8.2, yet 39-45% lower than WT at pH 9.0. Moreover, the mutant POE rates were negatively correlated with the increase of culture pH, an exact opposite of WT. Thus, a dynamic carbon concentration mechanism (CCM) that is highly sensitive to pH homeostasis was revealed, where the CA inhibition likely partially abrogated the mechanism that normally deactivates CCM under a high level of dissolved CO2 . Extension of the method to another sequenced N. oceanica strain of CCMP 1779 demonstrated comparable performance. Finally, McrBC-PCR followed by bisulfite sequencing revealed that the gene knockdown is mediated by the CG, CHG and CHH types of DNA methylation at the coding region of the targeted gene. The efficiency, robustness and general applicability of this reverse genetics approach suggested the possibility of large-scale RNAi-based gene function screening in industrial microalgae.

  7. RNAi mediated gene knockdown and transgenesis by microinjection in the necromenic Nematode Pristionchus pacificus.

    PubMed

    Cinkornpumin, Jessica K; Hong, Ray L

    2011-10-16

    Although it is increasingly affordable for emerging model organisms to obtain completely sequenced genomes, further in-depth gene function and expression analyses by RNA interference and stable transgenesis remain limited in many species due to the particular anatomy and molecular cellular biology of the organism. For example, outside of the crown group Caenorhabditis that includes Caenorhabditis elegans, stably transmitted transgenic lines in non-Caenorhabditis species have not been reported in this specious phylum (Nematoda), with the exception of Strongyloides stercoralis and Pristionchus pacificus. To facilitate the expanding role of P. pacificus in the study of development, evolution, and behavior, we describe here the current methods to use microinjection for making transgenic animals and gene knock down by RNAi. Like the gonads of C. elegans and most other nematodes, the gonads of P. pacificus is syncitial and capable of incorporating DNA and RNA into the oocytes when delivered by direct microinjection. Unlike C. elegans however, stable transgene inheritance and somatic expression in P. pacificus requires the addition of self genomic DNA digested with endonucleases complementary to the ends of target transgenes and coinjection markers. The addition of carrier genomic DNA is similar to the requirement for transgene expression in Strongyloides stercoralis and in the germ cells of C. elegans. However, it is not clear if the specific requirement for the animals' own genomic DNA is because P. pacificus soma is very efficient at silencing non-complex multi-copy genes or that extrachromosomal arrays in P. pacificus require genomic sequences for proper kinetochore assembly during mitosis. The ventral migration of the two-armed (didelphic) gonads in hermaphrodites further complicates the ability to inject both gonads in individual worms. We also demonstrate the use of microinjection to knockdown a dominant mutant (roller,tu92) by injecting double-stranded RNA (ds

  8. RNAi Mediated Gene Knockdown and Transgenesis by Microinjection in the Necromenic Nematode Pristionchus pacificus

    PubMed Central

    Cinkornpumin, Jessica K.; Hong, Ray L.

    2011-01-01

    Although it is increasingly affordable for emerging model organisms to obtain completely sequenced genomes, further in-depth gene function and expression analyses by RNA interference and stable transgenesis remain limited in many species due to the particular anatomy and molecular cellular biology of the organism. For example, outside of the crown group Caenorhabditis that includes Caenorhabditis elegans3, stably transmitted transgenic lines in non-Caenorhabditis species have not been reported in this specious phylum (Nematoda), with the exception of Strongyloides stercoralis4 and Pristionchus pacificus5. To facilitate the expanding role of P. pacificus in the study of development, evolution, and behavior6-7, we describe here the current methods to use microinjection for making transgenic animals and gene knock down by RNAi. Like the gonads of C. elegans and most other nematodes, the gonads of P. pacificus is syncitial and capable of incorporating DNA and RNA into the oocytes when delivered by direct microinjection. Unlike C. elegans however, stable transgene inheritance and somatic expression in P. pacificus requires the addition of self genomic DNA digested with endonucleases complementary to the ends of target transgenes and coinjection markers5. The addition of carrier genomic DNA is similar to the requirement for transgene expression in Strongyloides stercoralis4 and in the germ cells of C. elegans. However, it is not clear if the specific requirement for the animals' own genomic DNA is because P. pacificus soma is very efficient at silencing non-complex multi-copy genes or that extrachromosomal arrays in P. pacificus require genomic sequences for proper kinetochore assembly during mitosis. The ventral migration of the two-armed (didelphic) gonads in hermaphrodites further complicates the ability to inject both gonads in individual worms8. We also demonstrate the use of microinjection to knockdown a dominant mutant (roller,tu92) by injecting double

  9. Persistence of RNAi-Mediated Knockdown in Drosophila Complicates Mosaic Analysis Yet Enables Highly Sensitive Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Justin A; Sumabat, Taryn M; Hariharan, Iswar K

    2016-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful way of reducing gene function in Drosophila melanogaster tissues. By expressing synthetic short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) using the Gal4/UAS system, knockdown is efficiently achieved in specific tissues or in clones of marked cells. Here we show that knockdown by shRNAs is so potent and persistent that even transient exposure of cells to shRNAs can reduce gene function in their descendants. When using the FLP-out Gal4 method, in some instances we observed unmarked "shadow RNAi" clones adjacent to Gal4-expressing clones, which may have resulted from brief Gal4 expression following recombination but prior to cell division. Similarly, Gal4 driver lines with dynamic expression patterns can generate shadow RNAi cells after their activity has ceased in those cells. Importantly, these effects can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the cell autonomy of knockdown phenotypes. We have investigated the basis of this phenomenon and suggested experimental designs for eliminating ambiguities in interpretation. We have also exploited the persistence of shRNA-mediated knockdown to design a sensitive lineage-tracing method, i-TRACE, which is capable of detecting even low levels of past reporter expression. Using i-TRACE, we demonstrate transient infidelities in the expression of some cell-identity markers near compartment boundaries in the wing imaginal disc.

  10. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments.

    PubMed

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner.

  11. Simultaneous knockdown of six non-family genes using a single synthetic RNAi fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES

    Czarnecki, Olaf; Bryan, Anthony C.; Jawdy, Sara S.; ...

    2016-02-17

    Genetic engineering of plants that results in successful establishment of new biochemical or regulatory pathways requires stable introduction of one or more genes into the plant genome. It might also be necessary to down-regulate or turn off expression of endogenous genes in order to reduce activity of competing pathways. An established way to knockdown gene expression in plants is expressing a hairpin-RNAi construct, eventually leading to degradation of a specifically targeted mRNA. Knockdown of multiple genes that do not share homologous sequences is still challenging and involves either sophisticated cloning strategies to create vectors with different serial expression constructs ormore » multiple transformation events that is often restricted by a lack of available transformation markers. Synthetic RNAi fragments were assembled in yeast carrying homologous sequences to six or seven non-family genes and introduced into pAGRIKOLA. Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana and subsequent expression analysis of targeted genes proved efficient knockdown of all target genes. In conclusion, we present a simple and cost-effective method to create constructs to simultaneously knockdown multiple non-family genes or genes that do not share sequence homology. The presented method can be applied in plant and animal synthetic biology as well as traditional plant and animal genetic engineering.« less

  12. Simultaneous knockdown of six non-family genes using a single synthetic RNAi fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, Olaf; Bryan, Anthony C.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Yang, Xiaohan; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Chen, Jin-Gui; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2016-02-17

    Genetic engineering of plants that results in successful establishment of new biochemical or regulatory pathways requires stable introduction of one or more genes into the plant genome. It might also be necessary to down-regulate or turn off expression of endogenous genes in order to reduce activity of competing pathways. An established way to knockdown gene expression in plants is expressing a hairpin-RNAi construct, eventually leading to degradation of a specifically targeted mRNA. Knockdown of multiple genes that do not share homologous sequences is still challenging and involves either sophisticated cloning strategies to create vectors with different serial expression constructs or multiple transformation events that is often restricted by a lack of available transformation markers. Synthetic RNAi fragments were assembled in yeast carrying homologous sequences to six or seven non-family genes and introduced into pAGRIKOLA. Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana and subsequent expression analysis of targeted genes proved efficient knockdown of all target genes. In conclusion, we present a simple and cost-effective method to create constructs to simultaneously knockdown multiple non-family genes or genes that do not share sequence homology. The presented method can be applied in plant and animal synthetic biology as well as traditional plant and animal genetic engineering.

  13. Using RNAi in C. "elegans" to Demonstrate Gene Knockdown Phenotypes in the Undergraduate Biology Lab Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technology used to knock down genes in basic research and medicine. In 2006 RNAi technology using "Caenorhabditis elegans" ("C. elegans") was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine and thus students graduating in the biological sciences should have experience with this technology. However,…

  14. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the voltage gated sodium ion channel TcNav causes mortality in Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Halim, Hesham M.; Alshukri, Baida M. H.; Ahmad, Munawar S.; Nakasu, Erich Y. T.; Awwad, Mohammed H.; Salama, Elham M.; Gatehouse, Angharad M. R.; Edwards, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium ion channel (VGSC) belongs to the largest superfamily of ion channels. Since VGSCs play key roles in physiological processes they are major targets for effective insecticides. RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to analyse gene function, but recently, it has shown potential to contribute to novel strategies for selectively controlling agricultural insect pests. The current study evaluates the delivery of dsRNA targeted to the sodium ion channel paralytic A (TcNav) gene in Tribolium castaneum as a viable means of controlling this insect pest. Delivery of TcNav dsRNA caused severe developmental arrest with larval mortalities up to 73% post injection of dsRNA. Injected larvae showed significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression between 30–60%. Expression was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in pupae following injection causing 30% and 42% knockdown for early and late pupal stages, respectively. Oral delivery of dsRNA caused dose-dependant mortalities of between 19 and 51.34%; this was accompanied by significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression following 3 days of continuous feeding. The majority of larvae injected with, or fed, dsRNA died during the final larval stage prior to pupation. This work provides evidence of a viable RNAi-based strategy for insect control. PMID:27411529

  15. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the voltage gated sodium ion channel TcNav causes mortality in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Abd El Halim, Hesham M; Alshukri, Baida M H; Ahmad, Munawar S; Nakasu, Erich Y T; Awwad, Mohammed H; Salama, Elham M; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Edwards, Martin G

    2016-07-14

    The voltage-gated sodium ion channel (VGSC) belongs to the largest superfamily of ion channels. Since VGSCs play key roles in physiological processes they are major targets for effective insecticides. RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to analyse gene function, but recently, it has shown potential to contribute to novel strategies for selectively controlling agricultural insect pests. The current study evaluates the delivery of dsRNA targeted to the sodium ion channel paralytic A (TcNav) gene in Tribolium castaneum as a viable means of controlling this insect pest. Delivery of TcNav dsRNA caused severe developmental arrest with larval mortalities up to 73% post injection of dsRNA. Injected larvae showed significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression between 30-60%. Expression was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in pupae following injection causing 30% and 42% knockdown for early and late pupal stages, respectively. Oral delivery of dsRNA caused dose-dependant mortalities of between 19 and 51.34%; this was accompanied by significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression following 3 days of continuous feeding. The majority of larvae injected with, or fed, dsRNA died during the final larval stage prior to pupation. This work provides evidence of a viable RNAi-based strategy for insect control.

  16. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bisset, Darren R.; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A.; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T.; Weiss, Michael D.; Chamberlain, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUGexp) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUGexp mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSALR) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSALR mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSALR mice, including a reduction in the CUGexp mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUGexp mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSALR mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  17. Core RNAi machinery and gene knockdown in the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Alvarez Gonzales, Miguel A; Poland, Therese M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technology has been widely used in insect functional genomics research and provides an alternative approach for insect pest management. To understand whether the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), an invasive and destructive coleopteran insect pest of ash tree (Fraxinus spp.), possesses a strong RNAi machinery that is capable of degrading target mRNA as a response to exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induction, we identified three RNAi pathway core component genes, Dicer-2, Argonaute-2 and R2D2, from the A. planipennis genome sequence. Characterization of these core components revealed that they contain conserved domains essential for the proteins to function in the RNAi pathway. Phylogenetic analyses showed that they are closely related to homologs derived from other coleopteran species. We also delivered the dsRNA fragment of AplaScrB-2, a β-fructofuranosidase-encoding gene horizontally acquired by A. planipennis as we reported previously, into A. planipennis adults through microinjection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis on the dsRNA-treated beetles demonstrated a significantly decreased gene expression level of AplaScrB-2 appearing on day 2 and lasting until at least day 6. This study is the first record of RNAi applied in A. planipennis.

  18. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:23455436

  19. RNAi-Mediated Knockdown of Serine Protease Inhibitor Genes Increases the Mortality of Plutella xylostella Challenged by Destruxin A

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pengfei; Fan, Jiqiao; Liu, Yu; Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.; Yan, Shaoqiao; Qiu, Bao-Li; Ren, Shunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Destruxin A is a mycotoxin that is secreted by entomopathogenic fungi which has a broad-spectrum insecticidal effect. Previous transcript and protein profiling analysis showed that destruxin A has significant effects on the expression of serine protease inhibitor genes (serpin-2, 4, 5) in the larvae of Plutella xylostella. In the current study, we aimed to understand the role of serpins under application of destruxin A. We obtained two full-length cDNA sequences of P. xylostella serpins, named serpin-4 and serpin-5, and cloned the serpin-2 gene whose full-length has already been published. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these two serpin genes were highly clustered with other serpins associated with the immune response in other insects. The temporal and spatial expression of serpin-2, serpin-4 and serpin-5 were determined to be the highest in the fat body and hemolymph of 4th larval stage using qRT-PCR and western blot detection techniques. RNA interference (RNAi) mediated knockdown of P. xylostella serpin genes was carried out by microinjection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The expression levels of serpins decreased significantly after RNAi. Results showed that the depletion of serpins induced cecropins expression, increased phenoloxidase (PO) activity, body melanization and mortality in the larvae of P. xylostella under the same lethal concentration of destruxin A. The superimposed effects of serpins RNAi were similar with the destruxin A treatment upon mortality of P. xylostella larvae. We discovered for the first time that serpins play indispensable role in P. xylostella when challenged by destruxin A and deduced the possible function mechanism of destruxin A. Our findings are conducive to fully understanding the potential insecticidal mechanism of destruxin A and constitute a well-defined potential molecular target for novel insecticides. PMID:24837592

  20. RNAi-mediated knockdown of serine protease inhibitor genes increases the mortality of Plutella xylostella challenged by destruxin A.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengfei; Fan, Jiqiao; Liu, Yu; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Yan, Shaoqiao; Qiu, Bao-Li; Ren, Shunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Destruxin A is a mycotoxin that is secreted by entomopathogenic fungi which has a broad-spectrum insecticidal effect. Previous transcript and protein profiling analysis showed that destruxin A has significant effects on the expression of serine protease inhibitor genes (serpin-2, 4, 5) in the larvae of Plutella xylostella. In the current study, we aimed to understand the role of serpins under application of destruxin A. We obtained two full-length cDNA sequences of P. xylostella serpins, named serpin-4 and serpin-5, and cloned the serpin-2 gene whose full-length has already been published. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these two serpin genes were highly clustered with other serpins associated with the immune response in other insects. The temporal and spatial expression of serpin-2, serpin-4 and serpin-5 were determined to be the highest in the fat body and hemolymph of 4th larval stage using qRT-PCR and western blot detection techniques. RNA interference (RNAi) mediated knockdown of P. xylostella serpin genes was carried out by microinjection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The expression levels of serpins decreased significantly after RNAi. Results showed that the depletion of serpins induced cecropins expression, increased phenoloxidase (PO) activity, body melanization and mortality in the larvae of P. xylostella under the same lethal concentration of destruxin A. The superimposed effects of serpins RNAi were similar with the destruxin A treatment upon mortality of P. xylostella larvae. We discovered for the first time that serpins play indispensable role in P. xylostella when challenged by destruxin A and deduced the possible function mechanism of destruxin A. Our findings are conducive to fully understanding the potential insecticidal mechanism of destruxin A and constitute a well-defined potential molecular target for novel insecticides.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the synganglion from the honey bee mite, Varroa destructor and RNAi knockdown of neural peptide targets.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ewan M; Budge, Giles E; Watkins, Max; Bowman, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    Varroa mites (Varroa destructor) and the viruses that they transmit are one of the major contributing factors to the global honey bee crisis. Gene products within the nervous system are the targets of all the insecticides currently used to control Varroa but there is a paucity of transcriptomic data available for Varroa neural tissues. A cDNA library from the synganglia ("brains") of adult female Varroa was constructed and 600 ESTs sequenced and analysed revealing several current and potential druggable targets. Contigs coding for the deformed wing virus (DWV) variants V. destructor virus-1 (VDV-1) and the recombinant (VDV-1DVD) were present in the synganglion library. Negative-sense RNA-specific PCR indicated that VDV-1 replicates in the Varroa synganglion and all other tissues tested, but we could not detect DWV replicating in any Varroa tissue. Two neuropeptides were identified in the synganlion EST library: a B-type allatostatin and a member of the crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone (CHH) superfamily. Knockdown of the allatostatin or the CHH-like gene by double-stranded RNA-interference (dsRNAi) resulted in 85% and 55% mortality, respectively, of Varroa. Here, we present the first transcriptomic survey in Varroa and demonstrate that neural genes can be targeted by dsRNAi either for genetic validation of putative targets during drug discovery programmes or as a potential control measure in itself.

  2. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma.

  3. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the Halloween gene spookiest (CYP307B1) impedes adult eclosion in the western tarnished plant bug, Lygus hesperus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecdysteroids play a critical role in coordinating insect growth, development, and reproduction. A suite of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases coded by what are collectively termed Halloween genes mediate ecdysteroid biosynthesis. In this study, we describe cloning and RNAi-mediated knockdown of the CYP3...

  4. Knockdown of GPR137 by RNAi inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianping; Liu, Yanguo; Wang, Bo; Xian, Guozhe; Liu, Xin; Tian, Xingsong; Qin, Chengkun

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of cell-surface molecules involved in a number of biological and pathological processes, have recently emerged as key players in carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Orphan G protein-coupled receptors (oGPCRs) are a group of proteins lacking endogenous ligands. GPR137, one of the novel oGPCR genes, was discovered by homology screening. However, the biological role of GPR137 in cancers has not yet been discussed and is of great therapeutic interest. In this study, we knocked down GPR137 via a lentivirus system in two human pancreatic cancer cell lines BXPC-3 and PANC-1. Knockdown of GPR137 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation. Flow cytometry showed that cell cycle was arrested in the sub-G1 phase and apoptotic cells were significantly increased after GPR137 knockdown. Western blotting confirmed that GPR137 silencing induced apoptosis due to cleavage of PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) and upregulation of caspase 3. Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated overexpression of GPR137 promoted the proliferation of PANC-1 cells, suggesting GPR137 as a potential oncogene in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, our results prove the importance of GPR137 as a crucial regulator in controlling cancer cell growth and apoptosis.

  5. Transcriptome response and developmental implications of RNAi-mediated ODC knockdown in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Choubey, Ami; Rajam, M V

    2016-12-24

    Polyamines (PAs) are ubiquitously present polycationic compounds that play a critical role in various growth and developmental processes including stress responses in plants. Yet, their specific functions and mode of action remain largely unknown. In the present study, we have targeted tobacco ornithine decarboxylase gene (ODC) by RNA interference to modulate cellular PA levels and study the effects at different developmental time points. Down-regulation of ODC resulted in significant physiological and morphological anomalies including reduced leaf size, reduced chlorophyll and carotene content, decreased abiotic stress tolerance, early onset of senescence, delayed flowering, partial male and female sterility, reduced seed setting, delayed seed germination, reduced seed viability, and poor in vitro regeneration response from leaf explants. Also, for the first time, microarray analysis has been attempted to study genome-wide gene expression changes in response to lowered PA titers in an ODC knockdown line. A number of transcription factors, auxin- and ethylene-responsive genes, stress-induced genes, lignin-biosynthesis genes, photosynthesis-related genes, senescence-associated genes, membrane proteins, and protein kinases were found to be affected, suggesting a probable list of PA-responsive genes. Transcriptome analysis has also indicated many genes, which could directly or indirectly be responsible for regulating the PA metabolic pathway. Various phenotypic changes observed upon ODC knockdown along with the identification of a number of gene targets means it is a step forward in envisaging possible mechanisms of PA action and for assigning them with specific roles in various developmental processes they are known to be a part of.

  6. AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H

    2016-01-01

    Transferring genetic molecules into the peripheral sensory nervous system to manipulate nociceptive pathophysiology is a powerful approach for experimental modulation of sensory signaling and potentially for translation into therapy for chronic pain. This can be efficiently achieved by the use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in conjunction with nociceptor-specific regulatory transgene cassettes. Among different routes of delivery, direct injection into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the most efficient AAV-mediated gene transfer selectively into the peripheral sensory nervous system. Here, we briefly discuss the advantages and applications of intraganglionic microinjection, and then provide a detailed approach for DRG injection, including a list of the necessary materials and description of a method for performing DRG microinjection experiments. We also discuss our experience with several adeno-associated virus (AAV) options for in vivo transgene expression in DRG neurons.

  7. Nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening: identification of a signaling molecule network involved in fulvestrant action and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, N; Wittner, B S; Shioda, K; Hitora, T; Ito, T; Ramaswamy, S; Isselbacher, K J; Sgroi, D C; Shioda, T

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown screening of cancer cell cultures is an effective approach to predict drug targets or therapeutic/prognostic biomarkers, interactions among identified targets often remain obscure. Here, we introduce the nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening that generates a map of target interactions through systematic iterations of in silico prediction of targets and their experimental validation. An initial RNAi knockdown screening of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells targeting 6560 proteins identified four signaling molecules required for their fulvestrant-induced apoptosis. Signaling molecules physically or functionally interacting with these four primary node targets were computationally predicted and experimentally validated, resulting in identification of four second-generation nodes. Three rounds of further iterations of the prediction–validation cycle generated third, fourth and fifth generation of nodes, completing a 19-node interaction map that contained three predicted nodes but without experimental validation because of technical limitations. The interaction map involved all three members of the death-associated protein kinases (DAPKs) as well as their upstream and downstream signaling molecules (calmodulins and myosin light chain kinases), suggesting that DAPKs play critical roles in the cytocidal action of fulvestrant. The in silico Kaplan–Meier analysis of previously reported human breast cancer cohorts demonstrated significant prognostic predictive power for five of the experimentally validated nodes and for three of the prediction-only nodes. Immunohistochemical studies on the expression of 10 nodal proteins in human breast cancer tissues not only supported their prognostic prediction power but also provided statistically significant evidence of their synchronized expression, implying functional interactions among these nodal proteins. Thus, the Nodes-and-Connections approach to RNAi knockdown screening yields

  8. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibits the growth and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma via down-regulating midkine expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiu Yan; Tang, Hui Jun; Wang, Min; Cao, Guo Li; Yi, Ting Zhuang; Wu, Sheng Lan; Xu, Wei Jie; Tang, Shao Hui

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) overexpression contributes to the development of a variety of cancers. The present study explored the role of IGF-1R in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the possibility of IGF-1R silencing by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) as a therapeutic target for HCC. We showed that IGF-1R mRNA was up-regulated in Huh7 and Hep3B cells and human HCC tissues, and that IGF-1R knockdown by RNAi led to decreased proliferation, apoptosis induction, and decreased migration and invasion of Huh7 and Hep3B cells. Further, the in vivo study indicated that IGF-1R knockdown markedly diminished the tumorigenesis and metastasis of Huh7 xenograft. Moreover, the intratumoral administration of lentivirus-IGF-1R siRNA led to significant tumor growth inhibition in an established Huh7 xenograft model. Mechanistic investigations showed that midkine was found to be the most significantly down-regulated protein in Huh7 cells with IGF-1R knockdown, and ectopic overexpression of midkine significantly rescued inhibition of Huh7 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion caused by IGF-1R suppression. Collectively, these data suggest that IGF-1R inhibition by RNAi can significantly suppress HCC growth and invasion at least partially through down-regulating midkine expression, and IGF-1R is a potential target for HCC gene therapy. PMID:27813495

  9. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  10. RNAi-mediated TCR knockdown prevents autoimmunity in mice caused by mixed TCR dimers following TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Bunse, Mario; Bendle, Gavin M; Linnemann, Carsten; Bies, Laura; Schulz, Stephan; Schumacher, Ton N; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    Genetically modified T cells that express a transduced T cell receptor (TCR) α/β heterodimer in addition to their endogenous TCR are used in clinical studies to treat cancer. These cells express two TCR-α and two TCR-β chains that do not only compete for CD3 proteins but also form potentially self-reactive mixed TCR dimers, composed of endogenous and transferred chains. To overcome these deficits, we developed an RNAi-TCR replacement vector that simultaneously silences the endogenous TCR and expresses an RNAi-resistant TCR. Transduction of the virus-specific P14 TCR without RNAi resulted in unequal P14 TCR-α and -β chain surface levels, indicating heterodimerization with endogenous TCR chains. Such unequal expression was also observed following TCR gene optimization. Equal surface levels of the introduced TCR chains were however achieved by silencing the endogenous TCR. Importantly, all mice that received cells transduced with the native or optimized P14 TCR developed lethal TCR gene transfer-induced graft-versus-host-disease (TI-GVHD) due to formation of mixed TCR dimers. In contrast, TI-GVHD was almost completely prevented when using the RNAi-TCR replacement vector. Our data demonstrate that RNAi-assisted TCR replacement reduces the formation of mixed TCR dimers, and thereby significantly reduces the risk of TI-GVHD in TCR gene therapy.

  11. Gene targeting by RNAi-mediated knockdown of potent DNA ligase IV homologue in the cellulase-producing fungus Talaromyces cellulolyticus.

    PubMed

    Hayata, Koutarou; Asada, Seiya; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2014-11-01

    The genome of the cellulase-producing fungus Talaromyces cellulolyticus (formerly Acremonium cellulolyticus) was screened for a potent DNA ligase IV gene (ligD homologue). Homologous recombination efficiency in T. cellulolyticus is very low. Therefore, suppression of a non-homologous end-joining system was attempted to enable specific gene knockouts for molecular breeding. The transcript levels of ligD homologue were 0.037 of those of the parental YP-4 strain in the Li20 transformant carrying the RNAi construct targeting the ligD homologue. Transformation of the hairpin-type RNAi vector into T. cellulolyticus could be useful in fungal gene knockdown experiments. Cellulase production and protein secretion were similar in the parental YP-4 strain and the Li20 transformant. Knockout transformation of ligD homologue using the Li20 transformant led to 23.1 % double crossover gene targeting. Our results suggest that the potent DNA ligase IV gene of T. cellulolyticus is related to non-homologous end joining and that the knockdown of the ligD homologue is useful in gene targeting.

  12. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of LMP2A inhibits the growth of the Epstein-Barr-associated gastric carcinoma cell line GT38 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangjun; Chen, Weichang; Liu, Pengfei; Zhou, Jundong; Liu, Bingtuan; Ye, Wu; Wang, Wenping; Shen, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was applied to inhibit latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) gene expression, in order to explore the effects of LMP2A silencing on the growth of an Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) cell line in vitro. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi technology was employed to specifically knock down the LMP2A gene in the EBV-positive gastric carcinoma cell line GT38. After infection, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, flow cytometry and colony formation assays were conducted to evaluate the expression of LMP2A and the biological behavior of the GT38 cell line in vitro. The results showed that the expression of the LMP2A gene was clearly downregulated in the infected cells, which indicated that a highly efficient and stable lentivirus vector was successfully constructed. In the GT38 cells in which the expression of LMP2A was downregulated, the proliferation and colony formation of the cells was significantly inhibited. In addition, it was found that the cell cycle of the GT38 cells was arrested in the G0/G1 phase and the apoptosis rate was increased. These results indicate that lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of LMP2A inhibits the growth of the EBVaGC cell line GT38 in vitro, and suggests that LMP2A is a potential target for gene therapy in the treatment of EBVaGC. PMID:28123488

  13. AAV-mediated photoreceptor transduction of the pig cone-enriched retina

    PubMed Central

    Mussolino, C; della Corte, M; Rossi, S; Viola, F; Di Vicino, U; Marrocco, E; Neglia, S; Doria, M; Testa, F; Giovannoni, R; Crasta, M; Giunti, M; Villani, E; Lavitrano, M; Bacci, M L; Ratiglia, R; Simonelli, F; Auricchio, A; Surace, E M

    2011-01-01

    Recent success in clinical trials supports the use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene therapy of retinal diseases caused by defects in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In contrast, evidence of the efficacy of AAV-mediated gene transfer to retinal photoreceptors, the major site of inherited retinal diseases, is less robust. In addition, although AAV-mediated RPE transduction appears efficient, independently of the serotype used and species treated, AAV-mediated photoreceptor gene transfer has not been systematically investigated thus so far in large animal models, which also may allow identifying relevant species-specific differences in AAV-mediated retinal transduction. In the present study, we used the porcine retina, which has a high cone/rod ratio. This feature allows to properly evaluate both cone and rod photoreceptors transduction and compare the transduction characteristics of AAV2/5 and 2/8, the two most efficient AAV vector serotypes for photoreceptor targeting. Here we show that AAV2/5 and 2/8 transduces both RPE and photoreceptors. AAV2/8 infects and transduces photoreceptor more efficiently than AAV2/5, similarly to what we have observed in the murine retina. The use of the photoreceptor-specific rhodopsin promoter restricts transgene expression to porcine rods and cones, and results in photoreceptor transduction levels similar to those obtained with the ubiquitous promoters tested. Finally, immunological, toxicological and biodistribution studies support the safety of AAV subretinal administration to the large porcine retina. The data presented here on AAV-mediated transduction of the cone-enriched porcine retina may affect the development of gene-based therapies for rare and common severe photoreceptor diseases. PMID:21412286

  14. RNAi-mediated knockdown of mouse melanocortin-4 receptor in vitro and in vivo, using an siRNA expression construct based on the mir-187 precursor

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Minoru; Huang, Yi-Ying; Matsuo, Mina; Takashina, Yoko; Sasaki, Kazuyo; Horai, Yasushi; Juni, Aya; Kamijo, Shin-Ichi; Saigo, Kaoru; Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Tei, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in mammalian systems, including transgenic mice. Here, we report a gene knockdown system based on the human mir-187 precursor. We introduced small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences against the mouse melanocortin-4 receptor (mMc4r) to alter the targeting of miR-187. The siRNA-expressing cassette was placed under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) early enhancer/chicken β-actin promoter. In vitro, the construct efficiently knocked down the gene expression of a co-transfected mMc4r-expression vector in cultured mammalian cells. Using this construct, we generated a transgenic mouse line which exhibited partial but significant knockdown of mMc4r mRNA in various brain regions. Northern blot analysis detected transgenic expression of mMc4r siRNA in these regions. Furthermore, the transgenic mice fed a normal diet ate 9% more and were 30% heavier than wild-type sibs. They also developed hyperinsulinemia and fatty liver as do mMc4r knockout mice. We determined that this siRNA expression construct based on mir-187 is a practical and useful tool for gene functional studies in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:27725374

  15. RNAi KNOCKDOWN OF BmRab3 LED TO LARVA AND PUPA LETHALITY IN SILKWORM Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chabungbam Orville; Xin, Hu-hu; Chen, Rui-ting; Wang, Mei-xian; Liang, Shuang; Lu, Yan; Cai, Zi-zheng; Zhang, Deng-pan; Miao, Yun-gen

    2015-06-01

    Rab3 GTPases are known to play key a role in vesicular trafficking, and express highest in brain and endocrine tissues. In mammals, Rab3 GTPases are paralogs unlike in insect. In this study, we cloned Rab3 from the silk gland tissue of silkworm Bombyx mori, and identified it as BmRab3. Our in silico analysis indicated that BmRab3 is an isoform with a theoretical isoelectric point and molecular weight of 5.52 and 24.3 kDa, respectively. Further, BmRab3 showed the C-terminal hypervariability for GGT2 site but having two other putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor/GDP dissociation inhibitor interaction sites. Multiple alignment sequence indicated high similarities of BmRab3 with Rab3 isoforms of other species. The phylogeny tree showed BmRab3 clustered between the species of Tribolium castaneum and Aedes aegypti. Meanwhile, the expression analysis of BmRab3 showed the highest expression in middle silk glands (MSGs) than all other tissues in the third day of fifth-instar larva. Simultaneously, we showed the differential expression of BmRab3 in the early instar larva development, followed by higher expression in male than female pupae. In vivo dsRNA interference of BmRab3 reduced the expression of BmRab3 by 75% compared to the control in the MSGs in the first day. But as the worm grew to the third day, the difference of BmRab3 between knockdown and control was only about 10%. The knockdown later witnessed underdevelopment of the larvae and pharate pupae lethality in the overall development of silkworm B. mori L.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of dystrophin RNAi knockdown reveals a central role for dystrophin in muscle differentiation and contractile apparatus organization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD has a complex and as yet incompletely defined molecular pathophysiology hindering development of effective ameliorative approaches. Transcriptomic studies so far conducted on dystrophic cells and tissues suffer from non-specific changes and background noise due to heterogeneous comparisons and secondary pathologies. A study design in which a perfectly matched control cell population is used as reference for transcriptomic studies will give a much more specific insight into the effects of dystrophin deficiency and DMD pathophysiology. Results Using RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down dystrophin in myotubes from C57BL10 mice, we created a homogenous model to study the transcriptome of dystrophin-deficient myotubes. We noted significant differences in the global gene expression pattern between these myotubes and their matched control cultures. In particular, categorical analyses of the dysregulated genes demonstrated significant enrichment of molecules associated with the components of muscle cell contractile unit, ion channels, metabolic pathways and kinases. Additionally, some of the dysregulated genes could potentially explain conditions and endophenotypes associated with dystrophin deficiency, such as dysregulation of calcium homeostasis (Pvalb and Casq1), or cardiomyopathy (Obscurin, Tcap). In addition to be validated by qPCR, our data gains another level of validity by affirmatively reproducing several independent studies conducted previously at genes and/or protein levels in vivo and in vitro. Conclusion Our results suggest that in striated muscles, dystrophin is involved in orchestrating proper development and organization of myofibers as contractile units, depicting a novel pathophysiology for DMD where the absence of dystrophin results in maldeveloped myofibers prone to physical stress and damage. Therefore, it becomes apparent

  17. RNAi Knock-Down of LHCBM1, 2 and 3 Increases Photosynthetic H2 Production Efficiency of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Oey, Melanie; Ross, Ian L.; Stephens, Evan; Steinbeck, Janina; Wolf, Juliane; Radzun, Khairul Adzfa; Kügler, Johannes; Ringsmuth, Andrew K.; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Single cell green algae (microalgae) are rapidly emerging as a platform for the production of sustainable fuels. Solar-driven H2 production from H2O theoretically provides the highest-efficiency route to fuel production in microalgae. This is because the H2-producing hydrogenase (HYDA) is directly coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain, thereby eliminating downstream energetic losses associated with the synthesis of carbohydrate and oils (feedstocks for methane, ethanol and oil-based fuels). Here we report the simultaneous knock-down of three light-harvesting complex proteins (LHCMB1, 2 and 3) in the high H2-producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant Stm6Glc4 using an RNAi triple knock-down strategy. The resultant Stm6Glc4L01 mutant exhibited a light green phenotype, reduced expression of LHCBM1 (20.6% ±0.27%), LHCBM2 (81.2% ±0.037%) and LHCBM3 (41.4% ±0.05%) compared to 100% control levels, and improved light to H2 (180%) and biomass (165%) conversion efficiencies. The improved H2 production efficiency was achieved at increased solar flux densities (450 instead of ∼100 µE m−2 s−1) and high cell densities which are best suited for microalgae production as light is ideally the limiting factor. Our data suggests that the overall improved photon-to-H2 conversion efficiency is due to: 1) reduced loss of absorbed energy by non-photochemical quenching (fluorescence and heat losses) near the photobioreactor surface; 2) improved light distribution in the reactor; 3) reduced photoinhibition; 4) early onset of HYDA expression and 5) reduction of O2-induced inhibition of HYDA. The Stm6Glc4L01 phenotype therefore provides important insights for the development of high-efficiency photobiological H2 production systems. PMID:23613840

  18. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Xist does not rescue the impaired development of female cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Mami; Matoba, Shogo; Inoue, Kimiko; Kamimura, Satoshi; Hirose, Michiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Shiura, Hirosuke; Sugimoto, Michihiko; Abe, Kuniya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Ogura, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    In mice, one of the major epigenetic errors associated with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is ectopic expression of Xist during the preimplantation period in both sexes. We found that this aberrant Xist expression could be impeded by deletion of Xist from the putative active X chromosome in donor cells. In male clones, it was also found that prior injection of Xist-specific siRNA could significantly improve the postimplantation development of cloned embryos as a result of a significant repression of Xist at the morula stage. In this study, we examined whether the same knockdown strategy could work as well in female SCNT-derived embryos. Embryos were reconstructed with cumulus cell nuclei and injected with Xist-specific siRNA at 6-7 h after oocyte activation. RNA FISH analysis revealed that siRNA treatment successfully repressed Xist RNA at the morula stage, as shown by the significant decrease in the number of cloud-type Xist signals in the blastomere nuclei. However, blastomeres with different sizes (from "pinpoint" to "cloud") and numbers of Xist RNA signals remained within single embryos. After implantation, the dysregulated Xist expression was normalized autonomously, as in male clones, to a state of monoallelic expression in both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. However, at term there was no significant improvement in the survival of the siRNA-injected cloned embryos. Thus, siRNA injection was largely effective in repressing the Xist overexpression in female cloned embryos but failed to rescue them, probably because of an inability to mimic consistent monoallelic Xist expression in these embryos. This could only be achieved in female embryos by applying a gene knockout strategy rather than an siRNA approach.

  19. Triptolide T10 enhances AAV-mediated gene transfer in mice striatum.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xinmiao; Zhang, Ting; Hu, Jing; Ding, Wei; Wang, Xiaomin

    2010-08-02

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated gene transfer has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). Triptolide T10 is a monomeric compound isolated from tripterygium wilfordii Hook.f. (Thunder God vine), a traditional Chinese herb for anti-inflammatory medications. In the present study, we co-administered T10 with recombinant AAV2 in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and in the striatum of C57BL/6 mice, and then evaluated the AAV-mediated gene expression levels. The results have shown that T10 significantly augmented the expression of AAV-mediated gene in a dose-dependent fashion without detectable cytotoxicity. As growing evidence indicated that inflammation contributed to the progression of PD, and the anti-inflammatory effect of T10 was shown in our previous studies, our data of T10 to enhance AAV transduction suggest that T10 might be potentially used as a facilitating reagent for the AAV gene therapy applications in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Computational and molecular tools for scalable rAAV-mediated genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Stoimenov, Ivaylo; Ali, Muhammad Akhtar; Pandzic, Tatjana; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The rapid discovery of potential driver mutations through large-scale mutational analyses of human cancers generates a need to characterize their cellular phenotypes. Among the techniques for genome editing, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene targeting is suited for knock-in of single nucleotide substitutions and to a lesser degree for gene knock-outs. However, the generation of gene targeting constructs and the targeting process is time-consuming and labor-intense. To facilitate rAAV-mediated gene targeting, we developed the first software and complementary automation-friendly vector tools to generate optimized targeting constructs for editing human protein encoding genes. By computational approaches, rAAV constructs for editing ∼71% of bases in protein-coding exons were designed. Similarly, ∼81% of genes were predicted to be targetable by rAAV-mediated knock-out. A Gateway-based cloning system for facile generation of rAAV constructs suitable for robotic automation was developed and used in successful generation of targeting constructs. Together, these tools enable automated rAAV targeting construct design, generation as well as enrichment and expansion of targeted cells with desired integrations. PMID:25488813

  1. Molecular characterization, expression analysis and RNAi knock-down of elongation factor 1α and 1γ from Nilaparvata lugens and its yeast-like symbiont.

    PubMed

    Wang, W X; Zhu, T H; Li, K L; Chen, L F; Lai, F X; Fu, Q

    2016-11-04

    In the present paper, four cDNAs encoding the alpha and gamma subunits of elongation factor 1 (EF-1) were cloned and sequenced from Nilaparvata lugens, named NlEF-1α, NlEF-1γ, and its yeast-like symbiont (YLS), named YsEF-1α and YsEF-1γ, respectively. Comparisons with sequences from other species indicated a greater conservation for EF-1α than for EF-1γ. NlEF-1α has two identical copies. The deduced amino acid sequence homology of NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ is 96 and 64%, respectively, compared with Homalodisca vitripennis and Locusta migratoria. The deduced amino acid sequence homology of YsEF-1α and YsEF-1γ is 96 and 74%, respectively, compared with Metarhizium anisopliae and Ophiocordyceps sinensis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that the expression level of NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ mRNA in hemolymph, ovary, fat body and salivary glands were higher than the midgut and leg tissue. YsEF-1α and YsEF-1γ was highly expressed in fat body. The expression level of NlEF-1α was higher than that of NlEF-1γ. Through RNA interference (RNAi) of the two genes, the mortality of nymph reached 92.2% at the 11th day after treatment and the ovarian development was severely hindered. The RT-qPCR analysis verified the correlation between mortality, sterility and the down-regulation of the target genes. The expression and synthesis of vitellogenin (Vg) protein in insects injected with NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was significantly lower than control groups. Attempts to knockdown the YsEF-1 genes in the YLS was unsuccessful. However, the phenotype of N. lugens injected with YsEF-1α dsRNA was the same as that injected with NlEF-1α dsRNA, possibly due to the high similarity (up to 71.9%) in the nucleotide sequences between NlEF-1α and YsEF-1α. We demonstrated that partial silencing of NlEF-1α and NlEF-1γ genes caused lethal and sterility effect on N. lugens. NlEF-1γ shares low identity with that of

  2. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of the gap junction protein, Cx43, attenuates the development of vascular restenosis following balloon injury

    PubMed Central

    HAN, XIAO-JIAN; CHEN, MIN; HONG, TAO; ZHU, LING-YU; HE, DAN; FENG, JIU-GENG; JIANG, LI-PING

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)] has been developed into a mature interventional treatment for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, the long-term therapeutic effect is compromised by the high incidence of vascular restenosis following angioplasty, and the underlying mechanisms of vascular restenosis have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of the gap junction (GJ) protein, connexin 43 (Cx43), in the development of vascular restenosis. To establish vascular restenosis, rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon angioplasty injury. At 0, 7, 14 and 2 days following balloon injury, the arteries were removed, and the intimal/medial area of the vessels was measured to evaluate the degree of restenosis. We found that the intimal area gradually increased following balloon injury. Intimal hyperplasia and restenosis were particularly evident at 14 and 28 days after injury. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of Cx43 was temporarily decreased at 7 days, and subsequently increased at 14 and 28 days following balloon injury, as shown by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. To determine the involvement of Cx43 in vascular restenosis, the lentivirus vector expressing shRNA targeting Cx43, Cx43-RNAi-LV, was used to silence Cx43 in the rat carotid arteries. The knockdown of Cx43 effectively attenuated the development of intimal hyperplasia and vascular restenosis following balloon injury. Thus, our data indicate the vital role of the GJ protein, Cx43, in the development of vascular restenosis, and provide new insight into the pathogenesis of vascular reste-nosis. Cx43 may prove to be a novel potential pharmacological target for the prevention of vascular restenosis following PCI. PMID:25625334

  3. AAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal disorders in large animal models.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Lhériteau, Elsa; Lhéariteau, Elsa; Moullier, Phillip; Rolling, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of inherited and noninherited blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. The most widely used vectors for ocular gene delivery are based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) because they elicit minimal immune responses and mediated long-term transgene expression in a variety of retinal cell types. Extensive preclinical evaluation of new strategies in large animal models is key to the development of successful gene-based therapies for the retina. Because of differences in the retinal structures among species and unique structures such as the macula and fovea in the primate retina, nonhuman primates are widely used as preclinical animal models. But the observation of inherited retinal degenerations in dogs, which share a number of clinical and pathologic similarities with humans, has led to the characterization of several canine models for retinal diseases, one of which has already responded successfully to AAV-mediated gene therapy. This article presents a review and detailed discussion of the various large animal models available for the study of AAV-mediated gene-based therapies in the retina.

  4. AAV-mediated gene delivery attenuates neuroinflammation in feline Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Allison M; Peterson, Tiffany A; Gross, Amanda L; Wells, Stephen Z; McCurdy, Victoria J; Wolfe, Karen G; Dennis, John C; Brunson, Brandon L; Gray-Edwards, Heather; Randle, Ashley N; Johnson, Aime K; Morrison, Edward E; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2017-01-06

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the absence of hydrolytic enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (Hex), which results in storage of GM2 ganglioside in neurons and unremitting neurodegeneration. Neuron loss initially affects fine motor skills, but rapidly progresses to loss of all body faculties, a vegetative state, and death by five years of age in humans. A well-established feline model of SD allows characterization of the disease in a large animal model and provides a means to test the safety and efficacy of therapeutic interventions before initiating clinical trials. In this study, we demonstrate a robust central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory response in feline SD, primarily marked by expansion and activation of the microglial cell population. Quantification of major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) labeling revealed significant up-regulation throughout the CNS with areas rich in white matter most severely affected. Expression of the leukocyte chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α) was also up-regulated in the brain. SD cats were treated with intracranial delivery of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing feline Hex, with a study endpoint 16weeks post treatment. AAV-mediated gene delivery repressed the expansion and activation of microglia and normalized MHC-II and MIP-1α levels. These data reiterate the profound inflammatory response in SD and show that neuroinflammation is abrogated after AAV-mediated restoration of enzymatic activity.

  5. [The set-up of an in vitro model for stable knockdown of MyD88 by lentivirus-based RNAi in IEC-6 cell line and the study on its early apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Bao, Pingqian; Li, Yang; Chen, Keling; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Bin; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zongguang

    2012-12-01

    Intestinal inflammatory disease is a kind of non-specific disease with morbidity increasing yearly. It has been proved that the Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathways are closely related to intestinal inflammatory diseases. Myeloid differentiation protein 88 (Myd88) is a critical adaptor protein of TLR4 signaling and critical for the study of intestinal inflammatory disease, but stable Myd88 knockdown in vitro models of cell line are still very few. In the present study, an HIV-1-based lentivirus three-plamid packaging system was used for the construction of a lentivirual vector mediating RNA interference (RNAi) against Myd88 in intestinal fossae epithelial cell line-6 (IEC-6). Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to detect Myd88 expression. Annexin V staining and flowcytometry (FLM) were applied to detect and evaluate the early apoptosis. The results showed that lentiviral vectors containing the shRNA expression cassette specifically targeting Myd88 were constructed and efficiently stably knocked down Myd88 expression in IEC-6 cell line. Early apoptosis was significantly decreased after Myd88 knockdown. This study successfully constructed a lentivirus-based RNAi for Myd88 and detailed the key technique combined with characteristics of the early apoptosis after the Myd88 knockdown, provided a novel, stable and repeatable in vitro model for the pathogenesis, targeting therapeutic study for the intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  6. Knockdown of nuclease activity in the gut enhances RNAi efficiency in the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, but not in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Spit, Jornt; Philips, Annelies; Wynant, Niels; Santos, Dulce; Plaetinck, Geert; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2017-02-01

    The responsiveness towards orally delivered dsRNA and the potency of a subsequent environmental RNA interference (RNAi) response strongly differs between different insect species. While some species are very sensitive to dsRNA delivery through the diet, others are not. The underlying reasons for this may vary, but degradation of dsRNA by nucleases in the gut lumen is believed to play a crucial role. The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, is a voracious defoliator of potato crops worldwide, and is currently under investigation for novel control methods based on dsRNA treatments. Here we describe the identification and characterization of two nuclease genes exclusively expressed in the gut of this pest species. Removal of nuclease activity in adults increased the sensitivity towards dsRNA and resulted in improved protection of potato plants. A similar strategy in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, for which we show a far more potent nuclease activity in the gut juice, did however not lead to an improvement of the RNAi response. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Taken together, the present data confirm a negative effect of nucleases in the gut on the environmental RNAi response, and further suggest that interfering with this activity is a strategy worth pursuing for improving RNAi efficacy in insect pest control applications.

  7. Identification of gene knockdown targets conferring enhanced isobutanol and 1-butanol tolerance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a tunable RNAi screening approach.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nathan; Sun, Jie; Morse, Nicholas; Schmitz, Alexander; Alper, Hal S

    2016-12-01

    Improving yeast tolerance to 1-butanol and isobutanol is a step toward enabling high-titer production. To identify previously unknown genetic targets leading to increased tolerance, we establish a tunable RNA interference (RNAi) screening approach. Specifically, we optimized the efficiency and tunability of RNA interference library screening in yeast, ultimately enabling downregulation efficiencies from 0 to 94 %. Using this system, we identified the Hsp70 family as a key regulator of isobutanol tolerance in a single round of screening, with downregulation of these genes conferring up to 64 % increased growth in 12 g/L isobutanol. For 1-butanol, we find through two rounds of iterative screening that the combined downregulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and enolase improves growth up to 3100 % in 10 g/L 1-butanol. Collectively, this work improves the tunability of RNAi in yeast as demonstrated by the discovery of novel effectors for these complex phenotypes.

  8. RNAi-Mediated Knock-Down of transformer and transformer 2 to Generate Male-Only Progeny in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiqing; Wu, Qiang; Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Guifen; Wan, Fanghao

    2015-01-01

    The transformer (tra) gene appears to act as the genetic switch that promotes female development by interaction with the transformer2 (tra-2) gene in several dipteran species including the Medfly, housefly and Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we describe the isolation, expression and function of tra and tra-2 in the economically important agricultural pest, the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). Bdtra and Bdtra-2 are similar to their homologs from other tephritid species. Bdtra demonstrated sex-specific transcripts: one transcript in females and two transcripts in males. In contrast, Bdtra-2 only had one transcript that was common to males and females, which was transcribed continuously in different adult tissues and developmental stages. Bdtra-2 and the female form of Bdtra were maternally inherited in eggs, whereas the male form of Bdtra was not detectable until embryos of 1 and 2 h after egg laying. Function analyses of Bdtra and Bdtra-2 indicated that both were indispensable for female development, as nearly 100% males were obtained with embryonic RNAi against either Bdtra or Bdtra-2. The fertility of these RNAi-generated males was subsequently tested. More than 80% of RNAi-generated males could mate and the mated females could lay eggs, but only 40-48.6% males gave rise to progeny. In XX-reversed males and intersex individuals, no clear female gonadal morphology was observed after dissection. These results shed light on the development of a genetic sexing system with male-only release for this agricultural pest.

  9. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  10. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  11. RNAi-Mediated Knock-Down of transformer and transformer 2 to Generate Male-Only Progeny in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Guifen; Wan, Fanghao

    2015-01-01

    The transformer (tra) gene appears to act as the genetic switch that promotes female development by interaction with the transformer2 (tra-2) gene in several dipteran species including the Medfly, housefly and Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we describe the isolation, expression and function of tra and tra-2 in the economically important agricultural pest, the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). Bdtra and Bdtra-2 are similar to their homologs from other tephritid species. Bdtra demonstrated sex-specific transcripts: one transcript in females and two transcripts in males. In contrast, Bdtra-2 only had one transcript that was common to males and females, which was transcribed continuously in different adult tissues and developmental stages. Bdtra-2 and the female form of Bdtra were maternally inherited in eggs, whereas the male form of Bdtra was not detectable until embryos of 1 and 2 h after egg laying. Function analyses of Bdtra and Bdtra-2 indicated that both were indispensable for female development, as nearly 100% males were obtained with embryonic RNAi against either Bdtra or Bdtra-2. The fertility of these RNAi-generated males was subsequently tested. More than 80% of RNAi-generated males could mate and the mated females could lay eggs, but only 40-48.6% males gave rise to progeny. In XX-reversed males and intersex individuals, no clear female gonadal morphology was observed after dissection. These results shed light on the development of a genetic sexing system with male-only release for this agricultural pest. PMID:26057559

  12. Knockdown of neuropeptide Y in the dorsomedial hypothalamus reverses high-fat diet-induced obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonwook J; Bi, Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) plays an important role in the regulation of energy balance. While DMH NPY overexpression causes hyperphagia and obesity in rats, knockdown of NPY in the DMH via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RNAi (AAVshNPY) ameliorates these alterations. Whether this knockdown has a therapeutic effect on obesity and glycemic disorder has yet to be determined. The present study sought to test this potential using a rat model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and insulin resistance, mimicking human obesity with impaired glucose homeostasis. Rats had ad libitum access to rodent regular chow (RC) or HFD. Six weeks later, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for verifying HFD-induced glucose intolerance. After verification, obese rats received bilateral DMH injections of AAVshNPY or the control vector AAVshCTL, and OGTT and insulin tolerance test (ITT) were performed at 16 and 18 wk after viral injection (23 and 25 wk on HFD), respectively. Rats were killed at 26 wk on HFD. We found that AAVshCTL rats on HFD remained hyperphagic, obese, glucose intolerant, and insulin resistant relative to lean control RC-fed rats receiving DMH injection of AAVshCTL, whereas these alterations were reversed in NPY knockdown rats fed a HFD. NPY knockdown rats exhibited normal food intake, body weight, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity, as seen in lean control rats. Together, these results demonstrate a therapeutic action of DMH NPY knockdown against obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in rats, providing a potential target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

  13. RNAi knock-downs support roles for the mucin-like (AeIMUC1) gene and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) gene in Aedes aegypti susceptibility to Plasmodium gallinaceum.

    PubMed

    Berois, M; Romero-Severson, J; Severson, D W

    2012-03-01

    The mosquito midgut represents the first barrier encountered by the Plasmodium parasite (Haemosporida: Plasmodiidae) when it is ingested in blood from an infected vertebrate. Previous studies identified the Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) mucin-like (AeIMUC1) and short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) genes as midgut-expressed candidate genes influencing susceptibility to infection by Plasmodium gallinaceum (Brumpt). We used RNA inference (RNAi) by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) injections to examine ookinete survival to the oocyst stage following individual gene knock-downs. Double-stranded RNA gene knock-downs were performed 3 days prior to P. gallinaceum infection and oocyst development was evaluated at 7 days post-infection. Mean numbers of parasites developing to the oocyst stage were significantly reduced by 52.3% in dsAeIMUC1-injected females and by 36.5% in dsSDR-injected females compared with females injected with a dsβ-gal control. The prevalence of infection was significantly reduced in dsAeIMUC1- and dsSDR-injected females compared with females injected with dsβ-gal; these reductions resulted in a two- and three-fold increase in the number of uninfected individuals, respectively. Overall, these results suggest that both AeIMUC1 and SDR play a role in Ae. aegypti vector competence to P. gallinaceum.

  14. Recombinant AAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina: gene therapy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rolling, F

    2004-10-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as retinal macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa constitute a broad group of diseases that all share one critical feature, the progressive apoptotic loss of cells in the retina. There is currently no effective treatment available by which the course of these disorders can be modified, and visual dysfunction often progresses to total blindness. Gene therapy represents an attractive approach to treating retinal degeneration because the eye is easily accessible and allows local application of therapeutic vectors with reduced risk of systemic effects. Furthermore, transgene expression within the retina and effects of treatments may be monitored by a variety of noninvasive examinations. An increasing number of strategies for molecular treatment of retinal disease rely on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a therapeutic gene delivery vector. Before rAAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal degeneration becomes a reality, there are a number of important requirements that include: (1) evaluation of different rAAV serotypes, (2) screening of vectors in large animals in order to ensure that they mediate safe and long-term gene expression, (3) appropriate regulation of therapeutic gene expression, (4) evaluation of vectors carrying a therapeutic gene in relevant animal models, (5) identification of suitable patients, and finally (6) manufacture of clinical grade vector. All these steps towards gene therapy are still being explored. Outcomes of these studies will be discussed in the order in which they occur, from vector studies to preclinical assessment of the therapeutic potential of rAAV in animal models of retinal degeneration.

  15. Sustained correction of FVII deficiency in dogs using AAV-mediated expression of zymogen FVII.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Contreras, Oscar A; Smith, Shannon M; Bellinger, Dwight A; Raymer, Robin A; Merricks, Elizabeth; Faella, Armida; Pavani, Giulia; Zhou, Shangzhen; Nichols, Timothy C; High, Katherine A; Margaritis, Paris

    2016-02-04

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder treated by infusion of fresh-frozen plasma, plasma-derived FVII concentrates and low-dose recombinant activated FVII. Clinical data suggest that a mild elevation of plasma FVII levels (>10% normal) results in improved hemostasis. Research dogs with a G96E missense FVII mutation (FVII-G96E) have <1% FVII activity. By western blot, we show that they have undetectable plasmatic antigen, thus representing the most prevalent type of human FVII deficiency (low antigen/activity). In these dogs, we determine the feasibility of a gene therapy approach using liver-directed, adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotype 8 vector delivery of a canine FVII (cFVII) zymogen transgene. FVII-G96E dogs received escalating AAV doses (2E11 to 4.95E13 vector genomes [vg] per kg). Clinically therapeutic expression (15% normal) was attained with as low as 6E11 vg/kg of AAV and has been stable for >1 year (ongoing) without antibody formation to the cFVII transgene. Sustained and supraphysiological expression of 770% normal was observed using 4.95E13 vg/kg of AAV (2.6 years, ongoing). No evidence of pathological activation of coagulation or detrimental animal physiology was observed as platelet counts, d-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and serum chemistries remained normal in all dogs (cumulative 6.4 years). We observed a transient and noninhibitory immunoglobulin G class 2 response against cFVII only in the dog receiving the highest AAV dose. In conclusion, in the only large-animal model representing the majority of FVII mutation types, our data are first to demonstrate the feasibility, safety, and long-term duration of AAV-mediated correction of FVII deficiency.

  16. RNAi knockdown of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene eliminates jinggangmycin-enhanced reproduction and population growth in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Li; Li, Xin; Stanley, David; Song, Qi-Sheng; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in ecology lies in understanding the coexistence of intraguild species, well documented at the organismal level, but not at the molecular level. This study focused on the effects of the antibiotic, jinggangmycin (JGM), a fungicide widely used in Asian rice agroecosystems, on reproduction of insects within the planthopper guild, including the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens and the white-backed planthopper (WBPH) Sogatella furcifera, both serious resurgence rice pests. JGM exposure significantly increased BPH fecundity and population growth, but suppressed both parameters in laboratory and field WBPH populations. We used digital gene expression and transcriptomic analyses to identify a panel of differentially expressed genes, including a set of up-regulated genes in JGM-treated BPH, which were down-regulated in JGM-treated WBPH. RNAi silencing of Acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC), highly expressed in JGM-treated BPH, reduced ACC expression (by > 60%) and eliminated JGM-induced fecundity increases in BPH. These findings support our hypothesis that differences in ACC expression separates intraguild species at the molecular level. PMID:26482193

  17. RNAi knockdown of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene eliminates jinggangmycin-enhanced reproduction and population growth in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Li; Li, Xin; Stanley, David; Song, Qi-Sheng; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2015-10-20

    A major challenge in ecology lies in understanding the coexistence of intraguild species, well documented at the organismal level, but not at the molecular level. This study focused on the effects of the antibiotic, jinggangmycin (JGM), a fungicide widely used in Asian rice agroecosystems, on reproduction of insects within the planthopper guild, including the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens and the white-backed planthopper (WBPH) Sogatella furcifera, both serious resurgence rice pests. JGM exposure significantly increased BPH fecundity and population growth, but suppressed both parameters in laboratory and field WBPH populations. We used digital gene expression and transcriptomic analyses to identify a panel of differentially expressed genes, including a set of up-regulated genes in JGM-treated BPH, which were down-regulated in JGM-treated WBPH. RNAi silencing of Acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC), highly expressed in JGM-treated BPH, reduced ACC expression (by > 60%) and eliminated JGM-induced fecundity increases in BPH. These findings support our hypothesis that differences in ACC expression separates intraguild species at the molecular level.

  18. The development of a high-yield recombinant protein bioreactor through RNAi induced knockdown of ATP/ADP transporter in Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Reynald; Diao, Hong; Hüner, Norm; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Ma, Shengwu

    2011-10-20

    There is an increased need for high-yield protein production platforms to meet growing demand. Tuber-based production in Solanum tuberosum offers several advantages, including high biomass yield, although protein concentration is typically low. In this work, we investigated the question whether minor interruption of starch biosynthesis can have a positive effect on tuber protein content and/or tuber biomass, as previous work suggested that partial obstruction of starch synthesis had variable effects on tuber yield. To this end, we used a RNAi approach to knock down ATP/ADP transporter and obtained a large number of transgenic lines for screening of lines with improved tuber protein content and/or tuber biomass. The initial screening was based on tuber biomass because of its relative simplicity. We identified a line, riAATP1-10, with minor (less than 15%) reduction in starch, that had a nearly 30% increase in biomass compared to wild-type, producing both more and larger tubers with altered morphological features compared to wild-type. riAATP1-10 tubers have a higher concentration of soluble protein compared to wild-type tubers, with nearly 50% more soluble protein. We assessed the suitability of this line as a new bioreactor by expressing a human scFv, reaching over 0.5% of total soluble protein, a 2-fold increase over the highest accumulating line in a wild-type background. Together with increased biomass and increased levels in total protein content, foreign protein expression in riAATP1-10 line would translate into a nearly 4-fold increase in recombinant protein yield per plant. Our results indicate that riAATP1-10 line provides an improved expression system for production of foreign proteins.

  19. RNAi-mediated gene knockdown and anti-angiogenic therapy of RCCs using a cyclic RGD-modified liposomal-siRNA system.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yu; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Sato, Yusuke; Hyodo, Mamoru; Akita, Hidetaka; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Kyoko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-10

    Angiogenesis is one of crucial processes associated with tumor growth and development, and consequently a prime target for cancer therapy. Although tumor endothelial cells (TECs) play a key role in pathological angiogenesis, investigating phenotypical changes in neovessels when a gene expression in TEC is suppressed is a difficult task. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) represents a potential agent due to its ability to silence a gene of interest. We previously developed a system for in vivo siRNA delivery to cancer cells that involves a liposomal-delivery system, a MEND that contains a unique pH-sensitive cationic lipid, YSK05 (YSK-MEND). In the present study, we report on the development of a system that permits the delivery of siRNA to TECs by combining the YSK-MEND and a ligand that is specific to TECs. Cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) (cRGD) is a well-known ligand to αVβ3 integrin, which is selectively expressed at high levels in TECs. We incorporated cRGD into the YSK-MEND (RGD-MEND) to achieve an efficient gene silencing in TECs. Quantitative RT-PCR and the 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR indicated that the intravenous injection of RGD-MEND at a dose of 4.0mg/kg induced a significant RNAi-mediated gene reduction in TEC but not in endothelial cells of other organs. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic potency of the RGD-MEND encapsulating siRNA against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. A substantial delay in tumor growth was observed after three sequential RGD-MEND injections on alternate days. In conclusion, the RGD-MEND represents a new approach for the characterization of TECs and for us in anti-angiogenic therapy.

  20. RNAi knock-down of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Toll gene and immune deficiency gene reveals their difference in regulating antimicrobial peptides transcription.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fujun; He, Shulin; Liu, Yongjie; Zhu, Xiaowen; Sun, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaolin

    2014-06-01

    NF-κB dependent antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are of critical importance in protecting insects or mammals from microorganisms infection. However, we still do not make clear signaling pathways in regulating AMPs expression in shrimps. In this study, RNAi approach was used to study differences between Toll signaling pathway and immune deficiency signaling pathway in regulating the transcription of NF-κB dependent AMPs post bacteria challenge. Results showed that the transcription level of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor was highly suppressed in Litopenaeus vannamei immune deficiency (LvIMD) silenced shrimps by gene specific dsRNA compared to Litopenaeus vannamei Toll (LvToll) silenced shrimps with or without Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus lysodeikticus challenge. Conversely the transcription level of penaeidin3a was significantly suppressed in LvToll silenced shrimps compared to LvIMD silenced shrimps. However, no obvious difference was found in regulating the transcription of CrustinP. Meanwhile, we found that silencing LvToll both down regulated the transcription of Dorsal and Relish while silencing LvIMD only down regulated the transcription of Relish. At last, shrimp survival experiment showed that post V. anguillarum challenge high mortality was found both in LvToll and LvIMD silenced groups while post M. lysodeikticus challenge we saw high mortality only in LvToll silenced group. Hence, we conclude that shrimp L. vannamei Toll pathway and IMD pathway might be different in regulating the transcription of NF-κB dependent AMPs and responding to bacteria challenge but not independent of each other.

  1. RNAi-Mediated Knockdown of Catalase Causes Cell Cycle Arrest in SL-1 Cells and Results in Low Survival Rate of Spodoptera litura (Fabricius)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Meiying; Chen, Shaohua; Muhammad, Rizwan-ul-Haq; Dong, Xiaolin; Gong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production can lead to the disruption of structural and functional integrity of cells as a consequence of reactive interaction between ROS and various biological components. Catalase (CAT) is a common enzyme existing in nearly all organisms exposed to oxygen, which decomposes harmful hydrogen peroxide, into water and oxygen. In this study, the full length sequence that encodes CAT-like protein from Spodoptera litura named siltCAT (GenBank accession number: JQ_663444) was cloned and characterized. Amino acid sequence alignment showed siltCAT shared relatively high conservation with other insect, especially the conserved residues which defined heme and NADPH orientation. Expression pattern analysis showed that siltCAT mRNA was mainly expressed in the fat body, midgut, cuticle and malpighian tube, and as well as over last instar larvae, pupa and adult stages. RNA interference was used to silence CAT gene in SL-1 cells and the fourth-instar stage of S. litura larvae respectively. Our results provided evidence that CAT knockdown induced ROS generation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SL-1 cells. It also confirmed the decrease in survival rate because of increased ROS production in experimental groups injected with double-stranded RNA of CAT (dsCAT). This study implied that ROS scavenging by CAT is important for S. litura survival. PMID:23555693

  2. Outer Plexiform Layer Structures Are Not Altered Following AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in Healthy Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Giers, Bert C.; Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Isiegas, Carolina; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2017-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy approaches have been developed for a variety of different diseases. In particular, clinical gene therapy trials for RPE65 mutations, X-linked retinoschisis, and choroideremia have been conducted at different centers in recent years, showing that adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is safe, but limitations exist as to the therapeutic benefit and long-term duration of the treatment. The technique of vector delivery to retinal cells relies on subretinal injection of the vector solution, causing a transient retinal detachment. Although retinal detachments are known to cause remodeling of retinal neuronal structures as well as significant cell loss, the possible effects of this short-term therapeutic retinal detachment on retinal structure and circuitry have not yet been studied in detail. In this study, retinal morphology and apoptotic status were examined in healthy rat retinas following AAV-mediated gene transfer via subretinal injection with AAV2/5.CMV.d2GFP or sham injection with fluorescein. Outer plexiform layer (OPL) morphology was assessed by immunohistochemical labeling, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and electron microscopy. The number of synaptic contacts in the OPL was quantified after labeling with structural markers. To assess the apoptotic status, inflammatory and pro-apoptotic markers were tested and TUNEL assay for the detection of apoptotic nuclei was performed. Pre- and postsynaptic structures in the OPL, such as synaptic ribbons or horizontal and bipolar cell processes, did not differ in size or shape in injected versus non-injected areas and control retinas. Absolute numbers of synaptic ribbons were not altered. No signs of relevant gliosis were detected. TUNEL labeling of retinal cells did not vary between injected and non-injected areas, and apoptosis-inducing factor was not delocalized to the nucleus in transduced areas. The neuronal circuits in the OPL of healthy rat retinas undergoing AAV-mediated gene

  3. Outer Plexiform Layer Structures Are Not Altered Following AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in Healthy Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Giers, Bert C; Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Isiegas, Carolina; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2017-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy approaches have been developed for a variety of different diseases. In particular, clinical gene therapy trials for RPE65 mutations, X-linked retinoschisis, and choroideremia have been conducted at different centers in recent years, showing that adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy is safe, but limitations exist as to the therapeutic benefit and long-term duration of the treatment. The technique of vector delivery to retinal cells relies on subretinal injection of the vector solution, causing a transient retinal detachment. Although retinal detachments are known to cause remodeling of retinal neuronal structures as well as significant cell loss, the possible effects of this short-term therapeutic retinal detachment on retinal structure and circuitry have not yet been studied in detail. In this study, retinal morphology and apoptotic status were examined in healthy rat retinas following AAV-mediated gene transfer via subretinal injection with AAV2/5.CMV.d2GFP or sham injection with fluorescein. Outer plexiform layer (OPL) morphology was assessed by immunohistochemical labeling, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and electron microscopy. The number of synaptic contacts in the OPL was quantified after labeling with structural markers. To assess the apoptotic status, inflammatory and pro-apoptotic markers were tested and TUNEL assay for the detection of apoptotic nuclei was performed. Pre- and postsynaptic structures in the OPL, such as synaptic ribbons or horizontal and bipolar cell processes, did not differ in size or shape in injected versus non-injected areas and control retinas. Absolute numbers of synaptic ribbons were not altered. No signs of relevant gliosis were detected. TUNEL labeling of retinal cells did not vary between injected and non-injected areas, and apoptosis-inducing factor was not delocalized to the nucleus in transduced areas. The neuronal circuits in the OPL of healthy rat retinas undergoing AAV-mediated gene

  4. Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Mediated Dystrophin Gene Transfer Studies and Exon Skipping Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Kawecka, Klaudia; Theodoulides, Michael; Hasoglu, Yalin; Jarmin, Susan; Kymalainen, Hanna; Le-Heron, Anita; Popplewell, Linda; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Athanasopoulos, Takis

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked inherited musclewasting disease primarily affecting young boys with prevalence of between1:3,500- 1:5,000, is a rare genetic disease caused by defects in the gene for dystrophin. Dystrophin protein is critical to the stability of myofibers in skeletal and cardiac muscle. There is currently no cure available to ameliorate DMD and/or its patho-physiology. A number of therapeutic strategies including molecular-based therapeutics that replace or correct the missing or nonfunctional dystrophin protein have been devised to correct the patho-physiological consequences induced by dystrophin absence. We will review the current in vivo experimentation status (including preclinical models and clinical trials) for two of these approaches, namely: 1) Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated (micro) dystrophin gene augmentation/ supplementation and 2) Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping strategies.

  5. AAV-mediated gene delivery of BDNF or GDNF is neuroprotective in a model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kells, Adrian P; Fong, Dahna M; Dragunow, Mike; During, Matthew J; Young, Deborah; Connor, Bronwen

    2004-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that results in the progressive loss of GABAergic medium spiny projection neurons in the striatum. Neurotrophic factors have demonstrated neuroprotective actions on striatal neurons, suggesting that increased neurotrophic factor expression may prevent or reduce neuronal loss in the HD brain. We investigated whether enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), achieved by adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene delivery, could protect striatal neurons in the quinolinic acid (QA) rodent model of HD. Adult Wistar rats received unilateral intrastriatal injections of AAV-BDNF, AAV-GDNF, AAV-GFP, or PBS. Three weeks later, the rats were lesioned with QA, a toxin that induces striatal neuron death by an excitotoxic process. Both AAV-BDNF and AAV-GDNF significantly reduced the loss of both NeuN- and calbindin-immunopositive striatal neurons 2 weeks after lesion compared to controls. AAV-BDNF also provided significant neurotrophic support to NOS-immunopositive striatal interneurons, while AAV-GDNF-treated rats demonstrated significant protection of parvalbumin-immunopositive striatal interneurons compared to controls. These results indicate that AAV-mediated gene transfer of BDNF or GDNF into the striatum provides neuronal protection in a rodent model of HD.

  6. Modulation of tolerance to the transgene product in a nonhuman primate model of AAV-mediated gene transfer to liver.

    PubMed

    Mingozzi, Federico; Hasbrouck, Nicole C; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Edmonson, Shyrie A; Hui, Daniel J; Sabatino, Denise E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A

    2007-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer of factor IX (F.IX) to the liver results in long-term expression of transgene in experimental animals, but only short-term expression in humans. Loss of F.IX expression is likely due to a cytotoxic immune response to the AAV capsid, which results in clearance of transduced hepatocytes. We used a nonhuman primate model to assess the safety of AAV gene transfer coupled with an anti-T-cell regimen designed to block this immune response. Administration of a 3-drug regimen consisting of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), sirolimus, and the anti-IL-2 receptor antibody daclizumab consistently resulted in formation of inhibitory antibodies to human F.IX following hepatic artery administration of an AAV-hF.IX vector, whereas a 2-drug regimen consisting only of MMF and sirolimus did not. Administration of daclizumab was accompanied by a dramatic drop in the population of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that choice of immunosuppression (IS) regimen can modulate immune responses to the transgene product upon hepatic gene transfer in subjects not fully tolerant; and that induction of transgene tolerance may depend on a population of antigen-specific Tregs.

  7. The AAV-mediated and RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system for gene therapy of DMD and BMD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Wu, Peng; Shi, Zhi-Min; Xu, Yan-Li; Liu, Zhi-Jun

    2017-04-05

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (Dmd) result in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), which afflict many newborn boys. In 2016, Brain and Development published several interesting articles on DMD treatment with antisense oligonucleotide, kinase inhibitor, and prednisolone. Even more strikingly, three articles in the issue 6271 of Science in 2016 provide new insights into gene therapy of DMD and BMD via the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9). In brief, adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors transport guided RNAs (gRNAs) and Cas9 into mdx mouse model, gRNAs recognize the mutated Dmd exon 23 (having a stop codon), and Cas9 cut the mutated exon 23 off the Dmd gene. These manipulations restored expression of truncated but partially functional dystrophin, improved skeletal and cardiac muscle function, and increased survival of mdx mice significantly. This review concisely summarized the related advancements and discussed their primary implications in the future gene therapy of DMD, including AAV-vector selection, gRNA designing, Cas9 optimization, dystrophin-restoration efficiency, administration routes, and systemic and long-term therapeutic efficacy. Future orientations, including off-target effects, safety concerns, immune responses, precision medicine, and Dmd-editing in the brain (potentially blocked by the blood-brain barrier) were also elucidated briefly. Collectively, the AAV-mediated and RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has major superiorities compared with traditional gene therapy, and might contribute to the treatment of DMD and BMD substantially in the near future.

  8. AAV-mediated gene transfer of the obesity-associated gene Etv5 in rat midbrain does not affect energy balance or motivated behavior.

    PubMed

    Boender, Arjen J; Koning, Nivard A; van den Heuvel, José K; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; van Rozen, Andrea J; la Fleur, Susanne E; Adan, Roger A H

    2014-01-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have implicated the transcription factor E-twenty- six version 5 (Etv5) in the regulation of body mass index. Further substantiating the role of Etv5 in feeding behavior are the findings that targeted disruption of Etv5 in mice leads to decreased body weight gain and that expression of Etv5 is decreased in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta (VTA/SNpc) after food restriction. As Etv5 has been suggested to influence dopaminergic neurotransmission by driving the expression of genes that are responsible for the synthesis and release of dopamine, we investigated if expression levels of Etv5 are dependent on nutritional state and subsequently influence the expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase. While it was shown that Etv5 expression in the VTA/SNpc increases after central administration of leptin and that Etv5 was able to drive expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vitro, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 into the VTA/SNpc of rats did not alter expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in vivo. Moreover, AAV-mediated gene transfer of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc did not affect measures of energy balance or performances in a progressive ratio schedule. Thus, these data do not support a role for increased expression of Etv5 in the VTA/SNpc in the regulation of feeding behavior.

  9. AAV-Mediated Transduction and Targeting of Retinal Bipolar Cells with Improved mGluR6 Promoters in Rodents and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, TH; Ivanova, E; Cheng, JG; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell-type specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the para-fovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies. PMID:27115727

  10. AAV-mediated transduction and targeting of retinal bipolar cells with improved mGluR6 promoters in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q; Ganjawala, T H; Ivanova, E; Cheng, J G; Troilo, D; Pan, Z-H

    2016-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been a powerful gene delivery vehicle to the retina for basic research and gene therapy. For many of these applications, achieving cell type-specific targeting and high transduction efficiency is desired. Recently, there has been increasing interest in AAV-mediated gene targeting to specific retinal bipolar cell types. A 200-bp enhancer in combination with a basal SV40 promoter has been commonly used to target transgenes into ON-type bipolar cells. In the current study, we searched for additional cis-regulatory elements in the mGluR6 gene for improving AAV-mediated transduction efficiency into retinal bipolar cells. Our results showed that the combination of the endogenous mGluR6 promoter with additional enhancers in the introns of the mGluR6 gene markedly enhanced AAV transduction efficiency as well as made the targeting more selective for rod bipolar cells in mice. Furthermore, the AAV vectors with the improved promoter could target to ON bipolar cells with robust transduction efficiency in the parafovea and the far peripheral retina of marmoset monkeys. The improved mGluR6 promoter constructs could provide a valuable tool for genetic manipulation in rod bipolar cells in mice and facilitate clinical applications for ON bipolar cell-based gene therapies.

  11. RNAi induced knockdown of a cadherin-like protein (EF531715) does not affect toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 or Cry3Aa to Diabrotica virgifera virgifera larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Sek Yee; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Wang, Haichuan; Vélez, Ana María; Hasler, James; McCaskill, David; Xu, Tao; Chen, Hong; Jurzenski, Jessica; Kelker, Matthew; Xu, Xiaoping; Narva, Kenneth; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is an important maize pest throughout most of the U.S. Corn Belt. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins including modified Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic maize to protect against WCR feeding damage. To date, there is limited information regarding the WCR midgut target sites for these proteins. In this study, we examined whether a cadherin-like gene from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (DvvCad; GenBank accession # EF531715) associated with WCR larval midgut tissue is necessary for Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 toxicity. Experiments were designed to examine the sensitivity of WCR to trypsin activated Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 after oral feeding of the DvvCad dsRNA to knockdown gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that DvvCad mRNA transcript levels were reduced in larvae treated with cadherin dsRNA. Relative cadherin expression by immunoblot analysis and nano-liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) of WCR neonate brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) preparations exposed to DvvCad dsRNA confirmed reduced cadherin expression when compared to BBMV from untreated larvae. However, the larval mortality and growth inhibition of WCR neonates exposed to cadherin dsRNA for two days followed by feeding exposure to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 for four days was not significantly different to that observed in insects exposed to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 alone. In combination, these results suggest that cadherin is unlikely to be involved in the toxicity of Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 to WCR.

  12. rAAV-mediated delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes neurite outgrowth and protects neurodegeneration in focal ischemic model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Yu, Zhigang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zichao; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Luran; Zhao, Jiexu

    2011-06-20

    Stroke is one of the neurological diseases which lead to permanently neuronal damage after temporary or long-term occlusion of vessels or after heart attack. However, there are few efficient strategies to prevent or treat this kind of insult in clinical because the consequence is irreversible and could be long-lasting after the onset of stroke. Gene therapy especially using viral system has long been addressed to be of great potential to reduce the damage. Here, we generated recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Cells infected with rAAV-BDNF could be able to produce functional BDNF which promoted neurite outgrowth and protected neurons from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Further more, single injection of rAAV showed neuroprotection against cell death in focal ischemic model. These results showed that rAAV-mediated gene delivery is functional, which shed light to the future application of viral system-based gene therapy in clinical.

  13. AAV-mediated liver-specific MPV17 expression restores mtDNA levels and prevents diet-induced liver failure.

    PubMed

    Bottani, Emanuela; Giordano, Carla; Civiletto, Gabriele; Di Meo, Ivano; Auricchio, Alberto; Ciusani, Emilio; Marchet, Silvia; Lamperti, Costanza; d'Amati, Giulia; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in human MPV17 cause a hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS) hallmarked by early-onset liver failure, leading to premature death. Liver transplantation and frequent feeding using slow-release carbohydrates are the only available therapies, although surviving patients eventually develop slowly progressive peripheral and central neuropathy. The physiological role of Mpv17, including its functional link to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance, is still unclear. We show here that Mpv17 is part of a high molecular weight complex of unknown composition, which is essential for mtDNA maintenance in critical tissues, i.e. liver, of a Mpv17 knockout mouse model. On a standard diet, Mpv17-/- mouse shows hardly any symptom of liver dysfunction, but a ketogenic diet (KD) leads these animals to liver cirrhosis and failure. However, when expression of human MPV17 is carried out by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene replacement, the Mpv17 knockout mice are able to reconstitute the Mpv17-containing supramolecular complex, restore liver mtDNA copy number and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proficiency, and prevent liver failure induced by the KD. These results open new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of MPV17-related liver-specific MDS.

  14. Long-term restoration of rod and cone vision by single dose rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina in a canine model of childhood blindness.

    PubMed

    Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2005-12-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations.

  15. Long-Term Restoration of Rod and Cone Vision by Single Dose rAAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to the Retina in a Canine Model of Childhood Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Maguire, Albert M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2010-01-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations. PMID:16226919

  16. Safety and efficacy of AAV-mediated calpain 3 gene transfer in a mouse model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Marc; Roudaut, Carinne; Martin, Samia; Fougerousse, Françoise; Suel, Laurence; Poupiot, Jérôme; Gicquel, Evelyne; Noulet, Fanny; Danos, Olivier; Richard, Isabelle

    2006-02-01

    Calpainopathy (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, LGMD2A) is a recessive muscular disorder caused by deficiency in the calcium-dependent cysteine protease calpain 3. To date, no treatment exists for this disease. We evaluated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors for gene therapy in a murine model for LGMD2A. To drive the expression of calpain 3, we used rAAV2/1 pseudotyped vectors and muscle-specific promoters to avoid calpain 3 cell toxicity. We report efficient and stable transgene expression in muscle with restoration of the proteolytic activity and without evident toxicity. In addition, calpain 3 was correctly targeted to the sarcomere. Moreover, its presence resulted in improvement of the histological features and in therapeutic efficacy at the physiological levels, including correction of atrophy and full rescue of the contractile force deficits. Our results establish the feasibility of AAV-mediated calpain 3 gene transfer as a therapeutic approach.

  17. Acat1 knockdown gene therapy decreases amyloid-β in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephanie R; Chang, Catherine Cy; Dogbevia, Godwin; Bryleva, Elena Y; Bowen, Zachary; Hasan, Mazahir T; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Both genetic inactivation and pharmacological inhibition of the cholesteryl ester synthetic enzyme acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) have shown benefit in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we aimed to test the potential therapeutic applications of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Acat1 gene knockdown in AD mice. We constructed recombinant AAVs expressing artificial microRNA (miRNA) sequences, which targeted Acat1 for knockdown. We demonstrated that our AAVs could infect cultured mouse neurons and glia and effectively knockdown ACAT activity in vitro. We next delivered the AAVs to mouse brains neurosurgically, and demonstrated that Acat1-targeting AAVs could express viral proteins and effectively diminish ACAT activity in vivo, without inducing appreciable inflammation. We delivered the AAVs to the brains of 10-month-old AD mice and analyzed the effects on the AD phenotype at 12 months of age. Acat1-targeting AAV delivered to the brains of AD mice decreased the levels of brain amyloid-β and full-length human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP), to levels similar to complete genetic ablation of Acat1. This study provides support for the potential therapeutic use of Acat1 knockdown gene therapy in AD.

  18. Efficiency and Safety of AAV-Mediated Gene Delivery of the Human ND4 Complex I Subunit in the Mouse Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Guy, John; Qi, Xiaoping; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Arguello, Tania; Chou, Tsung-Han; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Lewin, Alfred S.; Hauswirth, William W.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the efficiency and safety of AAV-mediated gene delivery of a normal human ND4 complex I subunit in the mouse visual system. METHODS A nuclear encoded human ND4 subunit fused to the ATPc mitochondrial targeting sequence and FLAG epitope were packaged in AAV2 capsids that were injected into the right eyes of mice. AAV-GFP was injected into the left eyes. One month later, pattern electroretinography (PERG), rate of ATP synthesis, gene expression, and incorporation of the human ND4 subunit into the murine complex I were evaluated. Quantitative analysis of ND4FLAG-injected eyes was assessed compared with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-injected eyes. RESULTS Rates of ATP synthesis and PERG amplitudes were similar in ND4FLAG- and GFP-inoculated eyes. PERG latency was shorter in eyes that received ND4FLAG. Immunoprecipitated murine complex I gave the expected 52-kDa band of processed human ND4FLAG. Confocal microscopy revealed perinuclear expression of FLAG colocalized with mitochondria-specific fluorescent dye. Transmission electron microscopy revealed FLAG immunogold within mitochondria. Compared with Thy1.2-positive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), quantification was 38% for FLAG-positive RGCs and 65% for GFP-positive RGCs. Thy1.2 positive-RGC counts in AAV-ND4FLAG were similar to counts in control eyes injected with AAV-GFP. CONCLUSIONS Human ND4 was properly processed and imported into the mitochondria of RGCs and axons of mouse optic nerve after intravitreal injection. Although it had approximately two-thirds the efficiency of GFP, the expression of normal human ND4 in murine mitochondria did not induce the loss of RGCs, ATP synthesis, or PERG amplitude, suggesting that allotopic ND4 may be safe for the treatment of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. PMID:19387075

  19. AAV-mediated transfer of RhoA shRNA and CNTF promotes retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cen, Ling-Ping; Liang, Jia-Jian; Chen, Jian-Huan; Harvey, Alan R; Ng, Tsz Kin; Zhang, Mingzhi; Pang, Chi Pui; Cui, Qi; Fan, You-Ming

    2017-02-20

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) mediated transfer of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and RhoA shRNA has additive effects on promoting the survival and axon regeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve crush (ONC). Silencing effects of AAV-RhoA shRNA were confirmed by examining neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and by quantifying RhoA expression levels with western blotting. Young adult Fischer rats received an intravitreal injection of (i) saline, (ii) AAV green fluorescent protein (GFP), (iii) AAV-CNTF, (iv) AAV-RhoA shRNA, or (v) a combination of both AAV-CNTF and AAV-RhoA shRNA. Two weeks later, the ON was completely crushed. Three weeks after ONC, RGC survival was estimated by counting βIII-tubulin-positive neurons in retinal whole mounts. Axon regeneration was evaluated by counting GAP-43-positive axons in the crushed ON. It was found that AAV-RhoA shRNA decreased RhoA expression levels and promoted neurite outgrowth in vitro. In the ONC model, AAV-RhoA shRNA by itself had only weak beneficial effects on RGC axon regeneration. However, when combined with AAV-CNTF, AAV-RhoA shRNA significantly improved the therapeutic effect of AAV-CNTF on axon regeneration by nearly two fold, even though there was no significant change in RGC viability. In sum, this combination of vectors increases the regenerative response and can lead to more successful therapeutic outcomes following neurotrauma.

  20. Unique Roles of TLR9- and MyD88-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Adaptive Immune Responses to AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Geoffrey L; Suzuki, Masataka; Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Morel, Laurence M; Lee, Brendan; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Herzog, Roland W

    2015-01-01

    The immune system represents a significant barrier to successful gene therapy with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. In particular, adaptive immune responses to the viral capsid or the transgene product are of concern. The sensing of AAV by toll-like receptors (TLRs) TLR2 and TLR9 has been suggested to play a role in innate immunity to the virus and may also shape subsequent adaptive immune responses. Here, we investigated the functions of TLR2, TLR9 and the downstream signaling adaptor MyD88 in antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses. Antibody formation against the transgene product occurred largely independently of TLR signaling following gene transfer with AAV1 or AAV2 vectors, whereas loss of signaling through the TLR9-MyD88 pathway substantially reduced CD8+ T-cell responses. In contrast, MyD88 (but neither of the TLRs) regulated antibody responses to capsid. B cell-intrinsic MyD88 was required for the formation of anti-capsid IgG2c independently of vector serotype or route of administration. However, MyD88(-/-) mice instead produced anti-capsid IgG1 that emerged with delayed kinetics but nonetheless completely prevented in vivo readministration. We conclude that there are distinct roles for TLR9 and MyD88 in promoting adaptive immune responses to AAV-mediated gene transfer and that there are redundant MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent mechanisms that stimulate neutralizing antibody formation against AAV.

  1. RNAi Trigger Delivery into Anopheles gambiae Pupae.

    PubMed

    Regna, Kimberly; Harrison, Rachel M; Heyse, Shannon A; Chiles, Thomas C; Michel, Kristin; Muskavitch, Marc A T

    2016-03-08

    RNA interference (RNAi), a naturally occurring phenomenon in eukaryotic organisms, is an extremely valuable tool that can be utilized in the laboratory for functional genomic studies. The ability to knockdown individual genes selectively via this reverse genetic technique has allowed many researchers to rapidly uncover the biological roles of numerous genes within many organisms, by evaluation of loss-of-function phenotypes. In the major human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, the predominant method used to reduce the function of targeted genes involves injection of double-stranded (dsRNA) into the hemocoel of the adult mosquito. While this method has been successful, gene knockdown in adults excludes the functional assessment of genes that are expressed and potentially play roles during pre-adult stages, as well as genes that are expressed in limited numbers of cells in adult mosquitoes. We describe a method for the injection of Serine Protease Inhibitor 2 (SRPN2) dsRNA during the early pupal stage and validate SRPN2 protein knockdown by observing decreased target protein levels and the formation of melanotic pseudo-tumors in SRPN2 knockdown adult mosquitoes. This evident phenotype has been described previously for adult stage knockdown of SRPN2 function, and we have recapitulated this adult phenotype by SRPN2 knockdown initiated during pupal development. When used in conjunction with a dye-labeled dsRNA solution, this technique enables easy visualization by simple light microscopy of injection quality and distribution of dsRNA in the hemocoel.

  2. Core RNAi Machinery and Sid1, a Component for Systemic RNAi, in the Hemipteran Insect, Aphis glycines.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Raman; Michel, Andy P

    2013-02-08

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a novel tool to manage hemipteran pests. For the success of RNAi based pest control in the field, a robust and systemic RNAi response is a prerequisite. We identified and characterized major genes of the RNAi machinery, Dicer2 (Dcr2), Argonaute2 (Ago2), and R2d2 in Aphis glycines, a serious pest of soybean. The A. glycines genome encodes for at least one copy of Dcr2, R2d2 and Ago2. Comparative and molecular evolution analyses (dN/dS) showed that domain regions of encoded proteins are highly conserved, whereas linker (non-domain) regions are diversified. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analyses suggested that the RNAi machinery of A. glycines is more similar to that of Tribolium casteneum as compared to that of Drosophila melanogaster. We also characterized Sid1, a major gene implicated in the systemic response for RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. Through qPCR, Dcr2, R2d2, Ago2, and Sid1 were found to be expressed at similar levels in various tissues, but higher expression of Dcr2, R2d2, and Ago2 was seen in first and second instars. Characterization of RNAi pathway and Sid1 in A. glycines will provide the foundation of future work for controlling one of the most important insect pests of soybean in North America.

  3. RNAi therapeutics for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Ryan L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2010-06-18

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of sequence-specific gene silencing and serves as a powerful molecular tool to manipulate gene expression in vitro and in vivo. RNAi technologies have been applied to study gene function and validate drug targets. Researchers are investigating RNAi-based compounds as novel therapeutics to treat a variety of human diseases that are currently lacking sufficient treatment. To date, numerous studies support that RNAi therapeutics can improve disease phenotypes in various rodent models of human disease. Here, we focus on the development of RNAi-based therapies aimed at treating neurological disorders for which reduction of mutant or toxic gene expression may provide clinical benefit. We review RNAi-based gene-silencing strategies, proof-of-concept studies testing therapeutic RNAi for CNS disorders, and highlight the most recent research aimed at transitioning RNAi-based therapeutics toward clinical trials.

  4. Current issues of RNAi therapeutics delivery and development.

    PubMed

    Haussecker, D

    2014-12-10

    12 years following the discovery of the RNAi mechanism in Man, a number of RNAi therapeutics development candidates have emerged with profiles suggesting that they could become drugs of significant medical importance for diseases like TTR amyloidosis, HBV, solid cancers, and hemophilia. Despite this robust progress, the perception of RNAi therapeutics has been on a roller-coaster ride driven not only by science, but also regulatory trends, the stock markets, and Big Pharma business development decisions [1]. This presentation provides an update on the current state of RNAi therapeutics development with a particular focus on what RNAi delivery can achieve today and key challenges to be overcome to expand therapeutic opportunities. The delivery of RNAi triggers to disease-relevant cell types clearly represents the rate-limiting factor in broadly expanding the applicability of RNAi therapeutics. Today, with at least 3 delivery options (lipid nanoparticles/LNPs, GalNAc-siRNA conjugates, Dynamic PolyConjugates/DPCs) for which profound gene knockdowns have been demonstrated in non-human primates and in the clinic, RNAi therapeutics should in principle be able to address most diseases related to gene expression in the liver. Given the central importance of the liver in systemic physiology, this already represents a significant therapeutic and commercial opportunity rivaling that of e.g. monoclonal antibodies. Beyond the liver, there is a reason to believe that current RNAi therapeutics technologies can address a number of solid tumors (e.g. LNPs), diseases of the eye (e.g. self-delivering RNAi triggers) as well as diseases involving the respiratory epithelium (e.g. aerosolized LNPs), certain phagocytic cells (LNPs), hematopoietic stem cells and their progeny (lentiviral DNA-directed RNAi), vascular endothelial cells (cationic lipoplexes), and certain cell types in the kidney (self-delivering RNAi triggers, DPCs; Table 1). Despite this success, there has been a sense that

  5. Long-term effects and parental RNAi in the blood feeder Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera; Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Paim, Rafaela M M; Araujo, Ricardo N; Lehane, Michael J; Gontijo, Nelder F; Pereira, Marcos H

    2013-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely employed as a useful alternative to study gene function in insects, including triatomine bugs. However, several aspects related to the RNAi mechanism and functioning are still unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the persistence and the occurrence of systemic and parental RNAi in the triatomine bug Rhodnius prolixus. For such, the nitrophorins 1 to 4 (NP1-4), which are salivary hemeproteins, and the rhodniin, an intestinal protein, were used as targets for RNAi. The dsRNA for both molecules were injected separately into 3rd and 5th instar nymphs of R. prolixus and the knockdown (mRNA levels and phenotype) were progressively evaluated along several stages of the insect's life. We observed that the NP1-4 knockdown persisted for more than 7 months after the dsRNA injection, and at least 5 months in rhodniin knockdown, passing through various nymphal stages until the adult stage, without continuous input of dsRNA. The parental RNAi was successful from the dsRNA injection in 5th instar nymphs for both knockdown targets, when the RNAi effects (mRNA levels and phenotype) were observed at least in the 2nd instar nymphs of the F1 generation. However, the parental RNAi did not occur when the dsRNA was injected in the 3rd instars. The confirmation of the long persistence and parental transmission of RNAi in R. prolixus can improve and facilitate the utilization of this tool in insect functional genomic studies.

  6. RNAi pathway participates in chromosome segregation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Xu; Cao, Shuhuan; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    The RNAi machinery is a mighty regulator in a myriad of life events. Despite lines of evidence that small RNAs and components of the RNAi pathway may be associated with structure and behavior of mitotic chromosomes in diverse organisms, a direct role of the RNAi pathway in mammalian mitotic chromosome segregation remains elusive. Here we report that Dicer and AGO2, two central components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, participate in the chromosome segregation. Knockdown of Dicer or AGO2 results in a higher incidence of chromosome lagging, and this effect is independent from microRNAs as examined with DGCR8 knockout cells. Further investigation has revealed that α-satellite RNA, a noncoding RNA derived from centromeric repeat region, is managed by AGO2 under the guidance of endogenous small interference RNAs (ASAT siRNAs) generated by Dicer. Furthermore, the slicer activity of AGO2 is essential for the chromosome segregation. Level and distribution of chromosome-associated α-satellite RNA have crucial regulatory effect on the localization of centromeric proteins such as centromere protein C1 (CENPC1). With these results, we also provide a paradigm in which the RNAi pathway participates in vital cellular events through the maintenance of level and distribution of noncoding RNAs in cells.

  7. Intravenous, non-viral RNAi gene therapy of brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2004-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has the potential to knock down oncogenes in cancer, including brain cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of RNAi will not be realised until the rate-limiting step of delivery is solved. The development of RNA-based therapeutics is not practical, due to the instability of RNA in vivo. However, plasmid DNA can be engineered to express short hairpin RNA (shRNA), similar to endogenous microRNAs. Intravenous, non-viral RNAi-based gene therapy is enabled with a new gene-targeting technology, which encapsulates the plasmid DNA inside receptor-specific pegylated immunoliposomes (PILs). The feasibility of this RNAi approach was evaluated by showing it was possible to achieve a 90% knockdown of brain tumour-specific gene expression with a single intravenous injection in adult rats or mice with intracranial brain cancer. The survival of mice with intracranial human brain cancer was extended by nearly 90% with weekly intravenous injections of PILs carrying plasmid DNA expressing a shRNA directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor. RNAi-based gene therapy can be coupled with gene therapy that replaces mutated tumour suppressor genes to build a polygenic approach to the gene therapy of cancer.

  8. RNAi Induces Innate Immunity through Multiple Cellular Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Pei, Rongjuan; Xu, Yang; Yang, Dongliang; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Our previous results showed that the knockdown of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by RNA interference (RNAi) led to upregulation of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) in primary hepatocytes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the cellular signaling pathways recognizing RNA molecules may be involved the ISG stimulation by RNAi. Methods Primary murine hepatocytes (PMHs) from wild type mice and WHV transgenic (Tg) mice were prepared and treated with defined siRNAs. The mRNA levels of target genes and ISGs were detected by real-time RT-PCR. The involvement of the signaling pathways including RIG-I/MDA5, PKR, and TLR3/7/8/9 was examined by specific inhibition and the analysis of their activation by Western blotting. Results In PMHs from WHV Tg mice, specific siRNAs targeting WHV, mouse β-actin, and GAPDH reduced the levels of targeted mRNAs and increased the mRNA expression of IFN-β, MxA, and IP-10. The enhanced ISG expression by siRNA transfection were abolished by siRNA-specific 2′-O-methyl antisense RNA and the inhibitors 2-AP and chloroquine blocking PKR and other TLR-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, Western blotting revealed that RNAi results in an increase in PKR phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and NF-êB, indicating the possible role of IRF3 in the RNAi-directed induction of ISGs. In contrast, silencing of RIG-I and MDA5 failed to block RNAi-mediated MxA induction. Conclusions RNAi is capable of enhancing innate immune responses through the PKR- and TLR-dependent signaling pathways in primary hepatocytes. The immune stimulation by RNAi may contribute to the antiviral activity of siRNAs in vivo. PMID:23700487

  9. RNAi Screening in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhanita; Singh, Gatikrushna; Sachdev, Bindiya; Kumar, Ajit; Malhotra, Pawan; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a potent and precise reverse genetic approach to carryout large-scale functional genomic studies in a given organism. During the past decade, RNAi has also emerged as an important investigative tool to understand the process of viral pathogenesis. Our laboratory has successfully generated transgenic reporter and RNAi sensor line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf21) cells and developed a reversal of silencing assay via siRNA or shRNA guided screening to investigate RNAi factors or viral pathogenic factors with extraordinary fidelity. Here we describe empirical approaches and conceptual understanding to execute successful RNAi screening in Spodoptera frugiperda 21-cell line.

  10. Induction and prevention of severe hyperammonemia in the spfash mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency using shRNA and rAAV-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Sharon C; Kok, Cindy Y; Dane, Allison P; Carpenter, Kevin; Kizana, Eddy; Kuchel, Philip W; Alexander, Ian E

    2011-05-01

    Urea cycle defects presenting early in life with hyperammonemia remain difficult to treat and commonly necessitate liver transplantation. Gene therapy has the potential to prevent hyperammonemic episodes while awaiting liver transplantation, and possibly also to avert the need for transplantation altogether. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, the most prevalent urea cycle disorder, provides an ideal model for the development of liver-targeted gene therapy. While we and others have successfully cured the spf(ash) mouse model of OTC deficiency using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, a major limitation of this model is the presence of residual OTC enzymatic activity which confers a mild phenotype without clinically significant hyperammonemia. To better model severe disease we devised a strategy involving AAV2/8-mediated delivery of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to specifically knockdown residual endogenous OTC messenger RNA (mRNA). This strategy proved highly successful with vector-treated mice developing severe hyperammonemia and associated neurological impairment. Using this system, we showed that the dose of an AAV rescue construct encoding the murine OTC (mOTC) cDNA required to prevent hyperammonemia is fivefold lower than that required to control orotic aciduria. This result is favorable for clinical translation as it indicates that the threshold for therapeutic benefit is likely to be lower than indicated by earlier studies.

  11. Development of a multipurpose GATEWAY-based lentiviral tetracycline-regulated conditional RNAi system (GLTR).

    PubMed

    Sigl, Reinhard; Ploner, Christian; Shivalingaiah, Giridhar; Kofler, Reinhard; Geley, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an essential technology for functional gene analysis. Its success, however, depends on the effective expression of RNAi-inducing small double-stranded interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs) in target cells. In many cell types, RNAi can be achieved by transfection of chemically synthesised siRNAs, which results in transient knockdown of protein expression. Expression of double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) provides another means to induce RNAi in cells that are hard to transfect. To facilitate the generation of stable, conditional RNAi cell lines, we have developed novel one- and two-component vector GATEWAY-compatible lentiviral tetracycline-regulated RNAi (GLTR) systems. The combination of a modified RNA-polymerase-III-dependent H1 RNA promoter (designated 'THT') for conditional shRNA expression with different lentiviral delivery vectors allows (1) the use of fluorescent proteins for colour-coded combinatorial RNAi or for monitoring RNAi induction (pGLTR-FP), (2) selection of transduced cells (pGLTR-S), and (3) the generation of conditional cell lines using a one vector system (pGLTR-X). All three systems were found to be suitable for the analysis of essential genes, such as CDC27, a component of the mitotic ubiquitin ligase APC/C, in cell lines and primary human cells.

  12. Asian Citrus Psyllid RNAi Pathway – RNAi evidence

    PubMed Central

    Taning, Clauvis N. T.; Andrade, Eduardo C.; Hunter, Wayne B.; Christiaens, Olivier; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Diaphorina citri, known as the Asian citrus psyllid, is an important pest of citrus because it transmits a phloem-limited bacteria strongly implicated in huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). Emerging biotechnologies, such as RNA interference, could provide a new sustainable and environmentally friendly strategy for the management of this pest. In this study, genome and functional analysis were performed to verify whether the RNAi core genes are present in the Asian psyllid genome and if the RNAi machinery could be exploited to develop a management strategy for this pest. Analyses of RNAi-related genes in the Asian citrus psyllid genome showed an absence of sequences encoding R2D2, a dsRNA-binding protein that functions as a cofactor of Dicer-2 in Drosophila. Nevertheless, bioassays using an in Planta System showed that the Asian citrus psyllid was very sensitive to ingested dsRNA, demonstrating a strong RNAi response. A small dose of dsRNA administered through a citrus flush was enough to trigger the RNAi mechanism, causing significant suppression of the targeted transcript, and increased psyllid mortality. This study provides evidence of a functional RNAi machinery, which could be further exploited to develop RNAi based management strategies for the control of the Asian citrus psyllid. PMID:27901078

  13. Parameters for Successful Parental RNAi as An Insect Pest Management Tool in Western Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Ana M.; Fishilevich, Elane; Matz, Natalie; Storer, Nicholas P.; Narva, Kenneth E.; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2016-01-01

    Parental RNAi (pRNAi) is an RNA interference response where the gene knockdown phenotype is observed in the progeny of the treated organism. pRNAi has been demonstrated in female western corn rootworms (WCR) via diet applications and has been described as a potential approach for rootworm pest management. However, it is not clear if plant-expressed pRNAi can provide effective control of next generation WCR larvae in the field. In this study, we evaluated parameters required to generate a successful pRNAi response in WCR for the genes brahma and hunchback. The parameters tested included a concentration response, duration of the dsRNA exposure, timing of the dsRNA exposure with respect to the mating status in WCR females, and the effects of pRNAi on males. Results indicate that all of the above parameters affect the strength of pRNAi phenotype in females. Results are interpreted in terms of how this technology will perform in the field and the potential role for pRNAi in pest and resistance management strategies. More broadly, the described approaches enable examination of the dynamics of RNAi response in insects beyond pRNAi and crop pests. PMID:28029123

  14. Parameters for Successful Parental RNAi as An Insect Pest Management Tool in Western Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Ana M; Fishilevich, Elane; Matz, Natalie; Storer, Nicholas P; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-12-24

    Parental RNAi (pRNAi) is an RNA interference response where the gene knockdown phenotype is observed in the progeny of the treated organism. pRNAi has been demonstrated in female western corn rootworms (WCR) via diet applications and has been described as a potential approach for rootworm pest management. However, it is not clear if plant-expressed pRNAi can provide effective control of next generation WCR larvae in the field. In this study, we evaluated parameters required to generate a successful pRNAi response in WCR for the genes brahma and hunchback. The parameters tested included a concentration response, duration of the dsRNA exposure, timing of the dsRNA exposure with respect to the mating status in WCR females, and the effects of pRNAi on males. Results indicate that all of the above parameters affect the strength of pRNAi phenotype in females. Results are interpreted in terms of how this technology will perform in the field and the potential role for pRNAi in pest and resistance management strategies. More broadly, the described approaches enable examination of the dynamics of RNAi response in insects beyond pRNAi and crop pests.

  15. A Computational model for compressed sensing RNAi cellular screening

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) becomes an increasingly important and effective genetic tool to study the function of target genes by suppressing specific genes of interest. This system approach helps identify signaling pathways and cellular phase types by tracking intensity and/or morphological changes of cells. The traditional RNAi screening scheme, in which one siRNA is designed to knockdown one specific mRNA target, needs a large library of siRNAs and turns out to be time-consuming and expensive. Results In this paper, we propose a conceptual model, called compressed sensing RNAi (csRNAi), which employs a unique combination of group of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knockdown a much larger size of genes. This strategy is based on the fact that one gene can be partially bound with several small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and conversely, one siRNA can bind to a few genes with distinct binding affinity. This model constructs a multi-to-multi correspondence between siRNAs and their targets, with siRNAs much fewer than mRNA targets, compared with the conventional scheme. Mathematically this problem involves an underdetermined system of equations (linear or nonlinear), which is ill-posed in general. However, the recently developed compressed sensing (CS) theory can solve this problem. We present a mathematical model to describe the csRNAi system based on both CS theory and biological concerns. To build this model, we first search nucleotide motifs in a target gene set. Then we propose a machine learning based method to find the effective siRNAs with novel features, such as image features and speech features to describe an siRNA sequence. Numerical simulations show that we can reduce the siRNA library to one third of that in the conventional scheme. In addition, the features to describe siRNAs outperform the existing ones substantially. Conclusions This csRNAi system is very promising in saving both time and cost for large-scale RNAi screening experiments which

  16. Preclinical evaluation of RNAi as a treatment for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James S.; Chan, Amy; Costelha, Susete; Fishman, Shannon; Willoughby, Jennifer L. S.; Borland, Todd D.; Milstein, Stuart; Foster, Donald J.; Gonçalves, Paula; Chen, Qingmin; Qin, June; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Sah, Dinah W.; Alvarez, Rene; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Meyers, Rachel E.; Nochur, Saraswathy V.; Saraiva, Maria J.; Zimmermann, Tracy S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ATTR amyloidosis is a systemic, debilitating and fatal disease caused by transthyretin (TTR) amyloid accumulation. RNA interference (RNAi) is a clinically validated technology that may be a promising approach to the treatment of ATTR amyloidosis. The vast majority of TTR, the soluble precursor of TTR amyloid, is expressed and synthesized in the liver. RNAi technology enables robust hepatic gene silencing, the goal of which would be to reduce systemic levels of TTR and mitigate many of the clinical manifestations of ATTR that arise from hepatic TTR expression. To test this hypothesis, TTR-targeting siRNAs were evaluated in a murine model of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic TTR expression inhibited TTR deposition and facilitated regression of existing TTR deposits in pathologically relevant tissues. Further, the extent of deposit regression correlated with the level of RNAi-mediated knockdown. In comparison to the TTR stabilizer, tafamidis, RNAi-mediated TTR knockdown led to greater regression of TTR deposits across a broader range of affected tissues. Together, the data presented herein support the therapeutic hypothesis behind TTR lowering and highlight the potential of RNAi in the treatment of patients afflicted with ATTR amyloidosis. PMID:27033334

  17. Application of RNAi to Genomic Drug Target Validation in Schistosomes

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Alessandra; Mansour, Nuha R.; Paveley, Ross A.; Carruthers, Ian M.; Besnard, Jérémy; Hopkins, Andrew L.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Bickle, Quentin D.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the possibility of resistance developing to praziquantel (PZQ), has stimulated efforts to develop new drugs for schistosomiasis. In addition to the development of improved whole organism screens, the success of RNA interference (RNAi) in schistosomes offers great promise for the identification of potential drug targets to initiate drug discovery. In this study we set out to contribute to RNAi based validation of putative drug targets. Initially a list of 24 target candidates was compiled based on the identification of putative essential genes in schistosomes orthologous of C. elegans essential genes. Knockdown of Calmodulin (Smp_026560.2) (Sm-Calm), that topped this list, produced a phenotype characterised by waves of contraction in adult worms but no phenotype in schistosomula. Knockdown of the atypical Protein Kinase C (Smp_096310) (Sm-aPKC) resulted in loss of viability in both schistosomula and adults and led us to focus our attention on other kinase genes that were identified in the above list and through whole organism screening of known kinase inhibitor sets followed by chemogenomic evaluation. RNAi knockdown of these kinase genes failed to affect adult worm viability but, like Sm-aPKC, knockdown of Polo-like kinase 1, Sm-PLK1 (Smp_009600) and p38-MAPK, Sm-MAPK p38 (Smp_133020) resulted in an increased mortality of schistosomula after 2-3 weeks, an effect more marked in the presence of human red blood cells (hRBC). For Sm-PLK-1 the same effects were seen with the specific inhibitor, BI2536, which also affected viable egg production in adult worms. For Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-aPKC the in vitro effects were reflected in lower recoveries in vivo. We conclude that the use of RNAi combined with culture with hRBC is a reliable method for evaluating genes important for larval development. However, in view of the slow manifestation of the effects of Sm-aPKC knockdown in adults and the lack of effects of Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-MAPK p38 on adult viability, these

  18. Environmental RNAi in herbivorous insects.

    PubMed

    Ivashuta, Sergey; Zhang, Yuanji; Wiggins, B Elizabeth; Ramaseshadri, Partha; Segers, Gerrit C; Johnson, Steven; Meyer, Steve E; Kerstetter, Randy A; McNulty, Brian C; Bolognesi, Renata; Heck, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    Environmental RNAi (eRNAi) is a sequence-specific regulation of endogenous gene expression in a receptive organism by exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Although demonstrated under artificial dietary conditions and via transgenic plant presentations in several herbivorous insects, the magnitude and consequence of exogenous dsRNA uptake and the role of eRNAi remains unknown under natural insect living conditions. Our analysis of coleopteran insects sensitive to eRNAi fed on wild-type plants revealed uptake of plant endogenous long dsRNAs, but not small RNAs. Subsequently, the dsRNAs were processed into 21 nt siRNAs by insects and accumulated in high quantities in insect cells. No accumulation of host plant-derived siRNAs was observed in lepidopteran larvae that are recalcitrant to eRNAi. Stability of ingested dsRNA in coleopteran larval gut followed by uptake and transport from the gut to distal tissues appeared to be enabling factors for eRNAi. Although a relatively large number of distinct coleopteran insect-processed plant-derived siRNAs had sequence complementarity to insect transcripts, the vast majority of the siRNAs were present in relatively low abundance, and RNA-seq analysis did not detect a significant effect of plant-derived siRNAs on insect transcriptome. In summary, we observed a broad genome-wide uptake of plant endogenous dsRNA and subsequent processing of ingested dsRNA into 21 nt siRNAs in eRNAi-sensitive insects under natural feeding conditions. In addition to dsRNA stability in gut lumen and uptake, dosage of siRNAs targeting a given insect transcript is likely an important factor in order to achieve measurable eRNAi-based regulation in eRNAi-competent insects that lack an apparent silencing amplification mechanism.

  19. Environmental RNAi in herbivorous insects

    PubMed Central

    Ivashuta, Sergey; Zhang, Yuanji; Wiggins, B. Elizabeth; Ramaseshadri, Partha; Segers, Gerrit C.; Johnson, Steven; Meyer, Steve E.; Kerstetter, Randy A.; McNulty, Brian C.; Bolognesi, Renata; Heck, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental RNAi (eRNAi) is a sequence-specific regulation of endogenous gene expression in a receptive organism by exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Although demonstrated under artificial dietary conditions and via transgenic plant presentations in several herbivorous insects, the magnitude and consequence of exogenous dsRNA uptake and the role of eRNAi remains unknown under natural insect living conditions. Our analysis of coleopteran insects sensitive to eRNAi fed on wild-type plants revealed uptake of plant endogenous long dsRNAs, but not small RNAs. Subsequently, the dsRNAs were processed into 21 nt siRNAs by insects and accumulated in high quantities in insect cells. No accumulation of host plant-derived siRNAs was observed in lepidopteran larvae that are recalcitrant to eRNAi. Stability of ingested dsRNA in coleopteran larval gut followed by uptake and transport from the gut to distal tissues appeared to be enabling factors for eRNAi. Although a relatively large number of distinct coleopteran insect-processed plant-derived siRNAs had sequence complementarity to insect transcripts, the vast majority of the siRNAs were present in relatively low abundance, and RNA-seq analysis did not detect a significant effect of plant-derived siRNAs on insect transcriptome. In summary, we observed a broad genome-wide uptake of plant endogenous dsRNA and subsequent processing of ingested dsRNA into 21 nt siRNAs in eRNAi-sensitive insects under natural feeding conditions. In addition to dsRNA stability in gut lumen and uptake, dosage of siRNAs targeting a given insect transcript is likely an important factor in order to achieve measurable eRNAi-based regulation in eRNAi-competent insects that lack an apparent silencing amplification mechanism. PMID:25802407

  20. RNAi: future in insect management.

    PubMed

    Burand, John P; Hunter, Wayne B

    2013-03-01

    RNA interference is a post- transcriptional, gene regulation mechanism found in virtually all plants and animals including insects. The demonstration of RNAi in insects and its successful use as a tool in the study of functional genomics opened the door to the development of a variety of novel, environmentally sound approaches for insect pest management. Here the current understanding of the biogenesis of the two RNAi classes in insects is reviewed. These are microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Several other key approaches in RNAi -based for insect control, as well as for the prevention of diseases in insects are also reviewed. The problems and prospects for the future use of RNAi in insects are presented.

  1. Development of new RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Wong-Staal, F; Li, Q-X

    2007-02-01

    RNAi-mediated gene inactivation has become a cornerstone of the present day gene function studies that are the foundation of mechanism and target based drug discovery and development, which could potentially shorten the otherwise long process of drug development. In particular, the coming of age of "RNAi drug" could provide new promising therapeutics bypassing traditional approaches. However, there are technological hurdles need to overcome and the biological limitations need to consider for achieving effective therapeutics. Major hurdles include the intrinsic poor pharmacokinetic property of siRNA and major biological restrictions include off-target effects, interferon response and the interference with endogenous miRNA. Recent innovations in nucleic acid chemistry, formulations and delivery methods have gradually rendered it possible to develop effective RNAi-based therapeutics. Careful design based on the newest RNAi/miRNA biology can also help to minimize the potential tissue toxicity. If successful with systemic application, RNAi drug will no doubt revolutionize the whole drug development process. This review attempts to describe the progress in this area, including applications in preclinical models and recent favorable experience in a number of human trials of local diseases, along with the discussion on the potential limitations of RNAi therapeutics.

  2. Gene knockdown by intro-thoracic injection of double-stranded RNA in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuhua; Ding, Zhiping; Zhang, Chengwei; Yang, Baojun; Liu, Zewen

    2010-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful strategy for gene function study in insects. Here, we described the development of a RNAi technique by microinjection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. Based on the mortality and RNAi efficiency criteria, the conjunctive between prothorax and mesothorax was selected as the injection site and 50 nl as injection volume. Three genes with different expression patterns were selected to evaluate the RNAi efficiency. A comparable 40% decrease of gene expression was observed at the 4th day after injection for the ubiquitously expressed calreticulin and the gut specific cathepsin-B genes, but only 25% decrease at the 5th day for the central nervous system specific Nlbeta2 gene. Double injection could increase the RNAi efficiency, such as from 25% to 53% for Nlbeta2 gene. The gene knockdown technique developed in this study will be an essential post-genomic tool for further investigations in N. lugens.

  3. Late extraembryonic morphogenesis and its zen(RNAi)-induced failure in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Panfilio, Kristen A

    2009-09-15

    Many insects undergo katatrepsis, essential reorganization by the extraembryonic membranes that repositions the embryo. Knockdown of the zen gene by RNA interference (RNAi) prevents katatrepsis in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. However, the precise morphogenetic defect has been uncertain, and katatrepsis itself has not been characterized in detail. The dynamics of wild type and zen(RNAi) eggs were analyzed from time-lapse movies, supplemented by analysis of fixed specimens. These investigations identify three zen(RNAi) defects. First, a reduced degree of tissue contraction implies a role for zen in baseline compression prior to katatrepsis. Subsequently, a characteristic 'bouncing' activity commences, leading to the initiation of katatrepsis in wild type eggs. The second zen(RNAi) defect is a delay in this activity, suggesting that a temporal window of opportunity is missed after zen knockdown. Ultimately, the extraembryonic membranes fail to rupture in zen(RNAi) eggs: the third defect. Nevertheless, the outer serosal membrane manages to contract, albeit in an aberrant fashion with additional phenotypic consequences for the embryo. These data identify a novel epithelial morphogenetic event - rupture of the 'serosal window' structure - as the ultimate site of defect. Overall, Oncopeltus zen seems to have a role in coordinating a number of pre-katatreptic events during mid embryogenesis.

  4. RNAi for insect control: current perspective and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Rajan; Sethi, Amit; Thakur, Neelam; Murdock, Larry L

    2013-10-01

    The research on the RNA interference (RNAi) for the control of insect pests has made significant growth in recent years. The availability of the genomic sequences of insects has further widened the horizons for the testing of this technology to various insect groups. Different modes of application of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) have been tested; however, the practicability of delivery of dsRNA in insects still remains the biggest challenge. Till date, the oral delivery of dsRNA in insects is one of the efficient approaches for the practical application of this technique. The uptake of dsRNA from the insect gut is mediated either by SID-1/SID-2 transmembrane proteins or by endocytosis; however, the systemic RNAi machinery still remains to be revealed in insect species. The RNAi-mediated gene knockdown has shown striking results in different insect groups, pointing it to be the upcoming technique for insect control. However, before the successful application of this technique for insect control, some potential issues need to be resolved. This review presents the account of prospects and challenges for the use of this technology for insect control.

  5. AAV-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Couto, Linda B; Pierce, Glenn F

    2003-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia has been contemplated since the coagulation Factor genes responsible for the disease were cloned 20 years ago. Multiple approaches towards the delivery of Factors VIII or IX, the defective genes in the most common forms of hemophilia, have resulted in positive results in animals, and largely equivocal results in human clinical testing. Use of vectors based on adeno-associated virus has led to robust and sustained cures in hemophilic mice and dogs, and intriguing preliminary results in small or ongoing clinical trials. As more clinical experience is gained, solving delivery issues will be of paramount importance and will lead to more clinical success. This success will permit hemophilia to be cured following a single injection of the normal gene.

  6. Efficacy of RNA interference knockdown using aerosolized short interfering RNAs bound to nanoparticles in three diverse aphid species.

    PubMed

    Thairu, M W; Skidmore, I H; Bansal, R; Nováková, E; Hansen, T E; Li-Byarlay, H; Wickline, S A; Hansen, A K

    2017-03-17

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a promising method for validating gene function; however, its utility in nonmodel insects has proven problematic, with delivery methods being one of the main obstacles. This study investigates a novel method of RNAi delivery in aphids, the aerosolization of short interfering RNA (siRNA)-nanoparticle complexes. By using nanoparticles as a siRNA carrier, the likelihood of cellular uptake is increased, when compared to methods previously used in insects. To determine the efficacy of this RNAi delivery system, siRNAs were aerosolized with and without nanoparticles in three aphid species: Acyrthosiphon pisum, Aphis glycines and Schizaphis graminum. The genes targeted for knockdown were carotene dehydrogenase (tor), which is important for pigmentation in Ac. pisum, and branched chain-amino acid transaminase (bcat), which is essential in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids in all three aphid species. Overall, we observed modest gene knockdown of tor in Ac. pisum and moderate gene knockdown of bcat in Ap. glycines along with its associated phenotype. We also determined that the nanoparticle emulsion significantly increased the efficacy of gene knockdown. Overall, these results suggest that the aerosolized siRNA-nanoparticle delivery method is a promising new high-throughput and non-invasive RNAi delivery method in some aphid species.

  7. RNAI: Future in insect management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference is a post-transcriptional, gene regulation mechanism found in virtually all plants and animals including insects. The demonstration of RNAi in insects and its successful use as a tool in the study of functional genomics opened the door to the development of a variety of novel, envir...

  8. Transgenic, inducible RNAi in megakaryocytes and platelets in mice

    PubMed Central

    TAKIGUCHI, M.; JAMES, C.; JOSEFSSON, E. C.; CARMICHAEL, C. L.; PREMSRIRUT, P. K.; LOWE, S. W.; HAMILTON, J. R.; HUANG, D. C. S.; KILE, B. T.; DICKINS, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene function. The tetracycline (tet)-regulated expression system has recently been adapted to allow inducible RNAi in mice, however its efficiency in a particular cell type in vivo depends on a transgenic tet transactivator expression pattern and is often highly variable. Objective We aimed to establish a transgenic strategy that allows efficient and inducible gene knockdown in particular hematopoietic lineages in mice. Methods and results Using a tet-regulated reporter gene strategy, we found that transgenic mice expressing the rtTA (tet-on) transactivator under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (CMV-rtTA mice) display inducible reporter gene expression with unusual and near-complete efficiency in megakaryocytes and platelets. To test whether the CMV-rtTA transgene can drive inducible and efficient gene knockdown within this lineage, we generated a novel mouse strain harboring a tet-regulated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting Bcl-xL, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member known to be essential for maintaining platelet survival. Doxycycline treatment of adult mice carrying both transgenes induces shRNA expression, depletes Bcl-xL in megakaryocytes and triggers severe thrombocytopenia, whereas doxycycline withdrawal shuts off shRNA expression, normalizes Bcl-xL levels and restores platelet numbers. These effects are akin to those observed with drugs that target Bcl-xL, clearly demonstrating that this transgenic system allows efficient and inducible inhibition of genes in megakaryocytes and platelets. Conclusions We have established a novel transgenic strategy for inducible gene knockdown inmegakaryocytes and platelets that will be useful for characterizing genes involved in platelet production and function in adult mice. PMID:21138522

  9. Systemic RNAi in western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, does not involve transitive pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Huarong; Bowling, Andrew J; Gandra, Premchand; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Pence, Heather E; McEwan, Robert E; Khajuria, Chitvan; Siegfried, Blair D; Narva, Kenneth E

    2016-08-13

    Western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is highly sensitive to orally delivered double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). RNAi in WCR is systemic and spreads throughout the insect body. This raises the question whether transitive RNAi is a mechanism that functions in WCR to amplify the RNAi response via production of secondary siRNA. Secondary siRNA production is achieved through RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) activity in other eukaryotic organisms, but RdRP has not been identified in WCR and any other insects. This study visualized the spread of the RNAi-mediated knockdown of Dv v-ATPase C mRNA throughout the WCR gut and other tissues using high-sensitivity branched DNA in situ hybridization. Furthermore, we did not detect either secondary siRNA production or transitive RNAi in WCR through siRNA sequence profile analysis. Nucleotide mismatched sequences introduced into either the sense or antisense strand of v-ATPase C dsRNAs were maintained in siRNAs derived from WCR fed with the mismatched dsRNAs in a strand specific manner. The distribution of all siRNAs was restricted to within the original target sequence regions, which may indicate the lack of new dsRNA synthesis leading to production of secondary siRNA. Thus, the systemic spread of RNAi in WCR may be derived from the original dsRNA molecules taken up from the gut lumen. These results indicate that the initial dsRNA dose is important for a lethal systemic RNAi response in WCR and have implications in developing effective dsRNA traits to control WCR and in resistance management to prolong the durability of RNAi trait technology.

  10. Towards the elements of successful insect RNAi.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeffrey G; Michel, Kristin; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Siegfried, Blair D; Hunter, Wayne B; Smagghe, Guy; Zhu, Kun Yan; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), the sequence-specific suppression of gene expression, offers great opportunities for insect science, especially to analyze gene function, manage pest populations, and reduce disease pathogens. The accumulating body of literature on insect RNAi has revealed that the efficiency of RNAi varies between different species, the mode of RNAi delivery, and the genes being targeted. There is also variation in the duration of transcript suppression. At present, we have a limited capacity to predict the ideal experimental strategy for RNAi of a particular gene/insect because of our incomplete understanding of whether and how the RNAi signal is amplified and spread among insect cells. Consequently, development of the optimal RNAi protocols is a highly empirical process. This limitation can be relieved by systematic analysis of the molecular physiological basis of RNAi mechanisms in insects. An enhanced conceptual understanding of RNAi function in insects will facilitate the application of RNAi for dissection of gene function, and to fast-track the application of RNAi to both control pests and develop effective methods to protect beneficial insects and non-insect arthropods, particularly the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and cultured Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) from viral and parasitic diseases.

  11. Knockdown of genes in the Toll pathway reveals new lethal RNA interference targets for insect pest control.

    PubMed

    Bingsohn, L; Knorr, E; Billion, A; Narva, K E; Vilcinskas, A

    2017-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising alternative strategy for ecologically friendly pest management. However, the identification of RNAi candidate genes is challenging owing to the absence of laboratory strains and the seasonality of most pest species. Tribolium castaneum is a well-established model, with a strong and robust RNAi response, which can be used as a high-throughput screening platform to identify potential RNAi target genes. Recently, the cactus gene was identified as a sensitive RNAi target for pest control. To explore whether the spectrum of promising RNAi targets can be expanded beyond those found by random large-scale screening, to encompass others identified using targeted knowledge-based approaches, we constructed a Cactus interaction network. We tested nine genes in this network and found that the delivery of double-stranded RNA corresponding to fusilli and cactin showed lethal effects. The silencing of cactin resulted in 100% lethality at every developmental stage from the larva to the adult. The knockdown of pelle, Dorsal-related immunity factor and short gastrulation reduced or even prevented egg hatching in the next generation. The combination of such targets with lethal and parental RNAi effects can now be tested against different pest species in field studies.

  12. Turkey knockdown in successive flocks.

    PubMed

    Evans, R D; Edson, R K; Watkins, K L; Robertson, J L; Meldrum, J B; Novilla, M N

    2000-01-01

    Turkey knockdown was diagnosed in three of five flocks of hen turkeys on a single farm within a 12-mo period. The age of birds in the flocks affected ranged from 6 wk 2 days to 7 wk 4 days. The attack rate ranged from 0.02% to 0.30% with a case fatality rate in affected birds ranging from 0 to 74%. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical signs and histopathologic lesions associated with knockdown. The feed in all flocks contained bacitracin methylene disalicylate and monensin (Coban). Affected birds were recumbent, demonstrated paresis, and were unable to vocalize. Postmortem examination revealed few significant lesions although pallor of the adductor muscles and petechiation in adductor and gastrocnemius muscles were noted. Birds that had been recumbent for extended periods were severely dehydrated. Consistent microscopic lesions included degeneration, necrosis, and regeneration of adductor, gastrocnemius, and abdominal muscles. No lesion in cardiac tissue was noted. Results of our investigation indicated that changes in water consumption, vitamin E status, and brooder to finisher movement correlated with the occurrence of knockdown. Turkey knockdown was defined in 1993 as any condition identified in a turkey flock that has affected the neuromuscular system to a degree that a turkey is unable to walk or stand. This definition was later modified to...neuromuscular or skeletal systems to a degree that a turkey is unable to walk or stand properly. Knockdown may be associated with numerous feed, management, or disease factors alone or in combination. Dosage of monensin, feed restriction/gorging, water restriction, heat stress, copper, mycotoxins, sodium chloride in feed, and sulfa drugs have all been suggested as contributing factors; however, laboratory studies to duplicate this have not been successful. This report presents observations from a single farm at which three of five hen flocks in a single year experienced knockdown. When a flock was reported as

  13. RNAi mediated knockdown of the ryanodine receptor gene decreases chlorantraniliprole susceptibility in Sogatella furcifera.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yao; Wan, Pin-Jun; Hu, Xing-Xing; Li, Guo-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The diamide insecticides activate ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release and deplete intracellular calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscles and the endoplasmic reticulum of many types of cells. They rapidly interrupt feeding of the target pest and eventually kill the pest due to starvation. However, information about the structure and function of insect RyRs is still limited. In this study, we isolated a 15,985bp full-length cDNA (named SfRyR) from Sogatella furcifera, a serious rice planthopper pest throughout Asia. SfRyR encodes a 5140-amino acid protein, which shares 78-97% sequence identities with other insect homologues, and less than 50% identities with Homo sapiens RyR1-3. All hallmarks of the RyR proteins are conserved in SfRyR. In the N-terminus, SfRyR has a MIR domain, two RIH domains, three SPRY domains, four copies of RyR repeated domain and a RIH-associated domain. In the C-terminus, SfRyR possesses two consensus calcium ion-binding EF-hand motifs, and six transmembrane helices. Temporal and spatial expression analysis showed that SfRyR was widely found in all development stages including egg, first through fifth instar nymphs, macropterous adult females and males. On day 2 fifth-instar nymphs, SfRyR was ubiquitously expressed in the head, thorax and abdomen. Dietary ingestion of dsSfRyR1 and dsSfRyR2 significantly reduced the mRNA level of SfRyR in the treated nymphs by 77.9% and 81.8% respectively, and greatly decreased chlorantraniliprole-induced mortality. Thus, our results suggested that SfRyR gene encoded a functional RyR that mediates chlorantraniliprole toxicity to S. furcifera.

  14. Identifying targets for topical RNAi therapeutics in psoriasis: assessment of a new in vitro psoriasis model.

    PubMed

    Bracke, S; Desmet, E; Guerrero-Aspizua, S; Tjabringa, S G; Schalkwijk, J; Van Gele, M; Carretero, M; Lambert, J

    2013-08-01

    Diseases of the skin are amenable to RNAi-based therapies and targeting key components in the pathophysiology of psoriasis using RNAi may represent a successful new therapeutic strategy. We aimed to develop a straightforward and highly reproducible in vitro psoriasis model useful to study the effects of gene knockdown by RNAi and to identify new targets for topical RNAi therapeutics. We evaluated the use of keratinocytes derived from psoriatic plaques and normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). To induce a psoriatic phenotype in NHKs, combinations of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-17A, IL-6 and TNF-α) were tested. The model based on NHK met our needs of a reliable and predictive preclinical model, and this model was further selected for gene expression analyses, comprising a panel of 55 psoriasis-associated genes and five micro-RNAs (miRNAs). Gene silencing studies were conducted by using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and miRNA inhibitors directed against potential target genes such as CAMP and DEFB4 and miRNAs such as miR-203. We describe a robust and highly reproducible in vitro psoriasis model that recapitulates expression of a large panel of genes and miRNAs relevant to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Furthermore, we show that our model is a powerful first step model system for testing and screening RNAi-based therapeutics.

  15. Development of RNAi Methods for Peregrinus maidis, the Corn Planthopper

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianxiu; Rotenberg, Dorith; Afsharifar, Alireza; Barandoc-Alviar, Karen; Whitfield, Anna E.

    2013-01-01

    The corn planthopper, Peregrinus maidis, is a major pest of agronomically-important crops. Peregrinus maidis has a large geographical distribution and transmits Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV) and Maize stripe tenuivirus (MSpV). The objective of this study was to develop effective RNAi methods for P. maidis. Vacuolar-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an essential enzyme for hydrolysis of ATP and for transport of protons out of cells thereby maintaining membrane ion balance, and it has been demonstrated to be an efficacious target for RNAi in other insects. In this study, two genes encoding subunits of P. maidis V-ATPase (V-ATPase B and V-ATPase D) were chosen as RNAi target genes. The open reading frames of V-ATPase B and D were generated and used for constructing dsRNA fragments. Experiments were conducted using oral delivery and microinjection of V-ATPase B and V-ATPase D dsRNA to investigate the effectiveness of RNAi in P. maidis. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that microinjection of V-ATPase dsRNA led to a minimum reduction of 27-fold in the normalized abundance of V-ATPase transcripts two days post injection, while ingestion of dsRNA resulted in a two-fold reduction after six days of feeding. While both methods of dsRNA delivery resulted in knockdown of target transcripts, the injection method was more rapid and effective. The reduction in V-ATPase transcript abundance resulted in observable phenotypes. Specifically, the development of nymphs injected with 200 ng of either V-ATPase B or D dsRNA was impaired, resulting in higher mortality and lower fecundity than control insects injected with GFP dsRNA. Microscopic examination of these insects revealed that female reproductive organs did not develop normally. The successful development of RNAi in P. maidis to target specific genes will enable the development of new insect control strategies and functional analysis of vital genes and genes associated with interactions between P

  16. Development of RNAi methods for Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianxiu; Rotenberg, Dorith; Afsharifar, Alireza; Barandoc-Alviar, Karen; Whitfield, Anna E

    2013-01-01

    The corn planthopper, Peregrinus maidis, is a major pest of agronomically-important crops. Peregrinus maidis has a large geographical distribution and transmits Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV) and Maize stripe tenuivirus (MSpV). The objective of this study was to develop effective RNAi methods for P. maidis. Vacuolar-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an essential enzyme for hydrolysis of ATP and for transport of protons out of cells thereby maintaining membrane ion balance, and it has been demonstrated to be an efficacious target for RNAi in other insects. In this study, two genes encoding subunits of P. maidis V-ATPase (V-ATPase B and V-ATPase D) were chosen as RNAi target genes. The open reading frames of V-ATPase B and D were generated and used for constructing dsRNA fragments. Experiments were conducted using oral delivery and microinjection of V-ATPase B and V-ATPase D dsRNA to investigate the effectiveness of RNAi in P. maidis. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that microinjection of V-ATPase dsRNA led to a minimum reduction of 27-fold in the normalized abundance of V-ATPase transcripts two days post injection, while ingestion of dsRNA resulted in a two-fold reduction after six days of feeding. While both methods of dsRNA delivery resulted in knockdown of target transcripts, the injection method was more rapid and effective. The reduction in V-ATPase transcript abundance resulted in observable phenotypes. Specifically, the development of nymphs injected with 200 ng of either V-ATPase B or D dsRNA was impaired, resulting in higher mortality and lower fecundity than control insects injected with GFP dsRNA. Microscopic examination of these insects revealed that female reproductive organs did not develop normally. The successful development of RNAi in P. maidis to target specific genes will enable the development of new insect control strategies and functional analysis of vital genes and genes associated with interactions between P

  17. Functional analysis of the RNAi response in ovary-derived silkmoth Bm5 cells.

    PubMed

    Kolliopoulou, Anna; Swevers, Luc

    2013-08-01

    Experiments of dsRNA-mediated gene silencing in lepidopteran insects in vivo are characterized by high variability although lepidopteran cell cultures have shown an efficient response to RNAi in transfection experiments. In order to identify the core RNAi factors that regulate the RNAi response of Lepidoptera, we employed the silkmoth ovary-derived Bm5 cells as a test system since this cell line is known to respond potently in silencing after dsRNA transfection. Two parallel approaches were used; involving knock-down of the core RNAi genes or over-expression of the main siRNA pathway factors, in order to study possible inhibition or stimulation of the RNAi silencing response, respectively. Components from all three main small RNA pathways (BmAgo-1 for miRNA, BmAgo-2/BmDcr-2 for siRNA, and BmAgo-3 for piRNA) were found to be involved in the RNAi response that is triggered by dsRNA. Since BmAgo-3, a factor in the piRNA pathway that functions independent of Dicer in Drosophila, was identified as a limiting factor in the RNAi response, sense and antisense ssRNA was also tested to induce gene silencing but proved to be ineffective, suggesting a dsRNA-dependent role for BmAgo-3 in Bombyx mori. After efficient over-expression of the main siRNA factors, immunofluorescence staining revealed a predominant cytoplasmic localization in Bm5 cells. This is the first study in Lepidoptera to provide evidence for possible overlapping of all three known small RNA pathways in the regulation of the dsRNA-mediated silencing response using transfected B. mori-derived Bm5 cells as experimental system.

  18. RNAi-mediated gene function analysis in skin.

    PubMed

    Beronja, Slobodan; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    We have recently developed a method for RNAi-mediated gene function analysis in skin (Beronja et al., Nat Med 16:821-827, 2010). It employs ultrasound-guided in utero microinjections of lentivirus into the amniotic cavity of embryonic day 9 mice, which result in rapid, efficient, and stable transduction into mouse skin. Our technique greatly extends the available molecular and genetic toolbox for comprehensive functional examination of outstanding problems in epidermal biology. In its simplest form, as a single-gene function analysis via shRNA-mediated gene knockdown, our technique requires no animal mating and may need as little as only a few days between manipulation and phenotypic analysis.

  19. Lentivirus-mediated Knockdown of HDAC1 Uncovers Its Role in Esophageal Cancer Metastasis and Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min; He, Gang; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylationase 1 (HDAC1) is ubiquitously expressed in various cell lines and tissues and play an important role of regulation gene expression. Overexpression of HDAC1 has been observed in various types of cancers, which indicated that it might be a target for cancer therapy. To test HDAC1 inhibition for cancer treatment, the gene expression of HDAC1 was knockdown mediated by a lentivirus system. Our data showed the gene expression of HDAC1 could be efficiently knockdown by RNAi mediated by lentivirus in esophageal carcinoma EC109 cells. Knockdown of HDAC1 led to significant decrease of cell growth and altered cell cycle distribution. The result of transwell assay showed that the numbers of cells travelled through the micropore membrane was significantly decreased as HDAC1 expression was knockdown. Moreover, HDAC1 knockdown inhibited the migration of EC109 cells as determining by scratch test. Additionally, enhancement of cisplatin-stimulated apoptosis was detected by HDAC1 knockdown. Our data suggested inhibition of HDAC1 expression by lentivirus mediated shRNA might be further applied for esophageal cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27698906

  20. Cricket body size is altered by systemic RNAi against insulin signaling components and epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Dabour, Noha; Bando, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Taro; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Mito, Taro; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare

    2011-09-01

    A long-standing problem of developmental biology is how body size is determined. In Drosophila melanogaster, the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (I/IGF) and target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathways play important roles in this process. However, the detailed mechanisms by which insect body growth is regulated are not known. Therefore, we have attempted to utilize systemic nymphal RNA interference (nyRNAi) to knockdown expression of insulin signaling components including Insulin receptor (InR), Insulin receptor substrate (chico), Phosphatase and tensin homologue (Pten), Target of rapamycin (Tor), RPS6-p70-protein kinase (S6k), Forkhead box O (FoxO) and Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) and observed the effects on body size in the Gryllus bimaculatus cricket. We found that crickets treated with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against Gryllus InR, chico, Tor, S6k and Egfr displayed smaller body sizes, while Gryllus FoxO nyRNAi-ed crickets exhibited larger than normal body sizes. Furthermore, RNAi against Gryllus chico and Tor displayed slow growth and RNAi against Gryllus chico displayed longer lifespan than control crickets. Since no significant difference in ability of food uptake was observed between the Gryllus chico(nyRNAi) nymphs and controls, we conclude that the adult cricket body size can be altered by knockdown of expressions of Gryllus InR, chico, Tor, S6k, FoxO and Egfr by systemic RNAi. Our results suggest that the cricket is a promising model to study mechanisms underlying controls of body size and life span with RNAi methods.

  1. Knockdown of nucleophosmin by RNA interference reverses multidrug resistance in resistant leukemic HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Minhui; Hu, Jianda; Liu, Tingbo; Li, Jing; Chen, Buyuan; Chen, Xinji

    2013-09-01

    Nucleophosmin, a multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein, is involved in many cellular activities. However, the role of NPM in drug-resistance of leukemia has not yet been explored. We designed and selected one shRNA targeting on NPM gene transduction into HL-60 and HL-60/ADR cell lines (an adriamycin resistant cell line) by lentivirus. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation were assessed. The expressions of the related genes and proteins were detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed obvious down-regulation of NPM mRNA and protein levels after NPM RNAi. NPM-targeted RNAi also resulted in many cellular changes, such as, suppressing cell proliferation and inducing cell differentiation. Down-regulation of NPM gene could arrest the cell cycle progression, an increase in the proportion of G0/G1 phase in knockdown groups. NPM gene silencing could also induce pro-apoptotic genes and proteins expression, and inhibit anti-apoptotic genes/proteins expression. Furthermore, IC50 of two chemotherapeutic agents (adriamycin and ADR; daunorubicin and DNR) to HL-60 and HL-60/ADR cells decreased, especially more remarkable on HL-60/ADR cells. IC50 of ADR on HL-60/ADR cells was reduced from 12.544 ± 0.851 μmol/L (before NPM RNAi) to 6.331 ± 0.522 μmol/L (after NPM RNAi), IC50 of DNR was reduced from 2.152 ± 0.143 μmol/L (before NPM RNAi) to 1.116 ± 0.093 μmol/L (after NPM RNAi). The relative reversal rate of HL-60/ADR cells on ADR was 50.2%, and on DNR was 48.9%. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that shRNA expression vectors could effectively reduce NPM expression and restore the drug sensitivity of resistant leukemic cells to conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  2. Microinjection-based RNA interference knockdown of ecdysteroid biosynthetic genes in a non-model hemipteran pest, Lygus hesperus (western tarnished plant bug)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNAi-mediated knockdown of target transcripts offers great potential, both in terms of insect functional genomics and the development of novel insect pest management strategies. Frequently, dsRNAs targeting transcripts of interest are introduced orally to the target organism via feeding. This delive...

  3. Type I Interferons Impede Short Hairpin RNA-Mediated RNAi via Inhibition of Dicer-Mediated Processing to Small Interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Takayama, Kosuke; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-17

    RNAi by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) is a powerful tool not only for studying gene functions in various organisms, including mammals, but also for the treatment of severe disorders. However, shRNA-expressing vectors can induce type I interferon (IFN) expression by activation of innate immune responses, leading to off-target effects and unexpected side effects. Several strategies have been developed to prevent type I IFN induction. On the other hand, it has remained unclear whether type I IFNs have effects on shRNA-mediated RNAi. Here, we show that the type I IFNs significantly inhibit shRNA-mediated RNAi. Treatment with recombinant human IFN-α significantly inhibited shRNA-mediated knockdown of target genes, while it did not inhibit small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Following treatment with IFN-α, increased and decreased copy numbers of shRNA and its processed form, respectively, were found in the cells transfected with shRNA-expressing plasmids. Dicer protein levels were not altered by IFN-α. These results indicate that type I IFNs inhibit shRNA-mediated RNAi via inhibition of dicer-mediated processing of shRNA to siRNA. Our findings should provide important clues for efficient RNAi-mediated knockdown of target genes in both basic researches and clinical gene therapy.

  4. Ultra-low Gossypol cottonseed: Stability and specificity of the RNAi-mediated trait and performance of transgenic lines under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed, containing 22.5% protein, remains a low-value byproduct of lint production mainly due to the presence of toxic gossypol that makes it unfit for monogastrics. RNAi-knockdown of d-cadinene synthase gene(s) was used to engineer plants that produced ultra-low gossypol cottonseed (ULGCS). T...

  5. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  6. Knockdown of cullin 4A inhibits growth and increases chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; You, Liang; Jablons, David M; Li, Ya-Chin; Mao, Jian-Hua; Xu, Zhidong; Lung, Jr-Hau; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2016-07-01

    Cullin 4A (Cul4A) has been observed to be overexpressed in various cancers. In this study, the role of Cul4A in the growth and chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells were studied. We showed that Cul4A is overexpressed in lung cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of the Cul4A expression by shRNA in lung cancer cells resulted in decreased cellular proliferation and growth in lung cancer cells. Increased sensitivity to gemcitabine, a chemotherapy drug, was also noted in those Cul4A knockdown lung cancer cells. Moreover, increased expression of p21, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inducible early gene-1 (TIEG1) and TGF beta-induced (TGFBI) was observed in lung cancer cells after Cul4A knockdown, which may be partially related to increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. G0/G1 cell cycle arrest was also noted after Cul4A knockdown. Notably, decreased tumour growth and increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine were also noted after Cul4A knockdown in lung cancer xenograft nude mice models. In summary, our study showed that targeting Cul4A with RNAi or other techniques may provide a possible insight to the development of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  7. Robust RNAi enhancement via human Argonaute-2 overexpression from plasmids, viral vectors and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Kathleen; Niopek, Dominik; Cotugno, Gabriella; Kaldenbach, Michaela; Pankert, Teresa; Willemsen, Joschka; Zhang, Xian; Schürmann, Nina; Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Serva, Andrius; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Castoldi, Mirco; Starkuviene, Vytaute; Erfle, Holger; Gilbert, Daniel F.; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Boutros, Michael; Binder, Marco; Streetz, Konrad; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Grimm, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    As the only mammalian Argonaute protein capable of directly cleaving mRNAs in a small RNA-guided manner, Argonaute-2 (Ago2) is a keyplayer in RNA interference (RNAi) silencing via small interfering (si) or short hairpin (sh) RNAs. It is also a rate-limiting factor whose saturation by si/shRNAs limits RNAi efficiency and causes numerous adverse side effects. Here, we report a set of versatile tools and widely applicable strategies for transient or stable Ago2 co-expression, which overcome these concerns. Specifically, we engineered plasmids and viral vectors to co-encode a codon-optimized human Ago2 cDNA along with custom shRNAs. Furthermore, we stably integrated this Ago2 cDNA into a panel of standard human cell lines via plasmid transfection or lentiviral transduction. Using various endo- or exogenous targets, we demonstrate the potential of all three strategies to boost mRNA silencing efficiencies in cell culture by up to 10-fold, and to facilitate combinatorial knockdowns. Importantly, these robust improvements were reflected by augmented RNAi phenotypes and accompanied by reduced off-targeting effects. We moreover show that Ago2/shRNA-co-encoding vectors can enhance and prolong transgene silencing in livers of adult mice, while concurrently alleviating hepatotoxicity. Our customizable reagents and avenues should broadly improve future in vitro and in vivo RNAi experiments in mammalian systems. PMID:24049077

  8. An Arabidopsis Tissue-Specific RNAi Method for Studying Genes Essential to Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Rivera, Brunilís; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the genes in plants can be considered essential in the sense that when absent the plant fails to develop past the first few cell divisions. The fact that angiosperms pass through a haploid gametophyte stage can make it challenging to propagate such mutants even in the heterozygous condition. Here we describe a tissue-specific RNAi method that allows us to visualize cell division phenotypes in petals, which are large dispensable organs. Portions of the APETALA (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) promoters confer early petal-specific expression. We show that when either promoter is used to drive the expression of a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) RNAi transgene in plants uniformly expressing GUS, GUS expression is knocked down specifically in petals. We further tested the system by targeting the essential kinetochore protein CENPC and two different components of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (MAD2 and BUBR1). Plant lines expressing petal-specific RNAi hairpins targeting these genes exhibited an array of petal phenotypes. Cytological analyses of the affected flower buds confirmed that CENPC knockdown causes cell cycle arrest but provided no evidence that either MAD2 or BUBR1 are required for mitosis (although both genes are required for petal growth by this assay). A key benefit of the petal-specific RNAi method is that the phenotypes are not expressed in the lineages leading to germ cells, and the phenotypes are faithfully transmitted for at least four generations despite their pronounced effects on growth. PMID:23236491

  9. Functional VEGFA knockdown with artificial 3′-tailed mirtrons defined by 5′ splice site and branch point

    PubMed Central

    Kock, Kian Hong; Kong, Kiat Whye; Hoon, Shawn; Seow, Yiqi

    2015-01-01

    Mirtrons are introns that form pre-miRNA hairpins after splicing to produce RNA interference (RNAi) effectors distinct from Drosha-dependent intronic miRNAs, and will be especially useful for co-delivery of coding genes and RNAi. A specific family of mirtrons – 3′-tailed mirtrons – has hairpins precisely defined on the 5′ end by the 5′ splice site and 3′ end by the branch point. Here, we present design principles for artificial 3′-tailed mirtrons and demonstrate, for the first time, efficient gene knockdown with tailed mirtrons within eGFP coding region. These artificial tailed mirtrons, unlike canonical mirtrons, have very few sequence design restrictions. Tailed mirtrons targeted against VEGFA mRNA, the misregulation of which is causative of several disorders including cancer, achieved significant levels of gene knockdown. Tailed mirtron-mediated knockdown was further shown to be splicing-dependent, and at least as effective as equivalent artificial intronic miRNAs, with the added advantage of very defined cleavage sites for generation of mature miRNA guide strands. Further development and exploitation of this unique mirtron biogenesis pathway for therapeutic RNAi coupled into protein-expressing genes can potentially enable the development of precisely controlled combinatorial gene therapy. PMID:26089392

  10. Suppression of intestinal immunity through silencing of TCTP by RNAi in transgenic silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Hu, Cuimei; Wang, Fei; Ma, Sanyuan; Li, Xianyang; Song, Liang; Hua, Xiaoting; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-12-10

    Intestinal immune response is a front line of host defense. The host factors that participate in intestinal immunity response remain largely unknown. We recently reported that Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (BmTCTP) was obtained by constructing a phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut and carrying out high throughput screening of pathogen binding molecules. To further address the function of BmTCTP in silkworm intestinal immunity, transgenic RNAi silkworms were constructed by microinjection piggBac plasmid to Dazao embryos. The antimicrobial capacity of transgenic silkworm decreased since the expression of gut antimicrobial peptide from transgenic silkworm was not sufficiently induced during oral microbial challenge. Moreover, dynamic ERK phosphorylation from transgenic silkworm midgut was disrupted. Taken together, the innate immunity of intestinal was suppressed through disruption of dynamic ERK phosphorylation after oral microbial infection as a result of RNAi-mediated knockdown of midgut TCTP in transgenic silkworm.

  11. Nuclear organisation and RNAi in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Woolcock, Katrina J; Bühler, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been used extensively for investigating RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated heterochromatin assembly. However, only recently have studies begun to shed light on the 3D organisation of chromatin and the RNAi machinery in the fission yeast nucleus. These studies indicate association of repressive and active chromatin with different regions of the nuclear periphery, similar to other model organisms, and clustering of functionally related genomic features. Unexpectedly, RNAi factors were shown to associate with nuclear pores and were implicated in the regulation of genomic features outside of the well-studied heterochromatic regions. Nuclear organisation is likely to contribute to substrate specificity of the RNAi pathway. However, further studies are required to elucidate the exact mechanisms and functional importance of this nuclear organisation.

  12. Progress in RNAi-based antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the conserved sequence-specific degradation of message RNA mediated by small interfering (si)RNA duplexes 21-25 nucleotides in length. Given the ability to specifically silence any gene of interest, siRNAs offers several advantages over conventional drugs as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of human maladies including cancers, genetic disorders, and infectious diseases. Antiviral RNAi strategies have received much attention and several compounds are currently being tested in clinical trials. In particular, the development of siRNA-based HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) therapeutics has progressed rapidly and many recent studies have shown that the use of RNAi could inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting a number of viral or cellular genes. Therefore, the present chapter mainly focuses on the recent progress of RNAi-based anti-HIV gene therapeutics, with particular attention to molecular targets and delivery strategies of the siRNAs.

  13. RNAi-mediated plant protection against aphids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Dao; Liu, Zong-Cai; Huang, Si-Liang; Chen, Zhi-Qin; Sun, Yong-Wei; Duan, Peng-Fei; Ma, You-Zhi; Xia, Lan-Qin

    2016-06-01

    Aphids (Aphididae) are major agricultural pests that cause significant yield losses of crop plants each year by inflicting damage both through the direct effects of feeding and by vectoring harmful plant viruses. Expression of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against suitable insect target genes in transgenic plants has been shown to give protection against pests through plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). Thus, as a potential alternative and effective strategy for insect pest management in agricultural practice, plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control has received close attention in recent years. In this review, the mechanism of RNAi in insects and the so far explored effective RNAi target genes in aphids, their potential applications in the development of transgenic plants for aphid control and the major challenges in this regard are reviewed, and the future prospects of using plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control are discussed. This review is intended to be a helpful insight into the generation of aphid-resistant plants through plant-mediated RNAi strategy. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  15. miRNA-embedded shRNAs for Lineage-specific BCL11A Knockdown and Hemoglobin F Induction

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Swaroopa; Brendel, Christian; Renella, Raffaele; Du, Peng; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Grenier, Jennifer K; Grimson, Andrew W; Kamran, Sophia C; Thornton, James; de Boer, Helen; Root, David E; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) expressed via RNA polymerase (pol) III promoters has been widely exploited to modulate gene expression in a variety of mammalian cell types. For certain applications, such as lineage-specific knockdown, embedding targeting sequences into pol II-driven microRNA (miRNA) architecture is required. Here, using the potential therapeutic target BCL11A, we demonstrate that pol III-driven shRNAs lead to significantly increased knockdown but also increased cytotoxcity in comparison to pol II-driven miRNA adapted shRNAs (shRNAmiR) in multiple hematopoietic cell lines. We show that the two expression systems yield mature guide strand sequences that differ by a 4 bp shift. This results in alternate seed sequences and consequently influences the efficacy of target gene knockdown. Incorporating a corresponding 4 bp shift into the guide strand of shRNAmiRs resulted in improved knockdown efficiency of BCL11A. This was associated with a significant de-repression of the hemoglobin target of BCL11A, human γ-globin or the murine homolog Hbb-y. Our results suggest the requirement for optimization of shRNA sequences upon incorporation into a miRNA backbone. These findings have important implications in future design of shRNAmiRs for RNAi-based therapy in hemoglobinopathies and other diseases requiring lineage-specific expression of gene silencing sequences. PMID:26080908

  16. Towards Functional Annotation of the Preimplantation Transcriptome: An RNAi Screen in Mammalian Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wei; Dai, Xiangpeng; Marcho, Chelsea; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Kun; Tremblay, Kimberly D.; Mager, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    With readily available transcriptome-wide data, understanding the role of each expressed gene is an essential next step. Although RNAi technologies allow for genome-wide screens in cell culture, these approaches cannot replace strategies for discovery in the embryo. Here we present, for the first time, a knockdown screen in mouse preimplantation embryos. Early mammalian development encompasses dynamic cellular, molecular and epigenetic events that are largely conserved from mouse to man. We assayed 712 genes for requirements during preimplantation. We identified 59 genes required for successful development or outgrowth and implantation. We have characterized each phenotype and revealed cellular, molecular, and lineage specific defects following knockdown of transcript. Induced network analyses demonstrate this as a valid approach to identify networks of genes that play important roles during preimplantation. Our approach provides a robust and efficient strategy towards identification of novel phenotypes during mouse preimplantation and facilitates functional annotation of the mammalian transcriptome. PMID:27869233

  17. Morphogenesis defects are associated with abnormal nervous system regeneration following roboA RNAi in planarians.

    PubMed

    Cebrià, Francesc; Newmark, Phillip A

    2007-03-01

    The process by which the proper pattern is restored to newly formed tissues during metazoan regeneration remains an open question. Here, we provide evidence that the nervous system plays a role in regulating morphogenesis during anterior regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of a planarian ortholog of the axon-guidance receptor roundabout (robo) leads to unexpected phenotypes during anterior regeneration, including the development of a supernumerary pharynx (the feeding organ of the animal) and the production of ectopic, dorsal outgrowths with cephalic identity. We show that Smed-roboA RNAi knockdown disrupts nervous system structure during cephalic regeneration: the newly regenerated brain and ventral nerve cords do not re-establish proper connections. These neural defects precede, and are correlated with, the development of ectopic structures. We propose that, in the absence of proper connectivity between the cephalic ganglia and the ventral nerve cords, neurally derived signals promote the differentiation of pharyngeal and cephalic structures. Together with previous studies on regeneration in annelids and amphibians, these results suggest a conserved role of the nervous system in pattern formation during blastema-based regeneration.

  18. RNAi induced gene silencing in crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar

    2010-12-01

    The RNA silencing is one of the innovative and efficient molecular biology tools to harness the down-regulation of expression of gene(s) specifically. To accomplish such selective modification of gene expression of a particular trait, homology dependent gene silencing uses a stunning variety of gene silencing viz. co-suppression, post-transcriptional gene silencing, virus-induced gene silencing etc. This family of diverse molecular phenomena has a common exciting feature of gene silencing which is collectively called RNA interference abbreviated to as RNAi. This molecular phenomenon has become a focal point of plant biology and medical research throughout the world. As a result, this technology has turned out to be a powerful tool in understanding the function of individual gene and has ultimately led to the tremendous use in crop improvement. This review article illustrates the application of RNAi in a broad area of crop improvement where this technology has been successfully used. It also provides historical perspective of RNAi discovery and its contemporary phenomena, mechanism of RNAi pathway.

  19. Recombinant fungal entomopathogen RNAi target insect gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiongbo; Wu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology is considered as an alternative for control of pests. However, RNAi has not been used in field conditions yet, since delivering exogenous ds/siRNA to target pests is very difficult. The laboratory methods of introducing the ds/siRNA into insects through feeding, micro feeding / dripping and injecting cannot be used in fields. Transgenic crop is perhaps the most effective application of RNAi for pest control, but it needs long-time basic researches in order to reduce the cost and evaluate the safety. Therefore, transgenic microbe is maybe a better choice. Entomopathogenic fungi generally invade the host insects through cuticle like chemical insecticides contact insect to control sucking sap pests. Isaria fumosorosea is a common fungal entomopathogen in whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. We constructed a recombinant strain of I. fumosorosea expressing specific dsRNA of whitefly's TLR7 gene. It could silence the TLR7 gene and improve the virulence against whitefly. Transgenic fungal entomopathogen has shown great potential to attain the application of RNAi technology for pests control in fields. In the future, the research interests should be focused on the selection of susceptible target pests and their vital genes, and optimizing the methods for screening genes and recombinants as well.

  20. RNAi strategies to suppress insects of fruit and tree crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, to reduce plant feeding Hemiptera in fruit tree and grapevines. The successful use of RNAi strategies to reduce insect pests, psyllids and leafhoppers was demonstrated. An RNAi bioassay which absorbs dsRNA into plant tissues provided up to 40 days of act...

  1. MRP4 knockdown enhances migration, suppresses apoptosis, and produces aggregated morphology in human retinal vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tagami, Mizuki; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Imai, Hisanori; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Honda, Shigeru; Tsukahara, Yasutomo; Negi, Akira

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous VEGF decreases MRP4 expression in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} MRP4 knockdown leads to enhanced cell migration. {yields} MRP4 knockdown suppresses caspase-3-mediated cell apoptosis. {yields} MRP4 knockdown produces cell assembly and cell aggregation. -- Abstract: The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) MRP4/ABCC4 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that actively effluxes endogenous and xenobiotic substrates out of cells. In the rodent retina, Mrp4 mRNA and protein are exclusively expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but the angiogenic properties of Mrp4 are poorly understood so far. This study aims to explore the angiogenic properties of MRP4 in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) utilizing the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. MRP4 expression was decreased at the mRNA and protein levels after stimulation with exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor in a dose-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated MRP4 knockdown in HRECs do not affect cell proliferation but enhances cell migration. Moreover, cell apoptosis induced by serum starvation was less prominent in MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs as compared to control siRNA-treated HRECs. In a Matrigel-based tube-formation assay, although MRP4 knockdown did not lead to a significant change in the total tube length, MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs assembled and aggregated into a massive tube-like structure, which was not observed in control siRNA-treated HRECs. These results suggest that MRP4 is uniquely involved in retinal angiogenesis.

  2. The effect of neurospecific knockdown of candidate genes for locomotor behavior and sound production in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Sergey A; Bragina, Julia V; Besedina, Natalia G; Danilenkova, Larisa V; Kamysheva, Elena A; Panova, Anna A; Kamyshev, Nikolai G

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the functioning of central pattern generators (CPGs) are poorly understood. Investigations using genetic approaches in the model organism Drosophila may help to identify unknown molecular players participating in the formation or control of motor patterns. Here we report Drosophila genes as candidates for involvement in the neural mechanisms responsible for motor functions, such as locomotion and courtship song. Twenty-two Drosophila lines, used for gene identification, were isolated from a previously created collection of 1064 lines, each carrying a P element insertion in one of the autosomes. The lines displayed extreme deviations in locomotor and/or courtship song parameters compared with the whole collection. The behavioral consequences of CNS-specific RNAi-mediated knockdowns for 10 identified genes were estimated. The most prominent changes in the courtship song interpulse interval (IPI) were seen in flies with Sps2 or CG15630 knockdown. Glia-specific knockdown of these genes produced no effect on the IPI. Estrogen-induced knockdown of CG15630 in adults reduced the IPI. The product of the CNS-specific gene, CG15630 (a predicted cell surface receptor), is likely to be directly involved in the functioning of the CPG generating the pulse song pattern. Future studies should ascertain its functional role in the neurons that constitute the song CPG. Other genes (Sps2, CG34460), whose CNS-specific knockdown resulted in IPI reduction, are also worthy of detailed examination.

  3. The effect of neurospecific knockdown of candidate genes for locomotor behavior and sound production in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fedotov, Sergey A; Bragina, Julia V; Besedina, Natalia G; Danilenkova, Larisa V; Kamysheva, Elena A; Panova, Anna A; Kamyshev, Nikolai G

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the functioning of central pattern generators (CPGs) are poorly understood. Investigations using genetic approaches in the model organism Drosophila may help to identify unknown molecular players participating in the formation or control of motor patterns. Here we report Drosophila genes as candidates for involvement in the neural mechanisms responsible for motor functions, such as locomotion and courtship song. Twenty-two Drosophila lines, used for gene identification, were isolated from a previously created collection of 1064 lines, each carrying a P element insertion in one of the autosomes. The lines displayed extreme deviations in locomotor and/or courtship song parameters compared with the whole collection. The behavioral consequences of CNS-specific RNAi-mediated knockdowns for 10 identified genes were estimated. The most prominent changes in the courtship song interpulse interval (IPI) were seen in flies with Sps2 or CG15630 knockdown. Glia-specific knockdown of these genes produced no effect on the IPI. Estrogen-induced knockdown of CG15630 in adults reduced the IPI. The product of the CNS-specific gene, CG15630 (a predicted cell surface receptor), is likely to be directly involved in the functioning of the CPG generating the pulse song pattern. Future studies should ascertain its functional role in the neurons that constitute the song CPG. Other genes (Sps2, CG34460), whose CNS-specific knockdown resulted in IPI reduction, are also worthy of detailed examination. PMID:25494872

  4. RNAi silencing of the HaHMG-CoA reductase gene inhibits oviposition in the Helicoverpa armigera cotton bollworm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijian; Dong, Yongcheng; Desneux, Nicolas; Niu, Changying

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has considerable promise for developing novel pest control techniques, especially because of the threat of the development of resistance against current strategies. For this purpose, the key is to select pest control genes with the greatest potential for developing effective pest control treatments. The present study demonstrated that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase; HMGR) gene is a potential target for insect control using RNAi. HMGR is a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway in insects. A complete cDNA encoding full length HMGR (encoding an 837-aa protein) was cloned from Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The HaHMGR (H. armigera HMGR) knockdown using systemic RNAi in vivo inhibited the fecundity of the females, effectively inhibited ovipostion, and significantly reduced vitellogenin (Vg) mRNA levels. Moreover, the oviposition rate of the female moths was reduced by 98% by silencing HaHMGR compared to the control groups. One-pair experiments showed that both the proportions of valid mating and fecundity were zero. Furthermore, the HaHMGR-silenced females failed to lay eggs (approximate 99% decrease in oviposition) in the semi-field cage performance. The present study demonstrated the potential implications for developing novel pest management strategies using HaHMGR RNAi in the control of H. armigera and other insect pests.

  5. Knockdown of Neuropeptide Y in the Dorsomedial Hypothalamus Promotes Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; de La Serre, C Barbier; Zhang, Ni; Yang, Liang; Li, Hong; Bi, Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Recent evidence has shown that alterations in dorsomedial hypothalamic (DMH) neuropeptide Y (NPY) signaling influence glucose homeostasis, but the mechanism through which DMH NPY acts to affect glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Here we report that DMH NPY descending signals to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) modulate hepatic insulin sensitivity to control hepatic glucose production in rats. Using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, we revealed that knockdown of NPY in the DMH by adeno-associated virus-mediated NPY-specific RNAi promoted insulin's action on suppression of hepatic glucose production. This knockdown silenced DMH NPY descending signals to the DMV, leading to an elevation of hepatic vagal innervation. Hepatic vagotomy abolished the inhibitory effect of DMH NPY knockdown on hepatic glucose production, but this glycemic effect was not affected by vagal deafferentation. Together, these results demonstrate a distinct role for DMH NPY in the regulation of glucose homeostasis through the hepatic vagal efferents and insulin action on hepatic glucose production.

  6. Emerging strategies for RNA interference (RNAi) applications in insects.

    PubMed

    Nandety, Raja Sekhar; Kuo, Yen-Wen; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) in insects is a gene regulatory process that also plays a vital role in the maintenance and in the regulation of host defenses against invading viruses. Small RNAs determine the specificity of the RNAi through precise recognition of their targets. These small RNAs in insects comprise small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi interacting RNAs (piRNAs) of various lengths. In this review, we have explored different forms of the RNAi inducers that are presently in use, and their applications for an effective and efficient fundamental and practical RNAi research with insects. Further, we reviewed trends in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and their importance for insect RNAi, including the identification of novel insect targets as well as insect viruses. Here we also describe a rapidly emerging trend of using plant viruses to deliver the RNAi inducer molecules into insects for an efficient RNAi response.

  7. Nanoparticle-Based Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Shum, Ka-To; Burnett, John C.; Rossi, John J.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved, endogenous process for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Although RNAi therapeutics have recently progressed through the pipeline toward clinical trials, the application of these as ideal, clinical therapeutics requires the development of safe and effective delivery systems. Inspired by the immense progress with nanotechnology in drug delivery, efforts have been dedicated to the development of nanoparticle-based RNAi delivery systems. For example, a precisely engineered, multifunctional nanocarrier with combined passive and active targeting capabilities may address the delivery challenges for the widespread use of RNAi as a therapy. Therefore, in this review, we introduce the major hurdles in achieving efficient RNAi delivery and discuss the current advances in applying nanotechnology-based delivery systems to overcome the delivery hurdles of RNAi therapeutics. In particular, some representative examples of nanoparticle-based delivery formulations for targeted RNAi therapeutics are highlighted. PMID:23667320

  8. Emerging strategies for RNA interference (RNAi) applications in insects

    PubMed Central

    Nandety, Raja Sekhar; Kuo, Yen-Wen; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) in insects is a gene regulatory process that also plays a vital role in the maintenance and in the regulation of host defenses against invading viruses. Small RNAs determine the specificity of the RNAi through precise recognition of their targets. These small RNAs in insects comprise small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi interacting RNAs (piRNAs) of various lengths. In this review, we have explored different forms of the RNAi inducers that are presently in use, and their applications for an effective and efficient fundamental and practical RNAi research with insects. Further, we reviewed trends in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and their importance for insect RNAi, including the identification of novel insect targets as well as insect viruses. Here we also describe a rapidly emerging trend of using plant viruses to deliver the RNAi inducer molecules into insects for an efficient RNAi response. PMID:25424593

  9. Reverse genetics in the tide pool: knock-down of target gene expression via RNA interference in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Felipe S; Schoville, Sean D; Burton, Ronald S

    2015-07-01

    Reverse genetic tools are essential for characterizing phenotypes of novel genes and testing functional hypotheses generated from next-generation sequencing studies. RNA interference (RNAi) has been a widely used technique for describing or quantifying physiological, developmental or behavioural roles of target genes by suppressing their expression. The marine intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has become an emerging model for evolutionary and physiological studies, but this species is not amenable to most genetic manipulation approaches. As crustaceans are susceptible to RNAi-mediated gene knock-down, we developed a simple method for delivery of gene-specific double-stranded RNA that results in significant suppression of target gene transcription levels. The protocol was examined on five genes of interest, and for each, at least 50% knock-down in expression was achieved. While knock-down levels did not reach 100% in any trial, a well-controlled experiment with one heat-shock gene showed unambiguously that such partial gene suppression may cause dramatic changes in phenotype. Copepods with suppressed expression of heat-shock protein beta 1 (hspb1) exhibited dramatically decreased tolerance to high temperatures, validating the importance of this gene during thermal stress, as proposed by a previous study. The application of this RNAi protocol in T. californicus will be invaluable for examining the role of genes putatively involved in reproductive isolation, mitochondrial function and local adaptation.

  10. Specific in vivo knockdown of protein function by intrabodies

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea LJ; Dübel, Stefan; Böldicke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) are recombinant antibody fragments that bind to target proteins expressed inside of the same living cell producing the antibodies. The molecules are commonly used to study the function of the target proteins (i.e., their antigens). The intrabody technology is an attractive alternative to the generation of gene-targeted knockout animals, and complements knockdown techniques such as RNAi, miRNA and small molecule inhibitors, by-passing various limitations and disadvantages of these methods. The advantages of intrabodies include very high specificity for the target, the possibility to knock down several protein isoforms by one intrabody and targeting of specific splice variants or even post-translational modifications. Different types of intrabodies must be designed to target proteins at different locations, typically either in the cytoplasm, in the nucleus or in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Most straightforward is the use of intrabodies retained in the ER (ER intrabodies) to knock down the function of proteins passing the ER, which disturbs the function of members of the membrane or plasma proteomes. More effort is needed to functionally knock down cytoplasmic or nuclear proteins because in this case antibodies need to provide an inhibitory effect and must be able to fold in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm. In this review, we present a broad overview of intrabody technology, as well as applications both of ER and cytoplasmic intrabodies, which have yielded valuable insights in the biology of many targets relevant for drug development, including α-synuclein, TAU, BCR-ABL, ErbB-2, EGFR, HIV gp120, CCR5, IL-2, IL-6, β-amyloid protein and p75NTR. Strategies for the generation of intrabodies and various designs of their applications are also reviewed. PMID:26252565

  11. Antiviral RNAi: Translating Science Toward Therapeutic Success

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Viruses continuously evolve to contend with an ever-changing environment that involves transmission between hosts and sometimes species, immune responses, and in some cases therapeutic interventions. Given the high mutation rate of viruses relative to the timescales of host evolution and drug development, novel drug classes that are readily screened and translated to the clinic are needed. RNA interference (RNAi) – a natural mechanism for specific degradation of target RNAs that is conserved from plants to invertebrates and vertebrates – can potentially be harnessed to yield therapies with extensive specificity, ease of design, and broad application. In this review, we discuss basic mechanisms of action and therapeutic applications of RNAi, including design considerations and areas for future development in the field. PMID:21826573

  12. Functional screening of mammalian mechanosensitive genes using Drosophila RNAi library– Smarcd3/Bap60 is a mechanosensitive pro-inflammatory gene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Jang, In-hwan; Kim, Chan Woo; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Won Jae; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed blood flow (d-flow) induces atherosclerosis by altering the expression of mechanosensitive genes in the arterial endothelium. Previously, we identified >580 mechanosensitive genes in the mouse arterial endothelium, but their role in endothelial inflammation is incompletely understood. From this set, we obtained 84 Drosophila RNAi lines that silences the target gene under the control of upstream activation sequence (UAS) promoter. These lines were crossed with C564-GAL4 flies expressing GFP under the control of drosomycin promoter, an NF-κB target gene and a marker of pathogen-induced inflammation. Silencing of psmd12 or ERN1 decreased infection-induced drosomycin expression, while Bap60 silencing significantly increased the drosomycin expression. Interestingly, knockdown of Bap60 in adult flies using temperature-inducible Bap60 RNAi (C564ts-GAL4-Bap60-RNAi) enhanced drosomycin expression upon Gram-positive bacterial challenge but the basal drosomycin expression remained unchanged compared to the control. In the mammalian system, smarcd3 (mammalian ortholog of Bap60) expression was reduced in the human- and mouse aortic endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear in vitro as well as in the d-flow regions of mouse arterial endothelium in vivo. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of smarcd3 induced endothelial inflammation. In summary, we developed an in vivo Drosophila RNAi screening method to identify flow-sensitive genes that regulate endothelial inflammation. PMID:27819340

  13. Annexin A3 Knockdown Suppresses Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Yue-Hua; Qiu, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study identified an elevated abundance of annexin A3 (Anxa3) as a novel prognostic biomarker of lung adenocarcinoma (LADC) through quantitative proteomics analysis. However, the biological functions of Anxa3 in LADC are not fully clear. In this study, in vitro and in vivo assays were performed to investigate the effects of Anxa3 downregulation on the growth, migration, invasion, metastasis, and signaling pathway activation of LADC cells. After Anxa3 downregulation, the growth of A549 and LTEP-a2 LADC cells was slowed and they showed decreased migration and invasion in vitro. Anxa3 knockdown significantly inhibited tumor formation by A549 cells in vivo; while many metastases were formed by control A549 cells, there were obvious reductions in the numbers of lung, liver, and brain metastases formed by Anxa3 knockdown in A549 cells. Furthermore, Anxa3 knockdown significantly decreased MMP-2 and N-cadherin expression and increased E-cadherin expression both in cell lines in vitro and in tumor nodules examined during in vivo tumorigenesis assays. Interestingly, Anxa3 downregulation reduced the phosphorylated levels of MEK and ERK. In summary, Anxa3 knockdown inhibited the growth, migration, invasion, and metastasis of LADC, decreased the activation of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway, and modulated the expression of MMP-2, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin. PMID:27995049

  14. Knockdown of a cellulose synthase gene BoiCesA affects the leaf anatomy, cellulose content and salt tolerance in broccoli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangtao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ying; Xu, Fengfeng; Liu, Mengyun; Lin, Peng; Ren, Shuxin; Ma, Rui; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose is the major component of cell wall materials. A 300 bp specific fragment from the cDNA fragment was chosen to insert into vector pFGC1008 at forward and reverse orientations to construct the recombinant RNAi vector. Knockdown of BoiCesA caused “dwarf” phenotype with smaller leaves and a loss of the content of cellulose. Moreover, RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the expression of the RNAi apparatus could repress expression of the CesA gene. Meanwhile, examination of the leaves from the T3 of RNAi transformants indicated reduction of cell expansion in vascular bundles, particularly on their abaxial surface. The proline and soluble sugar content increased contrarily. Under the salt stress, the T3 of RNAi plants showed significant higher resistance. The expression levels of some salt tolerance related genes (BoiProH, BoiPIP2;2, BoiPIP2;3) were significantly changed in T3 of RNAi plants. The results showed that the hairpin structure of CesA specific fragment inhibited the endogenous gene expression and it was proved that the cDNA fragment was relevant to the cellulose biosynthesis. Moreover, modulation cellulose synthesis probably was an important influencing factor in polysaccharide metabolism and adaptations of plants to stresses. This will provide technological possibilities for the further study of modulation of the cellulose content of crops. PMID:28169290

  15. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Gutierrez, Manuel Cantu; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L; Booth, Benjamin W; Evans-Holm, Martha; Venken, Koen J T; Levis, Robert W; Spradling, Allan C; Hoskins, Roger A; Bellen, Hugo J

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ∼7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.

  16. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Evans-Holm, Martha; Venken, Koen J.T.; Levis, Robert W.; Spradling, Allan C.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.

  17. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE PAGES

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; ...

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore » reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  18. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  19. miRNA-embedded shRNAs for Lineage-specific BCL11A Knockdown and Hemoglobin F Induction.

    PubMed

    Guda, Swaroopa; Brendel, Christian; Renella, Raffaele; Du, Peng; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Grenier, Jennifer K; Grimson, Andrew W; Kamran, Sophia C; Thornton, James; de Boer, Helen; Root, David E; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) expressed via RNA polymerase (pol) III promoters has been widely exploited to modulate gene expression in a variety of mammalian cell types. For certain applications, such as lineage-specific knockdown, embedding targeting sequences into pol II-driven microRNA (miRNA) architecture is required. Here, using the potential therapeutic target BCL11A, we demonstrate that pol III-driven shRNAs lead to significantly increased knockdown but also increased cytotoxcity in comparison to pol II-driven miRNA adapted shRNAs (shRNA(miR)) in multiple hematopoietic cell lines. We show that the two expression systems yield mature guide strand sequences that differ by a 4 bp shift. This results in alternate seed sequences and consequently influences the efficacy of target gene knockdown. Incorporating a corresponding 4 bp shift into the guide strand of shRNA(miR)s resulted in improved knockdown efficiency of BCL11A. This was associated with a significant de-repression of the hemoglobin target of BCL11A, human γ-globin or the murine homolog Hbb-y. Our results suggest the requirement for optimization of shRNA sequences upon incorporation into a miRNA backbone. These findings have important implications in future design of shRNA(miR)s for RNAi-based therapy in hemoglobinopathies and other diseases requiring lineage-specific expression of gene silencing sequences.

  20. Use of chromatin remodeling ATPases as RNAi targets for parental control of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) and Neotropical brown stink bug (Euschistus heros).

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Khajuria, Chitvan; Frey, Meghan L F; Hamm, Ronda L; Wang, Haichuan; Schulenberg, Greg A; Bowling, Andrew J; Pence, Heather E; Gandra, Premchand; Arora, Kanika; Storer, Nicholas P; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism that is present in animals and plants and is triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA), depending on the organism. In the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), RNAi can be achieved by feeding rootworms dsRNA added to artificial diet or plant tissues transformed to express dsRNA. The effect of RNAi depends on the targeted gene function and can range from an absence of phenotypic response to readily apparent responses, including lethality. Furthermore, RNAi can directly affect individuals that consume dsRNA or the effect may be transferred to the next generation. Our previous work described the potential use of genes involved in embryonic development as a parental RNAi technology for the control of WCR. In this study, we describe the use of chromatin-remodeling ATPases as target genes to achieve parental gene silencing in two insect pests, a coleopteran, WCR, and a hemipteran, the Neotropical brown stink bug, Euschistus heros Fabricius (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Our results show that dsRNA targeting chromatin-remodeling ATPase transcripts, brahma, mi-2, and iswi strongly reduced the fecundity of the exposed females in both insect species. Additionally, knockdown of chd1 reduced the fecundity of E. heros.

  1. Effects of RNAi-mediated knockdown of Xist on the developmental efficiency of cloned male porcine embryos

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, Fang; HUANG, Zhihua; YUAN, Yujuan; SHI, Junsong; CAI, Gengyuan; LIU, Dewu; WU, Zhenfang; LI, Zicong

    2016-01-01

    Xist is an X-linked gene responsible for cis induction of X chromosome inactivation. Studies have indicated that Xist is abnormally activated in the active X chromosome in cloned mouse embryos due to loss of the maternal Xist-repressing imprint following enucleation during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Inhibition of Xist expression by injecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been shown to enhance the in vivo developmental efficiency of cloned male mouse embryos by more than 10-fold. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a similar procedure can be applied to improve the cloning efficiency in pigs. We first found that Xist mRNA levels at the morula stage were aberrantly higher in pig SCNT embryos than in in vivo fertilization-derived pig embryos. Injection of a preselected effective anti-Xist siRNA into 1-cell-stage male pig SCNT embryos resulted in significant inhibition of Xist expression through the 16-cell stage. This siRNA-mediated inhibition of Xist significantly increased the total cell number per cloned blastocyst and significantly improved the birth rate of cloned healthy piglets. The present study contributes useful information on the action of Xist in the development of pig SCNT embryos and proposes a new method for enhancing the efficiency of pig cloning. PMID:27569767

  2. Identification, RNAi Knockdown and Functional Analysis of an Ejaculate Protein that Mediates a Postmating, Prezgotic Phenotype in a cricket

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male ejaculate proteins, including both sperm and seminal fluid proteins, play an important role in mediating reproductive biology. The function of ejaculate proteins can include enabling sperm-egg interactions, enhancing sperm storage, mediating female attractiveness, and even regulating female lif...

  3. Control of liver size by RNAi-mediated multiplex knockdown and its application for discovery of regulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hao; Bogorad, Roman L.; Barnes, Carmen; Walsha, Stephen; Zhuang, Iris; Nonaka, Hidenori; Ruda, Vera; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Nechev, Lubomir; Akinc, Akin; Xue, Wen; Zerial, Marino; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Koteliansky, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The Hippo pathway controls organ size through a negative regulation of the transcription co-activator Yap1. The overexpression of hyperactive mutant Yap1 or deletion of key components in the Hippo pathway leads to increased organ size in different species. Analysis of interactions of this pathway with other cellular signals corroborating organ size control is limited in part due to the difficulties associated with development of rodent models. Methods Here, we develop a new model of reversible induction of the liver size in mice using siRNA-nanoparticles targeting two kinases of Hippo pathway, namely, mammalian Ste20 family kinases 1 and 2 (Mst1 and Mst2), and an upstream regulator, neurofibromatosis type II (NF2). Results The triple siRNAs nanoparticle-induced hepatomegaly in mice phenocopies one observed with Mst1-/- Mst2-/- liver-specific depletion, as shown by extensive proliferation of hepatocytes and activation of Yap1. The simultaneous co-treatment with a fourth siRNA nanoparticle against Yap1 fully blocked the liver growth. Hippo pathway-induced liver enlargement is associated with p53 activation, evidenced by its accumulation in the nuclei and upregulation of its target genes. Moreover, injections of the triple siRNAs nanoparticle in p53LSL/LSL mice shows that livers lacking p53 expression grow faster and exceed the size of livers in p53 wild type animals, indicating a role of p53 in controlling Yap1-induced liver growth. Conclusion Our data show that siRNA-nanoparticulate manipulation of gene expression can provide the reversible control of organ size in adult animals, which presents a new avenue for the investigation of complex regulatory networks in liver. PMID:26658687

  4. Stacking up CRISPR against RNAi for therapeutic gene inhibition.

    PubMed

    Haussecker, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    Both RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) technologies allow for the sequence-specific inhibition of gene function and therefore have the potential to be used as therapeutic modalities. By judging the current public and scientific journal interest, it would seem that CRISPR, by enabling clean, durable knockouts, will dominate therapeutic gene inhibition, also at the expense of RNAi. This review aims to look behind prevailing sentiments and to more clearly define the likely scope of the therapeutic applications of the more recently developed CRISPR technology and its relative strengths and weaknesses with regards to RNAi. It is found that largely because of their broadly overlapping delivery constraints, while CRISPR presents formidable competition for DNA-directed RNAi strategies, its impact on RNAi therapeutics triggered by synthetic oligonucleotides will likely be more moderate. Instead, RNAi and genome editing, and in particular CRISPR, are poised to jointly promote a further shift toward sequence-targeted precision medicines.

  5. Bax-inhibitor-1 knockdown phenotypes are suppressed by Buffy and exacerbate degeneration in a Drosophila model of Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1) is an evolutionarily conserved cytoprotective transmembrane protein that acts as a suppressor of Bax-induced apoptosis by regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. We knocked down BI-1 in the sensitive dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) expressing neurons of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate its neuroprotective functions. We additionally sought to rescue the BI-1-induced phenotypes by co-expression with the pro-survival Buffy and determined the effect of BI-1 knockdown on the neurodegenerative α-synuclein-induced Parkinson disease (PD) model. Methods We used organismal assays to assess longevity of the flies to determine the effect of the altered expression of BI-1 in the Ddc-Gal4-expressing neurons by employing two RNAi transgenic fly lines. We measured the locomotor ability of these RNAi lines by computing the climbing indices of the climbing ability and compared them to a control line that expresses the lacZ transgene. Finally, we performed biometric analysis of the developing eye, where we counted the number of ommatidia and calculated the area of ommatidial disruption. Results The knockdown of BI-1 in these neurons was achieved under the direction of the Ddc-Gal4 transgene and resulted in shortened lifespan and precocious loss of locomotor ability. The co-expression of Buffy, the Drosophila anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 homologue, with BI-1-RNAi resulted in suppression of the reduced lifespan and impaired climbing ability. Expression of human α-synuclein in Drosophila dopaminergic neurons results in neuronal degeneration, accompanied by the age-dependent loss in climbing ability. We exploited this neurotoxic system to investigate possible BI-1 neuroprotective function. The co-expression of α-synuclein with BI-1-RNAi results in a slight decrease in lifespan coupled with an impairment in climbing ability. In supportive experiments, we employed the neuron-rich Drosophila compound eye to investigate subtle phenotypes

  6. Geographic variation in RNAi sensitivity in the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Tanaka, Seiji; Jouraku, Akiya; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2017-03-20

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technology has been widely used in basic and applied research. It is known that RNAi works in some species but not in others, although the cause for this difference remains unclear. Here, we present inter- and intra-populational variations in RNAi sensitivity in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria, and provide information on the genetic background of such variations. In the four strains analyzed, originating from different Japanese localities, most individuals from two of the strains were sensitive to injections of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against the corazonin (CRZ) and ecdysone receptor genes, whereas those from the other two strains were resistant. Selection for individuals sensitive to dsCRZ produced a dramatic increase in the RNAi sensitivity in the following generations, although phenotypes also varied in the selected line, suggesting that several genes might control RNAi sensitivity. Reciprocal crosses between a sensitive and a resistant strain suggested that the resistant phenotype is dominant. The expression levels of nine RNAi-associated genes known for other organisms were not correlated with the variation in RNAi sensitivity observed in L. migratoria. Variations in RNAi sensitivity as the ones observed in this study should be considered when using RNAi in basic and applied research as well as in pest management.

  7. Knockout mouse production assisted by Blm knockdown

    PubMed Central

    FUKUDA, Mikiko; INOUE, Mayuko; MURAMATSU, Daisuke; MIYACHI, Hitoshi; SHINKAI, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Production of knockout mice using targeted embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a powerful approach for investigating the function of specific genes in vivo. Although the protocol for gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) in ESCs is already well established, the targeting efficiency varies at different target loci and is sometimes too low. It is known that knockdown of the Bloom syndrome gene, BLM, enhances HR-mediated gene targeting efficiencies in various cell lines. However, it has not yet been investigated whether this approach in ESCs is applicable for successful knockout mouse production. Therefore, we attempted to answer this question. Consistent with previous reports, Blm knockdown enhanced gene targeting efficiencies for three gene loci that we examined by 2.3–4.1-fold. Furthermore, the targeted ESC clones generated good chimeras and were successful in germline transmission. These data suggest that Blm knockdown provides a general benefit for efficient ESC-based and HR-mediated knockout mouse production. PMID:26598326

  8. Gene Silencing in Insect Cells Using RNAi.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; March, John C; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    A technique is described for synthesizing and transfecting double stranded RNA (dsRNA) for RNA interference (RNAi) in Sf-21 cell culture. Transfection with dsRNA only requires an hour and the cells usually recover within 12 h. Suggestions for designing dsRNA are included in the methods. Furthermore, websites are provided for rapid and effective dsRNA design. Three kits are essential for using the described methods: RNAqueous®-4PCR, Megascript™ T7 kit, and the Superscript™ III kit from Life Technologies, Inc.

  9. Toolkit for evaluating genes required for proliferation and survival using tetracycline-regulated RNAi.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Johannes; McJunkin, Katherine; Fellmann, Christof; Dow, Lukas E; Taylor, Meredith J; Hannon, Gregory J; Lowe, Scott W

    2011-01-01

    Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are versatile tools for analyzing loss-of-function phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. However, their use for studying genes involved in proliferation and survival, which are potential therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases, is confounded by the strong selective advantage of cells in which shRNA expression is inefficient. We therefore developed a toolkit that combines Tet-regulated miR30-shRNA technology, robust transactivator expression and two fluorescent reporters to track and isolate cells with potent target knockdown. We demonstrated that this system improves the study of essential genes and was sufficiently robust to eradicate aggressive cancer in mice by suppressing a single gene. Further, we applied this system for in vivo negative-selection screening with pooled shRNAs and propose a streamlined, inexpensive workflow that will facilitate the use of RNA interference (RNAi) for the identification and evaluation of essential therapeutic targets.

  10. AAV-Mediated Liver-Directed Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is directly or indirectly involved in many essential processes and is affected by numerous inherited diseases. Therefore, many inherited diseases could be effectively treated by targeting the liver using gene transfer approaches. The challenges associated with liver-directed gene therapy are efficient targeting of hepatocytes, stability of the vector genome, and persistent high level expression. Many of these obstacles can be overcome with adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer vectors. The first AAV gene transfer vector developed for in vivo use was based on the AAV2 serotype. AAV2 has a broad tropism and transduces many cell types, including hepatocytes, relatively efficiently in vivo. The capsid protein confers the serological profile and at least 12 primate AAV serotypes have already been characterized. Importantly, pseudotyping a recombinant AAV vector with different capsid proteins can dramatically alter the tropism. Both AAV8 and AAV9 have higher affinities for hepatocytes when compared to AAV2. In particular, AAV8 can transduce 3–4 fold more hepatocytes and deliver 3–4 fold more genomes per transduced cell when compared to AAV2. Depending on the dose, AAV8 can transduce up to 90–95% of hepatocytes in the mouse liver following intraportal vein injection. Interestingly, comparable levels of transduction can be achieved following intravenous injection. Direct intraparenchymal injection of an AAV vector also mediates relatively high level long term expression. Additional specificity can be conferred by using liver-specific promoters in conjunction with AAV8 capsid proteins. In addition to treating primary hepatocyte defects, immune reactions to transgene products can be minimized by circumventing the fixed tissue macrophages of the liver, Kupffer cells, and limiting expression to hepatocytes. The ability to target hepatocytes by virtue of the AAV serotype and the use of liver-specific promoters allows investigators to test novel therapeutic approaches and answer basic clinical and biological questions. PMID:22034029

  11. Immunology of AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Keirnan; Bennett, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The eye has been at the forefront of translational gene therapy largely owing to suitable disease targets, anatomic accessibility, and well-studied immunologic privilege. These advantages have fostered research culminating in several clinical trials and adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as the vector of choice for many ocular therapies. Pre-clinical and clinical investigations have assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses to a variety of naturally occurring and engineered AAV serotypes as well as their delivered transgenes and these data have been correlated to potential clinical sequelae. Encouragingly, AAV appears safe and effective with clinical follow-up surpassing 5 years in some studies. As disease targets continue to expand for AAV in the eye, thorough and deliberate assessment of immunologic safety is critical. With careful study, the development of these technologies should concurrently inform the biology of the ocular immune response. PMID:24009613

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-based generation of knockdown mice by intronic insertion of artificial microRNA using longer single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hiromi; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Sato, Takehito; Sato, Masahiro; Ohtsuka, Masato

    2015-08-05

    Knockdown mouse models, where gene dosages can be modulated, provide valuable insights into gene function. Typically, such models are generated by embryonic stem (ES) cell-based targeted insertion, or pronuclear injection, of the knockdown expression cassette. However, these methods are associated with laborious and time-consuming steps, such as the generation of large constructs with elements needed for expression of a functional RNAi-cassette, ES-cell handling, or screening for mice with the desired knockdown effect. Here, we demonstrate that reliable knockdown models can be generated by targeted insertion of artificial microRNA (amiRNA) sequences into a specific locus in the genome [such as intronic regions of endogenous eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) gene] using the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Crispr associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system. We used in vitro synthesized single-stranded DNAs (about 0.5-kb long) that code for amiRNA sequences as repair templates in CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis. Using this approach we demonstrate that amiRNA cassettes against exogenous (eGFP) or endogenous [orthodenticle homeobox 2 (Otx2)] genes can be efficiently targeted to a predetermined locus in the genome and result in knockdown of gene expression. We also provide a strategy to establish conditional knockdown models with this method.

  13. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans. PMID:27784754

  14. Phenotypic screen for RNAi effects in the codling moth Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinda; Gu, Liuqi; Ireland, Stephen; Garczynski, Stephen F; Knipple, Douglas C

    2015-11-10

    RNAi-based technologies have the potential to augment, or replace existing pest management strategies. However, some insect taxa are less susceptible to the induction of the post-transcriptional gene silencing effect than others, such as the Lepidoptera. Here we describe experiments to investigate the induction of RNAi in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, a major lepidopteran pest of apple, pear, and walnut. Prior to a knockdown screen, fluorescently labeled small interfering RNA (siRNA) and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP) coding sequence were delivered to the surface of artificial diet to which neonate larvae were introduced and subsequently examined for the distribution of fluorescence in their tissues. Fluorescence was highly concentrated in the midgut but its presence in other tissues was equivocal. Next, dsRNAs were made for C. pomonella genes orthologous to those that have well defined deleterious phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster. A screen was conducted using dsRNAs encoding cullin-1 (Cpcul1), maleless (Cpmle), musashi (Cpmsi), a homeobox gene (CpHbx), and pumilio (Cppum). The dsRNAs designed from these target genes were administered to neonate larvae by delivery to the surface of the growth medium. None of the dsRNA treatments affected larval viability, however Cpcul1-dsRNA had a significant effect on larval growth, with the average length of larvae about 3mm, compared to about 4mm in the control groups. Measurement of Cpcul1 transcript levels by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed a dose-dependent RNAi effect in response to increasing amount of Cpcul1-dsRNA. Despite their reduced size, Cpcul1-dsRNA-treated larvae molted normally and matured to adulthood in a manner similar to controls. In an additional experiment, Cpcul1-siRNA was found to induce similar stunting effect as that induced by Cpcul1-dsRNA.

  15. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-12-07

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans.

  16. MRP4 knockdown enhances migration, suppresses apoptosis, and produces aggregated morphology in human retinal vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Mizuki; Kusuhara, Sentaro; Imai, Hisanori; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Honda, Shigeru; Tsukahara, Yasutomo; Negi, Akira

    2010-10-01

    The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) MRP4/ABCC4 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that actively effluxes endogenous and xenobiotic substrates out of cells. In the rodent retina, Mrp4 mRNA and protein are exclusively expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but the angiogenic properties of Mrp4 are poorly understood so far. This study aims to explore the angiogenic properties of MRP4 in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) utilizing the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. MRP4 expression was decreased at the mRNA and protein levels after stimulation with exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor in a dose-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated MRP4 knockdown in HRECs do not affect cell proliferation but enhances cell migration. Moreover, cell apoptosis induced by serum starvation was less prominent in MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs as compared to control siRNA-treated HRECs. In a Matrigel-based tube-formation assay, although MRP4 knockdown did not lead to a significant change in the total tube length, MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs assembled and aggregated into a massive tube-like structure, which was not observed in control siRNA-treated HRECs. These results suggest that MRP4 is uniquely involved in retinal angiogenesis.

  17. Intramyocardial Injection of siRNAs Can Efficiently Establish Myocardial Tissue-Specific Renalase Knockdown Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ju; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury will cause additional death of cardiomyocytes in ischaemic heart disease. Recent studies revealed that renalase was involved in the I/R injury. So, the myocardial tissue-specific knockdown mouse models were needed for the investigations of renalase. To establish the mouse models, intramyocardial injection of siRNAs targeting renalase was performed in mice. The wild distribution and high transfection efficiency of the siRNAs were approved. And the renalase expression was efficiently suppressed in myocardial tissue. Compared with the high cost, time consumption, and genetic compensation risk of the Cre/loxP technology, RNA interference (RNAi) technology is much cheaper and less time-consuming. Among the RNAi technologies, injection of siRNAs is safer than virus. And considering the properties of the I/R injury mouse models, the efficiency and durability of injection with siRNAs are acceptable for the studies. Altogether, intramyocardial injection of siRNAs targeting renalase is an economical, safe, and efficient method to establish myocardial tissue-specific renalase knockdown mouse models. PMID:27868059

  18. Hepatocyte-targeted RNAi therapeutics for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wooddell, Christine I; Rozema, David B; Hossbach, Markus; John, Matthias; Hamilton, Holly L; Chu, Qili; Hegge, Julia O; Klein, Jason J; Wakefield, Darren H; Oropeza, Claudia E; Deckert, Jochen; Roehl, Ingo; Jahn-Hofmann, Kerstin; Hadwiger, Philipp; Vornlocher, Hans-Peter; McLachlan, Alan; Lewis, David L

    2013-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics have the potential to treat chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a fundamentally different manner than current therapies. Using RNAi, it is possible to knock down expression of viral RNAs including the pregenomic RNA from which the replicative intermediates are derived, thus reducing viral load, and the viral proteins that result in disease and impact the immune system's ability to eliminate the virus. We previously described the use of polymer-based Dynamic PolyConjugate (DPC) for the targeted delivery of siRNAs to hepatocytes. Here, we first show in proof-of-concept studies that simple coinjection of a hepatocyte-targeted, N-acetylgalactosamine-conjugated melittin-like peptide (NAG-MLP) with a liver-tropic cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA) targeting coagulation factor VII (F7) results in efficient F7 knockdown in mice and nonhuman primates without changes in clinical chemistry or induction of cytokines. Using transient and transgenic mouse models of HBV infection, we show that a single coinjection of NAG-MLP with potent chol-siRNAs targeting conserved HBV sequences resulted in multilog repression of viral RNA, proteins, and viral DNA with long duration of effect. These results suggest that coinjection of NAG-MLP and chol-siHBVs holds great promise as a new therapeutic for patients chronically infected with HBV.

  19. Systemic RNAi Delivery to the Muscles of ROSA26 Mice Reduces lacZ Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jessica; Chamberlain, Joel R.

    2014-01-01

    RNAi has potential for therapeutically downregulating the expression of dominantly inherited genes in a variety of human genetic disorders. Here we used the ROSA26 mouse, which constitutively expresses the bacterial lacZ gene in tissues body wide, as a model to test the ability to downregulate gene expression in striated muscles. Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) were generated that express short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) able to target the lacZ mRNA. Systemic delivery of these rAAV6 vectors led to a decrease of β-galactosidase expression of 30–50-fold in the striated muscles of ROSA26 mice. However, high doses of vectors expressing 21 nucleotide shRNA sequences were associated with significant toxicity in both liver and cardiac muscle. This toxicity was reduced in cardiac muscle using lower vector doses. Furthermore, improved knockdown in the absence of toxicity was obtained by using a shorter (19 nucleotide) shRNA guide sequence. These results support the possibility of using rAAV vectors to deliver RNAi sequences systemically to treat dominantly inherited disorders of striated muscle. PMID:25127128

  20. Knockdown of a Rice Stelar Nitrate Transporter Alters Long-Distance Translocation But Not Root Influx1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhong; Fan, Xiaorong; Li, Qing; Feng, Huimin; Miller, Anthony J.; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Guohua

    2012-01-01

    Root nitrate uptake is well known to adjust to the plant’s nitrogen demand for growth. Long-distance transport and/or root storage pools are thought to provide negative feedback signals regulating root uptake. We have characterized a vascular specific nitrate transporter belonging to the high-affinity Nitrate Transporter2 (NRT2) family, OsNRT2.3a, in rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica ‘Nipponbare’). Localization analyses using protoplast expression, in planta promoter-β-glucuronidase assay, and in situ hybridization showed that OsNRT2.3a was located in the plasma membrane and mainly expressed in xylem parenchyma cells of the stele of nitrate-supplied roots. Knockdown expression of OsNRT2.3a by RNA interference (RNAi) had impaired xylem loading of nitrate and decreased plant growth at low (0.5 mm) nitrate supply. In comparison with the wild type, the RNAi lines contained both nitrate and total nitrogen significantly higher in the roots and lower in the shoots. The short-term [15N]NO3− influx (5 min) in entire roots and NO3− fluxes in root surfaces showed that the knockdown of OsNRT2.3a in comparison with the wild type did not affect nitrate uptake by roots. The RNAi plants showed no significant changes in the expression of some root nitrate transporters (OsNRT2.3b, OsNRT2.4, and OsNAR2.1), but transcripts for nia1 (nitrate reductase) had increased and OsNRT2.1 and OsNRT2.2 had decreased when the plants were supplied with nitrate. Taken together, the data demonstrate that OsNRT2.3a plays a key role in long-distance nitrate transport from root to shoot at low nitrate supply level in rice. PMID:23093362

  1. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of NLK inhibits small-cell lung cancer growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Mutian; Li, Yaming; Tian, Xin; Dai, Shundong; Sun, Jing; Jin, Guojiang; Jiang, Shenyi

    2016-01-01

    Nemo-like kinase (NLK), an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase, has been recognized as a critical regulator of various cancers. In this study, we investigated the role of NLK in human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is the most aggressive form of lung cancer. NLK expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 20 paired fresh SCLC tissue samples and found to be noticeably elevated in tumor tissues. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi efficiently suppressed NLK expression in NCI-H446 cells, resulting in a significant reduction in cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Moreover, knockdown of NLK led to cell cycle arrest at the S-phase via suppression of Cyclin A, CDK2, and CDC25A, which could contribute to cell growth inhibition. Furthermore, knockdown of NLK decreased the migration of NCI-H446 cells and downregulated matrix metalloproteinase 9. Treatment with NLK short hairpin RNA significantly reduced SCLC tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, this study suggests that NLK plays an important role in the growth and metastasis of SCLC and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of SCLC. PMID:27895463

  2. Towards the elements of successful insect Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi), the sequence-specific suppression of gene expression, offers great opportunities for insect science, especially to analyze gene function, manage pest populations, and reduce disease pathogens. The accumulating body of literature on insect RNAi has revealed that ...

  3. RNAi control of aflatoxins in peanut plants, a multifactorial system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA-interference (RNAi)-mediated control of aflatoxin contamination in peanut plants is a multifactorial and hyper variable system. The use of RNAi biotechnology to silence single genes in plants has inherently high-variability among transgenic events. Also the level of expression of small interfe...

  4. RNAi mediated, stable resistance to Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), discovered in 2006, affects wheat production systems in the Great Plains of the United States. There are no available TriMV resistant commercial varieties. RNA interference (RNAi) was evaluated as an alternative strategy to generate resistance to TriMV. An RNAi pANDA...

  5. Bringing RNA Interference (RNAi) into the High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Sibani

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (abbreviated RNAi) is a relatively new discovery in the field of mechanisms that serve to regulate gene expression (a.k.a. protein synthesis). Gene expression can be regulated at the transcriptional level (mRNA production, processing, or stability) and at the translational level (protein synthesis). RNAi acts in a gene-specific…

  6. "Caenorhabditis Elegans" as an Undergraduate Educational Tool for Teaching RNAi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Janet; Krichevsky, Alexander; Leheste, Joerg R.; Moloney, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Discovery of RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is widely recognized as one of the most significant molecular biology breakthroughs in the past 10 years. There is a need for science educators to develop teaching tools and laboratory activities that demonstrate the power of this new technology and help students to better understand the RNAi process.…

  7. Knockdown of a nutrient amino acid transporter gene LdNAT1 reduces free neutral amino acid contents and impairs Leptinotarsa decemlineata pupation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai-Yun; Guo, Wen-Chao; Ahmat, Tursun; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    A Leptinotarsa decemlineata SLC6 NAT gene (LdNAT1) was cloned. LdNAT1 was highly expressed in the larval alimentary canal especially midgut. LdNAT1 mRNA levels were high right after the molt and low just before the molt. JH and a JH analog pyriproxyfen activated LdNAT1 expression. RNAi of an allatostatin gene LdAS-C increased JH and upregulated LdNAT1 transcription. Conversely, silencing of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT decreased JH and reduced LdNAT1 expression. Moreover, 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide repressed LdNAT1 expression, whereas a decrease in 20E by RNAi of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD and disruption of 20E signaling by knockdown of LdE75 and LdFTZ-F1 activated LdNAT1 expression. Thus, LdNAT1 responded to both 20E and JH. Moreover, knockdown of LdNAT1 reduced the contents of cysteine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and serine in the larval bodies and increased the contents of these amino acids in the larval feces. Furthermore, RNAi of LdNAT1 inhibited insulin/target of rapamycin pathway, lowered 20E and JH titers, reduced 20E and JH signaling, retarded larval growth and impaired pupation. These data showed that LdNAT1 was involved in the absorption of several neutral amino acids critical for larval growth and metamorphosis. PMID:26657797

  8. RNAi-dependent and RNAi-independent mechanisms contribute to the silencing of RIPed sequences in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Chicas, Agustin; Cogoni, Carlo; Macino, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) can silence genes at the transcriptional level by targeting locus-specific Lys9H3 methylation or at the post-transcriptional level by targeting mRNA degradation. Here we have cloned and sequenced genomic regions methylated in Lys9H3 in Neurospora crassa to test the requirements for components of the RNAi pathway in this modification. We find that 90% of clones map to repeated sequences and relics of transposons that have undergone repeat-induced point mutations (RIP). We find siRNAs derived from transposon relics indicating that the RNAi machinery targets these regions. This is confirmed by the fact that the presence of these siRNAs depends on components of the RNAi pathway such as the RdRP (QDE-1), the putative RecQ helicase (QDE-3) and the two Dicer enzymes. We show that Lys9H3 methylation of RIP sequences is not affected in mutants of the RNAi pathway indicating that the RNAi machinery is not involved in transcriptional gene silencing in Neurospora. We find that RIP regions are transcribed and that the transcript level increases in the mutants of the RNAi pathway. These data suggest that the biological function of the Neurospora RNAi machinery is to control transposon relics and repeated sequences by targeting degradation of transcripts derived from these regions.

  9. RNAi-dependent and RNAi-independent mechanisms contribute to the silencing of RIPed sequences in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Chicas, Agustin; Cogoni, Carlo; Macino, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) can silence genes at the transcriptional level by targeting locus-specific Lys9H3 methylation or at the post-transcriptional level by targeting mRNA degradation. Here we have cloned and sequenced genomic regions methylated in Lys9H3 in Neurospora crassa to test the requirements for components of the RNAi pathway in this modification. We find that 90% of clones map to repeated sequences and relics of transposons that have undergone repeat-induced point mutations (RIP). We find siRNAs derived from transposon relics indicating that the RNAi machinery targets these regions. This is confirmed by the fact that the presence of these siRNAs depends on components of the RNAi pathway such as the RdRP (QDE-1), the putative RecQ helicase (QDE-3) and the two Dicer enzymes. We show that Lys9H3 methylation of RIP sequences is not affected in mutants of the RNAi pathway indicating that the RNAi machinery is not involved in transcriptional gene silencing in Neurospora. We find that RIP regions are transcribed and that the transcript level increases in the mutants of the RNAi pathway. These data suggest that the biological function of the Neurospora RNAi machinery is to control transposon relics and repeated sequences by targeting degradation of transcripts derived from these regions. PMID:15302921

  10. RNAi therapeutics for brain cancer: current advancements in RNAi delivery strategies.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Meenakshi; Toulouse, André; Godinho, Bruno M D C; Mc Carthy, David John; Cryan, John F; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-10-01

    Malignant primary brain tumors are aggressive cancerous cells that invade the surrounding tissues of the central nervous system. The current treatment options for malignant brain tumors are limited due to the inability to cross the blood-brain barrier. The advancements in current research has identified and characterized certain molecular markers that are essential for tumor survival, progression, metastasis and angiogenesis. These molecular markers have served as therapeutic targets for the RNAi based therapies, which enable site-specific silencing of the gene responsible for tumor proliferation. However, to bring about therapeutic success, an efficient delivery carrier that can cross the blood-brain barrier and reach the targeted site is essential. The current review focuses on the potential of targeted, non-viral and viral particles containing RNAi therapeutic molecules as delivery strategies specifically for brain tumors.

  11. RNAi-mediated crop protection against insects.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-07-01

    Downregulation of the expression of specific genes through RNA interference (RNAi), has been widely used for genetic research in insects. The method has relied on the injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is not possible for practical applications in crop protection. By contrast, specific suppression of gene expression in nematodes is possible through feeding with dsRNA. This approach was thought to be unfeasible in insects, but recent results have shown that dsRNA fed as a diet component can be effective in downregulating targeted genes. More significantly, expression of dsRNA directed against suitable insect target genes in transgenic plants has been shown to give protection against pests, opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops.

  12. RNAi-based therapeutic nanostrategy: IL-8 gene silencing in pancreatic cancer cells using gold nanorods delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Nishtha; Yang, Chengbin; Yin, Feng; Yoon, Ho Sup; Swee Chuan, Tjin; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene silencing possesses great ability for therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. Among various oncogene mutations, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene mutations are found to be overexpressed in many pancreatic cell lines. In this work, we demonstrate IL-8 gene silencing by employing an RNAi-based gene therapy approach and this is achieved by using gold nanorods (AuNRs) for efficient delivery of IL-8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the pancreatic cell lines of MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1. Upon comparing to Panc-1 cells, we found that the dominant expression of the IL-8 gene in MiaPaCa-2 cells resulted in an aggressive behavior towards the processes of cell invasion and metastasis. We have hence investigated the suitability of using AuNRs as novel non-viral nanocarriers for the efficient uptake and delivery of IL-8 siRNA in realizing gene knockdown of both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescence imaging techniques have been applied to confirm transfection and release of IL-8 siRNA. The ratio of AuNRs and siRNA has been optimized and transfection efficiencies as high as 88.40 ± 2.14% have been achieved. Upon successful delivery of IL-8 siRNA into cancer cells, the effects of IL-8 gene knockdown are quantified in terms of gene expression, cell invasion, cell migration and cell apoptosis assays. Statistical comparative studies for both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells are presented in this work. IL-8 gene silencing has been demonstrated with knockdown efficiencies of 81.02 ± 10.14% and 75.73 ± 6.41% in MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells, respectively. Our results are then compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Oligofectamine, serving as positive control. The gene knockdown results illustrate the potential role of AuNRs as non-viral gene delivery vehicles for RNAi-based targeted cancer therapy applications.

  13. RNAi applications in therapy development for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M M

    2009-01-01

    RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for experimental manipulation of gene expression and is widely used to investigate gene function both in vitro and in vivo. RNAi refers to an evolutionarily conserved cellular mechanism for sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene silencing, in which double-stranded RNAs promote selective degradation of homologous cellular mRNAs. Because RNAi-based techniques can be employed to reduce expression of specific genes, this approach holds great promise as a therapy for diverse diseases, including devastating neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Importantly, in recent years RNAi has also emerged as a key tool in target identification and validation studies designed to complement traditional (i.e., small molecule-based) drug development strategies. These studies harness the power of RNAi-mediated reverse genetics to probe disease-associated pathways in both cell-based and animal models, and thus may provide critical data needed to focus drug development efforts around disease-relevant targets. This review highlights recent progress in the preclinical development of RNAi-based therapeutics for neurodegenerative disease and discusses the particular challenges that disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) pose for this approach. It further describes current applications of RNAi techniques for target identification and validation studies and underscores the importance of this methodology to developing treatments for neurological diseases.

  14. Lethality of PAK3 and SGK2 shRNAs to human papillomavirus positive cervical cancer cells is independent of PAK3 and SGK2 knockdown.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nannan; Ding, Bo; Agler, Michele; Cockett, Mark; McPhee, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The p21-activated kinase 3 (PAK3) and the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase 2 (SGK2) have been previously proposed as essential kinases for human papillomavirus positive (HPV+) cervical cancer cell survival. This was established using a shRNA knockdown approach. To validate PAK3 and SGK2 as potential targets for HPV+ cervical cancer therapy, the relationship between shRNA-induced phenotypes in HPV+ cervical cancer cells and PAK3 or SGK2 knockdown was carefully examined. We observed that the phenotypes of HPV+ cervical cancer cells induced by various PAK3 and SGK2 shRNAs could not be rescued by complement expression of respective cDNA constructs. A knockdown-deficient PAK3 shRNA with a single mismatch was sufficient to inhibit HeLa cell growth to a similar extent as wild-type PAK3 shRNA. The HPV+ cervical cancer cells were also susceptible to several non-human target shRNAs. The discrepancy between PAK3 and SGK2 shRNA-induced apoptosis and gene expression knockdown, as well as cell death stimulation, suggested that these shRNAs killed HeLa cells through different pathways that may not be target-specific. These data demonstrated that HPV+ cervical cancer cell death was not associated with RNAi-induced PAK3 and SGK2 knockdown but likely through off-target effects.

  15. Distinct RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are required for RNAi triggered by double-stranded RNA versus truncated transgenes in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Simone; Le Mouël, Anne; Meyer, Eric; Simon, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In many eukaryotes, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play key roles in the RNAi pathway. They have been implicated in the recognition and processing of aberrant transcripts triggering the process, and in amplification of the silencing response. We have tested the functions of RdRP genes from the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia in experimentally induced and endogenous mechanisms of gene silencing. In this organism, RNAi can be triggered either by high-copy, truncated transgenes or by directly feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Surprisingly, dsRNA-induced silencing depends on the putatively functional RDR1 and RDR2 genes, which are required for the accumulation of both primary siRNAs and a distinct class of small RNAs suggestive of secondary siRNAs. In contrast, a third gene with a highly divergent catalytic domain, RDR3, is required for siRNA accumulation when RNAi is triggered by truncated transgenes. Our data further implicate RDR3 in the accumulation of previously described endogenous siRNAs and in the regulation of the surface antigen gene family. While only one of these genes is normally expressed in any clonal cell line, the knockdown of RDR3 leads to co-expression of multiple antigens. These results provide evidence for a functional specialization of Paramecium RdRP genes in distinct RNAi pathways operating during vegetative growth. PMID:20200046

  16. Knockdown of eIF3d inhibits cell proliferation through G2/M phase arrest in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhifeng; Xiong, Liwen; Lin, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer and remains the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3, subunit d (eIF3d) has been recognized recently in several human cancers. In this paper, we attempt to evaluate the functional role of eIF3d in NSCLC cells. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was applied to silence eIF3d in the human NSCLC cell lines A549 and 95D. Cell viability was measured by MTT. Cell colony-forming ability was measured by colony formation. Cell cycle progression was determined by propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. Intracellular signaling molecules were detected using a PathScan(®) intracellular signaling array kit. In this study, we firstly proved that lentivirus-mediated RNAi specifically suppressed the expression of eIF3d both at the mRNA and protein levels in A549 and 95D cell lines. Further investigations revealed that eIF3d knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation. Moreover, the cell cycle of A549 cells was arrested at G2/M phase after eIF3d knockdown. Furthermore, the activations of AKT, HSP27 and SAPK/JNK were suppressed by eIF3d knockdown. This study highlights the crucial role of eIF3d in promoting NSCLC cell proliferation, and provides a foundation for further study into the clinical potential of lentiviral-mediated delivery of eIF3d RNAi therapy for treatment of NSCLC.

  17. The development of RNA interference (RNAi) in gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Murray E; Huang, Stanley C; Knox, David P; Britton, Collette

    2012-04-01

    Despite the utility of RNAi for defining gene function in Caenorhabditis elegans and early successes reported in parasitic nematodes, RNAi has proven to be stubbornly inconsistent or ineffective in the animal parasitic nematodes examined to date. Here, we summarise some of our experiences with RNAi in parasitic nematodes affecting animals and discuss the available data in the context of our own unpublished work, taking account of mode of delivery, larval activation, site of gene transcription and the presence/absence of essential RNAi pathway genes as defined by comparisons to C. elegans. We discuss future directions briefly including the evaluation of nanoparticles as a means to enhance delivery of interfering RNA to the target worm tissue.

  18. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi*

    PubMed Central

    Guyader, Christian P. E.; Lamarre, Baptiste; De Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E.; Slater, Nigel K.; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi. PMID:27721465

  19. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi.

    PubMed

    Guyader, Christian P E; Lamarre, Baptiste; De Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E; Slater, Nigel K; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2016-10-10

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi.

  20. Beyond Drosophila: RNAi in vivo and functional genomics in insects.

    PubMed

    Bellés, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability of insect genomes has revealed a large number of genes with unknown functions and the resulting problem of how to discover these functions. The RNA interference (RNAi) technique, which generates loss-of-function phenotypes by depletion of a chosen transcript, can help to overcome this challenge. RNAi can unveil the functions of new genes, lead to the discovery of new functions for old genes, and find the genes for old functions. Moreover, the possibility of studying the functions of homologous genes in different species can allow comparisons of the genetic networks regulating a given function in different insect groups, thereby facilitating an evolutionary insight into developmental processes. RNAi also has drawbacks and obscure points, however, such as those related to differences in species sensitivity. Disentangling these differences is one of the main challenges in the RNAi field.

  1. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyader, Christian P. E.; Lamarre, Baptiste; de Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E.; Slater, Nigel K.; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2016-10-01

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi.

  2. RNAi as a Route Toward Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory... Cold Spring Harbor , NY 11724... Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cold Spring Harbor , NY 11724 RNAi, sequencing No abstract provided. 8 1 SEP 2010-31 AUG 2011Annual01-09-2011 hannon

  3. Biotechnological uses of RNAi in plants: risk assessment considerations.

    PubMed

    Casacuberta, Josep M; Devos, Yann; du Jardin, Patrick; Ramon, Matthew; Vaucheret, Hervé; Nogué, Fabien

    2015-03-01

    RNAi offers opportunities to generate new traits in genetically modified (GM) plants. Instead of expressing novel proteins, RNAi-based GM plants reduce target gene expression. Silencing of off-target genes may trigger unintended effects, and identifying these genes would facilitate risk assessment. However, using bioinformatics alone is not reliable, due to the lack of genomic data and insufficient knowledge of mechanisms governing mRNA-small (s)RNA interactions.

  4. Phylogenetic Origin and Diversification of RNAi Pathway Genes in Insects.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Daniel; Pauli, Thomas; Donath, Alexander; Meusemann, Karen; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Petersen, Malte; Peters, Ralph S; Mayer, Christoph; Liu, Shanlin; Zhou, Xin; Misof, Bernhard; Niehuis, Oliver

    2017-01-06

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the set of molecular processes found in eukaryotic organisms in which small RNA molecules mediate the silencing or down-regulation of target genes. In insects, RNAi serves a number of functions, including regulation of endogenous genes, anti-viral defense, and defense against transposable elements. Despite being well studied in model organisms, such as Drosophila, the distribution of core RNAi pathway genes and their evolution in insects is not well understood. Here we present the most comprehensive overview of the distribution and diversity of core RNAi pathway genes across 100 insect species, encompassing all currently recognized insect orders. We inferred the phylogenetic origin of insect-specific RNAi pathway genes and also identified several hitherto unrecorded gene expansions using whole-body transcriptome data from the international 1KITE (1000 Insect Transcriptome Evolution) project as well as other resources such as i5K (5000 Insect Genome Project). Specifically, we traced the origin of the double stranded RNA binding protein R2D2 to the last common ancestor of winged insects (Pterygota), the loss of Sid-1/Tag-130 orthologs in Antliophora (fleas, flies and relatives, and scorpionflies in a broad sense), and confirm previous evidence for the splitting of the Argonaute proteins Aubergine and Piwi in Brachyceran flies (Diptera, Brachycera). Our study offers new reference points for future experimental research on RNAi-related pathway genes in insects.

  5. Institutional Profile: The Sheffield RNAi screening facility: a service for high-throughput, genome-wide Drosophila RNAi screens.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) was established in November 2008, as Britain's first Drosophila RNAi screening centre, funded by the University of Sheffield, Biomedical Sciences Department and the Wellcome Trust. The SRSF was formed to service the needs of research groups wanting to carry out high-throughput RNAi screens with Drosophila cells. The rationale for the SRSF is to provide RNAi libraries and the specialist equipment and expertise to do such screens. The facility supports both plate reader assays, high-content microscopy as well as the equipment needed to process these samples in a high-throughput fashion. The SRSF can either be used to identify genes involved in disease representing future drug targets, or to identify genes involved in drug resistance and efficacy.

  6. Effects of hnRNP A2/B1 Knockdown on Inhibition of Glioblastoma Cell Invasion, Growth and Survival.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jinmu; Chen, Song; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxin; Xie, Zongyi; Xu, Zhongye; Zhang, Qingtao; Liang, Ping; Zhai, Xuan; Cheng, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) plays an important role in influence of pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) processing and mRNA metabolism and transportation in cells. Increasing evidence indicates that hnRNP A2/B1 played an important role in development and progression of various human cancers. Forty cases of normal and human glioma tissue samples were analyzed using immunohistochemistry to reveal the expression of hnRNP A2/B1 protein in the samples. Then, knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 expression induced by RNA interference (RNAi) method was used to analyze the role of hnRNP A2/B1 in glioblastoma cell viability, adhesion, migration, invasion, and chemoresistance for temozolomide (TMZ). The data showed that hnRNP A2/B1 protein was overexpressed in glioma tissue specimens and associated with advanced glioma grades. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 could reduce glioblastoma cell viability, adhesion, migration, invasion, and chemoresistance for TMZ capacity, but induced tumor cells to apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in glioma U251 and SHG44 cells. Molecularly, hnRNP A2/B1 knockdown reduced expression of phospho-STAT3 and MMP-2. Detection of hnRNP A2/B1 expression may be useful as a biomarker for prediction of glioma progression and knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 expression as a novel strategy in future control of glioblastoma in clinic.

  7. [Knockdown of RUNX3 inhibits hypoxia-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition of human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhua; Li, Bingong; Wang, Yuqin; Wang, Delong; Zou, Jin; Ke, Xuan; Hao, Yanqin

    2016-12-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) knockdown on hypoxia-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) of human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs), and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism. Methods HCMECs were cultured in hypoxic conditions and infected with RUNX3-RNAi lentivirus to knock-down the expression of RUNX3. Reverse transcription PCR was performed to detect the mRNA expressions of RUNX3 and EndoMT related genes such as CD31, vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1); Western blotting was used to determine the protein expressions of RUNX3, CD31, α-SMA and another molecules involved in EndoMT; and immunofluorescence cytochemistry was applied to observe the colocalization of CD31 and α-SMA. Results Hypoxia induced the transition of HCMECs to mesenchymal cells. Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of TGF-β2, Smad2/3, phosphorylation of Smad2/3 (p-Smad2/3), Notch-1, Hes1, and Hey1; knockdown of RUNX3 down-regulated the levels of Smad2/3, p-Smad2/3, Hes1, and Hey1 to different extents, and raised the levels of TGF-β2 and Notch-1. Conclusion Knockdown of RUNX3 in HCMECs attenuates hypoxia-induced EndoMT via partially inhibiting TGF-β and Notch signaling pathway.

  8. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D.; Corson, Timothy W.; Crews, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects. PMID:23674677

  9. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D; Corson, Timothy W; Crews, Craig M

    2013-05-28

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects.

  10. Nrl knockdown by AAV-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 prevents retinal degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenhan; Mookherjee, Suddhasil; Chaitankar, Vijender; Hiriyanna, Suja; Kim, Jung-Woong; Brooks, Matthew; Ataeijannati, Yasaman; Sun, Xun; Dong, Lijin; Li, Tiansen; Swaroop, Anand; Wu, Zhijian

    2017-03-14

    In retinitis pigmentosa, loss of cone photoreceptors leads to blindness, and preservation of cone function is a major therapeutic goal. However, cone loss is thought to occur as a secondary event resulting from degeneration of rod photoreceptors. Here we report a genome editing approach in which adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 delivery to postmitotic photoreceptors is used to target the Nrl gene, encoding for Neural retina-specific leucine zipper protein, a rod fate determinant during photoreceptor development. Following Nrl disruption, rods gain partial features of cones and present with improved survival in the presence of mutations in rod-specific genes, consequently preventing secondary cone degeneration. In three different mouse models of retinal degeneration, the treatment substantially improves rod survival and preserves cone function. Our data suggest that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated NRL disruption in rods may be a promising treatment option for patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  11. Whole-animal genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks regulating male germline stem cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Ge, Qinglan; Chan, Brian; Liu, Hanhan; Singh, Shree Ram; Manley, Jacob; Lee, Jae; Weideman, Ann Marie; Hou, Gerald; Hou, Steven X.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regulated both intrinsically and externally, including by signals from the local environment and distant organs. To identify genes and pathways that regulate stem-cell fates in the whole organism, we perform a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen through ubiquitous gene knockdowns, focusing on regulators of adult Drosophila testis germline stem cells (GSCs). Here we identify 530 genes that regulate GSC maintenance and differentiation. Of these, we further knock down 113 selected genes using cell-type-specific Gal4s and find that more than half were external regulators, that is, from the local microenvironment or more distal sources. Some genes, for example, versatile (vers), encoding a heterochromatin protein, regulates GSC fates differentially in different cell types and through multiple pathways. We also find that mitosis/cytokinesis proteins are especially important for male GSC maintenance. Our findings provide valuable insights and resources for studying stem cell regulation at the organismal level. PMID:27484291

  12. Stable silencing of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene by lentivirus-mediated RNAi in goat fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumin; Xiong, Kai; Xie, Zhourui; Nan, Wenting; Liu, Honglin; Chen, Jie

    2012-07-01

    β-lactoglobulin (BLG), a dominant allergen in goat milk, is difficult to remove by traditional biochemical methods. Its elimination from goat milk by genetic modification therefore poses a major challenge for modern goat breeders. A shRNA targeting BLG mRNA with high interference efficiency was identified, with which lentiviral vectors were used for mediating stable shRNA interference in goat-fetal fibroblast cells. Apart from high efficiency in the knockdown of BLG expression in these cells, lentivector-mediated RNAi manifested stable integration into the goat genome itself. Consequently, an in vitro model for goat BLG-content control was compiled, and a goat-cell line for accompanying transgenetic goat production created.

  13. Knockdown of TCTN1 Strongly Decreases Growth of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyu; Dong, Mingjun; Yu, Hua; Xie, Yangyang; Yu, Yongming; Cao, Yisheng; Kong, Zhenfang; Zhou, Baofeng; Xu, Yidong; Yang, Tong; Li, Keqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Tectonic family member 1 (TCTN1), a member of the tectonic family, is involved in several developmental processes and is aberrantly expressed in multiple solid tumors. However, the expression and regulation of TCTN1 in human colorectal cancer (CRC) is still not clear. Material/Methods The expression of TCTN1 mRNA was first explored by using Oncomine microarray datasets. TCTN1 expression was silenced in human CRC cell lines HCT116 and SW1116 via RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, we investigated the effect of TCTN1 depletion on CRC cell growth by MTT, colony formation, and flow cytometry in vitro. Results In this study, meta-analysis showed that the expressions of TCTN1 mRNA in CRC specimens were significantly higher than that in normal specimens. Knockdown of TCTN1 expression potently inhibited the abilities of cell proliferation and colony formation as determined. Flow cytometry analysis showed that depletion of TCTN1 could cause cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. In addition, Annexin V/7-AAD double-staining indicated that TCTN1 silencing promoted cell apoptosis through down-regulation of caspase 3 and Bcl-2 and upregulation of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP. Conclusions Our results indicate that TCTN1 may be crucial for CRC cell growth, providing a novel alternative to target therapies of CRC. Further research on this topic is warranted. PMID:28123172

  14. Knockdown of proteins involved in iron metabolism limits tick reproduction and development

    PubMed Central

    Hajdusek, Ondrej; Sojka, Daniel; Kopacek, Petr; Buresova, Veronika; Franta, Zdenek; Sauman, Ivo; Winzerling, Joy; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2009-01-01

    Ticks are among the most important vectors of a wide range of human and animal diseases. During blood feeding, ticks are exposed to an enormous amount of free iron that must be appropriately used and detoxified. However, the mechanism of iron metabolism in ticks is poorly understood. Here, we show that ticks possess a complex system that efficiently utilizes, stores and transports non-heme iron within the tick body. We have characterized a new secreted ferritin (FER2) and an iron regulatory protein (IRP1) from the sheep tick, Ixodes ricinus, and have demonstrated their relationship to a previously described tick intracellular ferritin (FER1). By using RNA interference-mediated gene silencing in the tick, we show that synthesis of FER1, but not of FER2, is subject to IRP1-mediated translational control. Further, we find that depletion of FER2 from the tick plasma leads to a loss of FER1 expression in the salivary glands and ovaries that normally follows blood ingestion. We therefore suggest that secreted FER2 functions as the primary transporter of non-heme iron between the tick gut and the peripheral tissues. Silencing of the fer1, fer2, and irp1 genes by RNAi has an adverse impact on hatching rate and decreases postbloodmeal weight in tick females. Importantly, knockdown of fer2 dramatically impairs the ability of ticks to feed, thus making FER2 a promising candidate for development of an efficient anti-tick vaccine. PMID:19171899

  15. Identification of Drosophila Zfh2 as a mediator of hypercapnic immune regulation by a genome-wide RNAi screen

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jae; Hu, Jennifer A.; Krupinski, Thomas; Casalino-Matsuda, S. Marina; Sporn, Peter H. S.; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Beitel, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnia, elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in blood and tissue, develops in many patients with chronic severe obstructive pulmonary disease and other advanced lung disorders. Patients with advanced disease frequently develop bacterial lung infections, and hypercapnia is a risk factor for mortality in such individuals. We previously demonstrated that hypercapnia suppresses induction of NF-κB-regulated innate immune response genes required for host defense in human, mouse and Drosophila cells, and increases mortality from bacterial infections in both mice and Drosophila. However, the molecular mediator(s) of hypercapnic immune suppression are undefined. Here, we report a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2* cells stimulated with bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN). The screen identified 16 genes with human orthologs whose knockdown reduced hypercapnic suppression of the gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide (AMPs) Diptericin (Dipt), but did not increase Dipt mRNA levels in air. In vivo tests of one of the strongest screen hits, Zfh2 (mammalian orthologs ZFHX3/ATBF1 and ZFHX4), demonstrate that reducing zfh2 function using a mutation or RNAi improves survival of flies exposed to elevated CO2 and infected with S. aureus. Tissue-specific knockdown of zfh2 in the fat body, the major immune and metabolic organ of the fly, mitigates hypercapnia-induced reductions in Dipt and other AMPs and improves resistance of CO2-exposed flies to infection. Zfh2 mutations also partially rescue hypercapnia-induced delays in egg hatching, suggesting that Zfh2's role in mediating responses to hypercapnia extends beyond the immune system. Together, these results identify Zfh2 as the first in vivo mediator of hypercapnic immune suppression. PMID:26643480

  16. Expression Profiles and RNAi Silencing of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Transcripts in Aedes, Anopheles, and Culex Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Puglise, Jason M; Estep, Alden S; Becnel, James J

    2016-03-01

    Effective mosquito control is vital to curtail the devastating health effects of many vectored diseases. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated control of mosquitoes is an attractive alternative to conventional chemical pesticides. Previous studies have suggested that transcripts for inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) may be good RNAi targets. To revisit and extend previous reports, we examined the expression of Aedes aegypti (L.) IAPs (AaeIAPs) 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, and a viral IAP-associated factor (vIAF) as well as Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say and Culex quinquefasciatus Say IAP1 homologs (AquIAP1 and CquIAP1) in adult females. Expression profiles of IAPs suggested that some older female mosquitoes had significantly higher IAP mRNA levels when compared to the youngest ones. Minor differences in expression of AaeIAPs were observed in mosquitoes that imbibed a bloodmeal, but the majority of the time points (up to 48 h) were not significantly different. Although in vitro experiments with the Ae. aegypti Aag-2 cell line demonstrated that the various AaeIAPs could be effectively knocked down within one day after dsRNA treatment, only Aag-2 cells treated with dsIAP1 displayed apoptotic morphology. Gene silencing and mortality were also evaluated after topical application and microinjection of the same dsRNAs into female Ae. aegypti. In contrast to previous reports, topical administration of dsRNA against AaeIAP1 did not yield a significant reduction in gene expression or increased mortality. Knockdown of IAP1 and other IAPs by microinjection did not result in significant mortality. In toto, our findings suggest that IAPs may not be suitable RNAi targets for controlling adult mosquito populations.

  17. RNA Viruses and RNAi: Quasispecies Implications for Viral Escape.

    PubMed

    Presloid, John B; Novella, Isabel S

    2015-06-19

    Due to high mutation rates, populations of RNA viruses exist as a collection of closely related mutants known as a quasispecies. A consequence of error-prone replication is the potential for rapid adaptation of RNA viruses when a selective pressure is applied, including host immune systems and antiviral drugs. RNA interference (RNAi) acts to inhibit protein synthesis by targeting specific mRNAs for degradation and this process has been developed to target RNA viruses, exhibiting their potential as a therapeutic against infections. However, viruses containing mutations conferring resistance to RNAi were isolated in nearly all cases, underlining the problems of rapid viral evolution. Thus, while promising, the use of RNAi in treating or preventing viral diseases remains fraught with the typical complications that result from high specificity of the target, as seen in other antiviral regimens.

  18. Antitumor therapeutic application of self-assembled RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs: Combination of VEGF-RNAi and photothermal ablation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sejin; Kim, Namho; You, Dong Gil; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Yhee, Ji Young; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sun Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acid-directed self-assembly provides an attractive method to fabricate prerequisite nanoscale structures for a wide range of technological applications due to the remarkable programmability of DNA/RNA molecules. In this study, exquisite RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs with various geometries were developed by utilizing anti-VEGF siRNA molecules as RNAi-based therapeutics in addition to their role as building blocks for programmed self-assembly. In particular, the anti-VEGF siRNA-functionalized AuNP nanoconstructs can take additional advantage of gold-nanoclusters for photothermal cancer therapeutic agent. A noticeable technical aspect of self-assembled RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs in this study is the precise conjugation and separation of designated numbers of therapeutic siRNA onto AuNP to develop highly sophisticated RNA-based building blocks capable of creating various geometries of RNAi-AuNP nano-assemblies. The therapeutic potential of RNAi-AuNP nanoconstructs was validated in vivo as well as in vitro by combining heat generation capability of AuNP and anti-angiogenesis mechanism of siRNA. This strategy of combining anti-VEGF mechanism for depleting angiogenesis process at initial tumor progression and complete ablation of residual tumors with photothermal activity of AuNP at later tumor stage showed effective tumor growth inhibition and tumor ablation with PC-3 tumor bearing mice. PMID:28042312

  19. Development of RNAi technology for targeted therapy--a track of siRNA based agents to RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yinjian; Zhang, Chunling; Liang, Wei

    2014-11-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) was intensively studied in the past decades due to its potential in therapy of diseases. The target specificity and universal treatment spectrum endowed siRNA advantages over traditional small molecules and protein drugs. However, barriers exist in the blood circulation system and the diseased tissues blocked the actualization of RNAi effect, which raised function versatility requirements to siRNA therapeutic agents. Appropriate functionalization of siRNAs is necessary to break through these barriers and target diseased tissues in local or systemic targeted application. In this review, we summarized that barriers exist in the delivery process and popular functionalized technologies for siRNA such as chemical modification and physical encapsulation. Preclinical targeted siRNA delivery and the current status of siRNA based RNAi therapeutic agents in clinical trial were reviewed and finally the future of siRNA delivery was proposed. The valuable experience from the siRNA agent delivery study and the RNAi therapeutic agents in clinical trial paved ways for practical RNAi therapeutics to emerge early.

  20. Folic acid supplementation rescues anomalies associated with knockdown of parkin in dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons in Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Saurabh; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Yadav, Amarish Kumar; Srikrishna, Saripella

    2015-05-08

    parkin loss associated early-onset of Parkinson's disease, involves mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress as the plausible decisive molecular mechanisms in disease pathogenesis. Mitochondrial dysfunction involves several up/down regulation of gene products, one of which being p53 is found to be elevated. Elevated p53 is involved in mitochondrial mediated apoptosis of neuronal cells in Parkinson's patients who are folate deficient as well. The present study therefore attempts to examine the effect of Folic acid (FA) supplementation in alleviation of anomalies associated with parkin knockdown using RNAi approach, specific to Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in Drosophila model system. Here we show that FA supplementation provide protection against parkin RNAi associated discrepancies, thereby improves locomotor ability, reduces mortality and oxidative stress, and partially improves Zn levels. Further, metabolic active cell status and ATP levels were also found to be improved thereby indicating improved mitochondrial function. To corroborate FA supplementation in mitochondrial functioning further, status of p53 and spargel was checked by qRT-PCR. Here we show that folic acid supplementation enrich mitochondrial functioning as depicted from improved spargel level and lowered p53 level, which was originally vice versa in parkin knockdown flies cultured in standard media. Our data thus support the potential of folic acid in alleviating the behavioural defects, oxidative stress, augmentation of zinc and ATP levels in parkin knock down flies. Further, folic acid role in repressing mitochondrial dysfunction is encouraging to further explore its possible mechanistic role to be utilized as potential therapeutics for Parkinson's disease.

  1. Using Vital Dyes to Trace Uptake of dsRNA by Green Peach Aphid Allows Effective Assessment of Target Gene Knockdown.

    PubMed

    Bilgi, Vineeta; Fosu-Nyarko, John; Jones, Michael G K

    2017-01-03

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective tool to study gene function. For in vitro studies of RNAi in insects, microinjection of double-stranded (ds)RNA may cause stress. Non-persuasive oral delivery of dsRNA to trigger RNAi is a better mode of delivery for delicate insects such as aphids because it mimics natural feeding. However, when insects feed ad libitum, some individuals may not feed. For accurate measurement of gene knockdown, analysis should only include insects that have ingested dsRNA. The suitability of eleven dyes was assessed to trace ingestion of dsRNA in an artificial feeding system for green peach aphids (GPA, Myzus persicae). Non-toxic levels of neutral red and acridine orange were suitable tracers: they were visible in the stylet and gut after feeding for 24 h, and may also attract aphids to feed. Nymphs stained with neutral red (0.02%) were analysed for target gene expression after feeding on sucrose with dsRNA (V-ATPase, vha-8). There was a greater reduction in vha-8 expression and reproduction compared to nymphs fed the diet without dye. The results confirm the importance of identifying aphids that have ingested dsRNA, and also provide evidence that the vha-8 gene is a potential target for control of GPAs.

  2. Using Vital Dyes to Trace Uptake of dsRNA by Green Peach Aphid Allows Effective Assessment of Target Gene Knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Bilgi, Vineeta; Fosu-Nyarko, John; Jones, Michael G. K.

    2017-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective tool to study gene function. For in vitro studies of RNAi in insects, microinjection of double-stranded (ds)RNA may cause stress. Non-persuasive oral delivery of dsRNA to trigger RNAi is a better mode of delivery for delicate insects such as aphids because it mimics natural feeding. However, when insects feed ad libitum, some individuals may not feed. For accurate measurement of gene knockdown, analysis should only include insects that have ingested dsRNA. The suitability of eleven dyes was assessed to trace ingestion of dsRNA in an artificial feeding system for green peach aphids (GPA, Myzus persicae). Non-toxic levels of neutral red and acridine orange were suitable tracers: they were visible in the stylet and gut after feeding for 24 h, and may also attract aphids to feed. Nymphs stained with neutral red (0.02%) were analysed for target gene expression after feeding on sucrose with dsRNA (V-ATPase, vha-8). There was a greater reduction in vha-8 expression and reproduction compared to nymphs fed the diet without dye. The results confirm the importance of identifying aphids that have ingested dsRNA, and also provide evidence that the vha-8 gene is a potential target for control of GPAs. PMID:28054949

  3. Enhancement of larval RNAi efficiency by over-expressing Argonaute2 in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqian; Zeng, Baosheng; Ling, Lin; Xu, Jun; You, Lang; Aslam, Abu F M; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has been described as a powerful genetic tool for gene functional analysis and a promising approach for pest management. However, RNAi efficiency varies significantly among insect species due to distinct RNAi machineries. Lepidopteran insects include a large number of pests as well as model insects, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, only limited success of in vivo RNAi has been reported in lepidoptera, particularly during the larval stages when the worms feed the most and do the most harm to the host plant. Enhancing the efficiency of larval RNAi in lepidoptera is urgently needed to develop RNAi-based pest management strategies. In the present study, we investigate the function of the conserved RNAi core factor, Argonaute2 (Ago2), in mediating B. mori RNAi efficiency. We demonstrate that introducing BmAgo2 dsRNA inhibits the RNAi response in both BmN cells and embryos. Furthermore, we establish several transgenic silkworm lines to assess the roles of BmAgo2 in larval RNAi. Over-expressing BmAgo2 significantly facilitated both dsRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting DsRed using dsRNA injection and shRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting BmBlos2 using transgenic shRNA expression. Our results show that BmAgo2 is involved in RNAi in B. mori and provides a promising approach for improving larval RNAi efficiency in B. mori and in lepidopteran insects in general.

  4. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    SciTech Connect

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D.; Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Levin, Bruce L.; Leonard, Jonathan

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  5. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L; Booth, Benjamin W; Evans-Holm, Martha; Venken, Koen JT; Levis, Robert W; Spradling, Allan C; Hoskins, Roger A; Bellen, Hugo J

    2015-01-01

    Here, we document a collection of ∼7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05338.001 PMID:25824290

  6. Knockdown of the coenzyme Q synthesis gene Smed-dlp1 affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shiobara, Yumiko; Harada, Chiaki; Shiota, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Saeko; Tabata, Kenta; Sekie, Kiyoteru; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-12-01

    The freshwater planarian is a model organism used to study tissue regeneration that occupies an important position among multicellular organisms. Planarian genomic databases have led to the identification of genes that are required for regeneration, with implications for their roles in its underlying mechanism. Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a fundamental lipophilic molecule that is synthesized and expressed in every cell of every organism. Furthermore, CoQ levels affect development, life span, disease and aging in nematodes and mice. Because CoQ can be ingested in food, it has been used in preventive nutrition. In this study, we investigated the role of CoQ in planarian regeneration. Planarians synthesize both CoQ9 and rhodoquinone 9 (RQ9). Knockdown of Smed-dlp1, a trans-prenyltransferase gene that encodes an enzyme that synthesizes the CoQ side chain, led to a decrease in CoQ9 and RQ9 levels. However, ATP levels did not consistently decrease in these animals. Knockdown animals exhibited tissue regression and curling. The number of mitotic cells decreased in Smed-dlp1 (RNAi) animals. These results suggested a failure in physiological cell turnover and stem cell function. Accordingly, regenerating planarians died from lysis or exhibited delayed regeneration. Interestingly, the observed phenotypes were partially rescued by ingesting food supplemented with α-tocopherol. Taken together, our results suggest that oxidative stress induced by reduced CoQ9 levels affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis.

  7. Knockdown of the coenzyme Q synthesis gene Smed-dlp1 affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Shiobara, Yumiko; Harada, Chiaki; Shiota, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Saeko; Tabata, Kenta; Sekie, Kiyoteru; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater planarian is a model organism used to study tissue regeneration that occupies an important position among multicellular organisms. Planarian genomic databases have led to the identification of genes that are required for regeneration, with implications for their roles in its underlying mechanism. Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a fundamental lipophilic molecule that is synthesized and expressed in every cell of every organism. Furthermore, CoQ levels affect development, life span, disease and aging in nematodes and mice. Because CoQ can be ingested in food, it has been used in preventive nutrition. In this study, we investigated the role of CoQ in planarian regeneration. Planarians synthesize both CoQ9 and rhodoquinone 9 (RQ9). Knockdown of Smed-dlp1, a trans-prenyltransferase gene that encodes an enzyme that synthesizes the CoQ side chain, led to a decrease in CoQ9 and RQ9 levels. However, ATP levels did not consistently decrease in these animals. Knockdown animals exhibited tissue regression and curling. The number of mitotic cells decreased in Smed-dlp1 (RNAi) animals. These results suggested a failure in physiological cell turnover and stem cell function. Accordingly, regenerating planarians died from lysis or exhibited delayed regeneration. Interestingly, the observed phenotypes were partially rescued by ingesting food supplemented with α-tocopherol. Taken together, our results suggest that oxidative stress induced by reduced CoQ9 levels affects planarian regeneration and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26516985

  8. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H. PMID:27220407

  9. CSR-1 RNAi pathway positively regulates histone expression in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Palani, Santhosh; Sherman, Yekaterina; Grishok, Alla

    2012-10-03

    Endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) have been discovered in many organisms, including mammals. In C. elegans, depletion of germline-enriched endo-siRNAs found in complex with the CSR-1 Argonaute protein causes sterility and defects in chromosome segregation in early embryos. We discovered that knockdown of either csr-1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) ego-1, or the dicer-related helicase drh-3, leads to defects in histone mRNA processing, resulting in severe depletion of core histone proteins. The maturation of replication-dependent histone mRNAs, unlike that of other mRNAs, requires processing of their 3'UTRs through an endonucleolytic cleavage guided by the U7 snRNA, which is lacking in C. elegans. We found that CSR-1-bound antisense endo-siRNAs match histone mRNAs and mRNA precursors. Consistently, we demonstrate that CSR-1 directly binds to histone mRNA in an ego-1-dependent manner using biotinylated 2'-O-methyl RNA oligonucleotides. Moreover, we demonstrate that increasing the dosage of histone genes rescues the lethality associated with depletion of CSR-1 and EGO-1. These results support a positive and direct effect of RNAi on histone gene expression.

  10. RNAi of ace1 and ace2 in Blattella germanica reveals their differential contribution to acetylcholinesterase activity and sensitivity to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, L; Piulachs, M D; Bellés, X; Castañera, P; Ortego, F; Díaz-Ruíz, J R; Hernández-Crespo, P; Tenllado, F

    2009-12-01

    Cyclorrhapha insect genomes contain a single acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene while other insects contain at least two ace genes (ace1 and ace2). In this study we tested the hypothesis that the two ace paralogous from Blattella germanica have different contributions to AChE activity, using RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown each one individually. Paralogous-specific depletion of Bgace transcripts was evident in ganglia of injected cockroaches, although the effects at the protein level were less pronounced. Using spectrophotometric and zymogram measurements, we obtained evidence that BgAChE1 represents 65-75% of the total AChE activity in nerve tissue demonstrating that ace1 encodes a predominant AChE. A significant increase in sensitivity of Bgace1-interfered cockroaches was observed after 48 h of exposure to chlorpyrifos. In contrast, Bgace2 knockdown had a negligible effect on mortality to this organophosphate. These results point out a key role, qualitative and/or quantitative, of AChE1 as target of organophosphate insecticides in this species. Silencing the expression of Bgace1 but not Bgace2 also produced an increased mortality in insects when synergized with lambda-cyhalothrin, a situation which resembles the synergistic effects observed between organophosphates and pyrethroids. Gene silencing of ace genes by RNAi offers an exciting approach for examining a possible functional differentiation in ace paralogous.

  11. RNAi-based functional elucidation of PtrPRP, a gene encoding a hybrid proline rich protein, in cold tolerance of Poncirus trifoliata.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Jia, Mao-Mao; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs) have been suggested to play important roles in various plant development and stress response. In this study, we report the cloning and functional analysis of PtrPRP, a HyPRP-encoding gene of Poncirus trifoliata. PtrPRP contains 176 amino acids, among which 21% are proline residues, and has an 8-cysteine motif (8 CM) domain at the C terminal, a signal peptide and a proline-rich region at the N terminal. PtrPRP is constitutively expressed in root, stem and leaf, with the highest expression levels in leaf. It was progressively induced by cold, but transiently upregulated by salt and ABA. Transgenic P. trifoliata plants with knock-down PtrPRP by RNA interference (RNAi) were generated to investigate the role of PtrPRP in cold tolerance. When challenged by low temperature, the PtrPRP-RNAi plants displayed more sensitive performance compared with wild type (WT), as shown by higher electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde content. In addition, the RNAi lines accumulated more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lower levels of proline relative to WT. These results suggested that PtrPRP might be positively involved in cold tolerance by maintaining membrane integrity and ROS homeostasis.

  12. RNAi in fission yeast finds new targets and new ways of targeting at the nuclear periphery.

    PubMed

    Holoch, Daniel; Moazed, Danesh

    2012-04-15

    RNAi in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is critical for centromeric heterochromatin formation. It has remained unclear, however, whether RNAi also regulates the expression of protein-coding loci. In the April 1, 2012, issue of Genes & Development, Woolcock and colleagues (pp. 683-667) reported an elegant mechanism for the conditional RNAi-mediated repression of stress response genes involving association with Dcr1 at the nuclear pore. Unexpectedly, the initial targeting of RNAi components to these genes does not require small RNA guides.

  13. Non-transgenic RNAi technology to control insects on citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research demonstrated a non-transgenic delivery method for ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, that reduced fitness as measured in increased mortality over time, of two insect pests of citrus, ie. psyllids and leafhoppers. The Asian citrus psyllid transmits a deadly plant-infecting bacterium o...

  14. RNAi at work: Targeting invertebrate pests and beneficial organisms' diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invertebrates present two types of large scale RNAi application opportunities: pest control and beneficial insect health. The former involves the introduction of sustainable applications to keep pest populations low, and the latter represents the challenge of keeping beneficial organisms healthy. RN...

  15. The effect of radixin knockdown on the expression and efflux function of MRP2 in SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Wei-Rong; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Qing

    2012-08-15

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2) is the second member of the MRP transporter family and functions physiologically as an organic anion transporter. Earlier studies have confirmed that radixin, which is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family, modulates MRP2 localization at the canalicular membrane in hepatocytes. The relationship between radixin and MRP2 - particularly, the effect of radixin on the expression and function of MRP2 in cells or tissues that co-express all three ERM proteins - has not been well studied. To examine the role of radixin in the expression and function of MRP2 and other MRPs, we chose human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 cells that express all three ERM proteins rather than hepatocytes, which predominantly express radixin. Radixin stable knockdown SGC-7901 cells, which were constructed by RNAi, exhibited no compensatory up-regulation of ezrin or moesin. The mRNA expression profiles of MRPs in the radixin knockdown cells were primarily evaluated by RT-PCR. Real time quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that the radixin deficiency caused the mRNA and protein expression levels of MRP2 to be reduced by about 50%, respectively. Accordingly, efflux and MTT assays showed that the radixin knockdown cells exhibited lower efflux ability with respect to calcein but no significant change in cell viability. In conclusion, among the MRP1-6 family members, radixin selectively modulates the expression and function of MRP2 in a system co-expressing all three ERM proteins.

  16. Mosquito and Drosophila entomobirnaviruses suppress dsRNA- and siRNA-induced RNAi.

    PubMed

    van Cleef, Koen W R; van Mierlo, Joël T; Miesen, Pascal; Overheul, Gijs J; Fros, Jelke J; Schuster, Susan; Marklewitz, Marco; Pijlman, Gorben P; Junglen, Sandra; van Rij, Ronald P

    2014-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a crucial antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including the major mosquito species that transmit important human viruses. To counteract the potent antiviral RNAi pathway, insect viruses encode RNAi suppressors. However, whether mosquito-specific viruses suppress RNAi remains unclear. We therefore set out to study RNAi suppression by Culex Y virus (CYV), a mosquito-specific virus of the Birnaviridae family that was recently isolated from Culex pipiens mosquitoes. We found that the Culex RNAi machinery processes CYV double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs). Furthermore, we show that RNAi is suppressed in CYV-infected cells and that the viral VP3 protein is responsible for RNAi antagonism. We demonstrate that VP3 can functionally replace B2, the well-characterized RNAi suppressor of Flock House virus. VP3 was found to bind long dsRNA as well as siRNAs and interfered with Dicer-2-mediated cleavage of long dsRNA into siRNAs. Slicing of target RNAs by pre-assembled RNA-induced silencing complexes was not affected by VP3. Finally, we show that the RNAi-suppressive activity of VP3 is conserved in Drosophila X virus, a birnavirus that persistently infects Drosophila cell cultures. Together, our data indicate that mosquito-specific viruses may encode RNAi antagonists to suppress antiviral RNAi.

  17. Antifungal drug resistance evoked via RNAi-dependent epimutations.

    PubMed

    Calo, Silvia; Shertz-Wall, Cecelia; Lee, Soo Chan; Bastidas, Robert J; Nicolás, Francisco E; Granek, Joshua A; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M; Cardenas, Maria E; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-09-25

    Microorganisms evolve via a range of mechanisms that may include or involve sexual/parasexual reproduction, mutators, aneuploidy, Hsp90 and even prions. Mechanisms that may seem detrimental can be repurposed to generate diversity. Here we show that the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides develops spontaneous resistance to the antifungal drug FK506 (tacrolimus) via two distinct mechanisms. One involves Mendelian mutations that confer stable drug resistance; the other occurs via an epigenetic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway resulting in unstable drug resistance. The peptidylprolyl isomerase FKBP12 interacts with FK506 forming a complex that inhibits the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibition by FK506 blocks M. circinelloides transition to hyphae and enforces yeast growth. Mutations in the fkbA gene encoding FKBP12 or the calcineurin cnbR or cnaA genes confer FK506 resistance and restore hyphal growth. In parallel, RNAi is spontaneously triggered to silence the fkbA gene, giving rise to drug-resistant epimutants. FK506-resistant epimutants readily reverted to the drug-sensitive wild-type phenotype when grown without exposure to the drug. The establishment of these epimutants is accompanied by generation of abundant fkbA small RNAs and requires the RNAi pathway as well as other factors that constrain or reverse the epimutant state. Silencing involves the generation of a double-stranded RNA trigger intermediate using the fkbA mature mRNA as a template to produce antisense fkbA RNA. This study uncovers a novel epigenetic RNAi-based epimutation mechanism controlling phenotypic plasticity, with possible implications for antimicrobial drug resistance and RNAi-regulatory mechanisms in fungi and other eukaryotes.

  18. Exploring systemic RNA interference in insects: a genome-wide survey for RNAi genes in Tribolium

    PubMed Central

    Tomoyasu, Yoshinori; Miller, Sherry C; Tomita, Shuichiro; Schoppmeier, Michael; Grossmann, Daniela; Bucher, Gregor

    2008-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a highly conserved cellular mechanism. In some organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically. Some insects also exhibit a systemic RNAi response. However, Drosophila, the leading insect model organism, does not show a robust systemic RNAi response, necessitating another model system to study the molecular mechanism of systemic RNAi in insects. Results We used Tribolium, which exhibits robust systemic RNAi, as an alternative model system. We have identified the core RNAi genes, as well as genes potentially involved in systemic RNAi, from the Tribolium genome. Both phylogenetic and functional analyses suggest that Tribolium has a somewhat larger inventory of core component genes than Drosophila, perhaps allowing a more sensitive response to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). We also identified three Tribolium homologs of C. elegans sid-1, which encodes a possible dsRNA channel. However, detailed sequence analysis has revealed that these Tribolium homologs share more identity with another C. elegans gene, tag-130. We analyzed tag-130 mutants, and found that this gene does not have a function in systemic RNAi in C. elegans. Likewise, the Tribolium sid-like genes do not seem to be required for systemic RNAi. These results suggest that insect sid-1-like genes have a different function than dsRNA uptake. Moreover, Tribolium lacks homologs of several genes important for RNAi in C. elegans. Conclusion Although both Tribolium and C. elegans show a robust systemic RNAi response, our genome-wide survey reveals significant differences between the RNAi mechanisms of these organisms. Thus, insects may use an alternative mechanism for the systemic RNAi response. Understanding this process would assist with rendering other insects amenable to systemic RNAi, and may influence pest control approaches. PMID:18201385

  19. PCTAIRE1-knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to TNF family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Teruki; Shi, Ranxin; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Reed, John C; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    While PCTAIRE1/PCTK1/Cdk16 is overexpressed in malignant cells and is crucial in tumorigenesis, its function in apoptosis remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PCTAIRE1 in apoptosis, especially in the extrinsic cell death pathway. Gene-knockdown of PCTAIRE1 sensitized prostate cancer PPC1 and Du145 cells, and breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells to TNF-family cytokines, including TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Meanwhile, PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not sensitize non-malignant cells, including diploid fibroblasts IMR-90 and the immortalized prostate epithelial cell line 267B1. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did not up-regulate death receptor expression on the cell surface or affect caspase-8, FADD and FLIP expression levels. PCTAIRE1-knockdown did promote caspase-8 cleavage and RIPK1 degradation, while RIPK1 mRNA knockdown sensitized PPC1 cells to TNF-family cytokines. Furthermore, the kinase inhibitor SNS-032, which inhibits PCTAIRE1 kinase activity, sensitized PPC1 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Together these results suggest that PCTAIRE1 contributes to the resistance of cancer cell lines to apoptosis induced by TNF-family cytokines, which implies that PCTAIRE1 inhibitors could have synergistic effects with TNF-family cytokines for cytodestruction of cancer cells.

  20. Neuroligin-1 Knockdown Suppresses Seizure Activity by Regulating Neuronal Hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Wei, Jin-Lai; Tang, Bo; Liu, Jing; Chen, Ling; Tang, Zhao-Hua; Luo, Jing; Chen, Guo-Jun; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abnormally synchronized synaptic transmission in the brain leads to epilepsy. Neuroligin-1 (NL1) is a synaptic cell adhesion molecule localized at excitatory synapses. NL1 modulates synaptic transmission and determines the properties of neuronal networks in the mammalian central nervous system. We showed that the expression of NL1 and its binding partner neurexin-1β was increased in temporal lobe epileptic foci in patients and lithium-pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats. We investigated electrophysiological and behavioral changes in epileptic rats after lentivirally mediated NL1 knockdown in the hippocampus to determine whether NL1 suppression prevented seizures and, if so, to explore the probable underlying mechanisms. Our behavioral studies revealed that NL1 knockdown in epileptic rats reduced seizure severity and increased seizure latency. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from NL1 knockdown epileptic rats revealed a decrease in spontaneous action potential frequency and a decrease in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequency but not amplitude. The amplitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent EPSCs was also selectively decreased. Notably, NL1 knockdown reduced total NMDAR1 expression and the surface/total ratio in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. Taken together, these data indicate that NL1 knockdown in epileptic rats may reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and suppress neuronal hyperexcitability via changes in postsynaptic NMDARs.

  1. Defense and counterdefense in the RNAi-based antiviral immune system in insects.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, Joël T; van Cleef, Koen W R; van Rij, Ronald P

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an important pathway to combat virus infections in insects and plants. Hallmarks of antiviral RNAi in these organisms are: (1) an increase in virus replication after inactivation of major actors in the RNAi pathway, (2) production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (v-siRNAs), and (3) suppression of RNAi by dedicated viral proteins. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of RNAi in insects, its function as an antiviral immune system, viral small RNA profiles, and viral counterdefense strategies. We will also consider alternative, inducible antiviral immune responses.

  2. RNA interference-mediated knock-down of Bla g 1 in the German cockroach, Blattella germanica L., implicates this allergen-encoding gene in digestion and nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Suazo, A; Gore, C; Schal, C

    2009-11-01

    We used RNA interference (RNAi) to silence the expression of a gene encoding Bla g 1, a human allergen produced by the German cockroach, Blattella germanica L., to study its function in cockroach physiology. Females injected with 1 microg of double-stranded RNA contained 64% less Bla g 1 protein and Bla g 1 mRNA abundance was reduced by 91.4% compared to sham-injected females. Bla g 1 knockdown slowed the pace of weight gain, midgut growth, and colleterial gland and basal oocyte maturation, resulting in delayed egg case formation and lower fecundity. Exogenous juvenile hormone treatments rescued reproduction in RNAi-treated females, suggesting that Bla g 1 silencing lowered endogenous juvenile hormone, probably by reducing food intake and nutrient absorption.

  3. Androglobin knockdown inhibits growth of glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Lu, Yi-Sheng; Li, Xia; Zhu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Kui; Liu, Ji-Wei; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Ze-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Globin family was famous for oxygen supply function of its members such as hemoglobin and myoglobin. With the progress of research, several members of this protein family have been proven to play roles in tumors including glioma. Androglobin (ADGB) is a recently identified member of globin family with very few studies about its function. In the present study, we show that ADGB plays an oncogene role in glioma. Lentiviral vector mediated ADGB knockdown inhibited the proliferation of glioma cell lines determined by MTT assay and colony formation assay. ADGB knockdown also increased the apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 assessed by flow cytometry. In addition, western blot showed that ADGB knockdown altered levels of several proteins related to proliferation, survival or apoptosis in U251 cells. These findings suggest ADGB is involved in the progression of glioma in vitro. PMID:24966926

  4. Regeneration-dependent conditional gene knockdown (Readyknock) in planarian: demonstration of requirement for Djsnap-25 expression in the brain for negative phototactic behavior.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Pulvers, Jeremy N; Inoue, Takeshi; Tarui, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Agata, Kiyokazu; Umesono, Yoshihiko

    2007-06-01

    Freshwater planarians have a simple and evolutionarily primitive brain structure. Here, we identified the Djsnap-25 gene encoding a homolog of the evolutionarily conserved synaptic protein SNAP-25 from the planarian Dugesia japonica and assessed its role in brain function. Djsnap-25 was expressed widely in the nervous system. To investigate the specific role of Djsnap-25 in the brain, we developed a unique technique of RNA interference (RNAi), regeneration-dependent conditional gene knockdown (Readyknock), exploiting the high regenerative capacity of planarians, and succeeded in selectively eliminating the DjSNAP-25 activity in the head region while leaving the DjSNAP-25 activity in the trunk region intact. These knockdown animals showed no effect on brain morphology or on undirected movement of the trunk itself. Light-avoidance behavior or negative phototaxis was used to quantitatively analyze brain function in the knockdown animals. The results suggested that the DjSNAP-25 activity within the head region is required for two independent sensory-processing pathways that regulate locomotive activity and directional movement downstream of distinct primary sensory outputs coming from the head margin and the eyes, respectively, during negative phototaxis. Our approach demonstrates that planarians are a powerful model organism to study the molecular basis of the brain as an information-processing center.

  5. Knockdown of selenocysteine-specific elongation factor in Amblyomma maculatum alters the pathogen burden of Rickettsia parkeri with epigenetic control by the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Steven W; Browning, Rebecca E; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M C; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

  6. Knockdown of Selenocysteine-Specific Elongation Factor in Amblyomma maculatum Alters the Pathogen Burden of Rickettsia parkeri with Epigenetic Control by the Sin3 Histone Deacetylase Corepressor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Steven W.; Browning, Rebecca E.; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex. PMID:24282621

  7. Dmp53, basket and drICE gene knockdown and polyphenol gallic acid increase life span and locomotor activity in a Drosophila Parkinson’s disease model

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Arellano, Hector Flavio; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) by which dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons are eroded in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is critical for effective therapeutic strategies. By using the binary tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Gal4/UAS-X RNAi Drosophila melanogaster system, we report that Dmp53, basket and drICE gene knockdown in dopaminergic neurons prolong life span (p < 0.05; log-rank test) and locomotor activity (p < 0.05; χ2 test) in D. melanogaster lines chronically exposed to (1 mM) paraquat (PQ, oxidative stress (OS) generator) compared to untreated transgenic fly lines. Likewise, knockdown flies displayed higher climbing performance than control flies. Amazingly, gallic acid (GA) significantly protected DAergic neurons, ameliorated life span, and climbing abilities in knockdown fly lines treated with PQ compared to flies treated with PQ only. Therefore, silencing specific gene(s) involved in neuronal death might constitute an excellent tool to study the response of DAergic neurons to OS stimuli. We propose that a therapy with antioxidants and selectively “switching off” death genes in DAergic neurons could provide a means for pre-clinical PD individuals to significantly ameliorate their disease condition. PMID:24385865

  8. Argonaute2 is the catalytic engine of mammalian RNAi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jidong; Carmell, Michelle A; Rivas, Fabiola V; Marsden, Carolyn G; Thomson, J Michael; Song, Ji-Joon; Hammond, Scott M; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Hannon, Gregory J

    2004-09-03

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) is carried out by RISC, the RNA-induced silencing complex. RISC contains two signature components, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and Argonaute family proteins. Here, we show that the multiple Argonaute proteins present in mammals are both biologically and biochemically distinct, with a single mammalian family member, Argonaute2, being responsible for messenger RNA cleavage activity. This protein is essential for mouse development, and cells lacking Argonaute2 are unable to mount an experimental response to siRNAs. Mutations within a cryptic ribonuclease H domain within Argonaute2, as identified by comparison with the structure of an archeal Argonaute protein, inactivate RISC. Thus, our evidence supports a model in which Argonaute contributes "Slicer" activity to RISC, providing the catalytic engine for RNAi.

  9. Using nuclear run-on transcription assays in RNAi studies.

    PubMed

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism regulating gene transcript levels either by transcriptional gene silencing or by posttranscriptional gene silencing, which act in the genome maintenance and the regulation of gene expression which is typically inferred from measuring transcript abundance. Nuclear "run-on" (or "run-off") transcription assays have been used to obtain quantitative information about the relative rates of transcription of different genes in nuclei isolated from a particular tissue or organ. Basically, these assays exploit the activity of RNA polymerases to synthesize radiolabeled transcripts that then can be hybridized to filter-bound, cold, excess single-stranded DNA probes representing genes of interest. The protocol presented here streamlines, adapts, and optimizes nuclear run-on transcription assays for use in RNAi studies.

  10. RNAi as a Routine Route Toward Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    a third -generation shRNA library 2. collection of cell lines for screening within the proposed program 6 3. determination that microRNAs can...08-1-0572 TITLE: RNAi as a routine route toward breast cancer therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory J. Hannon, Ph.D... therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH – 08 – 1 - 0572 5b. GRANT NUMBER BC076047 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  11. Single domain antibodies for the knockdown of cytosolic and nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Böldicke, Thomas

    2017-03-08

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) from camels or sharks comprise only the variable heavy chain domain. Human sdAbs comprise the variable domain of the heavy chain (VH) or light chain (VL) and can be selected from human antibodies. SdAbs are stable, non aggregating molecules in vitro and in vivo compared to complete antibodies and scFv fragments. They are excellent novel inhibitors of cytosolic/nuclear proteins because they are correctly folded inside the cytosol in contrast to scFv fragments. SdAbs are unique because of their excellent specificity and possibility to target posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation sites, conformers or interaction regions of proteins that cannot be targeted with genetic knockout techniques and are impossible to knockdown with RNAi. The number of inhibiting cytosolic/nuclear sdAbs is increasing and usage of synthetic single pot single domain libraries will boost the generation of these fascinating molecules without the need of immunization. The most frequently selected antigenic epitopes belong to viral and oncogenic proteins, followed by toxins, proteins of the nervous system as well as plant- and drosophila proteins. It is now possible to select functional sdAbs against virtually every cytosolic/nuclear protein and desired epitope. The development of new endosomal escape protein domains and cell-penetrating peptides for efficient transfection broaden the application of inhibiting sdAbs. Last but not least, the generation of relatively new cell-specific nanoparticles such as polymersomes and polyplexes carrying cytosolic/nuclear sdAb-DNA or -protein will pave the way to apply cytosolic/nuclear sdAbs for inhibition of viral infection and cancer in the clinic. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical imaging of RNAi-mediated silencing of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Honma, Kimi; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Nagahara, Shunji

    2008-02-01

    RNAi has rapidly become a powerful tool for drug target discovery and validation in an in vitro culture system and, consequently, interest is rapidly growing for extension of its application to in vivo systems, such as animal disease models and human therapeutics. Cancer is one obvious application for RNAi therapeutics, because abnormal gene expression is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotype of cancer and thereby many oncogenes and cell-signaling molecules present enticing drug target possibilities. RNAi, potent and specific, could silence tumor-related genes and would appear to be a rational approach to inhibit tumor growth. In subsequent in vivo studies, the appropriate cancer model must be developed for an evaluation of siRNA effects on tumors. How to evaluate the effect of siRNA in an in vivo therapeutic model is also important. Accelerating the analyses of these models and improving their predictive value through whole animal imaging methods, which provide cancer inhibition in real time and are sensitive to subtle changes, are crucial for rapid advancement of these approaches. Bioluminescent imaging is one of these optically based imaging methods that enable rapid in vivo analyses of a variety of cellular and molecular events with extreme sensitivity.

  13. Lentiviral vector engineering for anti-HIV RNAi gene therapy.

    PubMed

    ter Brake, Olivier; Westerink, Jan-Tinus; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference or RNAi-based gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection has recently emerged as a highly effective antiviral approach. The lentiviral vector system is a good candidate for the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) in HIV-susceptible cells. However, this strategy can give rise to vector problems because the anti-HIV shRNAs can also target the HIV-based lentiviral vector system. In addition, there may be self-targeting of the shRNA-encoding sequences within the vector RNA genome in the producer cell. The insertion of microRNA (miRNA) cassettes in the vector may introduce Drosha cleavage sites that will also result in the destruction of the vector genome during the production and/or the transduction process. Here, we describe possible solutions to these lentiviral-RNAi problems. We also describe a strategy for multiple shRNA expression to establish a combinatorial RNAi therapy.

  14. Affinity approaches in RNAi-based therapeutics purification.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Figueiras, Ana; Sousa, Fani

    2016-05-15

    The recent investigation on RNA interference (RNAi) related mechanisms and applications led to an increased awareness of the importance of RNA in biology. Nowadays, RNAi-based technology has emerged as a potentially powerful tool for silencing gene expression, being exploited to develop new therapeutics for treating a vast number of human disease conditions, as it is expected that this technology can be translated onto clinical applications in a near future. This approach makes use of a large number of small (namely short interfering RNAs, microRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are likely to have a crucial role as the next generation therapeutics. The commercial and biomedical interest in these RNAi-based therapy applications have fostered the need to develop innovative procedures to easily and efficiently purify RNA, aiming to obtain the final product with high purity degree, good quality and biological activity. Recently, affinity chromatography has been applied to ncRNAs purification, in view of the high specificity. Therefore, this article intends to review the biogenesis pathways of regulatory ncRNAs and also to discuss the most significant and recent developments as well as applications of affinity chromatography in the challenging task of purifying ncRNAs. In addition, the importance of affinity chromatography in ncRNAs purification is addressed and prospects for what is forthcoming are presented.

  15. Knockdown of Expression of Cdk5 or p35 (a Cdk5 Activator) Results in Podocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ya-Li; Zhang, Xia; Fu, Hai-Xia; Guo, Mei; Shukla, Varsha; Amin, Niranjana D.; E, Jing; Bao, Li; Luo, Hong-Yan; Li, Bo; Lu, Xiao-Hua; Gao, Yong-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated glomerular epithelial cells. Podocyte loss has been found in many renal diseases. Cdk5 is a cyclin-dependent protein kinase which is predominantly regulated by p35. To study the role of Cdk5/p35 in podocyte survival, we first applied western blotting (WB) analysis to confirm the time-course expression of Cdk5 and p35 during kidney development and in cultured immortalized mouse podocytes. We also demonstrated that p35 plays an important role in promoting podocyte differentiation by overexpression of p35 in podocytes. To deregulate the expression of Cdk5 or p35 in mouse podocytes, we used RNAi and analyzed cell function and apoptosis assaying for podocyte specific marker Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) and cleaved caspase 3, respectively. We also counted viable cells using cell counting kit-8. We found that depletion of Cdk5 causes decreased expression of WT1 and apoptosis. It is noteworthy, however, that downregulation of p35 reduced Cdk5 activity, but had no effect on cleaved caspase 3 expression. It did, however, reduce expression of WT1, a transcription factor, and produced podocyte dysmorphism. On the other hand increased apoptosis could be detected in p35-deregulated podocytes using the TUNEL analysis and immunofluorescent staining with cleaved caspase3 antibody. Viability of podocytes was decreased in both Cdk5 and p35 knockdown cells. Knocking down Cdk5 or p35 gene by RNAi does not affect the cycline I expression, another Cdk5 activator in podocyes. We conclude that Cdk5 and p35 play a crucial role in maintaining podocyte differentiation and survival, and suggest these proteins as targets for therapeutic intervention in podocyte-damaged kidney diseases. PMID:27479491

  16. Comparative phosphoproteomics of zebrafish Fyn/Yes morpholino knockdown embryos.

    PubMed

    Lemeer, Simone; Jopling, Chris; Gouw, Joost; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Slijper, Monique; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2008-11-01

    The coordinated movement of cells is indispensable for normal vertebrate gastrulation. Several important players and signaling pathways have been identified in convergence and extension (CE) cell movements during gastrulation, including non-canonical Wnt signaling. Fyn and Yes, members of the Src family of kinases, are key regulators of CE movements as well. Here we investigated signaling pathways in early development by comparison of the phosphoproteome of wild type zebrafish embryos with Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos that display specific CE cell movement defects. For quantitation we used differential stable isotope labeling by reductive amination of peptides. Equal amounts of labeled peptides from wild type and Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos were mixed and analyzed by on-line reversed phase TiO(2)-reversed phase LC-MS/MS. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides were quantified, and significant changes in protein expression and/or phosphorylation were detected. We identified 348 phosphoproteins of which 69 showed a decrease in phosphorylation in Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos and 72 showed an increase in phosphorylation. Among these phosphoproteins were known regulators of cell movements, including Adducin and PDLIM5. Our results indicate that quantitative phosphoproteomics combined with morpholino-mediated knockdowns can be used to identify novel signaling pathways that act in zebrafish development in vivo.

  17. Knockdown of ACAT-1 reduces amyloidogenic processing of APP.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Henri J; Greco, Christopher; Kovacs, Dora M

    2007-04-17

    Previous studies have shown that acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT), an enzyme that controls cellular equilibrium between free cholesterol and cholesteryl esters, modulates proteolytic processing of APP in cell-based and animal models of Alzheimer's disease. Here we report that ACAT-1 RNAi reduced cellular ACAT-1 protein by approximately 50% and cholesteryl ester levels by 22% while causing a slight increase in the free cholesterol content of ER membranes. This correlated with reduced proteolytic processing of APP and 40% decrease in Abeta secretion. These data show that even a modest decrease in ACAT activity can have robust suppressive effects on Abeta generation.

  18. Inducing Cold-Sensitivity in the Frigophilic Fly Drosophila montana by RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Nicola; Tournière, Océane; Sneddon, Tanya; Ritchie, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation is a critical physiological adaptation for coping with seasonal cold. By increasing their cold tolerance individuals can remain active for longer at the onset of winter and can recover more quickly from a cold shock. In insects, despite many physiological studies, little is known about the genetic basis of cold acclimation. Recently, transcriptomic analyses in Drosophila virilis and D. montana revealed candidate genes for cold acclimation by identifying genes upregulated during exposure to cold. Here, we test the role of myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (Inos), in cold tolerance in D. montana using an RNAi approach. D. montana has a circumpolar distribution and overwinters as an adult in northern latitudes with extreme cold. We assessed cold tolerance of dsRNA knock-down flies using two metrics: chill-coma recovery time (CCRT) and mortality rate after cold acclimation. Injection of dsRNAInos did not alter CCRT, either overall or in interaction with the cold treatment, however it did induced cold-specific mortality, with high levels of mortality observed in injected flies acclimated at 5°C but not at 19°C. Overall, injection with dsRNAInos induced a temperature-sensitive mortality rate of over 60% in this normally cold-tolerant species. qPCR analysis confirmed that dsRNA injection successfully reduced gene expression of Inos. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of Inos in increasing cold tolerance in D. montana. The potential mechanisms involved by which Inos increases cold tolerance are also discussed. PMID:27832122

  19. Maternal depletion of Piwi, a component of the RNAi system, impacts heterochromatin formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingting; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2013-01-01

    A persistent question in epigenetics is how heterochromatin is targeted for assembly at specific domains, and how that chromatin state is faithfully transmitted. Stable heterochromatin is necessary to silence transposable elements (TEs) and maintain genome integrity. Both the RNAi system and heterochromatin components HP1 (Swi6) and H3K9me2/3 are required for initial establishment of heterochromatin structures in S. pombe. Here we utilize both loss of function alleles and the newly developed Drosophila melanogaster transgenic shRNA lines to deplete proteins of interest at specific development stages to dissect their roles in heterochromatin assembly in early zygotes and in maintenance of the silencing chromatin state during development. Using reporters subject to Position Effect Variegation (PEV), we find that depletion of key proteins in the early embryo can lead to loss of silencing assayed at adult stages. The piRNA component Piwi is required in the early embryo for reporter silencing in non-gonadal somatic cells, but knock-down during larval stages has no impact. This implies that Piwi is involved in targeting HP1a when heterochromatin is established at the late blastoderm stage and possibly also during embryogenesis, but that the silent chromatin state created is transmitted through cell division independent of the piRNA system. In contrast, heterochromatin structural protein HP1a is required for both initial heterochromatin assembly and the following mitotic inheritance. HP1a profiles in piwi mutant animals confirm that Piwi depletion leads to decreased HP1a levels in pericentric heterochromatin, particularly in TEs. The results suggest that the major role of the piRNA system in assembly of heterochromatin in non-gonadal somatic cells occurs in the early embryo during heterochromatin formation, and further demonstrate that failure of heterochromatin formation in the early embryo impacts the phenotype of the adult.

  20. Genetically modifying the insect gut microbiota to control Chagas disease vectors through systemic RNAi.

    PubMed

    Taracena, Mabel L; Oliveira, Pedro L; Almendares, Olivia; Umaña, Claudia; Lowenberger, Carl; Dotson, Ellen M; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O; Pennington, Pamela M

    2015-02-01

    Technologies based on RNA interference may be used for insect control. Sustainable strategies are needed to control vectors of Chagas disease such as Rhodnius prolixus. The insect microbiota can be modified to deliver molecules to the gut. Here, Escherichia coli HT115(DE3) expressing dsRNA for the Rhodnius heme-binding protein (RHBP) and for catalase (CAT) were fed to nymphs and adult triatomine stages. RHBP is an egg protein and CAT is an antioxidant enzyme expressed in all tissues by all developmental stages. The RNA interference effect was systemic and temporal. Concentrations of E. coli HT115(DE3) above 3.35 × 10(7) CFU/mL produced a significant RHBP and CAT gene knockdown in nymphs and adults. RHBP expression in the fat body was reduced by 99% three days after feeding, returning to normal levels 10 days after feeding. CAT expression was reduced by 99% and 96% in the ovary and the posterior midgut, respectively, five days after ingestion. Mortality rates increased by 24-30% in first instars fed RHBP and CAT bacteria. Molting rates were reduced by 100% in first instars and 80% in third instars fed bacteria producing RHBP or CAT dsRNA. Oviposition was reduced by 43% (RHBP) and 84% (CAT). Embryogenesis was arrested in 16% (RHBP) and 20% (CAT) of laid eggs. Feeding females 105 CFU/mL of the natural symbiont, Rhodococcus rhodnii, transformed to express RHBP-specific hairpin RNA reduced RHBP expression by 89% and reduced oviposition. Modifying the insect microbiota to induce systemic RNAi in R. prolixus may result in a paratransgenic strategy for sustainable vector control.

  1. Inducing Cold-Sensitivity in the Frigophilic Fly Drosophila montana by RNAi.

    PubMed

    Vigoder, Felipe M; Parker, Darren J; Cook, Nicola; Tournière, Océane; Sneddon, Tanya; Ritchie, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation is a critical physiological adaptation for coping with seasonal cold. By increasing their cold tolerance individuals can remain active for longer at the onset of winter and can recover more quickly from a cold shock. In insects, despite many physiological studies, little is known about the genetic basis of cold acclimation. Recently, transcriptomic analyses in Drosophila virilis and D. montana revealed candidate genes for cold acclimation by identifying genes upregulated during exposure to cold. Here, we test the role of myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (Inos), in cold tolerance in D. montana using an RNAi approach. D. montana has a circumpolar distribution and overwinters as an adult in northern latitudes with extreme cold. We assessed cold tolerance of dsRNA knock-down flies using two metrics: chill-coma recovery time (CCRT) and mortality rate after cold acclimation. Injection of dsRNAInos did not alter CCRT, either overall or in interaction with the cold treatment, however it did induced cold-specific mortality, with high levels of mortality observed in injected flies acclimated at 5°C but not at 19°C. Overall, injection with dsRNAInos induced a temperature-sensitive mortality rate of over 60% in this normally cold-tolerant species. qPCR analysis confirmed that dsRNA injection successfully reduced gene expression of Inos. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of Inos in increasing cold tolerance in D. montana. The potential mechanisms involved by which Inos increases cold tolerance are also discussed.

  2. RNAi knockdown of acetyl-CoA gene eliminates jinggangmycin-enhanced reproduction and population growth in the brown planthopper, Nilaparfata lugens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major challenge in ecology lies in understanding the coexistence of intraguild species, well documented at the organismal level, but not at the molecular level. This study focused on the effects of the antibiotic, jinggangmycin (JGM), a fungicide widely used in Asian rice agroecosystems, on reprod...

  3. Amastin Knockdown in Leishmania braziliensis Affects Parasite-Macrophage Interaction and Results in Impaired Viability of Intracellular Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Nakagaki, Brenda Naemi; Mendonça-Neto, Rondon Pessoa; Canavaci, Adriana Monte Cassiano; Souza Melo, Normanda; Martinelli, Patrícia Massara; Fernandes, Ana Paula; daRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis, a human parasitic disease with manifestations ranging from cutaneous ulcerations to fatal visceral infection, is caused by several Leishmania species. These protozoan parasites replicate as extracellular, flagellated promastigotes in the gut of a sandfly vector and as amastigotes inside the parasitophorous vacuole of vertebrate host macrophages. Amastins are surface glycoproteins encoded by large gene families present in the genomes of several trypanosomatids and highly expressed in the intracellular amastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. Here, we showed that the genome of L. braziliensis contains 52 amastin genes belonging to all four previously described amastin subfamilies and that the expression of members of all subfamilies is upregulated in L. braziliensis amastigotes. Although primary sequence alignments showed no homology to any known protein sequence, homology searches based on secondary structure predictions indicate that amastins are related to claudins, a group of proteins that are components of eukaryotic tight junction complexes. By knocking-down the expression of δ-amastins in L. braziliensis, their essential role during infection became evident. δ-amastin knockdown parasites showed impaired growth after in vitro infection of mouse macrophages and completely failed to produce infection when inoculated in BALB/c mice, an attenuated phenotype that was reverted by the re-expression of an RNAi-resistant amastin gene. Further highlighting their essential role in host-parasite interactions, electron microscopy analyses of macrophages infected with amastin knockdown parasites showed significant alterations in the tight contact that is normally observed between the surface of wild type amastigotes and the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:26641088

  4. UP-TORR: online tool for accurate and Up-to-Date annotation of RNAi Reagents.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanhui; Roesel, Charles; Flockhart, Ian; Perkins, Lizabeth; Perrimon, Norbert; Mohr, Stephanie E

    2013-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely adopted tool for loss-of-function studies but RNAi results only have biological relevance if the reagents are appropriately mapped to genes. Several groups have designed and generated RNAi reagent libraries for studies in cells or in vivo for Drosophila and other species. At first glance, matching RNAi reagents to genes appears to be a simple problem, as each reagent is typically designed to target a single gene. In practice, however, the reagent-gene relationship is complex. Although the sequences of oligonucleotides used to generate most types of RNAi reagents are static, the reference genome and gene annotations are regularly updated. Thus, at the time a researcher chooses an RNAi reagent or analyzes RNAi data, the most current interpretation of the RNAi reagent-gene relationship, as well as related information regarding specificity (e.g., predicted off-target effects), can be different from the original interpretation. Here, we describe a set of strategies and an accompanying online tool, UP-TORR (for Updated Targets of RNAi Reagents; www.flyrnai.org/up-torr), useful for accurate and up-to-date annotation of cell-based and in vivo RNAi reagents. Importantly, UP-TORR automatically synchronizes with gene annotations daily, retrieving the most current information available, and for Drosophila, also synchronizes with the major reagent collections. Thus, UP-TORR allows users to choose the most appropriate RNAi reagents at the onset of a study, as well as to perform the most appropriate analyses of results of RNAi-based studies.

  5. Knock-down of transcript abundance of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor genes in white clover (Trifolium repens) reveals a redundancy and diversity of gene function.

    PubMed

    Islam, Afsana; Leung, Susanna; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Laing, William A; Richardson, Kim A; Hofmann, Rainer W; Dijkwel, Paul P; McManus, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional regulation of four phylogenetically distinct members of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor (KPI) genes isolated from white clover (Trifolium repens; designated Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5) has been investigated to determine their wider functional role. The four genes displayed differential transcription during seed germination, and in different tissues of the mature plant, and transcription was also ontogenetically regulated. Heterologous over-expression of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5 in Nicotiana tabacum retarded larval growth of the herbivore Spodoptera litura, and an increase in the transcription of the pathogenesis-related genes PR1 and PR4 was observed in the Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI4 over-expressing lines. RNA interference (RNAi) knock-down lines in white clover displayed significantly altered vegetative growth phenotypes with inhibition of shoot growth and a stimulation of root growth, while knock-down of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2 and Tr-KPI5 transcript abundance also retarded larval growth of S. litura. Examination of these RNAi lines revealed constitutive stress-associated phenotypes as well as altered transcription of cellular signalling genes. These results reveal a functional redundancy across members of the KPI gene family. Further, the regulation of transcription of at least one member of the family, Tr-KPI2, may occupy a central role in the maintenance of a cellular homeostasis.

  6. RNAi technologies in agricultural biotechnology: The Toxicology Forum 40th Annual Summer Meeting.

    PubMed

    Sherman, James H; Munyikwa, Tichafa; Chan, Stephen Y; Petrick, Jay S; Witwer, Kenneth W; Choudhuri, Supratim

    2015-11-01

    During the 40th Annual Meeting of The Toxicology Forum, the current and potential future science, regulations, and politics of agricultural biotechnology were presented and discussed. The meeting session described herein focused on the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) in agriculture. The general process by which RNAi works, currently registered RNAi-based plant traits, example RNAi-based traits in development, potential use of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) as topically applied pesticide active ingredients, research related to the safety of RNAi, biological barriers to ingested dsRNA, recent regulatory RNAi science reviews, and regulatory considerations related to the use of RNAi in agriculture were discussed. Participants generally agreed that the current regulatory framework is robust and appropriate for evaluating the safety of RNAi employed in agricultural biotechnology and were also supportive of the use of RNAi to develop improved crop traits. However, as with any emerging technology, the potential range of future products, potential future regulatory frameworks, and public acceptance of the technology will continue to evolve. As such, continuing dialogue was encouraged to promote education of consumers and science-based regulations.

  7. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  8. Multiple sensors ensure guide strand selection in human RNAi pathways.

    PubMed

    Noland, Cameron L; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-05-01

    Small RNAs guide RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) to bind to cognate mRNA transcripts and trigger silencing of protein expression during RNA interference (RNAi) in eukaryotes. A fundamental aspect of this process is the asymmetric loading of one strand of a short interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA (miRNA) duplex onto RISCs for correct target recognition. Here, we use a reconstituted system to determine the extent to which the core components of the human RNAi machinery contribute to RNA guide strand selection. We show that Argonaute2 (Ago2), the endonuclease that binds directly to siRNAs and miRNAs within RISC, has intrinsic but substrate-dependent RNA strand selection capability. This activity can be enhanced substantially when Ago2 is in complex with the endonuclease Dicer and the double-stranded RNA-binding proteins (dsRBPs)-trans-activation response (TAR) RNA-binding protein (TRBP) or protein activator of PKR (PACT). The extent to which human Dicer/dsRBP complexes contribute to strand selection is dictated by specific duplex parameters such as thermodynamics, 5' nucleotide identity, and structure. Surprisingly, our results also suggest that strand selection for some miRNAs is enhanced by PACT-containing complexes but not by those containing TRBP. Furthermore, overall mRNA targeting by miRNAs is disfavored for complexes containing TRBP but not PACT. These findings demonstrate that multiple proteins collaborate to ensure optimal strand selection in humans and reveal the possibility of delineating RNAi pathways based on the presence of TRBP or PACT.

  9. Baculovirus-mediated Gene Delivery and RNAi Applications

    PubMed Central

    Makkonen, Kaisa-Emilia; Airenne, Kari; Ylä-Herttulala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Baculoviruses are widely encountered in nature and a great deal of data is available about their safety and biology. Recently, these versatile, insect-specific viruses have demonstrated their usefulness in various biotechnological applications including protein production and gene transfer. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies exist and support their use as gene delivery vehicles in vertebrate cells. Recently, baculoviruses have also demonstrated high potential in RNAi applications in which several advantages of the virus make it a promising tool for RNA gene transfer with high safety and wide tropism. PMID:25912715

  10. ARID1A gene knockdown promotes neuroblastoma migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Xu, Z; Zhao, Z; An, Q; Wang, L; Yu, Y; Piao, D

    2017-03-03

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood which often acquires drug resistance and becomes aggressive phenotypes. The high-risk patients suffer from high mortality due to the limitation of the treatment strategies. ARID1A (AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A), a subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, is considered as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ARID1A on migration and invasion in neuroblastoma cells. The shRNA targeting ARID1A was designed and delivered into SK-N-SH cells to knock down ARID1A expression. Knockdown of ARID1A by shRNA significantly increased the viability and invasion ability, and caused G1 arrest inhibition and DNA synthesis increase in SK-N-SH cells. Moreover, Knockdown of ARID1A increased the activity and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 in SK-N-SH cells. Furthermore, ARID1A knockdown caused diminished expression of E-cadherin, enhanced expression of N-cadherin and β-catenin nuclear translocation in SK-N-SH cells. These results suggest that loss of ARID1A may associate with the promotion of invasion and metastasis of neuroblastoma. Our findings indicate ARID1A is a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma.

  11. A genome-scale RNAi screen for Oct4 modulators defines a role of the Paf1 complex for embryonic stem cell identity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Nitzsche, Anja; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; de Vries, Ingrid; Kittler, Ralf; Junqueira, Magno; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schulz, Herbert; Hubner, Norbert; Doss, Michael Xavier; Sachinidis, Agapios; Hescheler, Juergen; Iacone, Roberto; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Caldarelli, Antonio; Poser, Ina; Theis, Mirko; Buchholz, Frank

    2009-05-08

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) maintain self-renewal while ensuring a rapid response to differentiation cues. The identification of genes maintaining ESC identity is important to develop these cells for their potential therapeutic use. Here we report a genome-scale RNAi screen for a global survey of genes affecting ESC identity via alteration of Oct4 expression. Factors with the strongest effect on Oct4 expression included components of the Paf1 complex, a protein complex associated with RNA polymerase II. Using a combination of proteomics, expression profiling, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that the Paf1C binds to promoters of key pluripotency genes, where it is required to maintain a transcriptionally active chromatin structure. The Paf1C is developmentally regulated and blocks ESC differentiation upon overexpression, and the knockdown in ESCs causes expression changes similar to Oct4 or Nanog depletions. We propose that the Paf1C plays an important role in maintaining ESC identity.

  12. RNAi-Mediated Functional Analysis of Bursicon Genes Related to Adult Cuticle Formation and Tanning in the Honeybee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Elias-Neto, Moysés; Falcon, Tiago; Dallacqua, Rodrigo Pires; Martins, Juliana Ramos; Bitondi, Marcia Maria Gentile

    2016-01-01

    Bursicon is a heterodimeric neurohormone that acts through a G protein-coupled receptor named rickets (rk), thus inducing an increase in cAMP and the activation of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the cuticular tanning pathway. In insects, the role of bursicon in the post-ecdysial tanning of the adult cuticle and wing expansion is well characterized. Here we investigated the roles of the genes encoding the bursicon subunits during the adult cuticle development in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. RNAi-mediated knockdown of AmBurs α and AmBurs β bursicon genes prevented the complete formation and tanning (melanization/sclerotization) of the adult cuticle. A thinner, much less tanned cuticle was produced, and ecdysis toward adult stage was impaired. Consistent with these results, the knockdown of bursicon transcripts also interfered in the expression of genes encoding its receptor, AmRk, structural cuticular proteins, and enzymes in the melanization/sclerotization pathway, thus evidencing roles for bursicon in adult cuticle formation and tanning. Moreover, the expression of AmBurs α, AmBurs β and AmRk is contingent on the declining ecdysteroid titer that triggers the onset of adult cuticle synthesis and deposition. The search for transcripts of AmBurs α, AmBurs β and candidate targets in RNA-seq libraries prepared with brains and integuments strengthened our data on transcript quantification through RT-qPCR. Together, our results support our premise that bursicon has roles in adult cuticle formation and tanning, and are in agreement with other recent studies pointing for roles during the pharate-adult stage, in addition to the classical post-ecdysial ones. PMID:27907116

  13. RNAi-Mediated Functional Analysis of Bursicon Genes Related to Adult Cuticle Formation and Tanning in the Honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Costa, Claudinéia Pereira; Elias-Neto, Moysés; Falcon, Tiago; Dallacqua, Rodrigo Pires; Martins, Juliana Ramos; Bitondi, Marcia Maria Gentile

    2016-01-01

    Bursicon is a heterodimeric neurohormone that acts through a G protein-coupled receptor named rickets (rk), thus inducing an increase in cAMP and the activation of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the cuticular tanning pathway. In insects, the role of bursicon in the post-ecdysial tanning of the adult cuticle and wing expansion is well characterized. Here we investigated the roles of the genes encoding the bursicon subunits during the adult cuticle development in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. RNAi-mediated knockdown of AmBurs α and AmBurs β bursicon genes prevented the complete formation and tanning (melanization/sclerotization) of the adult cuticle. A thinner, much less tanned cuticle was produced, and ecdysis toward adult stage was impaired. Consistent with these results, the knockdown of bursicon transcripts also interfered in the expression of genes encoding its receptor, AmRk, structural cuticular proteins, and enzymes in the melanization/sclerotization pathway, thus evidencing roles for bursicon in adult cuticle formation and tanning. Moreover, the expression of AmBurs α, AmBurs β and AmRk is contingent on the declining ecdysteroid titer that triggers the onset of adult cuticle synthesis and deposition. The search for transcripts of AmBurs α, AmBurs β and candidate targets in RNA-seq libraries prepared with brains and integuments strengthened our data on transcript quantification through RT-qPCR. Together, our results support our premise that bursicon has roles in adult cuticle formation and tanning, and are in agreement with other recent studies pointing for roles during the pharate-adult stage, in addition to the classical post-ecdysial ones.

  14. Identification of novel 14-3-3ζ interacting proteins by quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK).

    PubMed

    Ge, Feng; Li, Wen-Liang; Bi, Li-Jun; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2010-11-05

    The family of 14-3-3 proteins has emerged as critical regulators of diverse cellular responses under both physiological and pathological conditions. To gain insight into the molecular action of 14-3-3ζ in multiple myeloma (MM), we performed a systematic proteomic analysis of 14-3-3ζ-associated proteins. This analysis, recently developed by Matthias Mann, termed quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK), integrates RNAi, SILAC, immunoprecipitation, and quantitative MS technologies. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis allowed us to distinguish 14-3-3ζ-interacting proteins from background proteins, resulting in the identification of 292 proteins in total with 95 novel interactions. Three 14-3-3ζ-interacting proteins-BAX, HSP70, and BAG3-were further confirmed by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitations and colocalization analysis. Our results therefore not only uncover a large number of novel 14-3-3ζ-associated proteins that possess a variety of cellular functions, but also provide new research directions for the study of the functions of 14-3-3ζ. This study also demonstrated that QUICK is a useful approach to detect specific protein-protein interactions with very high confidence and may have a wide range of applications in the investigation of protein complex interaction networks.

  15. Differential effects of RNAi treatments on field populations of the western corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Sun, Weilin; Spencer, Joseph L; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2014-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated crop protection against insect pests is a technology that is greatly anticipated by the academic and industrial pest control communities. Prior to commercialization, factors influencing the potential for evolution of insect resistance to RNAi should be evaluated. While mutations in genes encoding the RNAi machinery or the sequences targeted for interference may serve as a prominent mechanism of resistance evolution, differential effects of RNAi on target pests may also facilitate such evolution. However, to date, little is known about how variation of field insect populations could influence the effectiveness of RNAi treatments. To approach this question, we evaluated the effects of RNAi treatments on adults of three western corn rootworm (WCR; Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) populations exhibiting different levels of gut cysteine protease activity, tolerance of soybean herbivory, and immune gene expression; two populations were collected from crop rotation-resistant (RR) problem areas and one from a location where RR was not observed (wild type; WT). Our results demonstrated that RNAi targeting DvRS5 (a highly expressed cysteine protease gene) reduced gut cysteine protease activity in all three WCR populations. However, the proportion of the cysteine protease activity that was inhibited varied across populations. When WCR adults were treated with double-stranded RNA of an immune gene att1, different changes in survival among WT and RR populations on soybean diets occurred. Notably, for both genes, the sequences targeted for RNAi were the same across all populations examined. These findings indicate that the effectiveness of RNAi treatments could vary among field populations depending on their physiological and genetic backgrounds and that the consistency of an RNAi trait's effectiveness on phenotypically different populations should be considered or tested prior to wide deployment. Also, genes that are potentially subjected

  16. Unbiased RNAi screen for hepcidin regulators links hepcidin suppression to proliferative Ras/RAF and nutrient-dependent mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Mleczko-Sanecka, Katarzyna; Roche, Franziska; da Silva, Ana Rita; Call, Debora; D'Alessio, Flavia; Ragab, Anan; Lapinski, Philip E; Ummanni, Ramesh; Korf, Ulrike; Oakes, Christopher; Damm, Georg; D'Alessandro, Lorenza A; Klingmüller, Ursula; King, Philip D; Boutros, Michael; Hentze, Matthias W; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2014-03-06

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is a key regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Its expression is largely regulated by 2 signaling pathways: the "iron-regulated" bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and the inflammatory JAK-STAT pathways. To obtain broader insights into cellular processes that modulate hepcidin transcription and to provide a resource to identify novel genetic modifiers of systemic iron homeostasis, we designed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen that monitors hepcidin promoter activity after the knockdown of 19 599 genes in hepatocarcinoma cells. Interestingly, many of the putative hepcidin activators play roles in signal transduction, inflammation, or transcription, and affect hepcidin transcription through BMP-responsive elements. Furthermore, our work sheds light on new components of the transcriptional machinery that maintain steady-state levels of hepcidin expression and its responses to the BMP- and interleukin-6-triggered signals. Notably, we discover hepcidin suppression mediated via components of Ras/RAF MAPK and mTOR signaling, linking hepcidin transcriptional control to the pathways that respond to mitogen stimulation and nutrient status. Thus using a combination of RNAi screening, reverse phase protein arrays, and small molecules testing, we identify links between the control of systemic iron homeostasis and critical liver processes such as regeneration, response to injury, carcinogenesis, and nutrient metabolism.

  17. Unbiased RNAi screen for hepcidin regulators links hepcidin suppression to proliferative Ras/RAF and nutrient-dependent mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mleczko-Sanecka, Katarzyna; Roche, Franziska; Rita da Silva, Ana; Call, Debora; D’Alessio, Flavia; Ragab, Anan; Lapinski, Philip E.; Ummanni, Ramesh; Korf, Ulrike; Oakes, Christopher; Damm, Georg; D’Alessandro, Lorenza A.; Klingmüller, Ursula; King, Philip D.; Boutros, Michael; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is a key regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Its expression is largely regulated by 2 signaling pathways: the “iron-regulated” bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and the inflammatory JAK-STAT pathways. To obtain broader insights into cellular processes that modulate hepcidin transcription and to provide a resource to identify novel genetic modifiers of systemic iron homeostasis, we designed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen that monitors hepcidin promoter activity after the knockdown of 19 599 genes in hepatocarcinoma cells. Interestingly, many of the putative hepcidin activators play roles in signal transduction, inflammation, or transcription, and affect hepcidin transcription through BMP-responsive elements. Furthermore, our work sheds light on new components of the transcriptional machinery that maintain steady-state levels of hepcidin expression and its responses to the BMP- and interleukin-6–triggered signals. Notably, we discover hepcidin suppression mediated via components of Ras/RAF MAPK and mTOR signaling, linking hepcidin transcriptional control to the pathways that respond to mitogen stimulation and nutrient status. Thus using a combination of RNAi screening, reverse phase protein arrays, and small molecules testing, we identify links between the control of systemic iron homeostasis and critical liver processes such as regeneration, response to injury, carcinogenesis, and nutrient metabolism. PMID:24385536

  18. Aptamer-targeted RNAi for HIV-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2011-01-01

    The highly specific mechanism of RNA (RNAi) that inhibits the expression of disease genes is increasingly being harnessed to develop a new class of therapeutics for a wide variety of human maladies. The successful use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for therapeutic purposes requires safe and efficient delivery to specific cells and tissues. Herein, we demonstrate novel cell type-specific dual inhibitory function anti-gp120 aptamer-siRNA delivery systems for HIV-1 therapy, in which both the aptamer and the siRNA portions have potent anti-HIV activities. The envelope glycoprotein is expressed on the surface of HIV-1 infected cells, allowing binding and internalization of the aptamer-siRNA chimeric molecules. The Dicer substrate siRNA delivered by the aptamers is functionally processed by Dicer, resulting in specific inhibition of HIV-1 replication and infectivity in cultured CEM T-cells and primary blood mononuclear cells. Our results provide a set of novel aptamer-targeted RNAi therapeutics to combat HIV and further validate the use of anti-gp120 aptamers for delivery of Dicer substrate siRNAs.

  19. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Brutscher, Laura M; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans.

  20. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  1. RNAi and overexpression of genes in ovarian somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that PIWI proteins, in collaboration with PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), play a critical role in retrotransposon silencing in Drosophila gonadal somatic and germ-line cells. The recent establishment of female germ-line stem cells/ovarian somatic sheet and its derivative cell line, ovarian somatic cells (OSCs), allows researchers to study the molecular functions of several protein factors involved in the primary piRNA pathway in Drosophila. Although transgene expression is difficult to achieve in gonad-derived cell lines, transfection of both expression vectors and knockdown reagents is highly effective in OSCs. Here, I focus on techniques that knockdown or overexpress genes of interest in OSCs.

  2. RNA Interference in the Age of CRISPR: Will CRISPR Interfere with RNAi?

    PubMed Central

    Unniyampurath, Unnikrishnan; Pilankatta, Rajendra; Krishnan, Manoj N.

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of multiple technologies for modifying gene structure has revolutionized mammalian biomedical research and enhanced the promises of gene therapy. Over the past decade, RNA interference (RNAi) based technologies widely dominated various research applications involving experimental modulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, a new gene editing technology, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) (CRISPR/Cas9) system, has received unprecedented acceptance in the scientific community for a variety of genetic applications. Unlike RNAi, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is bestowed with the ability to introduce heritable precision insertions and deletions in the eukaryotic genome. The combination of popularity and superior capabilities of CRISPR/Cas9 system raises the possibility that this technology may occupy the roles currently served by RNAi and may even make RNAi obsolete. We performed a comparative analysis of the technical aspects and applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and RNAi in mammalian systems, with the purpose of charting out a predictive picture on whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system will eclipse the existence and future of RNAi. The conclusion drawn from this analysis is that RNAi will still occupy specific domains of biomedical research and clinical applications, under the current state of development of these technologies. However, further improvements in CRISPR/Cas9 based technology may ultimately enable it to dominate RNAi in the long term. PMID:26927085

  3. Delivery of dsRNA for RNAi in insects: an overview and future directions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Na; Christiaens, Olivier; Liu, Jisheng; Niu, Jinzhi; Cappelle, Kaat; Caccia, Silvia; Huvenne, Hanneke; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to the process of exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silencing the complementary endogenous messenger RNA. RNAi has been widely used in entomological research for functional genomics in a variety of insects and its potential for RNAi-based pest control has been increasingly emphasized mainly because of its high specificity. This review focuses on the approaches of introducing dsRNA into insect cells or insect bodies to induce effective RNAi. The three most common delivery methods, namely, microinjection, ingestion, and soaking, are illustrated in details and their advantages and limitations are summarized for purpose of feasible RNAi research. In this review, we also briefly introduce the two possible dsRNA uptake machineries, other dsRNA delivery methods and the history of RNAi in entomology. Factors that influence the specificity and efficiency of RNAi such as transfection reagents, selection of dsRNA region, length, and stability of dsRNA in RNAi research are discussed for further studies.

  4. RNA-seq validation of RNAi identifies additional gene connectivity in Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a functional genomics tool to validate phenotypes by delivering targeted, gene-specific, and complementary dsRNA into a host via injection, feeding, or other means in order to reduce gene expression. RNAi in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, has been successful du...

  5. RNAi-Mediated Gene Silencing in a Gonad Organ Culture to Study Sex Determination Mechanisms in Sea Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Milton, Sarah L.; Moreno-Mendoza, Norma; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    The autosomal Sry-related gene, Sox9, encodes a transcription factor, which performs an important role in testis differentiation in mammals. In several reptiles, Sox9 is differentially expressed in gonads, showing a significant upregulation during the thermo-sensitive period (TSP) at the male-promoting temperature, consistent with the idea that SOX9 plays a central role in the male pathway. However, in spite of numerous studies, it remains unclear how SOX9 functions during this event. In the present work, we developed an RNAi-based method for silencing Sox9 in an in vitro gonad culture system for the sea turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea. Gonads were dissected as soon as the embryos entered the TSP and were maintained in organ culture. Transfection of siRNA resulted in the decrease of both Sox9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, we found coordinated expression patterns for Sox9 and the anti-Müllerian hormone gene, Amh, suggesting that SOX9 could directly or indirectly regulate Amh expression, as it occurs in mammals. These results demonstrate an in vitro method to knockdown endogenous genes in gonads from a sea turtle, which represents a novel approach to investigate the roles of important genes involved in sex determination or differentiation pathways in species with temperature-dependent sex determination. PMID:24705165

  6. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Meera C.; Blice-Baum, Anna C.; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology. PMID:27500162

  7. RNAi validation of resistance genes and their interactions in the highly DDT-resistant 91-R strain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gellatly, Kyle J; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Doherty, Jeffery J; Sun, Weilin; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Clark, J Marshall

    2015-06-01

    4,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been re-recommended by the World Health Organization for malaria mosquito control. Previous DDT use has resulted in resistance, and with continued use resistance will increase in terms of level and extent. Drosophila melanogaster is a model dipteran that has many available genetic tools, numerous studies done on insecticide resistance mechanisms, and is related to malaria mosquitoes allowing for extrapolation. The 91-R strain of D. melanogaster is highly resistant to DDT (>1500-fold), however, there is no mechanistic scheme that accounts for this level of resistance. Recently, reduced penetration, increased detoxification, and direct excretion have been identified as resistance mechanisms in the 91-R strain. Their interactions, however, remain unclear. Use of UAS-RNAi transgenic lines of D. melanogaster allowed for the targeted knockdown of genes putatively involved in DDT resistance and has validated the role of several cuticular proteins (Cyp4g1 and Lcp1), cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cyp6g1 and Cyp12d1), and ATP binding cassette transporters (Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1) involved in DDT resistance. Further, increased sensitivity to DDT in the 91-R strain after intra-abdominal dsRNA injection for Mdr50, Mdr65, and Mrp1 was determined by a DDT contact bioassay, directly implicating these genes in DDT efflux and resistance.

  8. A Drosophila RNAi library modulates Hippo pathway-dependent tissue growth.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Joseph H A; Manning, Samuel A; Kulkarni, Aishwarya; Harvey, Kieran F

    2016-01-13

    Libraries of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster carrying RNA interference (RNAi) constructs have been used extensively to perform large-scale functional genetic screens in vivo. For example, RNAi screens have facilitated the discovery of multiple components of the Hippo pathway, an evolutionarily conserved growth-regulatory network. Here we investigate an important technical limitation with the widely used VDRC KK RNAi collection. We find that approximately 25% of VDRC KK RNAi lines cause false-positive enhancement of the Hippo pathway, owing to ectopic expression of the Tiptop transcription factor. Of relevance to the broader Drosophila community, ectopic tiptop (tio) expression can also cause organ malformations and mask phenotypes such as organ overgrowth. To enhance the use of the VDRC KK RNAi library, we have generated a D. melanogaster strain that will allow researchers to test, in a single cross, whether their genetic screen of interest will be affected by ectopic tio expression.

  9. Analysis of Nuclear RNA Interference (RNAi) in Human Cells by Subcellular Fractionation and Argonaute Loading

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Li, Liande; Janowski, Bethany A.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known for its ability to regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. In mammalian cell nuclei, however, the impact of RNAi has remained more controversial. A key technical hurdle has been a lack of optimized protocols for the isolation and analysis of cell nuclei. Here we describe a simplified protocol for nuclei isolation from cultured cells that incorporates a method for obtaining nucleoplasmic and chromatin fractions and removing cytoplasmic contamination. Cell fractions can then be used to detect the presence and activity of RNAi factors in the nucleus. We present a protocol for investigating an early step in RNAi, Argonaute protein loading with small RNAs, which is enabled by our improved extract preparations. These protocols facilitate characterization of nuclear RNAi and can be applied to the analysis of other nuclear proteins and pathways. From cellular fractionation to analysis of Argonaute loading results, this protocol takes 4–6 d to complete. PMID:25079428

  10. RNAi effects on actin mRNAs in Homalodisca vitripennis cells

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Cristina; Kamita, Shizuo G; Dequine, Haley; Wuriyanghan, Ha; Lindbo, John A; Falk, Bryce W

    2010-01-01

    The xylem feeding leafhopper Homalodisaca vitripennis (H. vitripennis) is an unusually robust and efficient vector of Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative bacterium which causes several very important plant diseases. Here we investigated RNA interference (RNAi) to target actin, a key component of insect cells and whole bodies, in H. vitripennis cells. RNAi effectors were delivered via lipid based transfection and real-time RT-PCR, RNA hybridization, and microscopic analyses were employed to verify RNAi effects. When actin dsRNAs were used, a 10-fold decrease in the target H. vitripennis actin mRNA level was seen in cells. Altered phenotypic effects also were evident in transfected cells, as were small interfering RNAs, hallmarks of RNAi. The use of H. vitripennis cells and RNAi offers new opportunities to research hemipterans, the most important insect vectors of plant pathogens. PMID:20628496

  11. Manipulating the in vivo immune response by targeted gene knockdown.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Judy

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers, nucleic acids selected for high affinity binding to proteins, can be used to activate or antagonize immune mediators or receptors in a location and cell-type specific manner and to enhance antigen presentation. They can also be linked to other molecules (other aptamers, siRNAs or miRNAs, proteins, toxins) to produce multifunctional compounds for targeted immune modulation in vivo. Aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiCs) that induce efficient cell-specific knockdown in immune cells in vitro and in vivo can be used as an immunological research tool or potentially as an immunomodulating therapeutic.

  12. Persistent RNA virus infection of lepidopteran cell lines: Interactions with the RNAi machinery.

    PubMed

    Swevers, Luc; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Kolovou, Marianna; Zografidis, Aris; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Santos, Dulce; Wynant, Niels; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Wang, Luoluo; Cappelle, Kaat; Smagghe, Guy

    RNAi is broadly used as a technique for specific gene silencing in insects but few studies have investigated the factors that can affect its efficiency. Viral infections have the potential to interfere with RNAi through their production of viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) and the production of viral small RNAs that can saturate and inactivate the RNAi machinery. In this study, the impact of persistent infection of the RNA viruses Flock house virus (FHV) and Macula-like virus (MLV) on RNAi efficiency was investigated in selected lepidopteran cell lines. Lepidopteran cell lines were found to be readily infected by both viruses without any apparent pathogenic effects, with the exception of Bombyx-derived Bm5 and BmN4 cells, which could not be infected by FHV. Because Sf21 cells were free from both FHV and MLV and Hi5-SF were free from FHV and only contained low levels of MLV, they were tested to evaluate the impact of the presence of the virus. Two types of RNAi reporter assays however did not detect a significant interference with gene silencing in infected Sf21 and Hi5-SF cells when compared to virus-free cells. In Hi5 cells, the presence of FHV could be easily cleared through the expression of an RNA hairpin that targets its VSR gene, confirming that the RNAi mechanism was not inhibited. Sequencing indicated that the B2 RNAi inhibitor gene of FHV and a putative VSR gene from MLV were intact in persistently infected cell lines, indicating that protection against RNAi remains essential for virus survival. It is proposed that infection levels of persistent viruses in the cell lines are too low to have an impact on RNAi efficiency in the lepidopteran cell lines and that encoded VSRs act locally at the sites of viral replication (mitochondrial membranes) without affecting the rest of the cytoplasm.

  13. Endogenous RNAi and adaptation to environment in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Grishok, Alla

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of short RNAs to the control of repetitive elements are well documented in animals and plants. Here, the role of endogenous RNAi and AF10 homolog ZFP-1 in the adaptation of C. elegans to the environment is discussed. First, modulation of insulin signaling through regulation of transcription of the PDK-1 kinase (Mansisidor et al., PLoS Genetics, 2011) is reviewed. Second, an siRNA-based natural selection model is proposed in which variation in endogenous siRNA pools between individuals is subject to natural selection similarly to DNA-based genetic variation. The value of C. elegans for the research of siRNA-based epigenetic variation and adaptation is highlighted. PMID:24058837

  14. RITS- connecting transcription, RNAi and heterochromatin assembly in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Creamer, Kevin M.; Partridge, Janet F.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years a bevy of evidence has been unearthed indicating that ‘silent’ heterochromatin is not as transcriptionally inert as once thought. In the unicellular yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, processing of transcripts derived from centromeric repeats into homologous small interfering RNA (siRNA) is essential for the formation of centromeric heterochromatin. Deletion of genes required for siRNA biogenesis revealed that core components of the canonical RNAi pathway are essential for centromeric heterochromatin assembly as well as for centromere function. Subsequent purification of the RITS (RNA-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing) complex provided the critical link between siRNAs and heterochromatin assembly, with RITS acting as a physical bridge between non-coding RNA scaffolds and chromatin. Here, we review current understanding of how RITS promotes heterochromatin formation and how it participates in transcription coupled silencing. PMID:21823226

  15. RNAi in Arthropods: Insight into the Machinery and Applications for Understanding the Pathogen-Vector Interface

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Annette-Christi; Nijhof, Ard M.; Fick, Wilma; Stutzer, Christian; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The availability of genome sequencing data in combination with knowledge of expressed genes via transcriptome and proteome data has greatly advanced our understanding of arthropod vectors of disease. Not only have we gained insight into vector biology, but also into their respective vector-pathogen interactions. By combining the strengths of postgenomic databases and reverse genetic approaches such as RNAi, the numbers of available drug and vaccine targets, as well as number of transgenes for subsequent transgenic or paratransgenic approaches, have expanded. These are now paving the way for in-field control strategies of vectors and their pathogens. Basic scientific questions, such as understanding the basic components of the vector RNAi machinery, is vital, as this allows for the transfer of basic RNAi machinery components into RNAi-deficient vectors, thereby expanding the genetic toolbox of these RNAi-deficient vectors and pathogens. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge of arthropod vector RNAi machinery and the impact of RNAi on understanding vector biology and vector-pathogen interactions for which vector genomic data is available on VectorBase. PMID:24705082

  16. Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics to the Airways-From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yingshan; Lam, Jenny K W; Leung, Susan W S; Liang, Wanling

    2016-09-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a potent and specific post-transcriptional gene silencing process. Since its discovery, tremendous efforts have been made to translate RNAi technology into therapeutic applications for the treatment of different human diseases including respiratory diseases, by manipulating the expression of disease-associated gene(s). Similar to other nucleic acid-based therapeutics, the major hurdle of RNAi therapy is delivery. Pulmonary delivery is a promising approach of delivering RNAi therapeutics directly to the airways for treating local conditions and minimizing systemic side effects. It is a non-invasive route of administration that is generally well accepted by patients. However, pulmonary drug delivery is a challenge as the lungs pose a series of anatomical, physiological and immunological barriers to drug delivery. Understanding these barriers is essential for the development an effective RNA delivery system. In this review, the different barriers to pulmonary drug delivery are introduced. The potential of RNAi molecules as new class of therapeutics, and the latest preclinical and clinical studies of using RNAi therapeutics in different respiratory conditions are discussed in details. We hope this review can provide some useful insights for moving inhaled RNAi therapeutics from bench to bedside.

  17. Potential and development of inhaled RNAi therapeutics for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Man, Dede K W; Chow, Michael Y T; Casettari, Luca; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Lam, Jenny K W

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), continues to pose a serious threat to public health, and the situation is worsening with the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. Current TB regimens require long duration of treatment, and their toxic side effects often lead to poor adherence and low success rates. There is an urgent need for shorter and more effective treatment for TB. In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful tool for studying gene function by silencing the target genes. The survival of Mtb in host macrophages involves the attenuation of the antimicrobial responses mounted by the host cells. RNAi technology has helped to improve our understanding of how these bacilli interferes with the bactericidal effect and host immunity during TB infection. It has been suggested that the host-directed intervention by modulation of host pathways can be employed as a novel and effective therapy against TB. This therapeutic approach could be achieved by RNAi, which holds enormous potential beyond a laboratory to the clinic. RNAi therapy targeting TB is being investigated for enhancing host antibacterial capacity or improving drug efficacy on drug resistance strains while minimizing the associated adverse effects. One of the key challenges of RNAi therapeutics arises from the delivery of the RNAi molecules into the target cells, and inhalation could serve as a direct administration route for the treatment of pulmonary TB in a non-invasive manner. However, there are still major obstacles that need to be overcome. This review focuses on the RNAi candidates that are currently explored for the treatment of TB and discusses the major barriers of pulmonary RNAi delivery. From this, we hope to stimulate further studies of local RNAi therapeutics for pulmonary TB treatment.

  18. Diet-delivered RNAi in Helicoverpa armigera--Progresses and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lim, Zhi Xian; Robinson, Karl E; Jain, Ritesh G; Chandra, G Sharath; Asokan, R; Asgari, Sassan; Mitter, Neena

    2016-02-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (the cotton bollworm) is a significant agricultural pest endemic to Afro-Eurasia and Oceania. Gene suppression via RNA interference (RNAi) presents a potential avenue for management of the pest, which is highly resistant to traditional insecticide sprays. This article reviews current understanding on the fate of ingested double-stranded RNA in H. armigera. Existing in vivo studies on diet-delivered RNAi and their effects are summarized and followed by a discussion on the factors and hurdles affecting the efficacy of diet-delivered RNAi in H. armigera.

  19. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors.

  20. The RNAi machinery controls distinct responses to environmental signals in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    DOE PAGES

    Nicolas, Francisco E.; Vila, Ana; Moxon, Simon; ...

    2015-03-25

    Here, RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved mechanism of genome defence that can also have a role in the regulation of endogenous functions through endogenous small RNAs (esRNAs). In fungi, knowledge of the functions regulated by esRNAs has been hampered by lack of clear phenotypes in most mutants affected in the RNAi machinery. Mutants of Mucor circinelloides affected in RNAi genes show defects in physiological and developmental processes, thus making Mucor an outstanding fungal model for studying endogenous functions regulated by RNAi. Some classes of Mucor esRNAs map to exons (ex-siRNAs) and regulate expression of the genes from which theymore » derive. To have a broad picture of genes regulated by the silencing machinery during vegetative growth, we have sequenced and compared the mRNA profiles of mutants in the main RNAi genes by using RNA-seq. In addition, we have achieved a more complete phenotypic characterization of silencing mutants Deletion of any main RNAi gene provoked a deep impact in mRNA accumulation at exponential and stationary growth. Genes showing increased mRNA levels, as expected for direct ex-siRNAs targets, but also genes with decreased expression were detected, suggesting that, most probably, the initial ex-siRNA targets regulate the expression of other genes, which can be up- or down-regulated. Expression of 50% of the genes was dependent on more than one RNAi gene in agreement with the existence of several classes of ex-siRNAs produced by different combinations of RNAi proteins. These combinations of proteins have also been involved in the regulation of different cellular processes. Besides genes regulated by the canonical RNAi pathway, this analysis identified processes, such as growth at low pH and sexual interaction that are regulated by a dicer-independent non-canonical RNAi pathway. In conclusion, this work shows that the RNAi pathways play a relevant role in the regulation of a significant number of endogenous genes in M

  1. Axon Regeneration Genes Identified by RNAi Screening in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Paola; Hammarlund, Marc; Hauth, Linda; Lachnit, Martina; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian CNS lose the ability to regenerate soon after development due to both an inhibitory CNS environment and the loss of cell-intrinsic factors necessary for regeneration. The complex molecular events required for robust regeneration of mature neurons are not fully understood, particularly in vivo. To identify genes affecting axon regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, we performed both an RNAi-based screen for defective motor axon regeneration in unc-70/β-spectrin mutants and a candidate gene screen. From these screens, we identified at least 50 conserved genes with growth-promoting or growth-inhibiting functions. Through our analysis of mutants, we shed new light on certain aspects of regeneration, including the role of β-spectrin and membrane dynamics, the antagonistic activity of MAP kinase signaling pathways, and the role of stress in promoting axon regeneration. Many gene candidates had not previously been associated with axon regeneration and implicate new pathways of interest for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24403161

  2. [Inhibiting GDF-8 expression by retrovirus-based RNAi stably].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaowu; Yang, Zhuo; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Changmei

    2008-02-01

    We cloned human U6 promoter from pAVU6 + 27 vector into pXSN to transcripe small RNA. Meanwhile, a shRNA targeting GDF-8 was cloned down-stream of the hU6 promoter to construct recombinant vector. Then the packing cell GP-293 was co-transfected the recombinant with pVSV-G to gernarate virus particle. Resistant C2C12 cell pools were screened using G418. Levels of mRNA and protein of GDF-8 were tested by Real-Time PCR and western blotting. Cell proliferation and cell cycle were analyzed using MTT and FACS. The expression of GDF-8 was dramatically decreased by the retrovirus-based system in C2C12 cells. Cells proliferated effectively after integrating the recombinant. The cells in G0/G1 phase decreased by 13.7%, while cells in S phase increased by 14.9%. In conclusion, the retrovirus-based RNAi could be used to stably silence GDF-8. It can be a powerful tool in curing muscle atrophy.

  3. Genome-Wide RNAi Screens in C. elegans to Identify Genes Influencing Lifespan and Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly effective tool used to inhibit gene function. In C. elegans, whole genome screens have been used to identify genes involved with numerous traits including aging and innate immunity. RNAi in C. elegans can be carried out via feeding, soaking, or injection. Here we outline protocols used to maintain, grow, and carry out RNAi via feeding in C. elegans and determine whether the inhibited genes are essential for lifespan or innate immunity.

  4. The insect ecdysone receptor is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests.

  5. Vitellogenin RNAi halts ovarian growth and diverts reproductive proteins and lipids in young grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Derek R; Veleta, Katherine A; Canzano, Joseph; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2014-11-01

    Reduced reproduction extends lifespan of females in many animals. To test the effects of reproduction on storage of macronutrients, we block reproductive output in the lubber grasshopper by injecting RNAi against the precursor to egg-yolk protein, vitellogenin, in early adulthood. Controls were injected with either buffer or RNAi against the major storage protein in the hemolymph, hexamerin-90. Vitellogenin RNAi greatly reduced both levels of mRNA for vitellogenin and ovarian growth, in comparison to both controls. Fat body mass was increased upon vitellogenin RNAi, but concentrations of the three hexameric storage proteins from the hemolymph were not. Surprisingly, hemolymph vitellogenin levels were increased upon vitellogenin RNAi. Total reproductive protein (hemolymph vitellogenin plus ovarian vitellin) was unchanged by vitellogenin RNAi, as reproductive protein was diverted to the hemolymph. Similarly, the increased lipid storage upon vitellogenin RNAi was largely attributable to the reduction in lipid in the ovary, due to decreased ovarian growth. A BLAST search revealed that the 515 bp sequence of vitellogenin used for RNAi had three 11 bp regions identical to the vitellogenin receptor of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. This suggests that our treatment, in addition to reducing levels of vitellogenin transcript, may have also blocked transport of vitellogenin from the hemolymph to the ovary. This would be consistent with halted ovarian growth simultaneous with high levels of vitellogenin in the hemolymph. Nonetheless, the accumulation of vitellogenin, instead of hexameric storage proteins, is inconsistent with a simple model of the trade-off between reproduction and storage. This was observed in young females; future studies will address whether investment of proteins may shift to the soma as individuals age. Overall, our results suggest that blockage of reproduction in young grasshoppers redirects lipids to storage and reproductive proteins to the hemolymph.

  6. The status of RNAi-based transgenic research in plant nematology

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Tushar K.; Banakar, Prakash; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    With the understanding of nematode-plant interactions at the molecular level, new avenues for engineering resistance have opened up, with RNA interference being one of them. Induction of RNAi by delivering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been very successful in the model non-parasitic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, while in plant nematodes, dsRNA delivery has been accomplished by soaking nematodes with dsRNA solution mixed with synthetic neurostimulants. The success of in vitro RNAi of target genes has inspired the use of in planta delivery of dsRNA to feeding nematodes. The most convincing success of host-delivered RNAi has been achieved against root-knot nematodes. Plant-mediated RNAi has been shown to lead to the specific down-regulation of target genes in invading nematodes, which had a profound effect on nematode development. RNAi-based transgenics are advantageous as they do not produce any functional foreign proteins and target organisms in a sequence-specific manner. Although the development of RNAi-based transgenics against plant nematodes is still in the preliminary stage, they offer novel management strategy for the future. PMID:25628609

  7. RNAi and antiviral defense in Drosophila: setting up a systemic immune response.

    PubMed

    Karlikow, Margot; Goic, Bertsy; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) controls gene expression in eukaryotic cells and thus, cellular homeostasis. In addition, in plants, nematodes and arthropods it is a central antiviral effector mechanism. Antiviral RNAi has been well described as a cell autonomous response, which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules. This dsRNA is the precursor for the silencing of viral RNA in a sequence-specific manner. In plants, systemic antiviral immunity has been demonstrated, however much less is known in animals. Recently, some evidence for a systemic antiviral response in arthropods has come to light. Cell autonomous RNAi may not be sufficient to reach an efficient antiviral response, and the organism might rely on the spread and uptake of an RNAi signal of unknown origin. In this review, we offer a perspective on how RNAi-mediated antiviral immunity could confer systemic protection in insects and we propose directions for future research to understand the mechanism of RNAi-immune signal sorting, spreading and amplification.

  8. RNAi--a tool for target finding in new drug development.

    PubMed

    Gomase, Virendra S; Tagore, Somnath

    2008-03-01

    RNAi (RNA interference) refers to the introduction of homologous double stranded RNA (dsRNA) to specifically target a gene's product, resulting in null or hypomorphic phenotypes. Long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs; typically >200 nt) can be used to silence the expression of target genes in a variety of organisms and cell types (e.g., worms, fruit flies, and plants). The long dsRNAs enter a cellular pathway that is commonly referred to as the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. RNAi is being considered as an important tool not only for functional genomics, but also for gene-specific therapeutic activities that target the mRNAs of disease-related genes. RNAi plays a very important role in endogenous cellular processes, such as heterochromatin formation, developmental control and serves as an antiviral defense mechanism. RNAi has shown great potential for use as a tool for target finding in new drug development, molecular biological discovery, analysis and therapeutics. RNAi pathway is involved in post-transcription silencing, transcriptional silencing and epigenetic silencing as well as its use as a tool for forward genetics and therapeutics.

  9. Phosphodiesterase-4D Knock-down in the Prefrontal Cortex Alleviates Chronic Unpredictable Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors and Memory Deficits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Yang, Wei-Xing; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Nan; Zhang, You-Zhi; Liu, Yan-Qin; Xu, Ying; Wilson, Steven P.; O'Donnell, James M.; Zhang, Han-Ting; Li, Yun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) has four isoforms (PDE4A-D) with at least 25 splice variants. PDE4 subtype nonselective inhibitors produce potent antidepressant-like and cognition-enhancing effects via increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in the brain. Our previous data have demonstrated that long-form PDE4Ds appear to be involved in these pharmacological properties of PDE4 inhibitors in the normal animals. However, it is not clear whether long-form PDE4Ds are critical for the behaviors and related cellular signaling/neuronal plasticity/neuroendocrine alterations in the depressed animals. In the present study, animals exposed to the chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), a rodent model of depression, exhibited elevated corticosterone, depressive-like behavior, memory deficits, accompanied with decreased cAMP-PKA-CREB and cAMP-ERK1/2-CREB signaling and neuroplasticity. These alterations induced by CUS were reversed by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated prefrontal cortex long-form PDE4Ds (especially PDE4D4 and PDE4D5) knock-down, similar to the effects of the PDE4 subtype nonselective inhibitor rolipram. Furthermore, these effects of RNAi were not enhanced by rolipram. These data indicate a predominant role of long-form PDE4Ds in the pharmacotherapies of PDE4 inhibitors for depression and concomitant memory deficits. Long-form PDE4Ds, especially PDE4D4 and PDE4D5, appear to be the promising targets for the development of antidepressants with high therapeutic indices. PMID:26161529

  10. Knockdown of Leptin A Expression Dramatically Alters Zebrafish Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Dalman, Mark; Chen, Yun; Akhter, Mashal; Brahmandam, Sravya; Patel, Yesha; Lowe, Josef; Thakkar, Mitesh; Gregory, Akil-Vuai; Phelps, Daryllanae; Riley, Caitlin; Londraville, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Using morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO) technology, we blocked leptin A or leptin receptor expression in embryonic zebrafish, and analyzed consequences of leptin knock-down on fish development. Embryos injected with leptin A or leptin receptor MOs (leptin A or leptin receptor morphants) had smaller bodies and eyes, undeveloped inner ear, enlarged pericardial cavity, curved body and/or tail and larger yolk compared to control embryos of the same stages. The defects persisted in 6-9 day old larvae. We found that blocking leptin A function had little effect on the development of early brain (1 day old), but differentiation of both the morphant dorsal brain and retinal cells was severely disrupted in older (2 day old) embryos. Despite the enlarged pericardial cavity, differentiation of cardiac cells appeared to be similar to control embryos. Formation of the morphants’ inner ear is also severely disrupted, which corroborates existing reports of leptin receptor expression in inner ear of both zebrafish and mammals. Co-injection of leptin A MO and recombinant leptin results in partial rescue of the wild-type phenotype. Our results suggest that leptin A plays distinct roles in zebrafish development. PMID:22841760

  11. RNAi induced hepatotoxicity results from loss of the first synthesized isoform of miR-122 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Valdmanis, Paul N.; Gu, Shuo; Chu, Kirk; Jin, Lan; Zhang, Feijie; Munding, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Yue; Huang, Yong; Kutay, Huban; Ghoshal, Kalpana; Lisowski, Leszek; Kay, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs can be used to target and eliminate expression of virtually any disease causing gene or infectious virus, resulting in their pre-clinical and clinical development for treating disease1. To ensure success of RNAi therapeutics, small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) must co-opt sufficient quantities of endogenous microRNA machinery to elicit efficient gene knockdown without impeding normal cellular function. We previously observed liver toxicity including hepatocyte turnover, loss of gene repression and lethality2 in mice receiving high doses of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing shRNAs; however the mechanism by which toxicity ensues has not been elucidated. Using rAAV-shRNAs, we have now determined that hepatotoxicity arises when exogenous shRNAs exceed 12% of liver microRNAs. Once this threshold was surpassed, shRNAs specifically reduced the initial synthesized 22-nucleotide isoform of miR-122-5p without substantially affecting other microRNAs resulting in functional de-repression of miR-122 target mRNAs. Delivery of an rAAV-shRNA vector expressing miR-122 could circumvent toxicity despite accounting for 70% of microRNAs. Toxicity was also not observed in miR-122 knockout mice regardless of the level or sequence of shRNA. Our study establishes limits to the microRNA machinery available for therapeutic siRNAs and suggests new paradigms for the role of miR-122 in liver homeostasis in mice. PMID:27064447

  12. Comparison of RNAi sequences in insect-resistant plants to expressed sequences of a beneficial lady beetle: a closer look at RNAi off-target considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequences obtained from transcriptomes of the lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata were compared to those designed for incorporation into crops. Searches of the transcriptomes identified sequences as the most likely to be closely similar to the sequences described in RNAi plant incorporated products. S...

  13. Colorectal polyp model established by transplacental BMP4 RNAi

    PubMed Central

    JIN, XIN; CHEN, ZHONGMEI; XIANG, LI; LUO, QING; GUO, ZHENGHUA; DING, XIONGHUI; JIN, XIANQING

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that disruption of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway is an important cause of intestinal cancer in human and animal models. Thus, the purpose of this study was to construct a Balb/C model of colorectal polyps. Pregnant mice at 9.5 days gestation were injected via the tail vein with the pSES-Si BMP4 plasmid bearing a fluorochrome (DsRed) reporter, in order to silence the BMP4 gene in the first generation (F1); this group of mice was named the pSES-BMP4 group Intestinal fluorescence was detected at 1-, 4- and 8-week-old F1 mice, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western-blotting assays were used to determine changes in the expression of BMP4. A dissecting microscope and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were used to observe the cell morphology and appearance of the polyps. DsRed fluorescence was observed in the intestines of 1-week-old F1 mice of the pSES-BMP4 group. BMP4 expression at the mRNA and protein level was reduced in 1-, 4- and 8-week-old F1 mice (P<0.05). However, the level of Smad4 mRNA was only reduced in 8-week-old F1 mice (P<0.05). Multiple hyperplasic polyps emerged in the colon and rectum of the intestines of 4-week-old F1 mice in the pSES-BMP4 group. The size of colorectal polyps increased at 8 weeks, when vessels and polyp pedicles became apparent. In conclusion, silencing of the BMP4 gene using transplacental RNAi injection can induce formation of colorectal polyps in mice. PMID:24806485

  14. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; MacKenzie, R J; Eide, C A; Davare, M A; Watanabe-Smith, K; Tognon, C E; Mongoue-Tchokote, S; Park, B; Braziel, R M; Tyner, J W; Druker, B J

    2015-06-04

    To understand the role of cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis, we designed a functional RNA interference (RNAi) screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen, we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for a JAK3(A572V) mutation-positive acute myeloid leukemia cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3(A572V), as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3-activating mutations such as JAK3(M511I). In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant, but not wild-type JAK3, increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall, we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia. In addition, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth.

  15. Systemic Correction of Murine Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV by an AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Zhang, Quan; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Yang, Chunyu; Thurberg, Beth L; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-11-10

    Deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) causes glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV), which is characterized by the accumulation of a less branched, poorly soluble form of glycogen called polyglucosan (PG) in multiple tissues. This study evaluates the efficacy of gene therapy with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector in a mouse model of adult form of GSD IV (Gbe1(ys/ys)). An AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) vector containing a human GBE expression cassette (AAV-GBE) was intravenously injected into 14-day-old Gbe1(ys/ys) mice at a dose of 5 × 10(11) vector genomes per mouse. Mice were euthanized at 3 and 9 months of age. In the AAV-treated mice at 3 months of age, GBE enzyme activity was highly elevated in heart, which is consistent with the high copy number of the viral vector genome detected. GBE activity also increased significantly in skeletal muscles and the brain, but not in the liver. The glycogen content was reduced to wild-type levels in muscles and significantly reduced in the liver and brain. At 9 months of age, though GBE activity was only significantly elevated in the heart, glycogen levels were significantly reduced in the liver, brain, and skeletal muscles of the AAV-treated mice. In addition, the AAV treatment resulted in an overall decrease in plasma activities of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and creatine kinase, and a significant increase in fasting plasma glucose concentration at 9 months of age. This suggests an alleviation of damage and improvement of function in the liver and muscles by the AAV treatment. This study demonstrated a long-term benefit of a systemic injection of an AAV-GBE vector in Gbe1(ys/ys) mice.

  16. AAV-mediated cone rescue in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3-achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ji-jing; Deng, Wen-Tao; Dai, Xufeng; Lei, Bo; Everhart, Drew; Umino, Yumiko; Li, Jie; Zhang, Keqing; Mao, Song; Boye, Sanford L; Liu, Li; Chiodo, Vince A; Liu, Xuan; Shi, Wei; Tao, Ye; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

    2012-01-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which shows color blindness, severely impaired visual acuity, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. Mutations in the alpha subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGA3) are responsible for about 1/4 of achromatopsia in the U.S. and Europe. Here, we test whether gene replacement therapy using an AAV5 vector could restore cone-mediated function and arrest cone degeneration in the cpfl5 mouse, a naturally occurring mouse model of achromatopsia with a CNGA3 mutation. We show that gene therapy leads to significant rescue of cone-mediated ERGs, normal visual acuities and contrast sensitivities. Normal expression and outer segment localization of both M- and S-opsins were maintained in treated retinas. The therapeutic effect of treatment lasted for at least 5 months post-injection. This study is the first demonstration of substantial, relatively long-term restoration of cone-mediated light responsiveness and visual behavior in a naturally occurring mouse model of CNGA3 achromatopsia. The results provide the foundation for development of an AAV5-based gene therapy trial for human CNGA3 achromatopsia.

  17. Evaluation of AAV-mediated Gene Therapy for Central Nervous System Disease in Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    PubMed

    Gurda, Brittney L; De Guilhem De Lataillade, Adrien; Bell, Peter; Zhu, Yanqing; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Ping; Bagel, Jessica; Vite, Charles H; Sikora, Tracey; Hinderer, Christian; Calcedo, Roberto; Yox, Alexander D; Steet, Richard A; Ruane, Therese; O'Donnell, Patricia; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M; Casal, Margret; Ponder, Katherine P; Haskins, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease arising from mutations in β-d-glucuronidase (GUSB), which results in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation and a variety of clinical manifestations including neurological disease. Herein, MPS VII dogs were injected intravenously (i.v.) and/or intrathecally (i.t.) via the cisterna magna with AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors carrying the canine GUSB cDNA. Although i.v. injection alone at 3 days of age resulted in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) GUSB activity, brain tissue homogenates had only ~1 to 6% normal GUSB activity and continued to have elevated GAG storage. In contrast, i.t. injection at 3 weeks of age resulted in CSF GUSB activity 44-fold normal while brain tissue homogenates had >100% normal GUSB activity and reduced GAGs compared with untreated dogs. Markers for secondary storage and inflammation were eliminated in i.t.-treated dogs and reduced in i.v.-treated dogs compared with untreated dogs. Given that i.t.-treated dogs expressed higher levels of GUSB in the CNS tissues compared to those treated i.v., we conclude that i.t. injection of AAV9 or AAVrh10 vectors is more effective than i.v. injection alone in the large animal model of MPS VII.

  18. AAV-mediated delivery of optogenetic constructs to the macaque brain triggers humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Skyler D; El-Shamayleh, Yasmine; Horwitz, Gregory D

    2017-02-15

    Gene delivery to the primate central nervous system via recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) allows neurophysiologists to control and observe neural activity precisely. A current limitation of this approach is variability in vector transduction efficiency. Low levels of transduction can foil experimental manipulations, prompting vector readministration. The ability to make multiple vector injections into the same animal, even in cases where successful vector transduction has already been achieved, is also desirable. However, vector readministration has consequences for humoral immunity and gene delivery that depend on vector dosage and route of administration in complex ways. As part of optogenetic experiments in rhesus monkeys, we analyzed blood sera collected before and after AAV injections into the brain and quantified neutralizing antibodies to AAV using an in vitro assay. We found that injections of AAV1 and AAV9 vectors elevated neutralizing antibody titers consistently. These immune responses were specific to the serotype injected and were long lasting. These results demonstrate that optogenetic manipulations in monkeys trigger immune responses to AAV capsids, suggesting that vector readministration may have a higher likelihood of success by avoiding serotypes injected previously.

  19. Evaluation of lateral spread of transgene expression following subretinal AAV-mediated gene delivery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bruewer, Ashlee R; Mowat, Freya M; Bartoe, Joshua T; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Dog models with spontaneously occurring mutations in retinal dystrophy genes are an invaluable resource for preclinical development of retinal gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been most successful; to target the outer retina and RPE they are delivered by subretinal injection, causing a temporary retinal detachment with some potential for retinal morbidity. A recent reporter gene study using an AAV2/8 vector in dogs reported transgene expression beyond the boundary of the subretinal bleb. This could be a desirable feature which increases the area of retina treated while minimizing the retinal detachment and any associated morbidity. We performed a detailed study of the lateral spread of transgene expression beyond the subretinal injection site following subretinally delivered AAV vectors in normal dogs. Vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) using a small chicken beta-actin promoter. AAV2/2 (quadruple tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant), self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 (single Y-F capsid mutant) and a scAAV2/5 were used. We found that in all eyes GFP expression involved retina beyond the initial post-injection subretinal bleb boundary. In all eyes there was post-injection spread of the retinal detachment within the first 3 days post procedure and prior to retinal reattachment. In 11/16 eyes this accounted for the entire "lateral spread" of GFP expression while in 5/16 eyes a very slight extension of GFP expression beyond the final boundary of the subretinal bleb could be detected. All 3 AAV constructs induced GFP expression in the nerve fiber layer with spread to the optic nerve. Patients treated by subretinal injection should be monitored for possible expansion of the subretinal injection bleb prior to reattachment. Injections in the para-foveal region may expand to lead to a foveal detachment that may be undesirable. Cell-specific promoters may be required to limit spread of expressed transgene to the brain with these AAV serotypes.

  20. Long-term Amelioration of Feline Mucopolysaccharidosis VI After AAV-mediated Liver Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Cotugno, Gabriella; Annunziata, Patrizia; Tessitore, Alessandra; O'Malley, Thomas; Capalbo, Anita; Faella, Armida; Bartolomeo, Rosa; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Russo, Fabio; Sleeper, Meg M; Knox, Van W; Fernandez, Steven; Levanduski, Leah; Hopwood, John; De Leonibus, Elvira; Haskins, Mark; Auricchio, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is caused by deficient arylsulfatase B (ARSB) activity resulting in lysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). MPS VI is characterized by dysostosis multiplex, organomegaly, corneal clouding, and heart valve thickening. Gene transfer to a factory organ like liver may provide a lifetime source of secreted ARSB. We show that intravascular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) 2/8-TBG-felineARSB in MPS VI cats resulted in ARSB expression up to 1 year, the last time point of the study. In newborn cats, normal circulating ARSB activity was achieved following delivery of high vector doses (6 × 1013 genome copies (gc)/kg) whereas delivery of AAV2/8 vector doses as low as 2 × 1012 gc/kg resulted in higher than normal serum ARSB levels in juvenile MPS VI cats. In MPS VI cats showing high serum ARSB levels, independent of the age at treatment, we observed: (i) clearance of GAG storage, (ii) improvement of long bone length, (iii) reduction of heart valve thickness, and (iv) improvement in spontaneous mobility. Thus, AAV2/ 8-mediated liver gene transfer represents a promising therapeutic strategy for MPS VI patients. PMID:21119624

  1. The treatment of hemophilia A: from protein replacement to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Youjin, Shen; Jun, Yin

    2009-03-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is an essential component in blood coagulation, a deficiency of which causes the serious bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Recently, with the development of purification level and recombinant techniques, protein replacement treatment to hemophiliacs is relatively safe and can prolong their life expectancy. However, because of the possibility of unknown contaminants in plasma-derived FVIII and recombinant FVIII, and high cost for hemophiliacs to use these products, gene therapy for hemophilia A is an attractive alternative to protein replacement therapy. Thus far, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy. Further improvement of the virus for clinical application depends on better understanding of the molecular structure and fate of the vector genome. It is likely that hemophilia will be the first genetic disease to be cured by somatic cell gene therapy.

  2. AAV-mediated Gene Therapy Halts Retinal Degeneration in PDE6β-deficient Dogs.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Virginie; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Hulin, Philippe; Tshilenge, Kizito-Tshitoko; Biget, Marine; Ameline, Baptiste; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that subretinal injection of AAV2/5 RK.cpde6β allowed long-term preservation of photoreceptor function and vision in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency. The present study builds on these earlier findings to provide a detailed assessment of the long-term effects of gene therapy on the spatiotemporal pattern of retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs treated at 20 days of age. We analyzed the density distribution of the retinal layers and of particular photoreceptor cells in 3.5-year-old treated and untreated rcd1 dogs. Whereas no rods were observed outside the bleb or in untreated eyes, gene transfer halted rod degeneration in all vector-exposed regions. Moreover, while gene therapy resulted in the preservation of cones, glial cells and both the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers, no cells remained in vector-unexposed retinas, except in the visual streak. Finally, the retinal structure of treated 3.5-year-old rcd1 dogs was identical to that of unaffected 4-month-old rcd1 dogs, indicating near complete preservation. Our findings indicate that gene therapy arrests the degenerative process even if intervention is initiated after the onset of photoreceptor degeneration, and point to significant potential of this therapeutic approach in future clinical trials.

  3. Mitigation of cerebellar neuropathy in globoid cell leukodystrophy mice by AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Lee, Allan Yueh-Luen; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Hsu, Jui-Cheng; Huang, Zon-Darr; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Ming-Fu

    2015-10-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The absence of GALC activity leads to the accumulation of the toxic substance psychosine and the preferential loss of myelinating cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Profound demyelination, astrogliosis and axonopathy are the hallmarks of the pathogenesis of GLD, and cerebellar ataxia is one of the dominant manifestations in adolescents and adults affected with GLD. To date, studies regarding cerebellar degeneration in GLD are limited. In this study, the efficacy of cerebellum-targeted gene therapy on the cerebellar neuropathology in twitcher mice (a murine model of GLD) has been validated. We observed degeneration of Purkinje cells, Bergmann glia, and granule cells in addition to astrocytosis and demyelination in the cerebellum of the twitcher mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dark cell degeneration and disintegration of the cellular composition of Purkinje cells in untreated twitcher mice. In addition, the expressions of neurotrophic factors CNTF, GDNF and IGF-I were up-regulated and the expression of BDNF was down-regulated. Intracerebellar-mediated gene therapy efficiently corrected enzymatic deficiency by direct transduction to Purkinje cells and cross-correction in other cell types in the cerebellum, leading to the amelioration of both neuroinflammation and demyelination. The population, dendritic territory, and axonal processes of Purkinje cells remained normal in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, where radial fibers of Bergmann glia spanned the molecular layer and collateral branches ensheathed the dendritic processes of Purkinje cells. Moreover, the aberrant expressions of neurotrophic factors were mitigated in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, indicating the preservation of cellular function in addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture. The life span of the treated twitcher mice was significantly prolonged and their neurobehavioral performance was improved. Taken together, our findings underscore the complexity of cerebellar neurodegeneration in GLD and highlight the potential effectiveness of gene therapy in mitigating neuropathological deficits in GLD and other neurodegenerative disorders in which Purkinje cells are involved.

  4. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  5. Feasibility, limitation and possible solutions of RNAi-based technology for insect pest control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Hai-Chao; Miao, Xue-Xia

    2013-02-01

    Numerous studies indicate that target gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) could lead to insect death. This phenomenon has been considered as a potential strategy for insect pest control, and it is termed RNAi-mediated crop protection. However, there are many limitations using RNAi-based technology for pest control, with the effectiveness target gene selection and reliable double-strand RNA (dsRNA) delivery being two of the major challenges. With respect to target gene selection, at present, the use of homologous genes and genome-scale high-throughput screening are the main strategies adopted by researchers. Once the target gene is identified, dsRNA can be delivered by micro-injection or by feeding as a dietary component. However, micro-injection, which is the most common method, can only be used in laboratory experiments. Expression of dsRNAs directed against insect genes in transgenic plants and spraying dsRNA reagents have been shown to induce RNAi effects on target insects. Hence, RNAi-mediated crop protection has been considered as a potential new-generation technology for pest control, or as a complementary method of existing pest control strategies; however, further development to improve the efficacy of protection and range of species affected is necessary. In this review, we have summarized current research on RNAi-based technology for pest insect management. Current progress has proven that RNAi technology has the potential to be a tool for designing a new generation of insect control measures. To accelerate its practical application in crop protection, further study on dsRNA uptake mechanisms based on the knowledge of insect physiology and biochemistry is needed.

  6. Evidence of RNAi in humans from systemically administered siRNA via targeted nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mark E.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Choi, Chung Hang J.; Seligson, David; Tolcher, Anthony; Alabi, Christopher A.; Yen, Yun; Heidel, Jeremy D.; Ribas, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutics that are designed to engage RNA interference (RNAi) pathways have the potential to provide new, major ways of imparting therapy to patients.1,2 Fire et al. first demonstrated that long, double stranded RNAs mediate RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans,3 and Elbashir et al. opened the pathway to the use of RNAi for human therapy by showing that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs: ca. 21 base pair double stranded RNA) can elicit RNAi in mammalian cells without producing an interferon response.4 We are currently conducting the first-in-human Phase I clinical trial involving the systemic administration of siRNA to patients with solid cancers using a targeted, nanoparticle delivery system. Here we provide evidence of inducing an RNAi mechanism of action in a human from the delivered siRNA. Tumor biopsies from melanoma patients obtained after treatment reveal: (i) the presence of intracellularly-localized nanoparticles in amounts that correlate with dose levels of the nanoparticles administered (this is a first for systemically delivered nanoparticles of any kind), and (ii) reduction in both the specific mRNA (M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RRM2)) and the protein (RRM2) when compared to pre-dosing tissue. Most importantly, we detect the presence of an mRNA fragment that demonstrates siRNA mediated mRNA cleavage occurs specifically at the site predicted for an RNAi mechanism from a patient who received the highest dose of the nanoparticles. These data when taken in total demonstrate that siRNA administered systemically to a human can produce a specific gene inhibition (reduction in mRNA and protein) by an RNAi mechanism of action. PMID:20305636

  7. An experimental approach to evaluate the impact of impaired transport function on hepatobiliary drug disposition using Mrp2-deficient TR- rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in combination with Bcrp knockdown.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyunghee; Pfeifer, Nathan D; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Yue, Wei; Stewart, Paul W; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2014-03-03

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes that mediate biliary excretion of many drugs and endogenous compounds. BCRP and MRP2 have overlapping substrate profiles. Predicting drug disposition in the setting of altered transport function has important clinical significance. This investigation was designed to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate the impact of impaired Mrp2 and Bcrp function on hepatobiliary drug disposition. To achieve Bcrp knockdown by RNA interference (RNAi), sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) from Mrp2-deficient (TR(-)) and wild-type (WT) rats were infected with adenoviral vectors to express shRNA targeting Bcrp (Ad-siBcrp) at multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1-10. MOI of 5 was identified as optimal. At MOI of 5, viral infection as well as WT or TR(-) status was statistically significant predictors of the rosuvastatin (RSV) biliary excretion index (BEI), consistent with the known role of Bcrp and Mrp2 in the biliary excretion of RSV in vivo in rats. Relative to WT rat SCH, marginal mean BEI (%) of RSV in TR(-) rat SCH decreased by 28.6 (95% CI: 5.8-51.3). Ad-siBcrp decreased marginal mean BEI (%) of RSV by 13.3 (7.5-9.1) relative to SCH infected with adenoviral vectors expressing a nontargeting shRNA (Ad-siNT). The BEI of RSV was almost ablated in TR(-) rat SCH with Bcrp knockdown (5.9 ± 3.0%) compared to Ad-siNT-infected WT rat SCH (45.4 ± 6.6%). These results demonstrated the feasibility of Bcrp knockdown in TR(-) rat SCH as an in vitro system to assess the impact of impaired Bcrp and Mrp2 function. At MOI of 5, viral infection had minimal effects on RSV total accumulation, but significantly decreased marginal mean taurocholate total accumulation (pmol/mg of protein) and BEI (%) by 9.9 (7.0-12.8) and 7.5 (3.7-11.3), respectively, relative to noninfected SCH. These

  8. Dissecting Systemic RNA Interference in the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum: Parameters Affecting the Efficiency of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sherry C.; Miyata, Keita; Brown, Susan J.; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNAi, in which the introduction of dsRNA into a cell triggers the destruction of the corresponding mRNA resulting in a gene silencing effect, is conserved across a wide array of plant and animal phyla. However, the mechanism by which the dsRNA enters a cell, allowing the RNAi effect to occur throughout a multicellular organism (systemic RNAi), has only been studied extensively in certain plants and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In recent years, RNAi has become a popular reverse genetic technique for gene silencing in many organisms. Although many RNAi techniques in non-traditional model organisms rely on the systemic nature of RNAi, little has been done to analyze the parameters required to obtain a robust systemic RNAi response. The data provided here show that the concentration and length of dsRNA have profound effects on the efficacy of the RNAi response both in regard to initial efficiency and duration of the effect in Tribolium castaneum. In addition, our analyses using a series of short dsRNAs and chimeric dsRNA provide evidence that dsRNA cellular uptake (and not the RNAi response itself) is the major step affected by dsRNA size in Tribolium. We also demonstrate that competitive inhibition of dsRNA can occur when multiple dsRNAs are injected together, influencing the effectiveness of RNAi. These data provide specific information essential to the design and implementation of RNAi based studies, and may provide insight into the molecular basis of the systemic RNAi response in insects. PMID:23133513

  9. Effects of PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASE (PAL) knockdown on cell wall composition, biomass digestibility, and biotic and abiotic stress responses in Brachypodium

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Peraldi, Antoine; Dowd, Patrick F.; Mottiar, Yaseen; Santoro, Nicholas; Karlen, Steven D.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Foster, Cliff E.; Thrower, Nick; Bruno, Laura C.; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Johnson, Eric T.; Willhoit, Megan E.; Phutane, Megha; Ralph, John; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Nicholson, Paul; Sedbrook, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway in plants synthesizes a variety of structural and defence compounds, and is an important target in efforts to reduce cell wall lignin for improved biomass conversion to biofuels. Little is known concerning the trade-offs in grasses when perturbing the function of the first gene family in the pathway, PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASE (PAL). Therefore, PAL isoforms in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon were targeted, by RNA interference (RNAi), and large reductions (up to 85%) in stem tissue transcript abundance for two of the eight putative BdPAL genes were identified. The cell walls of stems of BdPAL-knockdown plants had reductions of 43% in lignin and 57% in cell wall-bound ferulate, and a nearly 2-fold increase in the amounts of polysaccharide-derived carbohydrates released by thermochemical and hydrolytic enzymic partial digestion. PAL-knockdown plants exhibited delayed development and reduced root growth, along with increased susceptibilities to the fungal pathogens Fusarium culmorum and Magnaporthe oryzae. Surprisingly, these plants generally had wild-type (WT) resistances to caterpillar herbivory, drought, and ultraviolet light. RNA sequencing analyses revealed that the expression of genes associated with stress responses including ethylene biosynthesis and signalling were significantly altered in PAL knocked-down plants under non-challenging conditions. These data reveal that, although an attenuation of the phenylpropanoid pathway increases carbohydrate availability for biofuel, it can adversely affect plant growth and disease resistance to fungal pathogens. The data identify notable differences between the stress responses of these monocot pal mutants versus Arabidopsis (a dicot) pal mutants and provide insights into the challenges that may arise when deploying phenylpropanoid pathway-altered bioenergy crops. PMID:26093023

  10. Effects of PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASE (PAL) knockdown on cell wall composition, biomass digestibility, and biotic and abiotic stress responses in Brachypodium

    DOE PAGES

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Peraldi, Antoine; Dowd, Patrick F.; ...

    2015-06-19

    The phenylpropanoid pathway in plants synthesizes a variety of structural and defence compounds, and is an important target in efforts to reduce cell wall lignin for improved biomass conversion to biofuels. Little is known concerning the trade-offs in grasses when perturbing the function of the first gene family in the pathway, PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASE (PAL). Therefore, PAL isoforms in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon were targeted, by RNA interference (RNAi), and large reductions (up to 85%) in stem tissue transcript abundance for two of the eight putative BdPAL genes were identified. The cell walls of stems of BdPAL-knockdown plants hadmore » reductions of 43% in lignin and 57% in cell wall-bound ferulate, and a nearly 2-fold increase in the amounts of polysaccharide-derived carbohydrates released by thermochemical and hydrolytic enzymic partial digestion. PAL-knockdown plants exhibited delayed development and reduced root growth, along with increased susceptibilities to the fungal pathogens Fusarium culmorum and Magnaporthe oryzae. Surprisingly, these plants generally had wild-type (WT) resistances to caterpillar herbivory, drought, and ultraviolet light. RNA sequencing analyses revealed that the expression of genes associated with stress responses including ethylene biosynthesis and signalling were significantly altered in PAL knocked-down plants under non-challenging conditions. These data reveal that, although an attenuation of the phenylpropanoid pathway increases carbohydrate availability for biofuel, it can adversely affect plant growth and disease resistance to fungal pathogens. Lastly, the data identify notable differences between the stress responses of these monocot pal mutants versus Arabidopsis (a dicot) pal mutants and provide insights into the challenges that may arise when deploying phenylpropanoid pathway-altered bioenergy crops.« less

  11. The SID-1 double-stranded RNA transporter is not required for systemic RNAi in the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Wang, Xianhui; Yu, Dan; Kang, Le

    2012-05-01

    Systemic RNAi, the spreading of RNAi effects to cells and tissues that have not initially encountered a dsRNA trigger, is a common phenomenon in many organisms. However, the underlying mechanisms of systemic RNAi remain largely unknown. Here, we studied the characteristics and possible mechanisms of systemic RNAi in Locusta migratoria. We observed that the locust has pronounced sensitive systemic RNAi in response to dsRNA injection for both broadly-expressed as well as tissue-specific genes. Only a 30 pg (dsRNA / mg tissues) dose could induce significant systemic RNAi effects. Only one SID-1 ortholog (LmSID-1) was identified in the locust genome, which exhibited a progressively increasing expression pattern with development and its expression was enriched in the gonad. To test the role of LmSID-1 in systemic RNAi, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results from in vivo experiments showed that silencing of LmSID-1 gene dose not influence RNAi effects of other genes. The results from in vitro experiments confirmed that the expression of the LmSID-1 protein in Drosophila S2 cells could not enhance dsRNA uptake. Thus, these findings imply the existence of alternative mechanisms underlying insect systemic RNAi, which may be different from Caenorhabditis elegans or mammals.

  12. [Expression analysis of a transformer gene in Daphnia pulex after RNAi].

    PubMed

    Guo, C Y; Chen, P; Zhang, M M; Ning, J J; Wang, С L; Wang, D L; Zhao, Y L

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the importance of the transformer (tra) gene in reproductive mode switching in Daphnia pulex, we studied the effect of silencing of this gene using RNA interference (RNAi). We obtained Dptra dsRNA by constructing and using a dsRNA expression vector and transcription method in vitro. D. pulex individuals in different reproductive modes were treated by soaking in a solution of Dptra dsRNA. We then assayed the expression of the endogenous Dptra mRNA after RNAi treatment using RT-PCR and obtained the suppression ratio. Expression of the tra gene in the RNAi groups was down-regulated compared with the controls after 16 h (p < 0.05). We also analyzed the effect of RNAi on the expression of the TRA protein using Western blot, which showed that the expression level of the TRA protein was reduced after RNAi treatment. Our experimental results showed that soaking of D. pulex adults in tra-specific dsRNA transcribed in vitro can specifically reduce the level of tra mRNA and also reduce the expression of the TRA protein, demonstrating effective in vivo silencing of the tra gene.

  13. Recent advances in RNAi-based strategies for therapy and prevention of HIV-1/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Manjunath N; Wu, Haoquan; Shankar, Premlata

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful tool to silence specific gene expression and has been widely used to suppress host factors such as CCR5 and/or viral genes involved in HIV-1 replication. Newer nuclease-based gene-editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, also provide powerful tools to ablate specific genes. Because of differences in co-receptor usage and the high mutability of the HIV-1 genome, a combination of host factors and viral genes needs to be suppressed for effective prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Whereas the continued presence of small interfering/short hairpin RNA (si/shRNA) mediators is needed for RNAi to be effective, the continued expression of nucleases in the gene-editing systems is undesirable. Thus, RNAi provides the only practical way for expression of multiple silencers in infected and uninfected cells, which is needed for effective prevention/treatment of infection. There have been several advances in the RNAi field in terms of si/shRNA design, targeted delivery to HIV-1 susceptible cells, and testing for efficacy in preclinical humanized mouse models. Here, we comprehensively review the latest advances in RNAi technology towards prevention and treatment of HIV-1.

  14. The Transgenic RNAi Project at Harvard Medical School: Resources and Validation.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Lizabeth A; Holderbaum, Laura; Tao, Rong; Hu, Yanhui; Sopko, Richelle; McCall, Kim; Yang-Zhou, Donghui; Flockhart, Ian; Binari, Richard; Shim, Hye-Seok; Miller, Audrey; Housden, Amy; Foos, Marianna; Randkelv, Sakara; Kelley, Colleen; Namgyal, Pema; Villalta, Christians; Liu, Lu-Ping; Jiang, Xia; Huan-Huan, Qiao; Wang, Xia; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ayers, Kathleen; Blum, Allison; Czech, Benjamin; Neumuller, Ralph; Yan, Dong; Cavallaro, Amanda; Hibbard, Karen; Hall, Don; Cooley, Lynn; Hannon, Gregory J; Lehmann, Ruth; Parks, Annette; Mohr, Stephanie E; Ueda, Ryu; Kondo, Shu; Ni, Jian-Quan; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-11-01

    To facilitate large-scale functional studies in Drosophila, the Drosophila Transgenic RNAi Project (TRiP) at Harvard Medical School (HMS) was established along with several goals: developing efficient vectors for RNAi that work in all tissues, generating a genome-scale collection of RNAi stocks with input from the community, distributing the lines as they are generated through existing stock centers, validating as many lines as possible using RT-qPCR and phenotypic analyses, and developing tools and web resources for identifying RNAi lines and retrieving existing information on their quality. With these goals in mind, here we describe in detail the various tools we developed and the status of the collection, which is currently composed of 11,491 lines and covering 71% of Drosophila genes. Data on the characterization of the lines either by RT-qPCR or phenotype is available on a dedicated website, the RNAi Stock Validation and Phenotypes Project (RSVP, http://www.flyrnai.org/RSVP.html), and stocks are available from three stock centers, the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center (United States), National Institute of Genetics (Japan), and TsingHua Fly Center (China).

  15. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  16. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia. PMID:24860163

  17. High-Throughput Construction of Intron-Containing Hairpin RNA Vectors for RNAi in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pu; Shen, Wentao; Gao, XinZheng; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng; Duan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    With the wide use of double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi) for the analysis of gene function in plants, a high-throughput system for making hairpin RNA (hpRNA) constructs is in great demand. Here, we describe a novel restriction-ligation approach that provides a simple but efficient construction of intron-containing hpRNA (ihpRNA) vectors. The system takes advantage of the type IIs restriction enzyme BsaI and our new plant RNAi vector pRNAi-GG based on the Golden Gate (GG) cloning. This method requires only a single PCR product of the gene of interest flanked with BsaI recognition sequence, which can then be cloned into pRNAi-GG at both sense and antisense orientations simultaneously to form ihpRNA construct. The process, completed in one tube with one restriction-ligation step, produced a recombinant ihpRNA with high efficiency and zero background. We demonstrate the utility of the ihpRNA constructs generated with pRNAi-GG vector for the effective silencing of various individual endogenous and exogenous marker genes as well as two genes simultaneously. This method provides a novel and high-throughput platform for large-scale analysis of plant functional genomics. PMID:22675447

  18. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-06-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia.

  19. The Transgenic RNAi Project at Harvard Medical School: Resources and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Holderbaum, Laura; Tao, Rong; Hu, Yanhui; Sopko, Richelle; McCall, Kim; Yang-Zhou, Donghui; Flockhart, Ian; Binari, Richard; Shim, Hye-Seok; Miller, Audrey; Housden, Amy; Foos, Marianna; Randkelv, Sakara; Kelley, Colleen; Namgyal, Pema; Villalta, Christians; Liu, Lu-Ping; Jiang, Xia; Huan-Huan, Qiao; Wang, Xia; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ayers, Kathleen; Blum, Allison; Czech, Benjamin; Neumuller, Ralph; Yan, Dong; Cavallaro, Amanda; Hibbard, Karen; Hall, Don; Cooley, Lynn; Hannon, Gregory J.; Lehmann, Ruth; Parks, Annette; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Ueda, Ryu; Kondo, Shu; Ni, Jian-Quan; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate large-scale functional studies in Drosophila, the Drosophila Transgenic RNAi Project (TRiP) at Harvard Medical School (HMS) was established along with several goals: developing efficient vectors for RNAi that work in all tissues, generating a genome-scale collection of RNAi stocks with input from the community, distributing the lines as they are generated through existing stock centers, validating as many lines as possible using RT–qPCR and phenotypic analyses, and developing tools and web resources for identifying RNAi lines and retrieving existing information on their quality. With these goals in mind, here we describe in detail the various tools we developed and the status of the collection, which is currently composed of 11,491 lines and covering 71% of Drosophila genes. Data on the characterization of the lines either by RT–qPCR or phenotype is available on a dedicated website, the RNAi Stock Validation and Phenotypes Project (RSVP, http://www.flyrnai.org/RSVP.html), and stocks are available from three stock centers, the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center (United States), National Institute of Genetics (Japan), and TsingHua Fly Center (China). PMID:26320097

  20. Biosafety considerations of RNAi-mediated virus resistance in fruit-tree cultivars and in rootstock.

    PubMed

    Lemgo, Godwin Nana Yaw; Sabbadini, Silvia; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Mezzetti, Bruno

    2013-12-01

    A major application of RNA interference (RNAi) is envisaged for the production of virus-resistant transgenic plants. For fruit trees, this remains the most, if not the only, viable option for the control of plant viral disease outbreaks in cultivated orchards, due to the difficulties associated with the use of traditional and conventional disease-control measures. The use of RNAi might provide an additional benefit for woody crops if silenced rootstock can efficiently transmit the silencing signal to non-transformed scions, as has already been demonstrated in herbaceous plants. This would provide a great opportunity to produce non-transgenic fruit from transgenic rootstock. In this review, we scrutinise some of the concerns that might arise with the use of RNAi for engineering virus-resistant plants, and we speculate that this virus resistance has fewer biosafety concerns. This is mainly because RNAi-eliciting constructs only express small RNA molecules rather than proteins, and because this technology can be applied using plant rootstock that can confer virus resistance to the scion, leaving the scion untransformed. We discuss the main biosafety concerns related to the release of new types of virus-resistant plants and the risk assessment approaches in the application of existing regulatory systems (in particular, those of the European Union, the USA, and Canada) for the evaluation and approval of RNAi-mediated virus-resistant plants, either as transgenic varieties or as plant virus resistance induced by transgenic rootstock.

  1. Effects on RNAi of the tight structure, sequence and position of the targeted region

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinari, Koichi; Miyagishi, Makoto; Taira, Kazunari

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene-silencing phenomenon that involves the double-stranded RNA-mediated cleavage of mRNA, and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can cause RNAi in mammalian cells. There have been many attempts to clarify the mechanism of RNAi, but information about the relationship between the sequence and structure, in particular, a tight structure, of the target RNA and the activities of siRNAs are limited. In the present study, we examined this relationship by introducing the TAR element, which adopts a very stable secondary structure, at different positions within target RNAs. Our results suggested that the activities of siRNAs were affected by the tight stem–loop structure of TAR. In contrast, the position of the target within the mRNA, the binding of the Tat protein to the TAR, and the location of the target within a translated or a noncoding region had only marginal effects on RNAi. When the target sequence was placed in two different orientations, only one orientation had a significant effect on the activities of siRNA, demonstrating that the presence of certain nucleotides at some specific positions was favorable for RNAi. Systematic analysis of 47 different sites within 47 plasmids under identical conditions indicated that it is the target sequence itself, rather than its location, that is the major determinant of siRNA activity. PMID:14762201

  2. The intron in centromeric noncoding RNA facilitates RNAi-mediated formation of heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mutazono, Masatoshi; Morita, Misato; Tsukahara, Chihiro; Chinen, Madoka; Nishioka, Shiori; Yumikake, Tatsuhiro; Dohke, Kohei; Sakamoto, Misuzu; Ideue, Takashi; Nakayama, Jun-ichi; Ishii, Kojiro

    2017-01-01

    In fission yeast, the formation of centromeric heterochromatin is induced through the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway. Some pre-mRNA splicing mutants (prp) exhibit defective formation of centromeric heterochromatin, suggesting that splicing factors play roles in the formation of heterochromatin, or alternatively that the defect is caused by impaired splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding RNAi factors. Herein, we demonstrate that the splicing factor spPrp16p is enriched at the centromere, and associates with Cid12p (a factor in the RNAi pathway) and the intron-containing dg ncRNA. Interestingly, removal of the dg intron, mutations of its splice sites, or replacement of the dg intron with an euchromatic intron significantly decreased H3K9 dimethylation. We also revealed that splicing of dg ncRNA is repressed in cells and its repression depends on the distance from the transcription start site to the intron. Inefficient splicing was also observed in other intron-containing centromeric ncRNAs, dh and antisense dg, and splicing of antisense dg ncRNA was repressed in the presence of the RNAi factors. Our results suggest that the introns retained in centromeric ncRNAs work as facilitators, co-operating with splicing factors assembled on the intron and serving as a platform for the recruitment of RNAi factors, in the formation of centromeric heterochromatin. PMID:28231281

  3. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21-24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed.

  4. The intron in centromeric noncoding RNA facilitates RNAi-mediated formation of heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Mutazono, Masatoshi; Morita, Misato; Tsukahara, Chihiro; Chinen, Madoka; Nishioka, Shiori; Yumikake, Tatsuhiro; Dohke, Kohei; Sakamoto, Misuzu; Ideue, Takashi; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Ishii, Kojiro; Tani, Tokio

    2017-02-01

    In fission yeast, the formation of centromeric heterochromatin is induced through the RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway. Some pre-mRNA splicing mutants (prp) exhibit defective formation of centromeric heterochromatin, suggesting that splicing factors play roles in the formation of heterochromatin, or alternatively that the defect is caused by impaired splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding RNAi factors. Herein, we demonstrate that the splicing factor spPrp16p is enriched at the centromere, and associates with Cid12p (a factor in the RNAi pathway) and the intron-containing dg ncRNA. Interestingly, removal of the dg intron, mutations of its splice sites, or replacement of the dg intron with an euchromatic intron significantly decreased H3K9 dimethylation. We also revealed that splicing of dg ncRNA is repressed in cells and its repression depends on the distance from the transcription start site to the intron. Inefficient splicing was also observed in other intron-containing centromeric ncRNAs, dh and antisense dg, and splicing of antisense dg ncRNA was repressed in the presence of the RNAi factors. Our results suggest that the introns retained in centromeric ncRNAs work as facilitators, co-operating with splicing factors assembled on the intron and serving as a platform for the recruitment of RNAi factors, in the formation of centromeric heterochromatin.

  5. Intelligent Interfaces for Mining Large-Scale RNAi-HCS Image Databases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Mak, Wayne; Hong, Pengyu; Sepp, Katharine; Perrimon, Norbert

    2007-11-05

    Recently, High-content screening (HCS) has been combined with RNA interference (RNAi) to become an essential image-based high-throughput method for studying genes and biological networks through RNAi-induced cellular phenotype analyses. However, a genome-wide RNAi-HCS screen typically generates tens of thousands of images, most of which remain uncategorized due to the inadequacies of existing HCS image analysis tools. Until now, it still requires highly trained scientists to browse a prohibitively large RNAi-HCS image database and produce only a handful of qualitative results regarding cellular morphological phenotypes. For this reason we have developed intelligent interfaces to facilitate the application of the HCS technology in biomedical research. Our new interfaces empower biologists with computational power not only to effectively and efficiently explore large-scale RNAi-HCS image databases, but also to apply their knowledge and experience to interactive mining of cellular phenotypes using Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) with Relevance Feedback (RF) techniques.

  6. Stc1: A Critical Link between RNAi and Chromatin Modification Required for Heterochromatin Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, Elizabeth H.; White, Sharon A.; Kagansky, Alexander; Bijos, Dominika A.; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Ponting, Chris P.; Rappsilber, Juri; Allshire, Robin C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In fission yeast, RNAi directs heterochromatin formation at centromeres, telomeres, and the mating type locus. Noncoding RNAs transcribed from repeat elements generate siRNAs that are incorporated into the Argonaute-containing RITS complex and direct it to nascent homologous transcripts. This leads to recruitment of the CLRC complex, including the histone methyltransferase Clr4, promoting H3K9 methylation and heterochromatin formation. A key question is what mediates the recruitment of Clr4/CLRC to transcript-bound RITS. We have identified a LIM domain protein, Stc1, that is required for centromeric heterochromatin integrity. Our analyses show that Stc1 is specifically required to establish H3K9 methylation via RNAi, and interacts both with the RNAi effector Ago1, and with the chromatin-modifying CLRC complex. Moreover, tethering Stc1 to a euchromatic locus is sufficient to induce silencing and heterochromatin formation independently of RNAi. We conclude that Stc1 associates with RITS on centromeric transcripts and recruits CLRC, thereby coupling RNAi to chromatin modification. PMID:20211136

  7. Intelligent Interfaces for Mining Large-Scale RNAi-HCS Image Databases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Mak, Wayne; Hong, Pengyu; Sepp, Katharine; Perrimon, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Recently, High-content screening (HCS) has been combined with RNA interference (RNAi) to become an essential image-based high-throughput method for studying genes and biological networks through RNAi-induced cellular phenotype analyses. However, a genome-wide RNAi-HCS screen typically generates tens of thousands of images, most of which remain uncategorized due to the inadequacies of existing HCS image analysis tools. Until now, it still requires highly trained scientists to browse a prohibitively large RNAi-HCS image database and produce only a handful of qualitative results regarding cellular morphological phenotypes. For this reason we have developed intelligent interfaces to facilitate the application of the HCS technology in biomedical research. Our new interfaces empower biologists with computational power not only to effectively and efficiently explore large-scale RNAi-HCS image databases, but also to apply their knowledge and experience to interactive mining of cellular phenotypes using Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) with Relevance Feedback (RF) techniques. PMID:21278820

  8. Biosafety research for non-target organism risk assessment of RNAi-based GE plants

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Andrew F.; Devos, Yann; Lemgo, Godwin N. Y.; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference, or RNAi, refers to a set of biological processes that make use of conserved cellular machinery to silence genes. Although there are several variations in the source and mechanism, they are all triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) which is processed by a protein complex into small, single stranded RNA, referred to as small interfering RNAs (siRNA) with complementarity to sequences in genes targeted for silencing. The use of the RNAi mechanism to develop new traits in plants has fueled a discussion about the environmental safety of the technology for these applications, and this was the subject of a symposium session at the 13th ISBGMO in Cape Town, South Africa. This paper continues that discussion by proposing research areas that may be beneficial for future environmental risk assessments of RNAi-based genetically modified plants, with a particular focus on non-target organism assessment. PMID:26594220

  9. Vitellogenin-RNAi and ovariectomy each increase lifespan, increase protein storage, and decrease feeding, but are not additive in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tetlak, Alicia G; Burnett, Jacob B; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2015-12-01

    Reduced reproduction has been shown to increase lifespan in many animals, yet the mechanisms behind this trade-off are unclear. We addressed this question by combining two distinct, direct means of life-extension via reduced reproduction, to test whether they were additive. In the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera, ovariectomized (OVX) individuals had a ~20% increase in lifespan and a doubling of storage relative to controls (Sham operated). Similarly, young female grasshoppers treated with RNAi against vitellogenin (the precursor to egg yolk protein) had increased fat body mass and halted ovarian growth. In this study, we compared VgRNAi to two control groups that do not reduce reproduction, namely buffer injection (Buffer) and injection with RNAi against a hexameric storage protein (Hex90RNAi). Each injection treatment was tested with and without ovariectomy. Hence, we tested feeding, storage, and lifespans in six groups: OVX and Buffer, OVX and Hex90RNAi, OVX and VgRNAi, Sham and Buffer, Sham and Hex90RNAi, and Sham and VgRNAi. Ovariectomized grasshoppers and VgRNAi grasshoppers each had similar reductions in feeding (~40%), increases in protein storage in the hemolymph (150-300%), and extensions in lifespan (13-21%). Ovariectomized grasshoppers had higher vitellogenin protein levels than did VgRNAi grasshoppers. Last but not least, when ovariectomy and VgRNAi were applied together, there was no greater effect on feeding, protein storage, or longevity. Hence, feeding regulation, and protein storage in insects, may be conserved components of life-extension via reduced reproduction.

  10. Targeted Knockdown of RNA-Binding Protein TIAR for Promoting Self-Renewal and Attenuating Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhe; Li, Ping; Tan, Li; Song, Houyan

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding protein TIAR has been suggested to mediate the translational silencing of ARE-containing mRNAs. To analyze the functions of TIAR, we established RNAi and genetic rescue assays. We evaluated the expression of neuroectoderm markers Pax6 and nestin, mesoderm markers brachyury and Flk1, and hypoblast and definitive endoderm markers Sox17 and Gata6 during EB differentiation and found that knockdown TIAR expression restrained the differentiation of E14 cells. We assessed gene expression levels of Flk-1 and VE-cadherin and observed attenuated differentiation of E14 cells into endothelial cells upon downregulation of TIAR gene expression. As such, we hypothesized an essential role of TIAR related to EB differentiation. As TIAR inhibits the translation of c-myc, we proposed that downregulation of TIAR results in restrained differentiation of E14 cells, due in part to the function of c-myc. We found that TIAR inhibited c-myc expression at the translational level in E14 cells; accordingly, a reduction of TIAR expression promoted self-renewal of pluripotent cells and attenuated differentiation. Additionally, we established that TIAR inhibited TIA-1 expression at the translational level in E14 cells. Taken together, we have contributed to the understanding of the regulatory relationships between TIAR and both c-myc and TIA-1.

  11. Persistence and transgenerational effect of plant-mediated RNAi in aphids.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A D; Wouters, R H M; Mugford, S T; Hogenhout, S A

    2015-02-01

    Plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) has been successfully used as a tool to study gene function in aphids. The persistence and transgenerational effects of plant-mediated RNAi in the green peach aphid (GPA) Myzus persicae were investigated, with a focus on three genes with different functions in the aphid. Rack1 is a key component of various cellular processes inside aphids, while candidate effector genes MpC002 and MpPIntO2 (Mp2) modulate aphid-plant interactions. The gene sequences and functions did not affect RNAi-mediated down-regulation and persistence levels in the aphids. Maximal reduction of gene expression was ~70% and this was achieved at between 4 d and 8 d of exposure of the aphids to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, gene expression levels returned to wild-type levels within ~6 d after removal of the aphids from the transgenic plants, indicating that a continuous supply of dsRNA is required to maintain the RNAi effect. Target genes were also down-regulated in nymphs born from mothers exposed to dsRNA-producing transgenic plants, and the RNAi effect lasted twice as long (12-14 d) in these nymphs. Investigations of the impact of RNAi over three generations of aphids revealed that aphids reared on dsMpC002 transgenic plants experienced a 60% decline in aphid reproduction levels compared with a 40% decline of aphids reared on dsRack1 and dsMpPIntO2 plants. In a field setting, a reduction of the aphid reproduction by 40-60% would dramatically decrease aphid population growth, contributing to a substantial reduction in agricultural losses.

  12. Establishing RNAi in a Non-Model Organism: The Antarctic Nematode Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Anna C.; Wharton, David A.; Thorne, Michael A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 is one of the only organisms known to survive extensive intracellular freezing throughout its tissues. Although the physiological mechanisms of this extreme adaptation are partly understood, the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. RNAi is a method that allows the examination of gene function in a direct, targeted manner, by knocking out specific mRNAs and revealing the effects on the phenotype. In this study we have explored the viability of RNAi in Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1. In the first trial, nematodes were fed E. coli expressing Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 dsRNA of the embryonic lethal genes rps-2 and dhc, and the blister gene duox. Pd-rps-2(RNAi)-treated nematodes showed a significant decrease in larval hatching. However, qPCR showed no significant decrease in the amount of rps-2 mRNA in Pd-rps-2(RNAi)-treated animals. Several soaking protocols for dsRNA uptake were investigated using the fluorescent dye FITC. Desiccation-enhanced soaking showed the strongest uptake of FITC and resulted in a significant and consistent decrease of mRNA levels of two of the four tested genes (rps-2 and tps-2a), suggesting effective uptake of dsRNA-containing solution by the nematode. These findings suggest that RNAi by desiccation-enhanced soaking is viable in Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1 and provide the first functional genomic approach to investigate freezing tolerance in this non-model organism. RNAi, in conjunction with qPCR, can be used to screen for candidate genes involved in intracellular freezing tolerance in Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1. PMID:27832164

  13. RNAiFold2T: Constraint Programming design of thermo-IRES switches

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Dotu, Ivan; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion; Clote, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA thermometers (RNATs) are cis-regulatory elements that change secondary structure upon temperature shift. Often involved in the regulation of heat shock, cold shock and virulence genes, RNATs constitute an interesting potential resource in synthetic biology, where engineered RNATs could prove to be useful tools in biosensors and conditional gene regulation. Results: Solving the 2-temperature inverse folding problem is critical for RNAT engineering. Here we introduce RNAiFold2T, the first Constraint Programming (CP) and Large Neighborhood Search (LNS) algorithms to solve this problem. Benchmarking tests of RNAiFold2T against existent programs (adaptive walk and genetic algorithm) inverse folding show that our software generates two orders of magnitude more solutions, thus allowing ample exploration of the space of solutions. Subsequently, solutions can be prioritized by computing various measures, including probability of target structure in the ensemble, melting temperature, etc. Using this strategy, we rationally designed two thermosensor internal ribosome entry site (thermo-IRES) elements, whose normalized cap-independent translation efficiency is approximately 50% greater at 42 °C than 30 °C, when tested in reticulocyte lysates. Translation efficiency is lower than that of the wild-type IRES element, which on the other hand is fully resistant to temperature shift-up. This appears to be the first purely computational design of functional RNA thermoswitches, and certainly the first purely computational design of functional thermo-IRES elements. Availability: RNAiFold2T is publicly available as part of the new release RNAiFold3.0 at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAiFold and http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold, which latter has a web server as well. The software is written in C ++ and uses OR-Tools CP search engine. Contact: clote@bc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  14. Next-generation transgenic cotton: pyramiding RNAi and Bt counters insect resistance.

    PubMed

    Ni, Mi; Ma, Wei; Wang, Xiaofang; Gao, Meijing; Dai, Yan; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lei; Peng, Yonggang; Chen, Shuyuan; Ding, Lingyun; Tian, Yue; Li, Jie; Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Guowang; Guo, Wangzhen; Yang, Yihua; Wu, Yidong; Heuberger, Shannon; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Zhang, Tianzhen; Zhu, Zhen

    2017-02-15

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are extensively cultivated worldwide. To counter rapidly increasing pest resistance to crops that produce single Bt toxins, transgenic plant 'pyramids' producing two or more Bt toxins that kill the same pest have been widely adopted. However, cross-resistance and antagonism between Bt toxins limit the sustainability of this approach. Here we describe development and testing of the first pyramids of cotton combining protection from a Bt toxin and RNA interference (RNAi). We developed two types of transgenic cotton plants producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from the global lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera designed to interfere with its metabolism of juvenile hormone (JH). We focused on suppression of JH acid methyltransferase (JHAMT), which is crucial for JH synthesis, and JH-binding protein (JHBP), which transports JH to organs. In 2015 and 2016, we tested larvae from a Bt-resistant strain and a related susceptible strain of H. armigera on seven types of cotton: two controls, Bt cotton, two types of RNAi cotton (targeting JHAMT or JHBP) and two pyramids (Bt cotton plus each type of RNAi). Both types of RNAi cotton were effective against Bt-resistant insects. Bt cotton and RNAi acted independently against the susceptible strain. In computer simulations of conditions in northern China, where millions of farmers grow Bt cotton as well as abundant non-transgenic host plants of H. armigera, pyramided cotton combining a Bt toxin and RNAi substantially delayed resistance relative to using Bt cotton alone.

  15. Current progress in the development of RNAi-based therapeutics for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Rossi, J J

    2011-12-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) treatment for HIV has changed the course of AIDS in societies in which the drugs are readily available. Despite the great success of HAART, drug resistance and toxicity issues still remain a concern for some individuals. Thus, a number of investigators have been exploring other approaches for inhibiting HIV-1 replication. One of the most potent of these is the use of RNA interference (RNAi). This review will focus solely on the use of RNAi for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, including the problems, progress and future prospects.

  16. RNAi silencing of P/Q-type calcium channels in Purkinje neurons of adult mouse leads to episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Julie; Bertaso, Federica; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Metz, Alexandra; Lemmers, Céline; Ango, Fabrice; Fagni, Laurent; Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Episodic ataxia type-2 (EA2) is a dominantly inherited human neurological disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the CaV2.1 subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. It remains however unknown whether the deficit of cerebellar CaV2.1 in adult is in direct link with the disease. To address this issue, we have used lentiviral based-vector RNA interference (RNAi) to knock-down CaV2.1 expression in the cerebellum of adult mice. We show that suppression of the P/Q-type channels in Purkinje neurons induced motor abnormalities, such as imbalance and ataxic gait. Interestingly, moderate channel suppression caused no basal ataxia, while β-adrenergic activation and exercise mimicked stress induced motor disorders. Moreover, stress-induced ataxia was stable, non-progressive and totally abolished by acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used to treat EA2. Altogether, these data reveal that P/Q-type channel suppression in adult mice supports the episodic status of EA2 disease.

  17. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-Degrading RNaseIII Enzymes of Viruses in Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Matilainen, Olli; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Cuellar, Wilmer J.; Lu, Rui; Saarma, Mart; Holmberg, Carina I.; Jäntti, Jussi; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2015-01-01

    Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV) infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant) and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA) molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA)—mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3) produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are homologous in

  18. Multiple shRNA expressions in a single plasmid vector improve RNAi against the XPA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Akihiro; Zhao, Xia; Takegami, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Matsui, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2008-05-30

    To improve the efficiency of stable knockdown with short hairpin RNA (shRNA), we inserted multiple shRNA expression sequences into a single plasmid vector. In this study, the DNA repair factor XPA was selected as a target gene since it is not essential for cell viability and it is easy to check the functional knockdown of this gene. The efficiency of knockdown was compared among single and triple expression vectors. The single shRNA-expressing vector caused limited knockdown of the target protein in stable transfectants, however, the multiple expression vectors apparently increased the frequency of knockdown transfectants. There were correlations between the knockdown level and marker expression in multiple-expressing transfectants, whereas poorer correlations were observed in single vector transfectants. Multiple-transfectants exhibited reduced efficiency of repair of UV-induced DNA damage and an increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light-irradiation. We propose that multiple shRNA expression vectors might be a useful strategy for establishing knockdown cells.

  19. Effective heritable gene knockdown in zebrafish using synthetic microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Giacomotto, Jean; Rinkwitz, Silke; Becker, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Although zebrafish is used to model human diseases through mutational and morpholino-based knockdown approaches, there are currently no robust transgenic knockdown tools. Here we investigate the knockdown efficiency of three synthetic miRNA-expressing backbones and show that these constructs can downregulate a sensor transgene with different degrees of potency. Using this approach, we reproduce spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in zebrafish by targeting the smn1 gene. We also generate different transgenic lines, with severity and age of onset correlated to the level of smn1 inhibition, recapitulating for the first time the different forms of SMA in zebrafish. These lines are proof-of-concept that miRNA-based approaches can be used to generate potent heritable gene knockdown in zebrafish. PMID:26051838

  20. RNAi Efficiency, Systemic Properties, and Novel Delivery Methods for Pest Insect Control: What We Know So Far

    PubMed Central

    Joga, Mallikarjuna R.; Zotti, Moises J.; Smagghe, Guy; Christiaens, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the research on the potential of using RNA interference (RNAi) to suppress crop pests has made an outstanding growth. However, given the variability of RNAi efficiency that is observed in many insects, the development of novel approaches toward insect pest management using RNAi requires first to unravel factors behind the efficiency of dsRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this review, we explore essential implications and possibilities to increase RNAi efficiency by delivery of dsRNA through non-transformative methods. We discuss factors influencing the RNAi mechanism in insects and systemic properties of dsRNA. Finally, novel strategies to deliver dsRNA are discussed, including delivery by symbionts, plant viruses, trunk injections, root soaking, and transplastomic plants. PMID:27909411

  1. RNAi Efficiency, Systemic Properties, and Novel Delivery Methods for Pest Insect Control: What We Know So Far.

    PubMed

    Joga, Mallikarjuna R; Zotti, Moises J; Smagghe, Guy; Christiaens, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the research on the potential of using RNA interference (RNAi) to suppress crop pests has made an outstanding growth. However, given the variability of RNAi efficiency that is observed in many insects, the development of novel approaches toward insect pest management using RNAi requires first to unravel factors behind the efficiency of dsRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this review, we explore essential implications and possibilities to increase RNAi efficiency by delivery of dsRNA through non-transformative methods. We discuss factors influencing the RNAi mechanism in insects and systemic properties of dsRNA. Finally, novel strategies to deliver dsRNA are discussed, including delivery by symbionts, plant viruses, trunk injections, root soaking, and transplastomic plants.

  2. Targeting Atp6v1c1 Prevents Inflammation and Bone Erosion Caused by Periodontitis and Reveals Its Critical Function in Osteoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Hao, Liang; Wang, Lin; Lu, Yun; Li, Qian; Zhu, Zheng; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (Periodontitis) is a serious disease that affects a majority of adult Americans and is associated with other systemic diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this pervasive and destructive disease. In this study, we utilized novel adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown gene therapy to treat bone erosion and inflammatory caused by periodontitis in mouse model. Atp6v1c1 is a subunit of the V-ATPase complex and regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex. We demonstrated previously that Atp6v1c1 has an essential function in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. We hypothesized that Atp6v1c1 may be an ideal target to prevent the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis. To test the hypothesis, we employed AAV RNAi knockdown of Atp6v1c1 gene expression to prevent bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously. We found that lesion-specific injection of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 into the periodontal disease lesions protected against bone erosion (>85%) and gingival inflammation caused by P. gingivalis W50 infection. AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown dramatically reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited the infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages in the bacteria-induced inflammatory lesions in periodontitis. Silencing of Atp6v1c1 expression also prevented the expressions of osteoclast-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 treatment can significantly attenuate the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis, indicating the dual function of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 as an inhibitor of bone erosion mediated by osteoclasts, and as an inhibitor of inflammation through down-regulation of pro

  3. Essential role of Jun family transcription factors in PU.1 knockdown-induced leukemic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Steidl, Ulrich; Rosenbauer, Frank; Verhaak, Roel G W; Gu, Xuesong; Ebralidze, Alexander; Otu, Hasan H; Klippel, Steffen; Steidl, Christian; Bruns, Ingmar; Costa, Daniel B; Wagner, Katharina; Aivado, Manuel; Kobbe, Guido; Valk, Peter J M; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Libermann, Towia A; Delwel, Ruud; Tenen, Daniel G

    2006-11-01

    Knockdown of the transcription factor PU.1 (encoded by Sfpi1) leads to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice. We examined the transcriptome of preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in which PU.1 was knocked down (referred to as 'PU.1-knockdown HSCs') to identify transcriptional changes preceding malignant transformation. Transcription factors c-Jun and JunB were among the top-downregulated targets. Restoration of c-Jun expression in preleukemic cells rescued the PU.1 knockdown-initiated myelomonocytic differentiation block. Lentiviral restoration of JunB at the leukemic stage led to loss of leukemic self-renewal capacity and prevented leukemia in NOD-SCID mice into which leukemic PU.1-knockdown cells were transplanted. Examination of human individuals with AML confirmed the correlation between PU.1 and JunB downregulation. These results delineate a transcriptional pattern that precedes leukemic transformation in PU.1-knockdown HSCs and demonstrate that decreased levels of c-Jun and JunB contribute to the development of PU.1 knockdown-induced AML by blocking differentiation and increasing self-renewal. Therefore, examination of disturbed gene expression in HSCs can identify genes whose dysregulation is essential for leukemic stem cell function and that are targets for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Soon; Rajasekaran, Nirmal; Ju, Woong; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi) based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings. PMID:26239469

  5. Logic integration of mRNA signals by an RNAi-based molecular computer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhen; Liu, Siyuan John; Bleris, Leonidas; Benenson, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic in vivo molecular ‘computers’ could rewire biological processes by establishing programmable, non-native pathways between molecular signals and biological responses. Multiple molecular computer prototypes have been shown to work in simple buffered solutions. Many of those prototypes were made of DNA strands and performed computations using cycles of annealing-digestion or strand displacement. We have previously introduced RNA interference (RNAi)-based computing as a way of implementing complex molecular logic in vivo. Because it also relies on nucleic acids for its operation, RNAi computing could benefit from the tools developed for DNA systems. However, these tools must be harnessed to produce bioactive components and be adapted for harsh operating environments that reflect in vivo conditions. In a step toward this goal, we report the construction and implementation of biosensors that ‘transduce’ mRNA levels into bioactive, small interfering RNA molecules via RNA strand exchange in a cell-free Drosophila embryo lysate, a step beyond simple buffered environments. We further integrate the sensors with our RNAi ‘computational’ module to evaluate two-input logic functions on mRNA concentrations. Our results show how RNA strand exchange can expand the utility of RNAi computing and point toward the possibility of using strand exchange in a native biological setting. PMID:20194121

  6. Logic integration of mRNA signals by an RNAi-based molecular computer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhen; Liu, Siyuan John; Bleris, Leonidas; Benenson, Yaakov

    2010-05-01

    Synthetic in vivo molecular 'computers' could rewire biological processes by establishing programmable, non-native pathways between molecular signals and biological responses. Multiple molecular computer prototypes have been shown to work in simple buffered solutions. Many of those prototypes were made of DNA strands and performed computations using cycles of annealing-digestion or strand displacement. We have previously introduced RNA interference (RNAi)-based computing as a way of implementing complex molecular logic in vivo. Because it also relies on nucleic acids for its operation, RNAi computing could benefit from the tools developed for DNA systems. However, these tools must be harnessed to produce bioactive components and be adapted for harsh operating environments that reflect in vivo conditions. In a step toward this goal, we report the construction and implementation of biosensors that 'transduce' mRNA levels into bioactive, small interfering RNA molecules via RNA strand exchange in a cell-free Drosophila embryo lysate, a step beyond simple buffered environments. We further integrate the sensors with our RNAi 'computational' module to evaluate two-input logic functions on mRNA concentrations. Our results show how RNA strand exchange can expand the utility of RNAi computing and point toward the possibility of using strand exchange in a native biological setting.

  7. Suppressors of RNAi from plant viruses are subject to episodic positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Gemma G. R.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Obbard, Darren J.

    2013-01-01

    Viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) are proteins that actively inhibit the antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) immune response, providing an immune evasion route for viruses. It has been hypothesized that VSRs are engaged in a molecular ‘arms race’ with RNAi pathway genes. Two lines of evidence support this. First, VSRs from plant viruses display high sequence diversity, and are frequently gained and lost over evolutionary time scales. Second, Drosophila antiviral RNAi genes show high rates of adaptive evolution. Here, we investigate whether VSRs diversify faster than other genes and, if so, whether this is a result of positive selection, as might be expected in an arms race. By analysis of 12 plant RNA viruses, we show that the relative rate of protein evolution is higher for VSRs than for other genes, but that this is not attributable to pervasive positive selection. We argue that, because evolutionary time scales are extremely different for viruses and eukaryotes, it is improbable that viral adaptation (as measured by the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous change) will be dominated by one-to-one coevolution with eukaryotes. Instead, for plant virus VSRs, we find strong evidence of episodic selection—diversifying selection that acts on a subset of lineages—which might be attributable to frequent shifts between different host genotypes or species. PMID:23804618

  8. Phenotypic screen for RNAi effects in the codling moth Cydia pomonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNAi-based technologies have the potential to augment, or replace existing pest management strategies. However, some insect taxa are less susceptible to the induction of the post-transcriptional gene silencing effect than others, such as the Lepidoptera. Here we describe experiments to investigate t...

  9. Clone Mapper: An Online Suite of Tools for RNAi Experiments in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Nishant; Pujol, Nathalie; Tichit, Laurent; Ewbank, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), mediated by the introduction of a specific double-stranded RNA, is a powerful method to investigate gene function. It is widely used in the Caenorhabditis elegans research community. An expanding number of laboratories conduct genome-wide RNAi screens, using standard libraries of bacterial clones each designed to produce a specific double-stranded RNA. Proper interpretation of results from RNAi experiments requires a series of analytical steps, from the verification of the identity of bacterial clones, to the identification of the clones’ potential targets. Despite the popularity of the technique, no user-friendly set of tools allowing these steps to be carried out accurately, automatically, and at a large scale, is currently available. We report here the design and production of Clone Mapper, an online suite of tools specifically adapted to the analysis pipeline typical for RNAi experiments with C. elegans. We show that Clone Mapper overcomes the limitations of existing techniques and provide examples illustrating its potential for the identification of biologically relevant genes. The Clone Mapper tools are freely available via http://www.ciml.univ-mrs.fr/EWBANK_jonathan/software.html. PMID:25187039

  10. RNAi-based insecticidal crops: potential effects on non-target species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNAi is a sequence specific mechanism that silences protein production when particular mRNAs are bound and enzymatically cleaved. Genetically modified crops that silence critical gene function in insect pests have been developed, and are a likely future direction for commercial pest management. Pote...

  11. Efficient delivery of RNAi prodrugs containing reversible charge-neutralizing phosphotriester backbone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Bryan R; Gogoi, Khirud; Hamil, Alexander S; Palm-Apergi, Caroline; van den Berg, Arjen; Hagopian, Jonathan C; Springer, Aaron D; Eguchi, Akiko; Kacsinta, Apollo D; Dowdy, Connor F; Presente, Asaf; Lönn, Peter; Kaulich, Manuel; Yoshioka, Naohisa; Gros, Edwige; Cui, Xian-Shu; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential to treat human disease1–3. However, in vivo delivery of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are negatively charged double-stranded RNA macromolecules, remains a major hurdle4–9. Current siRNA delivery has begun to move away from large lipid and synthetic nanoparticles to more defined molecular conjugates9. Here we address this issue by synthesis of short interfering ribonucleic neutrals (siRNNs) whose phosphate backbone contains neutral phosphotriester groups, allowing for delivery into cells. Once inside cells, siRNNs are converted by cytoplasmic thioesterases into native, charged phosphodiester-backbone siRNAs, which induce robust RNAi responses. siRNNs have favorable drug-like properties, including high synthetic yields, serum stability and absence of innate immune responses. Unlike siRNAs, siRNNs avidly bind serum albumin to positively influence pharmacokinetic properties. Systemic delivery of siRNNs conjugated to a hepatocyte-specific targeting domain induced extended dose-dependent in vivo RNAi responses in mice. We believe that siRNNs represent a technology that will open new avenues for development of RNAi therapeutics. PMID:25402614

  12. RNAi: a potential new class of therapeutic for human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Attila A

    2011-11-01

    Dominant negative genetic disorders, in which a mutant allele of a gene causes disease in the presence of a second, normal copy, have been challenging since there is no cure and treatments are only to alleviate the symptoms. Current therapies involving pharmacological and biological drugs are not suitable to target mutant genes selectively due to structural indifference of the normal variant of their targets from the disease-causing mutant ones. In instances when the target contains single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), whether it is an enzyme or structural or receptor protein are not ideal for treatment using conventional drugs due to their lack of selectivity. Therefore, there is a need to develop new approaches to accelerate targeting these previously inaccessible targets by classical therapeutics. Although there is a cooling trend by the pharmaceutical industry for the potential of RNA interference (RNAi), RNAi and other RNA targeting drugs (antisense, ribozyme, etc.) still hold their promise as the only drugs that provide an opportunity to target genes with SNP mutations found in dominant negative disorders, genes specific to pathogenic tumor cells, and genes that are critical for mediating the pathology of various other diseases. Because of its exquisite specificity and potency, RNAi has attracted a considerable interest as a new class of therapeutic for genetic diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease (HD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), spinocerebellar ataxia, dominant muscular dystrophies, and cancer. In this review, progress and challenges in developing RNAi therapeutics for genetic diseases will be discussed.

  13. Transcriptome analysis and systemic RNAi response in the African sweetpotato weevil (Cylas puncticollis, Coleoptera, Brentidae).

    PubMed

    Prentice, Katterinne; Pertry, Ine; Christiaens, Olivier; Bauters, Lander; Bailey, Ana; Niblett, Chuck; Ghislain, Marc; Gheysen, Godelieve; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The African sweetpotato weevil (SPW) Cylas puncticollis Boheman is one of the most important constraints of sweetpotato production in Sub-Saharan Africa and yet is largely an uncharacterized insect pest. Here, we report on the transcriptome analysis of SPW generated using an Illumina platform. More than 213 million sequencing reads were obtained and assembled into 89,599 contigs. This assembly was followed by a gene ontology annotation. Subsequently, a transcriptome search showed that the necessary RNAi components relevant to the three major RNAi pathways, were found to be expressed in SPW. To address the functionality of the RNAi mechanism in this species, dsRNA was injected into second instar larvae targeting laccase2, a gene which encodes an enzyme involved in the sclerotization of insect exoskeleton. The body of treated insects showed inhibition of sclerotization, leading eventually to death. Quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) confirmed this phenotype to be the result of gene silencing. Together, our results provide valuable sequence data on this important insect pest and demonstrate that a functional RNAi pathway with a strong and systemic effect is present in SPW and can further be explored as a new strategy for controlling this important pest.

  14. VSG switching in Trypanosoma brucei: antigenic variation analysed using RNAi in the absence of immune selection.

    PubMed

    Aitcheson, Niall; Talbot, Suzanne; Shapiro, Jesse; Hughes, Katie; Adkin, Carl; Butt, Thomas; Sheader, Karen; Rudenko, Gloria

    2005-09-01

    Trypanosoma brucei relies on antigenic variation of its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat for survival. We show that VSG switching can be efficiently studied in vitro using VSG RNAi in place of an immune system to select for switch variants. Contrary to models predicting an instant switch after inhibition of VSG synthesis, switching was not induced by VSG RNAi and occurred at a rate of 10(-4) per division. We find a highly reproducible hierarchy of VSG activation, which appears to be capable of resetting, whereby more than half of the switch events over 12 experiments were to one of two VSGs. We characterized switched clones according to switch mechanism using marker genes in the active VSG expression site (ES). Transcriptional switches between ESs were the preferred switching mechanism, whereby at least 10 of the 17 ESs identified in T. brucei 427 can be functionally active in vitro. We could specifically select for switches mediated by DNA rearrangements by inducing VSG RNAi in the presence of drug selection for the active ES. Most of the preferentially activated VSGs could be activated by multiple mechanisms. This VSG RNAi-based procedure provides a rapid and powerful means for analysing VSG switching in African trypanosomes entirely in vitro.

  15. 'Smart' non-viral delivery systems for targeted delivery of RNAi to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joanne M; Hibbitts, Alan; Barlow, James; Kelly, Ciara; Sivadas, Neeraj; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of RNAi offers a potentially exciting new therapeutic paradigm for respiratory diseases. However, effective delivery remains a key requirement for their translation into the clinic and has been a major factor in the limited clinical success seen to date. Inhalation offers tissue-specific targeting of the RNAi to treat respiratory diseases and a diminished risk of off-target effects. In order to deliver RNAi directly to the respiratory tract via inhalation, 'smart' non-viral carriers are required to protect the RNAi during delivery/aerosolization and enhance cell-specific uptake to target cells. Here, we review the state-of-the-art in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering, and specifically non-viral siRNA delivery platforms, for delivery via inhalation. This includes developments in inhaler device engineering and particle engineering, including manufacturing methods and excipients used in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering that underpin the development of smart, cell type-specific delivery systems to target siRNA to respiratory epithelial cells and/or alveolar macrophages.

  16. RNAiFold: a web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter; Dotu, Ivan

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic biology and nanotechnology are poised to make revolutionary contributions to the 21st century. In this article, we describe a new web server to support in silico RNA molecular design. Given an input target RNA secondary structure, together with optional constraints, such as requiring GC-content to lie within a certain range, requiring the number of strong (GC), weak (AU) and wobble (GU) base pairs to lie in a certain range, the RNAiFold web server determines one or more RNA sequences, whose minimum free-energy secondary structure is the target structure. RNAiFold provides access to two servers: RNA-CPdesign, which applies constraint programming, and RNA-LNSdesign, which applies the large neighborhood search heuristic; hence, it is suitable for larger input structures. Both servers can also solve the RNA inverse hybridization problem, i.e. given a representation of the desired hybridization structure, RNAiFold returns two sequences, whose minimum free-energy hybridization is the input target structure. The web server is publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold, which provides access to two specialized servers: RNA-CPdesign and RNA-LNSdesign. Source code for the underlying algorithms, implemented in COMET and supported on linux, can be downloaded at the server website.

  17. iScreen: Image-Based High-Content RNAi Screening Analysis Tools.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rui; Dong, Xiaonan; Levine, Beth; Xie, Yang; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screening has opened up a path to investigating functional genomics in a genome-wide pattern. However, such studies are often restricted to assays that have a single readout format. Recently, advanced image technologies have been coupled with high-throughput RNAi screening to develop high-content screening, in which one or more cell image(s), instead of a single readout, were generated from each well. This image-based high-content screening technology has led to genome-wide functional annotation in a wider spectrum of biological research studies, as well as in drug and target discovery, so that complex cellular phenotypes can be measured in a multiparametric format. Despite these advances, data analysis and visualization tools are still largely lacking for these types of experiments. Therefore, we developed iScreen (image-Based High-content RNAi Screening Analysis Tool), an R package for the statistical modeling and visualization of image-based high-content RNAi screening. Two case studies were used to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the iScreen package. iScreen is available for download on CRAN (http://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/web/packages/iScreen/index.html). The user manual is also available as a supplementary document.

  18. RNA Interference (RNAi) Induced Gene Silencing: A Promising Approach of Hi-Tech Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Adnan; Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Kim, Chang-Kil; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising gene regulatory approach in functional genomics that has significant impact on crop improvement which permits down-regulation in gene expression with greater precise manner without affecting the expression of other genes. RNAi mechanism is expedited by small molecules of interfering RNA to suppress a gene of interest effectively. RNAi has also been exploited in plants for resistance against pathogens, insect/pest, nematodes, and virus that cause significant economic losses. Keeping beside the significance in the genome integrity maintenance as well as growth and development, RNAi induced gene syntheses are vital in plant stress management. Modifying the genes by the interference of small RNAs is one of the ways through which plants react to the environmental stresses. Hence, investigating the role of small RNAs in regulating gene expression assists the researchers to explore the potentiality of small RNAs in abiotic and biotic stress management. This novel approach opens new avenues for crop improvement by developing disease resistant, abiotic or biotic stress tolerant, and high yielding elite varieties. PMID:25332689

  19. RNAi as a management tool for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Storer, Nicholas P; Li, Huarong; Bowling, Andrew J; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Worden, Sarah E; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-09-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is the most important pest of corn in the US Corn Belt. Economic estimates indicate that costs of control and yield loss associated with WCR damage exceed $US 1 billion annually. Historically, corn rootworm management has been extremely difficult because of its ability to evolve resistance to both chemical insecticides and cultural control practices. Since 2003, the only novel commercialized developments in rootworm management have been transgenic plants expressing Bt insecticidal proteins. Four transgenic insecticidal proteins are currently registered for rootworm management, and field resistance to proteins from the Cry3 family highlights the importance of developing traits with new modes of action. One of the newest approaches for controlling rootworm pests involves RNA interference (RNAi). This review describes the current understanding of the RNAi mechanisms in WCR and the use of this technology for WCR management. Further, the review addresses ecological risk assessment of RNAi and insect resistance management of RNAi for corn rootworm. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. An RNAi-Enhanced Logic Circuit for Cancer Specific Detection and Destruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    cancer specific detection and destruction. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ron Weiss...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER An RNAi-enhanced logic circuit for cancer specific detection and destruction. 5b. GRANT NUMBER...ABSTRACT Modern breast cancer therapies utilize non-specific approaches to kill or remove cancerous cells, inflicting significant collateral damage to

  1. [Mutation frequencies in HIV-1 subtype-A genome in regions containing efficient RNAi targets].

    PubMed

    Kravatsky, Y V; Chechetkin, V R; Fedoseeva, D M; Gorbacheva, M A; Kretova, O V; Tchurikov, N A

    2016-01-01

    The development of gene-therapy technology using RNAi for AIDS/HIV-1 treatment is a prospective alternative to traditional anti-retroviral therapy. RNAi targets could be selected in HIV-1 transcripts and in CCR5 mRNA. Previously, we experimentally selected a number of efficient siRNAs that target HIV-1 RNAs. The viral genome mutates frequently, and RNAi strength is very sensitive, even for a single mismatches. That is why it is important to study nucleotide sequences of targets in clinical isolates of HIV-1. In the present study, we analyzed mutations in 6 of about 300-bp regions containing RNAi targets from HIV-1 subtype A isolates in Russia. Estimates of the mean frequencies of mutations in the targets were obtained and the frequencies of mutations in the different codon positions were compared. The frequencies of mutations in the vicinity of the targets and directly within the targets were also compared and have been shown to be approximately the same. The frequencies of indels in the chosen regions have been assessed. Their frequencies have proved to be two to three orders of magnitude less compared to that for mutations.

  2. Tribolium castaneum as a model for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Eileen; Bingsohn, Linda; Kanost, Michael R; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Coleopteran insects are a highly diverse and successful order, and many beetle species are significant agricultural pests. New biorational strategies for managing populations of beetles and other insect species are needed as pests develop resistance to chemical insecticides and Bt toxins. There is now an opportunity to use genome sequence data to identify genes that are essential for insect growth, development, or survival as new targets for designing control technology. This goal requires a method for high-throughput in vivo screening of thousands of genes to identify candidate genes that, when their expression is disrupted, have a phenotype that may be useful in insect pest control. Tribolium castaneum, the red flour beetle, is a model organism that offers considerable advantages for such screening, including ease of rearing in large numbers, a sequenced genome, and a strong, systemic RNAi response for specific depletion of gene transcripts. The RNAi effect in T. castaneum can be elicited in any tissue and any stage by the injection of dsRNA into the hemocoel, and injection of dsRNA into adult females can even be used to identify phenotypes in offspring. A pilot RNAi screen (iBeetle) is underway. Several T. castaneum genes with promising RNAi phenotypes for further development as mechanisms for plant protection have been identified. These include heat shock protein 90, chitin synthase, the segmentation gene hairy, and a matrix metalloprotease. Candidate genes identified in T. castaneum screens can then be tested in agricultural pest species (in which screening is not feasible), to evaluate their effectiveness for use in potential plant-based RNAi control strategies. Delivery of dsRNA expressed by genetically modified crops to the midgut of phytophagous insects is under investigation as a new tool for very specific protection of plants from insect pest species. The T. castaneum screening platform offers a system for discovery of candidate genes with high potential

  3. HuR knockdown changes the oncogenic potential of oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kakuguchi, Wataru; Kitamura, Tetsuya; Kuroshima, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Makoto; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu; Higashino, Fumihiro

    2010-04-01

    HuR binds to AU-rich element-containing mRNA to protect them from rapid degradation. Here, we show that knockdown of HuR changes the oncogenic properties of oral cancer cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, HSC-3 and Ca9.22, which express HuR protein and cytoplasmic AU-rich element mRNA more abundantly than normal cells, were subjected to HuR knockdown. In the HuR-knockdown cancer cells, the cytoplasmic expression of c-fos, c-myc, and COX-2 mRNAs was inhibited compared with those in cells that had been transfected with a control small interfering RNA, and the half-lives of these mRNAs were shorter than those of their counterparts in the control cells. HuR-knockdown cells failed to make colonies in soft agar, suggesting that the cells had lost their ability for anchorage-independent cell growth. Additionally, the motile and invasive activities of the cells decreased remarkably by HuR knockdown. Furthermore, the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1, was reduced in HuR-knockdown cancer cells, and HuR bound to cdk1 mRNA to stabilize it. These findings suggest that HuR knockdown changes the features of oral cancer cells, at least in part, by affecting their cell cycle and shows potential as an effective therapeutic approach.

  4. RNAi Technology for Insect Management and Protection of Beneficial Insects from Diseases: Lessons, Challenges and Risk Assessments.

    PubMed

    Zotti, M J; Smagghe, G

    2015-06-01

    The time has passed for us to wonder whether RNA interference (RNAi) effectively controls pest insects or protects beneficial insects from diseases. The RNAi era in insect science began with studies of gene function and genetics that paved the way for the development of novel and highly specific approaches for the management of pest insects and, more recently, for the treatment and prevention of diseases in beneficial insects. The slight differences in components of RNAi pathways are sufficient to provide a high degree of variation in responsiveness among insects. The current framework to assess the negative effects of genetically modified (GM) plants on human health is adequate for RNAi-based GM plants. Because of the mode of action of RNAi and the lack of genomic data for most exposed non-target organisms, it becomes difficult to determine the environmental risks posed by RNAi-based technologies and the benefits provided for the protection of crops. A better understanding of the mechanisms that determine the variability in the sensitivity of insects would accelerate the worldwide release of commercial RNAi-based approaches.

  5. Absence of transitive and systemic pathways allows cell-specific and isoform-specific RNAi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    ROIGNANT, JEAN-YVES; CARRÉ, CLÉMENT; MUGAT, BRUNO; SZYMCZAK, DIMITRI; LEPESANT, JEAN-ANTOINE; ANTONIEWSKI, CHRISTOPHE

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) designates the multistep process by which double-stranded RNA induces the silencing of homologous endogenous genes. Some aspects of RNAi appear to be conserved throughout evolution, including the processing of trigger dsRNAs into small 21–23-bp siRNAs and their use to guide the degradation of complementary mRNAs. Two remarkable features of RNAi were uncovered in plants and Caenorhabditid elegans. First, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities allow the synthesis of siRNA complementary to sequences upstream of or downstream from the initial trigger region in the target mRNA, leading to a transitive RNAi with sequences that had not been initially targeted. Secondly, systemic RNAi may cause the targeting of gene silencing in one tissue to spread to other tissues. Using transgenes expressing dsRNA, we investigated whether transitive and systemic RNAi occur in Drosophila. DsRNA-producing transgenes targeted RNAi to specific regions of alternative mRNA species of one gene without transitive effect directed to sequences downstream from or upstream of the initial trigger region. Moreover, specific expression of a dsRNA, using either cell-specific GAL4 drivers or random clonal activation of a GAL4 driver, mediated a cell-autonomous RNAi. Together, our results provide evidence that transitive and systemic aspects of RNAi are not conserved in Drosophila and demonstrate that dsRNA-producing transgenes allow powerful reverse genetic approaches to be conducted in this model organism, by knocking down gene functions at the resolution of a single-cell type and of a single isoform. PMID:12592004

  6. Gene Network Polymorphism Illuminates Loss and Retention of Novel RNAi Silencing Components in the Cryptococcus Pathogenic Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Clancey, Shelly Applen; Wang, Xuying; Heitman, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a ubiquitous pathway that serves central functions throughout eukaryotes, including maintenance of genome stability and repression of transposon expression and movement. However, a number of organisms have lost their RNAi pathways, including the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis, the human pathogen Cryptococcus deuterogattii, and some human parasite pathogens, suggesting there may be adaptive benefits associated with both retention and loss of RNAi. By comparing the RNAi-deficient genome of the Pacific Northwest Outbreak C. deuterogattii strain R265 with the RNAi-proficient genomes of the Cryptococcus pathogenic species complex, we identified a set of conserved genes that were lost in R265 and all other C. deuterogattii isolates examined. Genetic and molecular analyses reveal several of these lost genes play roles in RNAi pathways. Four novel components were examined further. Znf3 (a zinc finger protein) and Qip1 (a homolog of N. crassa Qip) were found to be essential for RNAi, while Cpr2 (a constitutive pheromone receptor) and Fzc28 (a transcription factor) are involved in sex-induced but not mitosis-induced silencing. Our results demonstrate that the mitotic and sex-induced RNAi pathways rely on the same core components, but sex-induced silencing may be a more specific, highly induced variant that involves additional specialized or regulatory components. Our studies further illustrate how gene network polymorphisms involving known components of key cellular pathways can inform identification of novel elements and suggest that RNAi loss may have been a core event in the speciation of C. deuterogattii and possibly contributed to its pathogenic trajectory. PMID:26943821

  7. Dcdc2 knockout mice display exacerbated developmental disruptions following knockdown of doublecortin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Yin, X; Rosen, G; Gabel, L; Guadiana, S M; Sarkisian, M R; Galaburda, A M; Loturco, J J

    2011-09-08

    The dyslexia-associated gene DCDC2 is a member of the DCX family of genes known to play roles in neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and differentiation. Here we report the first phenotypic analysis of a Dcdc2 knockout mouse. Comparisons between Dcdc2 knockout mice and wild-type (wt) littermates revealed no significant differences in neuronal migration, neocortical lamination, neuronal cilliogenesis or dendritic differentiation. Considering previous studies showing genetic interactions and potential functional redundancy among members of the DCX family, we tested whether decreasing Dcx expression by RNAi would differentially impair neurodevelopment in Dcdc2 knockouts and wild-type mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that deficits in neuronal migration, and dendritic growth caused by RNAi of Dcx were more severe in Dcdc2 knockouts than in wild-type mice with the same transfection. These results indicate that Dcdc2 is not required for neurogenesis, neuronal migration or differentiation in mice, but may have partial functional redundancy with Dcx.

  8. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  9. FTO knockdown in rat ventromedial hypothalamus does not affect energy balance.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Margriet A; Sanders, Loek E; de Jong, Johannes W; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Adan, Roger A H

    2014-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) clustered in the first intron of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene has been associated with obesity. FTO expression is ubiquitous, with particularly high levels in the hypothalamic area of the brain. To investigate the region-specific role of FTO, AAV technology was applied to knockdown FTO in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). No effect of FTO knockdown was observed on bodyweight or parameters of energy balance. Animals were exposed twice to an overnight fast, followed by a high-fat high-sucrose (HFHS) diet for 1 week. FTO knockdown did not result in a different response to the diets. A region-specific role for FTO in the VMH in the regulation of energy balance could not be found.

  10. Knockdown of GALNT1 suppresses malignant phenotype of hepatocellular carcinoma by suppressing EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Miao-Juei; Hu, Rey-Heng; Chou, Chih-Hsing; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Liu, Ya-Wen; Huang, John; Hung, Ji-Shiang; Lai, I-Rue; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Yu, Sung-Liang; Wu, Yao-Ming; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    O-glycosylation is a common protein modification. Aberrant O-glycosylation is associated with many cancers. GALNT1 is a GalNAc-transferase that initiates protein O-glycosylation. We found that GALNT1 is frequently up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is associated with poor patient survival. Overexpression of GALNT1 increased and knockdown decreased HCC cell migration and invasion. Knockdown of GALNT1 inhibited EGF-induced migration and invasion. Knockdown of GALNT1 decreased EGFR activation and increased EGFR degradation, by decreasing EGFR O-glycosylation. This study demonstrates that down-regulation of GALNT1 is sufficient to suppress malignant phenotype of HCC cells by decreasing EGFR signaling. Thus, GALNT1 is a potential target in HCC. PMID:25730904

  11. Knockdown of Dyslexia-Gene Dcdc2 Interferes with Speech Sound Discrimination in Continuous Streams

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Anne B.; Chen, Fuyi; Sloan, Andrew M.; Carraway, Ryan S.; Rennaker, Robert L.; LoTurco, Joseph J.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia is the most common developmental language disorder and is marked by deficits in reading and phonological awareness. One theory of dyslexia suggests that the phonological awareness deficit is due to abnormal auditory processing of speech sounds. Variants in DCDC2 and several other neural migration genes are associated with dyslexia and may contribute to auditory processing deficits. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that RNAi suppression of Dcdc2 in rats causes abnormal cortical responses to sound and impaired speech sound discrimination. In the current study, rats were subjected in utero to RNA interference targeting of the gene Dcdc2 or a scrambled sequence. Primary auditory cortex (A1) responses were acquired from 11 rats (5 with Dcdc2 RNAi; DC−) before any behavioral training. A separate group of 8 rats (3 DC−) were trained on a variety of speech sound discrimination tasks, and auditory cortex responses were acquired following training. Dcdc2 RNAi nearly eliminated the ability of rats to identify specific speech sounds from a continuous train of speech sounds but did not impair performance during discrimination of isolated speech sounds. The neural responses to speech sounds in A1 were not degraded as a function of presentation rate before training. These results suggest that A1 is not directly involved in the impaired speech discrimination caused by Dcdc2 RNAi. This result contrasts earlier results using Kiaa0319 RNAi and suggests that different dyslexia genes may cause different deficits in the speech processing circuitry, which may explain differential responses to therapy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although dyslexia is diagnosed through reading difficulty, there is a great deal of variation in the phenotypes of these individuals. The underlying neural and genetic mechanisms causing these differences are still widely debated. In the current study, we demonstrate that suppression of a candidate-dyslexia gene causes deficits on tasks of

  12. Thioredoxin reductase 1 knockdown enhances selenazolidine cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells via mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Poerschke, Robyn L.; Moos, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase (TR1) is a selenoprotein that is involved in cellular redox status control and deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Many cancers, including lung, overexpress TR1, making it a potential cancer therapy target. Previous work has shown that TR1 knockdown enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer treatments, as well as certain selenocompounds. However, it is unknown if TR1 knockdown produces similar effect on the sensitivity of human lung cancer cells. To further elucidate the role of TR1 in the mechanism of selenocompounds in lung cancer, a lentiviral microRNA delivery system to knockdown TR1 expression in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells was utilized. Cell viability was assessed after 48 hr treatment with the selenocysteine prodrug selenazolidines 2-butylselenazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (BSCA) and 2-cyclohexylselenazolidine-4-(R)-carboxylic acid (ChSCA), selenocystine (SECY), methylseleninic acid (MSA), 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate (p-XSC), and selenomethionine (SEM). TR1 knockdown increased the cytotoxicity of BSCA, ChSCA, and SECY but did not sensitize cells to MSA, SEM, or p-XSC. GSH and TR1 depletion together decreased cell viability, while no change was observed with GSH depletion alone. Reactive oxygen species generation was induced only in TR1 knockdown cells treated with the selenazolidines or SECY. These three compounds also decreased total intracellular glutathione levels and oxidized thioredoxin, but in a TR1 independent manner. TR1 knockdown increased selenazolidine and SECY-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, as well as DNA strand breaks and AIF translocation from the mitochondria. These results indicate the ability of TR1 to modulate the cytotoxic effects of BSCA, ChSCA and SECY in human lung cancer cells through mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:20920480

  13. 3' UTR seed matches, but not overall identity, are associated with RNAi off-targets.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Amanda; Anderson, Emily M; Reynolds, Angela; Ilsley-Tyree, Diane; Leake, Devin; Fedorov, Yuriy; Baskerville, Scott; Maksimova, Elena; Robinson, Kathryn; Karpilow, Jon; Marshall, William S; Khvorova, Anastasia

    2006-03-01

    Off-target gene silencing can present a notable challenge in the interpretation of data from large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screens. We performed a detailed analysis of off-targeted genes identified by expression profiling of human cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA). Contrary to common assumption, analysis of the subsequent off-target gene database showed that overall identity makes little or no contribution to determining whether the expression of a particular gene will be affected by a given siRNA, except for near-perfect matches. Instead, off-targeting is associated with the presence of one or more perfect 3' untranslated region (UTR) matches with the hexamer or heptamer seed region (positions 2-7 or 2-8) of the antisense strand of the siRNA. These findings have strong implications for future siRNA design and the application of RNAi in high-throughput screening and therapeutic development.

  14. Mode of bacterial pathogenesis determines phenotype in elt-2 and elt-7 RNAi Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Samantha L; Sturgeon, Craig R; Travers, Deborah M; Montgomery, Madeline C

    2011-05-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has become a useful model for studying innate immunity. ELT-2, which is homologous to human GATA-4, -5 and -6, is considered the primary GATA transcription factor controlling intestinal immunity in C. elegans. In this study, we characterize the timeline of intestinal distension in nematodes where ELT-2 and another intestinal GATA transcription factor, ELT-7, are abrogated by RNAi using two different models: colonization and toxin-based infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We show that both ELT-2 and ELT-7 are important for survival of C. elegans exposed to P. aeruginosa. Intestinal distension is accelerated in elt-2 RNAi nematodes, and is observed in colonization but not toxin-based Pseudomonas infection. Upon onset of intestinal distension, nematodes die within 24 h, regardless of experimental treatment. These data provide new insight into the role of ELT-2 and ELT-7 in protecting C. elegans against P. aeruginosa infection.

  15. Engineering cherry rootstocks with resistance to Prunus necrotic ring spot virus through RNAi-mediated silencing.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-qing; Sink, Kenneth C; Walworth, Aaron E; Cook, Meridith A; Allison, Richard F; Lang, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is a major pollen-disseminated ilarvirus that adversely affects many Prunus species. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi) vector pART27-PNRSV containing an inverted repeat (IR) region of PNRSV was transformed into two hybrid (triploid) cherry rootstocks, 'Gisela 6' (GI 148-1) and 'Gisela 7'(GI 148-8)', which are tolerant and sensitive, respectively, to PNRSV infection. One year after inoculation with PNRSV plus Prune Dwarf Virus, nontransgenic 'Gisela 6' exhibited no symptoms but a significant PNRSV titre, while the transgenic 'Gisela 6' had no symptoms and minimal PNRSV titre. The nontransgenic 'Gisela 7' trees died, while the transgenic 'Gisela 7' trees survived. These results demonstrate the RNAi strategy is useful for developing viral resistance in fruit rootstocks, and such transgenic rootstocks may have potential to enhance production of standard, nongenetically modified fruit varieties while avoiding concerns about transgene flow and exogenous protein production that are inherent for transformed fruiting genotypes.

  16. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F.; Kauffman, Kevin J.; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E.; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE−/− mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)–targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  17. Conditional knockdown of target gene expression by tetracycline regulated transcription of double strand RNA.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xubin; Omi, Minoru; Harada, Hidekiyo; Ishii, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Harukazu

    2011-01-01

    In vivo electroporation has served as an effective tool for the study of developmental biology. Here we report tetracycline inducible gene knockdown by electroporation. Our system consists of genome integration of a cassette encoding long double strand RNA (dsRNA) of a gene of interest by electroporation, transcription of which is assured by RNA polymerase II, and induction of transcription of dsRNA by tetracyclin. Long dsRNA decapped by ribozyme in the cassette and without poly A tail is processed into siRNA within nuclei. We could successfully induce knockdown of En2 and Coactosin by Dox administration.

  18. RNAi-directed down-regulation of RSV results in increased resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Yuan, Yuan; Yuan, Fuhai; Wang, Man; Zhong, Huan; Gu, Minghong; Liang, Guohua

    2012-05-01

    Rice stripe disease (RSD), caused by rice stripe virus (RSV), is a serious disease in temperate rice-growing areas. We have created an RNAi construct containing coat protein gene (CP) and disease specific protein gene (SP) sequences from RSV. The RNAi construct was transformed into two susceptible japonica varieties, Suyunuo and Guanglingxiangjing, to develop resistance against RSD. The homozygous progeny of rice plants in the T(5) and T(7) generations containing RNAi constructs, after self-fertilization were strongly resistant to viral infection. RT-PCR indicated that viral replication of SP and CP in the transgenic plants was significantly inhibited. There were no obvious morphological or developmental differences between the transgenic and wild-type plants from seedling stage to maturity. The excellent agronomic traits of these two varieties, such as high yield and good quality were maintained. Suppression of virus genes using RNAi is therefore a practical and effective strategy for controlling viral infection in crops.

  19. Blood-brain barrier transport of non-viral gene and RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J

    2007-09-01

    The development of gene- and RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics represents a challenge for the drug delivery field. The global brain distribution of DNA genes, as well as the targeting of specific regions of the brain, is even more complicated because conventional delivery systems, i.e. viruses, have poor diffusion in brain when injected in situ and do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is only permeable to lipophilic molecules of less than 400 Da. Recent advances in the "Trojan Horse Liposome" (THL) technology applied to the transvascular non-viral gene therapy of brain disorders presents a promising solution to the DNA/RNAi delivery obstacle. The THL is comprised of immunoliposomes carrying either a gene for protein replacement or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmids for RNAi effect, respectively. The THL is engineered with known lipids containing polyethyleneglycol (PEG), which stabilizes its structure in vivo in circulation. The tissue target specificity of THL is given by conjugation of approximately 1% of the PEG residues to peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies (MAb) that bind to specific endogenous receptors (i.e. insulin and transferrin receptors) located on both the BBB and the brain cellular membranes, respectively. These MAbs mediate (a) receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL complex through the BBB, (b) endocytosis into brain cells and (c) transport to the brain cell nuclear compartment. The present review presents an overview of the THL technology and its current application to gene therapy and RNAi, including experimental models of Parkinson's disease and brain tumors.

  20. RNAi-mediated resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf virus in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed M S; Bian, Shiquan; Wang, Muyue; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Bingwei; Liu, Qiaoquan; Zhang, Changquan; Tang, Shuzhu; Gu, Minghong; Yu, Hengxiu

    2016-11-30

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), a member of the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae, causes significant economic losses in rice production in China and many other Asian countries. Development of resistant varieties by using conventional breeding methods is limited, as germplasm with high level of resistance to RBSDV have not yet been found. One of the most promising methods to confer resistance against RBSDV is the use of RNA interference (RNAi) technology. RBSDV non-structural protein P7-2, encoded by S7-2 gene, is a potential F-box protein and involved in the plant-virus interaction through the ubiquitination pathway. P8, encoded by S8 gene, is the minor core protein that possesses potent active transcriptional repression activity. In this study, we transformed rice calli using a mini-twin T-DNA vector harboring RNAi constructs of the RBSDV genes S7-2 or S8, and obtained plants harboring the target gene constructs and the selectable marker gene, hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT). From the offspring of these transgenic plants, we obtained selectable marker (HPT gene)-free plants. Homozygous T5 transgenic lines which harbored either S7-2-RNAi or S8-RNAi exhibited high level resistance against RBSDV under field infection pressure from indigenous viruliferous small brown planthoppers. Thus, our results showed that RNA interference with the expression of S7-2 or S8 genes seemed an effective way to induce high level resistance in rice against RBSD disease.

  1. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi have been studied to date, limiting our understanding of RNAi in fungi. Here we present funRNA http://funrna.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/, a fungal kingdom-wide comparative genomics platform for putative genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP. Description To identify and archive genes encoding the abovementioned key components, protein domain profiles were determined from reference sequences obtained from UniProtKB/SwissProt. The domain profiles were searched using fungal, metazoan, and plant genomes, as well as bacterial and archaeal genomes. 1,163, 442, and 678 genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP, respectively, were predicted. Based on the identification results, active site variation of Argonaute, diversification of Dicer, and sequence analysis of RdRP were discussed in a fungus-oriented manner. funRNA provides results from diverse bioinformatics programs and job submission forms for BLAST, BLASTMatrix, and ClustalW. Furthermore, sequence collections created in funRNA are synced with several gene family analysis portals and databases, offering further analysis opportunities. Conclusions funRNA provides identification results from a broad taxonomic range and diverse analysis functions, and could be used in diverse comparative and evolutionary studies. It could serve as a versatile genomics workbench for key components of RNAi. PMID:25522231

  2. Sex-induced silencing defends the genome of Cryptococcus neoformans via RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuying; Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Li, Wenjun; Floyd, Anna; Skalsky, Rebecca; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Cosuppression is a silencing phenomenon triggered by the introduction of homologous DNA sequences into the genomes of organisms as diverse as plants, fungi, flies, and nematodes. Here we report sex-induced silencing (SIS), which is triggered by tandem integration of a transgene array in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. A SXI2a-URA5 transgene array was found to be post-transcriptionally silenced during sexual reproduction. More than half of the progeny that inherited the SXI2a-URA5 transgene became uracil-auxotrophic due to silencing of the URA5 gene. In vegetative mitotic growth, silencing of this transgene array occurred at an ∼250-fold lower frequency, indicating that silencing is induced during the sexual cycle. Central components of the RNAi pathway—including genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase—are all required for both meiotic and mitotic transgene silencing. URA5-derived ∼22-nucleotide (nt) small RNAs accumulated in the silenced isolates, suggesting that SIS is mediated by RNAi via sequence-specific small RNAs. Through deep sequencing of the small RNA population in C. neoformans, we also identified abundant small RNAs mapping to repetitive transposable elements, and these small RNAs were absent in rdp1 mutant strains. Furthermore, a group of retrotransposons was highly expressed during mating of rdp1 mutant strains, and an increased transposition/mutation rate was detected in their progeny, indicating that the RNAi pathway squelches transposon activity during the sexual cycle. Interestingly, Ago1, Dcr1, Dcr2, and Rdp1 are translationally induced in mating cells, and Ago1, Dcr1, and Dcr2 localize to processing bodies (P bodies), whereas Rdp1 appears to be nuclear, providing mechanistic insights into the elevated silencing efficiency during sexual reproduction. We hypothesize that the SIS RNAi pathway operates to defend the genome during sexual development. PMID:21078820

  3. The RNAi machinery controls distinct responses to environmental signals in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, Francisco E.; Vila, Ana; Moxon, Simon; Cascales, Maria D.; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa M.; Garre, Victoriano

    2015-03-25

    Here, RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved mechanism of genome defence that can also have a role in the regulation of endogenous functions through endogenous small RNAs (esRNAs). In fungi, knowledge of the functions regulated by esRNAs has been hampered by lack of clear phenotypes in most mutants affected in the RNAi machinery. Mutants of Mucor circinelloides affected in RNAi genes show defects in physiological and developmental processes, thus making Mucor an outstanding fungal model for studying endogenous functions regulated by RNAi. Some classes of Mucor esRNAs map to exons (ex-siRNAs) and regulate expression of the genes from which they derive. To have a broad picture of genes regulated by the silencing machinery during vegetative growth, we have sequenced and compared the mRNA profiles of mutants in the main RNAi genes by using RNA-seq. In addition, we have achieved a more complete phenotypic characterization of silencing mutants Deletion of any main RNAi gene provoked a deep impact in mRNA accumulation at exponential and stationary growth. Genes showing increased mRNA levels, as expected for direct ex-siRNAs targets, but also genes with decreased expression were detected, suggesting that, most probably, the initial ex-siRNA targets regulate the expression of other genes, which can be up- or down-regulated. Expression of 50% of the genes was dependent on more than one RNAi gene in agreement with the existence of several classes of ex-siRNAs produced by different combinations of RNAi proteins. These combinations of proteins have also been involved in the regulation of different cellular processes. Besides genes regulated by the canonical RNAi pathway, this analysis identified processes, such as growth at low pH and sexual interaction that are regulated by a dicer-independent non-canonical RNAi pathway. In conclusion, this work shows that the RNAi pathways play a relevant role in the regulation of a significant number of endogenous

  4. Phytochrome RNAi enhances major fibre quality and agronomic traits of the cotton Gossypium hirsutum L.

    PubMed

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y; Buriev, Zabardast T; Saha, Sukumar; Jenkins, Johnie N; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor; Pepper, Alan E

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous improvement of fibre quality, early-flowering, early-maturity and productivity in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a challenging task for conventional breeding. The influence of red/far-red light ratio on the fibre length prompted us to examine the phenotypic effects of RNA interference (RNAi) of the cotton PHYA1 gene. Here we show a suppression of up to ~70% for the PHYA1 transcript, and compensatory overexpression of up to ~20-fold in the remaining phytochromes in somatically regenerated PHYA1 RNAi cotton plants. Two independent transformants of three generations exhibited vigorous root and vegetative growth, early-flowering, significantly improved upper half mean fibre length and an improvement in other major fibre characteristics. Small decreases in lint traits were observed but seed cotton yield was increased an average 10-17% compared with controls. RNAi-associated phenotypes were heritable and transferable via sexual hybridization. These results should aid in the development of early-maturing and productive Upland cultivars with superior fibre quality.

  5. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Daniel F; Erdmann, Gerrit; Zhang, Xian; Fritzsche, Anja; Demir, Kubilay; Jaedicke, Andreas; Muehlenberg, Katja; Wanker, Erich E; Boutros, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  6. Attacking HIV-1 RNA versus DNA by sequence-specific approaches: RNAi versus CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be effectively controlled by potent antiviral drugs, but this never results in a cure. The patient should therefore take these drugs for the rest of his/her life, which can cause drug-resistance and adverse effects. Therefore, more durable therapeutic strategies should be considered, such as a stable gene therapy to protect the target T cells against HIV-1 infection. The development of potent therapeutic regimens based on the RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) mechanisms will be described, which can be delivered by lentiviral vectors. These mechanisms attack different forms of the viral genome, the RNA and DNA, respectively, but both mechanisms act in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Early RNAi experiments demonstrated profound virus inhibition, but also indicated that viral escape is possible. Such therapy failure can be prevented by the design of a combinatorial RNAi attack on the virus and this gene therapy is currently being tested in a preclinical humanized mouse model. Recent CRISPR-Cas studies also document robust virus inhibition, but suggest a novel viral escape route that is induced by the cellular nonhomologous end joining DNA repair pathway, which is activated by CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA breaks. We will compare these two approaches for durable HIV-1 suppression and discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages. The potential for future clinical applications will be described.

  7. RNAi: Mammalian oocytes do it without RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    STEIN, PAULA; SVOBODA, PETR; ANGER, MARTIN; SCHULTZ, RICHARD M.

    2003-01-01

    Studies in mutant organisms deficient in RNA interference (RNAi) and related post-transcriptional gene silencing implicated a role for a single class of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Nevertheless, sequence homologs to these RdRps have not been found in coelomate organisms such as Drosophila or mammals. This lack of homologous sequences does not exclude that an RdRp functions in RNAi in these organisms because an RdRp could be acquired by horizontal transfer from an RNA virus. In fact, such a sequence is found in mice (Aquarius) and we observe that it is expressed in mouse oocytes and early embryos, which exhibit RNAi. We report here that cordycepin, an inhibitor of RNA synthesis, does not prevent Mos double-strand RNA (dsRNA) to target endogenous Mos mRNA in mouse oocytes and that targeting a chimeric Mos–EGFP mRNA with dsRNA to EGFP does not reduce the endogenous Mos mRNA, but does target the chimeric mRNA. These results indicate that an RdRp is not involved in dsRNA-mediated mRNA degradation in mammalian oocytes, and possibly in mammals in general, and therefore that only homologous sequences to the dsRNA are targeted for degradation. PMID:12554861

  8. A Multivariate Computational Method to Analyze High-Content RNAi Screening Data.

    PubMed

    Rameseder, Jonathan; Krismer, Konstantin; Dayma, Yogesh; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Airoldi, Edoardo M; Floyd, Scott R; Yaffe, Michael B

    2015-09-01

    High-content screening (HCS) using RNA interference (RNAi) in combination with automated microscopy is a powerful investigative tool to explore complex biological processes. However, despite the plethora of data generated from these screens, little progress has been made in analyzing HC data using multivariate methods that exploit the full richness of multidimensional data. We developed a novel multivariate method for HCS, multivariate robust analysis method (M-RAM), integrating image feature selection with ranking of perturbations for hit identification, and applied this method to an HC RNAi screen to discover novel components of the DNA damage response in an osteosarcoma cell line. M-RAM automatically selects the most informative phenotypic readouts and time points to facilitate the more efficient design of follow-up experiments and enhance biological understanding. Our method outperforms univariate hit identification and identifies relevant genes that these approaches would have missed. We found that statistical cell-to-cell variation in phenotypic responses is an important predictor of hits in RNAi-directed image-based screens. Genes that we identified as modulators of DNA damage signaling in U2OS cells include B-Raf, a cancer driver gene in multiple tumor types, whose role in DNA damage signaling we confirm experimentally, and multiple subunits of protein kinase A.

  9. Harnessing RNAi-based nanomedicines for therapeutic gene silencing in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Shiri; Toker, Itai A.; Emmanuel, Rafi; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Goldsmith, Meir; Abraham, Avigdor; Benjamini, Ohad; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Nagler, Arnon; Lieberman, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in systemic small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the liver and to solid tumors, systemic siRNA delivery to leukocytes remains challenging. The ability to silence gene expression in leukocytes has great potential for identifying drug targets and for RNAi-based therapy for leukocyte diseases. However, both normal and malignant leukocytes are among the most difficult targets for siRNA delivery as they are resistant to conventional transfection reagents and are dispersed in the body. We used mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as a prototypic blood cancer for validating a novel siRNA delivery strategy. MCL is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma that overexpresses cyclin D1 with relatively poor prognosis. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 using RNA interference (RNAi) is a potential therapeutic approach to this malignancy. Here, we designed lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) coated with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies that are specifically taken up by human MCL cells in the bone marrow of xenografted mice. When loaded with siRNAs against cyclin D1, CD38-targeted LNPs induced gene silencing in MCL cells and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice with no observed adverse effects. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cyclin D1 therapy in MCL and present a novel RNAi delivery system that opens new therapeutic opportunities for treating MCL and other B-cell malignancies. PMID:26699502

  10. The RNAi machinery regulates growth and development in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Carreras-Villaseñor, Nohemi; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U; Villalobos-Escobedo, J Manuel; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    The RNAi machinery is generally involved in genome protection in filamentous fungi; however, the physiological role of RNAi has been poorly studied in fungal models. Here, we report that in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride, the products of the dcr2 and rdr3 genes control reproductive development, because mutations in these genes affect conidiation. In addition, Dcr1 together with Dcr2 control vegetative growth since Δdcr1, Δdcr2 and Δdcr1Δdcr2 present morphological alterations. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of WT, Δdcr1, Δdcr2 and Δdcr1Δdcr2 show that each Dicer controls different biological processes, such as development or metabolism, which could explain the lack of conidiation in the mutants. Finally, we observed sRNAs that are differentially expressed in the WT and Δdcr2. The expression of some of these sRNAs correlates with the expression of differential transcripts, suggesting that these mRNAs may contain the corresponding targets. Together these data show that in T. atroviride, the RNAi machinery plays a central role in endogenous processes such as development and fitness, beyond controlling genome protection against invasive nucleic acids as reported for other fungi.

  11. Genome-Wide RNAi Screening to Dissect the TGF-β Signal Transduction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochu; Xu, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family of cytokines figures prominently in regulation of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis from Drosophila to mammals. Genetic defects affecting TGF-β signaling underlie developmental disorders and diseases such as cancer in human. Therefore, delineating the molecular mechanism by which TGF-β regulates cell biology is critical for understanding normal biology and disease mechanisms. Forward genetic screens in model organisms and biochemical approaches in mammalian tissue culture were instrumental in initial characterization of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway. With complete sequence information of the genomes and the advent of RNA interference (RNAi) technology, genome-wide RNAi screening emerged as a powerful functional genomics approach to systematically delineate molecular components of signal transduction pathways. Here, we describe a protocol for image-based whole-genome RNAi screening aimed at identifying molecules required for TGF-β signaling into the nucleus. Using this protocol we examined >90 % of annotated Drosophila open reading frames (ORF) individually and successfully uncovered several novel factors serving critical roles in the TGF-β pathway. Thus cell-based high-throughput functional genomics can uncover new mechanistic insights on signaling pathways beyond what the classical genetics had revealed.

  12. A multivariate computational method to analyze high-content RNAi screening data

    PubMed Central

    Rameseder, Jonathan; Krismer, Konstantin; Dayma, Yogesh; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Floyd, Scott R.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    High-content screening (HCS) using RNA interference (RNAi) in combination with automated microscopy is a powerful investigative tool to explore complex biological processes. However, despite the plethora of data generated from these screens, little progress has been made in analyzing HC data using multivariate methods that exploit the full richness of multidimensional data. We developed a novel multivariate method for HCS, Multivariate Robust Analysis Method (M-RAM), integrating image feature selection with ranking of perturbations for hit identification, and applied this method to a HC RNAi screen to discover novel components of the DNA damage response in an osteosarcoma cell line. M-RAM automatically selects the most informative phenotypic readouts and time points to facilitate the more efficient design of follow-up experiments and enhance biological understanding. Our method outperforms univariate hit identification and identifies relevant genes that these approaches would have missed. We found that statistical cell-to-cell variation in phenotypic responses is an important predictor of ‘hits’ in RNAi-directed image-based screens. Genes that we identified as modulators of DNA damage signaling in U2OS cells include B-Raf, a cancer driver gene in multiple tumor types, whose role in DNA damage signaling we confirm experimentally, and multiple subunits of protein kinase A. PMID:25918037

  13. The Antiviral RNAi Response in Vector and Non-vector Cells against Orthobunyaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Mick; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Skelton, Jessica K.; Kohl, Alain; Elliott, Richard M.; Schnettler, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Background Vector arthropods control arbovirus replication and spread through antiviral innate immune responses including RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. Arbovirus infections have been shown to induce the exogenous small interfering RNA (siRNA) and Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathways, but direct antiviral activity by these host responses in mosquito cells has only been demonstrated against a limited number of positive-strand RNA arboviruses. For bunyaviruses in general, the relative contribution of small RNA pathways in antiviral defences is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings The genus Orthobunyavirus in the Bunyaviridae family harbours a diverse range of mosquito-, midge- and tick-borne arboviruses. We hypothesized that differences in the antiviral RNAi response in vector versus non-vector cells may exist and that could influence viral host range. Using Aedes aegypti-derived mosquito cells, mosquito-borne orthobunyaviruses and midge-borne orthobunyaviruses we showed that bunyavirus infection commonly induced the production of small RNAs and the effects of the small RNA pathways on individual viruses differ in specific vector-arbovirus interactions. Conclusions/Significance These findings have important implications for our understanding of antiviral RNAi pathways and orthobunyavirus-vector interactions and tropism. PMID:28060823

  14. Shrimp with knockdown of LvSOCS2, a negative feedback loop regulator of JAK/STAT pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei, exhibit enhanced resistance against WSSV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Song, Xuan; Zhang, Zijian; Li, Haoyang; L, Kai; Yin, Bin; He, Jianguo; Li, Chaozheng

    2016-12-01

    JAK/STAT pathway is one of cytokine signaling pathways and mediates diversity immune responses to protect host from viral infection. In this study, LvSOCS2, a member of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) families, has been cloned and identified from Litopenaeus vannamei. The full length of LvSOCS2 is 1601 bp, including an 1194 bp open reading frame (ORF) coding for a putative protein of 397 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of ∼42.3 kDa. LvSOCS2 expression was most abundant in gills and could respond to the challenge of LPS, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphhylococcus aureus, Poly (I: C) and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). There are several STAT binding motifs presented in the proximal promoter region of LvSOCS2 and its expression was induced by LvJAK or LvSTAT protein in a dose dependent manner, suggesting LvSOCS2 could be the transcriptional target gene of JAK/STAT pathway. Moreover, the transcription of DmVir-1, a read out of the activation of JAK/STAT pathway in Drosophila, was promoted by LvJAK but inhibited by LvSOCS2, indicating that LvSOCS2 could be a negative regulator in this pathway and thus can form a negative feedback loop. Our previous study indicated that shrimp JAK/STAT pathway played a positive role against WSSV. In this study, RNAi-mediated knockdown of LvSOCS2 shrimps showed lower susceptibility to WSSV infection and caused lessened virus loads, which further demonstrated that the JAK/STAT pathway could function as an anti-viral immunity in shrimp.

  15. Viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSS): novel strategy of viruses to ablate the host RNA interference (RNAi) defense system.

    PubMed

    Bivalkar-Mehla, Shalmali; Vakharia, Janaki; Mehla, Rajeev; Abreha, Measho; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Tikoo, Akshay; Chauhan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic viruses have developed a molecular defense arsenal for their survival by counteracting the host anti-viral system known as RNA interference (RNAi). Cellular RNAi, in addition to regulating gene expression through microRNAs, also serves as a barrier against invasive foreign nucleic acids. RNAi is conserved across the biological species, including plants, animals and invertebrates. Viruses in turn, have evolved mechanisms that can counteract this anti-viral defense of the host. Recent studies of mammalian viruses exhibiting RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity have further advanced our understanding of RNAi in terms of host-virus interactions. Viral proteins and non-coding viral RNAs can inhibit the RNAi (miRNA/siRNA) pathway through different mechanisms. Mammalian viruses having dsRNA-binding regions and GW/WG motifs appear to have a high chance of conferring RSS activity. Although, RSSs of plant and invertebrate viruses have been well characterized, mammalian viral RSSs still need in-depth investigations to present the concrete evidences supporting their RNAi ablation characteristics. The information presented in this review together with any perspective research should help to predict and identify the RSS activity-endowed new viral proteins that could be the potential targets for designing novel anti-viral therapeutics.

  16. RNAiFold 2.0: a web server and software to design custom and Rfam-based RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several algorithms for RNA inverse folding have been used to design synthetic riboswitches, ribozymes and thermoswitches, whose activity has been experimentally validated. The RNAiFold software is unique among approaches for inverse folding in that (exhaustive) constraint programming is used instead of heuristic methods. For that reason, RNAiFold can generate all sequences that fold into the target structure or determine that there is no solution. RNAiFold 2.0 is a complete overhaul of RNAiFold 1.0, rewritten from the now defunct COMET language to C++. The new code properly extends the capabilities of its predecessor by providing a user-friendly pipeline to design synthetic constructs having the functionality of given Rfam families. In addition, the new software supports amino acid constraints, even for proteins translated in different reading frames from overlapping coding sequences; moreover, structure compatibility/incompatibility constraints have been expanded. With these features, RNAiFold 2.0 allows the user to design single RNA molecules as well as hybridization complexes of two RNA molecules. Availability: the web server, source code and linux binaries are publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold2.0. PMID:26019176

  17. Analysis of chikungunya virus proteins reveals that non-structural proteins nsP2 and nsP3 exhibit RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor activity.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Kalika; Anand, Abhishek; Dubey, Sunil Kumar; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Bhatnagar, Raj K; Sunil, Sujatha

    2016-11-30

    RNAi pathway is an antiviral defence mechanism employed by insects that result in degradation of viral RNA thereby curbing infection. Several viruses including flaviviruses encode viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) to counteract the antiviral RNAi pathway. Till date, no VSR has been reported in alphaviruses. The present study was undertaken to evaluate chikungunya virus (CHIKV) proteins for RNAi suppressor activity. We systematically analyzed all nine CHIKV proteins for RNAi suppressor activity using Sf21 RNAi sensor cell line based assay. Two non-structural proteins, namely, nsP2 and nsP3 were found to exhibit RNAi suppressor activity. We further validated the findings in natural hosts, namely in Aedes and in mammalian cell lines and further through EMSA and Agrobacterium infiltration in GFP silenced transgenic tobacco plants. Domains responsible for maximum RNAi suppressor activity were also identified within these proteins. RNA binding motifs in these domains were identified and their participation in RNAi suppression evaluated using site directed mutagenesis. Sequence alignment of these motifs across all species of known alphaviruses revealed conservation of these motifs emphasizing on a similar role of action in other species of alphaviruses as well. Further validation of RNAi suppressor activity of these proteins awaits establishment of specific virus infection models.

  18. Analysis of chikungunya virus proteins reveals that non-structural proteins nsP2 and nsP3 exhibit RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor activity

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Kalika; Anand, Abhishek; Dubey, Sunil Kumar; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Bhatnagar, Raj K.; Sunil, Sujatha

    2016-01-01

    RNAi pathway is an antiviral defence mechanism employed by insects that result in degradation of viral RNA thereby curbing infection. Several viruses including flaviviruses encode viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) to counteract the antiviral RNAi pathway. Till date, no VSR has been reported in alphaviruses. The present study was undertaken to evaluate chikungunya virus (CHIKV) proteins for RNAi suppressor activity. We systematically analyzed all nine CHIKV proteins for RNAi suppressor activity using Sf21 RNAi sensor cell line based assay. Two non-structural proteins, namely, nsP2 and nsP3 were found to exhibit RNAi suppressor activity. We further validated the findings in natural hosts, namely in Aedes and in mammalian cell lines and further through EMSA and Agrobacterium infiltration in GFP silenced transgenic tobacco plants. Domains responsible for maximum RNAi suppressor activity were also identified within these proteins. RNA binding motifs in these domains were identified and their participation in RNAi suppression evaluated using site directed mutagenesis. Sequence alignment of these motifs across all species of known alphaviruses revealed conservation of these motifs emphasizing on a similar role of action in other species of alphaviruses as well. Further validation of RNAi suppressor activity of these proteins awaits establishment of specific virus infection models. PMID:27901124

  19. RNA Interference Knockdown of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 in Maize Reveals Novel Functions for Brassinosteroid Signaling in Controlling Plant Architecture.

    PubMed

    Kir, Gokhan; Ye, Huaxun; Nelissen, Hilde; Neelakandan, Anjanasree K; Kusnandar, Andree S; Luo, Anding; Inzé, Dirk; Sylvester, Anne W; Yin, Yanhai; Becraft, Philip W

    2015-09-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones involved in various growth and developmental processes. The BR signaling system is well established in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) but poorly understood in maize (Zea mays). BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) is a BR receptor, and database searches and additional genomic sequencing identified five maize homologs including duplicate copies of BRI1 itself. RNA interference (RNAi) using the extracellular coding region of a maize zmbri1 complementary DNA knocked down the expression of all five homologs. Decreased response to exogenously applied brassinolide and altered BR marker gene expression demonstrate that zmbri1-RNAi transgenic lines have compromised BR signaling. zmbri1-RNAi plants showed dwarf stature due to shortened internodes, with upper internodes most strongly affected. Leaves of zmbri1-RNAi plants are dark green, upright, and twisted, with decreased auricle formation. Kinematic analysis showed that decreased cell division and cell elongation both contributed to the shortened leaves. A BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1-yellow fluorescent protein (BES1-YFP) transgenic line was developed that showed BR-inducible BES1-YFP accumulation in the nucleus, which was decreased in zmbri1-RNAi. Expression of the BES1-YFP reporter was strong in the auricle region of developing leaves, suggesting that localized BR signaling is involved in promoting auricle development, consistent with the zmbri1-RNAi phenotype. The blade-sheath boundary disruption, shorter ligule, and disrupted auricle morphology of RNAi lines resemble KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) mutants, consistent with a mechanistic connection between KNOX genes and BR signaling.

  20. Goat activin receptor type IIB knockdown by muscle specific promoter driven artificial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amrutlal K; Shah, Ravi K; Patel, Utsav A; Tripathi, Ajai K; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-10-10

    Activin receptor type IIB (ACVR2B) is a transmembrane receptor which mediates signaling of TGF beta superfamily ligands known to function in regulation of muscle mass, embryonic development and reproduction. ACVR2B antagonism has shown to enhance the muscle growth in several disease and transgenic models. Here, we show ACVR2B knockdown by RNA interference using muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter driven artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Among the various promoter elements tested, the ∼1.26 kb MCK promoter region showed maximum transcriptional activity in goat myoblasts cells. We observed up to 20% silencing in non-myogenic 293T cells and up to 32% silencing in myogenic goat myoblasts by MCK directed amiRNAs by transient transfection. Goat myoblasts stably integrated with MCK directed amiRNAs showed merely 8% silencing in proliferating myoblasts which was increased to 34% upon induction of differentiation at transcript level whereas up to 57% silencing at protein level. Knockdown of ACVR2B by 5'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in decreased SMAD2/3 signaling, increased expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and enhanced proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Unexpectedly, knockdown of ACVR2B by 3'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in increased SMAD2/3 signaling, reduced expression of MRFs and suppression of myogenesis. Our study offers muscle specific knockdown of ACVR2B as a potential strategy to enhance muscle mass in the farm animal species.

  1. Strength knock-down assessment of porosity in composites: modelling, characterising and specimen manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Alison J.; Archer, Edward; McIlhagger, Alistair; Lelong, Guillaume

    2012-08-01

    Porosity and inclusion of foreign material is known to reduce the strength of materials, and this paper addresses the particular problem of strength knock-down assessment due to porosity in composite materials. Porosity is often measured in terms of percentage of voids per unit volume of a component, because this can be related directly to ultra-sound absorption. Nevertheless, this is a poor indicator of actual strength knock-down, as it provides little information about void size, shape, orientation and whether they are evenly distributed or are clustered. Characterisation of void clustering enables a link between a cluster characteristic and the strength knock-down. Laboratory based testing achieves controlled porosity in specimens by introducing pin-holes into the RTM in-flow pipework, which entrains voids into the body of the preform within mould tooling. Specimens are manufactured to create resin regions bounded by a fibre reinforced picture frame, to allow for easy load application. Strength knock-downs from test are related to the theoretical expectations.

  2. The functional genetic link of NLGN4X knockdown and neurodevelopment in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lingling; Chang, Xiao; Zhang, Peilin; Coba, Marcelo P; Lu, Wange; Wang, Kai

    2013-09-15

    Genetic mutations in NLGN4X (neuroligin 4), including point mutations and copy number variants (CNVs), have been associated with susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, it is unclear how mutations in NLGN4X result in neurodevelopmental defects. Here, we used neural stem cells (NSCs) as in vitro models to explore the impacts of NLGN4X knockdown on neurodevelopment. Using two shRNAmir-based vectors targeting NLGN4X and one control shRNAmir vector, we modulated NLGN4X expression and differentiated these NSCs into mature neurons. We monitored the neurodevelopmental process at Weeks 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6, based on morphological analysis and whole-genome gene expression profiling. At the cellular level, in NSCs with NLGN4X knockdown, we observed increasingly delayed neuronal development and compromised neurite formation, starting from Week 2 through Week 6 post differentiation. At the molecular level, we identified multiple pathways, such as neurogenesis, neuron differentiation and muscle development, which are increasingly disturbed in cells with NLGN4X knockdown. Notably, several postsynaptic genes, including DLG4, NLGN1 and NLGN3, also have decreased expression. Based on in vitro models, NLGN4X knockdown directly impacts neurodevelopmental process during the formation of neurons and their connections. Our functional genomics study highlights the utility of NSCs models in understanding the functional roles of CNVs in affecting neurodevelopment and conferring susceptibility to neurodevelopmental diseases.

  3. A cellular high-throughput screening approach for therapeutic trans-cleaving ribozymes and RNAi against arbitrary mRNA disease targets.

    PubMed

    Yau, Edwin H; Butler, Mark C; Sullivan, Jack M

    2016-10-01

    Major bottlenecks in development of therapeutic post transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents (e.g. ribozymes, RNA interference, antisense) include the challenge of mapping rare accessible regions of the mRNA target that are open for annealing and cleavage, testing and optimization of agents in human cells to identify lead agents, testing for cellular toxicity, and preclinical evaluation in appropriate animal models of disease. Methods for rapid and reliable cellular testing of PTGS agents are needed to identify potent lead candidates for optimization. Our goal was to develop a means of rapid assessment of many RNA agents to identify a lead candidate for a given mRNA associated with a disease state. We developed a rapid human cell-based screening platform to test efficacy of hammerhead ribozyme (hhRz) or RNA interference (RNAi) constructs, using a model retinal degeneration target, human rod opsin (RHO) mRNA. The focus is on RNA Drug Discovery for diverse retinal degeneration targets. To validate the approach, candidate hhRzs were tested against NUH↓ cleavage sites (N = G,C,A,U; H = C,A,U) within the target mRNA of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), a model gene expression reporter, based upon in silico predictions of mRNA accessibility. HhRzs were embedded in a larger stable adenoviral VAI RNA scaffold for high cellular expression, cytoplasmic trafficking, and stability. Most hhRz expression plasmids exerted statistically significant knockdown of extracellular SEAP enzyme activity when readily assayed by a fluorescence enzyme assay intended for high throughput screening (HTS). Kinetics of PTGS knockdown of cellular targets is measureable in live cells with the SEAP reporter. The validated SEAP HTS platform was transposed to identify lead PTGS agents against a model hereditary retinal degeneration target, RHO mRNA. Two approaches were used to physically fuse the model retinal gene target mRNA to the SEAP reporter mRNA. The most expedient way to

  4. Knockdown of HSPA9 induces TP53-dependent apoptosis in human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tuoen; Krysiak, Kilannin; Shirai, Cara Lunn; Kim, Sanghyun; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are the most common adult myeloid blood cancers in the US. Patients have increased apoptosis in their bone marrow cells leading to low peripheral blood counts. The full complement of gene mutations that contribute to increased apoptosis in MDS remains unknown. Up to 25% of MDS patients harbor and acquired interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 5 [del(5q)], creating haploinsufficiency for a large set of genes including HSPA9. Knockdown of HSPA9 in primary human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells significantly inhibits growth and increases apoptosis. We show here that HSPA9 knockdown is associated with increased TP53 expression and activity, resulting in increased expression of target genes BAX and p21. HSPA9 protein interacts with TP53 in CD34+ cells and knockdown of HSPA9 increases nuclear TP53 levels, providing a possible mechanism for regulation of TP53 by HSPA9 haploinsufficiency in hematopoietic cells. Concurrent knockdown of TP53 and HSPA9 rescued the increased apoptosis observed in CD34+ cells following knockdown of HSPA9. Reduction of HSPA9 below 50% results in severe inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that del(5q) cells may be preferentially sensitive to further reductions of HSPA9 below 50%, thus providing a genetic vulnerability to del(5q) cells. Treatment of bone marrow cells with MKT-077, an HSPA9 inhibitor, induced apoptosis in a higher percentage of cells from MDS patients with del(5q) compared to non-del(5q) MDS patients and normal donor cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that reduced levels of HSPA9 may contribute to TP53 activation and increased apoptosis observed in del(5q)-associated MDS.

  5. Knockdown of HSPA9 induces TP53-dependent apoptosis in human hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tuoen; Krysiak, Kilannin; Shirai, Cara Lunn; Kim, Sanghyun; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are the most common adult myeloid blood cancers in the US. Patients have increased apoptosis in their bone marrow cells leading to low peripheral blood counts. The full complement of gene mutations that contribute to increased apoptosis in MDS remains unknown. Up to 25% of MDS patients harbor and acquired interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 5 [del(5q)], creating haploinsufficiency for a large set of genes including HSPA9. Knockdown of HSPA9 in primary human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells significantly inhibits growth and increases apoptosis. We show here that HSPA9 knockdown is associated with increased TP53 expression and activity, resulting in increased expression of target genes BAX and p21. HSPA9 protein interacts with TP53 in CD34+ cells and knockdown of HSPA9 increases nuclear TP53 levels, providing a possible mechanism for regulation of TP53 by HSPA9 haploinsufficiency in hematopoietic cells. Concurrent knockdown of TP53 and HSPA9 rescued the increased apoptosis observed in CD34+ cells following knockdown of HSPA9. Reduction of HSPA9 below 50% results in severe inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that del(5q) cells may be preferentially sensitive to further reductions of HSPA9 below 50%, thus providing a genetic vulnerability to del(5q) cells. Treatment of bone marrow cells with MKT-077, an HSPA9 inhibitor, induced apoptosis in a higher percentage of cells from MDS patients with del(5q) compared to non-del(5q) MDS patients and normal donor cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that reduced levels of HSPA9 may contribute to TP53 activation and increased apoptosis observed in del(5q)-associated MDS. PMID:28178280

  6. The Pratylenchus penetrans Transcriptome as a Source for the Development of Alternative Control Strategies: Mining for Putative Genes Involved in Parasitism and Evaluation of in planta RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Paulo; Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Verma, Ruchi; Wantoch, Sarah; Eisenback, Jonathan D.; Kamo, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The root lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans is considered one of the most economically important species within the genus. Host range studies have shown that nearly 400 plant species can be parasitized by this species. To obtain insight into the transcriptome of this migratory plant-parasitic nematode, we used Illumina mRNA sequencing analysis of a mixed population, as well as nematode reads detected in infected soybean roots 3 and 7 days after nematode infection. Over 140 million paired end reads were obtained for this species, and de novo assembly resulted in a total of 23,715 transcripts. Homology searches showed significant hit matches to 58% of the total number of transcripts using different protein and EST databases. In general, the transcriptome of P. penetrans follows common features reported for other root lesion nematode species. We also explored the efficacy of RNAi, delivered from the host, as a strategy to control P. penetrans, by targeted knock-down of selected nematode genes. Different comparisons were performed to identify putative nematode genes with a role in parasitism, resulting in the identification of transcripts with similarities to other nematode parasitism genes. Focusing on the predicted nematode secreted proteins found in this transcriptome, we observed specific members to be up-regulated at the early time points of infection. In the present study, we observed an enrichment of predicted secreted proteins along the early time points of parasitism by this species, with a significant number being pioneer candidate genes. A representative set of genes examined using RT-PCR confirms their expression during the host infection. The expression patterns of the different candidate genes raise the possibility that they might be involved in critical steps of P. penetrans parasitism. This analysis sheds light on the transcriptional changes that accompany plant infection by P. penetrans, and will aid in identifying potential gene targets for

  7. Variation in RNAi efficacy among insect species is attributable to dsRNA degradation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangxu; Peng, Yingchuan; Pu, Jian; Fu, Wenxi; Wang, Jiale; Han, Zhaojun

    2016-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an essential technique in entomology research. However, RNAi efficiency appears to vary significantly among insect species. Here, the sensitivity of four insect species from different orders to RNAi was compared to understand the reason for this variation. A previously reported method was modified to monitor trace amounts of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). After the administration of dsRNA, the dynamics of its content was determined in the hemolymph, in addition to the capability of its degradation in both the hemolymph and the midgut juice. The results showed that injection of dsRNA targeting the homologous chitinase gene in Periplaneta americana, Zophobas atratus, Locusta migratoria, and Spodoptera litura, with doses (1.0, 2.3, 11.5, and 33.0 μg, respectively) resulting in the same initial hemolymph concentration, caused 82%, 78%, 76%, and 20% depletion, respectively, whereas feeding doses based on body weight (24, 24, 36, and 30 μg) accounted for 47%, 28%, 5%, and 1% depletion. The sensitivity of insects to RNAi was observed to be as follows: P. americana > Z. atratus >L. migratoria >S. litura. In vivo monitoring revealed that RNAi effects among these insect species were highly correlated with the hemolymph dsRNA contents. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrated that the hemolymph contents after dsRNA injection were dependent on hemolymph degradation capacities, and on the degradation capabilities in the midgut juice, when dsRNA was fed. In conclusion, the RNAi efficacy in different insect species was observed to depend on the enzymatic degradation of dsRNA, which functions as the key factor determining the inner target exposure dosages. Thus, enzymatic degradation in vivo should be taken into consideration for efficient use of RNAi in insects.

  8. Effects of PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASE (PAL) knockdown on cell wall composition, biomass digestibility, and biotic and abiotic stress responses in Brachypodium

    SciTech Connect

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Peraldi, Antoine; Dowd, Patrick F.; Mottiar, Yaseen; Santoro, Nicholas; Karlen, Steven D.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Foster, Cliff E.; Thrower, Nick; Bruno, Laura C.; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Johnson, Eric T.; Willhoit, Megan E.; Phutane, Megha; Ralph, John; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Nicholson, Paul; Sedbrook, John C.

    2015-06-19

    The phenylpropanoid pathway in plants synthesizes a variety of structural and defence compounds, and is an important target in efforts to reduce cell wall lignin for improved biomass conversion to biofuels. Little is known concerning the trade-offs in grasses when perturbing the function of the first gene family in the pathway, PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASE (PAL). Therefore, PAL isoforms in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon were targeted, by RNA interference (RNAi), and large reductions (up to 85%) in stem tissue transcript abundance for two of the eight putative BdPAL genes were identified. The cell walls of stems of BdPAL-knockdown plants had reductions of 43% in lignin and 57% in cell wall-bound ferulate, and a nearly 2-fold increase in the amounts of polysaccharide-derived carbohydrates released by thermochemical and hydrolytic enzymic partial digestion. PAL-knockdown plants exhibited delayed development and reduced root growth, along with increased susceptibilities to the fungal pathogens Fusarium culmorum and Magnaporthe oryzae. Surprisingly, these plants generally had wild-type (WT) resistances to caterpillar herbivory, drought, and ultraviolet light. RNA sequencing analyses revealed that the expression of genes associated with stress responses including ethylene biosynthesis and signalling were significantly altered in PAL knocked-down plants under non-challenging conditions. These data reveal that, although an attenuation of the phenylpropanoid pathway increases carbohydrate availability for biofuel, it can adversely affect plant growth and disease resistance to fungal pathogens. Lastly, the data identify notable differences between the stress responses of these monocot pal mutants versus Arabidopsis (a dicot) pal mutants and provide insights into the challenges that may arise when deploying phenylpropanoid pathway-altered bioenergy crops.

  9. Chemical & RNAi screening at MSKCC: a collaborative platform to discover & repurpose drugs to fight disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Mahida, Jeni P.; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Ibáñez, Glorymar; Raja, Balajee Somalinga; Calder, Paul A.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) has implemented the creation of a full service state-of-the-art High-throughput Screening Core Facility (HTSCF) equipped with modern robotics and custom-built screening data management resources to rapidly store and query chemical and RNAi screening data outputs. The mission of the facility is to provide oncology clinicians and researchers alike with access to cost-effective HTS solutions for both chemical and RNAi screening, with an ultimate goal of novel target identification and drug discovery. HTSCF was established in 2003 to support the institution’s commitment to growth in molecular pharmacology and in the realm of therapeutic agents to fight chronic diseases such as cancer. This endeavor required broad range of expertise in technology development to establish robust and innovative assays, large collections of diverse chemical and RNAi duplexes to probe specific cellular events, sophisticated compound and data handling capabilities, and a profound knowledge in assay development, hit validation, and characterization. Our goal has been to strive for constant innovation, and we strongly believe in shifting the paradigm from traditional drug discovery towards translational research now, making allowance for unmet clinical needs in patients. Our efforts towards repurposing FDA-approved drugs fructified when digoxin, identified through primary HTS, was administered in the clinic for treatment of stage Vb retinoblastoma. In summary, the overall aim of our facility is to identify novel chemical probes, to study cellular processes relevant to investigator’s research interest in chemical biology and functional genomics, and to be instrumental in accelerating the process of drug discovery in academia. PMID:24661215

  10. RNAi prevents and reverses phenotypes induced by mutant human ataxin‐1

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Megan S.; Monteys, Alejandro Mas; Corbau, Romuald; Gonzalez‐Alegre, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an autosomal dominant fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the coding region of ATXN1. We showed previously that partial suppression of mutant ataxin‐1 (ATXN1) expression, using virally expressed RNAi triggers, could prevent disease symptoms in a transgenic mouse model and a knockin mouse model of the disease, using a single dose of virus. Here, we set out to test whether RNAi triggers targeting ATXN1 could not only prevent, but also reverse disease readouts when delivered after symptom onset. Methods We administered recombinant adeno‐associated virus (rAAV) expressing miS1, an artificial miRNA targeting human ATXN1 mRNA (rAAV.miS1), to a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1; B05 mice). Viruses were delivered prior to or after symptom onset at multiple doses. Control B05 mice were treated with rAAVs expressing a control artificial miRNA, or with saline. Animal behavior, molecular phenotypes, neuropathology, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy were done on all groups, and data were compared to wild‐type littermates. Results We found that SCA1 phenotypes could be reversed by partial suppression of human mutant ATXN1 mRNA by rAAV.miS1 when delivered after symptom onset. We also identified the therapeutic range of rAAV.miS1 that could prevent or reverse disease readouts. Interpretation SCA1 disease may be reversible by RNAi therapy, and the doses required for advancing this therapy to humans are delineated. Ann Neurol 2016;80:754–765 PMID:27686464

  11. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human.

    PubMed

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H T; Moreira, José C F; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival.

  12. Self-assembling RNA nanorings based on RNAI/II inverse kissing complexes.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Wade W; Zakrevsky, Paul; Afonin, Kirill A; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Shapiro, Bruce A; Jaeger, Luc

    2011-02-09

    RNA is an attractive biopolymer for nanodesign of self-assembling particles for nanobiotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, we experimentally characterize by biochemical and biophysical methods the formation of thermostable and ribonuclease resistant RNA nanorings previously proposed by computational design. High yields of fully programmable nanorings were produced based on several RNAI/IIi kissing complex variants selected for their ability to promote polygon self-assembly. This self-assembly strategy relying on the particular geometry of bended kissing complexes has potential for developing short interfering RNA delivery agents.

  13. RNAi Codex: a portal/database for short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene-silencing constructs.

    PubMed

    Olson, A; Sheth, N; Lee, J S; Hannon, G; Sachidanandam, R

    2006-01-01

    Use of RNA interference (RNAi) in forward genetic screens is proliferating. Currently, short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are being used to silence genes to tease out functional information. It is becoming easier to harness RNAi to silence specific genes, owing to the development of libraries of readymade shRNA and siRNA gene-silencing constructs by using a variety of sources. RNAi Codex, which consists of a database of shRNA related information and an associated website, has been developed as a portal for publicly available shRNA resources and is accessible at http://codex.cshl.org. RNAi Codex currently holds data from the Hannon-Elledge shRNA library and allows the use of biologist-friendly gene names to access information on shRNA constructs that can silence the gene of interest. It is designed to hold user-contributed annotations and publications for each construct, as and when such data become available. We will describe features of RNAi Codex and explain the use of the tool.

  14. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E.; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects. PMID:27245473

  15. The possible impact of persistent virus infection on the function of the RNAi machinery in insects: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Swevers, Luc; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-01-01

    RNAi experiments in insects are characterized by great variability in efficiency; for instance beetles and locusts are very amenable to dsRNA-mediated gene silencing, while other insect groups, most notably lepidopterans, are more refractory to RNAi. Several factors can be forwarded that could affect the efficiency of RNAi, such as the composition and function of the intracellular RNAi machinery, the mechanism of dsRNA uptake, the presence of dsRNA- and siRNA-degrading enzymes and non-specific activation of the innate immune response. In this essay, we investigate the evidence whether persistent infection with RNA viruses could be a major factor that affects the response to exogenous dsRNA in insects. The occurrence of RNA viruses in different insect groups will be discussed, as well as several mechanisms by which viruses could interfere with the process of RNAi. Finally, the impact of RNA virus infection on the design of dsRNA-based insect control strategies will be considered.

  16. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-07-02

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects.

  17. An effective method for controlling false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2010-10-01

    In most genome-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screens, the ultimate goal is to select siRNAs with a large inhibition or activation effect. The selection of hits typically requires statistical control of 2 errors: false positives and false negatives. Traditional methods of controlling false positives and false negatives do not take into account the important feature in RNAi screens: many small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may have very small but real nonzero average effects on the measured response and thus cannot allow us to effectively control false positives and false negatives. To address for deficiencies in the application of traditional approaches in RNAi screening, the author proposes a new method for controlling false positives and false negatives in RNAi high-throughput screens. The false negatives are statistically controlled through a false-negative rate (FNR) or false nondiscovery rate (FNDR). FNR is the proportion of false negatives among all siRNAs examined, whereas FNDR is the proportion of false negatives among declared nonhits. The author also proposes new concepts, q*-value and p*-value, to control FNR and FNDR, respectively. The proposed method should have broad utility for hit selection in which one needs to control both false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens in a robust manner.

  18. The possible impact of persistent virus infection on the function of the RNAi machinery in insects: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Swevers, Luc; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-01-01

    RNAi experiments in insects are characterized by great variability in efficiency; for instance beetles and locusts are very amenable to dsRNA-mediated gene silencing, while other insect groups, most notably lepidopterans, are more refractory to RNAi. Several factors can be forwarded that could affect the efficiency of RNAi, such as the composition and function of the intracellular RNAi machinery, the mechanism of dsRNA uptake, the presence of dsRNA- and siRNA-degrading enzymes and non-specific activation of the innate immune response. In this essay, we investigate the evidence whether persistent infection with RNA viruses could be a major factor that affects the response to exogenous dsRNA in insects. The occurrence of RNA viruses in different insect groups will be discussed, as well as several mechanisms by which viruses could interfere with the process of RNAi. Finally, the impact of RNA virus infection on the design of dsRNA-based insect control strategies will be considered. PMID:24204347

  19. Transposon-mediated targeted and specific knockdown of maternally expressed transcripts in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Iitsuka, Takako; Mita, Kaoru; Hozumi, Akiko; Hamada, Mayuko; Satoh, Nori; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2014-05-23

    Maternal mRNAs play crucial roles during early embryogenesis of ascidians, but their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we developed a new method to specifically knockdown maternal mRNAs in Ciona intestinalis using transposon-mediated transgenesis. We found that GFP expression is epigenetically silenced in Ciona intestinalis oocytes and eggs, and this epigenetic silencing of GFP was used to develop the knockdown method. When the 5' upstream promoter and 5' untranslated region (UTR) of a maternal gene are used to drive GFP in eggs, the maternal gene is specifically knocked down together with GFP. The 5' UTR of the maternal gene is the major element that determines the target gene silencing. Zygotic transcription of the target gene is unaffected, suggesting that the observed phenotypes specifically reflect the maternal function of the gene. This new method can provide breakthroughs in studying the functions of maternal mRNAs.

  20. Knockdown strategies for the study of proprotein convertases and proliferation in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    D'Anjou, François; Couture, Frédéric; Desjardins, Roxane; Day, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Gene silencing strategies targeting mRNA are suitable methods to validate the functions of specific genes. In this chapter, we sought to compare two knockdown strategies for the study of proprotein convertases and proliferation in prostate cancer cells. We used both SOFA-HDV ribozyme and lentiviral-mediated shRNA delivery system to reduce PACE4 mRNA levels and validate its implication in the proliferation of DU145 prostate cancer cells. The cellular effects of PACE4 knockdown were assessed (1) in vitro using two tetrazolium salts (MTT and XTT assays) and (2) in vivo using a tumor xenograft approach in immunodeficient mice (Nu/Nu). Our results confirm the unique role of the proprotein convertase PACE4 in prostate cancer cell proliferation while demonstrating advantages and disadvantages of each approach. Achieving target validation in an effective manner is critical, as further development using a drug development approach is highly laborious and requires enormous resources.

  1. Knockdown of ERM family member moesin in host cells increases HIV type 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Capalbo, Gianni; Mueller-Kuller, Thea; Markovic, Sandra; Klein, Stefan A; Dietrich, Ursula; Hoelzer, Dieter; Ottmann, Oliver G; Scheuring, Urban J

    2011-12-01

    Moesin is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of cytoskeleton/membrane structure organizing and signal transduction proteins. Previously, we found an increased expression of moesin during HIV-1 infection. Moesin was also reported to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. To analyze whether moesin is a host factor affecting the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to evaluate the effect of moesin knockdown on HIV-1 replication in P4-CCR5 cells. Moesin's knockdown did not affect the cell viability or cell phenotype. Interestingly, we observed a marked increase in viral replication, as demonstrated by enhanced HIV-1 RNA, p24 antigen, and ß-galactosidase reporter expression. Moesin-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 replication was confirmed in lymphocytic host cells (Jurkat). These results suggest an overall rather restrictive role of moesin for HIV-1 replication in host cells in vitro.

  2. C/EBPβ knockdown protects cardiomyocytes from hypertrophy via inhibition of p65-NFκB.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian; Li, Hong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Siyu; Ye, Jiantao; Zhou, Changhua; Liu, Min; Zhang, Luankun; Yu, Na; Gan, Xiaohong; Zhou, Houfeng; Xian, Zhiwei; Chen, Shaorui; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-06-05

    C/EBPβ, a member of the bHLH gene family of DNA-binding transcription factors, has been indicated as a central signal in physiologic hypertrophy. However, the role of C/EBPβ in pathological cardiac hypertrophy remains to be elucidated. In this study, we revealed that C/EBPβ is involved in cardiac hypertrophy, the expression of C/EBPβ were significantly increased in response to hypertrophic stimulation in vitro and in vivo. C/EBPβ knockdown inhibited PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and diminished the nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of p65-NFκB. These results suggested that C/EBPβ knockdown protected cardiomyocytes from hypertrophy, which may be attributed to inhibition of NFκB-dependent transcriptional activity. These findings shed new light on the understanding of C/EBPβ-related cardiomyopathy, and suggest the potential application of C/EBPβ inhibitors in cardiac hypertrophy.

  3. Effects of Shell-Buckling Knockdown Factors in Large Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Shell-buckling knockdown factors (SBKF) have been used in large cylindrical shell structures to account for uncertainty in buckling loads. As the diameter of the cylinder increases, achieving the manufacturing tolerances becomes increasingly more difficult. Knockdown factors account for manufacturing imperfections in the shell geometry by decreasing the allowable buckling load of the cylinder. In this paper, large-diameter (33 ft) cylinders are investigated by using various SBKF's. An investigation that is based on finite-element analysis (FEA) is used to develop design sensitivity relationships. Different manufacturing imperfections are modeled into a perfect cylinder to investigate the effects of these imperfections on buckling. The analysis results may be applicable to large- diameter rockets, cylindrical tower structures, bulk storage tanks, and silos.

  4. Knockdown of MLO genes reduces susceptibility to powdery mildew in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Stefano; Lenzi, Luisa; Perazzolli, Michele; Campa, Manuela; Dalla Costa, Lorenza; Urso, Simona; Valè, Giampiero; Salamini, Francesco; Velasco, Riccardo; Malnoy, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Erysiphe necator is the causal agent of powdery mildew (PM), one of the most destructive diseases of grapevine. PM is controlled by sulfur-based and synthetic fungicides, which every year are dispersed into the environment. This is why PM-resistant varieties should become a priority for sustainable grapevine and wine production. PM resistance can be achieved in other crops by knocking out susceptibility S-genes, such as those residing at genetic loci known as MLO (Mildew Locus O). All MLO S-genes of dicots belong to the phylogenetic clade V, including grapevine genes VvMLO7, 11 and 13, which are upregulated during PM infection, and VvMLO6, which is not upregulated. Before adopting a gene-editing approach to knockout candidate S-genes, the evidence that loss of function of MLO genes can reduce PM susceptibility is necessary. This paper reports the knockdown through RNA interference of VvMLO6, 7, 11 and 13. The knockdown of VvMLO6, 11 and 13 did not decrease PM severity, whereas the knockdown of VvMLO7 in combination with VvMLO6 and VvMLO11 reduced PM severity up to 77%. The knockdown of VvMLO7 and VvMLO6 seemed to be important for PM resistance, whereas a role for VvMLO11 does not seem likely. Cell wall appositions (papillae) were present in both resistant and susceptible lines in response to PM attack. Thirteen genes involved in defense were less upregulated in infected mlo plants, highlighting the early mlo-dependent disruption of PM invasion. PMID:27390621

  5. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells leads to epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Ju; Jin, Guoxiang; Yu, Bin; Wang, Zai; Lin, Raozhou; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2015-07-17

    Polarization of epithelial cells requires vectorial sorting and transport of polarity proteins to apical or basolateral domains. Kif5b is the mouse homologue of the human ubiquitous Kinesin Heavy Chain (uKHC). To investigate the function of Kif5b in epithelial cells, we examined the phenotypes of Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate, profound changes in cell morphology, loss of epithelial cell marker, and gain of mesenchymal marker, as well as increased cell migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis abilities. E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells, and their expression levels were decreased in Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA in Kif5b depleted MDCK cells could decrease mesenchymal marker expression and cell migration ability. These results indicate that stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells can lead to epithelial–mesenchymal transition, which is mediated by defective E-cadherin and NMMIIA expression. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate. • Kif5b deficient MDCK cells underwent epithelial–mesenchymal transition. • E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells. • Decreased E-cadherin and NMMIIA levels mediate EMT in Kif5b deficient MDCK cells. • Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA reverse the effects of Kif5b knockdown.

  6. Selective knockdown of ceramide synthases reveals complex interregulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Thomas D; Spassieva, Stefka; Jenkins, Russell W; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian ceramide synthases 1 to 6 (CerS1-6) generate Cer in an acyl-CoA-dependent manner, and expression of individual CerS has been shown to enhance the synthesis of ceramides with particular acyl chain lengths. However, the contribution of each CerS to steady-state levels of specific Cer species has not been evaluated. We investigated the knockdown of individual CerS in the MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cell line by using small-interfering RNA (siRNA). We found that siRNA-induced downregulation of each CerS resulted in counter-regulation of nontargeted CerS. Additionally, each CerS knockdown produced unique effects on the levels of multiple sphingolipid species. For example, downregulation of CerS2 decreased very long-chain Cer but increased levels of CerS4, CerS5, and CerS6 expression and upregulated long-chain and medium-long-chain sphingolipids. Conversely, CerS6 knockdown decreased C16:0-Cer but increased CerS5 expression and caused non-C16:0 sphingolipids to be upregulated. Knockdown of individual CerS failed to decrease total sphingolipids or upregulate sphingoid bases. Treatment with siRNAs targeting combined CerS, CerS2, CerS5, and CerS6, did not change overall Cer or sphingomyelin mass but caused upregulation of dihydroceramide and hexosyl-ceramide and promoted endoplasmic reticulum stress. These data suggest that sphingolipid metabolism is robustly regulated by both redundancy in CerS-mediated Cer synthesis and counter-regulation of CerS expression.

  7. Knockdown of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im 25 kDa promotes neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Hidefumi; Soumiya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Shoei

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown promoted NGF-induced neurite out growth from PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of CFIm25 did not influence the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm regulated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via coordinating RhoA activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown increase the number of primary dendrites of hippocampal neurons. -- Abstract: Mammalian precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) cleavage factor I (CFIm) plays important roles in the selection of poly(A) sites in a 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR), producing mRNAs with variable 3 Prime ends. Because 3 Prime -UTRs often contain cis elements that impact stability or localization of mRNA or translation, alternative polyadenylation diversifies utilization of primary transcripts in mammalian cells. However, the physiological role of CFIm remains unclear. CFIm acts as a heterodimer comprising a 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) and one of the three large subunits-CFIm59, CFIm68, or CFIm72. CFIm25 binds directly to RNA and introduces and anchors the larger subunit. To examine the physiological roles of CFIm, we knocked down the CFIm25 gene in neuronal cells using RNA interference. Knockdown of CFIm25 increased the number of primary dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons and promoted nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite extension from rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells without affecting the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. On the other hand, CFIm25 knockdown did not influence constitutively active or dominantly negative RhoA suppression or promotion of NGF-induced neurite extension from PC12 cells, respectively. Taken together, our results indicate that endogenous CFIm may promote neuritogenesis in developing neurons by coordinating events upstream of NGF-induced RhoA inactivation.

  8. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Using DNA-Directed RNA Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    e _s~u~m mary - Introduction: Alphaviruses are a large family of RNA viruses that can cause acute infection resulting in arthritis and encephalitis...One of the important alphaviruses is the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. This virus has been linked to a number of outbreaks in both North and... replication of VEE virus in vitro. Bhogal, H.S., McLaws, L.J., and Jager, S.J. 2006. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2

  9. Nociception, neurogenic inflammation and thermoregulation in TRPV1 knockdown transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Dániel Márton; Szoke, Eva; Bölcskei, Kata; Kvell, Krisztián; Bender, Balázs; Bosze, Zsuzsanna; Szolcsányi, János; Sándor, Zoltán

    2011-08-01

    Transgenic mice with a small hairpin RNA construct interfering with the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) were created by lentiviral transgenesis. TRPV1 expression level in transgenic mice was reduced to 8% while the expression of ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPA1) was unchanged. Ear oedema induced by topical application of TRPV1 agonist capsaicin was completely absent in TRPV1 knockdown mice. Thermoregulatory behaviour in relation to environmental thermopreference (30 vs. 35°C) was slightly impaired in male knockdown mice, but the reduction of TRPV1 function was not associated with enhanced hyperthermia. TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin induced hypothermia and tail vasodilatation was markedly inhibited in knockdown mice. In conclusion, shRNA-mediated knock down of the TRPV1 receptor in mice induced robust inhibition of the responses to TRPV1 agonists without altering the expression, gating function or neurogenic oedema provoked by TRPA1 activation. Thermoregulatory behaviour in response to heat was inhibited, but enhanced hyperthermia was not observed.

  10. Role of HSF activation for resistance to heat, cold and high-temperature knock-down.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Holmstrup, Martin; Justesen, Just; Loeschcke, Volker

    2005-12-01

    Regulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by the heat shock factor (HSF) and the importance of these proteins for resistance to heat stress is well documented. Less characterized is the importance of Hsps for cold stress resistance although Hsp70 is known to be induced following long-term cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, a temperature-sensitive HSF mutant line was used to investigate the role of HSF activation following heat hardening, rapid cold hardening (RCH) and long-term cold acclimation (LTCA) on heat and cold resistance, and this was correlated with Hsp70 expression. In addition, the effect of HSF activation on high-temperature knock-down resistance was evaluated. We found a significantly decreased HSF activation in the mutant line as compared to a corresponding control line following heat hardening, and this was correlated with decreased heat resistance of the mutant line. However, we did not find this difference in HSF activity to be important for resistance to cold stress or high-temperature knock-down. The findings indicate that induction of stress genes regulated by HSF, such as Hsps, although occurring following LTCA, are not of major importance for cold stress resistance and neither for RCH nor high-temperature knock-down resistance in D. melanogaster.

  11. ETV4 and Myeov knockdown impairs colon cancer cell line proliferation and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Alan C. . E-mail: amoss@bidmc.harvard.edu; Lawlor, Garrett; Murray, David; Tighe, Donal; Madden, Stephen F.; Mulligan, Anne-Marie; Keane, Conor O.; Brady, Hugh R.; Doran, Peter P.; MacMathuna, Padraic

    2006-06-23

    We have identified novel colorectal cancer-associated genes using NCBI's UNIGENE cDNA libraries. Colon cancer libraries were examined using Digital Differential Display and disease-associated genes were selected. Among these were ETV4 and MYEOV, novel colorectal cancer-associated genes. Samples of matched normal and neoplastic colon were obtained from human subjects and gene expression was quantified using real-time PCR. ETV4 gene expression was significantly increased in colonic neoplasia in comparison to matched normal colonic tissue (p < 0.05). Myeov expression was also increased in colon neoplasia in comparison to matched normal tissue. The effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of ETV4 and Myeov on cell proliferation and invasion was assessed. ETV4 knockdown resulted in a 90% decrease in cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and a 67% decrease in cell invasion. Myeov knockdown resulted in a 48% decrease in cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and a 36% decrease in cell invasion. These data suggest that ETV4 and Myeov may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. RNF7 knockdown inhibits prostate cancer tumorigenesis by inactivation of ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yangjiong; Jiang, Yan; Song, Hongmei; Liang, Tao; Li, Yonghui; Yan, Dongliang; Fu, Qiang; Li, Zuowei

    2017-01-01

    Development of castration resistance is a key contributor to mortality in patients with prostate cancer. High expression of RING finger protein 7 (RNF7) in cancer cells is known to play a key role in tumor progression. However, the role of RNF7 in prostate cancer progression is not well elucidated. In this study, we silenced RNF7 by shRNA interference in two castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines, DU145 and PC3. RNF7 knockdown attenuated proliferation and enhanced sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to cisplatin treatment. Invasive property of DU145 and PC3 cells was also attenuated by RNF7 silencing. The underlying mechanisms appear to be associated with accumulation of tumor suppressive proteins p21, p27 and NOXA, while inactivation of ERK1/2 by RNF7 knockdown. We demonstrated that RNF7 knockdown induced growth suppression of prostate cancer cells and inactivated ERK1/2 pathway, which suggested RNF7 might be a potential novel therapeutic target for CRPC. PMID:28252001

  13. Genetic and chemical knockdown: a complementary strategy for evaluating an anti-infective target

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Singh, Ragini; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Mohapatra, Subrat; Khandelwal, Swati; Patel, Sanjana; Datta, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    The equity of a drug target is principally evaluated by its genetic vulnerability with tools ranging from antisense- and microRNA-driven knockdowns to induced expression of the target protein. In order to upgrade the process of antibacterial target identification and discern its most effective type of inhibition, an in silico toolbox that evaluates its genetic and chemical vulnerability leading either to stasis or cidal outcome was constructed and validated. By precise simulation and careful experimentation using enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase and its specific inhibitor glyphosate, it was shown that genetic knockdown is distinct from chemical knockdown. It was also observed that depending on the particular mechanism of inhibition, viz competitive, uncompetitive, and noncompetitive, the antimicrobial potency of an inhibitor could be orders of magnitude different. Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to glyphosate and the lack of it in Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be predicted by the in silico platform. Finally, as predicted and simulated in the in silico platform, the translation of growth inhibition to a cidal effect was able to be demonstrated experimentally by altering the carbon source from sorbitol to glucose. PMID:23413046

  14. Effects of ezrin knockdown on the structure of gastric glandular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Hiroto; Tetsui, Takahito; Kobayakawa, Yuka; Hatano, Ryo; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki; Asano, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Ezrin, an adaptor protein that cross-links plasma membrane-associated proteins with the actin cytoskeleton, is concentrated on apical surfaces of epithelial cells, especially in microvilli of the small intestine and stomach. In the stomach, ezrin is predominantly expressed on the apical canalicular membrane of parietal cells. Transgenic ezrin knockdown mice in which the expression level of ezrin was reduced to <7% compared with the wild-type suffered from achlorhydria because of impairment of membrane fusion between tubulovesicles and apical membranes. We observed, for the first time, hypergastrinemia and foveolar hyperplasia in the gastric fundic region of the knockdown mice. Dilation of fundic glands was observed, the percentage of parietal and chief cells was reduced, and that of mucous-secreting cells was increased. The parietal cells of knockdown mice contained dilated tubulovesicles and abnormal mitochondria, and subsets of these cells contained abnormal vacuoles and multilamellar structures. Therefore, lack of ezrin not only causes achlorhydria and hypergastrinemia but also changes the structure of gastric glands, with severe perturbation of the secretory membranes of parietal cells.

  15. Promising Noninvasive Cellular Phenotype in Prostate Cancer Cells Knockdown of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Cao, Wei; Sadashivaiah, Kavitha; Chen, Wantao; Schneider, Abraham; Chellaiah, Meenakshi A.

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface interaction of CD44 and MMP9 increases migration and invasion of PC3 cells. We show here that stable knockdown of MMP9 in PC3 cells switches CD44 isoform expression from CD44s to CD44v6 which is more glycosylated. These cells showed highly adhesive morphology with extensive cell spreading which is due to the formation of focal adhesions and well organized actin-stress fibers. MMP9 knockdown blocks invadopodia formation and matrix degradation activity as well. However, CD44 knockdown PC3 cells failed to develop focal adhesions and stress fibers; hence these cells make unstable adhesions. A part of the reason for these changes could be caused by silencing of CD44v6 as well. Immunostaining of prostate tissue microarray sections illustrated significantly lower levels of CD44v6 in adenocarcinoma than normal tissue. Our results suggest that interaction between CD44 and MMP9 is a potential mechanism of invadopodia formation. CD44v6 expression may be essential for the protection of non-invasive cellular phenotype. CD44v6 decrease may be a potential marker for prognosis and therapeutics. PMID:23476138

  16. Urate oxidase knockdown decreases oxidative stress in a murine hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Beth M; Leonard, Stephen S; Klandorf, Hillar; Blemings, Kenneth P

    2009-01-01

    Humans, birds, and some primates do not express the uric acid degrading enzyme urate oxidase (UOX) and, as a result, have plasma uric acid concentrations higher than UOX expressing animals. Although high uric acid concentrations are suggested to increase the antioxidant defense system and provide a health advantage to animals without UOX, knockout mice lacking UOX develop pathological complications including gout and kidney failure. As an alternative to the knockout model, RNA interference was used to decrease UOX expression using stable transfection in a mouse hepatic cell line (ATCC, FL83B). Urate oxidase mRNA was reduced 66% (p < 0.05) compared to wild type, as measured by real time RT-PCR. To determine if UOX knockdown resulted in enhanced protection against oxidative stress, cells were challenged with hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) or 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1). Compared to wild type, cells with UOX knockdown exhibited a 37.2 +/- 3.5% reduction (p < 0.05) in the electron spin resonance (ESR) signal after being exposed to Cr(VI) and displayed less DNA fragmentation (p < 0.05) following SIN-1 treatment. Cell viability decreased in wild type cells (p < 0.05), but not cells with UOX knockdown, after treatment with SIN-1. These results are consistent with an increased intracellular uric acid concentration and an increased defense against oxidative stress.

  17. Urate oxidase knockdown decreases oxidative stress in a murine hepatic cell line

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Beth M; Leonard, Stephen S; Klandorf, Hillar

    2009-01-01

    Humans, birds, and some primates do not express the uric acid degrading enzyme urate oxidase (UOX) and, as a result, have plasma uric acid concentrations higher than UOX expressing animals. Although high uric acid concentrations are suggested to increase the antioxidant defense system and provide a health advantage to animals without UOX, knockout mice lacking UOX develop pathological complications including gout and kidney failure. As an alternative to the knockout model, RNA interference was used to decrease UOX expression using stable transfection in a mouse hepatic cell line (ATCC, FL83B). Urate oxidase mRNA was reduced 66% (p < 0.05) compared to wild type, as measured by real time RT-PCR. To determine if UOX knockdown resulted in enhanced protection against oxidative stress, cells were challenged with hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) or 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1). Compared to wild type, cells with UOX knockdown exhibited a 37.2 ± 3.5% reduction (p < 0.05) in the electron spin resonance (ESR) signal after being exposed to Cr(VI) and displayed less DNA fragmentation (p < 0.05) following SIN-1 treatment. Cell viability decreased in wild type cells (p < 0.05), but not cells with UOX knockdown, after treatment with SIN-1. These results are consistent with an increased intracellular uric acid concentration and an increased defense against oxidative stress. PMID:20357931

  18. Knockdown of HOXA5 inhibits the tumorigenesis in esophageal squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Jiang-Hai; Suo, Zhi-Min

    2017-02-01

    Homeobox A5 (HOXA5) is a member of the homeobox (HOX) family and was upregulated in many types of tumors. However, its expression and role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unclear. In this study, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression and function of HOXA5 in ESCC. Our results showed that HOXA5 was highly expressed in ESCC cell lines. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that knockdown of HOXA5 significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of ESCC cells. Furthermore, the in vivo experiments showed that knockdown of HOXA5 significantly inhibited the tumor growth of ESCC in mice xenograft model. Finally, sh-HOXA5 inhibited the expression of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-Myc in ESCC cells. Taken together, these data revealed that knockdown of HOXA5 suppressed the proliferation and metastasis partly by interfering with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in ESCC cells. Therefore, these findings suggest that HOXA5 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ESCC.

  19. Genomic RNAi screening in Drosophila S2 cells: What have we learned about host-pathogen interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Sara

    2008-01-01

    The détente between pathogen and host has been of keen interest to researchers in spite of being exceedingly difficult to probe. Recently, new RNA interference (RNAi) technologies, in particular in Drosophila tissue culture cells, have made it possible to interrogate the genetics of host organisms rapidly, with nearly complete genomic coverage and high fidelity. Therefore, it is not surprising that the applications of RNAi to the study of host-pathogen interactions were amongst the first to be published, and have already revealed many new insights into the hosts’ role in infection. This review will highlight the application of RNAi screening to pathogen-host interactions in Drosophila cells and will reveal some of the lessons learned from this approach. PMID:18539520

  20. Quantitative proteomics reveals direct and indirect alterations in the histone code following methyltransferase knockdown.

    PubMed

    Plazas-Mayorca, Mariana D; Bloom, Joshua S; Zeissler, Ulrike; Leroy, Gary; Young, Nicolas L; DiMaggio, Peter A; Krugylak, Leonid; Schneider, Robert; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2010-09-01

    Histones are highly conserved proteins that organize cellular DNA. These proteins, especially their N-terminal domains, are adorned with many post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as lysine methylation, which are associated with active or repressed transcriptional states. The lysine methyltransferase G9a and its interaction partner Glp1 can mono- or dimethylate histone H3 on lysine (H3K9me1 or me2); possible cross-talk between these modifications and other PTMs on the same or other histone molecules is currently uncharacterized. In this study, we comprehensively analyze the effects of G9a/Glp1 knockdown on the most abundant histone modifications through both Bottom Up and Middle Down mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In addition to the expected decrease in H3K9me1/me2 we find that other degrees of methylation on K9 are affected by the reduction of G9a/Glp1 activity, particularly when K9 methylation occurs in combination with K14 acetylation. In line with this, an increase in K14 acetylation upon G9a knockdown was observed across all H3 variants (H3.1, H3.2 and H3.3), hinting at the potential existence of a binary switch between K9 methylation and K14 acetylation. Interestingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of other modifications (such as H3K79me2) in response to lowered levels of G9a/Glp1 suggesting histone PTM cross-talk amongst the H3 variants. In contrast, we find that G9a/Glp1 knockdown produces little effect on the levels of histone H4 PTMs, indicating low to no trans-histone PTM crosstalk. Lastly, we determined gene expression profiles of control and G9a/Glp1 knockdown cells, and we find that the G9a/Glp1 knockdown influences several genes, including DNA binding proteins and key factors in chromatin. Our results provide new insights into the intra- and inter- histone cross-regulation of histone K9 methylation and its potential downstream gene targets.

  1. Knockdown of FAM3B triggers cell apoptosis through p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Mou, Haiwei; Li, Zongmeng; Yao, Pengle; Zhuo, Shu; Luan, Wei; Deng, Bo; Qian, Lihua; Yang, Mengmei; Mei, Hong; Le, Yingying

    2013-03-01

    FAM3B, also named PANDER, is a cytokine-like protein identified in 2002. Previous studies showed that FAM3B regulates glucose and lipid metabolism through interaction with liver and endocrine pancreas. FAM3B is also expressed by other tissues but its basic function is unclear. In this study, we found that FAM3B was expressed in mouse colon, intestine, liver and lung tissues and multiple types of cell lines, including murine pancreatic β-cell (Min6), microglia (N9) and muscle cell (C2C12); human colon cancer cells (HCT8, HCT116, HT29), hepatocyte (HL-7702), hepatocellular carcinoma cell (SMMC-7721) and lung carcinoma cell (A549). Inhibition of FAM3B expression by RNA interference induced apoptotic cell death of HCT8, HCT116, A549, N9, C2C12 and Min6 cells and decreased cell viability of HL-7702 and murine primary hepatocytes. Further studies with HCT8 cells showed that knockdown of FAM3B increased the protein levels of membrane-bound Fas and Bax, reduced the expression of Bcl-2, promoted the cleavage of caspases-8, -3, -9 and PARP, and the nuclear translocation of cleaved PARP. These results suggest that FAM3B silencing activates both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Mechanistic studies showed that neutralizing antibody against Fas or silencing Fas-associated death domain had no effect on, while caspase inhibitors could significantly reverse FAM3B knockdown induced apoptosis, suggesting Fas and death receptor mediated extrinsic apoptotic pathway is not involved in FAM3B silencing induced apoptosis. Further studies showed that p53 was significantly upregulated after FAM3B knockdown. Silencing p53 could almost completely reverse FAM3B knockdown induced upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, cleavage of caspases-8, -9, -3, and apoptotic cell death, suggesting p53-dependent pathway plays critical roles in FAM3B silencing induced apoptosis. Studies with HCT116 cells confirmed that inhibition of FAM3B expression induced apoptosis through p53-dependent

  2. Developing an in vivo toxicity assay for RNAi risk assessment in honey bees, Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Ana María; Jurzenski, Jessica; Matz, Natalie; Zhou, Xuguo; Wang, Haichuan; Ellis, Marion; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-02-01

    Maize plants expressing dsRNA for the management of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera are likely to be commercially available by the end of this decade. Honey bees, Apis mellifera, can potentially be exposed to pollen from transformed maize expressing dsRNA. Consequently, evaluation of the biological impacts of RNAi in honey bees is a fundamental component for ecological risk assessment. The insecticidal activity of a known lethal dsRNA target for D. v. virgifera, the vATPase subunit A, was evaluated in larval and adult honey bees. Activity of both D. v. virgifera (Dvv)- and A. mellifera (Am)-specific dsRNA was tested by dietary exposure to dsRNA. Larval development, survival, adult eclosion, adult life span and relative gene expression were evaluated. The results of these tests indicated that Dvv vATPase-A dsRNA has limited effects on larval and adult honey bee survival. Importantly, no effects were observed upon exposure of Am vATPase-A dsRNA suggesting that the lack of response involves factors other than sequence specificity. The results from this study provide guidance for future RNAi risk analyses and for the development of a risk assessment framework that incorporates similar hazard assessments.

  3. RNAi-based therapeutics targeting survivin and PLK1 for treatment of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Seth, Shaguna; Matsui, Yoshiyuki; Fosnaugh, Kathy; Liu, Yan; Vaish, Narendra; Adami, Roger; Harvie, Pierrot; Johns, Rachel; Severson, Gregory; Brown, Tod; Takagi, Akihide; Bell, Susan; Chen, Yan; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Tianying; Fam, Renata; Maciagiewicz, Iwona; Kwang, Erin; McCutcheon, Michael; Farber, Ken; Charmley, Patrick; Houston, Michael E; So, Alan; Templin, Michael V; Polisky, Barry

    2011-05-01

    Harnessing RNA interference (RNAi) to silence aberrant gene expression is an emerging approach in cancer therapy. Selective inhibition of an overexpressed gene via RNAi requires a highly efficacious, target-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) and a safe and efficient delivery system. We have developed siRNA constructs (UsiRNA) that contain unlocked nucleobase analogs (UNA) targeting survivin and polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1) genes. UsiRNAs were encapsulated into dialkylated amino acid-based liposomes (DiLA(2)) containing a nor-arginine head group, cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHEMS), cholesterol and 1, 2-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-polyethyleneglycol 2000 (DMPE-PEG2000). In an orthotopic bladder cancer mouse model, intravesical treatment with survivin or PLK1 UsiRNA in DiLA(2) liposomes at 1.0 and 0.5 mg/kg resulted in 90% and 70% inhibition of survivin or PLK1 mRNA, respectively. This correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in tumor volumes which was sustained over a 3-week period. Silencing of survivin and PLK1 mRNA was confirmed to be RNA-induced silencing complex mediated as specific cleavage products were detected in bladder tumors over the duration of the study. This report suggests that intravesical instillation of survivin or PLK1 UsiRNA can serve as a potential therapeutic modality for treatment of bladder cancer.

  4. A biodistribution study of solid lipid-polyethyleneimine hybrid nanocarrier for cancer RNAi therapy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui Yi; Tran, Ngoc; Wong, Ho Lun

    2016-11-01

    Solid lipid-polymer hybrid nanocarrier (LPN) was previously reported to achieve high siRNA transfection efficiency and induce sustained RNAi-based chemosensitizing effect at cellular level. In this study, our objectives were to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of LPNs in a prostate cancer model and determine the factors that potentially affect tumor penetration by LPNs. The LPN formulation with the highest transfection efficiency (64%) and stability was selected for the study. Mice bearing tumors of PC-3Mcells were treated with LPNs labeled with IR780 or AF647-siRNA. Near infrared imaging showed that LPNs achieved favorable in vivo biodistribution with high tumor/low organ ratios. LPN accumulation was also observed in liver metastatic tissue. Result of extravasation study confirmed that encapsulated siRNA molecules were able to escape into the tumor tissue at the extravascular area. When LPN levels in large (volume>750mm(3)) and small (<500mm(3)) tumors were compared, no significant difference was observed. However, both docetaxel pretreatment (72hbefore LPN) and concurrent docetaxel treatment significantly enhanced the tumor LPN levels by 3.9- and 3.1-fold, respectively (both p<0.01). In conclusion, LPN is a promising carrier system to deliver RNAi therapy to solid malignancies that also receive chemotherapy.

  5. Adeno Associated Viral Vector Delivered RNAi for Gene Therapy of SOD1 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stoica, Lorelei; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are a leading cause of ALS, responsible for up to 20% of familial cases. Although the exact mechanism by which mutant SOD1 causes disease remains unknown, multiple studies have shown that reduction of the mutant species leads to delayed disease onset and extension of lifespan of animal models. This makes SOD1 an ideal target for gene therapy coupling adeno associated virus vector (AAV) gene delivery with RNAi molecules. In this review we summarize the studies done thus far attempting to decrease SOD1 gene expression, using AAV vectors as delivery tools, and RNAi as therapeutic molecules. Current hurdles to be overcome, such as the need for widespread gene delivery through the entire central nervous system (CNS), are discussed. Continued efforts to improve current AAV delivery methods and capsids will accelerate the application of these therapeutics to the clinic. PMID:27531973

  6. Large scale RNAi reveals the requirement of nuclear envelope breakdown for nuclear import of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Inci; Weber, Susanne; Snijder, Berend; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Kühbacher, Andreas; Becker, Miriam; Day, Patricia M; Schiller, John T; Kann, Michael; Pelkmans, Lucas; Helenius, Ari; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-05-01

    A two-step, high-throughput RNAi silencing screen was used to identify host cell factors required during human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infection. Analysis of validated hits implicated a cluster of mitotic genes and revealed a previously undetermined mechanism for import of the viral DNA (vDNA) into the nucleus. In interphase cells, viruses were endocytosed, routed to the perinuclear area, and uncoated, but the vDNA failed to be imported into the nucleus. Upon nuclear envelope perforation in interphase cells HPV16 infection occured. During mitosis, the vDNA and L2 associated with host cell chromatin on the metaphase plate. Hence, we propose that HPV16 requires nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis for access of the vDNA to the nucleoplasm. The results accentuate the value of genes found by RNAi screens for investigation of viral infections. The list of cell functions required during HPV16 infection will, moreover, provide a resource for future virus-host cell interaction studies.

  7. Transmission bottlenecks and RNAi collectively influence tick-borne flavivirus evolution

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Rückert, Claudia; Armstrong, Philip M.; Bransfield, Angela; Anderson, John F.; Ebel, Gregory D.; Brackney, Doug E.

    2016-01-01

    Arthropod-borne RNA viruses exist within hosts as heterogeneous populations of viral variants and, as a result, possess great genetic plasticity. Understanding the micro-evolutionary forces shaping these viruses can provide insights into how they emerge, adapt