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Sample records for aav9 capsid protein

  1. Engineering Liver-detargeted AAV9 Vectors for Cardiac and Musculoskeletal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Pulicherla, Nagesh; Shen, Shen; Yadav, Swati; Debbink, Kari; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Asokan, Aravind

    2011-01-01

    We report the generation of a new class of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-derived vectors displaying selective loss of liver tropism and demonstrating potential for cardiac and musculoskeletal gene transfer applications. Random mutagenesis of residues within a surface-exposed region of the major AAV9 capsid protein yielded a capsid library with mutations clustered at the icosahedral threefold symmetry axis. Using a combination of sequence analysis, structural models, and in vivo screening, we identified several functionally diverse AAV9 variants. The latter were classified into three functional subgroups, with respect to parental AAV9 displaying: (i) decreased transduction efficiency across multiple tissues; (ii) a selective decrease in liver transduction, or (iii) a similar transduction profile. Notably, variants 9.45 and 9.61 (subgroup II) displayed 10- to 25-fold lower gene transfer efficiency in liver, while transducing cardiac and skeletal muscle as efficiently as AAV9. These results were further corroborated by quantitation of vector genome copies and histological analysis of reporter (tdTomato) gene expression. The study highlights the feasibility of generating AAV vectors with selectively ablated tissue tropism, which when combined with other targeting strategies could allow sharply segregated gene expression. Liver-detargeted AAV9 variants described herein are excellent candidates for preclinical evaluation in animal models of cardiac and musculoskeletal disease. PMID:21364538

  2. Pre-immunization with an Intramuscular Injection of AAV9-Human Erythropoietin Vectors Reduces the Vector-Mediated Transduction following Re-Administration in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Yang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Sha-Sha; Ma, Bao-Feng; Li, Bin; Lu, Tao; Qu, Ting-Yu; Klein, Ronald L.; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-mediated human erythropoietin (hEPO) gene delivery into the brain protects dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. In the present study, we examined whether pre-exposure to AAV9-hEPO vectors with an intramuscular or intrastriatal injection would reduce AAV9-mediated hEPO transduction in rat brain. We first characterized transgene expression and immune responses against AAV9-hEPO vectors in rat striatum at 4 days, 3 weeks and 6 months, and with doses ranging from 1011 to 1013 viral genomes. To sensitize immune system, rats received an injection of AAV9-hEPO into either the muscle or the left striatum, and then sequentially an injection of AAV9-hEPO into the right striatum 3 weeks later. We observed that transgene expression exhibited in a time course and dose dependent manner, and inflammatory and immune responses displayed in a time course manner. Intramuscular, but not intrastriatal injections of AAV9-hEPO resulted in reduced levels of hEPO transduction and increased levels of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II antigen expression in the striatum following AAV9-hEPO re-administration. There were infiltration of the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4)-and CD8-lymphacytes, and accumulation of activated microglial cells and astrocytes in the virally injected striatum. In addition, the sera from the rats with intramuscular injections of AAV9-hEPO contained greater levels of antibodies against both AAV9 capsid protein and hEPO protein than the other treatment groups. hEPO gene expression was negatively correlated with the levels of circulating antibodies against AAV9 capsid protein. Intramuscular and intrastriatal re-administration of AAV9-hEPO led to increased numbers of red blood cells in peripheral blood. Our results suggest that pre-immunization with an intramuscular injection can lead to the reduction of transgene

  3. AAV9-mediated engineering of autotransplanted kidney of non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Tomasoni, S; Trionfini, P; Azzollini, N; Zentilin, L; Giacca, M; Aiello, S; Longaretti, L; Cozzi, E; Baldan, N; Remuzzi, G; Benigni, A

    2017-05-01

    Ex vivo gene transfer to the graft before transplantation is an attractive option for circumventing systemic side effects of chronic antirejection therapy. Gene delivery of the immunomodulatory protein cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4-Ig) prevented chronic kidney rejection in a rat model of allotransplantation without the need for systemic immunosuppression. Here we generated adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) and AAV9 vectors encoding for LEA29Y, an optimized version of CTLA4-Ig. Both LEA29Y vectors were equally efficient for reducing T-cell proliferation in vitro. Serotype 9 was chosen for in vivo experiments owing to a lower frequency of preformed antibodies against the AAV9 capsid in 16 non-human primate tested sera. AAV9-LEA29Y was able to transduce the kidney of non-human primates in an autotransplantation model. Expression of LEA29Y mRNA by renal cells translated into the production of the corresponding protein, which was confined to the graft but not detected in serum. Results in non-human primates represent a step forward in maintaining the portability of this strategy into clinics.

  4. Systemic Delivery of shRNA by AAV9 Provides Highly Efficient Knockdown of Ubiquitously Expressed GFP in Mouse Heart, but Not Liver

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Bryan A.; O’Connor, Daniel M.; French, Brent A.

    2013-01-01

    AAV9 is a powerful gene delivery vehicle capable of providing long-term gene expression in a variety of cell types, particularly cardiomyocytes. The use of AAV-delivery for RNA interference is an intense area of research, but a comprehensive analysis of knockdown in cardiac and liver tissues after systemic delivery of AAV9 has yet to be reported. We sought to address this question by using AAV9 to deliver a short-hairpin RNA targeting the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transgenic mice that constitutively overexpress GFP in all tissues. The expression cassette was initially tested in vitro and we demonstrated a 61% reduction in mRNA and a 90% reduction in GFP protein in dual-transfected 293 cells. Next, the expression cassette was packaged as single-stranded genomes in AAV9 capsids to test cardiac GFP knockdown with several doses ranging from 1.8×1010 to 1.8×1011 viral genomes per mouse and a dose-dependent response was obtained. We then analyzed GFP expression in both heart and liver after delivery of 4.4×1011 viral genomes per mouse. We found that while cardiac knockdown was highly efficient, with a 77% reduction in GFP mRNA and a 71% reduction in protein versus control-treated mice, there was no change in liver expression. This was despite a 4.5-fold greater number of viral genomes in the liver than in the heart. This study demonstrates that single-stranded AAV9 vectors expressing shRNA can be used to achieve highly efficient cardiac-selective knockdown of GFP expression that is sustained for at least 7 weeks after the systemic injection of 8 day old mice, with no change in liver expression and no evidence of liver damage despite high viral genome presence in the liver. PMID:24086659

  5. Theoretical studies of viral capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Phelps, D K; Speelman, B; Post, C B

    2000-04-01

    Recent results in structural biology and increases in computer power have prompted initial theoretical studies on capsids of nonenveloped icosahedral viruses. The macromolecular assembly of 60 to 180 protein copies into a protein shell results in a structure of considerable size for molecular dynamics simulations. Nonetheless, progress has been made in examining these capsid assemblies from molecular dynamics calculations and kinetic models. The goals of these studies are to understand capsid function and structural properties, including quarternary structural stability, effects of antiviral compounds that bind the capsid and the self-assembly process. The insight that can be gained from the detailed information provided by simulations is demonstrated in studies of human rhinovirus; an entropic basis for the antiviral activity of hydrophobic compounds, predicted from calculated compressibility values, has been corroborated by experimental measurements on poliovirus.

  6. Assembly of bacteriophage P2 capsids from capsid protein fused to internal scaffolding protein

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jenny R.; Spilman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Most tailed bacteriophages with double-stranded DNA genomes code for a scaffolding protein, which is required for capsid assembly, but is removed during capsid maturation and DNA packaging. The gpO scaffolding protein of bacteriophage P2 also doubles as a maturation protease, while the scaffolding activity is confined to a 90 residue C-terminal “scaffolding” domain. Bacteriophage HK97 lacks a separate scaffolding protein; instead, an N-terminal “delta” domain in the capsid protein appears to serve an analogous role. We asked whether the C-terminal scaffolding domain of gpO could work as a delta domain when fused to the gpN capsid protein. Varying lengths of C-terminal sequences from gpO were fused to the N-terminus of gpN and expressed in E. coli. The presence of just the 41 C-terminal residues of gpO increased the fidelity of assembly and promoted the formation of closed shells, but the shells formed were predominantly small, 40 nm shells, compared to the normal, 55 nm P2 procapsid shells. Larger scaffolding domains fused to gpN caused the formation of shells of varying size and shape. The results suggest that while fusing the scaffolding protein to the capsid protein assists in shell closure, it also restricts the conformational variability of the capsid protein. PMID:20063181

  7. Protein-Protein Interfaces in Viral Capsids Are Structurally Unique.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanshan; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-11-06

    Viral capsids exhibit elaborate and symmetrical architectures of defined sizes and remarkable mechanical properties not seen with cellular macromolecular complexes. Given the uniqueness of the higher-order organization of viral capsid proteins in the virosphere, we explored the question of whether the patterns of protein-protein interactions within viral capsids are distinct from those in generic protein complexes. Our comparative analysis involving a non-redundant set of 551 inter-subunit interfaces in viral capsids from VIPERdb and 20,014 protein-protein interfaces in non-capsid protein complexes from the Protein Data Bank found 418 generic protein-protein interfaces that share similar physicochemical patterns with some protein-protein interfaces in the capsid set, using the program PCalign we developed for comparing protein-protein interfaces. This overlap in the structural space of protein-protein interfaces is significantly small, with a p-value <0.0001, based on a permutation test on the total set of protein-protein interfaces. Furthermore, the generic protein-protein interfaces that bear similarity in their spatial and chemical arrangement with capsid ones are mostly small in size with fewer than 20 interfacial residues, which results from the relatively limited choices of natural design for small interfaces rather than having significant biological implications in terms of functional relationships. We conclude based on this study that protein-protein interfaces in viral capsids are non-representative of patterns in the smaller, more compact cellular protein complexes. Our finding highlights the design principle of building large biological containers from repeated, self-assembling units and provides insights into specific targets for antiviral drug design for improved efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-Complementary AAV9 Gene Delivery Partially Corrects Pathology Associated with Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (CLN3).

    PubMed

    Bosch, Megan E; Aldrich, Amy; Fallet, Rachel; Odvody, Jessica; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Schuberth, Kaitlyn; Fitzgerald, Julie A; Foust, Kevin D; Kielian, Tammy

    2016-09-14

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is a fatal lysosomal storage disease caused by autosomal-recessive mutations in CLN3 for which no treatment exists. Symptoms appear between 5 and 10 years of age, beginning with blindness and seizures, followed by progressive cognitive and motor decline and premature death (late teens to 20s). We explored a gene delivery approach for JNCL by generating two self-complementary adeno-associated virus 9 (scAAV9) constructs to address CLN3 dosage effects using the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and β-actin promoters to drive low versus high transgene expression, respectively. This approach was based on the expectation that low CLN3 levels are required for cellular homeostasis due to minimal CLN3 expression postnatally, although this had not yet been demonstrated in vivo One-month-old Cln3(Δex7/8) mice received one systemic (intravenous) injection of scAAV9/MeCP2-hCLN3 or scAAV9/β-actin-hCLN3, with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing viruses as controls. A promoter-dosage effect was observed in all brain regions examined, in which hCLN3 levels were elevated 3- to 8-fold in Cln3(Δex7/8) mice receiving scAAV9/β-actin-hCLN3 versus scAAV9/MeCP2-hCLN3. However, a disconnect occurred between CLN3 levels and disease improvement, because only the scAAV9 construct driving low CLN3 expression (scAAV9/MeCP2-hCLN3) corrected motor deficits and attenuated microglial and astrocyte activation and lysosomal pathology. This may have resulted from preferential promoter usage because transgene expression after intravenous scAAV9/MeCP2-GFP injection was primarily detected in NeuN(+) neurons, whereas scAAV9/β-actin-GFP drove transgene expression in GFAP(+) astrocytes. This is the first demonstration of a systemic delivery route to restore CLN3 in vivo using scAAV9 and highlights the importance of promoter selection for disease modification in juvenile animals. Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is a fatal lysosomal

  9. AAV-8 is more efficient than AAV-9 in transducing neonatal dog heart.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiufang; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Hakim, Chady H; Kodippili, Kasun; McDonald, Thomas; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype-8 and 9 (AAV-8 and 9) are the leading candidate vectors to test bodywide neonatal muscle gene therapy in large mammals. We have previously shown that systemic injection of 2-2.5×10(14) viral genome (vg) particles/kg of AAV-9 resulted in widespread skeletal muscle gene transfer in newborn dogs. However, nominal transduction was observed in the heart. In contrast, robust expression was achieved in both skeletal muscle and heart in neonatal dogs with 7.14-9.06×10(14) vg particles/kg of AAV-8. To determine whether superior cardiac transduction of AAV-8 is because of the higher vector dose, we delivered 6.14×10(14) and 9.65×10(14) vg particles/kg of AAV-9 to newborn puppies via the jugular vein. Transduction was examined 2.5 months later. Consistent with our previous reports, we observed robust bodywide transduction in skeletal muscle. However, increased AAV dose only moderately improved heart transduction. It never reached the level achieved by AAV-8. Our results suggest that differential cardiac transduction by AAV-8 and AAV-9 is likely because of the intrinsic property of the viral capsid rather than the vector dose.

  10. Tailored transgene expression to specific cell types in the central nervous system after peripheral injection with AAV9

    PubMed Central

    Dashkoff, Jonathan; Lerner, Eli P; Truong, Nhi; Klickstein, Jacob A; Fan, Zhanyun; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A; Hyman, Bradley T; Hudry, Eloise

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of certain adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to cross the blood–brain barrier after intravenous delivery offers a unique opportunity for noninvasive brain delivery. However, without a well-tailored system, the use of a peripheral route injection may lead to undesirable transgene expression in nontarget cells or organs. To refine this approach, the present study characterizes the transduction profiles of new self-complementary AAV9 (scAAV9) expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) either under an astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic (GFA) protein) or neuronal (Synapsin (Syn)) promoter, after intravenous injection of adult mice (2 × 1013 vg/kg). ScAAV9-GFA-GFP and scAAV9-Syn-GFP robustly transduce astrocytes (11%) and neurons (17%), respectively, without aberrant expression leakage. Interestingly, while the percentages of GFP-positive astrocytes with scAAV9-GFA-GFP are similar to the performances observed with scAAV9-CBA-GFP (broadly active promoter), significant higher percentages of neurons express GFP with scAAV9-Syn-GFP. GFP-positive excitatory as well as inhibitory neurons are observed, as well as motor neurons in the spinal cord. Additionally, both activated (GFAP-positive) and resting astrocytes (GFAP-negative) express the reporter gene after scAAV9-GFA-GFP injection. These data thoroughly characterize the gene expression specificity of AAVs fitted with neuronal and astrocyte-selective promoters after intravenous delivery, which will prove useful for central nervous system (CNS) gene therapy approaches in which peripheral expression of transgene is a concern. PMID:27933308

  11. Modeling virus capsids and their protein binding -- the search for weak regions within the HIV capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto; Benson, Daryn

    2010-10-01

    Viruses remain a threat to the health of humans worldwide with 33 million infected with AIDS. Viruses are ubiquitous infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. Each virus infects in its own unique manner making the problem seem intractable. However, some general physical steps apply to many viruses and the application of basic physical modeling can potentially have great impact. The aim of this theoretical study is to investigate the stability of the HIV viral capsid (protein shell). The structural shell can be compromised by physical probes such as pulsed laser light. But what are the weakest regions of the capsid so that we can begin to understand vulnerabilities of these deadly materials? The atomic structure of HIV capsids is not precisely known and we begin by describing our work to model the capsid structure. Next we describe a course grained model to investigate protein interactions within the capsid.

  12. The Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Minor Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of polyomavirus virions is composed of pentameric knobs of the major capsid protein, VP1. In previously studied polyomavirus species, such as SV40, two interior capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, emerge from the virion to play important roles during the infectious entry process. Translation of the VP3 protein initiates at a highly conserved Met-Ala-Leu motif within the VP2 open reading frame. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV or MCPyV) is a member of a divergent clade of polyomaviruses that lack the conserved VP3 N-terminal motif. Consistent with this observation, we show that VP3 is not detectable in MCV-infected cells, VP3 is not found in native MCV virions, and mutation of possible alternative VP3-initiating methionine codons did not significantly affect MCV infectivity in culture. In contrast, VP2 knockout resulted in a >100-fold decrease in native MCV infectivity, despite normal virion assembly, viral DNA packaging, and cell attachment. Although pseudovirus-based experiments confirmed that VP2 plays an essential role for infection of some cell lines, other cell lines were readily transduced by pseudovirions lacking VP2. In cell lines where VP2 was needed for efficient infectious entry, the presence of a conserved myristoyl modification on the N-terminus of VP2 was important for its function. The results show that a single minor capsid protein, VP2, facilitates a post-attachment stage of MCV infectious entry into some, but not all, cell types. PMID:23990782

  13. Modulation of signaling pathways by RNA virus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Urbanowski, Matthew D; Ilkow, Carolina S; Hobman, Tom C

    2008-07-01

    Capsid proteins are structural components of virus particles. They are nucleic acid-binding proteins whose main recognized function is to package viral genomes into protective structures called nucleocapsids. Research over the last 10 years indicates that in addition to their role as genome guardians, viral capsid proteins modulate host cell signaling networks. Disruption or alteration of intracellular signaling pathways by viral capsids may benefit replication of the virus by affecting innate immunity and in some cases, may underlie disease progression. In this review, we describe how the capsid proteins from medically relevant RNA viruses interact with host cell signaling pathways.

  14. Viral capsid proteins are segregated in structural fold space.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanshan; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Viral capsid proteins assemble into large, symmetrical architectures that are not found in complexes formed by their cellular counterparts. Given the prevalence of the signature jelly-roll topology in viral capsid proteins, we are interested in whether these functionally unique capsid proteins are also structurally unique in terms of folds. To explore this question, we applied a structure-alignment based clustering of all protein chains in VIPERdb filtered at 40% sequence identity to identify distinct capsid folds, and compared the cluster medoids with a non-redundant subset of protein domains in the SCOP database, not including the viral capsid entries. This comparison, using Template Modeling (TM)-score, identified 2078 structural "relatives" of capsid proteins from the non-capsid set, covering altogether 210 folds following the definition in SCOP. The statistical significance of the 210 folds shared by two sets of the same sizes, estimated from 10,000 permutation tests, is less than 0.0001, which is an upper bound on the p-value. We thus conclude that viral capsid proteins are segregated in structural fold space. Our result provides novel insight on how structural folds of capsid proteins, as opposed to their surface chemistry, might be constrained during evolution by requirement of the assembled cage-like architecture. Also importantly, our work highlights a guiding principle for virus-based nanoplatform design in a wide range of biomedical applications and materials science.

  15. Viral Capsid Proteins Are Segregated in Structural Fold Space

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanshan; Brooks, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Viral capsid proteins assemble into large, symmetrical architectures that are not found in complexes formed by their cellular counterparts. Given the prevalence of the signature jelly-roll topology in viral capsid proteins, we are interested in whether these functionally unique capsid proteins are also structurally unique in terms of folds. To explore this question, we applied a structure-alignment based clustering of all protein chains in VIPERdb filtered at 40% sequence identity to identify distinct capsid folds, and compared the cluster medoids with a non-redundant subset of protein domains in the SCOP database, not including the viral capsid entries. This comparison, using Template Modeling (TM)-score, identified 2078 structural “relatives” of capsid proteins from the non-capsid set, covering altogether 210 folds following the definition in SCOP. The statistical significance of the 210 folds shared by two sets of the same sizes, estimated from 10,000 permutation tests, is less than 0.0001, which is an upper bound on the p-value. We thus conclude that viral capsid proteins are segregated in structural fold space. Our result provides novel insight on how structural folds of capsid proteins, as opposed to their surface chemistry, might be constrained during evolution by requirement of the assembled cage-like architecture. Also importantly, our work highlights a guiding principle for virus-based nanoplatform design in a wide range of biomedical applications and materials science. PMID:23408879

  16. Imaging of the alphavirus capsid protein during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Kielian, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses with highly organized structures. The nucleocapsid (NC) core contains a capsid protein lattice enclosing the plus-sense RNA genome, and it is surrounded by a lipid bilayer containing a lattice of the E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins. Capsid protein is synthesized in the cytoplasm and particle budding occurs at the plasma membrane (PM), but the traffic and assembly of viral components and the exit of virions from host cells are not well understood. To visualize the dynamics of capsid protein during infection, we developed a Sindbis virus infectious clone tagged with a tetracysteine motif. Tagged capsid protein could be fluorescently labeled with biarsenical dyes in living cells without effects on virus growth, morphology, or protein distribution. Live cell imaging and colocalization experiments defined distinct groups of capsid foci in infected cells. We observed highly motile internal puncta that colocalized with E2 protein, which may represent the transport machinery that capsid protein uses to reach the PM. Capsid was also found in larger nonmotile internal structures that colocalized with cellular G3BP and viral nsP3. Thus, capsid may play an unforeseen role in these previously observed G3BP-positive foci, such as regulation of cellular stress granules. Capsid puncta were also observed at the PM. These puncta colocalized with E2 and recruited newly synthesized capsid protein; thus, they may be sites of virus assembly and egress. Together, our studies provide the first dynamic views of the alphavirus capsid protein in living cells and a system to define detailed mechanisms during alphavirus infection.

  17. The Papillomavirus Major Capsid Protein L1

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Christopher B.; Day, Patricia M.; Trus, Benes L.

    2013-01-01

    The elegant icosahedral surface of the papillomavirus virion is formed by a single protein called L1. Recombinant L1 proteins can spontaneously self-assemble into a highly immunogenic structure that closely mimics the natural surface of native papillomavirus virions. This has served as the basis for two highly successful vaccines against cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPVs). During the viral life cycle, the capsid must undergo a variety of conformational changes, allowing key functions including the encapsidation of the ~8 kb viral genomic DNA, maturation into a more stable state to survive transit between hosts, mediating attachment to new host cells, and finally releasing the viral DNA into the newly infected host cell. This brief review focuses on conserved sequence and structural features that underlie the functions of this remarkable protein. PMID:23800545

  18. Intravascular AAV9 preferentially targets neonatal neurons and adult astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Foust, Kevin D; Nurre, Emily; Montgomery, Chrystal L; Hernandez, Anna; Chan, Curtis M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    Delivery of genes to the brain and spinal cord across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has not yet been achieved. Here we show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 injected intravenously bypasses the BBB and efficiently targets cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Injection of AAV9-GFP into neonatal mice through the facial vein results in extensive transduction of dorsal root ganglia and motor neurons throughout the spinal cord and widespread transduction of neurons throughout the brain, including the neocortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. In adult mice, tail vein injection of AAV9-GFP leads to robust transduction of astrocytes throughout the entire CNS, with limited neuronal transduction. This approach may enable the development of gene therapies for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy, through targeting of motor neurons, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, through targeting of astrocytes. It may also be useful for rapid postnatal genetic manipulations in basic neuroscience studies.

  19. Modeling virus capsids and their protein binding -- the search for weak regions within the HIV capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto F.; Benson, Daryn E.; Gilbert, C. Michael

    2011-03-01

    Viruses remain a threat to the health of humans worldwide with 33 million infected with HIV. Viruses are ubiquitous, infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. Each virus infects in its own unique manner making the problem seem intractable. However, some general physical steps apply to many viruses and the application of basic physical modeling can potentially have great impact. The aim of this theoretical study is to investigate the stability of the HIV viral capsid (protein shell). The structural shell can be compromised by physical probes such as pulsed laser light [1,2]. But, what are the weakest regions of the capsid so that we can begin to understand vulnerabilities of these deadly materials? The atomic structure of HIV capsids is not precisely known and we begin by describing our work to model the capsid structure. We have constructed three representative viral capsids of different CA protein number -- HIV-900, HIV-1260 and HIV-1740. The complexity of the assembly requires a course grained model to investigate protein interactions within the capsid which we will describe.

  20. Systemic gene delivery following intravenous administration of AAV9 to fetal and neonatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Wong, Andrew M S; Hoefer, Klemens; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Howe, Steven J; Cooper, Jonathan D; Waddington, Simon N; Chan, Jerry K Y; Rahim, Ahad A

    2015-09-01

    Several acute monogenic diseases affect multiple body systems, causing death in childhood. The development of novel therapies for such conditions is challenging. However, improvements in gene delivery technology mean that gene therapy has the potential to treat such disorders. We evaluated the ability of the AAV9 vector to mediate systemic gene delivery after intravenous administration to perinatal mice and late-gestation nonhuman primates (NHPs). Titer-matched single-stranded (ss) and self-complementary (sc) AAV9 carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were intravenously administered to fetal and neonatal mice, with noninjected age-matched mice used as the control. Extensive GFP expression was observed in organs throughout the body, with the epithelial and muscle cells being particularly well transduced. ssAAV9 carrying the WPRE sequence mediated significantly more gene expression than its sc counterpart, which lacked the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) sequence. To examine a realistic scale-up to larger models or potentially patients for such an approach, AAV9 was intravenously administered to late-gestation NHPs by using a clinically relevant protocol. Widespread systemic gene expression was measured throughout the body, with cellular tropisms similar to those observed in the mouse studies and no observable adverse events. This study confirms that AAV9 can safely mediate systemic gene delivery in small and large animal models and supports its potential use in clinical systemic gene therapy protocols.

  1. Copackaged AAV9 Vectors Promote Simultaneous Immune Tolerance and Phenotypic Correction of Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Todd, Adrian G; Clément, Nathalie; Falk, Darin J; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by lysosomal accumulation of glycogen from a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Replacement of the missing enzyme is available by repeated protein infusions; however, efficacy is limited by immune response and inability to restore enzymatic function in the central nervous system. An alternative therapeutic option is adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, which results in widespread gene transfer and prolonged transgene expression. Both enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and gene therapy can elicit anti-GAA immune reactions that dampen their effectiveness and pose life-threatening risks to patient safety. To modulate the immune responses related to gene therapy, we show that a human codon-optimized GAA (coGAA) driven by a liver-specific promoter (LSP) using AAV9 is capable of promoting immune tolerance in a Gaa(-/-) mouse model. Copackaging AAV9-LSP-coGAA with the tissue-restricted desmin promoter (AAV9-DES-coGAA) demonstrates the necessary cell autonomous expression in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, peripheral nerve, and the spinal cord. Simultaneous high-level expression in liver led to the expansion of GAA-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and induction of immune tolerance. Transfer of Tregs into naïve recipients prevented pathogenic allergic reactions after repeated ERT challenges. Copackaged AAV9 also attenuated preexisting humoral and cellular immune responses, which enhanced the biochemical correction. Our data present a therapeutic design in which simultaneous administration of two copackaged AAV constructs may provide therapeutic benefit and resolve immune reactions in the treatment of multisystem disorders.

  2. Copackaged AAV9 Vectors Promote Simultaneous Immune Tolerance and Phenotypic Correction of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A.; Todd, Adrian G.; Clément, Nathalie; Falk, Darin J.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by lysosomal accumulation of glycogen from a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Replacement of the missing enzyme is available by repeated protein infusions; however, efficacy is limited by immune response and inability to restore enzymatic function in the central nervous system. An alternative therapeutic option is adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, which results in widespread gene transfer and prolonged transgene expression. Both enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and gene therapy can elicit anti-GAA immune reactions that dampen their effectiveness and pose life-threatening risks to patient safety. To modulate the immune responses related to gene therapy, we show that a human codon-optimized GAA (coGAA) driven by a liver-specific promoter (LSP) using AAV9 is capable of promoting immune tolerance in a Gaa−/− mouse model. Copackaging AAV9-LSP-coGAA with the tissue-restricted desmin promoter (AAV9-DES-coGAA) demonstrates the necessary cell autonomous expression in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, peripheral nerve, and the spinal cord. Simultaneous high-level expression in liver led to the expansion of GAA-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and induction of immune tolerance. Transfer of Tregs into naïve recipients prevented pathogenic allergic reactions after repeated ERT challenges. Copackaged AAV9 also attenuated preexisting humoral and cellular immune responses, which enhanced the biochemical correction. Our data present a therapeutic design in which simultaneous administration of two copackaged AAV constructs may provide therapeutic benefit and resolve immune reactions in the treatment of multisystem disorders. PMID:26603344

  3. Capsid-Incorporation of Antigens into Adenovirus Capsid Proteins for a Vaccine Approach

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Qiana L.

    2010-01-01

    Some viral vectors are potent inducers of cellular and humoral responses; therefore, viral vectors can be used to vaccinate against cancer or infectious diseases. This report will focus on adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors. Traditional viral-vector vaccination embodies the concept that the vector uses the host-cell machinery to express antigens that are encoded as transgenes within the viral vector. Several preclinical successes have used this approach in animal model systems. However, in some instances, these conventional Ad-based vaccines have yielded suboptimal clinical results. These suboptimal results are ascribed, in part, to preexisting Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) immunity. To address this issue, the “antigen capsid-incorporation” strategy has been developed to circumvent the drawbacks associated with conventional transgene expression of antigens by Ad vectors. This strategy embodies the incorporation of antigenic peptides within the capsid structure of viral vectors. Incorporating immunogenic peptides into the Ad capsid offers potential advantages. Importantly, vaccination by means of the antigen capsid-incorporated approach results in a strong humoral response, similar to the response generated by native Ad capsid proteins. This strategy also allows for the boosting of antigenic specific responses. This strategy may be the way forward for improved vaccine schemes, especially for those infections requiring a strong humoral antigenic response. PMID:21047139

  4. Assembly of herpes simplex virus (HSV) intermediate capsids in insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses expressing HSV capsid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, D R; Roof, L L; Homa, F L

    1994-01-01

    The capsid of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is composed of seven proteins, VP5, VP19C, VP21, VP22a, VP23, VP24, and VP26, which are the products of six HSV-1 genes. Recombinant baculoviruses were used to express the six capsid genes (UL18, UL19, UL26, UL26.5, UL35, and UL38) in insect cells. All constructs expressed the appropriate-size HSV proteins, and insect cells infected with a mixture of the six recombinant baculoviruses contained large numbers of HSV-like capsids. Capsids were purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and electron microscopy showed that the capsids made in Sf9 cells had the same size and appearance as authentic HSV B capsids. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that the protein composition of these capsids was nearly identical to that of B capsids isolated from HSV-infected Vero cells. Electron microscopy of thin sections clearly demonstrated that the capsids made in insect cells contained the inner electron-translucent core associated with HSV B capsids. In infections in which single capsid genes were left out, it was found that the UL18 (VP23), UL19 (VP5), UL38 (VP19C), and either the UL26 (VP21 and VP24) or the UL26.5 (VP22a) genes were required for assembly of 100-nm capsids. VP22a was shown to form the inner core of the B capsid, since in infections in which the UL26.5 gene was omitted the 100-nm capsids that formed lacked the inner core. The UL35 (VP26) gene was not required for assembly of 100-nm capsids, although assembly of B capsids was more efficient when it was present. These and other observations indicate that (i) the products of the UL18, UL19, UL35, and UL38 genes self-assemble into structures that form the outer surface (icosahedral shell) of the capsid, (ii) the products of the UL26 and/or UL26.5 genes are required (as scaffolds) for assembly of 100-nm capsids, and (iii) the interaction of the outer surface of the capsid with the scaffolding proteins requires the product

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C phosphorylation of hepatitis B virus capsids inhibits virion formation and causes intracellular capsid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wittkop, Linda; Schwarz, Alexandra; Cassany, Aurelia; Grün-Bernhard, Stefanie; Delaleau, Mildred; Rabe, Birgit; Cazenave, Christian; Gerlich, Wolfram; Glebe, Dieter; Kann, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Capsids of hepatitis B virus and other hepadnaviruses contain a cellular protein kinase, which phosphorylates the capsid protein. Some phosphorylation sites are shown to be essential for distinct steps of viral replication as pregenome packaging or plus strand DNA synthesis. Although different protein kinases have been reported to phosphorylate the capsid protein, varying experimental approaches do not allow direct comparison. Furthermore, the activity of a specific protein kinase has not yet been correlated to steps in the hepadnaviral life cycle. In this study we show that capsids from various sources encapsidate active protein kinase Calpha, irrespective of hepatitis B virus genotype and host cell. Treatment of a virion expressing cell line with a pseudosubstrate inhibitor showed that inhibition of protein kinase C phosphorylation did not affect genome maturation but resulted in capsid accumulation and inhibited virion release to the medium. Our results imply that different protein kinases have distinct functions within the hepadnaviral life cycle.

  6. A protein with simultaneous capsid scaffolding and dsRNA-binding activities enhances the birnavirus capsid mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Johann; Casado, Santiago; Mata, Carlos P.; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2015-01-01

    Viral capsids are metastable structures that perform many essential processes; they also act as robust cages during the extracellular phase. Viruses can use multifunctional proteins to optimize resources (e.g., VP3 in avian infectious bursal disease virus, IBDV). The IBDV genome is organized as ribonucleoproteins (RNP) of dsRNA with VP3, which also acts as a scaffold during capsid assembly. We characterized mechanical properties of IBDV populations with different RNP content (ranging from none to four RNP). The IBDV population with the greatest RNP number (and best fitness) showed greatest capsid rigidity. When bound to dsRNA, VP3 reinforces virus stiffness. These contacts involve interactions with capsid structural subunits that differ from the initial interactions during capsid assembly. Our results suggest that RNP dimers are the basic stabilization units of the virion, provide better understanding of multifunctional proteins, and highlight the duality of RNP as capsid-stabilizing and genetic information platforms. PMID:26336920

  7. Nanoindentation studies of full and empty viral capsids and the effects of capsid protein mutations on elasticity and strength.

    PubMed

    Michel, J P; Ivanovska, I L; Gibbons, M M; Klug, W S; Knobler, C M; Wuite, G J L; Schmidt, C F

    2006-04-18

    The elastic properties of capsids of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have been examined at pH 4.8 by nanoindentation measurements with an atomic force microscope. Studies have been carried out on WT capsids, both empty and containing the RNA genome, and on full capsids of a salt-stable mutant and empty capsids of the subE mutant. Full capsids resisted indentation more than empty capsids, but all of the capsids were highly elastic. There was an initial reversible linear regime that persisted up to indentations varying between 20% and 30% of the diameter and applied forces of 0.6-1.0 nN; it was followed by a steep drop in force that is associated with irreversible deformation. A single point mutation in the capsid protein increased the capsid stiffness. The experiments are compared with calculations by finite element analysis of the deformation of a homogeneous elastic thick shell. These calculations capture the features of the reversible indentation region and allow Young's moduli and relative strengths to be estimated for the empty capsids.

  8. Nanoindentation studies of full and empty viral capsids and the effects of capsid protein mutations on elasticity and strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, J. P.; Ivanovska, I. L.; Gibbons, M. M.; Klug, W. S.; Knobler, C. M.; Wuite, G. J. L.; Schmidt, C. F.

    2006-04-01

    The elastic properties of capsids of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have been examined at pH 4.8 by nanoindentation measurements with an atomic force microscope. Studies have been carried out on WT capsids, both empty and containing the RNA genome, and on full capsids of a salt-stable mutant and empty capsids of the subE mutant. Full capsids resisted indentation more than empty capsids, but all of the capsids were highly elastic. There was an initial reversible linear regime that persisted up to indentations varying between 20% and 30% of the diameter and applied forces of 0.6-1.0 nN; it was followed by a steep drop in force that is associated with irreversible deformation. A single point mutation in the capsid protein increased the capsid stiffness. The experiments are compared with calculations by finite element analysis of the deformation of a homogeneous elastic thick shell. These calculations capture the features of the reversible indentation region and allow Young's moduli and relative strengths to be estimated for the empty capsids. atomic force microscopy | cowpea chlorotic mottle virus | finite element analysis | biomechanics

  9. Calibrating elastic parameters from molecular dynamics simulations of capsid proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen; Henley, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Virus capsids are modeled with elastic network models in which a handful of parameters determine transitions in assembly [1] and morphology [2]. We introduce an approach to compute these parameters from the microscopic structure of the proteins involved. We consider each protein as one or a few rigid bodies with very general interactions, which we parameterize by fitting the simulated equilibrium fluctuations (relative translations and rotations) of a pair of proteins (or fragments) to a 6-dimensional Gaussian. We can then compose these generalized springs into the global capsid structure to determine the continuum elastic parameters. We demonstrate our approach on HIV capsid protein and compare our results with the observed lattice structure (from cryo-EM [3] and AFM indentation studies). [1] R. Zandi et al, PNAS 101 (2004) 15556. [2] J. Lidmar, L. Mirny, and D. R. Nelson, PRE 68 (2003) 051910. [3] B. K. Ganser-Pornillos et al, Cell 131 (2007) 70.

  10. Structure of the Small Outer Capsid Protein, Soc: A Clamp for Stabilizing Capsids of T4-like Phages

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-07-22

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a 'glue' between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a 'cage' that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  11. Structure of the small outer capsid protein, Soc: a clamp for stabilizing capsids of T4-like phages.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2010-01-29

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a "glue" between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a "cage" that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  12. RNA-binding region of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Goh, Zee Hong; Mohd, Nur Azmina Syakirin; Tan, Soon Guan; Bhassu, Subha; Tan, Wen Siang

    2014-09-01

    White tail disease (WTD) kills prawn larvae and causes drastic losses to the freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) industry. The main causative agent of WTD is Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV). The N-terminal end of the MrNV capsid protein is very rich in positively charged amino acids and is postulated to interact with RNA molecules. N-terminal and internal deletion mutagenesis revealed that the RNA-binding region is located at positions 20-29, where 80 % of amino acids are positively charged. Substitution of all these positively charged residues with alanine abolished the RNA binding. Mutants without the RNA-binding region still assembled into virus-like particles, suggesting that this region is not a part of the capsid assembly domain. This paper is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to report the specific RNA-binding region of MrNV capsid protein. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Improper Tagging of the Non-Essential Small Capsid Protein VP26 Impairs Nuclear Capsid Egress of Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Binz, Anne; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the subcellular trafficking of herpesvirus capsids, the small capsid protein has been labeled with different fluorescent proteins. Here, we analyzed the infectivity of several HSV1(17+) strains in which the N-terminal region of the non-essential small capsid protein VP26 had been tagged at different positions. While some variants replicated with similar kinetics as their parental wild type strain, others were not infectious at all. Improper tagging resulted in the aggregation of VP26 in the nucleus, prevented efficient nuclear egress of viral capsids, and thus virion formation. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy showed that these aggregates had sequestered several other viral proteins, but often did not contain viral capsids. The propensity for aggregate formation was influenced by the type of the fluorescent protein domain, the position of the inserted tag, the cell type, and the progression of infection. Among the tags that we have tested, mRFPVP26 had the lowest tendency to induce nuclear aggregates, and showed the least reduction in replication when compared to wild type. Our data suggest that bona fide monomeric fluorescent protein tags have less impact on proper assembly of HSV1 capsids and nuclear capsid egress than tags that tend to dimerize. Small chemical compounds capable of inducing aggregate formation of VP26 may lead to new antiviral drugs against HSV infections. PMID:22952920

  14. The capsid protein of human immunodeficiency virus: designing inhibitors of capsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Neira, José L

    2009-11-01

    The mature capsid of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV-1, is formed by the assembly of copies of a capsid protein (CA). The C-terminal domain of CA, CTD, is able to homodimerize and most of the dimerization interface is formed by a single alpha-helix from each monomer. Assembly of the HIV-1 capsid critically depends on CA-CA interactions, including CTD interaction with itself and with the CA N-terminal domain, NTD. This minireview reports on the search and the design of peptides and small organic compounds that are able to interact with the CTD and/or CA of HIV-1. Such molecules aim to disrupt and/or alter the oligomerization capability of CTD. The different peptides designed so far interact with CTD mainly via hydrophobic contacts with residues close or belonging to the interface between the dimerization helices. A CTD-binding organic compound also establishes hydrophobic contacts with regions involved in the interface between the NTD and CTD. These results open new venues for the development of new antiviral drugs that are able to interact with CA and/or its domains, hampering HIV-1 assembly and infection.

  15. Antigenic properties of avian hepatitis E virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-10-22

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of big liver and spleen disease and hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens, and is genetically and antigenically related to mammalian HEVs. HEV capsid protein contains immunodominant epitopes and induces a protective humoral immune response. A better understanding of the antigenic composition of this protein is critically important for the development of effective vaccine and sensitive and specific serological assays. To date, six linear antigenic domains (I-VI) have been characterized in avian HEV capsid protein and analyzed for their applications in the serological diagnosis and vaccine design. Domains I and V induce strong immune response in chickens and are common to avian, human, and swine HEVs, indicating that the shared epitopes hampering differential diagnosis of avian HEV infection. Domains III and IV are not immunodominant and elicit a weak immune response. Domain VI, located in the N-terminal region of the capsid protein, can also trigger an intense immune response, but the anti-domain VI antibodies are transient. The protection analysis showed that the truncated capsid protein containing the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues expressed by the bacterial system can provide protective immunity against avian HEV infection in chickens. However, the synthetic peptides incorporating the different linear antigenic domains (I-VI) and epitopes are non-protective. The antigenic composition of avian HEV capsid protein is altogether complex. To develop an effective vaccine and accurate serological diagnostic methods, more conformational antigenic domains or epitopes are to be characterized in detail.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Human Astrovirus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Yukimatsu; Harper, Justin; Dryden, Kelly A.; Yeager, Mark; Méndez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. HAstV is a nonenveloped virus with a T=3 capsid and a positive-sense RNA genome. The capsid protein (CP) of HAstV is synthesized as a 90-kDa precursor (VP90) that can be divided into three linear domains: a conserved N-terminal domain, a hypervariable domain, and an acidic C-terminal domain. Maturation of HAstV requires proteolytic processing of the astrovirus CP both inside and outside the host cell, resulting in the removal of the C-terminal domain and the breakdown of the rest of the CP into three predominant protein species with molecular masses of ∼34, 27/29, and 25/26 kDa, respectively. We have now solved the crystal structure of VP9071–415 (amino acids [aa] 71 to 415 of VP90) of human astrovirus serotype 8 at a 2.15-Å resolution. VP9071–415 encompasses the conserved N-terminal domain of VP90 but lacks the hypervariable domain, which forms the capsid surface spikes. The structure of VP9071–415 is comprised of two domains: an S domain, which adopts the typical jelly-roll β-barrel fold, and a P1 domain, which forms a squashed β-barrel consisting of six antiparallel β-strands similar to what was observed in the hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid structure. Fitting of the VP9071–415 structure into the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps of HAstV produced an atomic model for a continuous, T=3 icosahedral capsid shell. Our pseudoatomic model of the human HAstV capsid shell provides valuable insights into intermolecular interactions required for capsid assembly and trypsin-mediated proteolytic maturation needed for virus infectivity. Such information has potential applications in the development of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine as well as small-molecule drugs targeting astrovirus assembly/maturation. IMPORTANCE Human astrovirus (HAstV) is a leading cause of viral diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. As a nonenveloped virus

  17. Efficient CNS targeting in adult mice by intrathecal infusion of single-stranded AAV9-GFP for gene therapy of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Bey, K; Ciron, C; Dubreil, L; Deniaud, J; Ledevin, M; Cristini, J; Blouin, V; Aubourg, P; Colle, M-A

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy constitutes a powerful tool for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. While AAVs are generally administered systemically to newborns in preclinical studies of neurological disorders, in adults the maturity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) must be considered when selecting the route of administration. Delivery of AAVs into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) represents an attractive approach to target the central nervous system (CNS) and bypass the BBB. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of intra-CSF delivery of a single-stranded (ss) AAV9-CAG-GFP vector in adult mice via intracisternal (iCist) or intralumbar (it-Lumb) administration. It-Lumb ssAAV9 delivery resulted in greater diffusion throughout the entire spinal cord and green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression mainly in the cerebellum, cortex and olfactory bulb. By contrast, iCist delivery led to strong GFP expression throughout the entire brain. Comparison of the transduction efficiency of ssAAV9-CAG-GFP versus ssAAV9-SYN1-GFP following it-Lumb administration revealed widespread and specific GFP expression in neurons and motoneurons of the spinal cord and brain when the neuron-specific synapsin 1 (SYN1) promoter was used. Our findings demonstrate that it-Lumb ssAAV9 delivery is a safe and highly efficient means of targeting the CNS in adult mice.

  18. Isolation of human cytomegalovirus intranuclear capsids, characterization of their protein constituents, and demonstration that the B-capsid assembly protein is also abundant in noninfectious enveloped particles.

    PubMed Central

    Irmiere, A; Gibson, W

    1985-01-01

    Two types of intranuclear capsids have been recovered from human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, strain AD169)-infected cells. By analogy with strain Colburn (simian CMV) particles, these have been designated as A- and B-capsids. Both types of capsids are composed of proteins with molecular weights of 153,000 (major capsid protein), 34,000 (minor capsid protein), 28,000, and 11,000 (smallest capsid protein). In addition to these species, B-capsids contain a 36,000-molecular-weight (36K) protein which has been designated as the HCMV "assembly protein," based on its similarities to counterparts in strain Colburn CMV (i.e., 37K protein) and herpes simplex virus (i.e., VP22a/p40/NC-3/ICP35e). Peptide comparisons established that the assembly protein of HCMV B-capsids and the 36K protein that distinguishes HCMV noninfectious enveloped particles from virions are the same, providing direct evidence that noninfectious enveloped particles are enveloped B-capsids. Images PMID:2993655

  19. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-10-15

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ∼8 kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. - Highlights: • L2 is the minor antigen of the non-enveloped T=7d icosahedral Papillomavirus capsid. • L2 is a nuclear protein that can traffic to ND-10 and facilitate genome encapsidation. • L2 is critical for infection and must be cleaved by furin. • L2 is a broadly protective vaccine antigen recognized by neutralizing antibodies.

  20. CapsidMaps: Protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L.; Reddy, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu. PMID:25697908

  1. CapsidMaps: protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2015-04-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac AAV9-S100A1 gene therapy rescues postischemic heart failure in a preclinical large animal model

    PubMed Central

    Pleger, Sven T.; Shan, Changguang; Ksienzyk, Jan; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Boekstegers, Peter; Hinkel, Rabea; Schinkel, Stefanie; Leuchs, Barbara; Ludwig, Jochen; Qiu, Gang; Weber, Christophe; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.; Raake, Philip; Koch, Walter J.; Katus, Hugo A.; Müller, Oliver J.; Most, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    As a prerequisite to clinical application, we determined the long-term therapeutic effectiveness and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV) S100A1 gene therapy in a preclinical, large animal model of heart failure. S100A1, a positive inotropic regulator of myocardial contractility, becomes depleted in failing cardiomyocytes in humans and various animal models, and myocardial-targeted S100A1 gene transfer rescues cardiac contractile function by restoring sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium Ca2+ handling in acutely and chronically failing hearts in small animal models. We induced heart failure in domestic pigs by balloon-occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery, resulting in myocardial infarction. After 2 weeks, when the pigs displayed significant left ventricular contractile dysfunction, we administered through retrograde coronary venous delivery, AAV9-S100A1 to the left ventricular non-infarcted myocardium. AAV9-luciferase and saline treatment served as control. At 14 weeks, both control groups showed significantly decreased myocardial S100A1 protein expression along with progressive deterioration of cardiac performance and left ventricular remodeling. AAV9-S100A1 treatment prevented and reversed this phenotype by restoring cardiac S100A1 protein levels. S100A1 treatment normalized cardiomyocyte Ca2+ cycling, sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium handling and energy homeostasis. Transgene expression was restricted to cardiac tissue and extra-cardiac organ function was uncompromised indicating a favorable safety profile. This translational study shows the pre-clinical feasibility, long-term therapeutic effectiveness and a favorable safety profile of cardiac AAV9-S100A1 gene therapy in a preclinical model of heart failure. Our study presents a strong rational for a clinical trial of S100A1 gene therapy for human heart failure that could potentially complement current strategies to treat end-stage heart failure. PMID:21775667

  3. Monitoring Protein Capsid Assembly with a Conjugated Polymer Strain Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cingil, Hande E; Storm, Ingeborg M; Yorulmaz, Yelda; te Brake, Diane W; de Vries, Renko; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Sprakel, Joris

    2015-08-12

    Semiconducting polymers owe their optoelectronic properties to the delocalized electronic structure along their conjugated backbone. Their spectral features are therefore uniquely sensitive to the conformation of the polymer, where mechanical stretching of the chain leads to distinct vibronic shifts. Here we demonstrate how the optomechanical response of conjugated polyelectrolytes can be used to detect their encapsulation in a protein capsid. Coating of the sensor polymers by recombinant coat proteins induces their stretching due to steric hindrance between the proteins. The resulting mechanical planarizations lead to pronounced shifts in the vibronic spectra, from which the process of capsid formation can be directly quantified. These results show how the coupling between vibronic states and mechanical stresses inherent to conjugated polymers can be used to noninvasively measure strains at the nanoscale.

  4. Immune response to hepatitis A virus capsid proteins after infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C H; Tschen, S Y; Heinricy, U; Weber, M; Flehmig, B

    1996-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the immune response of humans to viral capsid polypeptides of hepatitis A virus (HAV) after natural infection, which is very important for vaccine development. Antiviral capsids in 73 serum samples from patients with acute and chronic HAV infections were analyzed by immunoblotting against individual HAV capsid polypeptides (VP1, VP2, VP3, and VP4) by using a cell culture-based HAV antigen. For reference, total anti-HAV immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-HAV IgM were also determined by radioimmunoassay. As a result, a dominant immune response against VP1 (98% IgG, 94% IgM) was found in the acute phase. However, many other sera also reacted with VP0 (88% IgG; 35% IgM) and VP3 (81% IgG and 29% IgM). In contrast to the acute phase, anti-VP1, anti-VP0, and anti-VP3, IgG antibodies against all three viral proteins (29, 29, and 73% respectively), especially those against VP3, were found years after onset of HAV disease and over long periods in the sera of hepatitis patients. These results suggest that antibodies for capsid polypeptides are present over an extended period in the sera of HAV-infected patients. They are likely of importance in maintaining long-term immunity. PMID:8904442

  5. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  6. Cleavage sites within the poliovirus capsid protein precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.R.; Anderson, C.W.; Dorner, A.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1982-01-01

    Partial amino-terminal sequence analysis was performed on radiolabeled poliovirus capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3. A computer-assisted comparison of the amino acid sequences obtained with that predicted by the nucleotide sequence of the poliovirus genome allows assignment of the amino terminus of each capsid protein to a unique position within the virus polyprotein. Sequence analysis of trypsin-digested VP4, which has a blocked amino terminus, demonstrates that VP4 is encoded at or very near to the amino terminus of the polyprotein. The gene order of the capsid proteins is VP4-VP2-VP3-VP1. Cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 is shown to occur between asparagine and serine, whereas the cleavages that separate VP2/VP3 and VP3/VP1 occur between glutamine and glycine residues. This finding supports the hypothesis that the cleavage of VP0, which occurs during virion morphogenesis, is distinct from the cleavages that separate functional regions of the polyprotein.

  7. Chemical reactivity of brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Running, W E; Ni, P; Kao, C C; Reilly, J P

    2012-10-12

    Viral particles are biological machines that have evolved to package, protect, and deliver the viral genome into the host via regulated conformational changes of virions. We have developed a procedure to modify lysine residues with S-methylthioacetimidate across the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. Lysine residues that are not completely modified are involved in tertiary or quaternary structural interactions, and their extent of modification can be quantified as a function of pH. This procedure was applied to the pH-dependent structural transitions of brome mosaic virus (BMV). As the reaction pH increases from 5.5 to 8.5, the average number of modified lysine residues in the BMV capsid protein increases from 6 to 12, correlating well with the known pH-dependent swelling behavior of BMV virions. The extent of reaction of each of the capsid protein's lysine residues has been quantified at eight pH values using coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Each lysine can be assigned to one of three structural classes identified by inspection of the BMV virion crystal structure. Several lysine residues display reactivity that indicates their involvement in dynamic interactions that are not obvious in the crystal structure. The influence of several capsid protein mutants on the pH-dependent structural transition of BMV has also been investigated. Mutant H75Q exhibits an altered swelling transition accompanying solution pH increases. The H75Q capsids show increased reactivity at lysine residues 64 and 130, residues distal from the dimer interface occupied by H75, across the entire pH range.

  8. Chemical Reactivity of Brome Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Running, W. E.; Ni, P.; Kao, C. C.; Reilly, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Viral particles are biological machines that have evolved to package, protect, and deliver the viral genome into the host via regulated conformational changes of virions. We have developed a procedure to modify lysine resides with S-methylthioacetimidate (SMTA) across the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. Lysine residues that are not completely modified are involved in tertiary or quaternary structural interactions, and their extent of modification can be quantified as a function of pH. This procedure was applied to the pH-dependent structural transitions of Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV). As the reaction pH increases from 5.5 to 8.5, the average number of modified lysine residues in the BMV capsid protein increases from six to twelve, correlating well with the known pH dependent swelling behavior of BMV virions. The extent of reaction of each of the capsid protein’s lysine residues has been quantified at eight pH values using coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Each lysine can be assigned to one of three structural classes identified by inspection of the BMV virion crystal structure. Several lysine residues display reactivity that indicates their involvement in dynamic interactions that are not obvious in the crystal structure. The influence of several capsid protein mutants on the pH-dependent structural transition of BMV has also been investigated. Mutant H75Q exhibits an altered swelling transition accompanying solution pH increases. The H75Q capsids show increased reactivity at lysine residues 64 and 130, residues distal from the dimer interface occupied by H75, across the entire pH range. PMID:22750573

  9. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-01-01

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ~8kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. PMID:23689062

  10. The dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein binds a capsid protein-derived peptide: A biophysical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, María T.; Lidón-Moya, María C.; Barrera, Francisco N.; Prieto, Alicia; Gómez, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G.; Neira, José L.

    2004-01-01

    The type 1 HIV presents a conical capsid formed by ~1500 units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimer-ization of CA via its C-terminal domain, CA-C, constitutes a key step in virion assembly. CA-C dimerization is largely mediated by reciprocal interactions between residues of its second α-helix. Here, we show that an N-terminal-acetylated and C-terminal–amidated peptide, CAC1, comprising the sequence of the CA-C dimerization helix plus three flanking residues at each side, is able to form a complex with the entire CA-C domain. Thermal denaturation measurements followed by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography provided evidence of the interaction between CAC1 and CA-C. The apparent dissociation constant of the heterocomplex formed by CA-C and CAC1 was determined by several biophysical techniques, namely, fluorescence (using an anthraniloyl-labeled peptide), affinity chromatography, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The three techniques yielded similar values for the apparent dissociation constant, in the order of 50 μM. This apparent dissociation constant was only five times higher than was the dissociation constant of both CA-C and the intact capsid protein homodimers (10 μM). PMID:15152086

  11. The dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein binds a capsid protein-derived peptide: a biophysical characterization.

    PubMed

    Garzón, María T; Lidón-Moya, María C; Barrera, Francisco N; Prieto, Alicia; Gómez, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G; Neira, José L

    2004-06-01

    The type 1 HIV presents a conical capsid formed by approximately 1500 units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimerization of CA via its C-terminal domain, CA-C, constitutes a key step in virion assembly. CA-C dimerization is largely mediated by reciprocal interactions between residues of its second alpha-helix. Here, we show that an N-terminal-acetylated and C-terminal-amidated peptide, CAC1, comprising the sequence of the CA-C dimerization helix plus three flanking residues at each side, is able to form a complex with the entire CA-C domain. Thermal denaturation measurements followed by circular dichroism (CD), NMR, and size-exclusion chromatography provided evidence of the interaction between CAC1 and CA-C. The apparent dissociation constant of the heterocomplex formed by CA-C and CAC1 was determined by several biophysical techniques, namely, fluorescence (using an anthraniloyl-labeled peptide), affinity chromatography, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The three techniques yielded similar values for the apparent dissociation constant, in the order of 50 microM. This apparent dissociation constant was only five times higher than was the dissociation constant of both CA-C and the intact capsid protein homodimers (10 microM).

  12. High affinity anchoring of the decoration protein pb10 onto the bacteriophage T5 capsid

    PubMed Central

    Vernhes, Emeline; Renouard, Madalena; Gilquin, Bernard; Cuniasse, Philippe; Durand, Dominique; England, Patrick; Hoos, Sylviane; Huet, Alexis; Conway, James F.; Glukhov, Anatoly; Ksenzenko, Vladimir; Jacquet, Eric; Nhiri, Naïma; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Boulanger, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophage capsids constitute icosahedral shells of exceptional stability that protect the viral genome. Many capsids display on their surface decoration proteins whose structure and function remain largely unknown. The decoration protein pb10 of phage T5 binds at the centre of the 120 hexamers formed by the major capsid protein. Here we determined the 3D structure of pb10 and investigated its capsid-binding properties using NMR, SAXS, cryoEM and SPR. Pb10 consists of an α-helical capsid-binding domain and an Ig-like domain exposed to the solvent. It binds to the T5 capsid with a remarkably high affinity and its binding kinetics is characterized by a very slow dissociation rate. We propose that the conformational exchange events observed in the capsid-binding domain enable rearrangements upon binding that contribute to the quasi-irreversibility of the pb10-capsid interaction. Moreover we show that pb10 binding is a highly cooperative process, which favours immediate rebinding of newly dissociated pb10 to the 120 hexamers of the capsid protein. In extreme conditions, pb10 protects the phage from releasing its genome. We conclude that pb10 may function to reinforce the capsid thus favouring phage survival in harsh environments. PMID:28165000

  13. Long-term protective effects of AAV9-mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fei; Yang, Chun; Chen, Sha-Sha; Wang, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Wei; Hao, Qiang; Lu, Tao; Hoffer, Barry; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming; Xu, Qun-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Intrastriatal injection of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) protein has been shown to provide neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) - lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease. Here, we used an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector to deliver the human MANF (hMANF) gene into the rat striatum 10days after a 6-OHDA lesion to examine long-term effects of hMANF on nigral dopaminergic neurons and mechanisms underlying MANF neuroprotection. Intrastriatal injection of AAV9-hMANF vectors led to a robust and widespread expression of the hMANF gene in the injected striatum up to 24weeks. Increased levels of hMANF protein were also detected in the ipsilateral substantia nigra. The hMANF gene transfer promoted the survival of nigral dopaminergic neurons, regeneration of striatal dopaminergic fibers and an upregulation of striatal dopamine levels, resulting in a long-term improvement of rotational behavior up to 16weeks after viral injections. By using SH-SY5Y cells, we found that intra- and extracellular application of MANF protected cells against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity via inhibiting the endoplasmic reticulum stress and activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results suggest that AAV9-mediated hMANF gene delivery into the striatum exerts long-term neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in parkinsonian rats, and provide insights into mechanisms responsible for MANF neuroprotection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Modulation of a Pore in the Capsid of JC Polyomavirus Reduces Infectivity and Prevents Exposure of the Minor Capsid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christian D. S.; Ströh, Luisa J.; Gee, Gretchen V.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection of immunocompromised individuals results in the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The viral capsid of JCPyV is composed primarily of the major capsid protein virus protein 1 (VP1), and pentameric arrangement of VP1 monomers results in the formation of a pore at the 5-fold axis of symmetry. While the presence of this pore is conserved among polyomaviruses, its functional role in infection or assembly is unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the 5-fold pore in assembly and infection of JCPyV by generating a panel of mutant viruses containing amino acid substitutions of the residues lining this pore. Multicycle growth assays demonstrated that the fitness of all mutants was reduced compared to that of the wild-type virus. Bacterial expression of VP1 pentamers containing substitutions to residues lining the 5-fold pore did not affect pentamer assembly or prevent association with the VP2 minor capsid protein. The X-ray crystal structures of selected pore mutants contained subtle changes to the 5-fold pore, and no other changes to VP1 were observed. Pore mutant pseudoviruses were not deficient in assembly, packaging of the minor capsid proteins, or binding to cells or in transport to the host cell endoplasmic reticulum. Instead, these mutant viruses were unable to expose VP2 upon arrival to the endoplasmic reticulum, a step that is critical for infection. This study demonstrated that the 5-fold pore is an important structural feature of JCPyV and that minor modifications to this structure have significant impacts on infectious entry. IMPORTANCE JCPyV is an important human pathogen that causes a severe neurological disease in immunocompromised individuals. While the high-resolution X-ray structure of the major capsid protein of JCPyV has been solved, the importance of a major structural feature of the capsid, the 5-fold pore, remains poorly understood. This pore is conserved across

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument proteins VP1/2 and UL37 are associated with intranuclear capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Bucks, Michelle A.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Murphy, Michael A.; Wills, John W.; Courtney, Richard J. . E-mail: rcourtney@psu.edu

    2007-05-10

    The assembly of the tegument of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a complex process that involves a number of events at various sites within virus-infected cells. Our studies focused on determining whether tegument proteins, VP1/2 and UL37, are added to capsids located within the nucleus. Capsids were isolated from the nuclear fraction of HSV-1-infected cells and purified by rate-zonal centrifugation to separate B capsids (containing the scaffold proteins and no viral DNA) and C capsids (containing DNA and no scaffold proteins). Western blot analyses of these capsids indicated that VP1/2 associated primarily with C capsids and UL37 associated with B and C capsids. The results demonstrate that at least two of the tegument proteins of HSV-1 are associated with capsids isolated from the nuclear fraction, and these capsid-tegument protein interactions may represent initial events of the tegumentation process.

  16. Primate TRIM5 proteins form hexagonal nets on HIV-1 capsids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yen-Li; Chandrasekaran, Viswanathan; Carter, Stephen D; Woodward, Cora L; Christensen, Devin E; Dryden, Kelly A; Pornillos, Owen; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Jensen, Grant J; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2016-01-01

    TRIM5 proteins are restriction factors that block retroviral infections by binding viral capsids and preventing reverse transcription. Capsid recognition is mediated by C-terminal domains on TRIM5α (SPRY) or TRIMCyp (cyclophilin A), which interact weakly with capsids. Efficient capsid recognition also requires the conserved N-terminal tripartite motifs (TRIM), which mediate oligomerization and create avidity effects. To characterize how TRIM5 proteins recognize viral capsids, we developed methods for isolating native recombinant TRIM5 proteins and purifying stable HIV-1 capsids. Biochemical and EM analyses revealed that TRIM5 proteins assembled into hexagonal nets, both alone and on capsid surfaces. These nets comprised open hexameric rings, with the SPRY domains centered on the edges and the B-box and RING domains at the vertices. Thus, the principles of hexagonal TRIM5 assembly and capsid pattern recognition are conserved across primates, allowing TRIM5 assemblies to maintain the conformational plasticity necessary to recognize divergent and pleomorphic retroviral capsids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16269.001 PMID:27253068

  17. Widespread neuron-specific transgene expression in brain and spinal cord following synapsin promoter-driven AAV9 neonatal intracerebroventricular injection.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jesse R; Smith, Gaynor A; Rocha, Emily M; Hayes, Melissa A; Beagan, Jonathan A; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2014-07-25

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer holds great promise for treating a wide-range of neurodegenerative disorders. The AAV9 serotype crosses the blood-brain barrier and shows enhanced transduction efficiency compared to other serotypes, thus offering advantageous targeting when global transgene expression is required. Neonatal intravenous or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) delivery of recombinant AAV9 (rAAV9) have recently proven effective for modeling and treating several rodent models of neurodegenerative disease, however, the technique is associated with variable cellular tropism, making tailored gene transfer a challenge. In the current study, we employ the human synapsin 1 (hSYN1) gene promoter to drive neuron-specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) after neonatal i.c.v. injection of rAAV9 in mice. We observed widespread GFP expression in neurons throughout the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves and ganglia at 6 weeks-of-age. Region-specific quantification of GFP expression showed high neuronal transduction rates in substantia nigra pars reticulata (43.9±5.4%), motor cortex (43.5±3.3%), hippocampus (43.1±2.7%), cerebellum (29.6±2.3%), cervical spinal cord (24.9±3.9%), and ventromedial striatum (16.9±4.3%), among others. We found that 14.6±2.2% of neuromuscular junctions innervating the gastrocnemius muscle displayed GFP immunoreactivity. GFP expression was identified in several neuronal sub-types, including nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic cells, striatal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein (DARPP-32)-positive neurons, and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive motor neurons. These results build on contemporary gene transfer techniques, demonstrating that the hSYN1 promoter can be used with rAAV9 to drive robust neuron-specific transgene expression throughout the nervous system.

  18. Purification of recombinant budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 capsid protein and its ability for in vitro capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. E.; Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant system for the major capsid VP1 protein of budgerigar fledgling disease virus has been established. The VP1 gene was inserted into a truncated form of the pFlag-1 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 protein was purified to near homogeneity by immunoaffinity chromatography. Fractions containing highly purified VP1 were pooled and found to constitute 3.3% of the original E. coli-expressed VP1 protein. Electron microscopy revealed that the VP1 protein was isolated as pentameric capsomeres. Electron microscopy also revealed that capsid-like particles were formed in vitro from purified VP1 capsomeres with the addition of Ca2+ ions and the removal of chelating and reducing agents.

  19. Purification of recombinant budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 capsid protein and its ability for in vitro capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. E.; Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant system for the major capsid VP1 protein of budgerigar fledgling disease virus has been established. The VP1 gene was inserted into a truncated form of the pFlag-1 vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The budgerigar fledgling disease virus VP1 protein was purified to near homogeneity by immunoaffinity chromatography. Fractions containing highly purified VP1 were pooled and found to constitute 3.3% of the original E. coli-expressed VP1 protein. Electron microscopy revealed that the VP1 protein was isolated as pentameric capsomeres. Electron microscopy also revealed that capsid-like particles were formed in vitro from purified VP1 capsomeres with the addition of Ca2+ ions and the removal of chelating and reducing agents.

  20. C Terminus of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Major Capsid Protein VP2 Is Involved in Definition of the T Number for Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Castón, José R.; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Maraver, Antonio; Lombardo, Eleuterio; Rodríguez, José F.; Casal, J. Ignacio; Carrascosa, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a member of the Birnaviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA virus. The IBDV capsid is formed by two major structural proteins, VP2 and VP3, which assemble to form a T=13 markedly nonspherical capsid. During viral infection, VP2 is initially synthesized as a precursor, called VPX, whose C end is proteolytically processed to the mature form during capsid assembly. We have computed three-dimensional maps of IBDV capsid and virus-like particles built up by VP2 alone by using electron cryomicroscopy and image-processing techniques. The IBDV single-shelled capsid is characterized by the presence of 260 protruding trimers on the outer surface. Five classes of trimers can be distinguished according to their different local environments. When VP2 is expressed alone in insect cells, dodecahedral particles form spontaneously; these may be assembled into larger, fragile icosahedral capsids built up by 12 dodecahedral capsids. Each dodecahedral capsid is an empty T=1 shell composed of 20 trimeric clusters of VP2. Structural comparison between IBDV capsids and capsids consisting of VP2 alone allowed the determination of the major capsid protein locations and the interactions between them. Whereas VP2 forms the outer protruding trimers, VP3 is found as trimers on the inner surface and may be responsible for stabilizing functions. Since elimination of the C-terminal region of VPX is correlated with the assembly of T=1 capsids, this domain might be involved (either alone or in cooperation with VP3) in the induction of different conformations of VP2 during capsid morphogenesis. PMID:11602723

  1. The Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Intradimer Interface Modulates Capsid Assembly and Stability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    During the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle, capsid assembly and disassembly must ensure correct packaging and release of the viral genome. Here we show that changes in the dynamics of the core protein play an important role in regulating these processes. The HBV capsid assembles from 120 copies of the core protein homodimer. Each monomer contains a conserved cysteine at position 61 that can form an intradimer disulfide that we use as a marker for dimer conformational states. We show that dimers in the context of capsids form intradimer disulfides relatively rapidly. Surprisingly, compared to reduced dimers, fully oxidized dimers assembled slower and into capsids that were morphologically similar but less stable. We hypothesize that oxidized protein adopts a geometry (or constellation of geometries) that is unfavorable for capsid assembly, resulting in weaker dimer–dimer interactions as well as slower assembly kinetics. Our results suggest that structural flexibility at the core protein intradimer interface is essential for regulating capsid assembly and stability. We further suggest that capsid destabilization by the C61–C61 disulfide has a regulatory function to support capsid disassembly and release of the viral genome. PMID:25102363

  2. The hepatitis B virus core protein intradimer interface modulates capsid assembly and stability.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Katen, Sarah P; Zlotnick, Adam

    2014-09-02

    During the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle, capsid assembly and disassembly must ensure correct packaging and release of the viral genome. Here we show that changes in the dynamics of the core protein play an important role in regulating these processes. The HBV capsid assembles from 120 copies of the core protein homodimer. Each monomer contains a conserved cysteine at position 61 that can form an intradimer disulfide that we use as a marker for dimer conformational states. We show that dimers in the context of capsids form intradimer disulfides relatively rapidly. Surprisingly, compared to reduced dimers, fully oxidized dimers assembled slower and into capsids that were morphologically similar but less stable. We hypothesize that oxidized protein adopts a geometry (or constellation of geometries) that is unfavorable for capsid assembly, resulting in weaker dimer-dimer interactions as well as slower assembly kinetics. Our results suggest that structural flexibility at the core protein intradimer interface is essential for regulating capsid assembly and stability. We further suggest that capsid destabilization by the C61-C61 disulfide has a regulatory function to support capsid disassembly and release of the viral genome.

  3. Chikungunya virus capsid protein contains nuclear import and export signals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family. After autoproteolytic cleavage, the CHIKV capsid protein (CP) is involved in RNA binding and assembly of the viral particle. The monomeric CP is approximately 30 kDa in size and is small enough for passive transport through nuclear pores. Some alphaviruses are found to harbor nuclear localization signals (NLS) and transport of these proteins between cellular compartments was shown to be energy dependent. The active nuclear import of cytoplasmic proteins is mediated by karyopherins and their export by exportins. As nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking may play a role in the life cycle of CHIKV, we have sought to identify nuclear localization and nuclear export signals in CHIKV CP in a virus-free system. Methods EGFP-fusion proteins of CHIKV CP and mutants thereof were created and used to monitor their intracellular localization. Binding of cellular proteins was confirmed in pull-down assays with purified CP using co-immuoprecipitation. Nuclear localization was demonstrated in a virus-free system using fluorescence microscopy. Results Here we show that CHIKV CP is a nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with an active NLS that binds to karyopherin α (Karα) for its nuclear translocation. We also found that the Karα4 C-terminal NLS binding site is sufficient for this interaction. We further demonstrate that CHIKV CP interacts directly with the export receptor CRM1 to transport this viral protein out of the nucleus via a nuclear export signal (NES). The CHIKV CP NES was mapped between amino acids 143 and 155 of CP. Deduced from in silico analyses we found that the NES has a mode of binding similar to the snurportin-1 CRM1 complex. Conclusions We were able to show that in a virus-free system that the CHIKV capsid protein contains both, a NLS and a NES, and that it is actively transported between the cytoplasma and the nucleus. We conclude that CHIKV CP has the ability to shuttle via

  4. Chikungunya virus capsid protein contains nuclear import and export signals.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Saijo; Rai, Jagdish; John, Lijo; Schaefer, Stephan; Pützer, Brigitte M; Herchenröder, Ottmar

    2013-08-28

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family. After autoproteolytic cleavage, the CHIKV capsid protein (CP) is involved in RNA binding and assembly of the viral particle. The monomeric CP is approximately 30 kDa in size and is small enough for passive transport through nuclear pores. Some alphaviruses are found to harbor nuclear localization signals (NLS) and transport of these proteins between cellular compartments was shown to be energy dependent. The active nuclear import of cytoplasmic proteins is mediated by karyopherins and their export by exportins. As nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking may play a role in the life cycle of CHIKV, we have sought to identify nuclear localization and nuclear export signals in CHIKV CP in a virus-free system. EGFP-fusion proteins of CHIKV CP and mutants thereof were created and used to monitor their intracellular localization. Binding of cellular proteins was confirmed in pull-down assays with purified CP using co-immuoprecipitation. Nuclear localization was demonstrated in a virus-free system using fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that CHIKV CP is a nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with an active NLS that binds to karyopherin α (Karα) for its nuclear translocation. We also found that the Karα4 C-terminal NLS binding site is sufficient for this interaction. We further demonstrate that CHIKV CP interacts directly with the export receptor CRM1 to transport this viral protein out of the nucleus via a nuclear export signal (NES). The CHIKV CP NES was mapped between amino acids 143 and 155 of CP. Deduced from in silico analyses we found that the NES has a mode of binding similar to the snurportin-1 CRM1 complex. We were able to show that in a virus-free system that the CHIKV capsid protein contains both, a NLS and a NES, and that it is actively transported between the cytoplasma and the nucleus. We conclude that CHIKV CP has the ability to shuttle via interaction with karyopherins for its

  5. AAV9-NPC1 significantly ameliorates Purkinje cell death and behavioral abnormalities in mouse NPC disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chang; Gong, Xue-Min; Luo, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2017-03-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a fatal inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. There is no effective way to treat NPC disease. In this study, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 9 (AAV9) to deliver a functional NPC1 gene systemically into NPC1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 4. One single AAV9-NPC1 injection resulted in robust NPC1 expression in various tissues, including brain, heart, and lung. Strikingly, AAV9-mediated NPC1 delivery significantly promoted Purkinje cell survival, restored locomotor activity and coordination, and increased the lifespan of NPC1(-/-) mice. Our work suggests that AAV-based gene therapy is a promising means to treat NPC disease.

  6. The structure of avian polyomavirus reveals variably sized capsids, non-conserved inter-capsomere interactions, and a possible location of the minor capsid protein VP4

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Peter S.; Enderlein, Dirk; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Carter, Weston S.; Kawano, Masaaki; Xing Li; Swenson, Robert D.; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Cheng, R. Holland; Atwood, Walter J.; Johne, Reimar; Belnap, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Avian polyomavirus (APV) causes a fatal, multi-organ disease among several bird species. Using cryogenic electron microscopy and other biochemical techniques, we investigated the structure of APV and compared it to that of mammalian polyomaviruses, particularly JC polyomavirus and simian virus 40. The structure of the pentameric major capsid protein (VP1) is mostly conserved; however, APV VP1 has a unique, truncated C-terminus that eliminates an intercapsomere-connecting {beta}-hairpin observed in other polyomaviruses. We postulate that the terminal {beta}-hairpin locks other polyomavirus capsids in a stable conformation and that absence of the hairpin leads to the observed capsid size variation in APV. Plug-like density features were observed at the base of the VP1 pentamers, consistent with the known location of minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3. However, the plug density is more prominent in APV and may include VP4, a minor capsid protein unique to bird polyomaviruses.

  7. The Smallest Capsid Protein Mediates Binding of the Essential Tegument Protein pp150 to Stabilize DNA-Containing Capsids in Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinghong; Yu, Xuekui; Gong, Hao; Jiang, Xiaohong; Abenes, Gerrado; Liu, Hongrong; Shivakoti, Sakar; Britt, William J.; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Fenyong; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes birth defects in newborns and life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. Among all human herpesviruses, HCMV contains a much larger dsDNA genome within a similarly-sized capsid compared to the others, and it was proposed to require pp150, a tegument protein only found in cytomegaloviruses, to stabilize its genome-containing capsid. However, little is known about how pp150 interacts with the underlying capsid. Moreover, the smallest capsid protein (SCP), while dispensable in herpes simplex virus type 1, was shown to play essential, yet undefined, role in HCMV infection. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM), we determine three-dimensional structures of HCMV capsid (no pp150) and virion (with pp150) at sub-nanometer resolution. Comparison of these two structures reveals that each pp150 tegument density is composed of two helix bundles connected by a long central helix. Correlation between the resolved helices and sequence-based secondary structure prediction maps the tegument density to the N-terminal half of pp150. The structures also show that SCP mediates interactions between the capsid and pp150 at the upper helix bundle of pp150. Consistent with this structural observation, ribozyme inhibition of SCP expression in HCMV-infected cells impairs the formation of DNA-containing viral particles and reduces viral yield by 10,000 fold. By cryoEM reconstruction of the resulting “SCP-deficient” viral particles, we further demonstrate that SCP is required for pp150 functionally binding to the capsid. Together, our structural and biochemical results point to a mechanism whereby SCP recruits pp150 to stabilize genome-containing capsid for the production of infectious HCMV virion. PMID:23966856

  8. Hydroxyproline in the major capsid protein VP1 of polyomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, J.W.; Consigli, R.A.

    1989-06-01

    Amino acid analysis of (/sup 3/H)proline-labeled polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1 by two-dimensional paper chromatography of the acid-hydrolyzed protein revealed the presence of /sup 3/H-labeled hydroxyproline. Addition of the proline analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid to infected mouse kidney cell cultures prevented or greatly reduced hydroxylation of proline in VP1. Immunofluorescence analysis performed on infected cells over a time course of analog addition revealed that virus proteins were synthesized but that transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was impeded. A reduction in the assembly of progeny virions demonstrated by CsCl gradient purification of virus from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled infected cell cultures was found to correlate with the time of analog addition. These results suggest that incorporation of this proline analog into VP1, accompanied by reduction of the hydroxyproline content of the protein, influences the amount of virus progeny produced by affecting transport of VP1 to the cell nucleus for assembly into virus particles.

  9. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  10. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  11. The delta domain of the HK97 major capsid protein is essential for assembly.

    PubMed

    Oh, Bonnie; Moyer, Crystal L; Hendrix, Roger W; Duda, Robert L

    2014-05-01

    The 102 residue N-terminal extension of the HK97 major capsid protein, the delta domain, is normally present during the assembly of immature HK97 procapsids, but it is removed during maturation like well-known internal scaffolding proteins of other tailed phages and herpesviruses. The delta domain also shares other unusual properties usually found in other viral and phage scaffolding proteins, including its location on the inside of the capsid, a high predicted and measured α-helical content, and an additional prediction for the ability to form parallel coiled-coils. Viral scaffolding proteins are essential for capsid assembly and phage viability, so we tested whether the HK97 delta domain was essential for capsid assembly. We studied the effects of deleting all or parts of the delta domain on capsid assembly and on complementation of capsid-protein-defective phage, and our results demonstrate that the delta domain is required for HK97 capsid assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of Chemical Chaperones on the Assembly and Stability of HIV-1 Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Chemical chaperones are small organic molecules which accumulate in a broad range of organisms in various tissues under different stress conditions and assist in the maintenance of a correct proteostasis under denaturating environments. The effect of chemical chaperones on protein folding and aggregation has been extensively studied and is generally considered to be mediated through non-specific interactions. However, the precise mechanism of action remains elusive. Protein self-assembly is a key event in both native and pathological states, ranging from microtubules and actin filaments formation to toxic amyloids appearance in degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Another pathological event, in which protein assembly cascade is a fundamental process, is the formation of virus particles. In the late stage of the virus life cycle, capsid proteins self-assemble into highly-ordered cores, which encapsulate the viral genome, consequently protect genome integrity and mediate infectivity. In this study, we examined the effect of different groups of chemical chaperones on viral capsid assembly in vitro, focusing on HIV-1 capsid protein as a system model. We found that while polyols and sugars markedly inhibited capsid assembly, methylamines dramatically enhanced the assembly rate. Moreover, chemical chaperones that inhibited capsid core formation, also stabilized capsid structure under thermal denaturation. Correspondingly, trimethylamine N-oxide, which facilitated formation of high-order assemblies, clearly destabilized capsid structure under similar conditions. In contrast to the prevailing hypothesis suggesting that chemical chaperones affect proteins through preferential exclusion, the observed dual effects imply that different chaperones modify capsid assembly and stability through different mechanisms. Furthermore, our results indicate a correlation between the folding state of capsid to its tendency to assemble into highly

  13. The effect of chemical chaperones on the assembly and stability of HIV-1 capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Chemical chaperones are small organic molecules which accumulate in a broad range of organisms in various tissues under different stress conditions and assist in the maintenance of a correct proteostasis under denaturating environments. The effect of chemical chaperones on protein folding and aggregation has been extensively studied and is generally considered to be mediated through non-specific interactions. However, the precise mechanism of action remains elusive. Protein self-assembly is a key event in both native and pathological states, ranging from microtubules and actin filaments formation to toxic amyloids appearance in degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Another pathological event, in which protein assembly cascade is a fundamental process, is the formation of virus particles. In the late stage of the virus life cycle, capsid proteins self-assemble into highly-ordered cores, which encapsulate the viral genome, consequently protect genome integrity and mediate infectivity. In this study, we examined the effect of different groups of chemical chaperones on viral capsid assembly in vitro, focusing on HIV-1 capsid protein as a system model. We found that while polyols and sugars markedly inhibited capsid assembly, methylamines dramatically enhanced the assembly rate. Moreover, chemical chaperones that inhibited capsid core formation, also stabilized capsid structure under thermal denaturation. Correspondingly, trimethylamine N-oxide, which facilitated formation of high-order assemblies, clearly destabilized capsid structure under similar conditions. In contrast to the prevailing hypothesis suggesting that chemical chaperones affect proteins through preferential exclusion, the observed dual effects imply that different chaperones modify capsid assembly and stability through different mechanisms. Furthermore, our results indicate a correlation between the folding state of capsid to its tendency to assemble into highly

  14. Sequence analysis and structural implications of rotavirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Parbhoo, N; Dewar, J B; Gildenhuys, S

    Rotavirus is the major cause of severe virus-associated gastroenteritis worldwide in children aged 5 and younger. Many children lose their lives annually due to this infection and the impact is particularly pronounced in developing countries. The mature rotavirus is a non-enveloped triple-layered nucleocapsid containing 11 double stranded RNA segments. Here a global view on the sequence and structure of the three main capsid proteins, VP2, VP6 and VP7 is shown by generating a consensus sequence for each of these rotavirus proteins, for each species obtained from published data of representative rotavirus genotypes from across the world and across species. Degree of conservation between species was represented on homology models for each of the proteins. VP7 shows the highest level of variation with 14-45 amino acids showing conservation of less than 60%. These changes are localised to the outer surface alluding to a possible mechanism in evading the immune system. The middle layer, VP6 shows lower variability with only 14-32 sites having lower than 70% conservation. The inner structural layer made up of VP2 showed the lowest variability with only 1-16 sites having less than 70% conservation across species. The results correlate with each protein's multiple structural roles in the infection cycle. Thus, although the nucleotide sequences vary due to the error-prone nature of replication and lack of proof reading, the corresponding amino acid sequence of VP2, 6 and 7 remain relatively conserved. Benefits of this knowledge about the conservation include the ability to target proteins at sites that cannot undergo mutational changes without influencing viral fitness; as well as possibility to study systems that are highly evolved for structure and function in order to determine how to generate and manipulate such systems for use in various biotechnological applications.

  15. Intravenous AAV9 efficiently transduces myenteric neurons in neonate and juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    Gombash, Sara E.; Cowley, Christopher J.; Fitzgerald, Julie A.; Hall, Jodie C. E.; Mueller, Christian; Christofi, Fedias L.; Foust, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapies for neurological diseases with autonomic or gastrointestinal involvement may require global gene expression. Gastrointestinal complications are often associated with Parkinson's disease and autism. Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's brains, are routinely identified in the neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS) following colon biopsies from patients. The ENS is the intrinsic nervous system of the gut, and is responsible for coordinating the secretory and motor functions of the gastrointestinal tract. ENS dysfunction can cause severe patient discomfort, malnourishment, or even death as in intestinal pseudo-obstruction (Ogilvie syndrome). Importantly, ENS transduction following systemic vector administration has not been thoroughly evaluated. Here we show that systemic injection of AAV9 into neonate or juvenile mice results in transduction of 25–57% of ENS myenteric neurons. Transgene expression was prominent in choline acetyltransferase positive cells, but not within vasoactive intestinal peptide or neuronal nitric oxide synthase cells, suggesting a bias for cells involved in excitatory signaling. AAV9 transduction in enteric glia is very low compared to CNS astrocytes. Enteric glial transduction was enhanced by using a glial specific promoter. Furthermore, we show that AAV8 results in comparable transduction in neonatal mice to AAV9 though AAV1, 5, and 6 are less efficient. These data demonstrate that systemic AAV9 has high affinity for peripheral neural tissue and is useful for future therapeutic development and basic studies of the ENS. PMID:25360081

  16. Intravenous AAV9 efficiently transduces myenteric neurons in neonate and juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Gombash, Sara E; Cowley, Christopher J; Fitzgerald, Julie A; Hall, Jodie C E; Mueller, Christian; Christofi, Fedias L; Foust, Kevin D

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapies for neurological diseases with autonomic or gastrointestinal involvement may require global gene expression. Gastrointestinal complications are often associated with Parkinson's disease and autism. Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's brains, are routinely identified in the neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS) following colon biopsies from patients. The ENS is the intrinsic nervous system of the gut, and is responsible for coordinating the secretory and motor functions of the gastrointestinal tract. ENS dysfunction can cause severe patient discomfort, malnourishment, or even death as in intestinal pseudo-obstruction (Ogilvie syndrome). Importantly, ENS transduction following systemic vector administration has not been thoroughly evaluated. Here we show that systemic injection of AAV9 into neonate or juvenile mice results in transduction of 25-57% of ENS myenteric neurons. Transgene expression was prominent in choline acetyltransferase positive cells, but not within vasoactive intestinal peptide or neuronal nitric oxide synthase cells, suggesting a bias for cells involved in excitatory signaling. AAV9 transduction in enteric glia is very low compared to CNS astrocytes. Enteric glial transduction was enhanced by using a glial specific promoter. Furthermore, we show that AAV8 results in comparable transduction in neonatal mice to AAV9 though AAV1, 5, and 6 are less efficient. These data demonstrate that systemic AAV9 has high affinity for peripheral neural tissue and is useful for future therapeutic development and basic studies of the ENS.

  17. Quasicrystalline and crystalline types of local protein order in capsids of small viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konevtsova, O. V.; Pimonov, V. V.; Lorman, V. L.; Rochal, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    Like metal alloys and micellar systems in soft matter, the viral capsid structures can be of crystalline and quasicrystalline types. We reveal the local quasicrystalline order of proteins in small spherical viral capsids using their nets of dodecahedral type. We show that the structure of some of the viral shells is well described in terms of a chiral pentagonal tiling, whose nodes coincide with centers of mass of protein molecules. The chiral protein packing found in these capsids originates from the pentagonal Penrose tiling (PPT), due to a specific phason reconstruction needed to fit the protein order at the adjacent dodecahedron faces. Via examples of small spherical viral shells and geminate capsid of a Maize Streak virus, we discuss the benefits and shortcomings of the usage of a dodecahedral net in comparison to icosahedral one, which is commonly applied for the modeling of viral shells with a crystalline local order.

  18. Hexagonal organization of Moloney murine leukemia virus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Keith; McDermott, Jason; Barklis, Eric

    2002-06-20

    To help elucidate the mechanisms by which retrovirus structural proteins associate to form virus particles, we have examined membrane-bound assemblies of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) capsid (CA) proteins. Electron microscopy and image reconstruction techniques showed that CA dimers appear to function as organizational subunits of the cage-like, membrane-bound protein arrays. However, new three-dimensional (3D) data also were consistent with hexagonal (p6) assembly models. The p6 3D reconstructions of membrane-bound M-MuLV CA proteins gave unit cells of a = b = 80.3 A, c = 110 A, gamma = 120 degrees, in which six dimer units formed a cage lattice. Neighbor cage hole-to-hole distances were 45 A, while distances between hexagonal cage holes corresponded to unit cell lengths (80.3 A). The hexagonal model predicts two types of cage holes (trimer and hexamer holes), uses symmetric head-to-head dimer building blocks, and permits the introduction of lattice curvature by conversion of hexamer to pentamer units. The M-MuLV CA lattice is similar to those formed in helical tubes by HIV CA in that hexamer units surround cage holes of 25-30 A, but differs in that M-MuLV hexamer units appear to be CA dimers, whereas HIV CA units appear to be monomers. These results suggest that while general assembly principles apply to different retroviruses, clear assembly distinctions exist between these virus types. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  19. Assembly of the small outer capsid protein, Soc, on bacteriophage T4: a novel system for high density display of multiple large anthrax toxins and foreign proteins on phage capsid.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Shivachandra, Sathish B; Zhang, Zhihong; Rao, Venigalla B

    2007-07-27

    Bacteriophage T4 capsid is a prolate icosahedron composed of the major capsid protein gp23*, the vertex protein gp24*, and the portal protein gp20. Assembled on its surface are 810 molecules of the non-essential small outer capsid protein, Soc (10 kDa), and 155 molecules of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc (39 kDa). In this study Soc, a "triplex" protein that stabilizes T4 capsid, is targeted for molecular engineering of T4 particle surface. Using a defined in vitro assembly system, anthrax toxins, protective antigen, lethal factor and their domains, fused to Soc were efficiently displayed on the capsid. Both the N and C termini of the 80 amino acid Soc polypeptide can be simultaneously used to display antigens. Proteins as large as 93 kDa can be stably anchored on the capsid through Soc-capsid interactions. Using both Soc and Hoc, up to 1662 anthrax toxin molecules are assembled on the phage T4 capsid under controlled conditions. We infer from the binding data that a relatively high affinity capsid binding site is located in the middle of the rod-shaped Soc, with the N and C termini facing the 2- and 3-fold symmetry axes of the capsid, respectively. Soc subunits interact at these interfaces, gluing the adjacent capsid protein hexamers and generating a cage-like outer scaffold. Antigen fusion does interfere with the inter-subunit interactions, but these interactions are not essential for capsid binding and antigen display. These features make the T4-Soc platform the most robust phage display system reported to date. The study offers insights into the architectural design of bacteriophage T4 virion, one of the most stable viruses known, and how its capsid surface can be engineered for novel applications in basic molecular biology and biotechnology.

  20. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  1. Distinct transduction profiles in the CNS via three injection routes of AAV9 and the application to generation of a neurodegenerative mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Fathul; Konno, Ayumu; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Goenawan, Hanna; Miyake, Koichi; Shimada, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Using single-stranded adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (ssAAV9) vectors containing the neuron-specific synapsin-I promoter, we examined whether different administration routes (direct cerebellar cortical (DC), intrathecal (IT) and intravenous (IV) injections) could elicit specific transduction profiles in the CNS. The DC injection route robustly and exclusively transduced the whole cerebellum, whereas the IT injection route primarily transduced the cerebellar lobules 9 and 10 close to the injection site and the spinal cord. An IV injection in neonatal mice weakly and homogenously transduced broad CNS areas. In the cerebellar cortex, the DC and IT injection routes transduced all neuron types, whereas the IV injection route primarily transduced Purkinje cells. To verify the usefulness of this method, we generated a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1). Mice that received a DC injection of the ssAAV9 vector expressing mutant ATXN1, a protein responsible for SCA1, showed the intranuclear aggregation of mutant ATXN1 in Purkinje cells, significant atrophy of the Purkinje cell dendrites and progressive motor deficits, which are characteristics of SCA1. Thus, ssAAV9-mediated transduction areas, levels, and cell types change depending on the route of injection. Moreover, this approach can be used for the generation of different mouse models of CNS/neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26015973

  2. Epitope Insertion at the N-Terminal Molecular Switch of the Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus T=3 Capsid Protein Leads to Larger T=4 Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M.; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Marabini, Roberto; Chichón, Javier; Mena, Ignacio; Angulo, Iván; Carrascosa, José L.; Verdaguer, Nuria; Trus, Benes L.; Bárcena, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Viruses need only one or a few structural capsid proteins to build an infectious particle. This is possible through the extensive use of symmetry and the conformational polymorphism of the structural proteins. Using virus-like particles (VLP) from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) as a model, we addressed the basis of calicivirus capsid assembly and their application in vaccine design. The RHDV capsid is based on a T=3 lattice containing 180 identical subunits (VP1). We determined the structure of RHDV VLP to 8.0-Å resolution by three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy; in addition, we used San Miguel sea lion virus (SMSV) and feline calicivirus (FCV) capsid subunit structures to establish the backbone structure of VP1 by homology modeling and flexible docking analysis. Based on the three-domain VP1 model, several insertion mutants were designed to validate the VP1 pseudoatomic model, and foreign epitopes were placed at the N- or C-terminal end, as well as in an exposed loop on the capsid surface. We selected a set of T and B cell epitopes of various lengths derived from viral and eukaryotic origins. Structural analysis of these chimeric capsids further validates the VP1 model to design new chimeras. Whereas most insertions are well tolerated, VP1 with an FCV capsid protein-neutralizing epitope at the N terminus assembled into mixtures of T=3 and larger T=4 capsids. The calicivirus capsid protein, and perhaps that of many other viruses, thus can encode polymorphism modulators that are not anticipated from the plane sequence, with important implications for understanding virus assembly and evolution. PMID:22491457

  3. Papillomavirus Assembly Requires Trimerization of the Major Capsid Protein by Disulfides between Two Highly Conserved Cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Martin; Fligge, Claudia; Petzak, Ingrid; Harris, J. Robin; Streeck, Rolf E.

    1998-01-01

    We have used viruslike particles (VLPs) of human papillomaviruses to study the structure and assembly of the viral capsid. We demonstrate that mutation of either of two highly conserved cysteines of the major capsid protein L1 to serine completely prevents the assembly of VLPs but not of capsomers, whereas mutation of all other cysteines leaves VLP assembly unaffected. These two cysteines form intercapsomeric disulfides yielding an L1 trimer. Trimerization comprises about half of the L1 molecules in VLPs but all L1 molecules in complete virions. We suggest that trimerization of L1 is indispensable for the stabilization of intercapsomeric contacts in papillomavirus capsids. PMID:9621087

  4. Characterization of post-translation products of herpes simplex virus gene 35 proteins binding to the surfaces of full capsids but not empty capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.K.; Roizman, B.; Pereira, L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report on the properties of a genetically and immunologically related family of structural (..gamma..) polypeptides of herpes simplex virus 1 designated as infected cell polypeptides (ICP) 35. The members of this family were identified and studied with the aid of a panel of monoclonal antibodies exemplified by H745. This monoclonal antibody reacted with six bands (ICP35a to 35f) formed by ICPs contained in either HEp-2 or Vero cell lysates electrophoretically separated in denaturing gels and transferred to nitrocell sheets. The six bands had apparent molecular weights in the range 39,000 to 50,000. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that ICP35a to 35d are cytoplasmic precursors to nuclear products. ICP35 was labeled by /sup 32/P/sub i/ added to the medium, but the extent of phosphorylation varied and may be a determinant of isoelectric properties. Iodination studies indicate that ICP35e and 35f are the predominant forms of ICP35 present on the surface of full, nuclear capsids containing DNA. None of the members of the ICP35 family were detected in empty capsids. Surface iodination labeled the major capsid protein (ICP5) of empty capsids, but not of full capsids, indicating the ICP35e of 35f coat the surface of the viral capsid and block access to sites for iodination of ICP5, the major capsid protein.

  5. Structure of the pseudorabies virus capsid: comparison with herpes simplex virus type 1 and differential binding of essential minor proteins.

    PubMed

    Homa, F L; Huffman, J B; Toropova, K; Lopez, H R; Makhov, A M; Conway, J F

    2013-09-23

    The structure of pseudorabies virus (PRV) capsids isolated from the nucleus of infected cells and from PRV virions was determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and compared to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsids. PRV capsid structures closely resemble those of HSV-1, including distribution of the capsid vertex specific component (CVSC) of HSV-1, which is a heterodimer of the pUL17 and pUL25 proteins. Occupancy of CVSC on all PRV capsids is near 100%, compared to ~50% reported for HSV-1 C-capsids and 25% or less that we measure for HSV-1 A- and B-capsids. A PRV mutant lacking pUL25 does not produce C-capsids and lacks visible CVSC density in the cryo-EM-based reconstruction. A reconstruction of PRV capsids in which green fluorescent protein was fused within the N-terminus of pUL25 confirmed previous studies with a similar HSV-1 capsid mutant localizing pUL25 to the CVSC density region that is distal to the penton. However, comparison of the CVSC density in a 9-Å-resolution PRV C-capsid map with the available crystal structure of HSV-1 pUL25 failed to find a satisfactory fit, suggesting either a different fold for PRV pUL25 or a capsid-bound conformation for pUL25 that does not match the X-ray model determined from protein crystallized in solution. The PRV capsid imaged within virions closely resembles C-capsids with the addition of weak but significant density shrouding the pentons that we attribute to tegument proteins. Our results demonstrate significant structure conservation between the PRV and HSV capsids. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure of the pseudorabies virus capsid: comparison with herpes simplex virus type 1 and differential binding of essential minor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Homa, FL; Huffman, JB; Toropova, K; Lopez, HR; Makhov, AM; Conway, JF

    2013-01-01

    The structure of pseudorabies virus (PRV) capsids isolated from the nucleus of infected cells and from PRV virions was determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and compared to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsids. PRV capsid structures closely resemble those of HSV-1, including distribution of the capsid vertex specific component (CVSC) of HSV-1, which is a heterodimer of the pUL17 and pUL25 proteins. Occupancy of CVSC on all PRV capsids is near 100%, compared to ~50% reported for HSV-1 C-capsids and 25% or less that we measure for HSV-1 A- and B-capsids. A PRV mutant lacking pUL25 does not produce C-capsids and lacks visible CVSC density in the cryo-EM-based reconstruction. A reconstruction of PRV capsids in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused within the N-terminus of pUL25 confirmed previous studies with a similar HSV-1 capsid mutant localizing pUL25 to the CVSC density region that is distal to the penton. However, comparison of the CVSC density in a 9 Ångstrom resolution PRV C-capsid map with the available crystal structure of HSV-1 pUL25 failed to find a satisfactory fit, suggesting either a different fold for PRV pUL25 or a capsid- bound conformation for pUL25 that does not match the X-ray model determined from protein crystallized in solution. The PRV capsid imaged within virions closely resembles C-capsids with the addition of weak but significant density shrouding the pentons that we attribute to tegument proteins. Our results demonstrate significant structure conservation between the PRV and HSV capsids. PMID:23827137

  7. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability.

    PubMed

    Gres, Anna T; Kirby, Karen A; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Tanner, John J; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2015-07-03

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability

    DOE PAGES

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; ...

    2015-06-04

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. In this paper, we report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtlymore » altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Finally, inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle.« less

  9. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability

    SciTech Connect

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Tanner, John J.; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2015-06-04

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. In this paper, we report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Finally, inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle.

  10. The Amphipathic Helix of Adenovirus Capsid Protein VI Contributes to Penton Release and Postentry Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ruben; Schellenberger, Pascale; Vasishtan, Daven; Aknin, Cindy; Austin, Sisley; Dacheux, Denis; Rayne, Fabienne; Siebert, Alistair; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Gruenewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear delivery of the adenoviral genome requires that the capsid cross the limiting membrane of the endocytic compartment and traverse the cytosol to reach the nucleus. This endosomal escape is initiated upon internalization and involves a highly coordinated process of partial disassembly of the entering capsid to release the membrane lytic internal capsid protein VI. Using wild-type and protein VI-mutated human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-C5), we show that capsid stability and membrane rupture are major determinants of entry-related sorting of incoming adenovirus virions. Furthermore, by using electron cryomicroscopy, as well as penton- and protein VI-specific antibodies, we show that the amphipathic helix of protein VI contributes to capsid stability by preventing premature disassembly and deployment of pentons and protein VI. Thus, the helix has a dual function in maintaining the metastable state of the capsid by preventing premature disassembly and mediating efficient membrane lysis to evade lysosomal targeting. Based on these findings and structural data from cryo-electron microscopy, we suggest a refined disassembly mechanism upon entry. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show the intricate connection of adenovirus particle stability and the entry-dependent release of the membrane-lytic capsid protein VI required for endosomal escape. We show that the amphipathic helix of the adenovirus internal protein VI is required to stabilize pentons in the particle while coinciding with penton release upon entry and that release of protein VI mediates membrane lysis, thereby preventing lysosomal sorting. We suggest that this dual functionality of protein VI ensures an optimal disassembly process by balancing the metastable state of the mature adenovirus particle. PMID:25473051

  11. Rethinking the capsid proteins of enveloped viruses: multifunctionality from genome packaging to genome transfection.

    PubMed

    Freire, João M; Santos, Nuno C; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Da Poian, Andrea T; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-06-01

    Regardless of the debate on whether there is a place for viruses in the tree of life, it is consensual that they co-evolve with their hosts under the pressure of genome minimization. The abundance of multifunctional viral structural proteins is a consequence of this pressure. The molecular key to multifunctionality is the existence of intrinsically disordered domains together with ordered domains in the same protein. Capsid proteins, the hallmark of viruses, are not exceptions because they have coexisting ordered and disordered domains that are crucial for multifunctionality. It is also frequent to find supercharged proteins (i.e. proteins for which the net charge per unit molecular mass is > +0.75/kDa) among viral capsid proteins. All flaviviruses having annotated proteins in the ExPASy Viralzone database have supercharged capsid proteins. Moreover, cell-penetrating sequences/domains are frequent in viral proteins, even when they are not supercharged. Altogether, the findings strongly suggest that the ability to translocate membranes was acquired, conserved and optimized throughout the evolution of some viral proteins as part of their multifunctionality. The fitness of capsid proteins to translocate membranes carrying genomes was experimentally demonstrated with dengue virus capsid protein. This protein is potentially able to help the fusion process and translocate the RNA genome across the hemifused membrane formed by the viral envelope and the endosomal membrane. In addition, one of the cell-penetrating domains of the capsid protein also has antibacterial activity. This may be reminiscent of parasitic bacteria-bacteria competition for the same host and shed light on the origins of enveloped viruses. © 2015 FEBS.

  12. Isolation of capsid proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus by chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Murdin, A D; Doel, T R; Spier, R E

    1983-10-01

    A method for the isolation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid proteins was developed. The FMDV capsid proteins VP1, VP2, VP3 and VP0 were isolated from sucrose gradient purified virus by chromatofocusing in a pH 7.4-4.0 gradient on Polybuffer exchanger PBE 94. Under the conditions used the proteins eluted in the sequence VP1, VP2, VP0 (when present) and VP3. Capsid protein VP4 did not elute and could not be isolated by this method. Protein concentration in the eluate was monitored by the use of a radiolabelled marker and recoveries of approximately 50% of the input marker could be achieved when using up to 15 mg of virus and a 30-ml column. The high capacity and relative simplicity of chromatofocusing make it a useful alternative to other methods of purifying proteins.

  13. Coat as a Dagger: The Use of Capsid Proteins to Perforate Membranes during Non-Enveloped DNA Viruses Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bilkova, Eva; Forstova, Jitka; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2014-01-01

    To get access to the replication site, small non-enveloped DNA viruses have to cross the cell membrane using a limited number of capsid proteins, which also protect the viral genome in the extracellular environment. Most of DNA viruses have to reach the nucleus to replicate. The capsid proteins involved in transmembrane penetration are exposed or released during endosomal trafficking of the virus. Subsequently, the conserved domains of capsid proteins interact with cellular membranes and ensure their efficient permeabilization. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the role of capsid proteins of small non-enveloped DNA viruses in intracellular membrane perturbation in the early stages of infection. PMID:25055856

  14. Coat as a dagger: the use of capsid proteins to perforate membranes during non-enveloped DNA viruses trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bilkova, Eva; Forstova, Jitka; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2014-07-23

    To get access to the replication site, small non-enveloped DNA viruses have to cross the cell membrane using a limited number of capsid proteins, which also protect the viral genome in the extracellular environment. Most of DNA viruses have to reach the nucleus to replicate. The capsid proteins involved in transmembrane penetration are exposed or released during endosomal trafficking of the virus. Subsequently, the conserved domains of capsid proteins interact with cellular membranes and ensure their efficient permeabilization. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the role of capsid proteins of small non-enveloped DNA viruses in intracellular membrane perturbation in the early stages of infection.

  15. Identification of amino acid sequences in the polyomavirus capsid proteins that serve as nuclear localization signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. Jr; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The molecular mechanism participating in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Recently, the nuclear localization signal sequences (NLS) of many nuclear proteins have been identified, and most have been found to be composed of a highly basic amino acid stretch. A genetic "subtractive" and a biochemical "additive" approach were used in our studies to identify the NLS's of the polyomavirus structural capsid proteins. An NLS was identified at the N-terminus (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) of the major capsid protein VP1 and at the C-terminus (Glu307 -Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Glu-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) of the VP2/VP3 minor capsid proteins.

  16. Identification of amino acid sequences in the polyomavirus capsid proteins that serve as nuclear localization signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. Jr; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The molecular mechanism participating in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Recently, the nuclear localization signal sequences (NLS) of many nuclear proteins have been identified, and most have been found to be composed of a highly basic amino acid stretch. A genetic "subtractive" and a biochemical "additive" approach were used in our studies to identify the NLS's of the polyomavirus structural capsid proteins. An NLS was identified at the N-terminus (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) of the major capsid protein VP1 and at the C-terminus (Glu307 -Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Glu-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) of the VP2/VP3 minor capsid proteins.

  17. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fattaey, A.; Lenz, L.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against intact budgerigar fledgling disease (BFD) virions were produced and characterized. These antibodies were selected for their ability to react with BFD virions in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these antibodies was reactive in the immunofluorescent detection of BFD virus-infected cells. These antibodies immunoprecipitated intact virions and specifically recognized the major capsid protein, VP1, of the dissociated virion. The MAbs were found to preferentially recognize native BFD virus capsid protein when compared with denatured virus protein. These MAbs were capable of detecting BFD virus protein in chicken embryonated cell-culture lysates by dot-blot analysis.

  18. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fattaey, A.; Lenz, L.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against intact budgerigar fledgling disease (BFD) virions were produced and characterized. These antibodies were selected for their ability to react with BFD virions in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these antibodies was reactive in the immunofluorescent detection of BFD virus-infected cells. These antibodies immunoprecipitated intact virions and specifically recognized the major capsid protein, VP1, of the dissociated virion. The MAbs were found to preferentially recognize native BFD virus capsid protein when compared with denatured virus protein. These MAbs were capable of detecting BFD virus protein in chicken embryonated cell-culture lysates by dot-blot analysis.

  19. Multiple functions of capsid protein phosphorylation in duck hepatitis B virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, M; Summers, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the role of phosphorylation of the capsid protein of the avian hepadnavirus duck hepatitis B virus in viral replication. We found previously that three serines and one threonine in the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the capsid protein serve as phosphorylation sites and that the pattern of phosphorylation at these sites in intracellular viral capsids is complex. In this study, we present evidence that the phosphorylation state of three of these residues affects distinct steps in viral replication. By substituting these residues with alanine in order to mimic serine, or with aspartic acid in order to mimic phosphoserine, and assaying the effects of these substitutions on various steps in virus replication, we were able to make the following inferences. (i) The presence of phosphoserines at residues 245 and 259 stimulates DNA synthesis within viral nucleocapsids. (ii) The absence of phosphoserine at residue 257 and at residues 257 and 259 stimulates covalently closed circular DNA synthesis and virus production, respectively. (iii) The presence of phosphoserine at position 259 is required for initiation of infection. The results implied that both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated capsid proteins were necessary for a nucleocapsid particle to carry out all its functions in virus replication, explaining why differential phosphorylation of the capsid protein occurs in hepadnaviruses. Whether these differentially phosphorylated proteins coexist on the same nucleocapsid, or whether the nucleocapsid acquires sequential functions through selective phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, is discussed. Images PMID:8207809

  20. The Capsid Proteins of a Large, Icosahedral dsDNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaodong; Yu, Zeyun; Zhang, Ping; Battisti, Anthony J.; Chipman, Paul R.; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Bergoin, Max; Rossmann, Michael G.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) is a large (~1850 Å diameter) insect virus with an icosahedral, T=147 capsid, a dsDNA genome, and an internal lipid membrane. The structure of CIV was determined to 13 Å resolution by means of cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and three-dimensional image reconstruction. A homology model of P50, the CIV major capsid protein (MCP), was built based on its amino acid sequence and the structure of the homologous Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) Vp54 MCP. This model was fitted into the cryoEM density for each of the 25 trimeric CIV capsomers per icosahedral asymmetric unit. A difference map, in which the fitted CIV MCP capsomers were subtracted from the CIV cryoEM reconstruction, showed that there are at least three different types of minor capsid proteins associated with the capsomers outside the lipid membrane. “Finger” proteins are situated at many, but not all, of the spaces between three adjacent capsomers within each trisymmetron, and “zip” proteins are situated between sets of three adjacent capsomers at the boundary between neighboring trisymmetrons and pentasymmetrons. Based on the results of segmentation and density correlations, there are at least eight finger proteins, and three dimeric and two monomeric zip proteins in one asymmetric unit of the CIV capsid. These minor proteins appear to stabilize the virus by acting as intercapsomer cross-links. One transmembrane “anchor” protein per icosahedral asymmetric unit, which extends from beneath one of the capsomers in the pentasymmetron to the internal leaflet of the lipid membrane, may provide additional stabilization for the capsid. These results are consistent with the observations for other large, icosahedral dsDNA viruses that also utilize minor capsid proteins for stabilization and determining their assembly. PMID:19027752

  1. The Impact of Capsid Proteins on Virus Removal and Inactivation During Water Treatment Processes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Brooke K; Yang, Yu; Gerrity, Daniel W; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the amino acid composition of protein capsids on virus inactivation using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and titanium dioxide photocatalysis, and physical removal via enhanced coagulation using ferric chloride. Although genomic damage is likely more extensive than protein damage for viruses treated using UV, proteins are still substantially degraded. All amino acids demonstrated significant correlations with UV susceptibility. The hydroxyl radicals produced during photocatalysis are considered nonspecific, but they likely cause greater overall damage to virus capsid proteins relative to the genome. Oxidizing chemicals, including hydroxyl radicals, preferentially degrade amino acids over nucleotides, and the amino acid tyrosine appears to strongly influence virus inactivation. Capsid composition did not correlate strongly to virus removal during physicochemical treatment, nor did virus size. Isoelectric point may play a role in virus removal, but additional factors are likely to contribute. PMID:26604779

  2. The first identified nucleocytoplasmic shuttling herpesviral capsid protein: herpes simplex virus type 1 VP19C.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zheng, Chunfu

    2012-01-01

    VP19C is a structural protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 viral particle, which is essential for assembly of the capsid. In this study, a nuclear export signal (NES) of VP19C is for the first time identified and mapped to amino acid residues 342 to 351. Furthermore, VP19C is demonstrated to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through the NES in a chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent manner involving RanGTP hydrolysis. This makes VP19C the first herpesviral capsid protein with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling property and adds it to the list of HSV-1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins.

  3. The HSV-1 tegument protein pUL46 associates with cellular membranes and viral capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael A.; Bucks, Michelle A.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Courtney, Richard J.

    2008-07-05

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the addition of tegument proteins into nascent herpesvirus particles are poorly understood. To better understand the tegumentation process of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, we initiated studies that showed the tegument protein pUL46 (VP11/12) has a similar cellular localization to the membrane-associated tegument protein VP22. Using membrane flotation analysis we found that pUL46 associates with membranes in both the presence and absence of other HSV-1 proteins. However, when purified virions were stripped of their envelope, the majority of pUL46 was found to associate with the capsid fraction. This strong affinity of pUL46 for capsids was confirmed by an in vitro capsid pull-down assay in which purified pUL46-GST was able to interact specifically with capsids purified from the nuclear fraction of HSV-1 infected cells. These results suggest that pUL46 displays a dynamic interaction between cellular membranes and capsids.

  4. In Silico Studies of Medicinal Compounds Against Hepatitis C Capsid Protein from North India

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammad; Archunan, Govindaraju; Ilyas, Muhammad; Begum, Nargis; Jahangir, Syed; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Qahtani, Mohammad Al; Mathew, Shiny

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis viral infection is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Over one million people are estimated to be persistently infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide. As capsid core protein is the key element in spreading HCV; hence, it is considered to be the superlative target of antiviral compounds. Novel drug inhibitors of HCV are in need to complement or replace the current treatments such as pegylated interferon’s and ribavirin as they are partially booming and beset with various side effects. Our study was conducted to predict 3D structure of capsid core protein of HCV from northern part of India. Core, the capsid protein of HCV, handles the assembly and packaging of HCV RNA genome and is the least variable of all the ten HCV proteins among the six HCV genotypes. Therefore, we screened four phytochemicals inhibitors that are known to disrupt the interactions of core and other HCV proteins such as (a) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (b) ladanein, (c) naringenin, and (d) silybin extracted from medicinal plants; targeted against active site of residues of HCV-genotype 3 (G3) (Q68867) and its subtypes 3b (Q68861) and 3g (Q68865) from north India. To study the inhibitory activity of the recruited flavonoids, we conducted a quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR). Furthermore, docking interaction suggests that EGCG showed a maximum number of hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions with all the three modeled capsid proteins with high interaction energy followed by naringenin and silybin. Thus, our results strongly correlate the inhibitory activity of the selected bioflavonoid. Finally, the dynamic predicted capsid protein molecule of HCV virion provides a general avenue to target structure-based antiviral compounds that support the hypothesis that the screened inhibitors for viral capsid might constitute new class of potent agents but further confirmation is necessary using in vitro and in vivo

  5. Localization of the N-terminus of minor coat protein IIIa in the adenovirus capsid

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen; Glasgow, Joel N.; Borovjagin, Anton; Beatty, Matthew S.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; T. Curiel, David; Marabini, Roberto; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Minor coat protein IIIa is conserved in all adenoviruses and required for correct viral assembly, but its precise function in capsid organization is unknown. The latest adenovirus capsid model proposes that IIIa is located underneath the vertex region. To obtain experimental evidence on the location of IIIa and further define its role, we engineered the IIIa gene to encode heterologous N-terminal peptide extensions. Recombinant adenovirus variants with IIIa encoding six-histidine tag (6-His), 6-His and FLAG peptides, or 6-His linked to FLAG with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker were rescued and analyzed for virus yield, capsid incorporation of heterologous peptides, and capsid stability. Longer extensions could not be rescued. Western blot analysis confirmed that the modified IIIa proteins were expressed in infected cells and incorporated into virions. In the adenovirus encoding the 6-His-linker-FLAG-IIIa gene, the 6-His tag was present in light particles but not in mature virions. Immuno-electron microscopy of this virus showed that the FLAG epitope is not accessible to antibodies on the viral particles. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) and difference mapping located the IIIa N-terminal extension beneath the vertex complex, wedged at the interface between penton base and the peripentonal hexons, therefore supporting the latest proposed model. The position of the IIIa N-terminus and its low tolerance for modification provide new clues for understanding the role of this minor coat protein in adenovirus capsid assembly and disassembly. PMID:18786542

  6. Interactions between Sindbis virus RNAs and a 68 amino acid derivative of the viral capsid protein further defines the capsid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, B; Geigenmüller-Gnirke, U; Schlesinger, S

    1994-01-01

    In previous studies of encapsidation of Sindbis virus RNA, we identified a 570nt fragment (nt 684-1253) from the 12 kb genome that binds to the viral capsid protein with specificity and is required for packaging of Sindbis virus defective interfering RNAs. We now show that the capsid binding activity resides in a highly structured 132nt fragment (nt 945-1076). We had also demonstrated that a 68 amino acid peptide derived from the capsid protein retained most of the binding activity of the original protein and have now developed an RNA mobility shift assay with this peptide fused to glutathione-S-transferase. We have used this assay in conjunction with the original assay in which the intact capsid protein was immobilized on nitrocellulose to analyze more extensive deletions in the 132-mer. All of the deletions led to a reduction in binding, but the binding of a 5' 67-mer was enhanced by the addition of nonspecific flanking sequences. This result suggests that the stability of a particular structure within the 132nt sequence may be important for capsid recognition. Images PMID:8139918

  7. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  8. Poliovirus-associated protein kinase: Destabilization of the virus capsid and stimulation of the phosphorylation reaction by Zn sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Ratka, M.; Lackmann, M.; Ueckermann, C.; Karlins, U.; Koch, G. )

    1989-09-01

    The previously described poliovirus-associated protein kinase activity phosphorylates viral proteins VP0 and VP2 as well as exogenous proteins in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. In this paper, the effect of Zn{sup 2+} on the phosphorylation reaction and the stability of the poliovirus capsid has been studied in detail and compared to that of Mg{sup 2+}. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, phosphorylation of capsid proteins VP2 and VP4 is significantly higher while phosphorylation of VP0 and exogenous phosphate acceptor proteins is not detected. The results indicate the activation of more than one virus-associated protein kinase by Zn{sup 2+}. The ion-dependent behavior of the enzyme activities is observed independently of whether the virus was obtained from HeLa or green monkey kidney cells. The poliovirus capsid is destabilized by Zn{sup 2+}. This alteration of the poliovirus capsid structure is a prerequisite for effective phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins. The increased level of phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins results in further destabilization of the viral capsid. As a result of the conformational changes, poliovirus-associated protein kinase activities dissociate from the virus particle. The authors suggest that the destabilizing effect of phosphorylation on the viral capsid plays a role in uncoating of poliovirus.

  9. Intracisternal delivery of AAV9 results in oligodendrocyte and motor neuron transduction in the whole central nervous system of cats.

    PubMed

    Bucher, T; Dubreil, L; Colle, M-A; Maquigneau, M; Deniaud, J; Ledevin, M; Moullier, P; Joussemet, B

    2014-05-01

    Systemic and intracerebrospinal fluid delivery of adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to achieve widespread gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). However, after systemic injection, the neurotropism of the vector has been reported to vary according to age at injection, with greater neuronal transduction in newborns and preferential glial cell tropism in adults. This difference has not yet been reported after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) delivery. The present study analyzed both neuronal and glial cell transduction in the CNS of cats according to age of AAV9 CSF injection. In both newborns and young cats, administration of AAV9-GFP in the cisterna magna resulted in high levels of motor neurons (MNs) transduction from the cervical (84±5%) to the lumbar (99±1%) spinal cord, demonstrating that the remarkable tropism of AAV9 for MNs is not affected by age at CSF delivery. Surprisingly, numerous oligodendrocytes were also transduced in the brain and in the spinal cord white matter of young cats, but not of neonates, indicating that (i) age of CSF delivery influences the tropism of AAV9 for glial cells and (ii) AAV9 intracisternal delivery could be relevant for both the treatment of MN and demyelinating disorders.

  10. The structure of avian polyomavirus reveals variably sized capsids, nonconserved inter-capsomere interactions, and a possible location of the minor capsid protein VP4

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Peter S.; Enderlein, Dirk; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Carter, Weston S.; Kawano, Masaaki; Xing, Li; Swenson, Robert D.; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Cheng, R. Holland; Atwood, Walter J.; Johne, Reimar; Belnap, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Avian polyomavirus (APV) causes a fatal, multi-organ disease among several bird species. Using cryogenic electron microscopy and other biochemical techniques, we investigated the structure of APV and compared it to that of mammalian polyomaviruses, particularly JC polyomavirus and simian virus 40. The structure of the pentameric major capsid protein (VP1) is mostly conserved; however, APV VP1 has a unique, truncated C-terminus that eliminates an intercapsomere-connecting β-hairpin observed in other polyomaviruses. We postulate that the terminal β-hairpin locks other polyomavirus capsids in a stable conformation and that absence of the hairpin leads to the observed capsid size variation in APV. Plug-like density features were observed at the base of the VP1 pentamers, consistent with the known location of minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3. However, the plug density is more prominent in APV and may include VP4, a minor capsid protein unique to bird polyomaviruses. PMID:21239031

  11. Topography of the Human Papillomavirus Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Vesicular Trafficking of Infectious Entry.

    PubMed

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Keiffer, Timothy R; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Luszczek, Wioleta; Guion, Lucile G M; Müller, Martin; Sapp, Martin

    2015-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid protein L2. During entry, the HPV capsid undergoes numerous conformational changes that result in endosomal uptake and subsequent trafficking of the L2 protein in complex with the viral DNA to the trans-Golgi network. To facilitate this transport, the L2 protein harbors a number of putative motifs that, if capable of direct interaction, would interact with cytosolic host cell factors. These data imply that a portion of L2 becomes cytosolic during infection. Using a low concentration of digitonin to selectively permeabilize the plasma membrane of infected cells, we mapped the topography of the L2 protein during infection. We observed that epitopes within amino acid residues 64 to 81 and 163 to 170 and a C-terminal tag of HPV16 L2 are exposed on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes, whereas an epitope within residues 20 to 38, which are upstream of a putative transmembrane region, is luminal. Corroborating these findings, we also found that L2 protein is sensitive to trypsin digestion during infection. These data demonstrate that the majority of the L2 protein becomes accessible on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes in order to interact with cytosolic factors to facilitate vesicular trafficking. In order to complete infectious entry, nonenveloped viruses have to pass cellular membranes. This is often achieved through the viral capsid protein associating with or integrating into intracellular membrane. Here, we determine the topography of HPV L2 protein in the endocytic vesicular compartment, suggesting that L2 becomes a transmembrane protein with a short luminal portion and with the majority facing the cytosolic side for interaction with host cell transport factors. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Topography of the Human Papillomavirus Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Vesicular Trafficking of Infectious Entry

    PubMed Central

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Keiffer, Timothy R.; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Luszczek, Wioleta; Guion, Lucile G. M.; Müller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid protein L2. During entry, the HPV capsid undergoes numerous conformational changes that result in endosomal uptake and subsequent trafficking of the L2 protein in complex with the viral DNA to the trans-Golgi network. To facilitate this transport, the L2 protein harbors a number of putative motifs that, if capable of direct interaction, would interact with cytosolic host cell factors. These data imply that a portion of L2 becomes cytosolic during infection. Using a low concentration of digitonin to selectively permeabilize the plasma membrane of infected cells, we mapped the topography of the L2 protein during infection. We observed that epitopes within amino acid residues 64 to 81 and 163 to 170 and a C-terminal tag of HPV16 L2 are exposed on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes, whereas an epitope within residues 20 to 38, which are upstream of a putative transmembrane region, is luminal. Corroborating these findings, we also found that L2 protein is sensitive to trypsin digestion during infection. These data demonstrate that the majority of the L2 protein becomes accessible on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes in order to interact with cytosolic factors to facilitate vesicular trafficking. IMPORTANCE In order to complete infectious entry, nonenveloped viruses have to pass cellular membranes. This is often achieved through the viral capsid protein associating with or integrating into intracellular membrane. Here, we determine the topography of HPV L2 protein in the endocytic vesicular compartment, suggesting that L2 becomes a transmembrane protein with a short luminal portion and with the majority facing the cytosolic side for interaction with host cell transport factors. PMID:26246568

  13. Internal Proteins of the Procapsid and Mature Capsids of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Mapped by Bubblegram Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weimin; Newcomb, William W.; Cheng, Naiqian; Aksyuk, Anastasia; Winkler, Dennis C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsid is a huge assembly, ∼1,250 Å in diameter, and is composed of thousands of protein subunits with a combined mass of ∼200 MDa, housing a 100-MDa genome. First, a procapsid is formed through coassembly of the surface shell with an inner scaffolding shell; then the procapsid matures via a major structural transformation, triggered by limited proteolysis of the scaffolding proteins. Three mature capsids are found in the nuclei of infected cells. A capsids are empty, B capsids retain a shrunken scaffolding shell, and C capsids—which develop into infectious virions—are filled with DNA and ostensibly have expelled the scaffolding shell. The possible presence of other internal proteins in C capsids has been moot as, in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), they would be camouflaged by the surrounding DNA. We have used bubblegram imaging to map internal proteins in all four capsids, aided by the discovery that the scaffolding protein is exceptionally prone to radiation-induced bubbling. We confirmed that this protein forms thick-walled inner shells in the procapsid and the B capsid. C capsids generate two classes of bubbles: one occupies positions beneath the vertices of the icosahedral surface shell, and the other is distributed throughout its interior. A likely candidate is the viral protease. A subpopulation of C capsids bubbles particularly profusely and may represent particles in which expulsion of scaffold and DNA packaging are incomplete. Based on the procapsid structure, we propose that the axial channels of hexameric capsomers afford the pathway via which the scaffolding protein is expelled. IMPORTANCE In addition to DNA, capsids of tailed bacteriophages and their distant relatives, herpesviruses, contain internal proteins. These proteins are often essential for infectivity but are difficult to locate within the virion. A novel adaptation of cryo-EM based on detecting gas bubbles generated by radiation

  14. Residues of the UL25 protein of herpes simplex virus that are required for its stable interaction with capsids.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Shelley K; Huffman, Jamie B; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2011-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes.

  15. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes. PMID:21411517

  16. Osmolyte-Mediated Encapsulation of Proteins inside MS2 Viral Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Jeff E.; Capehart, Stacy L.; Francis, Matthew B.; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes in nanometer-sized compartments has the potential to enhance and control enzymatic activity, both in vivo and in vitro. Despite this potential, there are little quantitative data on the effect of encapsulation in a well-defined compartment under varying conditions. To gain more insight into these effects, we have characterized two improved methods for the encapsulation of heterologous molecules inside bacteriophage MS2 viral capsids. First, attaching DNA oligomers to a molecule of interest and incubating it with MS2 coat protein dimers yielded reassembled capsids that packaged the tagged molecules. The addition of a protein stabilizing osmolyte, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), significantly increased the yields of reassembly. Second, we found that expressed proteins with genetically encoded negatively charged peptide tags could also induce capsid reassembly, resulting in high yields of reassembled capsids containing the protein. This second method was used to encapsulate alkaline phosphatase tagged with a 16 amino acid peptide. The purified encapsulated enzyme was found to have the same Km value and a slightly lower kcat value than the free enzyme, indicating that this method of encapsulation had a minimal effect on enzyme kinetics. This method provides a practical and potentially scalable way of studying the complex effects of encapsulating enzymes in protein-based compartments. PMID:22953696

  17. Intravascular AAV9 preferentially targets neonatal-neurons and adult-astrocytes in CNS

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Kevin D.; Nurre, Emily; Montgomery, Chrystal L.; Hernandez, Anna; Chan, Curtis M.; Kaspar, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutics to the brain and spinal cord remains a challenge for neurodegenerative diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) hampers delivery of therapeutics to neurons, glia, and surrounding cell types of the central nervous system (CNS) that may be involved in disease progression. Here, we describe an intravenous injection of adeno-associated-virus-9 (AAV-9) in mouse that efficiently targets brain, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord motor neurons in neonatal animals and astrocytes in adult mouse brain and spinal cords, offering a new therapeutic delivery approach to deliver genes to widespread regions within the CNS. PMID:19098898

  18. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Adam; Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y H; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A; Merits, Andres; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2017-02-21

    Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design.IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen capable of causing explosive epidemics of incapacitating joint pain

  19. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y. H.; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A.; Merits, Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. PMID:28223458

  20. AAV9 delivering a modified human Mullerian inhibiting substance as a gene therapy in patient-derived xenografts of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, David; Sosulski, Amanda; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Dan; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Hendren, Katherine; Coletti, Caroline M.; Yu, Aaron; Castro, Cesar M.; Birrer, Michael J.; Gao, Guangping; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2015-01-01

    To improve ovarian cancer patient survival, effective treatments addressing chemoresistant recurrences are particularly needed. Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) has been shown to inhibit the growth of a stem-like population of ovarian cancer cells. We have recently engineered peptide modifications to human MIS [albumin leader Q425R MIS (LRMIS)] that increase production and potency in vitro and in vivo. To test this novel therapeutic peptide, serous malignant ascites from highly resistant recurrent ovarian cancer patients were isolated and amplified to create low-passage primary cell lines. Purified recombinant LRMIS protein successfully inhibited the growth of cancer spheroids in vitro in a panel of primary cell lines in four of six patients tested. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) -delivered gene therapy has undergone a clinical resurgence with a good safety profile and sustained gene expression. Therefore, AAV9 was used as a single i.p. injection to deliver LRMIS to test its efficacy in inhibiting growth of palpable tumors in patient-derived ovarian cancer xenografts from ascites (PDXa). AAV9-LRMIS monotherapy resulted in elevated and sustained blood concentrations of MIS, which significantly inhibited the growth of three of five lethal chemoresistant serous adenocarcinoma PDXa models without signs of measurable or overt toxicity. Finally, we tested the frequency of MIS type II receptor expression in a tissue microarray of serous ovarian tumors by immunohistochemistry and found that 88% of patients bear tumors that express the receptor. Taken together, these preclinical data suggest that AAV9-LRMIS provides a potentially well-tolerated and effective treatment strategy poised for testing in patients with chemoresistant serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26216943

  1. A recombinant capsid protein from Dengue-2 induces protection in mice against homologous virus.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Laura; Hermida, Lisset; Zulueta, Aída; Sánchez, Jorge; López, Carlos; Silva, Ricardo; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G

    2007-01-22

    In the present work, we study the immunogenicity and protective capacity of a recombinant capsid protein from Dengue-2 virus. The capsid gene was cloned under the T5 phage promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was obtained mainly associated to the soluble fraction upon cellular disruption and exhibited a pattern of high aggregation, determined by gel filtration chromatography. The semipurified preparation was inoculated in mice and after three doses, no antiviral antibodies were induced. On the other hand, mice intracranially challenged with homologous lethal virus, exhibited statistically significant protection with respect to the control group. These results describe, for the first time, the protective capacity of the capsid protein of Dengue virus indicating the existence of a protector mechanism, which is totally independent of the antibodies. This lack of induction of antiviral antibodies makes the capsid protein an attractive vaccine candidate against dengue since eliminates the potential risk of the induction of antibody dependent enhancement associated to the current vaccines under study.

  2. Treating Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy With Interleukin 7 and Vaccination With JC Virus Capsid Protein VP1

    PubMed Central

    Sospedra, Mireia; Schippling, Sven; Yousef, Sara; Jelcic, Ilijas; Bofill-Mas, Silvia; Planas, Raquel; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Demina, Viktoria; Cinque, Paola; Garcea, Robert; Croughs, Therese; Girones, Rosina; Martin, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a currently untreatable infection of the brain. Here, we demonstrate in 2 patients that treatment with interleukin 7, JC polyomavirus (JCV) capsid protein VP1, and a Toll-like receptor 7 agonist used as adjuvant, was well tolerated, and showed a very favorable safety profile and unexpected efficacy that warrant further investigation. PMID:25214510

  3. Antibody recognition of porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein epitopes after vaccination, infection, and disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Open reading frame 2 (ORF2) of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) codes for the 233-amino-acid capsid protein (CP). Baculovirus-based vaccines that express only ORF2 are protective against clinical disease following experimental challenge or natural infection. The goal of this study was to identify re...

  4. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C.-Y.; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  6. Intravenous Administration of Self-complementary AAV9 Enables Transgene Delivery to Adult Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Sandra; Joussemet, Béatrice; Riviere, Christel; Marais, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Douar, Anne-Marie; Fyfe, John; Moullier, Philippe; Colle, Marie-Anne; Barkats, Martine

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic gene delivery to the whole spinal cord is a major challenge for the treatment of motor neuron (MN) diseases. Systemic administration of viral gene vectors would provide an optimal means for the long-term delivery of therapeutic molecules from blood to the spinal cord but this approach is hindered by the presence of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Here, we describe the first successful study of MN transduction in adult animals following intravenous (i.v.) delivery of self-complementary (sc) AAV9 vectors (up to 28% in mice). Intravenous MN transduction was achieved in adults without pharmacological disruption of the BBB and transgene expression lasted at least 5 months. Importantly, this finding was successfully translated to large animals, with the demonstration of an efficient systemic scAAV9 gene delivery to the neonate and adult cat spinal cord. This new and noninvasive procedure raises the hope of whole spinal cord correction of MN diseases and may lead to the development of new gene therapy protocols in patients. PMID:19367261

  7. Disassociation of the SV40 Genome from Capsid Proteins Prior to Nuclear Entry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previously, we demonstrated that input SV40 particles undergo a partial disassembly in the endoplasmic reticulum, which exposes internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 to immunostaining. Then, in the cytoplasm, disassembly progresses further to also make the genomic DNA accessible to immune detection, as well as to detection by an ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU)-based chemical reaction. The cytoplasmic partially disassembled SV40 particles retain some of the SV40 capsid proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3, in addition to the viral genome. Findings In the current study, we asked where in the cell the SV40 genome might disassociate from capsid components. We observed partially disassembled input SV40 particles around the nucleus and, beginning at 12 hours post-infection, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled parental SV40 DNA in the nucleus, as detected using anti-BrdU antibodies. However, among the more than 1500 cells examined, we never detected input VP2/VP3 in the nucleus. Upon translocation of the BrdU-labeled SV40 genomes into nuclei, they were transcribed and, thus, are representative of productive infection. Conclusions Our findings imply that the SV40 genome disassociates from the capsid proteins before or at the point of entry into the nucleus, and then enters the nucleus devoid of VP2/3. PMID:22882793

  8. Disassociation of the SV40 genome from capsid proteins prior to nuclear entry.

    PubMed

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Norkin, Leonard C

    2012-08-10

    Previously, we demonstrated that input SV40 particles undergo a partial disassembly in the endoplasmic reticulum, which exposes internal capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 to immunostaining. Then, in the cytoplasm, disassembly progresses further to also make the genomic DNA accessible to immune detection, as well as to detection by an ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU)-based chemical reaction. The cytoplasmic partially disassembled SV40 particles retain some of the SV40 capsid proteins, VP1, VP2, and VP3, in addition to the viral genome. In the current study, we asked where in the cell the SV40 genome might disassociate from capsid components. We observed partially disassembled input SV40 particles around the nucleus and, beginning at 12 hours post-infection, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled parental SV40 DNA in the nucleus, as detected using anti-BrdU antibodies. However, among the more than 1500 cells examined, we never detected input VP2/VP3 in the nucleus. Upon translocation of the BrdU-labeled SV40 genomes into nuclei, they were transcribed and, thus, are representative of productive infection. Our findings imply that the SV40 genome disassociates from the capsid proteins before or at the point of entry into the nucleus, and then enters the nucleus devoid of VP2/3.

  9. Structural Model of the Tubular Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jaekyun; Qiao, Xin; Hung, Ivan; Mitra, Alok K; Desfosses, Ambroise; Huang, Daniel; Gor'kov, Peter L; Craven, Rebecca C; Kingston, Richard L; Gan, Zhehong; Zhu, Fangqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-08

    The orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA) assembles into polymorphic capsids, whose architecture, assembly, and stability are still being investigated. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CA (NTD and CTD, respectively) engage in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions to create the capsid. Hexameric turrets formed by the NTD decorate the majority of the capsid surface. We report nearly complete solid-state NMR (ssNMR) resonance assignments of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA, assembled into hexamer tubes that mimic the authentic capsid. The ssNMR assignments show that, upon assembly, large conformational changes occur in loops connecting helices, as well as the short 310 helix initiating the CTD. The interdomain linker becomes statically disordered. Combining constraints from ssNMR and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we establish an atomic resolution model of the RSV CA tubular assembly using molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) simulations. On the basis of comparison of this MDFF model with an earlier-derived crystallographic model for the planar assembly, the induction of curvature into the RSV CA hexamer lattice arises predominantly from reconfiguration of the NTD-CTD and CTD trimer interfaces. The CTD dimer and CTD trimer interfaces are also intrinsically variable. Hence, deformation of the CA hexamer lattice results from the variable displacement of the CTDs that surround each hexameric turret. Pervasive H-bonding is found at all interdomain interfaces, which may contribute to their malleability. Finally, we find helices at the interfaces of HIV and RSV CA assemblies have very different contact angles, which may reflect differences in the capsid assembly pathway for these viruses.

  10. X-Ray Structures of Native HIV-1 Capsid Protein Reveal Conformational Variability

    PubMed Central

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Tanner, John J.; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed molecular interactions between Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein (CA) hexamers have been elusive in the context of a native protein. We report crystal structures describing novel interactions between CA monomers related by 6-fold symmetry within a hexamer (intra-hexamer) and by 3-fold and 2-fold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (inter-hexamer). These structures help elucidate how CA builds a hexagonal lattice, the foundation of the mature capsid. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer that modulates interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer by crystal dehydration treatment alters inter-hexamer interfaces and condenses CA packing, highlighting an inherent structural variability. Capsid stability changes imparted by high concentrations of CA-targeting antiviral PF74 can be explained by variations at inter-hexamer interfaces remote to the ligand binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector molecule binding may perturb capsid uncoating or assembly and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. PMID:26044298

  11. The HIV-1 capsid protein as a drug target: recent advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Rosa; Neira, José L

    2013-12-01

    HIV-1, the agent responsible for AIDS, belongs to the retrovirus family. Assembly of the immature HIV-1 capsid occurs through the controlled polymerization of the Gag polyprotein, which is transported to the plasma membrane of infected cells, where morphogenesis of the immature, non-infectious virion occurs. Moreover, the mature capsid of HIV-1 is formed by the assembly of copies of the capsid protein (CA), which results, among other proteins, from cleavage of Gag. The C-terminal domain of CA (CTD) can homodimerize, and most of the dimerization interface is formed by a single α-helix from each monomer. Assembly of the HIV-1 capsid critically depends on CA-CA interactions, including CTD interaction with itself and with the N-terminal domain of CA (NTD). This review will report on recent advances for the search of small organic compounds and peptides that have been designed in the last four years to hamper CA assembly. Most of the molecules have been proved to interact with CA; such molecules aim to disrupt and/or alter the oligomerization capability of CTD and/or NTD.

  12. DNA condensates organized by the capsid protein VP15 in White Spot Syndrome Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingjie; Wu Jinlu; Chen Hu; Hew, Choy Leong; Yan Jie

    2010-12-20

    The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) has a large circular double-stranded DNA genome of around 300 kb and it replicates in the nucleus of the host cells. The machinery of how the viral DNA is packaged has been remained unclear. VP15, a highly basic protein, is one of the major capsid proteins found in the virus. Previously, it was shown to be a DNA binding protein and was hypothesized to participate in the viral DNA packaging process. Using Atomic Force Microscopy imaging, we show that the viral DNA is associated with a (or more) capsid proteins. The organized viral DNA qualitatively resembles the conformations of VP15 induced DNA condensates in vitro. Furthermore, single-DNA manipulation experiments revealed that VP15 is able to condense single DNA against forces of a few pico Newtons. Our results suggest that VP15 may aid in the viral DNA packaging process by directly condensing DNA.

  13. The flavivirus capsid protein: Structure, function and perspectives towards drug design.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edson R A; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; de Alencastro, Ricardo B; Horta, Bruno A C

    2017-01-02

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue and zika viruses, are etiologic agents transmitted to humans mainly by arthropods and are of great epidemiological interest. The flavivirus capsid protein is a structural element required for the viral nucleocapsid assembly that presents the classical function of sheltering the viral genome. After decades of research, many reports have shown its different functionalities and influence over cell normal functioning. The subcellular distribution of this protein, which involves accumulation around lipid droplets and nuclear localization, also corroborates with its multi-functional characteristic. As flavivirus diseases are still in need of global control and in view of the possible key functionalities that the capsid protein promotes over flavivirus biology, novel considerations arise towards anti-flavivirus drug research. This review covers the main aspects concerning structural and functional features of the flavivirus C protein, ultimately, highlighting prospects in drug discovery based on this viral target.

  14. DNA condensates organized by the capsid protein VP15 in White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjie; Wu, Jinlu; Chen, Hu; Hew, Choy Leong; Yan, Jie

    2010-12-20

    The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) has a large circular double-stranded DNA genome of around 300kb and it replicates in the nucleus of the host cells. The machinery of how the viral DNA is packaged has been remained unclear. VP15, a highly basic protein, is one of the major capsid proteins found in the virus. Previously, it was shown to be a DNA binding protein and was hypothesized to participate in the viral DNA packaging process. Using Atomic Force Microscopy imaging, we show that the viral DNA is associated with a (or more) capsid proteins. The organized viral DNA qualitatively resembles the conformations of VP15 induced DNA condensates in vitro. Furthermore, single-DNA manipulation experiments revealed that VP15 is able to condense single DNA against forces of a few pico Newtons. Our results suggest that VP15 may aid in the viral DNA packaging process by directly condensing DNA.

  15. Hepatitis E Virus Lifecycle and Identification of 3 Forms of the ORF2 Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Montpellier, Claire; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Sayed, Ibrahim M; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Ankavay, Maliki; Bull, Anne; Pillez, André; Abravanel, Florence; Helle, François; Brochot, Etienne; Drobecq, Hervé; Farhat, Rayan; Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie; Haddad, Juliano G; Izopet, Jacques; Meuleman, Philip; Goffard, Anne; Dubuisson, Jean; Cocquerel, Laurence

    2017-09-25

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a major cause of acute hepatitis worldwide. Approximately 2 billion people live in areas endemic for HEV and are at risk of infection. The HEV genome encodes 3 proteins, including the ORF2 capsid protein. Detailed analyses of the HEV lifecycle has been hampered by the lack of an efficient viral culture system. We performed studies with gt3 HEV cell culture-produced particles (HEVcc) and patient blood and stool samples. Samples were fractionated on iodixanol gradients and cushions. Infectivity assays were performed in vitro and in human liver chimeric mice. Proteins were analyzed by biochemical and proteomic approaches. Infectious particles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. HEV antigen levels were measured with the Wantaï ELISA. We developed an efficient cell culture system and isolated HEV particles that were infectious in vitro and in vivo. Using transmission electron microscopy, we defined the ultrastructure of HEVcc and particles from patient sera and stool samples. We also identified the precise sequence of the infectious particle-associated ORF2 capsid protein. In cultured cells and in samples from patients, HEV produced 3 forms of the ORF2 capsid protein: infectious/intracellular ORF2 (ORF2i), glycosylated ORF2 (ORF2g), and cleaved ORF2 (ORF2c). The ORF2i protein associated with infectious particles, whereas the ORF2g and ORF2c proteins were massively secreted glycoproteins not associated with infectious particles. ORF2g and ORF2c were the most abundant antigens detected in sera from patients. We developed a cell culture system and characterized HEV particles; we identified 3 ORF2 capsid proteins (ORF2i, ORF2g, and ORFc). These findings will advance our understanding of the HEV lifecycle and improve diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Decreasing disease severity in symptomatic, Smn(-/-);SMN2(+/+), spinal muscular atrophy mice following scAAV9-SMN delivery.

    PubMed

    Glascock, Jacqueline J; Osman, Erkan Y; Wetz, Mary J; Krogman, Megan M; Shababi, Monir; Lorson, Christian L

    2012-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder, is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by the homozygous loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In humans, a nearly identical copy gene is present, SMN2. SMN2 is retained in all SMA patients and encodes the same protein as SMN1. However, SMN1 and SMN2 differ by a silent C-to-T transition at the 5' end of exon 7, causing alternative splicing of SMN2 transcripts and low levels of full-length SMN. SMA is monogenic and therefore well suited for gene-replacement strategies. Recently, self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors have been used to deliver the SMN cDNA to an animal model of disease, the SMNΔ7 mouse. In this study, we examine a severe model of SMA, Smn(-/-);SMN2(+/+), to determine whether gene replacement is viable in a model in which disease development begins in utero. Using two delivery paradigms, intracerebroventricular injections and intravenous injections, we delivered scAAV9-SMN and demonstrated a two to four fold increase in survival, in addition to improving many of the phenotypic parameters of the model. This represents the longest extension in survival for this severe model for any therapeutic intervention and suggests that postsymptomatic treatment of SMA may lead to significant improvement of disease severity.

  17. The Collagen-like Protein gp12 Is a Temperature-dependent Reversible Binder of SPP1 Viral Capsids*

    PubMed Central

    Zairi, Mohamed; Stiege, Asita C.; Nhiri, Naima; Jacquet, Eric; Tavares, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Icosahedral capsids of viruses are lattices of defined geometry and homogeneous size. The (quasi-)equivalent organization of their protein building blocks provides, in numerous systems, the binding sites to assemble arrays of viral polypeptides organized with nanometer precision that protrude from the capsid surface. The capsid of bacterial virus (bacteriophage) SPP1 exposes, at its surface, the 6.6-kDa viral polypeptide gp12 that binds to the center of hexamers of the major capsid protein. Gp12 forms an elongated trimer with collagen-like properties. This is consistent with the fold of eight internal GXY repeats of gp12 to build a stable intersubunit triple helix in a prokaryotic setting. The trimer dissociates and unfolds at near physiological temperatures, as reported for eukaryotic collagen. Its structural organization is reacquired within seconds upon cooling. Interaction with the SPP1 capsid hexamers strongly stabilizes gp12, increasing its Tm to 54 °C. Above this temperature, gp12 dissociates from its binding sites and unfolds reversibly. Multivalent binding of gp12 trimers to the capsid is highly cooperative. The capsid lattice also provides a platform to assist folding and association of unfolded gp12 polypeptides. The original physicochemical properties of gp12 offer a thermoswitchable system for multivalent binding of the polypeptide to the SPP1 capsid surface. PMID:25074929

  18. Rescue of a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Respiratory Distress Type 1 by AAV9-IGHMBP2 Is Dose Dependent.

    PubMed

    Shababi, Monir; Feng, Zhihua; Villalon, Eric; Sibigtroth, Christine M; Osman, Erkan Y; Miller, Madeline R; Williams-Simon, Patricka A; Lombardi, Abby; Sass, Thalia H; Atkinson, Arleigh K; Garcia, Michael L; Ko, Chien-Ping; Lorson, Christian L

    2016-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an autosomal recessive disease occurring during childhood. The gene responsible for disease development is a ubiquitously expressed protein, IGHMBP2. Mutations in IGHMBP2 result in the loss of α-motor neurons leading to muscle atrophy in the distal limbs accompanied by respiratory complications. Although genetically and clinically distinct, proximal SMA is also caused by the loss of a ubiquitously expressed gene (SMN). Significant preclinical success has been achieved in proximal SMA using viral-based gene replacement strategies. We leveraged the technologies employed in SMA to demonstrate gene replacement efficacy in an SMARD1 animal model. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of single-stranded AAV9 expressing the full-length cDNA of IGHMBP2 in a low dose led to a significant level of rescue in treated SMARD1 animals. Consistent with drastically increased survival, weight gain, and strength, the rescued animals demonstrated a significant improvement in muscle, NMJ, motor neurons, and axonal pathology. In addition, increased levels of IGHMBP2 in lumbar motor neurons verified the efficacy of the virus to transduce the target tissues. Our results indicate that AAV9-based gene replacement is a viable strategy for SMARD1, although dosing effects and potential negative impacts of high dose and ICV injection should be thoroughly investigated.

  19. Improving single injection CSF delivery of AAV9-mediated gene therapy for SMA: a dose-response study in mice and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Kathrin; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Schmelzer, Leah; Braun, Lyndsey; McGovern, Vicki; Likhite, Shibi; Michels, Olivia; Govoni, Alessandra; Fitzgerald, Julie; Morales, Pablo; Foust, Kevin D; Mendell, Jerry R; Burghes, Arthur H M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most frequent lethal genetic neurodegenerative disorder in infants. The disease is caused by low abundance of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein leading to motor neuron degeneration and progressive paralysis. We previously demonstrated that a single intravenous injection (IV) of self-complementary adeno-associated virus-9 carrying the human SMN cDNA (scAAV9-SMN) resulted in widespread transgene expression in spinal cord motor neurons in SMA mice as well as nonhuman primates and complete rescue of the disease phenotype in mice. Here, we evaluated the dosing and efficacy of scAAV9-SMN delivered directly to the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) via single injection. We found widespread transgene expression throughout the spinal cord in mice and nonhuman primates when using a 10 times lower dose compared to the IV application. Interestingly, in nonhuman primates, lower doses than in mice can be used for similar motor neuron targeting efficiency. Moreover, the transduction efficacy is further improved when subjects are kept in the Trendelenburg position to facilitate spreading of the vector. We present a detailed analysis of transduction levels throughout the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord of nonhuman primates, providing new guidance for translation toward therapy for a wide range of neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Improving Single Injection CSF Delivery of AAV9-mediated Gene Therapy for SMA: A Dose–response Study in Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kathrin; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Schmelzer, Leah; Braun, Lyndsey; McGovern, Vicki; Likhite, Shibi; Michels, Olivia; Govoni, Alessandra; Fitzgerald, Julie; Morales, Pablo; Foust, Kevin D; Mendell, Jerry R; Burghes, Arthur H M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most frequent lethal genetic neurodegenerative disorder in infants. The disease is caused by low abundance of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein leading to motor neuron degeneration and progressive paralysis. We previously demonstrated that a single intravenous injection (IV) of self-complementary adeno-associated virus-9 carrying the human SMN cDNA (scAAV9-SMN) resulted in widespread transgene expression in spinal cord motor neurons in SMA mice as well as nonhuman primates and complete rescue of the disease phenotype in mice. Here, we evaluated the dosing and efficacy of scAAV9-SMN delivered directly to the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) via single injection. We found widespread transgene expression throughout the spinal cord in mice and nonhuman primates when using a 10 times lower dose compared to the IV application. Interestingly, in nonhuman primates, lower doses than in mice can be used for similar motor neuron targeting efficiency. Moreover, the transduction efficacy is further improved when subjects are kept in the Trendelenburg position to facilitate spreading of the vector. We present a detailed analysis of transduction levels throughout the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord of nonhuman primates, providing new guidance for translation toward therapy for a wide range of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25358252

  1. Examining Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Minor Capsid Proteins | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV or MCPyV) is a recently discovered member of the viral family Polyomaviridae. It is a skin-dwelling polyomavirus species that appears to cause a rare but highly lethal form of skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Despite MCC being uncommon, chronic MCV infection of human skin is widespread, and most infected people have no known symptoms. The surface of polyomavirus virions is made up of pentameric knobs of the major capsid protein VP1. VP1 enables attachment of the virus to the cell surface, permitting infectious entry and delivery of the viral genome to host cells. The VP1 protein of previously studied polyomaviruses, such as simian virus 40 and murine polyomavirus, associates with two minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, which are considered to play important roles during the infectious entry process.

  2. Expression and subcellular targeting of canine parvovirus capsid proteins in baculovirus-transduced NLFK cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Leona; Välilehto, Outi; Kirjavainen, Sanna; Tikka, Päivi J; Mellett, Mark; Käpylä, Pirjo; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vuento, Matti

    2005-01-17

    A mammalian baculovirus delivery system was developed to study targeting in Norden Laboratories feline kidney (NLFK) cells of the capsid proteins of canine parvovirus (CPV), VP1 and VP2, or corresponding counterparts fused to EGFP. VP1 and VP2, when expressed alone, both had equal nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. However, assembled form of VP2 had a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. When VP1 and VP2 were simultaneously present in cells, their nuclear localization increased. Thus, confocal immunofluorescence analysis of cells transduced with the different baculovirus constructs or combinations thereof in the absence or presence of infecting CPV revealed that the VP1 protein is a prerequisite for efficient targeting of VP2 to the nucleus. The baculovirus vectors were functional and the genes of interest efficiently introduced to this CPV susceptible mammalian cell line. Thus, we show evidence that the system could be utilized to study targeting of the CPV capsid proteins.

  3. Long-Term Correction of Sandhoff Disease Following Intravenous Delivery of rAAV9 to Mouse Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Jagdeep S; Altaleb, Naderah; Bello, Alexander; Kruck, Christa; LaFave, Matthew C; Varshney, Gaurav K; Burgess, Shawn M; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Hurlbut, David; Hemming, Richard; Kobinger, Gary P; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses are severe neurodegenerative disorders resulting from a deficiency in β-hexosaminidase A activity and lacking effective therapies. Using a Sandhoff disease (SD) mouse model (Hexb−/−) of the GM2 gangliosidoses, we tested the potential of systemically delivered adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) expressing Hexb cDNA to correct the neurological phenotype. Neonatal or adult SD and normal mice were intravenously injected with AAV9-HexB or –LacZ and monitored for serum β-hexosaminidase activity, motor function, and survival. Brain GM2 ganglioside, β-hexosaminidase activity, and inflammation were assessed at experimental week 43, or an earlier humane end point. SD mice injected with AAV9-LacZ died by 17 weeks of age, whereas all neonatal AAV9-HexB–treated SD mice survived until 43 weeks (P < 0.0001) with only three exhibiting neurological dysfunction. SD mice treated as adults with AAV9-HexB died between 17 and 35 weeks. Neonatal SD-HexB–treated mice had a significant increase in brain β-hexosaminidase activity, and a reduction in GM2 ganglioside storage and neuroinflammation compared to adult SD-HexB– and SD-LacZ–treated groups. However, at 43 weeks, 8 of 10 neonatal-HexB injected control and SD mice exhibited liver or lung tumors. This study demonstrates the potential for long-term correction of SD and other GM2 gangliosidoses through early rAAV9 based systemic gene therapy. PMID:25515709

  4. Cellular Analysis of Silencing the Huntington's Disease Gene Using AAV9 Mediated Delivery of Artificial Micro RNA into the Striatum of Q140/Q140 Mice.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Allison M; Sapp, Ellen; Chase, Kathryn; Sottosanti, Emily; Danielson, Eric; Pfister, Edith; Stoica, Lorelei; DiFiglia, Marian; Aronin, Neil; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    The genetic mutation in Huntington's disease (HD) is a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of the huntingtin (Htt) gene. RNAi strategies have proven effective in substantially down-regulating Htt mRNA in the striatum through delivery of siRNAs or viral vectors based on whole tissue assays, but the extent of htt mRNA lowering in individual neurons is unknown. Here we characterize the effect of an AAV9-GFP-miRHtt vector on Htt mRNA levels in striatal neurons of Q140/Q140 knock-in mice. HD mice received bilateral striatal injections of AAV9-GFP-miRHtt or AAV9-GFP at 6 or 12 weeks and striata were evaluated at 6 months of age for levels of Htt mRNA and protein and for mRNA signal within striatal neurons using RNAscope multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization. Compared to controls, the striatum of 6-month old mice treated at 6 or 12 weeks of age with AAV9-GFP-miRHtt showed a reduction of 40-50% in Htt mRNA and lowering of 25-40% in protein levels. The number of Htt mRNA foci in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of untreated Q140/Q140 mice varied widely per cell (0 to 34 per cell), with ∼10% of MSNs devoid of foci. AAV9-GFP-miRHtt treatment shifted the distribution toward lower numbers and the percentage of cells without foci increased to 14-20%. The average number of Htt mRNA foci per MSN was reduced by 43%. The findings here show that intrastriatal infusion of an AAV9-GFP-miRHtt vector lowers mRNA expression of Htt in striatum by ∼50%, through a partial reduction in the number of copies of mutant Htt mRNAs per cell. These findings demonstrate at the neuronal level the variable levels of Htt mRNA expression in MSNs and the neuronal heterogeneity of RNAi dependent Htt mRNA knockdown.

  5. Assembly-associated structural changes of bacteriophage T7 capsids. Detection by use of a protein-specific probe.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S A; Griess, G A; Serwer, P

    1992-01-01

    To detect changes in capsid structure that occur when a preassembled bacteriophage T7 capsid both packages and cleaves to mature-size longer (concatameric) DNA, the kinetics and thermodynamics are determined here for the binding of the protein-specific probe, 1,1'-bi(4-anilino)naphthalene-5,5'-di-sulfonic acid (bis-ANS), to bacteriophage T7, a T7 DNA deletion (8.4%) mutant, and a DNA-free T7 capsid (metrizamide low density capsid II) known to be a DNA packaging intermediate that has a permeability barrier not present in a related capsid (metrizamide high density capsid II). Initially, some binding to either bacteriophage or metrizamide low density capsid II occurs too rapidly to quantify (phase 1, duration < 10 s). Subsequent binding (phase 2) occurs with first-order kinetics. Only the phase 1 binding occurs for metrizamide high density capsid II. These observations, together with both the kinetics of the quenching by ethidium of bound bis-ANS fluorescence and the nature of bis-ANS-induced protein alterations, are explained by the hypothesis that the phase 2 binding occurs at internal sites. The number of these internal sites increases as the density of the packaged DNA decreases. The accompanying change in structure is potentially the signal for initiating cleavage of a concatemer. Evidence for the following was also obtained: (a) a previously undetected packaging-associated change in the conformation of the major protein of the outer capsid shell and (b) partitioning by a permeability barrier of the interior of the T7 capsid. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:1477280

  6. Vertex-Specific Proteins pUL17 and pUL25 Mechanically Reinforce Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids.

    PubMed

    Snijder, Joost; Radtke, Kerstin; Anderson, Fenja; Scholtes, Luella; Corradini, Eleonora; Baines, Joel; Heck, Albert J R; Wuite, Gijs J L; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter H

    2017-06-15

    Using atomic force microscopy imaging and nanoindentation measurements, we investigated the effect of the minor capsid proteins pUL17 and pUL25 on the structural stability of icosahedral herpes simplex virus capsids. pUL17 and pUL25, which form the capsid vertex-specific component (CVSC), particularly contributed to capsid resilience along the 5-fold and 2-fold but not along the 3-fold icosahedral axes. Our detailed analyses, including quantitative mass spectrometry of the protein composition of the capsids, revealed that both pUL17 and pUL25 are required to stabilize the capsid shells at the vertices. This indicates that herpesviruses withstand the internal pressure that is generated during DNA genome packaging by locally reinforcing the mechanical sturdiness of the vertices, the most stressed part of the capsids.IMPORTANCE In this study, the structural, material properties of herpes simplex virus 1 were investigated. The capsid of herpes simplex virus is built up of a variety of proteins, and we scrutinized the influence of two of these proteins on the stability of the capsid. For this, we used a scanning force microscope that makes detailed, topographic images of the particles and that is able to perform mechanical deformation measurements. Using this approach, we revealed that both studied proteins play an essential role in viral stability. These new insights support us in forming a complete view on viral structure and furthermore could possibly help not only to develop specific antivirals but also to build protein shells with improved stability for drug delivery purposes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. The Feline Calicivirus Leader of the Capsid Protein Is Associated with Cytopathic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Abente, Eugenio J.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Parra, Gabriel I.; Bok, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Open reading frame 2 (ORF2) of the feline calicivirus (FCV) genome encodes a capsid precursor that is posttranslationally processed to release the mature capsid protein (VP1) and a small protein of 124 amino acids, designated the leader of the capsid (LC). To investigate the role of the LC protein in the virus life cycle, mutations and deletions were introduced into the LC coding region of an infectious FCV cDNA clone. Three cysteine residues that are conserved among all vesivirus LC sequences were found to be critical for the recovery of FCV with a characteristic cytopathic effect in feline kidney cells. A cell-rounding phenotype associated with the transient expression of wild-type and mutagenized forms of the LC correlated with the cytopathic and growth properties of the corresponding engineered viruses. The host cellular protein annexin A2 was identified as a binding partner of the LC protein, consistent with a role for the LC in mediating host cell interactions that alter the integrity of the cell and enable virus spread. PMID:23269802

  8. The feline calicivirus leader of the capsid protein is associated with cytopathic effect.

    PubMed

    Abente, Eugenio J; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Parra, Gabriel I; Bok, Karin; Green, Kim Y

    2013-03-01

    Open reading frame 2 (ORF2) of the feline calicivirus (FCV) genome encodes a capsid precursor that is posttranslationally processed to release the mature capsid protein (VP1) and a small protein of 124 amino acids, designated the leader of the capsid (LC). To investigate the role of the LC protein in the virus life cycle, mutations and deletions were introduced into the LC coding region of an infectious FCV cDNA clone. Three cysteine residues that are conserved among all vesivirus LC sequences were found to be critical for the recovery of FCV with a characteristic cytopathic effect in feline kidney cells. A cell-rounding phenotype associated with the transient expression of wild-type and mutagenized forms of the LC correlated with the cytopathic and growth properties of the corresponding engineered viruses. The host cellular protein annexin A2 was identified as a binding partner of the LC protein, consistent with a role for the LC in mediating host cell interactions that alter the integrity of the cell and enable virus spread.

  9. Role of protein interactions in defining HIV-1 viral capsid shape and stability: a coarse-grained analysis.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Vinod; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2010-01-06

    Coarse-grained models of the HIV-1 CA dimer are constructed based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Coarse-grained representations of the capsid shell, which is composed of approximately 1500 copies of CA proteins, are constructed and their stability is examined. A key interaction between carboxyl and hexameric amino terminal domains is shown to generate the curvature of the capsid shell. It is demonstrated that variation of the strength of this interaction for different subunits in the lattice can cause formation of asymmetric, conical-shaped closed capsid shells, and it is proposed that variations, in the structure of the additional carboxyl-amino terminal binding interface during self-assembly, are important aspects of capsid cone formation. These results are in agreement with recent structural studies of the capsid hexamer subunit, which suggest that variability in the binding interface is a cause of the differences in subunit environments that exist in a conical structure.

  10. Role of Protein Interactions in Defining HIV-1 Viral Capsid Shape and Stability: A Coarse-Grained Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Vinod; Ayton, Gary S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Coarse-grained models of the HIV-1 CA dimer are constructed based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Coarse-grained representations of the capsid shell, which is composed of ∼1500 copies of CA proteins, are constructed and their stability is examined. A key interaction between carboxyl and hexameric amino terminal domains is shown to generate the curvature of the capsid shell. It is demonstrated that variation of the strength of this interaction for different subunits in the lattice can cause formation of asymmetric, conical-shaped closed capsid shells, and it is proposed that variations, in the structure of the additional carboxyl-amino terminal binding interface during self-assembly, are important aspects of capsid cone formation. These results are in agreement with recent structural studies of the capsid hexamer subunit, which suggest that variability in the binding interface is a cause of the differences in subunit environments that exist in a conical structure. PMID:20085716

  11. Serotype specificity of recombinant fusion protein containing domain III and capsid protein of dengue virus 2.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Gil, Lázaro; Hermida, Lisset; Gutiérrez, Sheila; García, Angélica; Bernardo, Lidice; Pavón, Alekis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G

    2012-07-01

    Recombinant fusion protein containing domain III of the dengue envelope protein fused to capsid protein from dengue 2 virus was immunogenic and conferred protection in mice against lethal challenge in previously report. Here, the antigenic specificity of this recombinant protein using anti-dengue antibodies from mice and humans and the cross-reactive humoral and cellular response induced in immunized mice were evaluated. The homologous anti-dengue antibodies showed a higher reactivity to the recombinant protein compared to the wide cross-reactivity observed for viral antigen as determined by ELISA. The IgG anti-dengue and functional antibodies, induced by the recombinant proteins in mice, were highly serotype specific by ELISA, hemaglutination inhibition and plaque reduction neutralizing tests. Accordingly, the cellular immune response determined by the IFNγ and TNFα secretion, was serotype specific. The specificity of serotype associated to this recombinant protein in addition to its high antigenicity, immunogenicity and protecting capacity suggest its advantage as a possible functional and safe vaccine candidate against dengue in a future tetravalent formulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antiviral agents targeted to interact with viral capsid proteins and a possible application to human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, M G

    1988-01-01

    The tertiary structure of most icosahedral viral capsid proteins consists of an eight-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel with a hydrophobic interior. In a group of picornaviruses, this hydrophobic pocket can be filled by suitable organic molecules, which thereby stop viral uncoating after attachment and penetration into the host cell. The antiviral activity of these agents is probably due to increased rigidity of the capsid protein, which inhibits disassembly. The hydrophobic pocket may be an essential functional component of the protein and, therefore, may have been conserved in the evolution of many viruses from a common precursor. Since eight-stranded anti-parallel beta-barrels, with a topology as in viral capsid proteins, are not generally found for other proteins involved in cell metabolism, this class of antiviral agents is likely to be more virus-specific and less cytotoxic. Furthermore, the greatest conservation of viral capsid proteins occurs within this pocket, whereas the least conserved part is the antigenic exterior. Thus, compounds that bind to such a pocket are likely to be effective against a broader group of serologically distinct viruses. Discovery of antiviral agents of this type will, therefore, depend on designing compounds that can enter and fit snugly into the hydrophobic pocket of a particular viral capsid protein. The major capsid protein, p24, of human immunodeficiency virus would be a likely suitable target. PMID:3133655

  13. Structure and dynamics of full-length HIV-1 capsid protein in solution.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Baber, James L; Clore, G Marius

    2013-10-30

    The HIV-1 capsid protein plays a crucial role in viral infectivity, assembling into a cone that encloses the viral RNA. In the mature virion, the N-terminal domain of the capsid protein forms hexameric and pentameric rings, while C-terminal domain homodimers connect adjacent N-terminal domain rings to one another. Structures of disulfide-linked hexamer and pentamer assemblies, as well as structures of the isolated domains, have been solved previously. The dimer configuration in C-terminal domain constructs differs in solution (residues 144-231) and crystal (residues 146-231) structures by ∼30°, and it has been postulated that the former connects the hexamers while the latter links pentamers to hexamers. Here we study the structure and dynamics of full-length capsid protein in solution, comprising a mixture of monomeric and dimeric forms in dynamic equilibrium, using ensemble simulated annealing driven by experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings and X-ray scattering data. The complexity of the system necessitated the development of a novel computational framework that should be generally applicable to many other challenging systems that currently escape structural characterization by standard application of mainstream techniques of structural biology. We show that the orientation of the C-terminal domains in dimeric full-length capsid and isolated C-terminal domain constructs is the same in solution, and we obtain a quantitative description of the conformational space sampled by the N-terminal domain relative to the C-terminal domain on the nano- to millisecond time scale. The positional distribution of the N-terminal domain relative to the C-terminal domain is large and modulated by the oligomerization state of the C-terminal domain. We also show that a model of the hexamer/pentamer assembly can be readily generated with a single configuration of the C-terminal domain dimer, and that capsid assembly likely proceeds via conformational selection of sparsely

  14. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Vihinen-Ranta, M; Kakkola, L; Kalela, A; Vilja, P; Vuento, M

    1997-12-01

    We investigated the abilities of synthetic peptides mimicking the potential nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsid proteins to translocate a carrier protein to the nucleus following microinjection into the cytoplasm of A72 cells. Possible nuclear localization sequences were chosen for synthesis from CPV capsid protein sequences (VP1, VP2) on the basis of the presence of clustered basic residues, which is a common theme in most of the previously identified targeting peptides. Nuclear targeting activity was found within the N-terminal residues 4-13 (PAKRARRGYK) of the VP1 capsid protein. While replacement of Arg10 with glycine did not affect the activity, replacement of Lys6, Arg7, or Arg9 with glycine abolished it. The targeting activity was found to residue in a cluster of basic residues, Lys5, Arg7, and Arg9. Nuclear import was saturated by excess of unlabelled peptide conjugates (showing that it was a receptor-mediated process). Transport into the nucleus was an energy-dependent and temperature-dependent process actively mediated by the nuclear pores and inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin.

  15. Identification of Capsid/Coat Related Protein Folds and Their Utility for Virus Classification

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    The viral supergroup includes the entire collection of known and unknown viruses that roam our planet and infect life forms. The supergroup is remarkably diverse both in its genetics and morphology and has historically remained difficult to study and classify. The accumulation of protein structure data in the past few years now provides an excellent opportunity to re-examine the classification and evolution of viruses. Here we scan completely sequenced viral proteomes from all genome types and identify protein folds involved in the formation of viral capsids and virion architectures. Viruses encoding similar capsid/coat related folds were pooled into lineages, after benchmarking against published literature. Remarkably, the in silico exercise reproduced all previously described members of known structure-based viral lineages, along with several proposals for new additions, suggesting it could be a useful supplement to experimental approaches and to aid qualitative assessment of viral diversity in metagenome samples. PMID:28344575

  16. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan Yan

    2010-11-25

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-{Delta}65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  17. Retrovirus Restriction by TRIM5 Proteins Requires Recognition of Only a Small Fraction of Viral Capsid Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiong; Friedman, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The host restriction factors TRIM5α and TRIMCyp potently inhibit retrovirus infection by binding to the incoming retrovirus capsid. TRIM5 proteins are dimeric, and their association with the viral capsid appears to be enhanced by avidity effects owing to formation of higher-order oligomeric complexes. We examined the stoichiometric requirement for TRIM5 functional recognition by quantifying the efficiencies of restriction of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles containing various proportions of restriction-sensitive and -insensitive CA subunits. Both TRIMCyp and TRIM5α inhibited infection of retrovirus particles containing as little as 25% of the restriction-sensitive CA protein. Accordingly, we also observed efficient binding of TRIMCyp in vitro to capsid assemblies containing as little as one-fourth wild-type CA protein. Paradoxically, the ability of HIV-1 particles to abrogate TRIMCyp restriction in trans was more strongly dependent on the fraction of wild-type CA than was restriction of infection. Collectively, our results indicate that TRIM5 restriction factors bind to retroviral capsids in a highly cooperative manner and suggest that TRIM5 can engage a capsid lattice containing a minimum of three or fewer recognizable subunits per hexamer. Our study supports a model in which localized binding of TRIM5 to the viral capsid nucleates rapid polymerization of a TRIM5 lattice on the capsid surface. PMID:23785198

  18. Protease digestion of hepatitis A virus: disparate effects on capsid proteins, antigenicity, and infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, S M; Amphlett, E; Sangar, D

    1991-01-01

    High concentrations of either trypsin or chymotrypsin caused nearly complete cleavage of capsid protein VP2 of hepatitis A virus but did not significantly reduce the infectivity, thermostability, or antigenicity of the virus. Chymotrypsin also had a lesser effect on VP1. These findings indicate the presence of a protease-accessible VP2 surface site which neither contributes significantly to the dominant antigenic site nor plays a role in the attachment of the virus to putative cell receptors. Images PMID:1654460

  19. The interface between hepatitis B virus capsid proteins affects self-assembly, pregenomic RNA packaging, and reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhenning; Pionek, Karolyn; Unchwaniwala, Nuruddin; Maguire, Megan L; Loeb, Daniel D; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid proteins (Cps) assemble around the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and viral reverse transcriptase (P). pgRNA is then reverse transcribed to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) within the capsid. The Cp assembly domain, which forms the shell of the capsid, regulates assembly kinetics and capsid stability. The Cp, via its nucleic acid-binding C-terminal domain, also affects nucleic acid organization. We hypothesize that the structure of the capsid may also have a direct effect on nucleic acid processing. Using structure-guided design, we made a series of mutations at the interface between Cp subunits that change capsid assembly kinetics and thermodynamics in a predictable manner. Assembly in cell culture mirrored in vitro activity. However, all of these mutations led to defects in pgRNA packaging. The amount of first-strand DNA synthesized was roughly proportional to the amount of RNA packaged. However, the synthesis of second-strand DNA, which requires two template switches, was not supported by any of the substitutions. These data demonstrate that the HBV capsid is far more than an inert container, as mutations in the assembly domain, distant from packaged nucleic acid, affect reverse transcription. We suggest that capsid molecular motion plays a role in regulating genome replication. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid plays a central role in the virus life cycle and has been studied as a potential antiviral target. The capsid protein (Cp) packages the viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and polymerase to form the HBV core. The role of the capsid in subsequent nucleic acid metabolism is unknown. Here, guided by the structure of the capsid with bound antiviral molecules, we designed Cp mutants that enhanced or attenuated the assembly of purified Cp in vitro. In cell culture, assembly of mutants was consistent with their in vitro biophysical properties. However, all of these mutations inhibited HBV replication. Specifically, changing the biophysical chemistry

  20. The Interface between Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Proteins Affects Self-Assembly, Pregenomic RNA Packaging, and Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhenning; Pionek, Karolyn; Unchwaniwala, Nuruddin; Maguire, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid proteins (Cps) assemble around the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and viral reverse transcriptase (P). pgRNA is then reverse transcribed to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) within the capsid. The Cp assembly domain, which forms the shell of the capsid, regulates assembly kinetics and capsid stability. The Cp, via its nucleic acid-binding C-terminal domain, also affects nucleic acid organization. We hypothesize that the structure of the capsid may also have a direct effect on nucleic acid processing. Using structure-guided design, we made a series of mutations at the interface between Cp subunits that change capsid assembly kinetics and thermodynamics in a predictable manner. Assembly in cell culture mirrored in vitro activity. However, all of these mutations led to defects in pgRNA packaging. The amount of first-strand DNA synthesized was roughly proportional to the amount of RNA packaged. However, the synthesis of second-strand DNA, which requires two template switches, was not supported by any of the substitutions. These data demonstrate that the HBV capsid is far more than an inert container, as mutations in the assembly domain, distant from packaged nucleic acid, affect reverse transcription. We suggest that capsid molecular motion plays a role in regulating genome replication. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid plays a central role in the virus life cycle and has been studied as a potential antiviral target. The capsid protein (Cp) packages the viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and polymerase to form the HBV core. The role of the capsid in subsequent nucleic acid metabolism is unknown. Here, guided by the structure of the capsid with bound antiviral molecules, we designed Cp mutants that enhanced or attenuated the assembly of purified Cp in vitro. In cell culture, assembly of mutants was consistent with their in vitro biophysical properties. However, all of these mutations inhibited HBV replication. Specifically, changing the

  1. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  2. Derivation of a triple mosaic adenovirus based on modification of the minor capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Yizhe; Le, Long P.; Matthews, Qiana L.; Han Tie; Wu Hongju; Curiel, David T.

    2008-08-01

    Adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX) has been shown to be a potential locale to insert targeting, imaging-related and therapeutic modalities by genetic modification. Recent evidences suggested that capsid protein mosaicism could be a promising strategy for improving the utility of Ad vector. In this study, we explored a method to genetically generate triple pIX mosaic Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) displaying three types of pIX on a single virion. pIXs were modified at their carboxy termini with a Flag sequence, a hexahistidine sequence (His{sub 6}) or a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), respectively. Western blotting analysis and fluorescence microscopy of the purified recombinant viruses indicated that all three modified pIXs were incorporated into the viral particles. Immuno-gold electron microscopy (EM) further confirmed that three types of pIX indeed co-existed on an individual virion. These results firstly validated a triple mosaic capsid configuration on pIX, and demonstrated the possibility of further radical design.

  3. Derivation of a triple mosaic adenovirus based on modification of the minor capsid protein IX.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yizhe; Le, Long P; Matthews, Qiana L; Han, Tie; Wu, Hongju; Curiel, David T

    2008-08-01

    Adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX) has been shown to be a potential locale to insert targeting, imaging-related and therapeutic modalities by genetic modification. Recent evidences suggested that capsid protein mosaicism could be a promising strategy for improving the utility of Ad vector. In this study, we explored a method to genetically generate triple pIX mosaic Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) displaying three types of pIX on a single virion. pIXs were modified at their carboxy termini with a Flag sequence, a hexahistidine sequence (His(6)) or a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), respectively. Western blotting analysis and fluorescence microscopy of the purified recombinant viruses indicated that all three modified pIXs were incorporated into the viral particles. Immuno-gold electron microscopy (EM) further confirmed that three types of pIX indeed co-existed on an individual virion. These results firstly validated a triple mosaic capsid configuration on pIX, and demonstrated the possibility of further radical design.

  4. Bioinformatic analysis of non-VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus A6.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Bo; Yang, Guang-Fei; Liang, Si-Jia; Lin, Jun

    2016-08-01

    This study bioinformatically analyzed the non-VP1 capsid proteins (VP2-VP4) of Coxasckievirus A6 (CVA6), with an attempt to predict their basic physicochemical properties, structural/functional features and linear B cell eiptopes. The online tools SubLoc, TargetP and the others from ExPASy Bioinformatics Resource Portal, and SWISS-MODEL (an online protein structure modeling server), were utilized to analyze the amino acid (AA) sequences of VP2-VP4 proteins of CVA6. Our results showed that the VP proteins of CVA6 were all of hydrophilic nature, contained phosphorylation and glycosylation sites and harbored no signal peptide sequences and acetylation sites. Except VP3, the other proteins did not have transmembrane helix structure and nuclear localization signal sequences. Random coils were the major conformation of the secondary structure of the capsid proteins. Analysis of the linear B cell epitopes by employing Bepipred showed that the average antigenic indices (AI) of individual VP proteins were all greater than 0 and the average AI of VP4 was substantially higher than that of VP2 and VP3. The VP proteins all contained a number of potential B cell epitopes and some eiptopes were located at the internal side of the viral capsid or were buried. We successfully predicted the fundamental physicochemical properties, structural/functional features and the linear B cell eiptopes and found that different VP proteins share some common features and each has its unique attributes. These findings will help us understand the pathogenicity of CVA6 and develop related vaccines and immunodiagnostic reagents.

  5. Therapeutic AAV9-mediated Suppression of Mutant SOD1 Slows Disease Progression and Extends Survival in Models of Inherited ALS

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Kevin D; Salazar, Desirée L; Likhite, Shibi; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Ditsworth, Dara; Ilieva, Hristelina; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Braun, Lyndsey; Cleveland, Don W; Kaspar, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) resulting in progressive motor neuron death through one or more acquired toxicities. Involvement of wild-type SOD1 has been linked to sporadic ALS, as misfolded SOD1 has been reported in affected tissues of sporadic patients and toxicity of astrocytes derived from sporadic ALS patients to motor neurons has been reported to be reduced by lowering the synthesis of SOD1. We now report slowed disease onset and progression in two mouse models following therapeutic delivery using a single peripheral injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) encoding an shRNA to reduce the synthesis of ALS-causing human SOD1 mutants. Delivery to young mice that develop aggressive, fatal paralysis extended survival by delaying both disease onset and slowing progression. In a later-onset model, AAV9 delivery after onset markedly slowed disease progression and significantly extended survival. Moreover, AAV9 delivered intrathecally to nonhuman primates is demonstrated to yield robust SOD1 suppression in motor neurons and glia throughout the spinal cord and therefore, setting the stage for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials. PMID:24008656

  6. Therapeutic AAV9-mediated suppression of mutant SOD1 slows disease progression and extends survival in models of inherited ALS.

    PubMed

    Foust, Kevin D; Salazar, Desirée L; Likhite, Shibi; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Ditsworth, Dara; Ilieva, Hristelina; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Braun, Lyndsey; Cleveland, Don W; Kaspar, Brian K

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) resulting in progressive motor neuron death through one or more acquired toxicities. Involvement of wild-type SOD1 has been linked to sporadic ALS, as misfolded SOD1 has been reported in affected tissues of sporadic patients and toxicity of astrocytes derived from sporadic ALS patients to motor neurons has been reported to be reduced by lowering the synthesis of SOD1. We now report slowed disease onset and progression in two mouse models following therapeutic delivery using a single peripheral injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) encoding an shRNA to reduce the synthesis of ALS-causing human SOD1 mutants. Delivery to young mice that develop aggressive, fatal paralysis extended survival by delaying both disease onset and slowing progression. In a later-onset model, AAV9 delivery after onset markedly slowed disease progression and significantly extended survival. Moreover, AAV9 delivered intrathecally to nonhuman primates is demonstrated to yield robust SOD1 suppression in motor neurons and glia throughout the spinal cord and therefore, setting the stage for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials.

  7. pH shift assembly of adenoviral serotype 5 capsid protein nanosystems for enhanced delivery of nanoparticles, proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vidhya R; Upadhyay, Arun K; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-11-28

    Empty adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) capsids devoid of viral genome were developed as a novel delivery system for nanoparticles, proteins, and nucleic acids. Ad5 capsids of 110 nm diameter undergo an increase in particle size to 1637 nm in 1mM acetic acid at pH4.0 and then shrink to 60 nm, following pH reversal to 7.4. These pH shifts induced reversible changes in capsid zeta potential and secondary structure and irreversible changes in tertiary structure of capsid proteins. Using pH shift dependent changes in capsid size and structure, 20 nm fluorescent nanoparticles, FITC-BSA, and Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugated siRNA were encapsulated with high efficiency in Ad5 capsids, as confirmed by electron microscopy and/or flow cytometry. HEK cell uptake with capsid delivery system was 7.8-, 7.4-, and 2.9-fold greater for nanoparticles, FITC-BSA, and Alexa-siRNA, respectively, when compared to plain solutes. Physical mixtures of capsids and fluorescent solutes exhibited less capsid associated fluorescence intensity and cell uptake. Further, unlike physical mixture, pH shift assembled Ad5 capsids protected siRNA from RNase degradation. Ad5 capsids before and after pH shift exhibited endolysosomal escape. Thus, empty Ad5 capsids can encapsulate a variety of solutes based on pH shift assembly, resulting in enhanced cellular delivery. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacteriophage P23-77 capsid protein structures reveal the archetype of an ancient branch from a major virus lineage.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Ilona; Grimes, Jonathan M; Pawlowski, Alice; Mäntynen, Sari; Harlos, Karl; Bamford, Jaana K H; Stuart, David I

    2013-05-07

    It has proved difficult to classify viruses unless they are closely related since their rapid evolution hinders detection of remote evolutionary relationships in their genetic sequences. However, structure varies more slowly than sequence, allowing deeper evolutionary relationships to be detected. Bacteriophage P23-77 is an example of a newly identified viral lineage, with members inhabiting extreme environments. We have solved multiple crystal structures of the major capsid proteins VP16 and VP17 of bacteriophage P23-77. They fit the 14 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the entire virus exquisitely well, allowing us to propose a model for both the capsid architecture and viral assembly, quite different from previously published models. The structures of the capsid proteins and their mode of association to form the viral capsid suggest that the P23-77-like and adeno-PRD1 lineages of viruses share an extremely ancient common ancestor.

  9. Unique region of the minor capsid protein of human parvovirus B19 is exposed on the virion surface.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, S J; Yoshimoto, K; Kajigaya, S; Anderson, S; Young, N S; Field, A; Warrener, P; Bansal, G; Collett, M S

    1992-01-01

    Capsids of the B19 parvovirus are composed of major (VP2; 58 kD) and minor (VP1; 83 kD) structural proteins. These proteins are identical except for a unique 226 amino acid region at the amino terminus of VP1. Previous immunization studies with recombinant empty capsids have demonstrated that the presence of VP1 was required to elicit virus-neutralizing antibody activity. However, to date, neutralizing epitopes have been identified only on VP2. Crystallographic studies of a related parvovirus (canine parvovirus) suggested the unique amino-terminal portion of VP1 assumed an internal position within the viral capsid. To determine the position of VP1 in both empty capsids and virions, we expressed a fusion protein containing the unique region of VP1. Antisera raised to this protein recognized recombinant empty capsids containing VP1 and VP2, but not those containing VP2 alone, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The antisera immunoprecipitated both recombinant empty capsids and human plasma-derived virions, and agglutinated the latter as shown by immune electron microscopy. The sera contained potent neutralizing activity for virus infectivity in vitro. These data indicate that a portion of the amino terminus of VP1 is located on the virion surface, and that this region contains intrinsic neutralizing determinants. The external location of the VP1-specific tail may provide a site for engineered heterologous epitope presentation in novel recombinant vaccines. Images PMID:1376332

  10. Location of the Bacteriophage P22 Coat Protein C-terminus Provides Opportunities for the Design of Capsid Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Servid, Amy; Jordan, Paul; O’Neil, Alison; Prevelige, Peter; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Rational design of modifications to the interior and exterior surfaces of virus-like particles (VLPs) for future therapeutic and materials applications is based on structural information about the capsid. Existing cryo-electron microscopy based models suggest that the C-terminus of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein (CP) extends towards the capsid exterior. Our biochemical analysis through genetic manipulations of the C-terminus supports the model where the CP C-terminus is exposed on the exterior of the P22 capsid. Capsids displaying a 6xHis tag appended to the CP C-terminus bind to a Ni affinity column, and the addition of positively or negatively charged coiled coil peptides to the capsid results in association of these capsids upon mixing. Additionally, a single cysteine appended to the CP C-terminus results in the formation of intercapsid disulfide bonds and can serve as a site for chemical modifications. Thus, the C-terminus is a powerful location for multivalent display of peptides that facilitate nanoscale assembly and capsid modification. PMID:23957641

  11. Structural Organization of Pregenomic RNA and the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Capsid Protein of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joseph C.-Y.; Dhason, Mary S.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) double-stranded DNA genome is reverse transcribed from its RNA pregenome (pgRNA) within the virus core (or capsid). Phosphorylation of the arginine-rich carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the HBV capsid protein (Cp183) is essential for pgRNA encapsidation and reverse transcription. However, the structure of the CTD remains poorly defined. Here we report sub-nanometer resolution cryo-EM structures of in vitro assembled empty and pgRNA-filled Cp183 capsids in unphosphorylated and phosphorylation-mimic states. In empty capsids, we found unexpected evidence of surface accessible CTD density partially occluding pores in the capsid surface. We also observed that CTD organization changed substantively as a function of phosphorylation. In RNA-filled capsids, unphosphorylated CTDs favored thick ropes of RNA, while the phosphorylation-mimic favored a mesh of thin, high-density strands suggestive of single stranded RNA. These results demonstrate that the CTD can regulate nucleic acid structure, supporting the hypothesis that the HBV capsid has a functional role as a nucleic acid chaperone. PMID:23028319

  12. Targeted gene delivery to the enteric nervous system using AAV: a comparison across serotypes and capsid mutants.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew J; Kuhn, Nathan C; Galligan, James J; Garcia, Joanna; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Mueller, Christian; Boye, Sanford L; Manfredsson, Fredric P

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most widely used gene transfer systems in research and clinical trials. AAV can transduce a wide range of biological tissues, however to date, there has been no investigation on targeted AAV transduction of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Here, we examined the efficiency, tropism, spread, and immunogenicity of AAV transduction in the ENS. Rats received direct injections of various AAV serotypes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the descending colon. AAV serotypes tested included; AAV 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, or 9 and the AAV2 and AAV8 capsid mutants, AAV2-Y444F, AAV2-tripleY-F, AAV2-tripleY-F+T-V, AAV8-Y733F, and AAV8-doubeY-F+T-V. Transduction, as determined by GFP-positive cells, occurred in neurons and enteric glia within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the ENS. AAV6 and AAV9 showed the highest levels of transduction within the ENS. Transduction efficiency scaled with titer and time, was translated to the murine ENS, and produced no vector-related immune response. A single injection of AAV into the colon covered an area of ~47 mm(2). AAV9 primarily transduced neurons, while AAV6 transduced enteric glia and neurons. This is the first report on targeted AAV transduction of neurons and glia in the ENS.

  13. Specific interaction of capsid protein and importin-{alpha}/{beta} influences West Nile virus production

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Chong, Mun-Keat; Ng, Mah-Lee

    2009-11-06

    West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein has been shown to enter the nucleus of infected cells. However, the mechanism by which C protein enters the nucleus is unknown. In this study, we have unveiled for the first time that nuclear transport of WNV and Dengue virus C protein is mediated by their direct association with importin-{alpha}. This interplay is mediated by the consensus sequences of bipartite nuclear localization signal located between amino acid residues 85-101 together with amino acid residues 42 and 43 of C protein. Elucidation of biological significance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction demonstrated that the binding efficiency of this association influenced the nuclear entry of C protein and virus production. Collectively, this study illustrated the molecular mechanism by which the C protein of arthropod-borne flavivirus enters the nucleus and showed the importance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction in the context of flavivirus life-cycle.

  14. Multiple origins of viral capsid proteins from cellular ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on earth and show remarkable diversity of genome sequences, replication and expression strategies, and virion structures. Evolutionary genomics of viruses revealed many unexpected connections but the general scenario(s) for the evolution of the virosphere remains a matter of intense debate among proponents of the cellular regression, escaped genes, and primordial virus world hypotheses. A comprehensive sequence and structure analysis of major virion proteins indicates that they evolved on about 20 independent occasions, and in some of these cases likely ancestors are identifiable among the proteins of cellular organisms. Virus genomes typically consist of distinct structural and replication modules that recombine frequently and can have different evolutionary trajectories. The present analysis suggests that, although the replication modules of at least some classes of viruses might descend from primordial selfish genetic elements, bona fide viruses evolved on multiple, independent occasions throughout the course of evolution by the recruitment of diverse host proteins that became major virion components. PMID:28265094

  15. Phosphorylation of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The structural proteins of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus, the first known nonmammalian polyomavirus, were analyzed by isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The major capsid protein VP1 was found to be composed of at least five distinct species having isoelectric points ranging from pH 6.45 to 5.85. By analogy with the murine polyomavirus, these species apparently result from different modifications of an initial translation product. Primary chicken embryo cells were infected in the presence of 32Pi to determine whether the virus structural proteins were modified by phosphorylation. SDS-PAGE of the purified virus structural proteins demonstrated that VP1 (along with both minor capsid proteins) was phosphorylated. Two-dimensional analysis of the radiolabeled virus showed phosphorylation of only the two most acidic isoelectric species of VP1, indicating that this posttranslational modification contributes to VP1 species heterogeneity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP1 revealed that phosphoserine is the only phosphoamino acid present in the VP1 protein.

  16. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2010-02-17

    In mature HIV-1 virions, the 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone-shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this paper, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild-type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15Nlabeled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of the conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  17. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianying; Yu, Bohai; Lin, Lexun; Zhai, Xia; Han, Yelu; Qin, Ying; Guo, Zhiwei; Wu, Shuo; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yan; Tong, Lei; Zhang, Fengmin; Si, Xiaoning; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2012-11-25

    The capsid proteins of some RNA viruses can translocate to the nucleus and interfere with cellular phenotypes. In this study we found that the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) was dominantly localized in the nucleus of the cells transfected with VP1-expressing plasmid. The VP1 nuclear localization also occurred in the cells infected with CVB3. Truncation analysis indicated that the VP1 nuclear localization sequence located near the C-terminal. The substitution of His220 with threonine completely abolished its translocation. The VP1 proteins of other CVB types might have the nuclear localization potential because this region was highly conserved. Moreover, the VP1 nuclear localization induced cell cycle deregulation, including a prolonged S phase and shortened G2-M phase. Besides these findings, we also found a domain between Ala72 and Phe106 that caused the VP1 truncates dotted distributed in the cytoplasm. Our results suggest a new pathogenic mechanism of CVB. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3 can specifically localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear localization signal of coxsackievirus B3 VP1 protein locates near its C-terminal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 nuclear localization of coxsackievirus B3 can deregulate cell cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a domain in the VP1 that determines it dotted distributed in the cytoplasm.

  18. Interactions between the West Nile virus capsid protein and the host cell-encoded phosphatase inhibitor, I2PP2A.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Tracey A; Urbanowski, Matthew D; Kakani, Kishore; Law, Lok-Man J; Brinton, Margo A; Hobman, Tom C

    2007-11-01

    The West Nile virus (WNV) capsid protein functions in virus assembly to package genomic RNA into nucleocapsid structures. It is becoming clear, that in addition to their structural roles, capsid proteins of RNA viruses have non-structural functions. For example, the WNV capsid protein has been implicated as a pathogenic determinant. Presumably, many, if not all, of the non-structural functions of this protein involve interactions with host cell-encoded proteins. In the present study, we used affinity purification to isolate human proteins that bind to the WNV capsid protein. One of the capsid binding proteins is I(2)(PP2A), a previously characterized inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A. Mapping studies revealed that capsid binding site overlaps with the region of I(2)(PP2A) that is required for inhibition of PP2A activity. Moreover, expression of the WNV capsid protein resulted in significantly increased PP2A activity and expected downstream events, such as inhibition of AP1-dependent transcription. Infected cells treated with I(2)(PP2A)-specific siRNAs produced less infectious virus than control siRNA-transfected cells, but this difference was minimal. Together, our data indicate that interactions between WNV capsid and I(2)(PP2A) result in increased PP2A activity. Given the central role of this phosphatase in cellular physiology, capsid/I(2)(PP2A) interactions may yet prove to be important for viral pathogenesis.

  19. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by dot-blotting using monoclonal antibodies to CPV40 capsid protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were prepared against the 40 kDa capsid protein of Cryptosporidium parvum virus (CPV) by immunizing mice with purified recombinant CPV40 protein. By immunoblotting analysis, one MAb, designated MAbCPV40-1, bound to a 40 kDa protein in extracts of C. parvum oocysts, which...

  20. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-02-05

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  1. Expression and self-assembly of recombinant capsid protein from the antigenically distinct Hawaii human calicivirus.

    PubMed Central

    Green, K Y; Kapikian, A Z; Valdesuso, J; Sosnovtsev, S; Treanor, J J; Lew, J F

    1997-01-01

    The Norwalk and Hawaii viruses are antigenically distinct members of the family Caliciviridae and are considered to be important etiologic agents of epidemic gastroenteritis, with most studies focusing on the role of Norwalk virus. To further investigate the importance of Hawaii virus, Hawaii virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by expression of its capsid protein in the baculovirus system and these VLPs were used as the antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that was efficient in the detection of a serologic response to Hawaii virus. The ready availability of Hawaii VLPs should enable larger-scale epidemiological studies to further elucidate the importance of this agent. PMID:9196224

  2. Atomic structure of the major capsid protein of rotavirus: implications for the architecture of the virion

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Magali; Petitpas, Isabelle; Navaza, Jorge; Lepault, Jean; Kohli, Evelyne; Pothier, Pierre; Prasad, B.V.Venkataram; Cohen, Jean; Rey, Félix A.

    2001-01-01

    The structural protein VP6 of rotavirus, an important pathogen responsible for severe gastroenteritis in children, forms the middle layer in the triple-layered viral capsid. Here we present the crystal structure of VP6 determined to 2 Å resolution and describe its interactions with other capsid proteins by fitting the atomic model into electron cryomicroscopic reconstructions of viral particles. VP6, which forms a tight trimer, has two distinct domains: a distal β-barrel domain and a proximal α-helical domain, which interact with the outer and inner layer of the virion, respectively. The overall fold is similar to that of protein VP7 from bluetongue virus, with the subunits wrapping about a central 3-fold axis. A distinguishing feature of the VP6 trimer is a central Zn2+ ion located on the 3-fold molecular axis. The crude atomic model of the middle layer derived from the fit shows that quasi-equivalence is only partially obeyed by VP6 in the T = 13 middle layer and suggests a model for the assembly of the 260 VP6 trimers onto the T = 1 viral inner layer. PMID:11285213

  3. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  4. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan.

  5. Widespread gene transfer in the central nervous system of cynomolgus macaques following delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna

    PubMed Central

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Vite, Charles H; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Grant, Rebecca; Bote, Erin; Yu, Hongwei; Pukenas, Bryan; Hurst, Robert; Wilson, James M

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors have recently been shown to transduce cells throughout the central nervous system of nonhuman primates when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a finding which could lead to a minimally invasive approach to treat genetic and acquired diseases affecting the entire CNS. We characterized the transduction efficiency of two routes of vector administration into the CSF of cynomolgus macaques—lumbar puncture, which is typically used in clinical practice, and suboccipital puncture, which is more commonly used in veterinary medicine. We found that delivery of vector into the cisterna magna via suboccipital puncture is up to 100-fold more efficient for achieving gene transfer to the brain. In addition, we evaluated the inflammatory response to AAV9-mediated GFP expression in the nonhuman primate CNS. We found that while CSF lymphocyte counts increased following gene transfer, there were no clinical or histological signs of immune toxicity. Together these data indicate that delivery of AAV9 into the cisterna magna is an effective method for achieving gene transfer in the CNS, and suggest that adapting this uncommon injection method for human trials could vastly increase the efficiency of gene delivery. PMID:26052519

  6. Intrathecal Delivery of ssAAV9-DAO Extends Survival in SOD1(G93A) ALS Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan; Duan, Weisong; Wang, Ying; Wen, Di; Liu, Yakun; Li, Zhongyao; Hu, Haojie; Cui, Hongying; Cui, Can; Lin, Huiqian; Li, Chunyan

    2016-12-26

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset, irreversible neurodegenerative disease that leads to progressive paralysis and inevitable death 3-5 years after diagnosis. The mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown, but new evidence indicates that accumulating levels of D-serine result from the downregulation of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) and that this is a novel mechanism that leads to motoneuronal death in ALS via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated cell toxicity. Here, we explored a new therapeutic approach to ALS by overexpressing DAO in the lumbar region of the mouse spinal cord using a single stranded adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (ssAAV9) vector. A single intrathecal injection of ssAAV9-DAO was made in SOD1(G93A) mice, a well-established mouse model of ALS. Treatment resulted in moderate expression of exogenous DAO in motorneurons in the lumbar spinal cord, reduced immunoreactivity of D-serine, alleviated motoneuronal loss and glial activation, and extended survival. The potential mechanisms underlying these effects were associated with the down-regulation of NF-κB and the restoration of the phosphorylation of Akt. In conclusion, administering ssAAV9-DAO may be an effective complementary approach to gene therapy to extend lifespans in symptomatic ALS.

  7. Combined Paracrine and Endocrine AAV9 mediated Expression of Hepatocyte Growth Factor for the Treatment of Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schievenbusch, Stephanie; Strack, Ingo; Scheffler, Melanie; Nischt, Roswitha; Coutelle, Oliver; Hösel, Marianna; Hallek, Michael; Fries, Jochen WU; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Odenthal, Margarete; Büning, Hildegard

    2010-01-01

    In chronic renal disease, tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a leading cause of renal failure. Here, we made use of one of the most promising gene therapy vector platforms, the adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector system, and the COL4A3-deficient mice, a genetic mouse model of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, to develop a novel bidirectional treatment strategy to prevent renal fibrosis. By comparing different AAV serotypes in reporter studies, we identified AAV9 as the most suitable delivery vector to simultaneously target liver parenchyma for endocrine and renal tubular epithelium for paracrine therapeutic expression of the antifibrogenic cytokine human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). We used transcriptional targeting to drive hHGF expression from the newly developed CMV-enhancer-Ksp-cadherin-promoter (CMV-Ksp) in renal and hepatic tissue following tail vein injection of rAAV9-CMV-Ksp-hHGF into COL4A3-deficient mice. The therapeutic efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by a remarkable attenuation of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and repression of fibrotic markers such as collagen1α1 (Col1A1), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Taken together, our results show the great potential of rAAV9 as an intravenously applicable vector for the combined paracrine and endocrine expression of antifibrogenic factors in the treatment of renal failure caused by tubulointerstitial fibrosis. PMID:20424598

  8. [Antigenic analysis of the recombinant capsid protein of porcine circovirus type 2].

    PubMed

    Shang, Shao-bin; Zhou, Ji-yong; Wu, Jian-xiang; Chen, Qing-xin; Gong, Hui

    2005-06-01

    The nuclear localization signal (NLS)-defected capsid protein gene (dCap) of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) was expressed firstly in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (rGST-dCap protein). The purified rGST-dCap protein and NLS-defected Cap protein of PCV2 (rdCap protein) from the purified rGST-dCap protein reacted specifically with swine antiserum to PCV2. Furthermore, the obtained monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rdCap protein were shown to bind to PCV2 particles replicated in PK15 cell. MAbs to rdCap protein also revealed the neutralizing ability to PCV2 particles. These results demonstrate that rGST-dCap protein expressed in E. coli is folded correctly or at least partly, and all mAbs to rdCap protein possess the binding epitopes of PCV2 particle whereas mAbs 4C4,3F6 and 2G7 to rdCap protein keep the neutralization epitopes of PCV2 particle, showing a potential of rGST-dCap protein as a vaccine antigen or serodiagnostic reagent.

  9. Total chemical synthesis of dengue 2 virus capsid protein via native chemical ligation: role of the conserved salt-bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Zhao, Le; Chen, Xishan; Lu, Wei-Yue; Lu, Wuyuan

    2013-06-15

    The dengue capsid protein C is a highly basic alpha-helical protein of ~100 amino acid residues that forms an emphipathic homodimer to encapsidate the viral genome and to interact with viral membranes. The solution structure of dengue 2 capsid protein C (DEN2C) has been determined by NMR spectroscopy, revealing a large dimer interface formed almost exclusively by hydrophobic residues. The only acidic residue (Glu87) conserved in the capsid proteins of all four serotypes of dengue virus forms a salt bridge with the side chains of Lys45 and Arg55'. To understand the structural and functional significance of this conserved salt bridge, we chemically synthesized an N-terminally truncated form of DEN2C ((WT)DEN2C) and its salt bridge-void analog (E87A)DEN2C using the native chemical ligation technique developed by Kent and colleagues. Comparative biochemical and biophysical studies of these two synthetic proteins using circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, protein thermal denaturation, and proteolytic susceptibility assay demonstrated that the conserved salt bridge contributed to DEN2C dimerization and stability as well as its resistance to proteolytic degradation. Our work provided insight into the role of a fully conserved structural element of the dengue capsid protein C and paved the way for additional functional studies of this important viral protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-06-24

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%-99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy.

  11. Sequence analysis and location of capsid proteins within RNA 2 of strawberry latent ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Kreiah, S; Strunk, G; Cooper, J I

    1994-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the RNA 2 of a strawberry isolate (H) of strawberry latent ringspot virus (SLRSV) comprised 3824 nucleotides and contained one long open reading frame with a theoretical coding capacity of 890 amino acids equivalent to a protein of 98.8K. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of virion-derived proteins were determined by Edman degradation allowing the capsid coding regions to be located and serine/glycine cleavage sites to be identified within the polyprotein. The amino acid sequence in the capsid coding region of an isolate of SLRSV from flowering cherry in New Zealand was 97% identical to that of SLRSV-H. Except in the 3' and 5' terminal non-coding sequences, computer-based alignment and comparison algorithms did not reveal any substantial homologies between RNA 2 of SLRSV-H and the equivalent genomic segments in the nepoviruses arabis mosaic, cherry leaf roll, grapevine fanleaf, raspberry ringspot, grapevine hungarian chrome mosaic, tomato blackring, tomato ringspot, tobacco ringspot, or in the comoviruses cowpea mosaic and red clover mottle. Despite the similarities in overall genome organization, data from RNA 2 remain insufficient for unambiguous positioning of SLRSV in relation to species/genera in the Comoviridae.

  12. HPV antibody detection by ELISA with capsid protein L1 fused to glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Sehr, Peter; Müller, Martin; Höpfl, Reinhard; Widschwendter, Andreas; Pawlita, Michael

    2002-10-01

    An alternative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was developed to analyze antibodies to human papillomavirus capsid antigens. The assay uses glutathione crosslinked to casein to capture the major capsid protein L1 from human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6b, 16 and 18 fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) as antigen. The method allows efficient one-step purification of L1 fusion protein from crude bacterial lysates on ELISA plates coated with glutathione casein. The GST-L1 capture ELISA detected HPV 16 antibodies with high type specificity. Comparison with the current "gold-standard" for L1-serology that uses virus-like particles (VLP) as antigen demonstrated similar assay sensitivity. Pairwise comparison of the absorbance values of 105 human sera obtained in the two ELISA formats for HPV 16 showed a R(2) value of linear regression of 0.68. Conformity of the two ELISAs in classification of sera as HPV 16 L1 antibody-positive or -negative was verified with Cohen's kappa test, yielding a value of 0.62. These data indicate that the GST-L1 capture ELISA is similar in performance to the VLP ELISA. The ease of antigen production and purification in the GST-based ELISA will be advantageous to screen large sample numbers in vaccine trials or epidemiological studies examining immune responses to many HPV types in parallel.

  13. Different architectures in the assembly of infectious bursal disease virus capsid proteins expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, J L; Castón, J R; Castro, M; Carrascosa, J L; Rodriguez, J F; Casal, J I

    2000-12-20

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) capsid is formed by the processing of a large polyprotein and subsequent assembly of VPX/VP2 and VP3. To learn more about the processing of the polyprotein and factors affecting the correct assembly of the viral capsid in vitro, different constructs were made using two baculovirus transfer vectors, pFastBac and pAcYM1. Surprisingly, the expression of the capsid proteins gave rise to different types of particles in each system, as observed by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. FastBac expression led to the production of only rigid tubular structures, similar to those described as type I in viral infection. Western blot analysis revealed that these rigid tubules are formed exclusively by VPX. These tubules revealed a hexagonal arrangement of units that are trimer clustered, similar to those observed in IBDV virions. In contrast, pAcYM1 expression led to the assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs), flexible tubules, and intermediate assembly products formed by icosahedral caps elongated in tubes, suggesting an aberrant morphogenesis. Processing of VPX to VP2 seems to be a crucial requirement for the proper morphogenesis and assembly of IBDV particles. After immunoelectron microscopy, VPX/VP2 was detected on the surface of tubules and VLPs. We also demonstrated that VP3 is found only on the inner surfaces of VLPs and caps of the tubular structures. In summary, assembly of VLPs requires the internal scaffolding of VP3, which seems to induce the closing of the tubular architecture into VLPs and, thereafter, the subsequent processing of VPX to VP2. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. High Cooperativity of the SV40 Major Capsid Protein VP1 in Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Santanu; Abd-El-Latif, Mahmoud; Bronstein, Michal; Ben-nun-Shaul, Orly; Kler, Stanislav; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2007-01-01

    SV40 is a small, non enveloped DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid of 45 nm. The outer shell is composed of pentamers of the major capsid protein, VP1, linked via their flexible carboxy-terminal arms. Its morphogenesis occurs by assembly of capsomers around the viral minichromosome. However the steps leading to the formation of mature virus are poorly understood. Intermediates of the assembly reaction could not be isolated from cells infected with wt SV40. Here we have used recombinant VP1 produced in insect cells for in vitro assembly studies around supercoiled heterologous plasmid DNA carrying a reporter gene. This strategy yields infective nanoparticles, affording a simple quantitative transduction assay. We show that VP1 assembles under physiological conditions into uniform nanoparticles of the same shape, size and CsCl density as the wild type virus. The stoichiometry is one DNA molecule per capsid. VP1 deleted in the C-arm, which is unable to assemble but can bind DNA, was inactive indicating genuine assembly rather than non-specific DNA-binding. The reaction requires host enzymatic activities, consistent with the participation of chaperones, as recently shown. Our results demonstrate dramatic cooperativity of VP1, with a Hill coefficient of ∼6. These findings suggest that assembly may be a concerted reaction. We propose that concerted assembly is facilitated by simultaneous binding of multiple capsomers to a single DNA molecule, as we have recently reported, thus increasing their local concentration. Emerging principles of SV40 assembly may help understanding assembly of other complex systems. In addition, the SV40-based nanoparticles described here are potential gene therapy vectors that combine efficient gene delivery with safety and flexibility. PMID:17712413

  15. Mutational Analysis and Allosteric Effects in the HIV-1 Capsid Protein Carboxyl-Terminal Dimerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD, residues 146−231) of the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays an important role in the CA−CA dimerization and viral assembly of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Disrupting the native conformation of the CA is essential for blocking viral capsid formation and viral replication. Thus, it is important to identify the exact nature of the structural changes and driving forces of the CTD dimerization that take place in mutant forms. Here, we compare the structural stability, conformational dynamics, and association force of the CTD dimers for both wild-type and mutated sequences using all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD). The simulations show that Q155N and E159D at the major homology region (MHR) and W184A and M185A at the helix 2 region are energetically less favorable than the wild-type, imposing profound negative effects on intermolecular CA−CA dimerization. Detailed structural analysis shows that three mutants (Q155N, E159D, and W184A) display much more flexible local structures and weaker CA−CA association than the wild-type, primarily due to the loss of interactions (hydrogen bonds, side chain hydrophobic contacts, and π-stacking) with their neighboring residues. Most interestingly, the MHR that is far from the interacting dimeric interface is more sensitive to the mutations than the helix 2 region that is located at the CA−CA dimeric interface, indicating that structural changes in the distinct motif of the CA could similarly allosterically prevent the CA capsid formation. In addition, the structural and free energy comparison of the five residues shorter CA (151−231) dimer with the CA (146−231) dimer further indicates that hydrophobic interactions, side chain packing, and hydrogen bonds are the major, dominant driving forces in stabilizing the CA interface. PMID:19199580

  16. High cooperativity of the SV40 major capsid protein VP1 in virus assembly.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Santanu; Abd-El-Latif, Mahmoud; Bronstein, Michal; Ben-nun-Shaul, Orly; Kler, Stanislav; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2007-08-22

    SV40 is a small, non enveloped DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid of 45 nm. The outer shell is composed of pentamers of the major capsid protein, VP1, linked via their flexible carboxy-terminal arms. Its morphogenesis occurs by assembly of capsomers around the viral minichromosome. However the steps leading to the formation of mature virus are poorly understood. Intermediates of the assembly reaction could not be isolated from cells infected with wt SV40. Here we have used recombinant VP1 produced in insect cells for in vitro assembly studies around supercoiled heterologous plasmid DNA carrying a reporter gene. This strategy yields infective nanoparticles, affording a simple quantitative transduction assay. We show that VP1 assembles under physiological conditions into uniform nanoparticles of the same shape, size and CsCl density as the wild type virus. The stoichiometry is one DNA molecule per capsid. VP1 deleted in the C-arm, which is unable to assemble but can bind DNA, was inactive indicating genuine assembly rather than non-specific DNA-binding. The reaction requires host enzymatic activities, consistent with the participation of chaperones, as recently shown. Our results demonstrate dramatic cooperativity of VP1, with a Hill coefficient of approximately 6. These findings suggest that assembly may be a concerted reaction. We propose that concerted assembly is facilitated by simultaneous binding of multiple capsomers to a single DNA molecule, as we have recently reported, thus increasing their local concentration. Emerging principles of SV40 assembly may help understanding assembly of other complex systems. In addition, the SV40-based nanoparticles described here are potential gene therapy vectors that combine efficient gene delivery with safety and flexibility.

  17. A Single Amino Acid Mutation in the Carnation Ringspot Virus Capsid Protein Allows Virion Formation but Prevents Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Tim L.; Haikal, Patrick R.; Callaway, Anton S.; Lommel, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A Carnation ringspot virus (CRSV) variant (1.26) was identified that accumulates virions but is incapable of forming a systemic infection. The 1.26 capsid protein gene possesses a Ser→Pro mutation at amino acid 282. Conversion of 1.26 amino acid 282 to Ser restored systemic infection, while the reciprocal mutation in wild-type CRSV abolished systemic infection. Similar mutations introduced into the related Red clover necrotic mosaic virus capsid protein gene failed to induce the packaging but nonsystemic movement phenotype. These results provide additional support for the theory that virion formation is necessary but not sufficient for systemic movement with the dianthoviruses. PMID:11533217

  18. Biophysical analysis of the MHR motif in folding and domain swapping of the HIV capsid protein C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Rebeca; Fuertes, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Neira, José Luis; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2015-01-20

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depends on the function, in virion morphogenesis and other stages of the viral cycle, of a highly conserved structural element, the major homology region (MHR), within the carboxyterminal domain (CTD) of the capsid protein. In a modified CTD dimer, MHR is swapped between monomers. While no evidence for MHR swapping has been provided by structural models of retroviral capsids, it is unknown whether it may occur transiently along the virus assembly pathway. Whatever the case, the MHR-swapped dimer does provide a novel target for the development of anti-HIV drugs based on the concept of trapping a nonnative capsid protein conformation. We have carried out a thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of the domain-swapped CTD dimer in solution. The analysis includes a dissection of the role of conserved MHR residues and other amino acids at the dimerization interface in CTD folding, stability, and dimerization by domain swapping. The results revealed some energetic hotspots at the domain-swapped interface. In addition, many MHR residues that are not in the protein hydrophobic core were nevertheless found to be critical for folding and stability of the CTD monomer, which may dramatically slow down the swapping reaction. Conservation of MHR residues in retroviruses did not correlate with their contribution to domain swapping, but it did correlate with their importance for stable CTD folding. Because folding is required for capsid protein function, this remarkable MHR-mediated conformational stabilization of CTD may help to explain the functional roles of MHR not only during immature capsid assembly but in other processes associated with retrovirus infection. This energetic dissection of the dimerization interface in MHR-swapped CTD may also facilitate the design of anti-HIV compounds that inhibit capsid assembly by conformational trapping of swapped CTD dimers. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier

  19. Biophysical Analysis of the MHR Motif in Folding and Domain Swapping of the HIV Capsid Protein C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Rebeca; Fuertes, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Neira, José Luis; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depends on the function, in virion morphogenesis and other stages of the viral cycle, of a highly conserved structural element, the major homology region (MHR), within the carboxyterminal domain (CTD) of the capsid protein. In a modified CTD dimer, MHR is swapped between monomers. While no evidence for MHR swapping has been provided by structural models of retroviral capsids, it is unknown whether it may occur transiently along the virus assembly pathway. Whatever the case, the MHR-swapped dimer does provide a novel target for the development of anti-HIV drugs based on the concept of trapping a nonnative capsid protein conformation. We have carried out a thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of the domain-swapped CTD dimer in solution. The analysis includes a dissection of the role of conserved MHR residues and other amino acids at the dimerization interface in CTD folding, stability, and dimerization by domain swapping. The results revealed some energetic hotspots at the domain-swapped interface. In addition, many MHR residues that are not in the protein hydrophobic core were nevertheless found to be critical for folding and stability of the CTD monomer, which may dramatically slow down the swapping reaction. Conservation of MHR residues in retroviruses did not correlate with their contribution to domain swapping, but it did correlate with their importance for stable CTD folding. Because folding is required for capsid protein function, this remarkable MHR-mediated conformational stabilization of CTD may help to explain the functional roles of MHR not only during immature capsid assembly but in other processes associated with retrovirus infection. This energetic dissection of the dimerization interface in MHR-swapped CTD may also facilitate the design of anti-HIV compounds that inhibit capsid assembly by conformational trapping of swapped CTD dimers. PMID:25606682

  20. Detection, characterization and quantitation of coxsackievirus A16 using polyclonal antibodies against recombinant capsid subunit proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingwei; Ku, Zhiqiang; Cai, Yicun; Sun, Bing; Leng, Qibin; Huang, Zhong

    2011-04-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16), together with enterovirus type 71 (EV71), is responsible for most cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide. Recent findings suggest that the recombination between CVA16 and EV71, and co-circulation of these two viruses may have contributed to the increase of HFMD cases in China over the past few years. Thus, for CVA16, further understanding of its virology, epidemiology and development of diagnostic tests and vaccines are of importance. The present study aimed to develop reagents and protocols for the detection, characterization and quantitation of CVA16. Recombinant CVA16 capsid subunit proteins VP0, VP3 and truncated VP1, were produced in Escherichia coli and used to immunize guinea pigs to generate polyclonal antibodies. The resultant three antisera detected specifically CVA16 propagated in Vero cells by immunostaining, ELISA and Western blotting. The antisera was used to show that CVA16 capsids were composed of correctly processed VP0, VP1 and VP3 subunits, and were present in the form of efficiently assembled particles. A method for the quantitation of the yield of CVA16 in Vero cells was established based on a Western blotting protocol using the recombinant VP0 as a reference standard and anti-VP0 as the detection antibody. This study shows the development and validation of reagents and methods, for qualitative and quantitative determination of CVA16, which are essential for the development of vaccines.

  1. Gyrase B Inhibitor Impairs HIV-1 Replication by Targeting Hsp90 and the Capsid Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Vozzolo, Luciano; Loh, Belinda; Gane, Paul J.; Tribak, Maryame; Zhou, Lihong; Anderson, Ian; Nyakatura, Elisabeth; Jenner, Richard G.; Selwood, David; Fassati, Ariberto

    2010-01-01

    Chemical genetics is an emerging approach to investigate the biology of host-pathogen interactions. We screened several inhibitors of ATP-dependent DNA motors and detected the gyrase B inhibitor coumermycin A1 (C-A1) as a potent antiretroviral. C-A1 inhibited HIV-1 integration and gene expression from acutely infected cell, but the two activities mapped to distinct targets. Target discovery identified Hsp90 as the C-A1 target affecting viral gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that Hsp90 associates with the viral promoter and may directly regulate gene expression. Molecular docking suggested that C-A1 binds to two novel pockets at the C terminal domain of Hsp90. C-A1 inhibited Hsp90 dimer formation, suggesting that it impairs viral gene expression by preventing Hsp90 dimerization at the C terminus. The inhibition of HIV-1 integration imposed by C-A1 was independent of Hsp90 and mapped to the capsid protein, and a point mutation at residue 105 made the virus resistant to this block. HIV-1 susceptibility to the integration block mediated by C-A1 was influenced by cyclophilin A. Our chemical genetic approach revealed an unexpected function of capsid in HIV-1 integration and provided evidence for a role of Hsp90 in regulating gene expression in mammalian cells. Both activities were amenable to inhibition by small molecules and represent novel antiretroviral drug targets. PMID:20937817

  2. Identification of Immunogenic Hot Spots within Plum Pox Potyvirus Capsid Protein for Efficient Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fernández, M. Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-01-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-γ, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence. PMID:12438590

  3. Identification of immunogenic hot spots within plum pox potyvirus capsid protein for efficient antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-12-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-gamma, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence.

  4. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene of two serotypes of San Miguel sea lion virus: identification of conserved and non-conserved amino acid sequences among calicivirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Neill, J D

    1992-07-01

    The San Miguel sea lion viruses, members of the calicivirus family, are closely related to the vesicular disease of swine viruses which can cause severe disease in swine. In order to begin the molecular characterization of these viruses, the nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene of two San Miguel sea lion viruses (SMSV), serotypes 1 and 4, was determined. The coding sequences for the capsid precursor protein were located within the 3' terminal 2620 bases of the genomic RNAs of both viruses. The encoded capsid precursor proteins were 79,500 and 77,634 Da for SMSV 1 and SMSV 4, respectively. The SMSV 1 protein was 47.7% and SMSV 4 was 48.6% homologous to the feline calicivirus (FCV) capsid precursor protein while the two SMSV capsid precursors were 73% homologous to each other. Six distinct regions within the capsid precursors (denoted as regions A-F) were identified based on amino acid sequence alignment analysis of the two SMSV serotypes with FCV and the rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) capsid protein. Three regions showed similarity among all four viruses (regions B, D and F) and one region showed a very high degree of homology between the SMSV serotypes but only limited similarity with FCV (region A). RHDV contained only a truncated region A. A fifth region, consisting of approximately 100 residues, was not conserved among any of the viruses (region E) and, in SMSV, may contain the serotype-specific determinants. Another small region (region C) contained between 15 and 27 amino acids and showed little sequence conservation. Region B showed the highest degree of conservation among the four viruses and contained the residues which had homology to the picornavirus VP3 structural protein. An open reading frame, found in the 3' terminal 514 bases of the SMSV genomes, encoded small proteins (12,575 and 12,522 Da, respectively for SMSV 1 and SMSV 4) of which 32% of the conserved amino acids were basic residues, implying a possible nucleic acid

  5. Characterization of neutralizing epitopes within the major capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 33

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Stefanie D; Sapp, Martin; Streeck, Rolf E; Selinka, Hans-Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Background Infections with papillomaviruses induce type-specific immune responses, mainly directed against the major capsid protein, L1. Based on the propensity of the L1 protein to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs), type-specific vaccines have already been developed. In order to generate vaccines that target a broader spectrum of HPV types, extended knowledge of neutralizing epitopes is required. Despite the association of human papillomavirus type 33 (HPV33) with cervical carcinomas, fine mapping of neutralizing conformational epitopes on HPV33 has not been reported yet. By loop swapping between HPV33 and HPV16 capsid proteins, we have identified amino acid sequences critical for the binding of conformation-dependent type-specific neutralizing antibodies to surface-exposed hyper variable loops of HPV33 capsid protein L1. Results Reactivities of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) H33.B6, H33.E12, H33.J3 and H16.56E with HPV16:33 and HPV33:16 hybrid L1 VLPs revealed the complex structures of their conformational epitopes as well as the major residues contributing to their binding sites. Whereas the epitope of mAb H33.J3 was determined by amino acids (aa) 51–58 in the BC loop of HPV33 L1, sequences of at least two hyper variable loops, DE (aa 132–140) and FGb (aa 282–291), were found to be essential for binding of H33.B6. The epitope of H33.E12 was even more complex, requiring sequences of the FGa loop (aa 260–270), in addition to loops DE and FGb. Conclusion These data demonstrate that neutralizing epitopes in HPV33 L1 are mainly located on the tip of the capsomere and that several hyper variable loops contribute to form these conformational epitopes. Knowledge of the antigenic structure of HPV is crucial for designing hybrid particles as a basis for intertypic HPV vaccines. PMID:17014700

  6. Role of cucumovirus capsid protein in long-distance movement within the infected plant.

    PubMed Central

    Taliansky, M E; García-Arenal, F

    1995-01-01

    Direct evidence is presented for a host-specific role of the cucumovirus capsid protein in long-distance movement within infected plants. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a systemic host for cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV). Tomato aspermy cucumovirus, strain 1 (1-TAV), multiplied to the levels of CMV (i.e., replicated, moved from cell to cell, and formed infectious particles) in the inoculated leaves of cucumbers but was completely unable to spread systemically. The defective long-distance systemic movement of 1-TAV was complemented by CMV in mixed infections. Coinfection of cucumbers with 1-TAV RNA with various combinations of transcripts from full-length cDNA clones of CMV genomic RNA 1, RNA2, and RNA3 showed that CMV RNA3 alone complemented 1-TAV long-distance movement. We obtained mutants containing mutations in the two open reading frames in CMV RNA3 encoding the 3a protein and the capsid protein (CP), both of which are necessary for cell-to-cell movement of CMV. Complementation experiments with mutant CMV RNA3 showed that only 3a protein mutants, i.e., those with an intact CP, complemented the long-distance movement of 1-TAV in cucumbers. Since CMV and TAV have common systemic host plants, the results presented here are strong evidence for an active, host-specific function of the CPs of these two cucumoviruses for long-distance spread in the phloem. The results also suggest that the plasmodesmata in the vascular system and/or at the boundary between the mesophyll and the vascular system, involved in long-distance movement through the phloem, and those in the mesophyll, involved in cell-to-cell movement, differ functionally. PMID:7815560

  7. Protection of chickens against avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) infection by immunization with recombinant avian HEV capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2007-04-12

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is an emerging virus associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens in North America. Avian HEV is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans. In the lack of a practical animal model, avian HEV infection in chickens has been used as a model to study human HEV replication and pathogenesis. A 32 kDa recombinant ORF2 capsid protein of avian HEV expressed in Escherichia coli was found having similar antigenic structure as that of human HEV containing major neutralizing epitopes. To determine if the capsid protein of avian HEV can be used as a vaccine, 20 chickens were immunized with purified avian HEV recombinant protein with aluminum as adjuvant and another 20 chickens were mock immunized with KLH precipitated in aluminum as controls. Both groups of chickens were subsequently challenged with avian HEV. All the tested mock-immunized control chickens developed typical avian HEV infection characterized by viremia, fecal virus shedding and seroconversion to avian HEV antibodies. Gross hepatic lesions were also found in portion of these chickens. In contrast, none of the tested chickens immunized with avian HEV capsid protein had detectable viremia, fecal virus shedding or observable gross hepatitis lesions. The results from this study suggested that immunization of chickens with avian HEV recombinant ORF2 capsid protein with aluminum as adjuvant can induce protective immunity against avian HEV infection. Chickens are a useful small animal model to study anti-HEV immunity and pathogenesis.

  8. Mutations within potential glycosylation sites in the capsid protein of hepatitis E virus prevent the formation of infectious virus particles.

    PubMed

    Graff, Judith; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Torian, Udana; Nguyen, Hanh; St Claire, Marisa; Yu, Claro; Purcell, Robert H; Emerson, Suzanne U

    2008-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a nonenveloped RNA virus. However, the single capsid protein resembles a typical glycoprotein in that it contains a signal sequence and potential glycosylation sites that are utilized when recombinant capsid protein is overexpressed in cell culture. In order to determine whether these unexpected observations were biologically relevant or were artifacts of overexpression, we analyzed capsid protein produced during a normal viral replication cycle. In vitro transcripts from an infectious cDNA clone mutated to eliminate potential glycosylation sites were transfected into cultured Huh-7 cells and into the livers of rhesus macaques. The mutations did not detectably affect genome replication or capsid protein synthesis in cell culture. However, none of the mutants infected rhesus macaques. Velocity sedimentation analyses of transfected cell lysates revealed that mutation of the first two glycosylation sites prevented virion assembly, whereas mutation of the third site permitted particle formation and RNA encapsidation, but the particles were not infectious. However, conservative mutations that did not destroy glycosylation motifs also prevented infection. Overall, the data suggested that the mutations were lethal because they perturbed protein structure rather than because they eliminated glycosylation.

  9. Systemic elimination of de novo capsid protein synthesis from replication-competent AAV contamination in the liver.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Qu, Guang; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    The capsid protein synthesis in targeted tissues resulting from residual contaminating replication-competent adeno-associated virus particles (rcAAV) remains a concern for hazardous immune responses that shut down the factor IX expression in the hemophilia B clinical trial. To systematically reduce/eliminate the effects of potential contaminating rcAAV particles, we designed a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) helper (pH22mir) with a microRNA binding cassette containing multiple copies of liver-specific (hsa-mir-122) and hematopoietic-specific (has-mir-142-3p) sequences to specifically control cap gene expression. In 293 cells, the rep and cap gene from pH22mir functioned similarly to that of conventional helper pH22. The vector yields and compositions from pH22mir and pH22 were indistinguishable. The performance of vector produced in this new system was comparable to that of similar vectors produced by conventional methods. In the human hepatic cell line, the capsid expression was reduced significantly from cap-mir cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. In the liver, 99.9% of capsid expression could be suppressed and no cap expression could be detected by western blot. In summary, we demonstrated a new concept in reducing de novo capsid synthesis in the targeted tissue. This strategy may not only help AAV vectors in controlling undesirable capsid gene expression, but can also be adopted for lentiviral or adenoviral vector production.

  10. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  11. Human papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 remains associated with the incoming viral genome throughout the entry process.

    PubMed

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Guion, Lucile G M; Keiffer, Timothy R; Sapp, Martin

    2017-05-31

    During infectious entry, acidification within the endosome triggers uncoating of the HPV capsid whereupon host cyclophilins facilitate the release of most of the major capsid protein, L1, from the minor capsid protein L2 and the viral genome. The L2/DNA complex traffics to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Following the onset of mitosis, HPV-harboring transport vesicles bud from the TGN followed by association with mitotic chromosomes. During this time, the HPV genome remains in a vesicular compartment until the nucleus has completely reformed. Recent data suggests that while most of L1 protein dissociates and is degraded in the endosome, some L1 protein remains associated with the viral genome. The L1 protein has DNA binding activity and L2 protein has multiple domains capable of interacting with L1 capsomeres. In this study, we report that some L1 protein traffics with L2 and viral genome to the nucleus. The accompanying L1 protein is mostly full-length and retains conformation-dependent epitopes, which are recognized by neutralizing antibodies. Since more than one L1 molecule contributes to these epitopes and require assembly into capsomeres, we propose that L1 protein is present in form of pentamers. Furthermore, we provide evidence that L1 protein interacts directly with viral DNA within the capsid. Based on our findings, we propose that the L1 protein, likely arranged as capsomeres, stabilizes the viral genome within the subviral complex during intracellular trafficking.IMPORTANCE After internalization, the non-enveloped human papillomavirus virion uncoats in the endosome whereupon conformational changes result in a dissociation of a subset of the major capsid protein L1 from the minor capsid protein L2, which remains in complex with the viral DNA. Recent data suggests that some L1 protein may accompany the viral genome beyond the endosomal compartment. Herein, we demonstrate that conformationally intact L1 protein, likely still arranged as capsomeres, remains

  12. Cell-Free Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly Dependent on the Core Protein C-Terminal Domain and Regulated by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ludgate, Laurie; Liu, Kuancheng; Luckenbaugh, Laurie; Streck, Nicholas; Eng, Stacey; Voitenleitner, Christian; Delaney, William E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple subunits of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) assemble into an icosahedral capsid that packages the viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). The N-terminal domain (NTD) of HBc is sufficient for capsid assembly, in the absence of pgRNA or any other viral or host factors, under conditions of high HBc and/or salt concentrations. The C-terminal domain (CTD) is deemed dispensable for capsid assembly although it is essential for pgRNA packaging. We report here that HBc expressed in a mammalian cell lysate, rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL), was able to assemble into capsids when (low-nanomolar) HBc concentrations mimicked those achieved under conditions of viral replication in vivo and were far below those used previously for capsid assembly in vitro. Furthermore, at physiologically low HBc concentrations in RRL, the NTD was insufficient for capsid assembly and the CTD was also required. The CTD likely facilitated assembly under these conditions via RNA binding and protein-protein interactions. Moreover, the CTD underwent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events in RRL similar to those seen in vivo which regulated capsid assembly. Importantly, the NTD alone also failed to accumulate in mammalian cells, likely resulting from its failure to assemble efficiently. Coexpression of the full-length HBc rescued NTD assembly in RRL as well as NTD expression and assembly in mammalian cells, resulting in the formation of mosaic capsids containing both full-length HBc and the NTD. These results have important implications for HBV assembly during replication and provide a facile cell-free system to study capsid assembly under physiologically relevant conditions, including its modulation by host factors. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important global human pathogen and the main cause of liver cancer worldwide. An essential component of HBV is the spherical capsid composed of multiple copies of a single protein, the core protein (HBc). We have

  13. Inhibition of HIV-1 Maturation via Small-Molecule Targeting of the Amino-Terminal Domain in the Viral Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Zhou, Jing; Halambage, Upul D; Jurado, Kellie A; Jamin, Augusta V; Wang, Yujie; Engelman, Alan N; Aiken, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein is an attractive therapeutic target, owing to its multifunctionality in virus replication and the high fitness cost of amino acid substitutions in capsids to HIV-1 infectivity. To date, small-molecule inhibitors have been identified that inhibit HIV-1 capsid assembly and/or impair its function in target cells. Here, we describe the mechanism of action of the previously reported capsid-targeting HIV-1 inhibitor, Boehringer-Ingelheim compound 1 (C1). We show that C1 acts during HIV-1 maturation to prevent assembly of a mature viral capsid. However, unlike the maturation inhibitor bevirimat, C1 did not significantly affect the kinetics or fidelity of Gag processing. HIV-1 particles produced in the presence of C1 contained unstable capsids that lacked associated electron density and exhibited impairments in early postentry stages of infection, most notably reverse transcription. C1 inhibited assembly of recombinant HIV-1 CA in vitro and induced aberrant cross-links in mutant HIV-1 particles capable of spontaneous intersubunit disulfide bonds at the interhexamer interface in the capsid lattice. Resistance to C1 was conferred by a single amino acid substitution within the compound-binding site in the N-terminal domain of the CA protein. Our results demonstrate that the binding site for C1 represents a new pharmacological vulnerability in the capsid assembly stage of the HIV-1 life cycle.IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 capsid protein is an attractive but unexploited target for clinical drug development. Prior studies have identified HIV-1 capsid-targeting compounds that display different mechanisms of action, which in part reflects the requirement for capsid function at both the efferent and afferent phases of viral replication. Here, we show that one such compound, compound 1, interferes with assembly of the conical viral capsid during virion maturation and results in perturbations at a specific protein-protein

  14. Mutually-induced Conformational Switching of RNA and Coat Protein Underpins Efficient Assembly of a Viral Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Neil A.; Stockley, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA viruses package their genomes into capsids enclosing fixed volumes. We assayed the ability of bacteriophage MS2 coat protein to package large, defined fragments of its genomic, single-stranded RNA. We show that the efficiency of packaging into a T=3 capsid in vitro is inversely proportional to RNA length, implying that there is a free-energy barrier to be overcome during assembly. All the RNAs examined have greater solution persistence lengths than the internal diameter of the capsid into which they become packaged, suggesting that protein-mediated RNA compaction must occur during assembly. Binding ethidium bromide to one of these RNA fragments, which would be expected to reduce its flexibility, severely inhibited packaging, consistent with this idea. Cryo-EM structures of the capsids assembled in these experiments with the sub-genomic RNAs show a layer of RNA density beneath the coat protein shell but lack density for the inner RNA shell seen in the wild-type virion. The inner layer is restored when full-length virion RNA is used in the assembly reaction, implying that it becomes ordered only when the capsid is filled, presumably because of the effects of steric and/or electrostatic repulsions. The cryo-EM results explain the length dependence of packaging. In addition, they show that for the sub-genomic fragments the strongest ordered RNA density occurs below the coat protein dimers forming the icosahedral 5-fold axes of the capsid. There is little such density beneath the proteins at the 2-fold axes, consistent with our model in which coat protein dimers binding to RNA stem–loops located at sites throughout the genome leads to switching of their preferred conformations, thus regulating the placement of the quasi-conformers needed to build the T=3 capsid. The data are consistent with mutual chaperoning of both RNA and coat protein conformations, partially explaining the ability of such viruses to assemble so rapidly and accurately. PMID

  15. Virions of Pariacoto virus contain a minor protein translated from the second AUG codon of the capsid protein open reading frame.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karyn N; Ball, L Andrew

    2003-10-01

    Virions of the alphanodavirus Pariacoto virus (PaV) have T=3 icosahedral symmetry and are assembled from multiple copies of a precursor protein that is cleaved into two mature capsid proteins after assembly. The crystal structure of PaV shows that the N-terminal approximately 30 amino acid residues of the subunits surrounding the 5-fold axes interact extensively with icosahedrally ordered regions of the encapsidated positive-sense genomic RNAs. We found that wild-type PaV particles also contain a minor capsid protein that is truncated by 24 residues at its N terminus. Reverse genetic experiments showed that translation of this protein initiated at the second AUG of the capsid protein open reading frame. When either the longer or shorter version of the capsid protein was expressed independently of the other, it assembled into virus particles and underwent maturational cleavage. Virions that lacked the shorter capsid protein retained infectivity for cultured insect cells and Galleria mellonella larvae.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene of papaya leaf-distortion mosaic potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Maoka, T; Kashiwazaki, S; Tsuda, S; Usugi, T; Hibino, H

    1996-01-01

    The DNA complementary to the 3'-terminal 1 404 nucleotides [excluding the poly(A) tail] of papaya leaf-distortion mosaic potyvirus (PLDMV) RNA was cloned and sequenced. The sequence starts within a long open reading frame (ORF) of 1 195 nucleotides and is followed by a 3' non-coding region of 209 nucleotides. Capsid protein (CP) is encoded at the 3' terminus of the ORF. The CP contains 293 residues and has a Mr of 33 277. The CP of PLDMV exhibits 49 to 59% sequence similarity at the amino acid level to the CPs of papaya ringspot potyvirus (PRSV) and other potyviruses. This result is consistent with the absence of a serological relationship between PLDMV and PRSV or other potyviruses. The results support the assignment of PLDMV as a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus.

  17. Multiple functions of capsid proteins in (+) stranded RNA viruses during plant-virus interactions.

    PubMed

    Weber, Philipp H; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2015-01-22

    In addition to providing a protective shell for genomic RNA(s), the coat (capsid) proteins (CPs) of plus-stranded RNA viruses play a variety of other functions that condition the plant-virus relationship. In this review we outline the extensive research progress that has been made within the last decade on those CP characteristics that relate to virus infectivity, pathogenicity, symptom expression, interactions with host factors, virus movement, vector transmission, host range, as well as those used to study virus evolution. By discussing the examples among a variety of plant RNA viruses we show that in addition to general features and pathways, the involvement of CPs may assume very distinct tasks that depend on the particular virus life style. Research perspectives and potential applications are discussed at the end. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of the capsid protein of porcine circovirus type 2 in Lactococcus lactis for oral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Huang, Lihua; Kong, Jian; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2008-06-01

    Diseases associated with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections are becoming a major problem for the swine industry worldwide. The capsid protein (Cap) of PCV2 is an antigen important for both early diagnosis and development of vaccines. In this study, Lactococcus lactis was used as vehicle to deliver the PCV2 antigen in an attempt to develop oral vaccine. A cap gene with a deleted nuclear localization signal sequence (dcap) was cloned into an Escherichia coli/L. lactis shuttle vector pSEC: LEISS under the control of a nisin promoter. Intracellular and extracellular expression of the dCap was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Significantly higher levels of PCV2-specific IgG in the sera of mice were observed upon oral administration of strain cultures expressing the PCV2 antigen. These results suggest that it is feasible to use L. lactis as an antigen delivery vehicle for developing oral vaccines against PCV2 infection.

  19. Analysis of epitopes in the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shiwei; Zhao, Qin; Lu, Mingzhe; Sun, Peiming; Qiu, Hongkai; Zhang, Lu; Lv, Junhua; Zhou, En-Min

    2011-02-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is related genetically and antigenically to human and swine HEVs and capsid protein of avian HEV shares approximately 48-49% amino acid sequence identities with those of human and swine HEVs. Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced and used to locate different epitopes in the ORF2 region of aa 339-570 of avian HEV Chinese isolate. The results showed that five epitopes were located in the aa 339-414 region and one in the aa 510-515 region. Two epitopes located in aa 339-355 and aa 384-414 regions are the immunodominant epitopes on the surface of the avian HEV particles as demonstrated by immune capture of viral particles and immunohistochemical detection of the ORF2 antigens with two MAbs.

  20. Kinetics of the association of dengue virus capsid protein with the granular component of nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Ashish Kumar; Cecilia, D

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replicates in the cytoplasm but translocation of the capsid protein (C) to the nucleoli of infected cells has been shown to facilitate virus multiplication for DENV-2. This study demonstrates that the nucleolar localization of C occurs with all four serotypes of DENV. The interaction of C with the nucleolus was found to be dynamic with a mobile fraction of 66% by FRAP. That the C shuttled between the nucleus and cytoplasm was suggested by FLIP and translation inhibition experiments. Colocalization with B23 indicated that DENV C targeted the granular component (GC) of the nucleolus. Presence of DENV C in the nucleolus affected the recovery kinetics of B23 in infected and transfected cells. Sub-nucleolar localization of DENV C of all serotypes to the GC, its mobility in and out of the nucleolus and its affect on the dynamics of B23 is being shown for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ac54 Gene Is Crucial for Localization of the Major Capsid Protein VP39 at the Site of Nucleocapsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhanwen; Zhong, Ling; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Wenbi; Yuan, Meijin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Baculovirus DNAs are synthesized and inserted into preformed capsids to form nucleocapsids at a site in the infected cell nucleus, termed the virogenic stroma. Nucleocapsid assembly of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) requires the major capsid protein VP39 and nine minor capsid proteins, including VP1054. However, how VP1054 participates in nucleocapsid assembly remains elusive. In this study, the VP1054-encoding gene (ac54) was deleted to generate the ac54-knockout AcMNPV (vAc54KO). In vAc54KO-transfected cells, nucleocapsid assembly was disrupted, leading to the formation of abnormally elongated capsid structures. Interestingly, unlike cells transfected with AcMNPV mutants lacking other minor capsid proteins, in which capsid structures were distributed within the virogenic stroma, ac54 ablation resulted in a distinctive location of capsid structures and VP39 at the periphery of the nucleus. The altered distribution pattern of capsid structures was also observed in cells transfected with AcMNPV lacking BV/ODV-C42 or in cytochalasin d-treated AcMNPV-infected cells. BV/ODV-C42, along with PP78/83, has been shown to promote nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) formation, which is another requisite for nucleocapsid assembly. Immunofluorescence using phalloidin indicated that the formation and distribution of nuclear F-actin were not affected by ac54 deletion. However, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that BV/ODV-C42, PP78/83, and 38K failed to integrate into capsid structures in the absence of VP1054, and immunoprecipitation further demonstrated that in transient expression assays, VP1054 interacted with BV/ODV-C42 and VP80 but not VP39. Our findings suggest that VP1054 plays an important role in the transport of capsid proteins to the nucleocapsid assembly site prior to the process of nucleocapsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses whose replication occurs within the host nucleus. The localization of

  2. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments.

  3. An extensive thermodynamic characterization of the dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Lidón-Moya, María C.; Barrera, Francisco N.; Bueno, Marta; Pérez-Jiménez, Raúl; Sancho, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G.; Neira, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus presents a conical capsid formed by several hundred units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimerization of CA occurs via its C-terminal domain, CA-C. This self-association process, which is thought to be pH-dependent, seems to constitute a key step in virus assembly. CA-C isolated in solution is able to dimerize. An extensive thermodynamic characterization of the dimeric and monomeric species of CA-C at different pHs has been carried out by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), absorbance, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Thermal and chemical denaturation allowed the determination of the thermodynamic parameters describing the unfolding of both CA-C species. Three reversible thermal transitions were observed, depending on the technique employed. The first one was protein concentration-dependent; it was observed by FTIR and NMR, and consisted of a broad transition occurring between 290 and 315 K; this transition involves dimer dissociation. The second transition (Tm ~ 325 K) was observed by ANS-binding experiments, fluorescence anisotropy, and near-UV CD; it involves partial unfolding of the monomeric species. Finally, absorbance, far-UV CD, and NMR revealed a third transition occurring at Tm ~ 333 K, which involves global unfolding of the monomeric species. Thus, dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding were not coupled. At low pH, CA-C underwent a conformational transition, leading to a species displaying ANS binding, a low CD signal, a red-shifted fluorescence spectrum, and a change in compactness. These features are characteristic of molten globule-like conformations, and they resemble the properties of the second species observed in thermal unfolding. PMID:16131662

  4. An extensive thermodynamic characterization of the dimerization domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Lidón-Moya, María C; Barrera, Francisco N; Bueno, Marta; Pérez-Jiménez, Raúl; Sancho, Javier; Mateu, Mauricio G; Neira, José L

    2005-09-01

    The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus presents a conical capsid formed by several hundred units of the capsid protein, CA. Homodimerization of CA occurs via its C-terminal domain, CA-C. This self-association process, which is thought to be pH-dependent, seems to constitute a key step in virus assembly. CA-C isolated in solution is able to dimerize. An extensive thermodynamic characterization of the dimeric and monomeric species of CA-C at different pHs has been carried out by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), absorbance, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Thermal and chemical denaturation allowed the determination of the thermodynamic parameters describing the unfolding of both CA-C species. Three reversible thermal transitions were observed, depending on the technique employed. The first one was protein concentration-dependent; it was observed by FTIR and NMR, and consisted of a broad transition occurring between 290 and 315 K; this transition involves dimer dissociation. The second transition (Tm approximately 325 K) was observed by ANS-binding experiments, fluorescence anisotropy, and near-UV CD; it involves partial unfolding of the monomeric species. Finally, absorbance, far-UV CD, and NMR revealed a third transition occurring at Tm approximately 333 K, which involves global unfolding of the monomeric species. Thus, dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding were not coupled. At low pH, CA-C underwent a conformational transition, leading to a species displaying ANS binding, a low CD signal, a red-shifted fluorescence spectrum, and a change in compactness. These features are characteristic of molten globule-like conformations, and they resemble the properties of the second species observed in thermal unfolding.

  5. Biological and immunological characterization of norovirus major capsid proteins from three different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuqi; Wan, Xin; Ling, Tong; Shen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the leading cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to a lack of cell culture system and animal model, our understanding of NoVs has been lagging behind. In this study, NoV major capsid proteins (VP1) from three different genotypes (GI.2, GII.3 and GII.4) were expressed by using recombinant baculovirus expression system and which led to successful assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs). The receptor binding patterns of three kinds of VLPs were characterized by using synthetic and salivary HBGA-VLP binding assay. Cross-reactivity and cross-blocking activity of rabbit hyperimmune sera against these VLPs were determined by ELISA/Western blot analysis and saliva-VLP binding blockade assay, respectively. Expression of the major capsid proteins from three genotypes all led to smaller VLPs in dominance when sf9 cells were cultured in suspension, which was in consistence with our previous report. These smaller VLPs were used for in vitro synthetic and salivary HBGA-VLP binding and binding blockade assays. VLPs from GII.3 strain exhibited no binding to all synthetic HBGAs and saliva samples tested while VLPs from GI.2 and GII.4 strain showed similar binding pattern and bound to all salivary HBGAs tested. Rabbit anti-GII.3 VLPs hyperimmune serum didn't block the binding of GI.2 and GII.4 VLPs to salivary HBGAs while rabbit anti-GI.2 VLP hyperimmune serum blocked the binding of GII.4 VLPs to salivary HBGAs but not vice versa. Our results provide further evidence indirectly in support of presence of other factors involved in receptor binding other than HBGAs for NoVs, and demonstrate poor cross-blocking activities of antibodies against VLPs within or across genogroups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  7. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao; Miao, Ji; Zhao, Qinjian

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  8. The Astrovirus Capsid: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Carlos F.; DuBois, Rebecca M.

    2017-01-01

    Astroviruses are enterically transmitted viruses that cause infections in mammalian and avian species. Astroviruses are nonenveloped, icosahedral viruses comprised of a capsid protein shell and a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome. The capsid protein undergoes dramatic proteolytic processing both inside and outside of the host cell, resulting in a coordinated maturation process that affects cellular localization, virus structure, and infectivity. After maturation, the capsid protein controls the initial phases of virus infection, including virus attachment, endocytosis, and genome release into the host cell. The astrovirus capsid is the target of host antibodies including virus-neutralizing antibodies. The capsid protein also mediates the binding of host complement proteins and inhibits complement activation. Here, we will review our knowledge on the astrovirus capsid protein (CP), with particular attention to the recent structural, biochemical, and virological studies that have advanced our understanding of the astrovirus life cycle. PMID:28106836

  9. The Astrovirus Capsid: A Review.

    PubMed

    Arias, Carlos F; DuBois, Rebecca M

    2017-01-19

    Astroviruses are enterically transmitted viruses that cause infections in mammalian and avian species. Astroviruses are nonenveloped, icosahedral viruses comprised of a capsid protein shell and a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome. The capsid protein undergoes dramatic proteolytic processing both inside and outside of the host cell, resulting in a coordinated maturation process that affects cellular localization, virus structure, and infectivity. After maturation, the capsid protein controls the initial phases of virus infection, including virus attachment, endocytosis, and genome release into the host cell. The astrovirus capsid is the target of host antibodies including virus-neutralizing antibodies. The capsid protein also mediates the binding of host complement proteins and inhibits complement activation. Here, we will review our knowledge on the astrovirus capsid protein (CP), with particular attention to the recent structural, biochemical, and virological studies that have advanced our understanding of the astrovirus life cycle.

  10. Early stage P22 viral capsid self-assembly mediated by scaffolding protein: atom-resolved model and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiajian; Yang, Jing; Sereda, Yuriy V; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2015-04-23

    Molecular dynamics simulation of an atom-resolved bacteriophage P22 capsid model is used to delineate the underlying mechanism of early stage P22 self-assembly. A dimer formed by the C-terminal fragment of scaffolding protein with a new conformation is demonstrated to catalyze capsomer (hexamer and pentamer) aggregation efficiently. Effects of scaffolding protein/coat protein binding patterns and scaffolding protein concentration on efficiency, fidelity, and capsid curvature of P22 self-assembly are identified.

  11. Identification of an immunodominant antigenic site involving the capsid protein VP3 of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, L H; Jansen, R W; Stapleton, J T; Cohen, J I; Lemon, S M

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus, an hepatotropic picornavirus, is a common cause of acute hepatitis in man for which there is no available vaccine. Competitive binding studies carried out in solid phase suggest that neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis A virus recognize a limited number of epitopes on the capsid surface, although the polypeptide locations of these epitopes are not well defined. Neutralization-escape mutants, selected for resistance to monoclonal antibodies, demonstrate broad cross-resistance to other monoclonal antibodies. Sequencing of virion RNA from several of these mutants demonstrated that replacement of aspartic acid residue 70 of capsid protein VP3 (residue 3070) with histidine or alanine confers resistance to neutralization by monoclonal antibody K2-4F2 and prevents binding of this antibody and other antibodies with similar solid-phase competition profiles. These results indicate that residue 3070 contributes to an immunodominant antigenic site. Mutation at residue 102 of VP1 (residue 1102) confers partial resistance against antibody B5-B3 and several other antibodies but does not prevent antibody attachment. Both VP3 and VP1 sites align closely in the linear peptide sequences with sites of neutralization-escape mutations in poliovirus and human rhinovirus, suggesting conservation of structure among these diverse picornaviruses. However, because partial neutralization resistance to several monoclonal antibodies (2D2, 3E1, and B5-B3) was associated with mutation at either residue 3070 or residue 1102, these sites appear more closely related functionally in hepatitis A virus than in these other picornaviruses. PMID:2460866

  12. Antigenic characteristics of the complete and truncated capsid protein VP1 of enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Dong, Min; Jiang, Bingfu; Dai, Xing; Meng, Jihong

    2012-08-01

    The complete VP1 protein of enterovirus 71 (EV71) and a series of truncations were expressed in Escherichia coli and their antigenic characteristics were studied. Immunoblot analysis showed the major immunoreactive region of the VP1 protein was located in the N-terminal portion at position of amino acid (aa) 1-100. The complete VP1 possessed strong cross-reactivity with antisera against coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and echovirus 6 (Echo6), while the truncated fragment at position 1-100 aa only had weak cross-reactivity. Moreover, an EV71-specific linear epitope at position 94-105 aa was identified using two EV71-specific mAbs (2B9 and 5B7) with indirect ELISA, but could not be recognized by antibodies against EV71 virus particles. The complete and all of truncated VP1 proteins except His-VP1(202-297) and GST-VP1(202-248) failed to elicit a significant neutralizing antibody response in mice. His-VP1(202-297) and GST-VP1(202-248) containing neutralizing epitope(s) could be recognized only by anti-EV71 mouse sera but not rabbit or human sera. These findings may contribute to a further understanding of antigenic characteristics of the capsid protein VP1 and may be helpful to the development of diagnostic reagents and vaccines.

  13. Epitope analysis of capsid and matrix proteins of North American ovine lentivirus field isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Marcom, K A; Pearson, L D; Chung, C S; Poulson, J M; DeMartini, J C

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against two phenotypically distinct ovine lentivirus (OvLV) strains were generated by fusion of BALB/c SP2/0-Ag 14 myeloma cells with spleen cells from mice immunized with purified OvLV. Hybridomas were selected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and analysis of reactivity on immunoblots. The majority (17 of 21) of the MAbs recognized the gag-encoded capsid protein, CA p27, of both strains. Four other MAbs recognized a smaller structural protein, presumably a matrix protein, MA p17. Three distinct epitopes on CA p27 and one on MA p17 were distinguished by the MAbs with competition ELISA. MAbs from each epitope group were able to recognize 17 North American field isolates of OvLV and the closely related caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV). Analysis of the data indicated that these epitopes were highly conserved among naturally occurring isolates. A representative MAb from each epitope group of anti-CA p27 MAbs reacted with four field strains of OvLV and CAEV on immunoblots. An anti-MA p17 MAb recognized the same OvLV strains on immunoblots but failed to recognize CAEV. MAbs which recognize conserved epitopes of gag-encoded lentivirus proteins (CA p27 and MA p17) are valuable tools. These MAbs can be used to develop sensitive diagnostic assays and to study the pathogenesis of lentivirus infections in sheep and goats. Images PMID:1715884

  14. Classic Nuclear Localization Signals and a Novel Nuclear Localization Motif Are Required for Nuclear Transport of Porcine Parvovirus Capsid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Maude; Bouchard-Lévesque, Véronique; Fernandes, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear targeting of capsid proteins (VPs) is important for genome delivery and precedes assembly in the replication cycle of porcine parvovirus (PPV). Clusters of basic amino acids, corresponding to potential nuclear localization signals (NLS), were found only in the unique region of VP1 (VP1up, for VP1 unique part). Of the five identified basic regions (BR), three were important for nuclear localization of VP1up: BR1 was a classic Pat7 NLS, and the combination of BR4 and BR5 was a classic bipartite NLS. These NLS were essential for viral replication. VP2, the major capsid protein, lacked these NLS and contained no region with more than two basic amino acids in proximity. However, three regions of basic clusters were identified in the folded protein, assembled into a trimeric structure. Mutagenesis experiments showed that only one of these three regions was involved in VP2 transport to the nucleus. This structural NLS, termed the nuclear localization motif (NLM), is located inside the assembled capsid and thus can be used to transport trimers to the nucleus in late steps of infection but not for virions in initial infection steps. The two NLS of VP1up are located in the N-terminal part of the protein, externalized from the capsid during endosomal transit, exposing them for nuclear targeting during early steps of infection. Globally, the determinants of nuclear transport of structural proteins of PPV were different from those of closely related parvoviruses. IMPORTANCE Most DNA viruses use the nucleus for their replication cycle. Thus, structural proteins need to be targeted to this cellular compartment at two distinct steps of the infection: in early steps to deliver viral genomes to the nucleus and in late steps to assemble new viruses. Nuclear targeting of proteins depends on the recognition of a stretch of basic amino acids by cellular transport proteins. This study reports the identification of two classic nuclear localization signals in the minor

  15. In vitro expression, monoclonal antibody and bioactivity for capsid protein of porcine circovirus type II without nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Yong; Shang, Shao-Bin; Gong, Hui; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wu, Jian-Xiang; Shen, Hui-Gang; Chen, Ting-Fei; Guo, Jun-Qing

    2005-08-04

    We expressed firstly the Capsid protein gene defecting the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Porcine circovirus type II (PCV2) in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (rGST-dCap protein). The purified rGST-dCap protein and the recombinant NLS-defected Cap protein of PCV2 (rdCap protein) from the purified rGST-dCap protein reacted specifically with swine antiserum to PCV2. Furthermore, the obtained monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rdCap protein were shown to bind to PCV2 particles replicated in PK15 cell and capsid protein (Cap protein) of PCV2 expressed in PK15 cells, respectively. mAbs to rdCap protein also revealed the neutralizing ability to PCV2 particles. These results demonstrated that rGST-dCap protein expressed in E. coli was folded correctly or at least partly, and mAbs to rdCap protein possessed the binding epitopes of PCV2 particles whereas mAbs 4C4 and 3F6 to rdCap protein remained the neutralization epitope of PCV2 particle, showing a possibility of neutralizing mAb to rdCap protein as an immnuotherapeutic agent and a potential of rGST-dCap protein as a vaccine antigen or serodiagnostic reagent.

  16. Differential expression of two isolates of beak and feather disease virus capsid protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Edward I; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Roman, Noelia; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2013-04-01

    Expression of recombinant beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid-associated protein (Cap) has relied on inefficient techniques that typically produce low yields or use specialized expression systems, which greatly increase the cost and expertise required for mass production. An Escherichia coli system was used to express recombinant BFDV Cap derived from two isolates of BFDV, from a Long-billed Corella (Cacatua tenuirostris) and an Orange-bellied parrot (OBP; Neophema chrysogaster). Purification by affinity and size exclusion chromatography was optimized through an iterative process involving screening and modification of buffer constituents and pH. A buffer containing glycerol, β-mercaptoethanol, Triton X-100, and a high concentration of NaCl at pH 8 was used to increase solubility of the protein. The final concentration of the corella-isolated BFDV protein was fifteen- to twenty-fold greater than that produced in previous publications using E. coli expression systems. Immunoassays were used to confirm the specific antigenicity of recombinant Cap, verifying its validity for use in continued experimentation as a potential vaccine, a reagent in diagnostic assays, and as a concentrated sample for biological discoveries.

  17. Properties of African Cassava Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein Expressed in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Katharina; Schäfer, Benjamin; Kepp, Gabi; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The capsid proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses combine multiple functions for packaging the single-stranded viral genome, insect transmission and shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP was expressed in fission yeast, and purified by SDS gel electrophoresis. After tryptic digestion of this protein, mass spectrometry covered 85% of the amino acid sequence and detected three N-terminal phosphorylation sites (threonine 12, serines 25 and 62). Differential centrifugation of cell extracts separated the CP into two fractions, the supernatant and pellet. Upon isopycnic centrifugation of the supernatant, most of the CP accumulated at densities typical for free proteins, whereas the CP in the pellet fraction showed a partial binding to nucleic acids. Size-exclusion chromatography of the supernatant CP indicated high order complexes. In DNA binding assays, supernatant CP accelerated the migration of ssDNA in agarose gels, which is a first hint for particle formation. Correspondingly, CP shifted ssDNA to the expected densities of virus particles upon isopycnic centrifugation. Nevertheless, electron microscopy did not reveal any twin particles, which are characteristic for geminiviruses. PMID:27399762

  18. Crystal Structure of the Avian Reovirus Inner Capsid Protein σA▿

    PubMed Central

    Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martinez-Costas, José; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Schoehn, Guy; Fox, Gavin C.; Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Benavente, Javier; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    Avian reovirus, an important avian pathogen, expresses eight structural and four nonstructural proteins. The structural σA protein is a major component of the inner capsid, clamping together λA building blocks. σA has also been implicated in the resistance of avian reovirus to the antiviral action of interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA in the host cell cytoplasm and thus inhibiting activation of the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. We have solved the structure of bacterially expressed σA by molecular replacement and refined it using data to 2.3-Å resolution. Twelve σA molecules are present in the P1 unit cell, arranged as two short double helical hexamers. A positively charged patch is apparent on the surface of σA on the inside of this helix and mutation of either of two key arginine residues (Arg155 and Arg273) within this patch abolishes double-stranded RNA binding. The structural data, together with gel shift assay, electron microscopy, and sedimentation velocity centrifugation results, provide evidence for cooperative binding of σA to double-stranded RNA. The minimal length of double-stranded RNA required for σA binding was observed to be 14 to 18 bp. PMID:18799570

  19. Expression and characterization of HPV-16 L1 capsid protein in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Silvia Boschi; de Alencar Muniz Chaves, Agtha; Aires, Karina Araújo; Cianciarullo, Aurora Marques; Garcea, Robert L.; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are responsible for the most common human sexually transmitted viral infections. Infection with high-risk HPVs, particularly HPV16, is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The papillomavirus L1 major capsid protein, the basis of the currently marketed vaccines, self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs). Here, we describe the expression, purification and characterization of recombinant HPV16 L1 produced by a methylotrophic yeast. A codon-optimized HPV16 L1 gene was cloned into a non-integrative expression vector under the regulation of a methanol-inducible promoter and used to transform competent Pichia pastoris cells. Purification of L1 protein from yeast extracts was performed using heparin–sepharose chromatography, followed by a disassembly/reassembly step. VLPs could be assembled from the purified L1 protein, as demonstrated by electron microscopy. The display of conformational epitopes on the VLPs surface was confirmed by hemagglutination and hemagglutination inhibition assays and by immuno-electron microscopy. This study has implications for the development of an alternative platform for the production of a papillomavirus vaccine that could be provided by public health programs, especially in resource-poor areas, where there is a great demand for low-cost vaccines. PMID:19756360

  20. Several recombinant capsid proteins of equine rhinitis a virus show potential as diagnostic antigens.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Stevenson, Rachel A; Crabb, Brendan S; Studdert, Michael J; Hartley, Carol A

    2005-06-01

    Equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) is a significant pathogen of horses and is also closely related to Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite these facts, knowledge of the prevalence and importance of ERAV infections remains limited, largely due to the absence of a simple, robust diagnostic assay. In this study, we compared the antigenicities of recombinant full-length and fragmented ERAV capsid proteins expressed in Escherichia coli by using sera from experimentally infected and naturally exposed horses. We found that, from the range of antigens tested, recombinant proteins encompassing the C-terminal region of VP1, full-length VP2, and the N-terminal region of VP2 reacted specifically with antibodies present in sera from each of the five experimentally infected horses examined. Antibodies to epitopes on VP2 (both native and recombinant forms) persisted longer postinfection (>105 days) than antibodies specific for epitopes on other fragments. Our data also suggest that B-cell epitopes within the C terminus of VP1 and N terminus of VP2 contribute to a large proportion of the total reactivity of recombinant VP1 and VP2, respectively. Importantly, the reactivity of these VP1 and VP2 recombinant proteins in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) correlated well with the results from a range of native antigen-based serological assays using sera from 12 field horses. This study provides promising candidates for development of a diagnostic ERAV ELISA.

  1. Rubella virus capsid protein modulation of viral genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K. . E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu

    2005-07-05

    The ratio of the subgenomic (SG) to genome RNA synthesized by rubella virus (RUB) replicons expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (RUBrep/GFP) is substantially higher than the ratio of these species synthesized by RUB (4.3 for RUBrep/GFP vs. 1.3-1.4 for RUB). It was hypothesized that this modulation of the viral RNA synthesis was by one of the virus structural protein genes and it was found that introduction of the capsid (C) protein gene into the replicons as an in-frame fusion with GFP resulted in an increase of genomic RNA production (reducing the SG/genome RNA ratio), confirming the hypothesis and showing that the C gene was the moiety responsible for the modulation effect. The N-terminal one-third of the C gene was required for the effect of be exhibited. A similar phenomenon was not observed with the replicons of Sindbis virus, a related Alphavirus. Interestingly, modulation was not observed when RUBrep/GFP was co-transfected with either other RUBrep or plasmid constructs expressing the C gene, demonstrating that modulation could occur only when the C gene was provided in cis. Mutations that prevented translation of the C protein failed to modulate RNA synthesis, indicating that the C protein was the moiety responsible for modulation; consistent with this conclusion, modulation of RNA synthesis was maintained when synonymous codon mutations were introduced at the 5' end of the C gene that changed the C gene sequence without altering the amino acid sequence of the C protein. These results indicate that C protein translated in proximity of viral replication complexes, possibly from newly synthesized SG RNA, participate in regulating the replication of viral RNA.

  2. Binding of the C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein to lipid membranes: a biophysical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Francisco N.; Hurtado-Gómez, Estefanía; Lidón-Moya, María C.; Neira, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The capsid protein, CA, of HIV-1 forms a capsid that surrounds the viral genome. However, recent studies have shown that an important proportion of the CA molecule does not form part of this capsid, and its location and function are still unknown. In the present work we show, by using fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, that the C-terminal region of CA, CA-C, is able to bind lipid vesicles in vitro in a peripheral fashion. CA-C had a greater affinity for negatively charged lipids (phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine) than for zwitterionic lipids [PC/Cho/SM (equimolar mixture of phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and sphingomyelin) and phosphatidylcholine]. The interaction of CA-C with lipid membranes was supported by theoretical studies, which predicted that different regions, occurring close in the three-dimensional CA-C structure, were responsible for the binding. These results show the flexibility of CA-C to undergo conformational rearrangements in the presence of different binding partners. We hypothesize that the CA molecules that do not form part of the mature capsid might be involved in lipid-binding interactions in the inner leaflet of the virion envelope. PMID:16259620

  3. Antigenic relationships among human rotaviruses as determined by outer capsid protein VP4.

    PubMed Central

    Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1990-01-01

    cDNA clones representing the VP4 gene of symptomatic human rotavirus strain KU (VP7 serotype 1) or DS-1 (VP7 serotype 2) or asymptomatic human rotavirus strain 1076 (VP7 serotype 2) were constructed and inserted into a baculovirus expression vector under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. The resulting recombinants expressed the appropriate authentic VP4 rotavirus outer capsid protein. Guinea pigs immunized with these VP4 proteins developed antibodies that neutralized infectivity of the rotavirus from which the immunizing VP4 was derived. These antisera were then used in neutralization tests to define the extent and distribution of VP4 antigenic polymorphism among human rotaviruses. Three distinct serotypes and one subtype of the VP4 outer capsid protein were identified among 17 human rotavirus strains that had previously been assigned to five distinct VP7 serotypes. For the most part, VP4 serotype segregated independently of VP7 serotype. Ten strains of human rotavirus that were associated with symptomatic infection and that exhibited VP7 serotype 1, 3, 4, or 9 specificity, each possessed a VP4 of the same serotype and subtype, designated VP4 serotype 1A. Both symptomatic human rotavirus strains with VP7 serotype 2 specificity were related by neutralization to the VP4 serotype 1A strains and were classified as a subtype of VP4 serotype 1--i.e., serotype 1B--since viruses of serotype 1A appeared to be prime strains. Four human rotavirus strains that were recovered from healthy infants in newborn nurseries in which virus transmission persisted over a long interval, belonged to VP7 serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4, but each strain possessed the same VP4 antigenic specificity that was designated VP4 serotype 2. Finally, a single strain of symptomatic human rotavirus of VP7 serotype 1 specificity possessed a unique VP4 that was provisionally classified as VP4 serotype 3 but this remains to be confirmed because neutralization tests were performed in only one direction. Among

  4. Structural Basis for the Development of Avian Virus Capsids That Display Influenza Virus Proteins and Induce Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Elena; Mata, Carlos P.; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Nieto, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bioengineering of viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) is a well-established approach in the development of new and improved vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. We report here that the capsid of a major avian pathogen, infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), can accommodate heterologous proteins to induce protective immunity. The structural units of the ∼70-nm-diameter T=13 IBDV capsid are trimers of VP2, which is made as a precursor (pVP2). The pVP2 C-terminal domain has an amphipathic α helix that controls VP2 polymorphism. In the absence of the VP3 scaffolding protein, 466-residue pVP2 intermediates bearing this α helix assemble into genuine VLPs only when expressed with an N-terminal His6 tag (the HT-VP2-466 protein). HT-VP2-466 capsids are optimal for protein insertion, as they are large enough (cargo space, ∼78,000 nm3) and are assembled from a single protein. We explored HT-VP2-466-based chimeric capsids initially using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The VLP assembly yield was efficient when we coexpressed EGFP-HT-VP2-466 and HT-VP2-466 from two recombinant baculoviruses. The native EGFP structure (∼240 copies/virion) was successfully inserted in a functional form, as VLPs were fluorescent, and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy showed that the EGFP molecules incorporated at the inner capsid surface. Immunization of mice with purified EGFP-VLPs elicited anti-EGFP antibodies. We also inserted hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix (M2) protein epitopes derived from the mouse-adapted A/PR/8/34 influenza virus and engineered several HA- and M2-derived chimeric capsids. Mice immunized with VLPs containing the HA stalk, an M2 fragment, or both antigens developed full protection against viral challenge. IMPORTANCE Virus-like particles (VLPs) are multimeric protein cages that mimic the infectious virus capsid and are potential candidates as nonliving vaccines that induce long-lasting protection. Chimeric VLPs can display

  5. Structural basis for the development of avian virus capsids that display influenza virus proteins and induce protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Elena; Mata, Carlos P; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Nieto, Amelia; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2015-03-01

    Bioengineering of viruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) is a well-established approach in the development of new and improved vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. We report here that the capsid of a major avian pathogen, infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), can accommodate heterologous proteins to induce protective immunity. The structural units of the ~70-nm-diameter T=13 IBDV capsid are trimers of VP2, which is made as a precursor (pVP2). The pVP2 C-terminal domain has an amphipathic α helix that controls VP2 polymorphism. In the absence of the VP3 scaffolding protein, 466-residue pVP2 intermediates bearing this α helix assemble into genuine VLPs only when expressed with an N-terminal His6 tag (the HT-VP2-466 protein). HT-VP2-466 capsids are optimal for protein insertion, as they are large enough (cargo space, ~78,000 nm(3)) and are assembled from a single protein. We explored HT-VP2-466-based chimeric capsids initially using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The VLP assembly yield was efficient when we coexpressed EGFP-HT-VP2-466 and HT-VP2-466 from two recombinant baculoviruses. The native EGFP structure (~240 copies/virion) was successfully inserted in a functional form, as VLPs were fluorescent, and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy showed that the EGFP molecules incorporated at the inner capsid surface. Immunization of mice with purified EGFP-VLPs elicited anti-EGFP antibodies. We also inserted hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix (M2) protein epitopes derived from the mouse-adapted A/PR/8/34 influenza virus and engineered several HA- and M2-derived chimeric capsids. Mice immunized with VLPs containing the HA stalk, an M2 fragment, or both antigens developed full protection against viral challenge. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are multimeric protein cages that mimic the infectious virus capsid and are potential candidates as nonliving vaccines that induce long-lasting protection. Chimeric VLPs can display or include foreign

  6. The structure and evolution of the major capsid protein of a large, lipid-containing DNA virus.

    PubMed

    Nandhagopal, Narayanasamy; Simpson, Alan A; Gurnon, James R; Yan, Xiadong; Baker, Timothy S; Graves, Michael V; Van Etten, James L; Rossmann, Michael G

    2002-11-12

    Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus type 1 (PBCV-1) is a very large, icosahedral virus containing an internal membrane enclosed within a glycoprotein coat consisting of pseudohexagonal arrays of trimeric capsomers. Each capsomer is composed of three molecules of the major capsid protein, Vp54, the 2.0-A resolution structure of which is reported here. Four N-linked and two O-linked glycosylation sites were identified. The N-linked sites are associated with nonstandard amino acid motifs as a result of glycosylation by virus-encoded enzymes. Each monomer of the trimeric structure consists of two eight-stranded, antiparallel beta-barrel, "jelly-roll" domains related by a pseudo-sixfold rotation. The fold of the monomer and the pseudo-sixfold symmetry of the capsomer resembles that of the major coat proteins in the double-stranded DNA bacteriophage PRD1 and the double-stranded DNA human adenoviruses, as well as the viral proteins VP2-VP3 of picornaviruses. The structural similarities among these diverse groups of viruses, whose hosts include bacteria, unicellular eukaryotes, plants, and mammals, make it probable that their capsid proteins have evolved from a common ancestor that had already acquired a pseudo-sixfold organization. The trimeric capsid protein structure was used to produce a quasi-atomic model of the 1,900-A diameter PBCV-1 outer shell, based on fitting of the Vp54 crystal structure into a three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy image reconstruction of the virus.

  7. A synthetic parvovirus B19 capsid protein can replace viral antigen in antibody-capture enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Kock, W C

    1995-09-01

    To establish a renewable source of parvovirus B19 antigens for diagnostic tests, gene sequences for the viral capsid proteins, VP1 and VP2, were cloned into baculovirus expression vectors and the recombinant viruses used to infect Sf9 insect cells. Cell lysates examined by immunoblotting demonstrated reactive proteins corresponding to the expected sizes of native VP1 (83 kDa) and VP2 (58 kDa). The VP2 protein was produced efficiently in quantity and self-assembled into empty capsids as shown by density equilibration in a CsCl step gradient. The VP2 protein was purified and used as an antigen in antibody-capture enzyme immunoassays for the detection of B19 IgG and IgM antibodies. Compared to a standard antibody-capture EIA based on whole viral antigen, the VP2-EIA gave a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 97% in detection of B19 IgM in 138 patients suspected of B19 infection. No IgM-positive specimens were missed. IgG detection yielded a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 96% in the same population. Recombinant VP2 capsid proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells can substitute for serum-derived B19 virus in standard antibody-capture EIA for the detection of B19 IgG and IgM with comparable results.

  8. Identification of a nuclear localization sequence in the polyomavirus capsid protein VP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the C-terminal (Glu307-Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Gln-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus minor capsid protein VP2. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of newly synthesized VP2 was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP2 (expressing full-length VP2) and pSG5 delta 3VP2 (expressing truncated VP2, lacking amino acids Glu307-Leu318). These constructs were transfected into COS-7 cells, and the intracellular localization of the VP2 protein was determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP2 was localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP2 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. A biochemical "additive" approach was also used to determine whether this sequence could target nonnuclear proteins to the nucleus. A synthetic peptide identical to VP2 amino acids Glu307-Leu318 was cross-linked to the nonnuclear proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG). The conjugates were then labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and microinjected into the cytoplasm of NIH 3T6 cells. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus of the microinjected cells, whereas unconjugated BSA and IgG remained in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these genetic subtractive and biochemical additive approaches have identified the C-terminal sequence of polyoma-virus VP2 (containing amino acids Glu307-Leu318) as the NLS of this protein.

  9. Identification of a nuclear localization sequence in the polyomavirus capsid protein VP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the C-terminal (Glu307-Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Gln-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus minor capsid protein VP2. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of newly synthesized VP2 was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP2 (expressing full-length VP2) and pSG5 delta 3VP2 (expressing truncated VP2, lacking amino acids Glu307-Leu318). These constructs were transfected into COS-7 cells, and the intracellular localization of the VP2 protein was determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP2 was localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP2 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. A biochemical "additive" approach was also used to determine whether this sequence could target nonnuclear proteins to the nucleus. A synthetic peptide identical to VP2 amino acids Glu307-Leu318 was cross-linked to the nonnuclear proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG). The conjugates were then labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and microinjected into the cytoplasm of NIH 3T6 cells. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus of the microinjected cells, whereas unconjugated BSA and IgG remained in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these genetic subtractive and biochemical additive approaches have identified the C-terminal sequence of polyoma-virus VP2 (containing amino acids Glu307-Leu318) as the NLS of this protein.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of different immunogenic viral nanoconstructs from rotavirus VP6 inner capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Bugli, Francesca; Caprettini, Valeria; Cacaci, Margherita; Martini, Cecilia; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Torelli, Riccardo; Della Longa, Stefano; Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Giardina, Bruno; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Arcovito, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In order to deliver low-cost viral capsomeres from a large amount of soluble viral VP6 protein from human rotavirus, we developed and optimized a biotechnological platform in Escherichia coli. Specifically, three different expression protocols were compared, differing in their genetic constructs, ie, a simple native histidine-tagged VP6 sequence, VP6 fused to thioredoxin, and VP6 obtained with the newly described small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion system. Our results demonstrate that the histidine-tagged protein does not escape the accumulation in the inclusion bodies, and that SUMO is largely superior to the thioredoxin-fusion tag in enhancing the expression and solubility of VP6 protein. Moreover, the VP6 protein produced according to the SUMO fusion tag displays well-known assembly properties, as observed in both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images, giving rise to either VP6 trimers, 60 nm spherical virus-like particles, or nanotubes a few microns long. This different quaternary organization of VP6 shows a higher level of immunogenicity for the elongated structures with respect to the spheres or the protein trimers. Therefore, the expression and purification strategy presented here – providing a large amount of the viral capsid protein in the native form with relatively simple, rapid, and economical procedures – opens a new route toward large-scale production of a more efficient antigenic compound to be used as a vaccination tool or as an adjuvant, and also represents a top-quality biomaterial to be further modified for biotechnological purposes. PMID:24936129

  11. Self-assembly in the carboxysome: a viral capsid-like protein shell in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeates, T O; Tsai, Y; Tanaka, S; Sawaya, M R; Kerfeld, C A

    2007-06-01

    Many proteins self-assemble to form large supramolecular complexes. Numerous examples of these structures have been characterized, ranging from spherical viruses to tubular protein assemblies. Some new kinds of supramolecular structures are just coming to light, while it is likely there are others that have not yet been discovered. The carboxysome is a subcellular structure that has been known for more than 40 years, but whose structural and functional details are just now emerging. This giant polyhedral body is constructed as a closed shell assembled from several thousand protein subunits. Within this protein shell, the carboxysome encapsulates the CO(2)-fixing enzymes, Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) and carbonic anhydrase; this arrangement enhances the efficiency of cellular CO(2) fixation. The carboxysome is present in many photosynthetic and chemoautotrophic bacteria, and so plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. It also serves as the prototypical member of what appears to be a large class of primitive protein-based organelles in bacteria. A series of crystal structures is beginning to reveal the secrets of how the carboxysome is assembled and how it enhances the efficiency of CO(2) fixation. Some of the assembly principles revealed in the carboxysome are reminiscent of those seen in icosahedral viral capsids. In addition, the shell appears to be perforated by pores for metabolite transport into and out of the carboxysome, suggesting comparisons to the pores through oligomeric transmembrane proteins, which serve to transport small molecules across the membrane bilayers of cells and eukaryotic organelles.

  12. Understanding dengue virus capsid protein disordered N-Terminus and pep14-23-based inhibition.

    PubMed

    Faustino, André F; Guerra, Gabriela M; Huber, Roland G; Hollmann, Axel; Domingues, Marco M; Barbosa, Glauce M; Enguita, Francisco J; Bond, Peter J; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Da Poian, Andrea T; Almeida, Fabio C L; Santos, Nuno C; Martins, Ivo C

    2015-02-20

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection affects millions of people and is becoming a major global disease for which there is no specific available treatment. pep14-23 is a recently designed peptide, based on a conserved segment of DENV capsid (C) protein. It inhibits the interaction of DENV C with host intracellular lipid droplets (LDs), which is crucial for viral replication. Combining bioinformatics and biophysics, here, we analyzed pep14-23 structure and ability to bind different phospholipids, relating that information with the full-length DENV C. We show that pep14-23 acquires α-helical conformation upon binding to negatively charged phospholipid membranes, displaying an asymmetric charge distribution structural arrangement. Structure prediction for the N-terminal segment reveals four viable homodimer orientations that alternatively shield or expose the DENV C hydrophobic pocket. Taken together, these findings suggest a new biological role for the disordered N-terminal region, which may function as an autoinhibitory domain mediating DENV C interaction with its biological targets. The results fit with our current understanding of DENV C and pep14-23 structure and function, paving the way for similar approaches to understanding disordered proteins and improved peptidomimetics drug development strategies against DENV and similar Flavivirus infections.

  13. Maize rayado fino virus capsid proteins assemble into virus-like particles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Hammond, John

    2010-02-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV; genus Marafivirus; family Tymoviridae) is an isometric plant virus of 30 nm containing two components: empty shells and complete virus particles (encapsidating the 6.3 kb genomic RNA). Both particles are composed of two serologically related, carboxy co-terminal, coat proteins (CP) of apparent molecular mass 21-22 kDa (CP2) and 24-28 kDa (CP1) in a molar ratio of 3:1, respectively; CP1 contains a 37 amino acid amino terminal extension of CP2. In our study, expression of CP1 or CP2 in Escherichia coli resulted in assembly of each capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs), appearing in electron microscopy as stain-permeable (CP2) or stain-impermeable particles (CP1). CP1 VLPs encapsidated bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA, but not CP mRNA, while CP2 VLPs encapsidated neither CP mRNA nor 16S ribosomal RNA. Expression of CP1 and CP2 in E. coli using a co-expression vector resulted in the assembly of VLPs which were stain-impermeable and encapsidated CP mRNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal 37 amino acid residues of CP1, although not required for particle formation, may be involved in the assembly of complete virions and that the presence of both CP1 and CP2 in the particle is required for specific encapsidation of MRFV CP mRNA.

  14. Systemic injection of AAV9-GDNF provides modest functional improvements in the SOD1(G93A) ALS rat but has adverse side effects.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, G M; Alkaslasi, M; Vit, J-P; Lawless, G; Godoy, M; Gowing, G; Shelest, O; Svendsen, C N

    2017-03-09

    Injecting proteins into the central nervous system that stimulate neuronal growth can lead to beneficial effects in animal models of disease. In particular, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has shown promise in animal and cell models of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, systemic AAV9-GDNF was delivered via tail vein injections to young rats to determine whether this could be a safe and functional strategy to treat the SOD1(G93A) rat model of ALS and, therefore, translated to a therapy for ALS patients. We found that GDNF administration in this manner resulted in modest functional improvement, whereby grip strength was maintained for longer and the onset of forelimb paralysis was delayed compared to non-treated rats. This did not, however, translate into an extension in survival. In addition, ALS rats receiving GDNF exhibited slower weight gain, reduced activity levels and decreased working memory. Collectively, these results confirm that caution should be applied when applying growth factors such as GDNF systemically to multiple tissues.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 9 March 2017; doi:10.1038/gt.2017.9.

  15. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  16. The T=1 capsid protein of Penicillium chrysogenum virus is formed by a repeated helix-rich core indicative of gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A; Havens, Wendy M; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2010-07-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 A resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of alpha-helices, forming a repeated alpha-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the alpha-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability.

  17. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-11-25

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  18. Solution structure of the capsid protein from the human T-cell leukemia virus type-I.

    PubMed

    Khorasanizadeh, S; Campos-Olivas, R; Summers, M F

    1999-08-13

    The solution structure of the capsid protein (CA) from the human T-cell leukemia virus type one (HTLV-I), a retrovirus that causes T-cell leukemia and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy in humans, has been determined by NMR methods. The protein consists of independent N and C-terminal domains connected by a flexible linker. The domains are structurally similar to the N-terminal "core" and C-terminal "dimerization" domains, respectively, of the human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) capsid proteins, although several important differences exist. In particular, hydrophobic residues near the major homology region are partially buried in HTLV-I CA, which is monomeric in solution, whereas analogous residues in HIV-1 and EIAV CA project from the C-terminal domain and promote dimerization. These differences in the structure and oligomerization state of the proteins appear to be related to, and possibly controlled by, the oxidation state of conserved cysteine residues, which are reduced in HTLV-I CA but form a disulfide bond in the HIV-1 and EIAV CA crystal structures. The results are consistent with an oxidative capsid assembly mechanism, in which CA oligomerization or maturation is triggered by disulfide bo nd formation as the budding virus enters the oxidizing environment of the bloodstream. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Identification of an antigenic domain in the N-terminal region of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein that is not common to swine and human HEVs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhen; Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Liu, Lihong; Widén, Frederik; Hsu, Walter H; Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-12-01

    The antigenic domains located in the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein have been characterized. This region shares common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. However, epitopes in the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues have never been reported. In this study, an antigenic domain located between amino acids 23 and 85 was identified by indirect ELISA using the truncated recombinant capsid proteins as coating antigens and anti-avian HEV chicken sera as primary antibodies. In addition, this domain did not react with anti-swine and human HEV sera. These results indicated that the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues of avian HEV capsid protein do not share common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. This finding is important for our understanding of the antigenicity of the avian HEV capsid protein. Furthermore, it has important implications in the selection of viral antigens for serological diagnosis.

  20. A GLP-Compliant Toxicology and Biodistribution Study: Systemic Delivery of an rAAV9 Vector for the Treatment of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Aaron S.; Duncan, F. Jason; Camboni, Marybeth; Waligura, Kathryn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Bremer, William G.; Shilling, Christopher; Walker, Christopher M.; Bolon, Brad; Flanigan, Kevin M.; McBride, Kim L.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Fu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease due to defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In preparation for a clinical trial, we performed an IND-enabling GLP-toxicology study to assess systemic rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU gene delivery in WT C57BL/6 mice at 1 × 1014 vg/kg and 2 × 1014 vg/kg (n = 30/group, M:F = 1:1), and non-GLP testing in MPS IIIB mice at 2 × 1014 vg/kg. Importantly, no adverse clinical signs or chronic toxicity were observed through the 6 month study duration. The rAAV9-mediated rNAGLU expression was rapid and persistent in virtually all tested CNS and somatic tissues. However, acute liver toxicity occurred in 33% (5/15) WT males in the 2 × 1014 vg/kg cohort, which was dose-dependent, sex-associated, and genotype-specific, likely due to hepatic rNAGLU overexpression. Interestingly, a significant dose response was observed only in the brain and spinal cord, whereas in the liver at 24 weeks postinfection (pi), NAGLU activity was reduced to endogenous levels in the high dose cohort but remained at supranormal levels in the low dose group. The possibility of rAAV9 germline transmission appears to be minimal. The vector delivery resulted in transient T-cell responses and characteristic acute antibody responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in all rAAV9-treated animals, with no detectable impacts on tissue transgene expression. This study demonstrates a generally safe and effective profile, and may have identified the upper dosing limit of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU via systemic delivery for the treatment of MPS IIIB. PMID:26684447

  1. Human Papillomavirus E2 Regulates SRSF3 (SRp20) To Promote Capsid Protein Expression in Infected Differentiated Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Klymenko, T; Hernandez-Lopez, H; MacDonald, A I; Bodily, J M; Graham, S V

    2016-05-15

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is tightly linked to differentiation of the infected epithelial cell, suggesting a sophisticated interplay between host cell metabolism and virus replication. Previously, we demonstrated in differentiated keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo that HPV type 16 (HPV16) infection caused increased levels of the cellular SR splicing factors (SRSFs) SRSF1 (ASF/SF2), SRSF2 (SC35), and SRSF3 (SRp20). Moreover, the viral E2 transcription and replication factor that is expressed at high levels in differentiating keratinocytes could bind and control activity of the SRSF1 gene promoter. Here, we show that the E2 proteins of HPV16 and HPV31 control the expression of SRSFs 1, 2, and 3 in a differentiation-dependent manner. E2 has the greatest transactivation effect on expression of SRSF3. Small interfering RNA depletion experiments in two different models of the HPV16 life cycle (W12E and NIKS16) and one model of the HPV31 life cycle (CIN612-9E) revealed that only SRSF3 contributed significantly to regulation of late events in the virus life cycle. Increased levels of SRSF3 are required for L1 mRNA and capsid protein expression. Capsid protein expression was regulated specifically by SRSF3 and appeared independent of other SRSFs. Taken together, these data suggest a significant role of the HPV E2 protein in regulating late events in the HPV life cycle through transcriptional regulation of SRSF3 expression. Human papillomavirus replication is accomplished in concert with differentiation of the infected epithelium. Virus capsid protein expression is confined to the upper epithelial layers so as to avoid immune detection. In this study, we demonstrate that the viral E2 transcription factor activates the promoter of the cellular SRSF3 RNA processing factor. SRSF3 is required for expression of the E4(^)L1 mRNA and so controls expression of the HPV L1 capsid protein. Thus, we reveal a new dimension of virus-host interaction crucial for production

  2. Human Papillomavirus E2 Regulates SRSF3 (SRp20) To Promote Capsid Protein Expression in Infected Differentiated Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Klymenko, T.; Hernandez-Lopez, H.; MacDonald, A. I.; Bodily, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is tightly linked to differentiation of the infected epithelial cell, suggesting a sophisticated interplay between host cell metabolism and virus replication. Previously, we demonstrated in differentiated keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo that HPV type 16 (HPV16) infection caused increased levels of the cellular SR splicing factors (SRSFs) SRSF1 (ASF/SF2), SRSF2 (SC35), and SRSF3 (SRp20). Moreover, the viral E2 transcription and replication factor that is expressed at high levels in differentiating keratinocytes could bind and control activity of the SRSF1 gene promoter. Here, we show that the E2 proteins of HPV16 and HPV31 control the expression of SRSFs 1, 2, and 3 in a differentiation-dependent manner. E2 has the greatest transactivation effect on expression of SRSF3. Small interfering RNA depletion experiments in two different models of the HPV16 life cycle (W12E and NIKS16) and one model of the HPV31 life cycle (CIN612-9E) revealed that only SRSF3 contributed significantly to regulation of late events in the virus life cycle. Increased levels of SRSF3 are required for L1 mRNA and capsid protein expression. Capsid protein expression was regulated specifically by SRSF3 and appeared independent of other SRSFs. Taken together, these data suggest a significant role of the HPV E2 protein in regulating late events in the HPV life cycle through transcriptional regulation of SRSF3 expression. IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus replication is accomplished in concert with differentiation of the infected epithelium. Virus capsid protein expression is confined to the upper epithelial layers so as to avoid immune detection. In this study, we demonstrate that the viral E2 transcription factor activates the promoter of the cellular SRSF3 RNA processing factor. SRSF3 is required for expression of the E4^L1 mRNA and so controls expression of the HPV L1 capsid protein. Thus, we reveal a new dimension of virus-host interaction

  3. The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL17 Protein Is the Second Constituent of the Capsid Vertex-Specific Component Required for DNA Packaging and Retention▿

    PubMed Central

    Toropova, Katerina; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Conway, James F.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL17 and UL25 minor capsid proteins are essential for DNA packaging. They are thought to comprise a molecule arrayed in five copies around each of the capsid vertices. This molecule was initially termed the “C-capsid-specific component” (CCSC) (B. L. Trus et al., Mol. Cell 26:479-489, 2007), but as we have subsequently observed this feature on reconstructions of A, B, and C capsids, we now refer to it more generally as the “capsid vertex-specific component” (CVSC) (S. K. Cockrell et al., J. Virol. 85:4875-4887, 2011). We previously confirmed that UL25 occupies the vertex-distal region of the CVSC density by visualizing a large UL25-specific tag in reconstructions calculated from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) images. We have pursued the same strategy to determine the capsid location of the UL17 protein. Recombinant viruses were generated that contained either a small tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C terminus of UL17. Purification of the TAP-tagged UL17 or a similarly TAP-tagged UL25 protein clearly demonstrated that the two proteins interact. A cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids containing the UL17-GFP protein reveals that UL17 is the second component of the CVSC and suggests that UL17 interfaces with the other CVSC component, UL25, through its C terminus. The portion of UL17 nearest the vertex appears to be poorly constrained, which may provide flexibility in interacting with tegument proteins or the DNA-packaging machinery at the portal vertex. The exposed locations of the UL17 and UL25 proteins on the HSV-1 capsid exterior suggest that they may be attractive targets for highly specific antivirals. PMID:21632758

  4. The herpes simplex virus 1 UL17 protein is the second constituent of the capsid vertex-specific component required for DNA packaging and retention.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Katerina; Huffman, Jamie B; Homa, Fred L; Conway, James F

    2011-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL17 and UL25 minor capsid proteins are essential for DNA packaging. They are thought to comprise a molecule arrayed in five copies around each of the capsid vertices. This molecule was initially termed the "C-capsid-specific component" (CCSC) (B. L. Trus et al., Mol. Cell 26:479-489, 2007), but as we have subsequently observed this feature on reconstructions of A, B, and C capsids, we now refer to it more generally as the "capsid vertex-specific component" (CVSC) (S. K. Cockrell et al., J. Virol. 85:4875-4887, 2011). We previously confirmed that UL25 occupies the vertex-distal region of the CVSC density by visualizing a large UL25-specific tag in reconstructions calculated from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) images. We have pursued the same strategy to determine the capsid location of the UL17 protein. Recombinant viruses were generated that contained either a small tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C terminus of UL17. Purification of the TAP-tagged UL17 or a similarly TAP-tagged UL25 protein clearly demonstrated that the two proteins interact. A cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids containing the UL17-GFP protein reveals that UL17 is the second component of the CVSC and suggests that UL17 interfaces with the other CVSC component, UL25, through its C terminus. The portion of UL17 nearest the vertex appears to be poorly constrained, which may provide flexibility in interacting with tegument proteins or the DNA-packaging machinery at the portal vertex. The exposed locations of the UL17 and UL25 proteins on the HSV-1 capsid exterior suggest that they may be attractive targets for highly specific antivirals.

  5. Detention of HPV L1 Capsid Protein and hTERC Gene in Screening of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Huang; Ruifang, Wu; Ruizhen, Li; Yiheng, Liang; Zhihong, Liu; Juan, Li; Chun, Wang; Yanqiu, Zhou; Leiming, Weng

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the expression of human papilloma virus (HPV) L1 capsid protein, and human telomerase RNA component (hTERC) in cervical cancer and the role of detection of both genes in screening of cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 309 patients were recruited and cervical exfoliated cells were collected. Immunocytochemistry was employed to detect HPV L1 capsid protein, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to detect the hTERC. Results: The expression of HPV L1 capsid protein reduced with the increase of the histological grade of cervical cells and was negatively related to the grade of cervical lesions. However, the expression of hTERC increased with the increase of the histological grade and positively associated with the grade of cervical lesions. The proportion of patients with L1(-)/hTERC(+) was higher in patients with histological grade of CIN2 or higher than that in those with histological grade of CIN1. The L1(+)/hTERC(-) and L1(-)/hTERC(-) were negatively related to the grade of cervical lesions. L1(-)/hTERC(+) was positively associated with the grade of cervical lesions. The L1/hTERC ratio increased. The negative predictive value of both HPV L1 and hTERC was higher than that of HPV L1 or hTERC, but there was no marked difference in the screening efficacy of cervical cancer among HPV L1, hTERC and HPV L1+hTERC. Conclusion: HPV L1 capsid protein and hTERC gene may serve as markers for the early diagnosis and prediction of cervical lesions. The increase in L1/hTERC ratio reflects the progression of cervical lesions to a certain extent. PMID:23997907

  6. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Juan; Romo, Jamie; McWhorter, Troy; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1-4 (DENV1-4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a qualitative assessment of cell binding and entry capacity using HeLa cells. DENV2 envelope peptide, Dsp2EP, (0564)Gly-Gly(0595), was shown to bind and remain at the cell surface. In contrast, DENV3 capsid protein peptide, Dsp3CP, (0002)Asn-Gln(0028), readily enters HeLa cells and accumulates at discrete loci in the nucleus. FITC-labeled dengue synthetic peptides colocalize with Low Density Lipoprotein-CM-DiI and Apo E-CM-DiI to a degree that suggests that Dengue viruses may utilize cell entry pathways used by LLPs.

  7. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Juan; Romo, Jamie; McWhorter, Troy; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    2016-01-01

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1–4 (DENV1–4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a qualitative assessment of cell binding and entry capacity using HeLa cells. DENV2 envelope peptide, Dsp2EP, 0564Gly-Gly0595, was shown to bind and remain at the cell surface. In contrast, DENV3 capsid protein peptide, Dsp3CP, 0002Asn-Gln0028, readily enters HeLa cells and accumulates at discrete loci in the nucleus. FITC-labeled dengue synthetic peptides colocalize with Low Density Lipoprotein-CM-DiI and Apo E-CM-DiI to a degree that suggests that Dengue viruses may utilize cell entry pathways used by LLPs. PMID:27123468

  8. Genetic identification of multiple biological roles associated with the capsid protein of satellite panicum mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, W; Scholthof, K B

    2001-01-01

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV), an 824-nucleotide, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus, depends on Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) for replication and spread in host plants. Compared with PMV infection alone, symptoms are intensified and develop faster on millet plants infected with SPMV and PMV. SPMV encodes a 157 amino acid capsid protein (CP) (17.5 kDa) to encapsidate SPMV RNA and form T = 1 satellite virions. The present study identifies additional biological activities of the SPMV CP, including the induction of severe chlorosis on proso millet plants (Panicum miliaceum cv. Sunup or Red Turghai). Initial deletion mutagenesis experiments mapped the chlorosis-inducing domain to amino acids 50 to 157 on the C-terminal portion of the SPMV CP. More defined analyses revealed that amino acids 124 to 135 comprised a critical domain associated with chlorosis induction and virion formation, whereas the extreme C-terminal residues 148 to 157 were not strictly essential for either role. The results also demonstrated that the absence of SPMV CP tended to stimulate the accumulation of defective RNAs. This suggests that the SPMV CP plays a significant role in maintaining the structural integrity of the full-length satellite virus RNA and harbors multiple functions associated with pathogenesis in SPMV-infected host plants.

  9. Nuclear import strategies of high-risk HPV18 L2 minor capsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, K.; Daley, J.; Darshan, M.S.; Bordeaux, J.; Moroianu, J. . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2006-08-15

    We have investigated the nuclear import strategies of high-risk HPV18 L2 minor capsid protein. HPV18 L2 interacts with Kap {alpha}{sub 2} adapter, and Kap {beta}{sub 2} and Kap {beta}{sub 3} nuclear import receptors. Moreover, binding of RanGTP to either Kap {beta}{sub 2} or Kap {beta}{sub 3} inhibits their interaction with L2, suggesting that these Kap {beta}/L2 complexes are import competent. Mapping studies show that HPV18 L2 contains two NLSs: in the N-terminus (nNLS) and in the C-terminus (cNLS), both of which can independently mediate nuclear import. Both nNLS and cNLS form a complex with Kap {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} heterodimer and mediate nuclear import via a classical pathway. The nNLS is also essential for the interaction of HPV18 L2 with Kap {beta}{sub 2} and Kap {beta}{sub 3}. Interestingly, both nNLS and cNLS interact with the viral DNA and this DNA binding occurs without nucleotide sequence specificity. Together, the data suggest that HPV18 L2 can interact via its NLSs with several Kaps and the viral DNA and may enter the nucleus via multiple import pathways mediated by Kap {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 1} heterodimers, Kap {beta}{sub 2} and Kap {beta}{sub 3}.

  10. Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Assembly-Activating Protein Is Not an Essential Requirement for Capsid Assembly of AAV Serotypes 4, 5, and 11.

    PubMed

    Earley, Lauriel F; Powers, John M; Adachi, Kei; Baumgart, Joshua T; Meyer, Nancy L; Xie, Qing; Chapman, Michael S; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have made great progress in their use for gene therapy; however, fundamental aspects of AAV's capsid assembly remain poorly characterized. In this regard, the discovery of assembly-activating protein (AAP) sheds new light on this crucial part of AAV biology and vector production. Previous studies have shown that AAP is essential for assembly; however, how its mechanistic roles in assembly might differ among AAV serotypes remains uncharacterized. Here, we show that biological properties of AAPs and capsid assembly processes are surprisingly distinct among AAV serotypes 1 to 12. In the study, we investigated subcellular localizations and assembly-promoting functions of AAP1 to -12 (i.e., AAPs derived from AAV1 to -12, respectively) and examined the AAP dependence of capsid assembly processes of these 12 serotypes using combinatorial approaches that involved immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, barcode-Seq (i. e., a high-throughput quantitative method using DNA barcodes and a next-generation sequencing technology), and quantitative dot blot assays. This study revealed that AAP1 to -12 are all localized in the nucleus with serotype-specific differential patterns of nucleolar association; AAPs and assembled capsids do not necessarily colocalize; AAPs are promiscuous in promoting capsid assembly of other serotypes, with the exception of AAP4, -5, -11, and -12; assembled AAV5, -8, and -9 capsids are excluded from the nucleolus, in contrast to the nucleolar enrichment of assembled AAV2 capsids; and, surprisingly, AAV4, -5, and -11 capsids are not dependent on AAP for assembly. These observations highlight the serotype-dependent heterogeneity of the capsid assembly process and challenge current notions about the role of AAP and the nucleolus in capsid assembly.

  11. Annexin II binds to capsid protein VP1 of enterovirus 71 and enhances viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Lin; Chou, Ying-Ting; Wu, Cheng-Nan; Ho, Mei-Shang

    2011-11-01

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which is mostly self-limited but may be complicated with a severe to fatal neurological syndrome in some children. Understanding the molecular basis of virus-host interactions might help clarify the largely unknown neuropathogenic mechanisms of EV71. In this study, we showed that human annexin II (Anx2) protein could bind to the EV71 virion via the capsid protein VP1. Either pretreatment of EV71 with soluble recombinant Anx2 or pretreatment of host cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody could result in reduced viral attachment to the cell surface and a reduction of the subsequent virus yield in vitro. HepG2 cells, which do not express Anx2, remained permissive to EV71 infection, though the virus yield was lower than that for a cognate lineage expressing Anx2. Stable transfection of plasmids expressing Anx2 protein into HepG2 cells (HepG2-Anx2 cells) could enhance EV71 infectivity, with an increased virus yield, especially at a low infective dose, and the enhanced infectivity could be reversed by pretreating HepG2-Anx2 cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody. The Anx2-interacting domain was mapped by yeast two-hybrid analysis to VP1 amino acids 40 to 100, a region different from the known receptor binding domain on the surface of the picornavirus virion. Our data suggest that binding of EV71 to Anx2 on the cell surface can enhance viral entry and infectivity, especially at a low infective dose.

  12. Identification of two neutralization epitopes on the capsid protein of avian hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E-M; Guo, H; Huang, F F; Sun, Z F; Meng, X J

    2008-02-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV, the causative agent of hepatitis E. To identify the neutralizing epitopes on the capsid (ORF2) protein of avian HEV, four mAbs (7B2, 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10) against recombinant avian HEV ORF2 protein were generated. mAbs 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 blocked each other for binding to avian HEV ORF2 protein in a competitive ELISA, whereas 5G10 did not block the other mAbs, suggesting that 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2 recognize the same or overlapping epitopes and 5G10 recognizes a different one. The epitopes recognized by 7B2, 1E11 and 10A2, and by 5G10 were mapped by Western blotting between aa 513 and 570, and between aa 476 and 513, respectively. mAbs 1E11, 10A2 and 5G10 were shown to bind to avian HEV particles in vitro, although only 5G10 reacted to viral antigens in transfected LMH cells. To assess the neutralizing activities of the mAbs, avian HEV was incubated in vitro with each mAb before inoculation into specific-pathogen-free chickens. Both viraemia and faecal virus shedding were delayed in chickens inoculated with the mixtures of avian HEV and 1E11, 10A2 or 5G10, suggesting that these three mAbs partially neutralize avian HEV.

  13. Engineering Bacterial Surface Displayed Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins: A Novel System to Explore Interaction Between Norovirus and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Mengya; Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Peng; Gao, Zhiyong; Wang, Dapeng; Shi, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are major contributors to acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks. Many aspects of HuNoVs are poorly understood due to both the current inability to culture HuNoVs, and the lack of efficient small animal models. Surrogates for HuNoVs, such as recombinant viral like particles (VLPs) expressed in eukaryotic system or P particles expressed in prokaryotic system, have been used for studies in immunology and interaction between the virus and its receptors. However, it is difficult to use VLPs or P particles to collect or isolate potential ligands binding to these recombinant capsid proteins. In this study, a new strategy was used to collect HuNoVs binding ligands through the use of ice nucleation protein (INP) to display recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs on bacterial surfaces. The viral protein-ligand complex could be easily separated by a low speed centrifugation step. This system was also used to explore interaction between recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs and their receptors. In this system, the VP1 capsid encoding gene (ORF2) and the protruding domain (P domain) encoding gene (3′ terminal fragment of ORF2) of HuNoVs GI.1 and GII.4 were fused with 5′ terminal fragment of INP encoding gene (inaQn). The results demonstrated that the recombinant VP1 and P domains of HuNoVs were expressed and anchored on the surface of Escherichia coli BL21 cells after the bacteria were transformed with the corresponding plasmids. Both cell surface displayed VP1 and P domains could be recognized by HuNoVs specific antibodies and interact with the viral histo-blood group antigens receptors. In both cases, displayed P domains had better binding abilities than VP1. This new strategy of using displayed HuNoVs capsid proteins on the bacterial surface could be utilized to separate HuNoVs binding components from complex samples, to investigate interaction between the virus and its receptors, as well as to develop an oral vaccine for HuNoVs. PMID

  14. Identification of the Neutralizing Epitopes of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Major Capsid Protein within the BC and EF Surface Loops

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Maxime J. J.; Nicol, Jérôme T. J.; Samimi, Mahtab; Arnold, Françoise; Cazal, Raphael; Ballaire, Raphaelle; Mercey, Olivier; Gonneville, Hélène; Combelas, Nicolas; Vautherot, Jean-Francois; Moreau, Thierry; Lorette, Gérard; Coursaget, Pierre; Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is the first polyomavirus clearly associated with a human cancer, i.e. the Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Polyomaviruses are small naked DNA viruses that induce a robust polyclonal antibody response against the major capsid protein (VP1). However, the polyomavirus VP1 capsid protein epitopes have not been identified to date. The aim of this study was to identify the neutralizing epitopes of the MCPyV capsid. For this goal, four VP1 mutants were generated by insertional mutagenesis in the BC, DE, EF and HI loops between amino acids 88-89, 150-151, 189-190, and 296-297, respectively. The reactivity of these mutants and wild-type VLPs was then investigated with anti-VP1 monoclonal antibodies and anti-MCPyV positive human sera. The findings together suggest that immunodominant conformational neutralizing epitopes are present at the surface of the MCPyV VLPs and are clustered within BC and EF loops. PMID:25812141

  15. The C Terminus of the Herpes Simplex Virus UL25 Protein Is Required for Release of Viral Genomes from Capsids Bound to Nuclear Pores.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Jamie B; Daniel, Gina R; Falck-Pedersen, Erik; Huet, Alexis; Smith, Greg A; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2017-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) capsid is released into the cytoplasm after fusion of viral and host membranes, whereupon dynein-dependent trafficking along microtubules targets it to the nuclear envelope. Binding of the capsid to the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by the capsid protein pUL25 and the capsid-tethered tegument protein pUL36. Temperature-sensitive mutants in both pUL25 and pUL36 dock at the NPC but fail to release DNA. The uncoating reaction has been difficult to study due to the rapid release of the genome once the capsid interacts with the nuclear pore. In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a truncation mutant of pUL25. Live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the mutant was not impaired in penetration of the host cell or in trafficking of the capsid to the nuclear membrane. However, expression of viral proteins was absent or significantly delayed in cells infected with the pUL25 mutant virus. Transmission electron microscopy revealed capsids accumulated at nuclear pores that retained the viral genome for at least 4 h postinfection. In addition, cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of virion capsids did not detect any obvious differences in the location or structural organization for the pUL25 or pUL36 proteins on the pUL25 mutant capsids. Further, in contrast to wild-type virus, the antiviral response mediated by the viral DNA-sensing cyclic guanine adenine synthase (cGAS) was severely compromised for the pUL25 mutant. These results demonstrate that the pUL25 capsid protein has a critical role in releasing viral DNA from NPC-bound capsids.IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. Early steps in infection include release of the capsid into the cytoplasm, docking of the capsid at a nuclear pore, and release of the viral genome into the nucleus

  16. Thermostabilizing Mutations in Reovirus Outer-Capsid Protein μ1 Selected by Heat Inactivation of Infectious Subvirion Particles

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Jason K.; Agosto, Melina A.; Severson, Tonya F.; Yin, John; Nibert, Max L.

    2007-01-01

    The 76-kDa μ1 protein of nonfusogenic mammalian reovirus is a major component of the virion outer capsid, which contains 200 μ1 trimers arranged in an incomplete T=13 lattice. In virions, μ1 is largely covered by a second major outer-capsid protein, σ3, which limits μ1 conformational mobility. In infectious subvirion particles, from which σ3 has been removed, μ1 is broadly exposed on the surface and can be promoted to rearrange into a protease-sensitive and hydrophobic conformer, leading to membrane perforation or penetration. In this study, mutants that resisted loss of infectivity upon heat inactivation (heat-resistant mutants) were selected from infectious subvirion particles of reovirus strains Type 1 Lang and Type 3 Dearing. All of the mutants were found to have mutations in μ1, and the heat-resistance phenotype was mapped to μ1 by both recoating and reassortant genetics. Heat-resistant mutants were also resistant to rearrangement to the protease-sensitive conformer of μ1, suggesting that heat inactivation is associated with μ1 rearrangement, consistent with published results. Rate constants of heat inactivation were determined, and the dependence of inactivation rate on temperature was consistent with the Arrhenius relationship. The Gibbs free energy of activation was calculated with reference to transition-state theory and was found to be correlated with the degree of heat resistance in each of the analyzed mutants. The mutations are located in upper portions of the μ1 trimer, near intersubunit contacts either within or between trimers in the viral outer capsid. We propose that the mutants stabilize the outer capsid by interfering with unwinding of the μ1 trimer. PMID:17208266

  17. Piscine reovirus encodes a cytotoxic, non-fusogenic, integral membrane protein and previously unrecognized virion outer-capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Key, Tim; Read, Jolene; Nibert, Max L; Duncan, Roy

    2013-05-01

    Piscine reovirus (PRV) is a tentative new member of the family Reoviridae and has been linked to heart and skeletal muscle inflammation in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Recent sequence-based evidence suggests that PRV is about equally related to members of the genera Orthoreovirus and Aquareovirus. Sequence similarities have also suggested that PRV might encode a fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein, which in turn suggests that PRV might be the prototype of a new genus with syncytium-inducing potential. In previous support of this designation has been the absence of identifiable PRV-encoded homologues of either the virion outer-clamp protein of ortho- and aquareoviruses or the virion outer-fibre protein of most orthoreoviruses. In the current report, we have provided experimental evidence that the putative p13 FAST protein of PRV lacks the defining feature of the FAST protein family - the ability to induce syncytium formation. Instead, p13 is the first example of a cytosolic, integral membrane protein encoded by ortho- or aquareoviruses, and induces cytotoxicity in the absence of cell-cell fusion. Sequence analysis also identified signature motifs of the outer-clamp and outer-fibre proteins of other reoviruses in two of the predicted PRV gene products. Based on these findings, we conclude that PRV does not encode a FAST protein and is therefore unlikely to be a new fusogenic reovirus. The presence of a novel integral membrane protein and two previously unrecognized, essential outer-capsid proteins has important implications for the biology, evolution and taxonomic classification of this virus.

  18. Separate Basic Region Motifs within the Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Proteins Are Essential for Infectivity and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Grieger, Joshua C.; Snowdy, Stephen; Samulski, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is gaining momentum as a gene therapy vector for human applications. However, there remain impediments to the development of this virus as a vector. One of these is the incomplete understanding of the biology of the virus, including nuclear targeting of the incoming virion during initial infection, as well as assembly of progeny virions from structural components in the nucleus. Toward this end, we have identified four basic regions (BR) on the AAV2 capsid that represent possible nuclear localization sequence (NLS) motifs. Mutagenesis of BR1 (120QAKKRVL126) and BR2 (140PGKKRPV146) had minor effects on viral infectivity (∼4- and ∼10-fold, respectively), whereas BR3 (166PARKRLN172) and BR4 (307RPKRLN312) were found to be essential for infectivity and virion assembly, respectively. Mutagenesis of BR3, which is located in Vp1 and Vp2 capsid proteins, does not interfere with viral production or trafficking of intact AAV capsids to the nuclear periphery but does inhibit transfer of encapsidated DNA into the nucleus. Substitution of the canine parvovirus NLS rescued the BR3 mutant to wild-type (wt) levels, supporting the role of an AAV NLS motif. In addition, rAAV2 containing a mutant form of BR3 in Vp1 and a wt BR3 in Vp2 was found to be infectious, suggesting that the function of BR3 is redundant between Vp1 and Vp2 and that Vp2 may play a role in infectivity. Mutagenesis of BR4 was found to inhibit virion assembly in the nucleus of transfected cells. This affect was not completely due to the inefficient nuclear import of capsid subunits based on Western blot analysis. In fact, aberrant capsid foci were observed in the cytoplasm of transfected cells, compared to the wild type, suggesting a defect in early viral assembly or trafficking. Using three-dimensional structural analysis, the lysine- and arginine-to-asparagine change disrupts hydrogen bonding between these basic residues and adjacent beta strand glutamine residues that may

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to reovirus reveal structure/function relationships between capsid proteins and genetics of susceptibility to antibody action.

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, H W; Mann, M A; Fields, B N; Tyler, K L

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen newly isolated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were used to study relationships between reovirus outer capsid proteins sigma 3, mu 1c, and lambda 2 (core spike) and the cell attachment protein sigma 1. We focused on sigma 1-associated properties of serotype specificity and hemagglutination (HA). Competition between MAbs revealed two surface epitopes on mu 1c that were highly conserved between reovirus serotype 1 Lang (T1L) and serotype 3 Dearing (T3D). There were several differences between T1L and T3D sigma 3 epitope maps. Studies using T1L x T3D reassortants showed that primary sequence differences between T1L and T3D sigma 3 proteins accounted for differences in sigma 3 epitope maps. Four of 12 non-sigma 1 MAbs showed a serotype-associated pattern of binding to 25 reovirus field isolates. Thus, for reovirus field isolates, different sigma 1 proteins are associated with preferred epitopes on other outer capsid proteins. Further evidence for a close structural and functional interrelationship between sigma 3/mu 1c and sigma 1 included (i) inhibition by sigma 3 and mu 1c MAbs of sigma 1-mediated HA, (ii) enhancement of sigma 1-mediated HA by proteolytic cleavage of sigma 3 and mu 1c, and (iii) genetic studies demonstrating that sigma 1 controlled the capacity of sigma 3 MAbs to inhibit HA. These data suggest that (i) epitopes on sigma 3 and mu 1c lie in close proximity to sigma 1 and that MAbs to these epitopes can modulate sigma 1-mediated functions, (ii) these spatial relationships have functional significance, since removal of sigma 3 and/or cleavage of mu 1c to delta can enhance sigma 1 function, (iii) in nature, the sigma 1 protein places selective constraints on the epitope structure of the other capsid proteins, and (iv) viral susceptibility to antibody action can be determined by genes other than that encoding an antibody's epitope. PMID:1719233

  20. Expression of viral polymerase and phosphorylation of core protein determine core and capsid localization of the human hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Deroubaix, Aurélie; Osseman, Quentin; Cassany, Aurélia; Bégu, Dominique; Ragues, Jessica; Kassab, Somar; Lainé, Sébastien; Kann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biopsies from patients show that hepadnaviral core proteins and capsids - collectively called core - are found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. In the majority of studies, cytoplasmic core localization is related to low viraemia while nuclear core localization is associated with high viral loads. In order to better understand the molecular interactions leading to core localization, we analysed transfected hepatoma cells using immune fluorescence microscopy. We observed that expression of core protein in the absence of other viral proteins led to nuclear localization of core protein and capsids, while expression of core in the context of the other viral proteins resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. Analysis of which viral partner was responsible for cytoplasmic retention indicated that the HBx, surface proteins and HBeAg had no impact but that the viral polymerase was the major determinant. Further analysis revealed that ϵ, an RNA structure to which the viral polymerase binds, was essential for cytoplasmic retention. Furthermore, we showed that core protein phosphorylation at Ser 164 was essential for the cytoplasmic core localization phenotype, which is likely to explain differences observed between individual cells.

  1. Long-term Correction of Very Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Mice Using AAV9 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Allison M; Conlon, Thomas; Walter, Glenn; Zeng, Huadong; Shaffer, Scott A; Dungtao, Fu; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Tang, Qiushi; Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-01-01

    Very long-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is the rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. VLCAD-deficient mice and patients clinical symptoms stem from not only an energy deficiency but also long-chain metabolite accumulations. VLCAD-deficient mice were treated systemically with 1 × 1012 vector genomes of recombinant adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9)-VLCAD. Biochemical correction was observed in vector-treated mice beginning 2 weeks postinjection, as characterized by a significant drop in long-chain fatty acyl accumulates in whole blood after an overnight fast. Changes persisted through the termination point around 20 weeks postinjection. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) revealed normalization of intramuscular lipids in treated animals. Correction was not observed in liver tissue extracts, but cardiac muscle extracts showed significant reduction of long-chain metabolites. Disease-specific phenotypes were characterized, including thermoregulation and maintenance of euglycemia after a fasting cold challenge. Internal body temperatures of untreated VLCAD−/− mice dropped below 20 °C and the mice became lethargic, requiring euthanasia. In contrast, all rAAV9-treated VLCAD−/− mice and the wild-type controls maintained body temperatures. rAAV9-treated VLCAD−/− mice maintained euglycemia, whereas untreated VLCAD−/− mice suffered hypoglycemia following a fasting cold challenge. These promising results suggest rAAV9 gene therapy as a potential treatment for VLCAD deficiency in humans. PMID:22395529

  2. In Vitro Dynamic Visualization Analysis of Fluorescently Labeled Minor Capsid Protein IX and Core Protein V by Simultaneous Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ugai, Hideyo; Wang, Minghui; Le, Long P.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses represent a promising therapeutic medicine for human cancer therapy, but successful translation to human clinical trials requires careful evaluation of these viral characteristics. While the function of the adenovirus proteins have been analyzed in detail, the dynamics of adenovirus infection remain largely unknown due to technological constraints which prevent adequate tracking of the adenovirus particles after infection. Fluorescent labeling of the adenoviral particles is one new strategy designed to directly analyze dynamic processes of viral infection in virus-host cell interactions. We hypothesized that the double labeling technique of adenovirus with fluorescent proteins would allow us to properly analyze intracellular viruses and the fate of viral proteins in live analysis of adenovirus as compared to a single labeling. Thus, we generated a fluorescently labeled adenovirus with both a red fluorescent minor capsid protein IX (pIX-mRFP1) and a green fluorescent minor core protein V (pV-EGFP), resulting in Ad5-IX-mRFP1-E3-V-EGFP. The fluorescent signals for pIX-mRFP1 and pV-EGFP were detected within 10 min in living cells. However, the growth curve analysis of Ad5-IX-mRFP1-E3-V-EGFP showed approximately 150-fold reduced production of the viral progeny at 48 hours post-infection (h.p.i.) as compared to Ad5. Interestingly, pIX-mRFP1 and pV-EGFP were initially localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleolus, respectively, at 18 h.p.i. These proteins were observed in the nucleus during the late stage of infection and the relocalization of the proteins was observed in an adenoviral replication-dependent manner. These results indicate that the simultaneous detection of adenovirus using dual-fluorescent proteins is suitable for real-time analysis, including identification of infected cells, and monitoring viral spread, which will be required for complete evaluation of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:19853616

  3. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-01-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges. PMID:8764013

  4. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-08-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges.

  5. Dengue Virus Uses a Non-Canonical Function of the Host GBF1-Arf-COPI System for Capsid Protein Accumulation on Lipid Droplets.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Nestor G; Mondotte, Juan A; Byk, Laura A; De Maio, Federico A; Samsa, Marcelo M; Alvarez, Cecilia; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2015-09-01

    Dengue viruses cause the most important human viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. In recent years, a great deal has been learned about molecular details of dengue virus genome replication; however, little is known about genome encapsidation and the functions of the viral capsid protein. During infection, dengue virus capsid progressively accumulates around lipid droplets (LDs) by an unknown mechanism. Here, we examined the process by which the viral capsid is transported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, where the protein is synthesized, to LDs. Using different methods of intervention, we found that the GBF1-Arf1/Arf4-COPI pathway is necessary for capsid transport to LDs, while the process is independent of both COPII components and Golgi integrity. The transport was sensitive to Brefeldin A, while a drug resistant form of GBF1 was sufficient to restore capsid subcellular distribution in infected cells. The mechanism by which LDs gain or lose proteins is still an open question. Our results support a model in which the virus uses a non-canonical function of the COPI system for capsid accumulation on LDs, providing new ideas for antiviral strategies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cellular Transcription Factor Sp1 Recruits Simian Virus 40 Capsid Proteins to the Viral Packaging Signal, ses

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Ben-Nun-Shaul, Orly; Roitman, Vered; Yosef, Yael; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2002-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) capsid assembly occurs in the nucleus. All three capsid proteins bind DNA nonspecifically, raising the dilemma of how they attain specificity to the SV40 minichromosome in the presence of a large excess of genomic DNA. The SV40 packaging signal, ses, which is required for assembly, is composed of multiple DNA elements that bind transcription factor Sp1. Our previous studies showed that Sp1 participates in SV40 assembly and that it cooperates in DNA binding with VP2/3. We hypothesized that Sp1 recruits the capsid proteins to the viral minichromosome, conferring upon them specific DNA recognition. Here, we have tested the hypothesis. Computer analysis showed that the combination of six tandem GC boxes at ses is not found at cellular promoters and therefore is unique to SV40. Cooperativity in DNA binding between Sp1 and VP2/3 was not abolished at even a 1,000-fold excess of cellular DNA, providing strong support for the recruitment hypothesis. Sp1 also binds VP1 and cooperates with VP1 in DNA binding. VP1 pentamers (VP15) avidly interact with VP2/3, utilizing the same VP2/3 domain as described for polyomavirus. We conclude that VP15-VP2/3 building blocks are recruited by Sp1 to ses, where they form the nucleation center for capsid assembly. By this mechanism the virus ensures that capsid formation is initiated at a single site around its minichromosome. Sp1 enhances the formation of SV40 pseudovirions in vitro, providing additional support for the model. Analyses of Sp1 and VP3 deletion mutants showed that Sp1 and VP2/3 bind one another and cooperate in DNA binding through their DNA-binding domains, with additional contacts outside these domains. VP1 contacts Sp1 at residues outside the Sp1 DNA-binding domain. These and additional data allowed us to propose a molecular model for the VP15-VP2/3-DNA-Sp1 complex. PMID:12021324

  7. The SD1 Subdomain of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Capsid Protein Plays a Critical Role in Nucleocapsid and Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Josephine M.; Lulla, Valeria; Kim, Dal Young; Frolova, Elena I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an important human and animal pathogen, for which no safe and efficient vaccines or therapeutic means have been developed. Viral particle assembly and budding processes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. However, our understanding of the mechanistic process of VEEV assembly, RNA encapsidation, and the roles of different capsid-specific domains in these events remain to be described. The results of this new study demonstrate that the very amino-terminal VEEV capsid-specific subdomain SD1 is a critical player in the particle assembly process. It functions in a virus-specific mode, and its deletion, mutation, or replacement by the same subdomain derived from other alphaviruses has strong negative effects on infectious virus release. VEEV variants with mutated SD1 accumulate adaptive mutations in both SD1 and SD2, which result in a more efficiently replicating phenotype. Moreover, efficient nucleocapsid and particle assembly proceeds only when the two subdomains, SD1 and SD2, are derived from the same alphavirus. These two subdomains together appear to form the central core of VEEV nucleocapsids, and their interaction is one of the driving forces of virion assembly and budding. The similar domain structures of alphavirus capsid proteins suggest that this new knowledge can be applied to other alphaviruses. IMPORTANCE Alphaviruses are a group of human and animal pathogens which cause periodic outbreaks of highly debilitating diseases. Despite significant progress made in understanding the overall structure of alphavirus and VEEV virions, and glycoprotein spikes in particular, the mechanistic process of nucleocapsid assembly, RNA encapsidation, and the roles of different capsid-specific domains in these processes remain to be described. Our new data demonstrate that the very amino-terminal subdomain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus capsid protein, SD1, plays a critical role in the

  8. Pre-clinical immunogenicity of human papillomavirus alpha-7 and alpha-9 major capsid proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Sara L.; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Draper, Eve; Godi, Anna; Wilkinson, Dianna E.; Minor, Philip; Page, Mark; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer protection against the oncogenic genotypes HPV16 and HPV18 through the generation of type-specific neutralizing antibodies raised against the constituent virus-like particles (VLP) based upon the major capsid proteins (L1) of these genotypes. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39, HPV45, HPV59, HPV68) species groups. The mechanism of cross-protection is unclear but may involve antibodies capable of recognizing shared inter-genotype epitopes. The relationship(s) between the genetic and antigenic diversity of the L1 protein, particularly for non-vaccine genotypes, is poorly understood. We carried out a comprehensive evaluation of the immunogenicity of L1 VLP derived from genotypes within the Alpha-7 and Alpha-9 species groups in New Zealand White rabbits and used L1L2 pseudoviruses as the target antigens in neutralization assays. The majority antibody response against L1 VLP was type-specific, as expected, but several instances of robust cross-neutralization were nevertheless observed including between HPV33 and HPV58 within the Alpha-9 species and between HPV39, HPV59 and HPV68 in the Alpha-7 species. Immunization with an experimental tetravalent preparation comprising VLP based upon HPV16, HPV18, HPV39 and HPV58 was capable of generating neutralizing antibodies against all the Alpha-7 and Alpha-9 genotypes. Competition of HPV31 and HPV33 cross-neutralizing antibodies in the tetravalent sera confirmed that these antibodies originated from HPV16 and HPV58 VLP, respectively, and suggested that they represent minority specificities within the antibody repertoire generated by the immunizing antigen. These data improve our understanding of the antigenic diversity of the L1 protein per se and may inform the rational design of a next generation vaccine formulation based upon

  9. Characterization of Two Novel Linear B-Cell Epitopes in the Capsid Protein of Avian Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) That Are Common to Avian, Swine, and Human HEVs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinjie; Zhao, Qin; Dang, Lu; Sun, Yani; Gao, Jiming; Liu, Baoyuan; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Tao, Hu; Zhang, Gaiping; Luo, Jianxun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antisera raised against the avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein are cross-reactive with human and swine HEV capsid proteins. In this study, two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the avian HEV capsid protein, namely, 3E8 and 1B5, were shown to cross-react with the swine HEV capsid protein. The motifs involved in binding both MAbs were identified and characterized using phage display biopanning, peptide synthesis, and truncated or mutated protein expression, along with indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The results showed that the I/VPHD motif is a necessary core sequence and that P and H are two key amino acids for recognition by MAb 3E8. The VKLYM/TS motif is the minimal amino acid sequence necessary for recognition by MAb 1B5. Cross-reactivity between the two epitopes and antibodies against avian, swine, and human HEVs in sera showed that both epitopes are common to avian, swine, and human HEVs. In addition, amino acid sequence alignment of the capsid proteins revealed that the key motifs of both novel epitopes are the same in HEVs from different animal species, predicting that they may be common to HEV isolates from boars, rabbits, rats, ferrets, mongooses, deer, and camels as well. Protein modeling analysis showed that both epitopes are at least partially exposed on the surface of the HEV capsid protein. Protective capacity analysis demonstrated that the two epitopes are nonprotective against avian HEV infection in chickens. Collectively, these studies characterize two novel linear B-cell epitopes common to avian, swine, and human HEVs, which furthers the understanding of HEV capsid protein antigenic structure. IMPORTANCE More and more evidence indicates that the host range diversity of hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a global public health concern. A better understanding of the antigenic structure of the HEV capsid protein may improve disease diagnosis and prevention. In this study, binding site mapping and

  10. Chirality of Viral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavaram, Sanjay; Xie, Fangming; Bruinsma, Robijn; Klug, William; Rudnick, Joseph

    Most icosahedral viruses are classified by their T-number which identifies their capsid in terms of the number of capsomers and their relative arrangement. Certain T-numbers (T = 7 for instance) are inherently chiral (with no reflection planes) while others (e.g. T = 1) are achiral. We present a Landau-Brazovskii (LB) theory for weak crystallization in which a scalar order parameter that measures density of capsid proteins successfully predicts the various observed T-numbers and their respective chiralities. We find that chiral capsids gain stability by spontaneously breaking symmetry from an unstable chiral state. The inherently achiral LB-free energy does not preferentially select a particular chiral state from its mirror reflection. Based on the physical observation that proteins are inherently chiral molecules with directional interactions, we propose a new chiral term to the LB energy as a possible selection mechanism for chirality.

  11. Preferred transduction with AAV8 and AAV9 via thalamic administration in the MPS IIIB model: A comparison of four rAAV serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J.A.; Bloom, M.D.; Heldermon, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. Since early therapeutic intervention is likely to yield the most efficacious results, we sought to determine the possible therapeutic utility of rAAV in early gene therapy based interventions. Currently, the application of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is one of the most widely used gene transfer systems, and represents a promising approach in the treatment of MPS IIIB. From a translational standpoint, a minimally invasive, yet highly efficient method of vector administration is ideal. The thalamus is thought to be the switchboard for signal relay in the central nervous system (CNS) and therefore represents an attractive target. To identify an optimal AAV vector for early therapeutic intervention, and establish whether thalamic administration represents a feasible therapeutic approach, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four green fluorescent protein (GFP) bearing rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10, administered bilaterally into the thalamus. Of the four serotypes compared, AAV8 and -9 proved superior to AAV5 and -rh10 both in biodistribution and transduction efficiency profiles. Genotype differences in transduction efficiency and biodistribution patterns were also observed. Importantly, we conclude that AAV8 and to a lesser extent, AAV9 represent preferable candidates for early gene therapy based intervention in the treatment of MPS IIIB. We also highlight the feasibility of thalamic rAAV administration, and conclude that this method results in moderate rAAV biodistribution with limited treatment capacity, thus suggesting a need for alternate methods of vector delivery. PMID:27014573

  12. Preferred transduction with AAV8 and AAV9 via thalamic administration in the MPS IIIB model: A comparison of four rAAV serotypes.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-03-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. Since early therapeutic intervention is likely to yield the most efficacious results, we sought to determine the possible therapeutic utility of rAAV in early gene therapy based interventions. Currently, the application of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is one of the most widely used gene transfer systems, and represents a promising approach in the treatment of MPS IIIB. From a translational standpoint, a minimally invasive, yet highly efficient method of vector administration is ideal. The thalamus is thought to be the switchboard for signal relay in the central nervous system (CNS) and therefore represents an attractive target. To identify an optimal AAV vector for early therapeutic intervention, and establish whether thalamic administration represents a feasible therapeutic approach, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four green fluorescent protein (GFP) bearing rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10, administered bilaterally into the thalamus. Of the four serotypes compared, AAV8 and -9 proved superior to AAV5 and -rh10 both in biodistribution and transduction efficiency profiles. Genotype differences in transduction efficiency and biodistribution patterns were also observed. Importantly, we conclude that AAV8 and to a lesser extent, AAV9 represent preferable candidates for early gene therapy based intervention in the treatment of MPS IIIB. We also highlight the feasibility of thalamic rAAV administration, and conclude that this method results in moderate rAAV biodistribution with limited treatment capacity, thus suggesting a need for alternate methods of vector delivery.

  13. Conserved Tryptophan Motifs in the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Are Required for Efficient Secondary Envelopment of Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Lyudmila; Buch, Anna; Döhner, Katinka; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Prank, Ute; Sandbaumhüter, Malte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replicates in the skin and mucous membranes, and initiates lytic or latent infections in sensory neurons. Assembly of progeny virions depends on the essential large tegument protein pUL36 of 3,164 amino acid residues that links the capsids to the tegument proteins pUL37 and VP16. Of the 32 tryptophans of HSV-1-pUL36, the tryptophan-acidic motifs 1766WD1767 and 1862WE1863 are conserved in all HSV-1 and HSV-2 isolates. Here, we characterized the role of these motifs in the HSV life cycle since the rare tryptophans often have unique roles in protein function due to their large hydrophobic surface. The infectivity of the mutants HSV-1(17+)Lox-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA and HSV-1(17+)Lox-CheVP26-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA, in which the capsid has been tagged with the fluorescent protein Cherry, was significantly reduced. Quantitative electron microscopy shows that there were a larger number of cytosolic capsids and fewer enveloped virions compared to their respective parental strains, indicating a severe impairment in secondary capsid envelopment. The capsids of the mutant viruses accumulated in the perinuclear region around the microtubule-organizing center and were not dispersed to the cell periphery but still acquired the inner tegument proteins pUL36 and pUL37. Furthermore, cytoplasmic capsids colocalized with tegument protein VP16 and, to some extent, with tegument protein VP22 but not with the envelope glycoprotein gD. These results indicate that the unique conserved tryptophan-acidic motifs in the central region of pUL36 are required for efficient targeting of progeny capsids to the membranes of secondary capsid envelopment and for efficient virion assembly. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus infections give rise to severe animal and human diseases, especially in young, immunocompromised, and elderly individuals. The structural hallmark of herpesvirus virions is the tegument, which contains evolutionarily conserved proteins that are essential for several

  14. Conserved Tryptophan Motifs in the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Are Required for Efficient Secondary Envelopment of Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Lyudmila; Buch, Anna; Döhner, Katinka; Pohlmann, Anja; Binz, Anne; Prank, Ute; Sandbaumhüter, Malte; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replicates in the skin and mucous membranes, and initiates lytic or latent infections in sensory neurons. Assembly of progeny virions depends on the essential large tegument protein pUL36 of 3,164 amino acid residues that links the capsids to the tegument proteins pUL37 and VP16. Of the 32 tryptophans of HSV-1-pUL36, the tryptophan-acidic motifs (1766)WD(1767) and (1862)WE(1863) are conserved in all HSV-1 and HSV-2 isolates. Here, we characterized the role of these motifs in the HSV life cycle since the rare tryptophans often have unique roles in protein function due to their large hydrophobic surface. The infectivity of the mutants HSV-1(17(+))Lox-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA and HSV-1(17(+))Lox-CheVP26-pUL36-WD/AA-WE/AA, in which the capsid has been tagged with the fluorescent protein Cherry, was significantly reduced. Quantitative electron microscopy shows that there were a larger number of cytosolic capsids and fewer enveloped virions compared to their respective parental strains, indicating a severe impairment in secondary capsid envelopment. The capsids of the mutant viruses accumulated in the perinuclear region around the microtubule-organizing center and were not dispersed to the cell periphery but still acquired the inner tegument proteins pUL36 and pUL37. Furthermore, cytoplasmic capsids colocalized with tegument protein VP16 and, to some extent, with tegument protein VP22 but not with the envelope glycoprotein gD. These results indicate that the unique conserved tryptophan-acidic motifs in the central region of pUL36 are required for efficient targeting of progeny capsids to the membranes of secondary capsid envelopment and for efficient virion assembly. Herpesvirus infections give rise to severe animal and human diseases, especially in young, immunocompromised, and elderly individuals. The structural hallmark of herpesvirus virions is the tegument, which contains evolutionarily conserved proteins that are essential for several stages of

  15. The concentration of Ca2+ that solubilizes outer capsid proteins from rotavirus particles is dependent on the strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, M C; Charpilienne, A; Liprandi, F; Gajardo, R; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J

    1996-01-01

    It has been previously shown that rotavirus maturation and stability of the outer capsid are calcium-dependent processes. More recently, it has been hypothesized that penetration of the cell membrane is also affected by conformational changes of the capsid induced by Ca2+. In this study, we determined quantitatively the critical concentration of calcium ion that leads to solubilization of the outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7. Since this critical concentration is below or close to trace levels of Ca2+, we have used buffered solutions based on ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and Ca-EGTA. This method allowed us to show a very high variability of the free [Ca2+] needed to stabilize, at room temperature, the outer capsid of several rotavirus strains. This concentration is about 600 nM for the two bovine strains tested (RF and UK), 100 nM for the porcine strain OSU, and only 10 to 20 nM for the simian strain SA11. Titration of viral infectivity after incubation in buffer of defined [Ca2+] confirmed that the loss of infectivity occurs at different [Ca2+] for these three strains. For the bovine strain, the cleavage of VP4 by trypsin has no significant effect on the [Ca2+] that solubilizes outer shell proteins. The outer layer (VP7) of virus-like particles (VLP) made of recombinant proteins VP2, VP6, and VP7 (VLP2/6/7) was also solubilized by lowering the [Ca2+]. The critical concentration of Ca2+ needed to solubilize VP7 from VLP2/6/7 made of protein from the bovine strain is close to the concentration needed for the corresponding virus. Genetic analysis of this phenotype in a set of reassortant viruses from two parental strains having the phenotypes of strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) confirmed that this property of viral particles is probably associated with the gene coding for VP7. The analysis of VLP by reverse genetics might allow the identification of the region(s) essential for calcium binding. PMID:8763990

  16. Molecular evolution of the major capsid protein VP1 of enterovirus 70.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, N; Tanimura, M; Miyamura, K

    1994-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the genome RNA encoding capsid protein VP1 (918 nucleotides) of 18 enterovirus 70 (EV70) isolates collected from various parts of the world in 1971 to 1981 were determined, and nucleotide substitutions among them were studied. The genetic distances between isolates were calculated by the pairwise comparison of nucleotide difference. Regression analysis of the genetic distances against time of isolation of the strains showed that the synonymous substitution rate was very high at 21.53 x 10(-3) substitution per nucleotide per year, while the nonsynonymous rate was extremely low at 0.32 x 10(-3) substitution per nucleotide per year. The rate estimated by the average value of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions (W.-H. Li, C.-C. Wu, and C.-C. Luo, Mol. Biol. Evol. 2:150-174, 1985) was 5.00 x 10(-3) substitution per nucleotide per year. Taking the average value of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions as genetic distances between isolates, the phylogenetic tree was inferred by the unweighted pairwise grouping method of arithmetic average and by the neighbor-joining method. The tree indicated that the virus had evolved from one focal place, and the time of emergence was estimated to be August 1967 +/- 15 months, 2 years before first recognition of the pandemic of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis. By superimposing every nucleotide substitution on the branches of the phylogenetic tree, we analyzed nucleotide substitution patterns of EV70 genome RNA. In synonymous substitutions, the proportion of transitions, i.e., C<==>U and G<==>A, was found to be extremely frequent in comparison with that reported on other viruses or pseudogenes. In addition, parallel substitutions (independent substitutions at the same nucleotide position on different branches, i.e., different isolates, of the tree) were frequently found in both synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. These frequent parallel substitutions and the low nonsynonymous substitution rate

  17. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  18. A Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Physical-Chemical Properties of Calicivirus Capsid Protein Adsorption to Fomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeler, David; Matysiak, Silvina

    2013-03-01

    Any inanimate object with an exposed surface bears the possibility of hosting a virus and may therefore be labeled a fomite. This research hopes to distinguish which chemical-physical differences in fomite surface and virus capsid protein characteristics cause variations in virus adsorption through an alignment of in silico molecular dynamics simulations with in vitro measurements. The impact of surface chemistry on the adsorption of the human norovirus (HNV)-surrogate calicivirus capsid protein 2MS2 has been simulated for monomer and trimer structures and is reported in terms of protein-self assembled monolayer (SAM) binding free energy. The coarse-grained MARTINI forcefield was used to maximize spatial and temporal resolution while minimizing computational load. Future work will investigate the FCVF5 and SMSVS4 calicivirus trimers and will extend beyond hydrophobic and hydrophilic SAM surface chemistry to charged SAM surfaces in varying ionic concentrations. These results will be confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance experiments conducted by Dr. Wigginton at the University of Michigan. This should provide a novel method for predicting the transferability of viruses that cannot be studied in vitro such as dangerous foodborne and nosocomially-acquired viruses like HNV.

  19. Capsid size determination by Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPI1 involves specific incorporation of SaPI1 proteins into procapsids.

    PubMed

    Poliakov, Anton; Chang, Jenny R; Spilman, Michael S; Damle, Priyadarshan K; Christie, Gail E; Mobley, James A; Dokland, Terje

    2008-07-11

    The Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPI1 carries the gene for the toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1) and can be mobilized by infection with S. aureus helper phage 80alpha. SaPI1 depends on the helper phage for excision, replication and genome packaging. The SaPI1-transducing particles comprise proteins encoded by the helper phage, but have a smaller capsid commensurate with the smaller size of the SaPI1 genome. Previous studies identified only 80alpha-encoded proteins in mature SaPI1 virions, implying that the presumptive SaPI1 capsid size determination function(s) must act transiently during capsid assembly or maturation. In this study, 80alpha and SaPI1 procapsids were produced by induction of phage mutants lacking functional 80alpha or SaPI1 small terminase subunits. By cryo-electron microscopy, these procapsids were found to have a round shape and an internal scaffolding core. Mass spectrometry was used to identify all 80alpha-encoded structural proteins in 80alpha and SaPI1 procapsids, including several that had not previously been found in the mature capsids. In addition, SaPI1 procapsids contained at least one SaPI1-encoded protein that has been implicated genetically in capsid size determination. Mass spectrometry on full-length phage proteins showed that the major capsid protein and the scaffolding protein are N-terminally processed in both 80alpha and SaPI1 procapsids.

  20. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-09-16

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.

  1. Role of a Nuclear Localization Signal on the Minor Capsid Proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV Nuclear Entry

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Shauna M.; Zhao, Linbo; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. PMID:25463609

  2. Finding a needle in a haystack: detection of a small protein (the 12-kDa VP26) in a large complex (the 200-MDa capsid of herpes simplex virus).

    PubMed Central

    Booy, F P; Trus, B L; Newcomb, W W; Brown, J C; Conway, J F; Steven, A C

    1994-01-01

    Macromolecular complexes that consist of homopolymeric protein frameworks with additional proteins attached at strategic sites for a variety of structural and functional purposes are widespread in subcellular biology. One such complex is the capsid of herpes simplex virus type 1 whose basic framework consists of 960 copies of the viral protein, VP5 (149 kDa), arranged in an icosahedrally symmetric shell. This shell also contains major amounts of three other proteins, including VP26 (12 kDa), a small protein that is approximately equimolar with VP5 and accounts for approximately 6% of the capsid mass. With a view to inferring the role of VP26 in capsid assembly, we have localized it by quantitative difference imaging based on three-dimensional reconstructions calculated from cryo-electron micrographs. Purified capsids from which VP26 had been removed in vitro by treatment with guanidine hydrochloride were compared with preparations of the same depleted capsids to which purified VP26 had been rebound and with native (undepleted) capsids. The resulting three-dimensional density maps indicate that six VP26 subunits are distributed symmetrically around the outer tip of each hexon protrusion on VP26-containing capsids. Because VP26 may be readily dissociated from and reattached to the capsid, it does not appear to contribute significantly to structural stabilization. Rather, its exposed location suggests that VP26 may be involved in linking the capsid to the surrounding tegument and envelope at a later stage of viral assembly. Images PMID:8202543

  3. Lethal mutations in the major homology region and their suppressors act by modulating the dimerization of the rous sarcoma virus capsid protein C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Dalessio, Paula M; Craven, Rebecca C; Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Ropson, Ira J

    2013-02-01

    An infective retrovirus requires a mature capsid shell around the viral replication complex. This shell is formed by about 1500 capsid protein monomers, organized into hexamer and pentamer rings that are linked to each other by the dimerization of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The major homology region (MHR), the most highly conserved protein sequence across retroviral genomes, is part of the CTD. Several mutations in the MHR appear to block infectivity by preventing capsid formation. Suppressor mutations have been identified that are distant in sequence and structure from the MHR and restore capsid formation. The effects of two lethal and two suppressor mutations on the stability and function of the CTD were examined. No correlation with infectivity was found for the stability of the lethal mutations (D155Y-CTD, F167Y-CTD) and suppressor mutations (R185W-CTD, I190V-CTD). The stabilities of three double mutant proteins (D155Y/R185W-CTD, F167Y/R185W-CTD, and F167Y/I190V-CTD) were additive. However, the dimerization affinity of the mutant proteins correlated strongly with biological function. The CTD proteins with lethal mutations did not dimerize, while those with suppressor mutations had greater dimerization affinity than WT-CTD. The suppressor mutations were able to partially correct the dimerization defect caused by the lethal MHR mutations in double mutant proteins. Despite their dramatic effects on dimerization, none of these residues participate directly in the proposed dimerization interface in a mature capsid. These findings suggest that the conserved sequence of the MHR has critical roles in the conformation(s) of the CTD that are required for dimerization and correct capsid maturation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Lethal mutations in the major homology region and their suppressors act by modulating the dimerization of the Rous sarcoma virus capsid protein C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Dalessio, Paula M.; Craven, Rebecca C.; Lokhandwala, Parvez M.; Ropson, Ira J.

    2013-01-01

    An infective retrovirus requires a mature capsid shell around the viral replication complex. This shell is formed by about 1500 capsid protein monomers, organized into hexamer and pentamer rings that are linked to each other by the dimerization of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The major homology region (MHR), the most highly conserved protein sequence across retroviral genomes, is part of the CTD. Several mutations in the MHR appear to block infectivity by preventing capsid formation. Suppressor mutations have been identified that are distant in sequence and structure from the MHR and restore capsid formation. The effects of two lethal and two suppressor mutations on the stability and function of the CTD were examined. No correlation with infectivity was found for the stability of the lethal mutations (D155Y-CTD, F167Y-CTD) and suppressor mutations (R185W-CTD, F167Y-CTD). The stabilities of three double mutant proteins (D155Y/R185W-CTD, F167Y/R185W-CTD and F167Y/I190V-CTD) were additive. However, the dimerization affinity of the mutant proteins correlated strongly with biological function. The CTD proteins with lethal mutations did not dimerize, while those with suppressor mutations had greater dimerization affinity than WT-CTD. The suppressor mutations were able to partially correct the dimerization defect caused by the lethal MHR mutations in double mutant proteins. Despite their dramatic effects on dimerization, none of these residues participate directly in the proposed dimerization interface in a mature capsid. These findings suggest that the conserved sequence of the MHR has critical roles in the conformation(s) of the CTD that are required for dimerization and correct capsid maturation. PMID:23011855

  5. Total Chemical Synthesis of Dengue 2 Virus Capsid Protein via Native Chemical Ligation: Role of the Conserved Salt-bridge1

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Changyou; Zhao, Le; Chen, Xishan; Lu, Wei-Yue; Lu, Wuyuan

    2013-01-01

    The dengue capsid protein C is a highly basic alpha-helical protein of ~100 amino acid residues that forms an emphipathic homodimer to encapsidate the viral genome and to interact with viral membranes. The solution structure of dengue 2 capsid protein C (DEN2C) has been determined by NMR spectroscopy, revealing a large dimer interface formed almost exclusively by hydrophobic residues. The only acidic residue (Glu87) conserved in the capsid proteins of all four serotypes of dengue virus forms a salt bridge with the side chains of Lys45 and Arg55′. To understand the structural and functional significance of this conserved salt bridge, we chemically synthesized an N-terminally truncated form of DEN2C (WTDEN2C) and its salt bridge-void analog E87ADEN2C using the native chemical ligation technique developed by Kent and colleagues. Comparative biochemical and biophysical studies of these two synthetic proteins using circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, protein thermal denaturation, and proteolytic susceptibility assay demonstrated that the conserved salt bridge contributed to DEN2C dimerization and stability as well as its resistance to proteolytic degradation. Our work provided insight into the role of a fully conserved structural element of the dengue capsid protein C and paved the way for additional functional studies of this important viral protein. PMID:23673222

  6. Bacterial surface-displayed GII.4 human norovirus capsid proteins bound to surface of Romaine lettuce through HBGA-like molecules

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein (INP) mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein (G...

  7. Characterization of the antibody response against EV71 capsid proteins in Chinese individuals by NEIBM-ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yingying; Chen, Xuguang; Qian, Baohua; Wu, Guorong; He, Ting; Feng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Caixia; Wang, Lili; Wang, Jinhong; Li, Xiangyu; Cao, Mingmei; Peng, Heng; Zhao, Chunyan; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) has become the major pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide, while the anti-EV71 antibody responses other than neutralizing epitopes have not been characterized. In this study, EV71 capsid proteins VP1, VP3, VP0 and various VP1 antigens were constructed to analyze anti-EV71 response in severe HFMD cases, non-HFMD outpatient children and normal adults using a novel evolved immunoglobulin-binding molecule (NEIBM)-based ELISA. The high prevalence of antibody responses against all three capsid proteins was demonstrated, and anti-EV71 VP1 showed the main antibody response. Anti-EV71 VP1 antibody response was found to predominantly target to epitopes based on the common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. Moreover, inhibition pattern against anti-EV71 VP1 reactions in three groups was obviously different. Taken together, these results firstly characterized the anti-EV71 antibody responses which are predominantly against VP1 epitopes based on common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. This finding could be helpful for the better understanding of anti-EV71 humoral immunity and useful for seroepidemiological surveillance. PMID:26023863

  8. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the major capsid protein P2 of the lipid-containing bacteriophage PM2

    SciTech Connect

    Abrescia, Nicola G. A.; Kivelä, Hanna M.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bamford, Jaana K. H.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Stuart, David I.

    2005-08-01

    The viral capsid protein P2 of bacteriophage PM2 has been crystallized. Preliminary X-ray analysis demonstrates the position and orientation of the two trimers in the asymmetric unit. PM2 (Corticoviridae) is a dsDNA bacteriophage which contains a lipid membrane beneath its icosahedral capsid. In this respect it resembles bacteriophage PRD1 (Tectiviridae), although it is not known whether the similarity extends to the detailed molecular architecture of the virus, for instance the fold of the major coat protein P2. Structural analysis of PM2 has been initiated and virus-derived P2 has been crystallized by sitting-nanodrop vapour diffusion. Crystals of P2 have been obtained in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with two trimers in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 171.1, b = 78.7, c = 130.1 Å. The crystals diffract to 4 Å resolution at the ESRF BM14 beamline (Grenoble, France) and the orientation of the non-crystallographic threefold axes, the spatial relationship between the two trimers and the packing of the trimers within the unit cell have been determined. The trimers form tightly packed layers consistent with the crystal morphology, possibly recapitulating aspects of the arrangement of subunits in the virus.

  9. The lectin from Musa paradisiaca binds with the capsid protein of tobacco mosaic virus and prevents viral infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Huan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-04

    It has been demonstrated that the lectin from Musa paradisiaca (BanLec-1) could inhibit the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In order to evaluate its effects on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the banlec-1 gene was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and tobacco, respectively. Recombinant BanLec-1 showed metal ions dependence, and higher thermal and pH stability. Overexpression of banlec-1 in tobacco resulted in decreased leaf size, and higher resistance to TMV infection, which includes reduced TMV cellular entry, more stable chlorophyll contents, and enhanced antioxidant enzymes. BanLec-1 was found to bind directly to the TMV capsid protein in vitro, and to inhibit TMV infection in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to limited prevention in vivo, purified rBanLec-1 exhibited more significant effects on TMV infection in vitro. Taken together, our study indicated that BanLec-1 could prevent TMV infection in tobacco, probably through the interaction between BanLec-1 and TMV capsid protein.

  10. Characterization of the antibody response against EV71 capsid proteins in Chinese individuals by NEIBM-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yingying; Chen, Xuguang; Qian, Baohua; Wu, Guorong; He, Ting; Feng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Caixia; Wang, Lili; Wang, Jinhong; Li, Xiangyu; Cao, Mingmei; Peng, Heng; Zhao, Chunyan; Pan, Wei

    2015-05-29

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) has become the major pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide, while the anti-EV71 antibody responses other than neutralizing epitopes have not been characterized. In this study, EV71 capsid proteins VP1, VP3, VP0 and various VP1 antigens were constructed to analyze anti-EV71 response in severe HFMD cases, non-HFMD outpatient children and normal adults using a novel evolved immunoglobulin-binding molecule (NEIBM)-based ELISA. The high prevalence of antibody responses against all three capsid proteins was demonstrated, and anti-EV71 VP1 showed the main antibody response. Anti-EV71 VP1 antibody response was found to predominantly target to epitopes based on the common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. Moreover, inhibition pattern against anti-EV71 VP1 reactions in three groups was obviously different. Taken together, these results firstly characterized the anti-EV71 antibody responses which are predominantly against VP1 epitopes based on common enterovirus cross-reactive sequence. This finding could be helpful for the better understanding of anti-EV71 humoral immunity and useful for seroepidemiological surveillance.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Viral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Roya; Reguera, David

    2005-03-01

    Viral genomes, whether they involve RNA or DNA molecules, are invariably protected by a rigid, single-protein-thick, shell referred to as ``capsid.'' Viral capsids are known to tolerate wide ranges of pH and salt conditions and to withstand internal pressures as high as 100 atms. We study the mechanical properties of viral capsids, calling explicit attention to the inhomogeneity of the shells that is inherent in their being discrete/polyhedral rather than continuous/spherical. We analyze the distribution of stress in these capsids due to isotropic internal pressure (arising, for instance, from genome confinement and/or osmotic activity), and compare the results with appropriate generalizations of classical elasticity theory. We also examine the competing mechanisms for viral shell failure, e.g., in-plane crack formation vs radial bursting. The biological consequences of the special stabilities and stress distributions of viral capsids are also discussed.

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene and 3' non-coding region of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Abouhaidar, M G

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' OH end of papaya mosaic virus RNA have been determined. The 3'-terminal sequence obtained was 900 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained an open reading frame capable of giving rise to a protein of 214 amino acid residues with an Mr of 22930. This protein was identified as the viral capsid protein. The 3' non-coding region of PMV genome RNA was about 121 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] and homologous to the complementary sequence of the non-coding region at the 5' end of PMV RNA. A long open reading frame was also found in the predicted 5' end region of the negative strand.

  13. Expression of Major Capsid Protein VP-1 in the Absence of Viral Particles in Thymomas Induced by Murine Polyomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuan, Norberto; Porrás, Analía; Otero, Javier; Perazzo, Sofía

    2001-01-01

    Thymomas induced by polyomavirus strain PTA in mice are known to express the major capsid protein VP-1. Since the expression of a late structural protein such as VP-1 is considered a sign of virus replication, the present work attempted to clarify the implication of the presence of this protein in tumor cells. Electron microscopy of tumors showed a striking absence of viral particles in the vast majority of the cells. However, immunoelectron microscopy of the same samples demonstrated intranuclear VP-1 in most cells despite the absence of viral particles. Very little infectious virus was recovered from tumors. A change in the electrophoretic mobility of VP-1 from thymomas was detected compared with VP-1 from productively infected cells. The data presented in this work prove that the expression of VP-1 in polyomavirus-induced tumors is not synonymous with the presence of infectious virus, suggesting a possible defect in viral encapsidation. PMID:11222714

  14. Context-Dependent Cleavage of the Capsid Protein by the West Nile Virus Protease Modulates the Efficiency of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    VanBlargan, Laura A.; Davis, Kaitlin A.; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Akey, David L.; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms that define the specificity of flavivirus RNA encapsulation are poorly understood. Virions composed of the structural proteins of one flavivirus and the genomic RNA of a heterologous strain can be assembled and have been developed as live attenuated vaccine candidates for several flaviviruses. In this study, we discovered that not all combinations of flavivirus components are possible. While a West Nile virus (WNV) subgenomic RNA could readily be packaged by structural proteins of the DENV2 strain 16681, production of infectious virions with DENV2 strain New Guinea C (NGC) structural proteins was not possible, despite the very high amino acid identity between these viruses. Mutagenesis studies identified a single residue (position 101) of the DENV capsid (C) protein as the determinant for heterologous virus production. C101 is located at the P1′ position of the NS2B/3 protease cleavage site at the carboxy terminus of the C protein. WNV NS2B/3 cleavage of the DENV structural polyprotein was possible when a threonine (Thr101 in strain 16681) but not a serine (Ser101 in strain NGC) occupied the P1′ position, a finding not predicted by in vitro protease specificity studies. Critically, both serine and threonine were tolerated at the P1′ position of WNV capsid. More extensive mutagenesis revealed the importance of flanking residues within the polyprotein in defining the cleavage specificity of the WNV protease. A more detailed understanding of the context dependence of viral protease specificity may aid the development of new protease inhibitors and provide insight into associated patterns of drug resistance. IMPORTANCE West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause considerable morbidity and mortality in humans. No specific antiflavivirus therapeutics are available for treatment of infection. Proteolytic processing of the flavivirus polyprotein is an essential step in the replication

  15. Anti-adenoviral Artificial MicroRNAs Expressed from AAV9 Vectors Inhibit Human Adenovirus Infection in Immunosuppressed Syrian Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Schaar, Katrin; Geisler, Anja; Kraus, Milena; Pinkert, Sandra; Pryshliak, Markian; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Ying, Baoling; Kurreck, Jens; Wold, William S; Klopfleisch, Robert; Toth, Karoly; Fechner, Henry

    2017-09-15

    Infections of immunocompromised patients with human adenoviruses (hAd) can develop into life-threatening conditions, whereas drugs with anti-adenoviral efficiency are not clinically approved and have limited efficacy. Small double-stranded RNAs that induce RNAi represent a new class of promising anti-adenoviral therapeutics. However, as yet, their efficiency to treat hAd5 infections has only been investigated in vitro. In this study, we analyzed artificial microRNAs (amiRs) delivered by self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors for treatment of hAd5 infections in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters. In vitro evaluation of amiRs targeting the E1A, pTP, IVa2, and hexon genes of hAd5 revealed that two scAAV vectors containing three copies of amiR-pTP and three copies of amiR-E1A, or six copies of amiR-pTP, efficiently inhibited hAd5 replication and improved the viability of hAd5-infected cells. Prophylactic application of amiR-pTP/amiR-E1A- and amiR-pTP-expressing scAAV9 vectors, respectively, to immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters resulted in the reduction of hAd5 levels in the liver of up to two orders of magnitude and in reduction of liver damage. Concomitant application of the vectors also resulted in a decrease of hepatic hAd5 infection. No side effects were observed. These data demonstrate anti-adenoviral RNAi as a promising new approach to combat hAd5 infection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Alphavirus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Recognize a Cross-Reactive Epitope from the Capsid Protein and Can Eliminate Virus from Persistently Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Linn, May La; Mateo, L.; Gardner, J.; Suhrbier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Persistent alphavirus infections in synovial and neural tissues are believed to be associated with chronic arthritis and encephalitis, respectively, and represent likely targets for CD8+ αβ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Here we show that the capsid protein is a dominant target for alphavirus-specific CTL in BALB/c mice and that capsid-specific CTL from these mice recognize an H-2Kd restricted epitope, QYSGGRFTI. This epitope lies in the highly conserved region of the capsid protein, and QYSGGRFTI-specific CTL were cross reactive across a range of Old World alphaviruses. In vivo the acute primary viraemia of these highly cytopathic viruses was unaffected by QYSGGRFTI-specific CTL. However, in vitro these CTL were able to completely clear virus from macrophages persistently and productively infected with the arthrogenic alphavirus Ross River virus. PMID:9573286

  17. Retargeting of Adenovirus Vectors through Genetic Fusion of a Single-Chain or Single-Domain Antibody to Capsid Protein IX ▿

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Lanthier, Robert M.; Smith, Adam C.; Christou, Carin; Risco Quiroz, Milagros; Powell, Karen L.; O'Meara, Ryan W.; Kothary, Rashmi; Lorimer, Ian A.; Parks, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are the most commonly used system for gene therapy applications, due in part to their ability to infect a wide array of cell types and tissues. However, many therapies would benefit from the ability to target the Ad vector only to specific cells, such as tumor cells for cancer gene therapy. In this study, we investigated the utility of capsid protein IX (pIX) as a platform for the presentation of single-chain variable-fragment antibodies (scFv) and single-domain antibodies (sdAb) for virus retargeting. We show that scFv can be displayed on the capsid through genetic fusion to native pIX but that these molecules fail to retarget the virus, due to improper folding of the scFv. Redirecting expression of the fusion protein to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in correct folding of the scFv and allows it to recognize its epitope; however, ER-targeted pIX-scFv was incorporated into the Ad capsid at a very low level which was not sufficient to retarget virus infection. In contrast, a pIX-sdAb construct was efficiently incorporated into the Ad capsid and enhanced virus infection of cells expressing the targeted receptor. Taken together, our data indicate that pIX is an effective platform for presentation of large targeting polypeptides on the surface of the virus capsid, but the nature of the ligand can significantly affect its association with virions. PMID:20631131

  18. Retargeting of adenovirus vectors through genetic fusion of a single-chain or single-domain antibody to capsid protein IX.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Kathy L; Lanthier, Robert M; Smith, Adam C; Christou, Carin; Risco Quiroz, Milagros; Powell, Karen L; O'Meara, Ryan W; Kothary, Rashmi; Lorimer, Ian A; Parks, Robin J

    2010-10-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are the most commonly used system for gene therapy applications, due in part to their ability to infect a wide array of cell types and tissues. However, many therapies would benefit from the ability to target the Ad vector only to specific cells, such as tumor cells for cancer gene therapy. In this study, we investigated the utility of capsid protein IX (pIX) as a platform for the presentation of single-chain variable-fragment antibodies (scFv) and single-domain antibodies (sdAb) for virus retargeting. We show that scFv can be displayed on the capsid through genetic fusion to native pIX but that these molecules fail to retarget the virus, due to improper folding of the scFv. Redirecting expression of the fusion protein to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in correct folding of the scFv and allows it to recognize its epitope; however, ER-targeted pIX-scFv was incorporated into the Ad capsid at a very low level which was not sufficient to retarget virus infection. In contrast, a pIX-sdAb construct was efficiently incorporated into the Ad capsid and enhanced virus infection of cells expressing the targeted receptor. Taken together, our data indicate that pIX is an effective platform for presentation of large targeting polypeptides on the surface of the virus capsid, but the nature of the ligand can significantly affect its association with virions.

  19. The impact of viral RNA on the association free energies of capsid protein assembly: bacteriophage MS2 as a case study.

    PubMed

    ElSawy, Karim M

    2017-02-01

    A large number of single-stranded RNA viruses assemble their capsid and their genomic material simultaneously. The RNA viral genome plays multiple roles in this process that are currently only partly understood. In this work, we investigated the thermodynamic basis of the role of viral RNA on the assembly of capsid proteins. The viral capsid of bacteriophage MS2 was considered as a case study. The MS2 virus capsid is composed of 60 AB and 30 CC protein dimers. We investigated the effect of RNA stem loop (the translational repressor TR) binding to the capsid dimers on the dimer-dimer relative association free energies. We found that TR binding results in destabilization of AB self-association compared with AB and CC association. This indicates that the association of the AB and CC dimers is the most likely assembly pathway for the MS2 virus, which explains the experimental observation of alternating patterns of AB and CC dimers in dominant assembly intermediates of the MS2 virus. The presence of viral RNA, therefore, dramatically channels virus assembly to a limited number of pathways, thereby enhancing the efficiency of virus self-assembly process. Interestingly, Thr59Ser and Thr45Ala mutations of the dimers, in the absence of RNA stem loops, lead to stabilization of AB self-association compared with the AB and CC associations, thereby channelling virus assembly towards a fivefold (AB)5 pentamer intermediate, providing a testable hypothesis of our thermodynamic arguments.

  20. The capsid protein of satellite Panicum mosaic virus contributes to systemic invasion and interacts with its helper virus.

    PubMed

    Omarov, Rustem T; Qi, Dong; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2005-08-01

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) depends on its helper Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) for replication and spread in host plants. The SPMV RNA encodes a 17-kDa capsid protein (CP) that is essential for formation of its 16-nm virions. The results of this study indicate that in addition to the expression of the full-length SPMV CP from the 5'-proximal AUG start codon, SPMV RNA also expresses a 9.4-kDa C-terminal protein from the third in-frame start codon. Differences in solubility between the full-length protein and its C-terminal product were observed. Subcellular fractionation of infected plant tissues showed that SPMV CP accumulates in the cytosol, cell wall-, and membrane-enriched fractions. However, the 9.4-kDa protein exclusively cofractionated with cell wall- and membrane-enriched fractions. Earlier studies revealed that the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) from nucleotides 63 to 104 was associated with systemic infection in a host-specific manner in millet plants. This study shows that nucleotide deletions and insertions in the 5'-UTR plus simultaneous truncation of the N-terminal part of the CP impaired SPMV spread in foxtail millet, but not in proso millet plants. In contrast, the expression of the full-length version of SPMV CP efficiently compensated the negative effect of the 5'-UTR deletions in foxtail millet. Finally, immunoprecipitation assays revealed the presence of a specific interaction between the capsid proteins of SPMV and its helper virus (PMV). Our findings show that the SPMV CP has several biological functions, including facilitating efficient satellite virus infection and movement in millet plants.

  1. Tabulation as a high-resolution alternative to coarse-graining protein interactions: Initial application to virus capsid subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiriti, Justin; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional coarse-graining based on a reduced number of interaction sites often entails a significant sacrifice of chemical accuracy. As an alternative, we present a method for simulating large systems composed of interacting macromolecules using an energy tabulation strategy previously devised for small rigid molecules or molecular fragments [S. Lettieri and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Comput. Chem. 33, 268-275 (2012); J. Spiriti and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 5161-5177 (2014)]. We treat proteins as rigid and construct distance and orientation-dependent tables of the interaction energy between them. Arbitrarily detailed interactions may be incorporated into the tables, but as a proof-of-principle, we tabulate a simple α-carbon Gō-like model for interactions between dimeric subunits of the hepatitis B viral capsid. This model is significantly more structurally realistic than previous models used in capsid assembly studies. We are able to increase the speed of Monte Carlo simulations by a factor of up to 6700 compared to simulations without tables, with only minimal further loss in accuracy. To obtain further enhancement of sampling, we combine tabulation with the weighted ensemble (WE) method, in which multiple parallel simulations are occasionally replicated or pruned in order to sample targeted regions of a reaction coordinate space. In the initial study reported here, WE is able to yield pathways of the final ˜25% of the assembly process.

  2. [Construction of the plant expression vector with hepatitis a capsid protein fusion gene and genetic transformation of Citrus. Sinensis Osbeck].

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Wei, Hong; Chen, Shan-Chun; He, Yong-Rui

    2004-07-01

    The use of edible plants for the production and delivery of vaccine proteins could provide an economical alternative to fermentation systems. The construction of the plant expression vector pBI121-A was reported, which contained a fusion gene encoding hepatitis A capsid proteins. The gene was located between the left and right Ti border sequences under the control of CaMV35S promoter. The vector was identified via PCR and restriction enzyme analysis and was introduced into Agrobacterium tumerifacience LBA4404. The transgenic Citrus plants were produced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of epicotyl segments.13 putatively transformed plants through the kanamycin selection were micrografted onto the seedlings. The presence and integration of the transgene had been verified by PCR analysis. The result showed that five transformants were integrated and the transformation efficiency was 4.1%.

  3. Mutants at the 2-Fold Interface of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Structural Proteins Suggest a Role in Viral Transcription for AAV Capsids.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Fikret; Salganik, Maxim; Resztak, Justyna; Singh, Jasbir; Bennett, Antonette; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2016-08-15

    We previously reported that an amino acid substitution, Y704A, near the 2-fold interface of adeno-associated virus (AAV) was defective for transcription of the packaged genome (M. Salganik, F. Aydemir, H. J. Nam, R. McKenna, M. Agbandje-McKenna, and N. Muzyczka, J Virol 88:1071-1079, 2013, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02093-13). In this report, we have characterized the defect in 6 additional capsid mutants located in a region ∼30 Å in diameter on the surface of the AAV type 2 (AAV2) capsid near the 2-fold interface. These mutants, which are highly conserved among primate serotypes, displayed a severe defect (3 to 6 logs) in infectivity. All of the mutants accumulated significant levels of uncoated DNA in the nucleus, but none of the mutants were able to accumulate significant amounts of genomic mRNA postinfection. In addition, wild-type (wt) capsids that were bound to the conformational antibody A20, which is known to bind the capsid surface in the region of the mutants, were also defective for transcription. In all cases, the mutant virus particles, as well as the antibody-bound wild-type capsids, were able to enter the cell, travel to the nucleus, uncoat, and synthesize a second strand but were unable to transcribe their genomes. Taken together, the phenotype of these mutants provides compelling evidence that the AAV capsid plays a role in the transcription of its genome, and the mutants map this functional region on the surface of the capsid near the 2-fold interface. This appears to be the first example of a viral structural protein that is also involved in the transcription of the viral genome that it delivers to the nucleus. Many viruses package enzymes within their capsids that assist in expressing their genomes postinfection, e.g., retroviruses. A number of nonenveloped viruses, including AAV, carry proteases that are needed for capsid maturation or for capsid modification during infection. We describe here what appears to be the first example of

  4. The C Terminus of the Large Tegument Protein pUL36 Contains Multiple Capsid Binding Sites That Function Differently during Assembly and Cell Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schipke, Julia; Pohlmann, Anja; Diestel, Randi; Binz, Anne; Rudolph, Kathrin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Bauerfeind, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    The largest tegument protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), pUL36, is a multivalent cross-linker between the viral capsids and the tegument and associated membrane proteins during assembly that upon subsequent cell entry releases the incoming capsids from the outer tegument and viral envelope. Here we show that pUL36 was recruited to cytosolic progeny capsids that later colocalized with membrane proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) and the trans-Golgi network. During cell entry, pUL36 dissociated from viral membrane proteins but remained associated with cytosolic capsids until arrival at the nucleus. HSV1 UL36 mutants lacking C-terminal portions of increasing size expressed truncated pUL36 but could not form plaques. Cytosolic capsids of mutants lacking the C-terminal 735 of the 3,164 amino acid residues accumulated in the cytosol but did not recruit pUL36 or associate with membranes. In contrast, pUL36 lacking only the 167 C-terminal residues bound to cytosolic capsids and subsequently colocalized with viral and host membrane proteins. Progeny virions fused with neighboring cells, but incoming capsids did not retain pUL36, nor could they target the nucleus or initiate HSV1 gene expression. Our data suggest that residues 2430 to 2893 of HSV1 pUL36, containing one binding site for the capsid protein pUL25, are sufficient to recruit pUL36 onto cytosolic capsids during assembly for secondary envelopment, whereas the 167 residues of the very C terminus with the second pUL25 binding site are crucial to maintain pUL36 on incoming capsids during cell entry. Capsids lacking pUL36 are targeted neither to membranes for virus assembly nor to nuclear pores for genome uncoating. PMID:22258258

  5. Structures of Adenovirus Incomplete Particles Clarify Capsid Architecture and Show Maturation Changes of Packaging Protein L1 52/55k

    PubMed Central

    Condezo, Gabriela N.; Marabini, Roberto; Ayora, Silvia; Carazo, José M.; Alba, Raúl; Chillón, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenovirus is one of the most complex icosahedral, nonenveloped viruses. Even after its structure was solved at near-atomic resolution by both cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, the location of minor coat proteins is still a subject of debate. The elaborated capsid architecture is the product of a correspondingly complex assembly process, about which many aspects remain unknown. Genome encapsidation involves the concerted action of five virus proteins, and proteolytic processing by the virus protease is needed to prime the virion for sequential uncoating. Protein L1 52/55k is required for packaging, and multiple cleavages by the maturation protease facilitate its release from the nascent virion. Light-density particles are routinely produced in adenovirus infections and are thought to represent assembly intermediates. Here, we present the molecular and structural characterization of two different types of human adenovirus light particles produced by a mutant with delayed packaging. We show that these particles lack core polypeptide V but do not lack the density corresponding to this protein in the X-ray structure, thereby adding support to the adenovirus cryo-electron microscopy model. The two types of light particles present different degrees of proteolytic processing. Their structures provide the first glimpse of the organization of L1 52/55k protein inside the capsid shell and of how this organization changes upon partial maturation. Immature, full-length L1 52/55k is poised beneath the vertices to engage the virus genome. Upon proteolytic processing, L1 52/55k disengages from the capsid shell, facilitating genome release during uncoating. IMPORTANCE Adenoviruses have been extensively characterized as experimental systems in molecular biology, as human pathogens, and as therapeutic vectors. However, a clear picture of many aspects of their basic biology is still lacking. Two of these aspects are the location of minor coat proteins in

  6. Expression, characterization, and immunoreactivities of a soluble hepatitis E virus putative capsid protein species expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; McAtee, P; Yarbough, P O; Tam, A W; Fuerst, T

    1997-01-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) open reading frame-2 (ORF-2) is predicted to encode a 71-kDa putative capsid protein involved in virus particle formation. When insect Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells were infected with a recombinant baculovirus containing the entire ORF-2 sequence, two types of recombinant proteins were produced; an insoluble protein of 73 kDa and a soluble protein of 62 kDa. The 62-kDa species was shown to be a proteolytic cleavage product of the 73-kDa protein. N-terminal sequence analysis of the 62-kDa protein indicated that it lacked the first 111 amino acids that are present in the full-length 73-kDa protein. A soluble 62-kDa protein was produced without the proteolytic processing by inserting the coding sequence of amino acids 112 to 660 of ORF-2 in a baculovirus expression vector and using the corresponding virus to infect Sf9 cells. The two recombinant 62-kDa proteins made by different mechanisms displayed immunoreactivities very compatible to each other. The 62-kDa proteins obtained by both proteolytic processing and reengineering demonstrated much higher sensitivities in detecting anti-HEV antibodies in human sera than the antigens made from bacteria, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The data suggest that the soluble 62-kDa protein made from insect cells contains additional epitopes not present in recombinant proteins made from bacteria. Therefore, the 62-kDa protein may be useful for HEV diagnostic improvement and vaccine development. The reengineered construct allows for the consistent large-scale production of the soluble 62-kDa protein without proteolytic processing. PMID:9220158

  7. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor; Afonine, Pavel V.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Parent, Kristin N.; Cingolani, Gino

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid') built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinity for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging' is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein. PMID:28134243

  8. Role of a nuclear localization signal on the minor capsid Proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV nuclear entry

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Shauna M.; Zhao, Linbo; Bosard, Catherine; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. - Highlights: • Polyomaviruses must deliver their genome to the nucleus to replicate. • The minor capsid proteins have a well-conserved nuclear localization signal. • Mutation of this NLS diminishes, but does not completely inhibit, infection.

  9. C-Terminal Amino Acids 471-507 of Avian Hepatitis E Virus Capsid Protein Are Crucial for Binding to Avian and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinquan; Bilic, Ivana; Marek, Ana; Glösmann, Martin; Hess, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The infection of chickens with avian Hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) can be asymptomatic or induces clinical signs characterized by increased mortality and decreased egg production in adult birds. Due to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for avian HEV, the interaction between virus and host cells is still barely understood. In this study, four truncated avian HEV capsid proteins (ORF2-1 – ORF2-4) with an identical 338aa deletion at the N-terminus and gradual deletions from 0, 42, 99 and 136aa at the C-terminus, respectively, were expressed and used to map the possible binding site within avian HEV capsid protein. Results from the binding assay showed that three truncated capsid proteins attached to avian LMH cells, but did not penetrate into cells. However, the shortest construct, ORF2-4, lost the capability of binding to cells suggesting that the presence of amino acids 471 to 507 of the capsid protein is crucial for the attachment. The construct ORF2-3 (aa339-507) was used to study the potential binding of avian HEV capsid protein to human and other avian species. It could be demonstrated that ORF2-3 was capable of binding to QT-35 cells from Japanese quail and human HepG2 cells but failed to bind to P815 cells. Additionally, chicken serum raised against ORF2-3 successfully blocked the binding to LMH cells. Treatment with heparin sodium salt or sodium chlorate significantly reduced binding of ORF2-3 to LMH cells. However, heparinase II treatment of LMH cells had no effect on binding of the ORF2-3 construct, suggesting a possible distinct attachment mechanism of avian as compared to human HEV. For the first time, interactions between avian HEV capsid protein and host cells were investigated demonstrating that aa471 to 507 of the capsid protein are needed to facilitate interaction with different kind of cells from different species. PMID:27073893

  10. C-Terminal Amino Acids 471-507 of Avian Hepatitis E Virus Capsid Protein Are Crucial for Binding to Avian and Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinquan; Bilic, Ivana; Marek, Ana; Glösmann, Martin; Hess, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The infection of chickens with avian Hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) can be asymptomatic or induces clinical signs characterized by increased mortality and decreased egg production in adult birds. Due to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for avian HEV, the interaction between virus and host cells is still barely understood. In this study, four truncated avian HEV capsid proteins (ORF2-1 - ORF2-4) with an identical 338aa deletion at the N-terminus and gradual deletions from 0, 42, 99 and 136aa at the C-terminus, respectively, were expressed and used to map the possible binding site within avian HEV capsid protein. Results from the binding assay showed that three truncated capsid proteins attached to avian LMH cells, but did not penetrate into cells. However, the shortest construct, ORF2-4, lost the capability of binding to cells suggesting that the presence of amino acids 471 to 507 of the capsid protein is crucial for the attachment. The construct ORF2-3 (aa339-507) was used to study the potential binding of avian HEV capsid protein to human and other avian species. It could be demonstrated that ORF2-3 was capable of binding to QT-35 cells from Japanese quail and human HepG2 cells but failed to bind to P815 cells. Additionally, chicken serum raised against ORF2-3 successfully blocked the binding to LMH cells. Treatment with heparin sodium salt or sodium chlorate significantly reduced binding of ORF2-3 to LMH cells. However, heparinase II treatment of LMH cells had no effect on binding of the ORF2-3 construct, suggesting a possible distinct attachment mechanism of avian as compared to human HEV. For the first time, interactions between avian HEV capsid protein and host cells were investigated demonstrating that aa471 to 507 of the capsid protein are needed to facilitate interaction with different kind of cells from different species.

  11. Blue native protein electrophoresis for studies of mouse polyomavirus morphogenesis and interactions between the major capsid protein VP1 and cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Horníková, Lenka; Man, Petr; Forstová, Jitka

    2011-12-01

    Morphogenesis of the mouse polyomavirus virion is a complex and not yet well understood process. Nuclear lysates of infected cells and cells transiently producing the major capsid protein (VP1) of the mouse polyomavirus and whole-cell lysates were separated by blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) to characterize the participation of cellular proteins in virion precursor complexes. Several VP1-specific complexes were found by immunostaining with the anti-VP1 antibody. Some of these complexes contained proteins from the heat shock protein 70 family. The BN-PAGE was found to be a useful tool for the identification of protein complexes by immunostaining of separated cell lysates. However, whole-cell lysates and lysates of isolated nuclei of cells infected with polyomavirus appeared to be too complex for BN-PAGE separation followed by mass spectrometry. No distinct bands specific for cells infected with polyomavirus were detected by Coomassie blue stained gels, hence this method is not suitable for the discovery of new cellular proteins participating in virion assembly. Nevertheless, BN-PAGE can be valuable for the analyses of different types of complexes formed by proteins after their enrichment or isolation by affinity chromatography.

  12. Effect of capsid proteins to ICG mass ratio on fluorescent quantum yield of virus-resembling optical nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Ico, Gerardo; Matsumura, Paul; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, Valentine; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported construction of a new type of optical nano-construct composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore. We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. To utilize OVGs as effective nano-probes in fluorescence imaging applications, their fluorescence quantum yield needs to be maximized. In this study, we investigate the effect of altering the CP to ICG mass ratio on the fluorescent quantum yield of OVGs. Results of this study provide the basis for construction of OVGs with optimal amounts of CP and ICG to yield maximal fluorescence quantum yield.

  13. A Physical Interaction between Viral Replicase and Capsid Protein Is Required for Genome-Packaging Specificity in an RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwon, Sun-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Genome packaging is functionally coupled to replication in RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (Poliovirus), insects (Flock house virus [FHV]), and plants (Brome mosaic virus [BMV]). However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We have observed previously that in FHV and BMV, unlike ectopically expressed capsid protein (CP), packaging specificity results from RNA encapsidation by CP that has been translated from mRNA produced from replicating genomic RNA. Consequently, we hypothesize that a physical interaction with replicase increases the CP specificity for packaging viral RNAs. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the molecular interaction between replicase protein and CP using a FHV-Nicotiana benthamiana system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation in conjunction with fluorescent cellular protein markers and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that FHV replicase (protein A) and CP physically interact at the mitochondrial site of replication and that this interaction requires the N-proximal region from either amino acids 1 to 31 or amino acids 32 to 50 of the CP. In contrast to the mitochondrial localization of CP derived from FHV replication, ectopic expression displayed a characteristic punctate pattern on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This pattern was altered to relocalize the CP throughout the cytoplasm when the C-proximal hydrophobic domain was deleted. Analysis of the packaging phenotypes of the CP mutants defective either in protein A-CP interactions or ER localization suggested that synchronization between protein A-CP interaction and its subcellular localization is imperative to confer packaging specificity. PMID:22438552

  14. Bacterial Surface-Displayed GII.4 Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins Bound to HBGA-Like Molecules in Romaine Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Rong, Shaofeng; Tian, Peng; Zhou, Yue; Guan, Shimin; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein on bacterial surface and used it as a new strategy to explore interaction between HuNoV protein and receptor candidates from romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins were confirmed on the surface of the transformed bacteria by an immunofluorescence assay. The distribution patterns of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins in romaine lettuce were identified through a confocal immunofluorescence assay. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be found in the stomata, and the surfaces of vein and leaf of romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be captured by an ELISA assay utilizing extract from leaf (LE) or vein (VE). The binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could be competitively blocked by histo-blood group antigens from human saliva. In addition, the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could also be attenuated by heat denaturation of lettuce proteins, and abolished by oxidation of lettuce carbohydrates. The results indicated that histo-blood group antigen-like molecules in LE or VE were involved in the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to romaine lettuce. All data demonstrated that the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be utilized in a new and simple system for investigation of the interaction between the HuNoVs and their candidate ligands.

  15. Bacterial Surface-Displayed GII.4 Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins Bound to HBGA-Like Molecules in Romaine Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Rong, Shaofeng; Tian, Peng; Zhou, Yue; Guan, Shimin; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    Human Noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the main cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Contaminated produce is a main vehicle for dissemination of HuNoVs. In this study, we used an ice nucleation protein mediated surface display system to present the protruding domain of GII.4 HuNoV capsid protein on bacterial surface and used it as a new strategy to explore interaction between HuNoV protein and receptor candidates from romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins were confirmed on the surface of the transformed bacteria by an immunofluorescence assay. The distribution patterns of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins in romaine lettuce were identified through a confocal immunofluorescence assay. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be found in the stomata, and the surfaces of vein and leaf of romaine lettuce. The surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be captured by an ELISA assay utilizing extract from leaf (LE) or vein (VE). The binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could be competitively blocked by histo-blood group antigens from human saliva. In addition, the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to LE or VE could also be attenuated by heat denaturation of lettuce proteins, and abolished by oxidation of lettuce carbohydrates. The results indicated that histo-blood group antigen-like molecules in LE or VE were involved in the binding of the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins to romaine lettuce. All data demonstrated that the surface-displayed HuNoV proteins could be utilized in a new and simple system for investigation of the interaction between the HuNoVs and their candidate ligands. PMID:28265267

  16. Circovirus Transport Proceeds via Direct Interaction of the Cytoplasmic Dynein IC1 Subunit with the Viral Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jingjing; Lin, Cui; Wang, Huijuan; Wang, Lun; Zhou, Niu; Jin, Yulan; Liao, Min

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microtubule transport of circovirus from the periphery of the cell to the nucleus is essential for viral replication in early infection. How the microtubule is recruited to the viral cargo remains unclear. In this study, we observed that circovirus trafficking is dependent on microtubule polymerization and that incoming circovirus particles colocalize with cytoplasmic dynein and endosomes. However, circovirus binding to dynein was independent of the presence of microtubular α-tubulin and translocation of cytoplasmic dynein into the nucleus. The circovirus capsid (Cap) subunit enhanced microtubular acetylation and directly interacted with intermediate chain 1 (IC1) of dynein. N-terminal residues 42 to 100 of the Cap viral protein were required for efficient binding to the dynein IC1 subunit and for retrograde transport. Knockdown of IC1 decreased virus transport and replication. These results demonstrate that Cap is a direct ligand of the cytoplasmic dynein IC1 subunit and an inducer of microtubule α-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, Cap recruits the host dynein/microtubule machinery to facilitate transport toward the nucleus by an endosomal mechanism distinct from that used for physiological dynein cargo. IMPORTANCE Incoming viral particles hijack the intracellular trafficking machinery of the host in order to migrate from the cell surface to the replication sites. Better knowledge of the interaction between viruses and virus proteins and the intracellular trafficking machinery may provide new targets for antiviral therapies. Currently, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of circovirus transport. Here, we report that circovirus particles enter early endosomes and utilize the microtubule-associated molecular motor dynein to travel along microtubules. The circovirus capsid subunit enhances microtubular acetylation, and N-terminal residues 42 to 100 directly interact with the dynein IC1 subunit during retrograde transport. These findings

  17. High prevalence of serum antibodies reacting with simian virus 40 capsid protein mimotopes in patients affected by malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Elisa; Corallini, Alfredo; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Taronna, Angelo; Tassi, Gianfranco; Manfrini, Marco; Comar, Manola; Bovenzi, Massimo; Guaschino, Roberto; Vaniglia, Francesca; Magnani, Corrado; Casali, Ferruccio; Rezza, Giovanni; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro G.

    2012-01-01

    Human malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is considered a rare tumor, but recent estimations indicate that one-quarter million people will die of this neoplasm in Europe in the next three decades. The mineral asbestos is considered the main causative agent of this neoplasm. MPM is largely unresponsive to conventional chemotherapy/radiotherapy. In addition to asbestos exposure, genetic predisposition to asbestos carcinogenesis and to simian virus (SV)40 infection has also been suggested. SV40 is a DNA tumor virus found in some studies to be associated at high prevalence with MPM. SV40 sequences have also been detected, although at a lower prevalence than in MPM, in blood specimens from healthy donors. However, some studies have failed to reveal SV40 footprints in MPM and its association with this neoplasm. These conflicting results indicate the need for further investigations with new approaches. We report on the presence of antibodies in serum samples from patients affected by MPM that specifically react with two different SV40 mimotopes. The two SV40 peptides used in indirect ELISAs correspond to viral capsid proteins. ELISA with the two SV40 mimotopes gave overlapping results. Our data indicate that in serum samples from MPM-affected patients (n = 97), the prevalence of antibodies against SV40 viral capsid protein antigens is significantly higher (26%, P = 0.043) than in the control group (15%) represented by healthy subjects (n = 168) with the same median age (66 y) and sex. Our results suggest that SV40 is associated with a subset of MPM and circulates in humans. PMID:23071320

  18. Capsid protein genetic analysis and viral spread to the spinal cord in cats experimentally infected with feline calicivirus (FCV).

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Sato, Y; Ohe, K; Sakai, S; Fukuyama, M; Furuhata, K; Kishikawa, S; Yamamoto, S; Kiuchi, A; Hara, M; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    2005-08-01

    We investigated primitively the molecular basis of the neural spread of a feline calcivirus isolate (FCV-S) from the spinal cord of a cat that died after manifesting excitation. Experimental infections of cats with three clones from parent virus isolate FCV-S, isolated based on plaque size, were performed, and virus recovery from the spinal cord and the nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of the viral capsid protein region (ORF2) were compared. In the experimental infection with the one-time cloned virus (C1L1) isolated from a large plaque, the C1L1 was recovered from the spinal cord. In contrast, seven-times cloned C6L7 (from large plaque) and five-times cloned C5S2 (isolated from small plaque) were not recovered from the spinal cord. Genetic analysis of the capsid protein gene of the three viral clones revealed that four bases were different and two amino acids were different at positions 34 (Val in C6L7 and Ala in C1L1 and C5S2) and 46 (Leu in C6L7 and Pro in C1L1 and C5S2) between C6L7 (with large plaque) and C5S2 (with small plaque). The amino acid at position 434 of C1L1 was different from those of C6L7 and C5S2 (Gly in C1L1, D (Asp) in C6L7 and C5S2). From these results, the plaque size seemed not to be related to the spread of virus to the spinal cord. Clone C1L1, which spread to the spinal cord, had a difference of one amino acid from the other two clones, which may be related to the ability to spread to the spinal cord.

  19. Mechanisms leading to an oriented immobilization of recombinant proteins derived from the P24 capsid of HIV-1 onto copolymers.

    PubMed

    Allard, L; Cheynet, V; Oriol, G; Véron, L; Merlier, F; Scrémin, G; Mandrand, B; Delair, T; Mallet, F

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism leading to an oriented immobilization of recombinant proteins onto synthetic copolymers, five genetically modified HIV-1 p24 capsid proteins (RH24, RH24A4K2, RH24R6, RH24R4K2, and RH24K6) were tested for their efficiency to covalently bind to maleic anhydride-alt-methyl vinyl ether (MAMVE) and N-vinyl pyrrolidone-alt-maleic anhydride (NVPMA) copolymers. These proteins contain, at their C-termini, tags differing in cationic and/or reactive amino acids density. We demonstrated that an increase of the charge and amine density in the tag enhances the coupling yield, the most efficient tag being a six lysine one. The reactivity of the proteins depends directly on the reactivity of the tag, and this led us to conclude that the tag was the site where the covalent grafting with the polymer occurred. Thus, design of such tags provides a new efficient and versatile method allowing oriented immobilization of recombinant proteins onto copolymers.

  20. Encapsidation of poliovirus replicons encoding the complete human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene by using a complementation system which provides the P1 capsid protein in trans.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, D C; Ansardi, D C; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    Poliovirus genomes which contain small regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag, pol, and env genes substituted in frame for the P1 capsid region replicate and express HIV-1 proteins as fusion proteins with the P1 capsid precursor protein upon transfection into cells (W. S. Choi, R. Pal-Ghosh, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 65:2875-2883, 1991). Since these genomes, referred to as replicons, do not express capsid proteins, a complementation system was developed to encapsidate the genomes by providing P1 capsid proteins in trans from a recombinant vaccinia virus, VV-P1. Virus stocks of encapsidated replicons were generated after serial passage of the replicon genomes into cells previously infected with VV-P1 (D. C. Porter, D. C. Ansardi, W. S. Choi, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 67:3712-3719, 1993). Using this system, we have further defined the role of the P1 region in viral protein expression and RNA encapsidation. In the present study, we constructed poliovirus replicons which contain the complete 1,492-bp gag gene of HIV-1 substituted for the entire P1 region of poliovirus. To investigate whether the VP4 coding region was required for the replication and encapsidation of poliovirus RNA, a second replicon in which the complete gag gene was substituted for the VP2, VP3, and VP1 capsid sequences was constructed. Transfection of replicon RNA with and without the VP4 coding region into cells resulted in similar levels of expression of the HIV-1 Gag protein and poliovirus 3CD protein, as indicated by immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from transfected cells demonstrated comparable levels of RNA replication for each replicon. Transfection of the replicon genomes into cells infected with VV-P1 resulted in the encapsidation of the genomes; serial passage in the presence of VV-P1 resulted in the generation of virus stocks of encapsidated replicons. Analysis of the levels of protein expression and encapsidated

  1. Nuclear Localization but Not PML Protein Is Required for Incorporation of the Papillomavirus Minor Capsid Protein L2 into Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Katrin A.; Florin, Luise; Sapp, Cornelia; Maul, Gerd G.; Sapp, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that nuclear domain(s) 10 (ND10) is the site of papillomavirus morphogenesis. The viral genome replicates in or close to ND10. In addition, the minor capsid protein, L2, accumulates in these subnuclear structures and recruits the major capsid protein, L1. We have now used cell lines deficient for promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein, the main structural component of ND10, to study the role of this nuclear protein for L2 incorporation into virus-like particles (VLPs). L2 expressed in PML protein knockout (PML−/−) cells accumulated in nuclear dots, which resemble L2 aggregates forming at ND10 in PML protein-containing cells. These L2 assemblies also attracted L1 and the transcriptional repressor Daxx, suggesting that they are functional in the absence of PML protein. In addition, L2-containing VLPs assembled in PML−/− cells. In order to analyze whether incorporation of L2 into VLPs requires any specific subcellular localization, an L1 mutant defective for nuclear transport and L2 mutants deficient in nuclear translocation and/or ND10 localization were constructed. Using this approach, we identified two independent L2 domains interacting with L1. Mutant L2 proteins not accumulating in ND10 were incorporated into VLPs. Mutant L1 protein, which assembled into VLPs in the cytoplasm, did not incorporate L2 defective for nuclear translocation. The same mutant L2 protein, which passively diffuses into the nucleus, is incorporated into wild-type L1-VLPs in the nucleus. Our data demonstrate that the incorporation of L2 into VLPs requires nuclear but not ND10 localization. PMID:14722267

  2. Role of conformational epitopes expressed by human papillomavirus major capsid proteins in the serologic detection of infection and prophylactic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hines, J F; Ghim, S J; Christensen, N D; Kreider, J W; Barnes, W A; Schlegel, R; Jenson, A B

    1994-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a variety of cutaneous warts, mucosal condylomata, and dysplasias and are etiologic in cervical cancer. Papillomavirus (PV) conformational epitopes on the surface of virions are type-specific and are the target of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we describe two methods of in vitro expression of HPV major capsid (L1) proteins which mimicked conformational epitopes and demonstrate their type specificity and ability to react with neutralizing and/or conformation-dependent antibodies. The L1 open reading frames (ORFs) for HPV-1, 6, 11, and 16 were molecularly cloned into a SV 40 expression vector and the encoded gene products were expressed in mammalian (cos) cells. Similarly, the L1 ORFs for HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 were molecularly cloned into recombinant baculovirus and the encoded gene products were expressed in insect (SF9) cells. The expressed L1 proteins reacted by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies generated against their corresponding native virions and by Western blotting with antibodies that recognized nonconformational epitopes of denatured virions. The recombinant L1 proteins expressed conformational epitopes in both cos and Sf9 cells that were type-specific and displayed neutralizing epitopes. The ability to express, purify, and qualitate the reactivity of recombinant L1 proteins will now permit the serologic analysis of host response to HPV infection and the development of prophylactic PV subunit vaccines.

  3. The loss of outer capsid protein P2 results in nontransmissibility by the insect vector of rice dwarf phytoreovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tomaru, M; Maruyama, W; Kikuchi, A; Yan, J; Zhu, Y; Suzuki, N; Isogai, M; Oguma, Y; Kimura, I; Omura, T

    1997-01-01

    A transmission-defective (TD) isolate of rice dwarf phytoreovirus lacked the ability to infect cells when derived from the virus-free insect vector Nephotettix cincticeps. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified virus showed that among six structural proteins, the P2 outer capsid protein (encoded by genome segment S2) was absent from the TD isolate, whereas all six proteins were present in the transmission-competent (TC) isolate. P2 was not detected on immunoblots of rice plants infected with the TD isolate. Genome segment S2 and its transcript were detected in both TD and TC isolates. Sequence analysis of the S2 segment of the TD isolate revealed the presence of a termination codon due to a point mutation in the open reading frame, which might explain the absence of P2 in the TD isolate. These results demonstrate that the P2 protein is one of the factors essential for infection by the virus of vector cells and, thus, influences transmissibility by vector insects. PMID:9311898

  4. Application of Mutated miR-206 Target Sites Enables Skeletal Muscle-specific Silencing of Transgene Expression of Cardiotropic AAV9 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Schön, Christian; Größl, Tobias; Pinkert, Sandra; Stein, Elisabeth A; Kurreck, Jens; Vetter, Roland; Fechner, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of completely complementary microRNA (miR) target sites (miRTS) into a transgene has been shown to be a valuable approach to specifically repress transgene expression in non-targeted tissues. miR-122TS have been successfully used to silence transgene expression in the liver following systemic application of cardiotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 vectors. For miR-206–mediated skeletal muscle-specific silencing of miR-206TS–bearing AAV9 vectors, however, we found this approach failed due to the expression of another member (miR-1) of the same miR family in heart tissue, the intended target. We introduced single-nucleotide substitutions into the miR-206TS and searched for those which prevented miR-1–mediated cardiac repression. Several mutated miR-206TS (m206TS), in particular m206TS-3G, were resistant to miR-1, but remained fully sensitive to miR-206. All these variants had mismatches in the seed region of the miR/m206TS duplex in common. Furthermore, we found that some m206TS, containing mismatches within the seed region or within the 3′ portion of the miR-206, even enhanced the miR-206– mediated transgene repression. In vivo expression of m206TS-3G– and miR-122TS–containing transgene of systemically applied AAV9 vectors was strongly repressed in both skeletal muscle and the liver but remained high in the heart. Thus, site-directed mutagenesis of miRTS provides a new strategy to differentiate transgene de-targeting of related miRs. PMID:23439498

  5. Quantification and modification of the equilibrium dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice self-assembled as a protein nanocoating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2015-09-01

    Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Unfortunately, protein assemblies are soft materials that may be too sensitive to mechanical disruption, and their intrinsic conformational dynamism may also influence their applicability. Thus, it may be critically important to characterize, understand and manipulate the mechanical features and dynamic behavior of protein assemblies in order to improve their suitability as nanomaterials. In this study, the capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus was induced to self-assemble as a continuous, single layered, ordered nanocoating onto an inorganic substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the mechanical behavior and the equilibrium dynamics (``breathing'') of this virus-based, self-assembled protein lattice in close to physiological conditions. The results uniquely provided: (i) evidence that AFM can be used to directly visualize in real time and quantify slow breathing motions leading to dynamic disorder in protein nanocoatings and viral capsid lattices; (ii) characterization of the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice and protein-based nanocoating, including flexibility, mechanical strength and remarkable self-repair capacity after mechanical damage; (iii) proof of principle that chemical additives can modify the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice or protein-based nanocoating, and improve their applied potential by increasing their mechanical strength and elasticity. We discuss the implications for the development of mechanically resistant and compliant biocoatings precisely organized at the nanoscale, and of novel antiviral agents acting on fundamental physical properties of viruses.Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications

  6. Quantification and modification of the equilibrium dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice self-assembled as a protein nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Alejandro; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2015-09-28

    Self-assembling, protein-based bidimensional lattices are being developed as functionalizable, highly ordered biocoatings for multiple applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Unfortunately, protein assemblies are soft materials that may be too sensitive to mechanical disruption, and their intrinsic conformational dynamism may also influence their applicability. Thus, it may be critically important to characterize, understand and manipulate the mechanical features and dynamic behavior of protein assemblies in order to improve their suitability as nanomaterials. In this study, the capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus was induced to self-assemble as a continuous, single layered, ordered nanocoating onto an inorganic substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the mechanical behavior and the equilibrium dynamics ("breathing") of this virus-based, self-assembled protein lattice in close to physiological conditions. The results uniquely provided: (i) evidence that AFM can be used to directly visualize in real time and quantify slow breathing motions leading to dynamic disorder in protein nanocoatings and viral capsid lattices; (ii) characterization of the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice and protein-based nanocoating, including flexibility, mechanical strength and remarkable self-repair capacity after mechanical damage; (iii) proof of principle that chemical additives can modify the dynamics and mechanics of a viral capsid lattice or protein-based nanocoating, and improve their applied potential by increasing their mechanical strength and elasticity. We discuss the implications for the development of mechanically resistant and compliant biocoatings precisely organized at the nanoscale, and of novel antiviral agents acting on fundamental physical properties of viruses.

  7. Purification of recombinant virus-like particles of porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein using ion-exchange monolith chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zaveckas, Mindaugas; Snipaitis, Simas; Pesliakas, Henrikas; Nainys, Juozas; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2015-06-01

    Diseases associated with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection are having a severe economic impact on swine-producing countries. The PCV2 capsid (Cap) protein expressed in eukaryotic systems self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) which can serve as antigens for diagnostics or/and as vaccine candidates. In this work, conventional adsorbents as well as a monolithic support with large pore sizes were examined for the chromatographic purification of PCV2 Cap VLPs from clarified yeast lysate. Q Sepharose XL was used for the initial separation of VLPs from residual host nucleic acids and some host cell proteins. For the further purification of PCV2 Cap VLPs, SP Sepharose XL, Heparin Sepharose CL-6B and CIMmultus SO3 monolith were tested. VLPs were not retained on SP Sepharose XL. The purity of VLPs after chromatography on Heparin Sepharose CL-6B was only 4-7% and the recovery of VLPs was 5-7%. Using ion-exchange chromatography on the CIMmultus SO3 monolith, PCV2 Cap VLPs with the purity of about 40% were obtained. The recovery of VLPs after chromatography on the CIMmultus SO3 monolith was 15-18%. The self-assembly of purified PCV2 Cap protein into VLPs was confirmed by electron microscopy. Two-step chromatographic purification procedure of PCV2 Cap VLPs from yeast lysate was developed using Q Sepharose XL and cation-exchange CIMmultus SO3 monolith.

  8. Diversity of environmental single-stranded DNA phages revealed by PCR amplification of the partial major capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Max; Kailasan, Shweta; Cohen, Allison; Roux, Simon; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Shevenell, Amelia; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Breitbart, Mya

    2014-10-01

    The small single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bacteriophages of the subfamily Gokushovirinae were traditionally perceived as narrowly targeted, niche-specific viruses infecting obligate parasitic bacteria, such as Chlamydia. The advent of metagenomics revealed gokushoviruses to be widespread in global environmental samples. This study expands knowledge of gokushovirus diversity in the environment by developing a degenerate PCR assay to amplify a portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of gokushoviruses. Over 500 amplicons were sequenced from 10 environmental samples (sediments, sewage, seawater and freshwater), revealing the ubiquity and high diversity of this understudied phage group. Residue-level conservation data generated from multiple alignments was combined with a predicted 3D structure, revealing a tendency for structurally internal residues to be more highly conserved than surface-presenting protein-protein or viral-host interaction domains. Aggregating this data set into a phylogenetic framework, many gokushovirus MCP clades contained samples from multiple environments, although distinct clades dominated the different samples. Antarctic sediment samples contained the most diverse gokushovirus communities, whereas freshwater springs from Florida were the least diverse. Whether the observed diversity is being driven by environmental factors or host-binding interactions remains an open question. The high environmental diversity of this previously overlooked ssDNA viral group necessitates further research elucidating their natural hosts and exploring their ecological roles.

  9. Functional Analysis of Adenovirus Protein IX Identifies Domains Involved in Capsid Stability, Transcriptional Activity, and Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Grave, Linda; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Chatton, Bruno; Kedinger, Claude

    2001-01-01

    The product of adenovirus (Ad) type 5 gene IX (pIX) is known to actively participate in the stability of the viral icosahedron, acting as a capsid cement. We have previously demonstrated that pIX is also a transcriptional activator of several viral and cellular TATA-containing promoters, likely contributing to the transactivation of the Ad expression program. By extensive mutagenesis, we have now delineated the functional domains involved in each of the pIX properties: residues 22 to 26 of the highly conserved N-terminal domain are crucial for incorporation of the protein into the virion; specific residues of the C-terminal leucine repeat are responsible for pIX interactions with itself and possibly other proteins, a property that is critical for pIX transcriptional activity. We also show that pIX takes part in the virus-induced nuclear reorganization of late infected cells: the protein induces, most likely through self-assembly, the formation of specific nuclear structures which appear as dispersed nuclear globules by immunofluorescence staining and as clear amorphous spherical inclusions by electron microscopy. The integrity of the leucine repeat appears to be essential for the formation and nuclear retention of these inclusions. Together, our results demonstrate the multifunctional nature of pIX and provide new insights into Ad biology. PMID:11435594

  10. New Structural Insights into the Genome and Minor Capsid Proteins of BK Polyomavirus using Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurdiss, Daniel L.; Morgan, Ethan L.; Thompson, Rebecca F.; Prescott, Emma L.; Panou, Margarita M.; Macdonald, Andrew; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BK polyomavirus is the causative agent of several diseases in transplant patients and the immunosuppressed. In order to better understand the structure and life cycle of BK, we produced infectious virions and VP1-only virus-like particles in cell culture, and determined their three-dimensional structures using cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and single-particle image processing. The resulting 7.6-Å resolution structure of BK and 9.1-Å resolution of the virus-like particles are the highest-resolution cryo-EM structures of any polyomavirus. These structures confirm that the architecture of the major structural protein components of these human polyomaviruses are similar to previous structures from other hosts, but give new insight into the location and role of the enigmatic minor structural proteins, VP2 and VP3. We also observe two shells of electron density, which we attribute to a structurally ordered part of the viral genome, and discrete contacts between this density and both VP1 and the minor capsid proteins. PMID:26996963

  11. Immunohistochemical detection of Human Papillomavirus capsid proteins L1 and L2 in squamous intraepithelial lesions: Potential utility in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Yemelyanova, A; Gravitt, PE; Ronnett, BM; Rositch, AF; Ogurtsova, A; Seidman, JD; Roden, RBS

    2012-01-01

    While cervical cancer screening relies on cervical cytology and high-risk HPV detection, histologic diagnosis, and specifically lesion grade, is the main parameter that drives clinical management of screen-positive women. Morphologically diagnosed squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL/CIN) regress spontaneously in more than half of the cases, but identifying those likely to persist and progress is not currently possible based upon morphology. Lack of major capsid protein L1 expression has been suggested as a feature in progressive lesions, while expression of the minor capsid protein L2 has not been extensively evaluated. The goal of this study is to evaluate immunohistochemical expression of L1 and L2 in SILs in correlation with lesion grade. One hundred fifty cervical specimens with SILs were selected based on HPV 16 or HPV 18 detection by Q-PCR. These included 89 low-grade SILs (LSIL/CIN1) and 123 high-grade SILs (75 HSIL/CIN2 and 48 HSIL/CIN3). More than one lesion/grade was identified in 53 specimens. The presence and grade of SIL was determined by a panel of pathologists. Capsid protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry using MAB 837 for L1 and RG-1 for L2. Lesions of different grades in the same specimen were scored separately. Expression of capsid proteins was detected in 34/89 (40%) LSIL/CIN1, 5/75 (6%) HSIL/CIN2 and none of 48 HSIL/CIN3. L1 and L2 were co-expressed in the same area of the lesion in 22 cases. In addition, L1 alone was expressed in 6 lesions and L2 alone in 11 lesions. Among the cases with multiple lesion grades in the same specimen, none with HSIL/CIN 3 expressed capsid proteins in any portion/grade of the lesion. HPV capsid proteins are expressed almost exclusively in LSIL/CIN1 and rarely in HSIL/CIN 2. Additional studies are warranted to examine lack of L1 and L2 expression in LSIL/CIN1 as a predictor of persistence or progression to HSIL/CIN 3, the precursor of cervical cancer. PMID:22996373

  12. Conservation of major and minor jelly-roll capsid proteins in Polinton (Maverick) transposons suggests that they are bona fide viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lakshminarayan M. Iyer and I. King Jordan. For complete reviews, see the Reviewers’ Reports section. Polintons (also known as Mavericks) and Tlr elements of Tetrahymena thermophila represent two families of large DNA transposons widespread in eukaryotes. Here, we show that both Polintons and Tlr elements encode two key virion proteins, the major capsid protein with the double jelly-roll fold and the minor capsid protein, known as the penton, with the single jelly-roll topology. This observation along with the previously noted conservation of the genes for viral genome packaging ATPase and adenovirus-like protease strongly suggests that Polintons and Tlr elements combine features of bona fide viruses and transposons. We propose the name ‘Polintoviruses’ to denote these putative viruses that could have played a central role in the evolution of several groups of DNA viruses of eukaryotes. PMID:24773695

  13. Conservation of major and minor jelly-roll capsid proteins in Polinton (Maverick) transposons suggests that they are bona fide viruses.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Bamford, Dennis H; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-04-29

    Polintons (also known as Mavericks) and Tlr elements of Tetrahymena thermophila represent two families of large DNA transposons widespread in eukaryotes. Here, we show that both Polintons and Tlr elements encode two key virion proteins, the major capsid protein with the double jelly-roll fold and the minor capsid protein, known as the penton, with the single jelly-roll topology. This observation along with the previously noted conservation of the genes for viral genome packaging ATPase and adenovirus-like protease strongly suggests that Polintons and Tlr elements combine features of bona fide viruses and transposons. We propose the name 'Polintoviruses' to denote these putative viruses that could have played a central role in the evolution of several groups of DNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  14. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Phosphorylates S/T-P Sites in the Hepadnavirus Core Protein C-Terminal Domain and Is Incorporated into Viral Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H.; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids. PMID:22951823

  15. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  16. The phosphorylated form of the ORF3 protein of hepatitis E virus interacts with its non-glycosylated form of the major capsid protein, ORF2.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shweta; Korkaya, Hasan; Zafrullah, Mohammad; Jameel, Shahid; Lal, Sunil K

    2002-06-21

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human RNA virus containing three open reading frames. Of these, ORF1 encodes the viral nonstructural polyprotein; ORF2 encodes the major capsid protein, which exists in a glycosylated and non-glycosylated form; and ORF3 codes for a phosphoprotein of undefined function. Using fluorescence-based colocalization, yeast two-hybrid experiments, transiently transfected COS-1 cell co-immunoprecipitation, and cell-free coupled transcription-translation techniques, we have shown that the ORF3 protein interacts with the ORF2 protein. The domains involved in this ORF2-ORF3 association have been identified and mapped. Our deletion analysis showed that a 25-amino acid region (residues 57-81) of the ORF3 protein is required for this interaction. Using a Mexican HEV isolate, site-directed mutagenesis of ORF3, and a phosphatase digestion assay, we showed that the ORF2-ORF3 interaction is dependent upon the phosphorylation at Ser(80) of ORF3. Finally, using COS-1 cell immunoprecipitation experiments, we found that the phosphorylated ORF3 protein preferentially interacts with the non-glycosylated ORF2 protein. These findings were confirmed using tunicamycin inhibition, point mutants, and deletion mutants expressing only non-glycosylated ORF2. ORF3 maps in the structural region of the HEV genome and now interacts with the major capsid protein, ORF2, in a post-translational modification-dependent manner. Such an interaction of ORF2 with ORF3 suggests a possible well regulated role for ORF3 in HEV structural assembly.

  17. Expression of muscovy duck parvovirus capsid proteins (VP2 and VP3) in a baculovirus expression system and demonstration of immunity induced by the recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Le Gall-Reculé, G; Jestin, V; Chagnaud, P; Blanchard, P; Jestin, A

    1996-09-01

    The gene encoding the muscovy duck parvovirus (DPV)-strain 89384 capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 was cloned in a baculovirus expression system and expressed in insect cells. The recombinant proteins were found to react with specific anti-DPV serum by Western blotting and to be located in the nucleus of insect cells (Sf9) as shown by immunofluorescence. Empty virus-like particles (VLPs) identical in size and appearance to DPV virions were observed by electron microscopy. The antigenicity and immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins were evaluated by ELISA and seroneutralization. Immunization of 3-week-old muscovy ducklings induced anti-DPV antibodies; neutralizing antibody titres were consistent with those observed in ducklings inoculated with a commercial inactivated vaccine. The way to develop these promising results is discussed.

  18. Long-distance Axonal Transport of AAV9 Is Driven by Dynein and Kinesin-2 and Is Trafficked in a Highly Motile Rab7-positive Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Michael J; Perlson, Eran; Holzbaur, Erika LF; Wolfe, John H

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can move along axonal pathways after brain injection, resulting in transduction of distal brain regions. This can enhance the spread of therapeutic gene transfer and improve treatment of neurogenetic disorders that require global correction. To better understand the underlying cellular mechanisms that drive AAV trafficking in neurons, we investigated the axonal transport of dye-conjugated AAV9, utilizing microfluidic primary neuron cultures that isolate cell bodies from axon termini and permit independent analysis of retrograde and anterograde axonal transport. After entry, AAV was trafficked into nonmotile early and recycling endosomes, exocytic vesicles, and a retrograde-directed late endosome/lysosome compartment. Rab7-positive late endosomes/lysosomes that contained AAV were highly motile, exhibiting faster retrograde velocities and less pausing than Rab7-positive endosomes without virus. Inhibitor experiments indicated that the retrograde transport of AAV within these endosomes is driven by cytoplasmic dynein and requires Rab7 function, whereas anterograde transport of AAV is driven by kinesin-2 and exhibits unusually rapid velocities. Furthermore, increasing AAV9 uptake by neuraminidase treatment significantly enhanced virus transport in both directions. These findings provide novel insights into AAV trafficking within neurons, which should enhance progress toward the utilization of AAV for improved distribution of transgene delivery within the brain. PMID:24100640

  19. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  20. Functional correction of neurological and somatic disorders at later stages of disease in MPS IIIA mice by systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiyan; Cataldi, Marcela P; Ware, Tierra A; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Meadows, Aaron S; Murrey, Darren A; McCarty, Douglas M

    2016-01-01

    The reversibility of neuropathic lysosomal storage diseases, including MPS IIIA, is a major goal in therapeutic development, due to typically late diagnoses and a large population of untreated patients. We used self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) serotype 9 vector expressing human N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH) to test the efficacy of treatment at later stages of the disease. We treated MPS IIIA mice at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 months of age with an intravenous injection of scAAV9-U1a-hSGSH vector, leading to restoration of SGSH activity and reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and somatic tissues at a dose of 5E12 vg/kg. Treatment up to 3 months age improved learning ability in the Morris water maze at 7.5 months, and lifespan was normalized. In mice treated at 6 months age, behavioral performance was impaired at 7.5 months, but did not decline further when retested at 12 months, and lifespan was increased, but not normalized. Treatment at 9 months did not increase life-span, though the GAG storage pathology in the CNS was improved. The study suggests that there is potential for gene therapy intervention in MPS IIIA at intermediate stages of the disease, and extends the clinical relevance of our systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery approach.

  1. Functional correction of neurological and somatic disorders at later stages of disease in MPS IIIA mice by systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiyan; Cataldi, Marcela P; Ware, Tierra A; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Meadows, Aaron S; Murrey, Darren A; McCarty, Douglas M

    2016-01-01

    The reversibility of neuropathic lysosomal storage diseases, including MPS IIIA, is a major goal in therapeutic development, due to typically late diagnoses and a large population of untreated patients. We used self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) serotype 9 vector expressing human N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH) to test the efficacy of treatment at later stages of the disease. We treated MPS IIIA mice at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 months of age with an intravenous injection of scAAV9-U1a-hSGSH vector, leading to restoration of SGSH activity and reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and somatic tissues at a dose of 5E12 vg/kg. Treatment up to 3 months age improved learning ability in the Morris water maze at 7.5 months, and lifespan was normalized. In mice treated at 6 months age, behavioral performance was impaired at 7.5 months, but did not decline further when retested at 12 months, and lifespan was increased, but not normalized. Treatment at 9 months did not increase life-span, though the GAG storage pathology in the CNS was improved. The study suggests that there is potential for gene therapy intervention in MPS IIIA at intermediate stages of the disease, and extends the clinical relevance of our systemic scAAV9-hSGSH gene delivery approach. PMID:27331076

  2. Diversity of environmental single-stranded DNA phages revealed by PCR amplification of the partial major capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Max; Kailasan, Shweta; Cohen, Allison; Roux, Simon; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Shevenell, Amelia; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Breitbart, Mya

    2014-01-01

    The small single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bacteriophages of the subfamily Gokushovirinae were traditionally perceived as narrowly targeted, niche-specific viruses infecting obligate parasitic bacteria, such as Chlamydia. The advent of metagenomics revealed gokushoviruses to be widespread in global environmental samples. This study expands knowledge of gokushovirus diversity in the environment by developing a degenerate PCR assay to amplify a portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of gokushoviruses. Over 500 amplicons were sequenced from 10 environmental samples (sediments, sewage, seawater and freshwater), revealing the ubiquity and high diversity of this understudied phage group. Residue-level conservation data generated from multiple alignments was combined with a predicted 3D structure, revealing a tendency for structurally internal residues to be more highly conserved than surface-presenting protein–protein or viral–host interaction domains. Aggregating this data set into a phylogenetic framework, many gokushovirus MCP clades contained samples from multiple environments, although distinct clades dominated the different samples. Antarctic sediment samples contained the most diverse gokushovirus communities, whereas freshwater springs from Florida were the least diverse. Whether the observed diversity is being driven by environmental factors or host-binding interactions remains an open question. The high environmental diversity of this previously overlooked ssDNA viral group necessitates further research elucidating their natural hosts and exploring their ecological roles. PMID:24694711

  3. The complex subcellular distribution of satellite panicum mosaic virus capsid protein reflects its multifunctional role during infection.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dong; Omarov, Rustem T; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2008-06-20

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) depends on its helper Panicum mosaic virus for replication and movement in host plants. The positive-sense single-stranded genomic RNA of SPMV encodes a 17-kDa capsid protein (CP) to form 16-nm virions. We determined that SPMV CP accumulates in both cytosolic and non-cytosolic fractions, but cytosolic accumulation of SPMV CP is exclusively associated with virions. An N-terminal arginine-rich motif (N-ARM) on SPMV CP is used to bind its cognate RNA and to form virus particles. Intriguingly, virion formation is dispensable for successful systemic SPMV RNA accumulation, yet this process still depends on an intact N-ARM. In addition, a C-terminal domain on the SPMV CP is necessary for self-interaction. Biochemical fractionation and fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-tagged SPMV CP demonstrated that the non-cytosolic SPMV CP is associated with the cell wall, the nucleus and other membranous organelles. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a satellite virus CP not only accumulates exclusively as virions in the cytosol but also is directed to the nucleolus and membranes. That SPMV CP is found both in the nucleus and the cell wall suggests its involvement in viral nuclear import and cell-to-cell transport.

  4. Using cryoEM Reconstruction and Phase Extension to Determine Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage ${\\Phi}$6 Major Capsid Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Daniel; Plevka, Pavel; Boura, Evzen

    2013-11-29

    Bacteriophage ${\\Phi}$6 is a double-stranded RNA virus that has been extensively studied as a model organism. In this paper we describe structure determination of ${\\Phi}$6 major capsid protein P1. The protein crystallized in base centered orthorhombic space group C2221. Matthews’s coefficient indicated that the crystals contain from four to seven P1 subunits in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The self-rotation function had shown presence of fivefold axes of non-crystallographic symmetry in the crystals. Thus, electron density map corresponding to a P1 pentamer was excised from a previously determined cryoEM reconstruction of the ${\\Phi}$6 procapsid at 7 Å resolution and used as a model for molecular replacement. The phases for reflections at higher than 7 Å resolution were obtained by phase extension employing the fivefold non-crystallographic symmetry present in the crystal. Lastly, the averaged 3.6 Å-resolution electron density map was of sufficient quality to allow model building.

  5. Bioprocessing of plant-derived virus-like particles of Norwalk virus capsid protein under current Good Manufacture Practice regulations.

    PubMed

    Lai, Huafang; Chen, Qiang

    2012-03-01

    Despite the success in expressing a variety of subunit vaccine proteins in plants and the recent stride in improving vaccine accumulation levels by transient expression systems, there is still no plant-derived vaccine that has been licensed for human use. The lack of commercial success of plant-made vaccines lies in several technical and regulatory barriers that remain to be overcome. These challenges include the lack of scalable downstream processing procedures, the uncertainty of regulatory compliance of production processes, and the lack of demonstration of plant-derived products that meet the required standards of regulatory agencies in identity, purity, potency and safety. In this study, we addressed these remaining challenges and successfully demonstrate the ability of using plants to produce a pharmaceutical grade Norwalk virus (NV) vaccine under current Good Manufacture Practice (cGMP) guidelines at multiple gram scales. Our results demonstrate that an efficient and scalable extraction and purification scheme can be established for processing virus-like particles (VLPs) of NV capsid protein (NVCP). We successfully operated the upstream and downstream NVCP production processes under cGMP regulations. Furthermore, plant-derived NVCP VLP demonstrates the identity, purity, potency and safety that meet the preset release specifications. This material is being tested in a Phase I human clinical trial. This research provides the first report of producing a plant-derived vaccine at scale under cGMP regulations in an academic setting and an important step for plant-produced vaccines to become a commercial reality.

  6. Functional and Structural Characterization of Novel Type of Linker Connecting Capsid and Nucleocapsid Protein Domains in Murine Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Doležal, Michal; Hadravová, Romana; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Langerová, Hana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2016-09-23

    The assembly of immature retroviral particles is initiated in the cytoplasm by the binding of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag with viral genomic RNA. The protein interactions necessary for assembly are mediated predominantly by the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains, which have conserved structures. In contrast, the structural arrangement of the CA-NC connecting region differs between retroviral species. In HIV-1 and Rous sarcoma virus, this region forms a rod-like structure that separates the CA and NC domains, whereas in Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, this region is densely packed, thus holding the CA and NC domains in close proximity. Interestingly, the sequence connecting the CA and NC domains in gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), is unique. The sequence is called a charged assembly helix (CAH) due to a high number of positively and negatively charged residues. Although both computational and deletion analyses suggested that the MLV CAH forms a helical conformation, no structural or biochemical data supporting this hypothesis have been published. Using an in vitro assembly assay, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, microcalorimetry, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay), we have characterized the structure and function of the MLV CAH. We provide experimental evidence that the MLV CAH belongs to a group of charged, E(R/K)-rich, single α-helices. This is the first single α-helix motif identified in viral proteins.

  7. Development of recombinant capsid antigen/transmembrane epitope fusion proteins for serological diagnosis of animal lentivirus infections.

    PubMed

    Rosati, S; Profiti, M; Lorenzetti, R; Bandecchi, P; Mannelli, A; Ortoffi, M; Tolari, F; Ciabatti, I M

    2004-10-01

    Among animal lentiviruses, Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) and Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) are important pathogens associated with a variety of clinical pictures including immunodeficiency, anaemia, arthritis, pneumonia. The detection of viral antibody response represents a practical diagnostic approach in all lentivirus infections since they remain detectable long life. Capsid antigen (CA) is the major viral core protein and specific antibodies against this antigen are usually first recognised in infected sheep, goat and horse, remaining detectable for long period. Transmembrane (TM) domain of envelope glycoprotein contains a well conserved motif known to form an immunodominant epitope in several lentiviruses. In this study a simple strategy was developed to express the entire CA and the TM epitope in a single fusion protein from equine, feline and small ruminant lentiviruses in prokaryotic system and evaluated the diagnostic utility of a purified preparation in an indirect ELISA for each of the three infections. Results demonstrate that, for FIV and SRLV infections, the combination of CA and TM fractions increases the sensitivity of diagnostic tests based only on CA. The corresponding CA/TM antigen from EIAV showed excellent agreement with Coggins test.

  8. Bioprocessing of plant-derived virus-like particles of Norwalk virus capsid protein under current Good Manufacture Practice regulations

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Huafang; Chen, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success in expressing a variety of subunit vaccine proteins in plants and the recent stride in improving vaccine accumulation levels by transient expression systems, there is still no plant-derived vaccine that has been licensed for human use. The lack of commercial success of plant-made vaccines lies in several technical and regulatory barriers that remain to be overcome. These challenges include the lack of scalable downstream processing procedures, the uncertainty of regulatory compliance of production processes, and the lack of demonstration of plant-derived products that meet the required standards of regulatory agencies in identity, purity, potency and safety. In this study, we addressed these remaining challenges and successfully demonstrate the ability of using plants to produce a pharmaceutical grade Norwalk virus (NV) vaccine under current Good Manufacture Practice (cGMP) guidelines at multiple gram scales. Our results demonstrate that an efficient and scalable extraction and purification scheme can established for processing virus-like particles (VLP) of NV capsid protein (NVCP). We successfully operated the upstream and downstream NVCP production processes under cGMP regulations. Furthermore, plant-derived NVCP VLP demonstrates the identity, purity, potency and safety that meet the preset release specifications. This material is being tested in a Phase I human clinical trial. This research provides the first report of producing a plant-derived vaccine at scale under cGMP regulations in an academic setting and an important step for plant-produced vaccines to become a commercial reality. PMID:22134876

  9. Yellow fever virus capsid protein is a potent suppressor of RNA silencing that binds double-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Wiley, Michael R.; Badawi, Atif; Adelman, Zach N.; Myles, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus (YFV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and West Nile virus (WNV), profoundly affect human health. The successful transmission of these viruses to a human host depends on the pathogen’s ability to overcome a potentially sterilizing immune response in the vector mosquito. Similar to other invertebrate animals and plants, the mosquito’s RNA silencing pathway comprises its primary antiviral defense. Although a diverse range of plant and insect viruses has been found to encode suppressors of RNA silencing, the mechanisms by which flaviviruses antagonize antiviral small RNA pathways in disease vectors are unknown. Here we describe a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) encoded by the prototype flavivirus, YFV. We show that the YFV capsid (YFC) protein inhibits RNA silencing in the mosquito Aedes aegypti by interfering with Dicer. This VSR activity appears to be broadly conserved in the C proteins of other medically important flaviviruses, including that of ZIKV. These results suggest that a molecular “arms race” between vector and pathogen underlies the continued existence of flaviviruses in nature. PMID:27849599

  10. Elucidating the mechanism behind irreversible deformation of viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, Anton; Roos, Wouter H; Wuite, Gijs J L; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-10-07

    Atomic force microscopy has recently provided highly precise measurements of mechanical properties of various viruses. However, molecular details underlying viral mechanics remain unresolved. Here we report atomic force microscopy nanoindentation experiments on T=4 hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids combined with coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which permit interpretation of experimental results at the molecular level. The force response of the indented capsid recorded in simulations agrees with experimental observations. In both experiment and simulation, irreversible capsid deformation is observed for deep indentations. Simulations show the irreversibility to be due to local bending and shifting of capsid proteins, rather than their global rearrangement. These results emphasize the viability of large capsid deformations without significant changes of the mutual positions of HBV capsid proteins, in contrast to the stiffer capsids of other viruses, which exhibit more extensive contacts between their capsid proteins than seen in the case of HBV.

  11. Synthesis of viruslike particles by expression of the putative capsid protein of Leishmania RNA virus in a recombinant baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Cadd, T L; Patterson, J L

    1994-01-01

    The putative capsid open reading frame (ORF2) of the Leishmania RNA virus LRV1-4 was expressed in a baculovirus expression system. The expressed protein was identified by Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal antiserum raised to purified LRV1-4 virus. Electron microscopy and sedimentation analysis indicated that the expressed protein self-assembles into empty viruslike particles of similar size and shape to authentic virus particles, thus confirming that ORF2 encodes the viral capsid. The expressed particles are present exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected SF9 cells and are able to assemble in the absence of LRV1-4 RNA, viral polymerase, or any Leishmania host factors. Images PMID:8254748

  12. The presence of Chlamydia phage PhiCPG1 capsid protein VP1 genes and antibodies in patients infected with Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyue; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yuanjun; Li, Lingjie; Hou, Shuping; Gao, Xibo; Qi, Manli; Liu, Quanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia phage PhiCPG1 has been found in Chlamydia caviae in a guinea pig model for inclusion conjunctivitis, raising the possibility that Chlamydia phage is also present in patients infected with C. trachomatis (Ct). In the present study, we assayed for presence of Chlamydia phage capsid protein VP1 genes and antibodies in 84 non-Ct controls and 206 Ct patients using an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), followed by verification with Western blot. None of the subjects were exposed to an antibiotic treatment or had a C. pneumoniae infection. The VP1 antibody test was positive in both, the ELISA and Western blot assay, in 4 Ct patients. PCR amplification experiments revealed presence of the VP1 gene in 5 Ct patients. The results suggest that Chlamydia phage capsid protein VP1 may exist in some Ct patients.

  13. Assembly, stability and dynamics of virus capsids.

    PubMed

    Mateu, Mauricio G

    2013-03-01

    Most viruses use a hollow protein shell, the capsid, to enclose the viral genome. Virus capsids are large, symmetric oligomers made of many copies of one or a few types of protein subunits. Self-assembly of a viral capsid is a complex oligomerization process that proceeds along a pathway regulated by ordered interactions between the participating protein subunits, and that involves a series of (usually transient) assembly intermediates. Assembly of many virus capsids requires the assistance of scaffolding proteins or the viral nucleic acid, which interact with the capsid subunits to promote and direct the process. Once assembled, many capsids undergo a maturation reaction that involves covalent modification and/or conformational rearrangements, which may increase the stability of the particle. The final, mature capsid is a relatively robust protein complex able to protect the viral genome from physicochemical aggressions; however, it is also a metastable, dynamic structure poised to undergo controlled conformational transitions required to perform biologically critical functions during virus entry into cells, intracellular trafficking, and viral genome uncoating. This article provides an updated general overview on structural, biophysical and biochemical aspects of the assembly, stability and dynamics of virus capsids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Latex bead immobilisation in PDMS matrix for the detection of p53 gene point mutation and anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Christophe A; Degiuli, Agnès; Imbert-Laurenceau, Emmanuelle; Mallet, Francois; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Blum, Loïc J

    2005-03-01

    Two diagnostic chemiluminescent biochips were developed for either the detection of p53 gene point mutation or the serological detection of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein. Both biochips were composed of 24 microarrays of latex beads spots (4x4) (150 microm in diameter, 800 microm spacing) entrapped in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer (PDMS). The latex beads, bearing oligonucleotide sequences or capsid protein, were spotted with a conventional piezoelectric spotter and subsequently transferred at the PDMS interface. The electron microscopy observation of the biochips showed how homogeneous and well distributed the spots could be. Point mutation detection on the codon 273 of the p53 gene was performed on the basis of the melting temperature difference between the perfect match sequence and the one base pair mismatch sequence. The hybridisation of a 20-mer oligonucleotide form the codon 273 including a one base pair mutation in its sequence on a biochip arrayed with non-muted and the muted complementary sequences, enabled a clear discrimination at 56 degrees C between muted and wild sequences. Moreover, the quantitative measurement of the amount of muted sequence in a sample was possible in the range 0.4-4 pmol. Serological measurement of anti-HIV-1 p24 capsid protein on the biochip, prepared with 1-microm-diameter latex beads, enabled the detection of monoclonal antibodies in the range 1.55-775 ng mL(-1). Such a range could be lowered to 0.775 ng mL(-1) when using 50-nm-diameter beads, which generated a higher specific surface. The validation of the biochip for the detection of anti-HIV-1 capsid protein antibodies was performed in human sera from seropositive and seronegative patients. The positivity of the sera was easily discriminated at serum dilutions below 1:1,000.

  15. Egg yolk IgY against RHDV capsid protein VP60 promotes rabbit defense against RHDV infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Zai Xin; Hu, Wei Dong; Li, Bing Chao; Li, Tian You; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Zhi

    2014-01-15

    VP60 capsid protein is the major structural and immunogenicity protein of RHDV (Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus, RHDV), and has been implicated as a main protein antigen in RHDV diagnosis and vaccine design. In this report, egg yolk antibody (IgY) against N-terminal of VP60 was evaluated and developed as a new strategy for RHDV therapy. Briefly, N-terminal of VP60 (∼250aa) fragment was cloned and inserted into pET28a expression vector, and then the resultant plasmid, pET28a/VP60-N, was transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) for recombinant VP60-N protein (rVP60-N) expression. Next, the rVP60-N was purified by Ni(+)-affinity purification chromatography and identified by Western blotting with RHDV antiserum. After immunizing the chickens with rVP60-N, the anti-rVP60-N IgY was isolated, and the activity and specificity of the IgY antibody were analyzed by ELISA and Western blotting. In our results, the rVP60-N could be expressed in E. coli as soluble fraction, and the isolated anti-rVP60-N IgY demonstrated a high specificity and titer (1:22,000) against rVP60-N antigen. For further evaluation of the IgY efficacy in vivo, rabbits were grouped randomly and challenged with RHDV, and the results showed that anti-rVP60-N IgY could significantly protect rabbits from virus infection and promote the host survival after a sustained treatment with anti-rVP60-N IgY for 5 days. Taken together, our study demonstrates evidence that production of IgY against VP60 could be as a novel strategy for the RHDV therapy.

  16. Evolutionary and structural analyses of alpha-papillomavirus capsid proteins yields novel insights into L2 structure and interaction with L1

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, John; Panda, Debasis; Rose, Suzanne; Jensen, Ty; Hughes, Willie A; Tso, For Yue; Angeletti, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    Background PVs (PV) are small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that have been identified as the primary etiological agent for cervical cancer and their potential for malignant transformation in mucosal tissue has a large impact on public health. The PV family Papillomaviridae is organized into multiple genus based on sequential parsimony, host range, tissue tropism, and histology. We focused this analysis on the late gene products, major (L1) and minor (L2) capsid proteins from the family Papillomaviridae genus Alpha-papillomavirus. Alpha-PVs preferentially infect oral and anogenital mucosa of humans and primates with varied risk of oncogenic transformation. Development of evolutionary associations between PVs will likely provide novel information to assist in clarifying the currently elusive relationship between PV and its microenvironment (i.e., the single infected cell) and macro environment (i.e., the skin tissue). We attempt to identify the regions of the major capsid proteins as well as minor capsid proteins of alpha-papillomavirus that have been evolutionarily conserved, and define regions that are under constant selective pressure with respect to the entire family of viruses. Results This analysis shows the loops of L1 are in fact the most variable regions among the alpha-PVs. We also identify regions of L2, involved in interaction with L1, as evolutionarily conserved among the members of alpha- PVs. Finally, a predicted three-dimensional model was generated to further elucidate probable aspects of the L1 and L2 interaction. PMID:19087355

  17. Prognostic relevance of human papillomavirus L1 capsid protein detection within mild and moderate dysplastic lesions of the cervix uteri in combination with p16 biomarker.

    PubMed

    Hilfrich, Ralf; Hariri, Jalil

    2008-04-01

    To proof the prognostic relevance of HPV L1 capsid protein detection on colposcopically-guided punch biopsies in combination with p16. Sections of colposcopically-guided punch biopsies from 191 consecutive cases with at least 5 years of follow-up were stained with HPV L1 capsid protein antibodies (Cytoactiv screening antibody) and a monoclonal anti-p16 antibody. Fifty sections were derived from a benign group, 91 from low-grade (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN 1]) lesions and 50 from high-grade (CIN 2 and 3) lesions. Overall only 16.1% of the 87 L1-negative, p16-positive CIN lesions showed remission of the lesion compared to 72.4% of the double positive cases. None of the L1/p16 double negative CIN lesions progressed. HPV L1 capsid protein detection with Cytoactiv screening antibody seems to be a promising new tool to predict the behavior of HPV-associated (p16-positive) early dysplastic lesions.

  18. Controlling viral capsid assembly with templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Michael F.

    2008-05-01

    We develop coarse-grained models that describe the dynamic encapsidation of functionalized nanoparticles by viral capsid proteins. We find that some forms of cooperative interactions between protein subunits and nanoparticles can dramatically enhance rates and robustness of assembly, as compared to the spontaneous assembly of subunits into empty capsids. For large core-subunit interactions, subunits adsorb onto core surfaces en masse in a disordered manner, and then undergo a cooperative rearrangement into an ordered capsid structure. These assembly pathways are unlike any identified for empty capsid formation. Our models can be directly applied to recent experiments in which viral capsid proteins assemble around functionalized inorganic nanoparticles [Sun , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 1354 (2007)]. In addition, we discuss broader implications for understanding the dynamic encapsidation of single-stranded genomic molecules during viral replication and for developing multicomponent nanostructured materials.

  19. Controlling Viral Capsid Assembly with Templating

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    We develop coarse-grained models that describe the dynamic encapsidation of functionalized nanoparticles by viral capsid proteins. We find that some forms of cooperative interactions between protein subunits and nanoparticles can dramatically enhance rates and robustness of assembly, as compared to the spontaneous assembly of subunits into empty capsids. For large core-subunit interactions, subunits adsorb onto core surfaces en masse in a disordered manner, and then undergo a cooperative rearrangement into an ordered capsid structure. These assembly pathways are unlike any identified for empty capsid formation. Our models can be directly applied to recent experiments in which viral capsid proteins assemble around the functionalized inorganic nanoparticles [Sun et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci (2007) 104, 1354]. In addition, we discuss broader implications for understanding the dynamic encapsidation of single-stranded genomic molecules during viral replication and for developing multicomponent nanostructured materials. PMID:18643099

  20. Recombinant viral capsid protein VP1 suppresses lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yi; Hung, Shao-Wen; Liang, Chi-Ming; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2014-06-15

    Recombinant capsid protein VP1 (rVP1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus binds to integrins to modulate Akt/GSK3-β signaling and suppress migration/invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Here, we showed that the rVP1-mediated inhibition of Akt/GSK3-β signaling and cell migration/invasion was accompanied by downregulation in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PIP3), integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and IKK/NF-κB signaling as well as suppression of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7. Addition of PIP3 or overexpression of ILK reversed the rVP1-induced inhibition of IKK/NF-κB signaling, COX-2 and MIG-7. The rVP1-mediated downregulation of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7 led to not only attenuation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, MMP2 activity and invasion of lung cancer cells in vitro but also decreased tumor growth and metastasis of lung cancer in xenograft mice. Moreover, downregulation of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7 significantly prolonged the overall and disease-free survival of lung cancer-bearing mice. These results suggest that rVP1 inhibits cancer invasion/metastasis, partly if not mainly, via downregulating integrin/PI3K/Akt, ILK and IKK/NF-κB signaling to suppress expression of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7.

  1. The Interdomain Linker Region of HIV-1 Capsid Protein is a Critical Determinant of Proper Core Assembly and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiyang; Ablan, Sherimay; Derebail, Suchitra; Hercík, Kamil; Soheilian, Ferri; Thomas, James A.; Tang, Shixing; Hewlett, Indira; Nagashima, Kunio; Gorelick, Robert J.; Freed, Eric O.; Levin, Judith G.

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 capsid protein consists of two independently folded domains connected by a flexible peptide linker (residues 146–150), the function of which remains to be defined. To investigate the role of this region in virus replication, we made alanine or leucine substitutions in each linker residue and two flanking residues. Three classes of mutants were identified: (i) S146A and T148A behave like wild type (WT); (ii) Y145A, I150A, and L151A are noninfectious, assemble unstable cores with aberrant morphology, and synthesize almost no viral DNA; and (iii) P147L and S149A display a poorly infectious, attenuated phenotype. Infectivity of P147L and S149A is rescued specifically by pseudotyping with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein. Moreover, despite having unstable cores, these mutants assemble WT-like structures and synthesize viral DNA, although less efficiently than WT. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the linker region is essential for proper assembly and stability of cores and efficient replication. PMID:22036671

  2. Electroaddressed immobilization of recombinant HIV-1 P24 capsid protein onto screen-printed arrays for serological testing.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Christophe A; Imbert-Laurenceau, Emmanuelle; Mallet, Francois; Chaix, Carole; Mandrand, Bernard; Blum, Loïc J

    2005-05-01

    A serological chemiluminescent biochip was designed based on screen-printed electrode arrays composed of nine 1-mm(2) electrodes. Arrays were shown to be produced with good batch-to-batch reproducibility (standard deviations of 4.4 and 12.0% for ferricyanide oxidation potential and current, respectively) and very good reproducibility within a particular array (2.0 and 7.5% standard deviations for the same controls). Electrode arrays were used to electroaddress various bioconjugate structures comprising a recombinant HIV-1 P24 capsid protein (RH24K) in polypyrrole film. Entrapment of RH24K preimmobilized onto maleic anhydride-alt-methyl vinyl ether copolymer was shown to be the more efficient immobilization procedure. This addressed sensing layer enabled the detection of anti-P24 antibodies at a concentration of 3.5 ng/ml through peroxidase-labeled anti-human immunoglobulin G reaction. The biochip was used to perform an HIV-1 serological test in human sera. HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative sera were easily discriminated using serum dilutions greater than 1/10,000.

  3. Variable internal flexibility characterizes the helical capsid formed by agrobacterium VirE2 protein on single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Zbaida, David; Eisenstein, Miriam; Frankenstein, Ziv; Mehlman, Tevie; Weiner, Lev; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Barak, Yoav; Albeck, Shira; Briggs, John A G; Wolf, Sharon G; Elbaum, Michael

    2013-07-02

    Agrobacterium is known for gene transfer to plants. In addition to a linear ssDNA oligonucleotide, Agrobacterium tumefaciens secretes an abundant ssDNA-binding effector, VirE2. In many ways VirE2 adapts the conjugation mechanism to transform the eukaryotic host. The crystal structure of VirE2 shows two compact domains joined by a flexible linker. Bound to ssDNA, VirE2 forms an ordered solenoidal shell, or capsid known as the T-complex. Here, we present a three-dimensional reconstruction of the VirE2-ssDNA complex using cryo-electron microscopy and iterative helical real-space reconstruction. High-resolution refinement was not possible due to inherent heterogeneity in the protein structure. By a combination of computational modeling, chemical modifications, mass spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance, we found that the N-terminal domain is tightly constrained by both tangential and longitudinal links, while the C terminus is weakly constrained. The quaternary structure is thus rigidly assembled while remaining locally flexible. This flexibility may be important in accommodating substrates without sequence specificity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of neutralizing linear epitopes from the VP1 capsid protein of Enterovirus 71 using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Foo, Damian Guang Wei; Alonso, Sylvie; Phoon, Meng Chee; Ramachandran, N P; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Poh, Chit Laa

    2007-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and has been associated with severe neurological diseases resulting in high mortalities. Currently, there is no vaccine available and treatment is limited to palliative care. In this study, antisera were raised in mice against 95 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the VP1 capsid protein of EV71. Two peptides, SP55 and SP70, containing amino acid 163-177 and 208-222 of VP1, respectively, are capable of eliciting neutralizing antibodies against EV71 in the in vitro microneutralization assay. SP70 was identified to be particularly potent in eliciting a neutralizing antibody titer comparable to that obtained with a whole virion-immune serum. Immunization of mice with either SP55 or SP70 triggered an EV71-specific IgG response as high as that obtained with the whole virion as immunogen. The IgG sub-typing revealed that the neutralizing antibodies elicited by both synthetic peptides are likely belonging to the IgG1 sub-type. Alignment with databases showed that the amino acid residues of SP70 are highly conserved amongst the VP1 sequences of EV71 strains from various sub-genogroups. Altogether, these data indicate that SP70 represents a promising candidate for an effective synthetic peptide-based vaccine against EV71.

  5. Characterization of a novel monoclonal antibody reactive against the N-terminal region of Enterovirus 71 VP1 capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Lim, Xiao Fang; Jia, Qiang; Chow, Vincent T K; Kwang, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral infectious disease caused by human Enterovirus A, particularly Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus 16 (CA16) serotypes, with EV71 infection associated with severe neurological complications and mortality. Lots of attention has been placed on elucidating viral epitopes, which is useful for EV71 viral research. In this study, a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb 4) specific for EV71 was generated and mapped to target the N-terminal region of VP1 capsid protein, spanning amino acid residues 12-19 (IGDSVSRA). mAb 4 can cross-react with all the 11 representative EV71 subgenotypes (A, B1-5, C1-5), but not with the representative strain of CA16 as demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). BLAST analyses of this epitope against all Enterovirus entries in Genbank also demonstrated that this epitope is unique in EV71, but not other Enterovirus such as CA16 It may be useful for structural study of VP1 morphogenesis during infection and also applications for identification of EV71 infection.

  6. Glucocorticoids Prevent Enterovirus 71 Capsid Protein VP1 Induced Calreticulin Surface Exposure by Alleviating Neuronal ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan-Dan; Mai, Jian-Ning; He, Li-Ya; Li, Pei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Xiong; Yan, Jian-Jiang; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Deng, Li; Wei, Dan; Liu, Di-Hui; Yang, Si-Da; Yao, Zhi-Bin

    2017-02-01

    Severe hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) caused by Enterovirus 71 (EV71) always accompanies with inflammation and neuronal damage in the central nervous system (CNS). During neuronal injuries, cell surface-exposed calreticulin (Ecto-CRT) is an important mediator for primary phagocytosis of viable neurons by microglia. Our data confirmed that brainstem neurons underwent neuronophagia by glia in EV71-induced death cases of HFMD. EV71 capsid proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, or VP4 did not induce apoptosis of brainstem neurons. Interestingly, we found VP1-activated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy could promote Ecto-CRT upregulation, but ER stress or autophagy alone was not sufficient to induce CRT exposure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that VP1-induced autophagy activation was mediated by ER stress. Meaningfully, we found dexamethasone treatment could attenuate Ecto-CRT upregulation by alleviating VP1-induced ER stress. Altogether, these findings identify VP1-promoted Ecto-CRT upregulation as a novel mechanism of EV71-induced neuronal cell damage and highlight the potential of the use of glucocorticoids to treat severe HFMD patients with CNS complications.

  7. Capsid Protein VP4 of Human Rhinovirus Induces Membrane Permeability by the Formation of a Size-Selective Multimeric Pore

    PubMed Central

    Panjwani, Anusha; Strauss, Mike; Gold, Sarah; Wenham, Hannah; Jackson, Terry; Chou, James J.; Rowlands, David J.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Hogle, James M.; Tuthill, Tobias J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family. PMID:25102288

  8. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of capsid protein gene in feline calicivirus isolates from Rio Grande do Sul in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Henzel, A; Sá e Silva, M; Luo, S; Lovato, L T; Weiblen, R

    2012-02-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important pathogen that affects domestic cats, inducing acute oral and upper respiratory tract clinical signs. The aim of this study was to analyze the variability of the capsid protein in different FCV isolates from southern Brazil. The sequencing analyses of thirteen Brazilian FCV samples, phylogenetic analyses and assessments of ten previously published sequences were conducted by examining the open reading frame 2 (ORF2, regions B-F). Comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequences of the ORF2 in Brazilian FCV isolates with those of the FCV-F9 strain indicated that the main differences are located within the regions C and hypervariable E (HVR_E). Epitopes that were mapped to the regions D, 5'HVR_E and conserved E also presented with some variability when compared to the strain F9. This is the first study describing sequence analyses and the phylogenetic relationships among FCV isolates from Brazil. The results presented here may expand upon current knowledge regarding aspects of FCV biology, epidemiology and genetic diversity and provide insights into improving the efficacies of current FCV vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal {beta}-hexamer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wispelaere, Melissanne de; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Wilkens, Stephan; Rao, A.L.N.

    2011-10-10

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32}, highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a {beta}-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the {beta}-hexamer structure by mutating {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32} to {sup 28}AAAAA{sup 32} had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNase and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having {beta}-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.

  10. Chlamydiaphage φCPG1 Capsid Protein Vp1 Inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis Growth via the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanli; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Quan; Sun, Changgui; Zhang, Xinmei; Liu, Yuanjun; Liu, Quanzhong

    2016-04-14

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of curable bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Although the pathogen is well established, the pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Given the current challenges of antibiotic resistance and blocked processes of vaccine development, the use of a specific chlamydiaphage may be a new treatment solution. φCPG1 is a lytic phage specific for Chlamydia caviae, and shows over 90% nucleotide sequence identity with other chlamydiaphages. Vp1 is the major capsid protein of φCPG1. Purified Vp1 was previously confirmed to inhibit Chlamydia trachomatis growth. We here report the first attempt at exploring the relationship between Vp1-treated C. trachomatis and the protein and gene levels of the mitogen-activated/extracellular regulated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway by Western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. Moreover, we evaluated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after Vp1 treatment. After 48 h of incubation, the p-ERK level of the Vp1-treated group decreased compared with that of the Chlamydia infection group. Accordingly, ERK1 and ERK2 mRNA expression levels of the Vp1-treated group also decreased compared with the Chlamydia infection group. IL-8 and IL-1 levels were also decreased after Vp1 treatment compared with the untreated group. Our results demonstrate that the inhibition effect of the chlamydiaphage φCPG1 capsid protein Vp1 on C. trachomatis is associated with the MAPK pathway, and inhibits production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1. The bacteriophages may provide insight into a new signaling transduction mechanism to influence their hosts, in addition to bacteriolysis.

  11. Norovirus-binding proteins recovered from activated sludge micro-organisms with an affinity to a noroviral capsid peptide.

    PubMed

    Sano, D; Wada, K; Imai, T; Masago, Y; Omura, T

    2010-12-01

    Transmission routes of noroviruses, leading aetiological agents of acute gastroenteritis, are rarely verified when outbreaks occur. Because the destination of norovirus particles being firmly captured by micro-organisms could be totally different from that of those particles moving freely, micro-organisms with natural affinity ligands such as virus-binding proteins would affect the fate of viruses in environment, if such microbial affinity ligands exist. The aim of this study is to identify norovirus-binding proteins (NoVBPs) that are presumably working as natural ligands for norovirus particles in water environments.  NoVBPs were recovered from activated sludge micro-organisms by an affinity chromatography technique in which a capsid peptide of norovirus genogroup II (GII) was immobilized. The recovered NoVBPs bind to norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) of norovirus GII, and this adsorption was stronger than that to NoVLPs of norovirus genogroup I. The profile of two-dimensional electrophoresis of NoVBPs showed that the recovered NoVBPs included at least seven spots of protein. The determination of N-terminal amino acid sequences of these NoVBPs revealed that hydrophobic interactions could contribute to the adsorption between NoVBPs and norovirus particles.  NoVBPs conferring a high affinity to norovirus GII were successfully isolated from activated sludge micro-organisms.  NoVBPs could be natural viral ligands and play an important role in the NoV transmission. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. An efficient approach for recombinant expression and purification of the viral capsid protein from beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Khandokar, Yogesh B; Himiari, Zainab; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2015-04-01

    Structural insights into the biology of viruses such as beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) which do not replicate in cell cultures are increasingly reliant on recombinant methods for protein production and purification. Development of efficient methods for homogenous production of BFDV capsid protein is also essential for vaccine development and diagnostic purposes. In this study, two different plasmids (pMCSG21 and pMCSG24), three homologous BFDV capsid proteins, and two unique expression media (auto-induction and IPTG-induced expression) were trialled for over-expression of the BFDV in Escherichia coli. Over-expression was observed for all three recombinant targets of BFDV capsid protein using E. coli BL21 (DE3) Rosetta 2 cell lines under IPTG induction. These proteins could be purified using an optimized, two-step purification process using a buffer containing 20mM N-cyclohexyl-3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (CAPS), 500 mM NaCl and supplemented with 200 mM L-arginine at pH 10.5, to yield a soluble and stable protein of greater than 95% purity. The final concentration of purified protein was approximately fourteen-to-eighteen fold greater than that reported previously. Initial crystallization and X-ray diffraction confirm that the protein is structured in a manner consistent with icosahedral symmetry. Antigenicity of recombinant Cap was confirmed by immunoassay, verifying its validity for use in continued experimentation as a potential DNA vaccine, a reagent in diagnostic assays, and purified concentrated protein for structural and functional biology.

  13. Cysteine Residues in the Major Capsid Protein, Vp1, of the JC Virus Are Important for Protein Stability and Oligomer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shintaro; Suzuki, Tadaki; Igarashi, Manabu; Orba, Yasuko; Ohtake, Noriko; Nagakawa, Keita; Niikura, Kenichi; Kimura, Takashi; Kasamatsu, Harumi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    The capsid of the human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) consists of 72 pentameric capsomeres of a major structural protein, Vp1. The cysteine residues of the related Vp1 of SV40 are known to contribute to Vp1 folding, pentamer formation, pentamer-pentamer contacts, and capsid stabilization. In light of the presence of a slight structural difference between JCV Vp1 and SV40 counterpart, the way the former folds could be either different from or similar to the latter. We found a difference: an important contribution of Vp1 cysteines to the formation of infectious virions, unique in JCV and absent in SV40. Having introduced amino acid substitution at each of six cysteines (C42, C80, C97, C200, C247, and C260) in JCV Vp1, we found that, when expressed in HeLa cells, the Vp1 level was decreased in C80A and C247A mutants, and remained normal in the other mutants. Additionally, the C80A and C247A Vp1-expressing cell extracts did not show the hemagglutination activity characteristic of JCV particles. The C80A and C247A mutant Vp1s were found to be less stable than the wild-type Vp1 in HeLa cells. When produced in a reconstituted in vitro protein translation system, these two mutant proteins were stable, suggesting that some cellular factors were responsible for their degradation. As determined by their sucrose gradient sedimentation profiles, in vitro translated C247A Vp1 formed pentamers, but in vitro translated C80A Vp1 was entirely monomeric. When individually incorporated into the JCV genome, the C80A and C247A mutants, but not the other Vp1 cysteine residues mutants, interfered with JCV infectivity. Furthermore, the C80A, but not the C247A, mutation prevented the nuclear localization of Vp1 in JCV genome transfected cells. These findings suggest that C80 of JCV Vp1 is required for Vp1 stability and pentamer formation, and C247 is involved in capsid assembly in the nucleus. PMID:24130786

  14. Cysteine residues in the major capsid protein, Vp1, of the JC virus are important for protein stability and oligomer formation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shintaro; Suzuki, Tadaki; Igarashi, Manabu; Orba, Yasuko; Ohtake, Noriko; Nagakawa, Keita; Niikura, Kenichi; Kimura, Takashi; Kasamatsu, Harumi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    The capsid of the human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) consists of 72 pentameric capsomeres of a major structural protein, Vp1. The cysteine residues of the related Vp1 of SV40 are known to contribute to Vp1 folding, pentamer formation, pentamer-pentamer contacts, and capsid stabilization. In light of the presence of a slight structural difference between JCV Vp1 and SV40 counterpart, the way the former folds could be either different from or similar to the latter. We found a difference: an important contribution of Vp1 cysteines to the formation of infectious virions, unique in JCV and absent in SV40. Having introduced amino acid substitution at each of six cysteines (C42, C80, C97, C200, C247, and C260) in JCV Vp1, we found that, when expressed in HeLa cells, the Vp1 level was decreased in C80A and C247A mutants, and remained normal in the other mutants. Additionally, the C80A and C247A Vp1-expressing cell extracts did not show the hemagglutination activity characteristic of JCV particles. The C80A and C247A mutant Vp1s were found to be less stable than the wild-type Vp1 in HeLa cells. When produced in a reconstituted in vitro protein translation system, these two mutant proteins were stable, suggesting that some cellular factors were responsible for their degradation. As determined by their sucrose gradient sedimentation profiles, in vitro translated C247A Vp1 formed pentamers, but in vitro translated C80A Vp1 was entirely monomeric. When individually incorporated into the JCV genome, the C80A and C247A mutants, but not the other Vp1 cysteine residues mutants, interfered with JCV infectivity. Furthermore, the C80A, but not the C247A, mutation prevented the nuclear localization of Vp1 in JCV genome transfected cells. These findings suggest that C80 of JCV Vp1 is required for Vp1 stability and pentamer formation, and C247 is involved in capsid assembly in the nucleus.

  15. Deletion of the Hoc and Soc capsid proteins affects the surface and cellular uptake properties of bacteriophage T4 derived nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly; Furukawa, Yoko; Underwood, Alison; Black, Lindsay; Liu, Jinny L.

    2014-01-01

    Recently the use of engineered viral scaffolds in biotechnology and medical applications has been increasing dramatically. T4 phage capsid derived nanoparticles (NPs) have potential advantages as sensors and in biotechnology. These applications require that the physical properties and cellular uptake of these NPs be understood. In this study we used a T4 deletion mutant to investigate the effects of removing both the Hoc and Soc proteins from the capsid surface on T4 tailless NPs. The surface charge, zeta potential, size, and cellular uptake efficiencies for both the T4 NP and T4ΔHocΔSoc NP mutant were measured and compared using dynamic light scattering and flow cytometry and significant differences were detected. PMID:22285187

  16. Inhibition of Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) Infections by a Novel Antiviral Peptide Derived from EV-71 Capsid Protein VP1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee Wah; Chan, Yoke Fun; Sim, Kooi Mow; Tan, Eng Lee; Poh, Chit Laa

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). In recent years, EV-71 infections were reported to cause high fatalities and severe neurological complications in Asia. Currently, no effective antiviral or vaccine is available to treat or prevent EV-71 infection. In this study, we have discovered a synthetic peptide which could be developed as a potential antiviral for inhibition of EV-71. Ninety five synthetic peptides (15-mers) overlapping the entire EV-71 capsid protein, VP1, were chemically synthesized and tested for antiviral properties against EV-71 in human Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. One peptide, SP40, was found to significantly reduce cytopathic effects of all representative EV-71 strains from genotypes A, B and C tested, with IC50 values ranging from 6–9.3 µM in RD cells. The in vitro inhibitory effect of SP40 exhibited a dose dependent concentration corresponding to a decrease in infectious viral particles, total viral RNA and the levels of VP1 protein. The antiviral activity of SP40 peptide was not restricted to a specific cell line as inhibition of EV-71 was observed in RD, HeLa, HT-29 and Vero cells. Besides inhibition of EV-71, it also had antiviral activities against CV-A16 and poliovirus type 1 in cell culture. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the SP40 peptide was not virucidal but was able to block viral attachment to the RD cells. Substitutions of arginine and lysine residues with alanine in the SP40 peptide at positions R3A, R4A, K5A and R13A were found to significantly decrease antiviral activities, implying the importance of positively charged amino acids for the antiviral activities. The data demonstrated the potential and feasibility of SP40 as a broad spectrum antiviral agent against EV-71. PMID:22563456

  17. Detection of serum antibodies to hepatitis E virus in domestic pigs in Italy using a recombinant swine HEV capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Ponterio, Eleonora; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Orrù, Ginevra; Liciardi, Manuel; Ostanello, Fabio; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2014-06-16

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been detected in both humans and animals, particularly pigs, worldwide. Several evidences, including human infection following consumption of raw contaminated meat, suggest a zoonotic transmission of HEV. In Italy, large circulation of genotype 3 HEV has been reported in swine, and recent studies have confirmed the involvement of this genotype in autochthonous human cases. In this study 111 sera collected from healthy pigs in two Italian regions were tested for anti-HEV IgG antibodies. For specific HEV antibody detection in swine, we developed ELISA and Western blotting methods, using a truncated capsid (ORF2) protein lacking the first 111 amino acids of a swine HEV genotype 3 strain. The ORF2-based ELISA revealed anti-HEV antibodies in 104 out of 111 pigs compared with 102 detected with a commercial ELISA kit. A lower number of sera reacted with the recombinant ORF2 protein in a Western blotting format (81/111). Using a Latent class analysis (LCA), the estimated sensitivities for ELISA-ORF2 and ELISA-kit tests were 0.961 and 0.936, respectively, whereas specificities were 0.599 and 0.475. The estimated sensitivity of Western blotting was 0.775, and the specificity was 0.944. The overall results confirm the high prevalence of HEV seropositive healthy pigs in Italy. Through comparisons with a commercial ELISA test, the swine genotype 3 HEV antigen produced in this study was proven suitable to detect anti-HEV antibodies in pig sera by both ELISA and Western Blotting.

  18. A novel finding for enterovirus virulence from the capsid protein VP1 of EV71 circulating in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjuan; Fu, Chong; Wu, Suying; Chen, Xiong; Shi, Yingying; Zhou, Bingfei; Zhang, Lianglu; Zhang, Fengfeng; Wang, Zhihao; Zhang, Yingying; Fan, Chengpeng; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Peng, Biwen; Liu, Wanhong; He, Xiaohua

    2014-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic virus that causes various clinical manifestations in young children, ranging from asymptomatic to fatal. Different pathotypes of EV71 notably differ in virulence. Several virulence determinants of EV71 have been predicted. However, these reported virulence determinants could not be used to identify the EV71 strains of subgenotype C4, which mainly circulate in China. In this study, VP1 sequences of 37 EV71 strains from severe cases (SC-EV71) and 192 EV71 strains from mild cases (MC-EV71) in mainland China were analyzed to determine the potential virulence determinants in the capsid protein VP1 of EV71. Although most SC-EV71 strains belonged to subgenotype C4a, no specific genetic lineages in C4a were correlated with EV71 virulence. Interestingly, amino acid substitutions at nine positions (H22Q, P27S, N31S/D, E98K, E145G/Q, D164E, T240A/S, V249I, and A289T) were detected by aligning the VP1 sequences of the SC-EV71 and MC-EV71 strains. Moreover, both the constituent ratios of the conservative or mutated residues in the MC-EV71 and SC-EV71 strains and the changes in the VP1 3D structure resulting from these mutations confirmed that the conservative residues (22H, 249V, and 289A) and the mutated residues (27S, 31S/D, 98K, 145G/Q, 164E, and 240A/S) might be potential virulence determinants in VP1 of EV71. Furthermore, these results led to the hypothesis that VP1 acts as a sandwich switch for viral particle stabilization and cellular receptors attachment, and specific mutations in this protein can convert mild cases into severe cases. These findings highlight new opportunities for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  19. Preclinical Refinements of a Broadly Protective VLP-based HPV Vaccine Targeting the Minor Capsid Protein, L2

    PubMed Central

    Tumban, Ebenezer; Muttil, Pavan; Escobar, Carolina Andrea A.; Peabody, Julianne; Wafula, Denis; Peabody, David S.; Chackerian, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    An ideal prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine would provide broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses against all high-risk HPV types, would be effective after a single dose, and would be formulated in such a manner to allow for long-term storage without the necessity for refrigeration. We have developed candidate HPV vaccines consisting of bacteriophage virus-like particles (VLPs) that display a broadly neutralizing epitope derived from the HPV16 minor capsid protein, L2. Immunization with 16L2 VLPs elicited high titer and broadly cross-reactive and cross-neutralizing antibodies against diverse HPV types. In this study we introduce two refinements for our candidate vaccines, with an eye towards enhancing efficacy and clinical applicability in the developing world. First, we assessed the role of antigen dose and boosting on immunogenicity. Mice immunized with 16L2-MS2 VLPs at doses ranging from 2–25 μg with or without alum were highly immunogenic at all doses; alum appeared to have an adjuvant effect at the lowest dose. Although boosting enhanced antibody titers, even a single immunization could elicit strong and long-lasting antibody responses. We also developed a method to enhance vaccine stability. Using a spray dry apparatus and a combination of sugars & an amino acid as protein stabilizers, we generated dry powder vaccine formulations of our L2 VLPs. Spray drying of our L2 VLPs did not affect the integrity or immunogenicity of VLPs upon reconstitution. Spray dried VLPs were stable at room temperature and at 37°C for over one month and the VLPs were highly immunogenic. Taken together, these enhancements are designed to facilitate implementation of a next-generation VLP-based HPV vaccine which addresses U.S. and global disparities in vaccine affordability and access in rural/remote populations. PMID:26003490

  20. Preclinical refinements of a broadly protective VLP-based HPV vaccine targeting the minor capsid protein, L2.

    PubMed

    Tumban, Ebenezer; Muttil, Pavan; Escobar, Carolina Andrea A; Peabody, Julianne; Wafula, Denis; Peabody, David S; Chackerian, Bryce

    2015-06-26

    An ideal prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine would provide broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses against all high-risk HPV types, would be effective after a single dose, and would be formulated in such a manner to allow for long-term storage without the necessity for refrigeration. We have developed candidate HPV vaccines consisting of bacteriophage virus-like particles (VLPs) that display a broadly neutralizing epitope derived from the HPV16 minor capsid protein, L2. Immunization with 16L2 VLPs elicited high titer and broadly cross-reactive and cross-neutralizing antibodies against diverse HPV types. In this study we introduce two refinements for our candidate vaccines, with an eye towards enhancing efficacy and clinical applicability in the developing world. First, we assessed the role of antigen dose and boosting on immunogenicity. Mice immunized with 16L2-MS2 VLPs at doses ranging from 2 to 25 μg with or without alum were highly immunogenic at all doses; alum appeared to have an adjuvant effect at the lowest dose. Although boosting enhanced antibody titers, even a single immunization could elicit strong and long-lasting antibody responses. We also developed a method to enhance vaccine stability. Using a spray dry apparatus and a combination of sugars & an amino acid as protein stabilizers, we generated dry powder vaccine formulations of our L2 VLPs. Spray drying of our L2 VLPs did not affect the integrity or immunogenicity of VLPs upon reconstitution. Spray dried VLPs were stable at room temperature and at 37 °C for over one month and the VLPs were highly immunogenic. Taken together, these enhancements are designed to facilitate implementation of a next-generation VLP-based HPV vaccine which addresses U.S. and global disparities in vaccine affordability and access in rural/remote populations.

  1. Production of recombinant capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (r-MCP43) of giant freshwater prawn, M. rosenbergii (de Man) for immunological diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Farook, M A; Madan, N; Taju, G; Majeed, S Abdul; Nambi, K S N; Raj, N Sundar; Vimal, S; Hameed, A S Sahul

    2014-08-01

    White tail disease (WTD) caused by Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and extra small virus (XSV) is a serious problem in prawn hatcheries. The gene for capsid protein of MrNV (MCP43) was cloned into pRSET B expression vector. The MCP43 protein was expressed as a protein with a 6-histidine tag in Escherichia coli GJ1158 with NaCl induction. This recombinant protein, which was used to raise the antiserum in rabbits, recognized capsid protein in different WTD-infected post-larvae and adult prawn. Various immunological methods such as Western blot, dot blot and ELISA techniques were employed to detect MrNV in infected samples using the antiserum raised against recombinant MCP43 of MrNV. The dot blot assay using anti-rMCP43 was found to be capable of detecting MrNV in WTD-infected post-larvae as early as at 24 h post-infection. The antiserum raised against r-MCP43 could detect the MrNV in the infected samples at the level of 100 pg of total protein. The capsid protein of MrNV estimated by ELISA using anti-rMCP43 and pure r-MCP43 as a standard was found to increase gradually during the course of infection from 24 h p.i. to moribund stage. The results of immunological diagnostic methods employed in this study were compared with that of RT-PCR to test the efficiency of antiserum raised against r-MCP43 for the detection of MrNV. The Western blot, dot blot and ELISA detected all MrNV-positive coded samples as detected by RT-PCR.

  2. A Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif revealed in an adenovirus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Christoph; Bru, Thierry; McBride, Ryan; Robison, Elizabeth; Nycholat, Corwin M; Kremer, Eric J; Paulson, James C

    2012-01-01

    Sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of transmembrane receptors that are well documented to play roles in regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. To see whether the features that define the molecular recognition of sialic acid were found in other sialic-acid-binding proteins, we analyzed 127 structures with bound sialic acids found in the Protein Data Bank database. Of these, the canine adenovirus 2-fiber knob protein showed close local structural relationship to Siglecs despite low sequence similarity. The fiber knob harbors a noncanonical sialic-acid recognition site, which was then explored for detailed specificity using a custom glycan microarray comprising 58 diverse sialosides. It was found that the adenoviral protein preferentially recognizes the epitope Neu5Acα2-3[6S]Galβ1-4GlcNAc, a structure previously identified as the preferred ligand for Siglec-8 in humans and Siglec-F in mice. Comparison of the Siglec and fiber knob sialic-acid-binding sites reveal conserved structural elements that are not clearly identifiable from the primary amino acid sequence, suggesting a Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif that comprises the consensus features of these proteins in complex with sialic acid. PMID:22522600

  3. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentilin, Lorena; Baj, Gabriele; Giraudi, Pablo; Bellarosa, Cristina; Giacca, Mauro; Tiribelli, Claudio; Muro, Andrés F.

    2012-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar type I (CNI) syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) deficiency. The disease is lethal due to bilirubin-induced neurological damage unless phototherapy is applied from birth. However, treatment becomes less effective during growth, and liver transplantation is required. To investigate the pathophysiology of the disease and therapeutic approaches in mice, we generated a mouse model by introducing a premature stop codon in the UGT1a1 gene, which results in an inactive enzyme. Homozygous mutant mice developed severe jaundice soon after birth and died within 11 d, showing significant cerebellar alterations. To rescue neonatal lethality, newborns were injected with a single dose of adeno-associated viral vector 9 (AAV9) expressing the human UGT1A1. Gene therapy treatment completely rescued all AAV-treated mutant mice, accompanied by lower plasma bilirubin levels and normal brain histology and motor coordination. Our mouse model of CNI reproduces genetic and phenotypic features of the human disease. We have shown, for the first time, the full recovery of the lethal effects of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We believe that, besides gene-addition-based therapies, our mice could represent a very useful model to develop and test novel technologies based on gene correction by homologous recombination.—Bortolussi, G., Zentilin, L., Baj, G., Giraudi, P., Bellarosa, C., Giacca, M., Tiribelli, C., Muro, A. F. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer. PMID:22094718

  4. Postnatal Cardiac Gene-Editing Using CRISPR/Cas9 with AAV9-Mediated Delivery of Short Guide RNAs Results in Mosaic Gene Disruption.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anne K; Molenaar, Bas; Versteeg, Danielle; Leitoguinho, Ana R; Demkes, Charlotte J; Spanjaard, Bastiaan; de Ruiter, Hesther; Akbari Moqadam, Farhad A; Kooijman, Lieneke; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; van Rooij, Eva

    2017-08-29

    Rationale: CRISPR/Cas9-based DNA editing has rapidly evolved as an attractive tool to modify the genome. Although CRISPR/Cas9 has been extensively used to manipulate the germline in zygotes, its application in postnatal gene editing remains incompletely characterized. Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of CRISPR/Cas9-based cardiac genome editing in vivo in postnatal mice. Methods and Results: We generated cardiomyocyte-specific Cas9 mice and demonstrated that Cas9 expression does not affect cardiac function or gene expression. As a proof of concept, we delivered short guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeting three genes critical for cardiac physiology, Myh6, Sav1 and Tbx20, using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9). Despite a similar degree of DNA disruption and subsequent mRNA downregulation, only disruption of Myh6 was sufficient to induce a cardiac phenotype, irrespective of sgRNA exposure or the level of Cas9 expression. DNA sequencing analysis revealed target dependent mutations that were highly reproducible across mice resulting in differential rates of in- and out-of-frame mutations. Finally, we applied a dual sgRNA approach to effectively delete en important coding region of Sav1, which increased the editing efficiency. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the effect of postnatal CRISPR/Cas9-based cardiac gene editing using AAV9 to deliver a single sgRNA is target dependent. We demonstrate a mosaic pattern of gene disruption, which hinders the application of the technology to study gene function. Further studies are required in order to expand the versatility of CRISPR/Cas9 as a robust tool to study novel cardiac gene functions in vivo.

  5. Near-Complete Correction of Profound Metabolomic Impairments Corresponding to Functional Benefit in MPS IIIB Mice after IV rAAV9-hNAGLU Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiyan; Meadows, Aaron S; Ware, Tierra; Mohney, Robert P; McCarty, Douglas M

    2017-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a lysosomal storage disease with complex CNS and somatic pathology due to a deficiency in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). Using global metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry targeting 361 metabolites, this study detected significant decreases in 225 and increases in six metabolites in serum samples from 7-month-old MPS IIIB mice, compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The metabolic disturbances involve virtually all major pathways of amino acid, peptide (58/102), carbohydrate (18/28), lipid (111/139), nucleotide (12/24), energy (2/9), vitamin and cofactor (11/16), and xenobiotic (11/28) metabolism. Notably, the reduced metabolites included eight essential amino acids, vitamins (C, E, B2, and B6), and neurotransmitters (serotonin, glutamate, aspartate, tryptophan, and N-acetyltyrosine). The metabolic impairments appear to emerge early during disease progression before the age of 2 months. Importantly, the restoration of NAGLU activity with an intravenous (i.v.) injection of rAAV9-hNAGLU vector led to near-complete correction of all serum metabolite abnormalities, with 201 (87%) metabolites normalized and 30 (13%) over-corrected. While the mechanisms are unclear, our data demonstrate that the lack of NAGLU activity triggers profound functional metabolic disturbances in MPS IIIB. These metabolic impairments respond well to a systemic rAAV9-hNAGLU gene delivery, supporting the surrogate biomarker potential of serum metabolomic profiles for MPS IIIB therapies. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Time-resolved spectroscopy of self-assembly of CCMV protein capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jelyn; Aronzon, Dina; Manoharan, V. N.

    2008-10-01

    In order to gain a deeper understanding of the process a virus undergoes to assemble; the purpose of this study to time resolve the self-assembly of a virus. Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle virus (CCMV), an icosahedral type virus, can assemble without its genetic code (RNA) depending on its chemical and physical surroundings. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of colloidal gold particles is known to display a shift when the gold interacts with the proteins of a virus. Surface plasmon resonance is the free electron oscillation occurring at the surface of the gold particle resulting in a characteristic peak location at maximal absorbance and peak width. The shift results from the change in the refractive index of the particles as induced by the presence of the proteins. We hope to detect this shift through total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM). The accomplishments of this research are the completion of the TIR setup and the purification of the virus and its proteins.

  7. Protective immunity of a Pichia pastoris expressed recombinant iridovirus major capsid protein in the Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Fan, Yuding; LaPatra, Scott E; Ma, Jie; Xu, Jin; Meng, Yan; Jiang, Nan; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-10-13

    The major capsid protein (MCP) is the main immunogenic protein of iridoviruses, that has been widely used as an immunogen in vaccination trials. In this study, the codon-optimized giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV) MCP gene (O-MCP) was synthesized and cloned into a pPICZα B vector for secretory expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris after methanol induction. The expression of the O-MCP protein was detected by the Bradford protein assay, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and electron microscopy. The Bradford protein assay indicated that the concentration of the O-MCP expressed was about 40 μg/ml in culture supernatants. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the O-MCP had a molecular weight of about 66 kDa and reacted with a His-specific MAb that was confirmed by Western blotting. Electron microscopy observations revealed that the purified O-MCP could self-assemble into virus-like particles. Healthy giant salamanders were vaccinated by intramuscular injection with the O-MCP antigen at a dose of 20 μg/individual. The numbers of erythrocytes and leukocytes in the peripheral blood of immunized Chinese giant salamanders increased significantly at day 3 and reached a peak at day 5 post-immunization. Meanwhile, the differential leukocyte counts of monocytes and neutrophils increased significantly at day 5 post-immunization compared to that of the control group. The percentage of lymphocytes was 71.33 ± 3.57% at day 21 post-immunization. The neutralization assay showed that the serum neutralizing antibody titer reached 321 at day 21 post-immunization. The GSIV challenge test revealed that the relative percent survival of Chinese giant salamanders vaccinated with O-MCP was 78%. These results indicated that the O-MCP antigen expressed by the Pichia pastoris system elicited significant immune response in the Chinese giant salamander against GSIV and might represent a potential yeast-derived vaccine candidate that could be used for the control of disease caused by the

  8. Nonicosahedral pathways for capsid expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermelli, Paolo; Indelicato, Giuliana; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-09-01

    For a significant number of viruses a structural transition of the protein container that encapsulates the viral genome forms an important part of the life cycle and is a prerequisite for the particle becoming infectious. Despite many recent efforts the mechanism of this process is still not fully understood, and a complete characterization of the expansion pathways is still lacking. We present here a coarse-grained model that captures the essential features of the expansion process and allows us to investigate the conditions under which a viral capsid becomes unstable. Based on this model we demonstrate that the structural transitions in icosahedral viral capsids are likely to occur through a low-symmetry cascade of local expansion events spreading in a wavelike manner over the capsid surface.

  9. Protective immunity to rabbit oral and cutaneous papillomaviruses by immunization with short peptides of L2, the minor capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Embers, Monica E; Budgeon, Lynn R; Pickel, Martin; Christensen, Neil D

    2002-10-01

    The papillomavirus minor capsid protein, L2, has been shown to exhibit immunogenicity, whereby a variety of B-cell epitopes, predominantly in the amino terminus of L2, have been deduced. However, immunity to L2 in vivo has not been examined extensively. Notably, a common neutralization epitope for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 16 was mapped to amino acids (aa) 108 to 120. The objectives of this study were to derive antisera from rabbits using the corresponding sequences from rabbit viruses and to assess the ability of these peptides to protect against infection. Synthetic peptides consisting of two overlapping sequences each in the region of aa 94 to 122 of the rabbit oral (ROPV) and cottontail rabbit (CRPV) papillomaviruses were used to immunize rabbits. Rabbits were then infected with both ROPV and CRPV and monitored for the development of oral and cutaneous papillomas, respectively. Serum derived from rabbits immunized with either of the two peptides was shown to (i) react to purified L2 from the cognate virus, (ii) specifically recognize L2 within virus-infected cells, and (iii) neutralize virus in vitro. Following viral challenge, cutaneous papilloma growth was completely absent in rabbits immunized with either CRPV peptide. Likewise, ROPV peptide-immunized rabbits were protected from oral papillomatosis. Challenge of CRPV peptide-immune rabbits with the viral genome resulted in efficient papilloma growth, suggesting a neutralizing antibody-mediated mechanism of protection. These results afford in vivo evidence for the immunogenicity provided by a distinct region of L2 and further support previous evidence for the ability of this region to elicit antiviral immunity.

  10. Vaccination with Recombinant Baculovirus Expressing Ranavirus Major Capsid Protein Induces Protective Immunity in Chinese Giant Salamander, Andrias davidianus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Xinglang; Han, Yahui; Jia, Qiuhong; Gao, Hongwei

    2017-07-25

    The Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (CGSIV), belonging to the genus Ranavirus in the family Iridoviridae, is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease causing high mortality of more than 90% and economic losses in Chinese giant salamanders in China. In this study, a recombinant baculovirus-based vaccine expressing the CGSIV major capsid protein (MCP) was developed and its protective immunity in Chinese giant salamanders was evaluated. The recombinant Autographacalifornica nucleopolyhedrosis virus (AcNPV), expressing CGSIV MCP, designated as AcNPV-MCP, was generated with the highest titers of 1 × 10⁸ plaque forming units/mL (PFU/mL) and confirmed by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assays. Western blot analysis revealed that the expressed MCP reacted with mouse anti-MCP monoclonal antibodies at the band of about 53 kDa. The results of IIF indicated that the MCP was expressed in the infected Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells with the recombinant baculovirus, and the Chinese giant salamander muscle cells also transduced with the AcNPV-MCP. Immunization with the recombinant baculovirus of AcNPV-MCP elicited robust specific humoral immune responses detected by ELISA and neutralization assays and potent cellular immune responses in Chinese giant salamanders. Importantly, the effective immunization conferred highly protective immunity for Chinese giant salamanders against CGSIV challenge and produced a relative percent of survival rate of 84%. Thus, the recombinant baculovirus expressing CGSIV MCP can induce significant immune responses involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in Chinese giant salamanders and might represent a potential baculovirus based vaccine candidate for Chinese giant salamanders against CGSIV.

  11. Interaction between Simian Virus 40 Major Capsid Protein VP1 and Cell Surface Ganglioside GM1 Triggers Vacuole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yong; Motamedi, Nasim; Magaldi, Thomas G.; Gee, Gretchen V.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus that has served as an important model to understand many aspects of biology, induces dramatic cytoplasmic vacuolization late during productive infection of monkey host cells. Although this activity led to the discovery of the virus in 1960, the mechanism of vacuolization is still not known. Pentamers of the major SV40 capsid protein VP1 bind to the ganglioside GM1, which serves as the cellular receptor for the virus. In this report, we show that binding of VP1 to cell surface GM1 plays a key role in SV40 infection-induced vacuolization. We previously showed that SV40 VP1 mutants defective for GM1 binding fail to induce vacuolization, even though they replicate efficiently. Here, we show that interfering with GM1-VP1 binding by knockdown of GM1 after infection is established abrogates vacuolization by wild-type SV40. Vacuole formation during permissive infection requires efficient virus release, and conditioned medium harvested late during SV40 infection rapidly induces vacuoles in a VP1- and GM1-dependent fashion. Furthermore, vacuolization can also be induced by a nonreplicating SV40 pseudovirus in a GM1-dependent manner, and a mutation in BK pseudovirus VP1 that generates GM1 binding confers vacuole-inducing activity. Vacuolization can also be triggered by purified pentamers of wild-type SV40 VP1, but not by GM1 binding-defective pentamers or by intracellular expression of VP1. These results demonstrate that SV40 infection-induced vacuolization is caused by the binding of released progeny viruses to GM1, thereby identifying the molecular trigger for the activity that led to the discovery of SV40. PMID:27006465

  12. Non-capsid proteins to identify foot-and-mouth disease viral circulation in cattle irrespective of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, I E; Malirat, V; Neitzert, E

    2005-12-01

    The ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to establish subclinical and even persistent infection, the so called carrier state, imposes the need to reliably demonstrate absence of viral circulation, to monitor the progress of control measures, either during eradication programs or after reintroduction of virus in free areas. This demonstration becomes critical in immunized populations, because of the concern that silent viral circulation could be hidden by immunization. This concern originates from the fact that vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) protects against clinical disease, but not necessarily against subclinical infection or establishment of the carrier state in cattle. A novel approach, developed and validated at PANAFTOSA during the 1990s, based on an immunoenzymatic system for detection of antibodies against non-capsid proteins (NCP) has proven valuable for monitoring viral circulation within and between herds, irrespective of the vaccination status. Antibodies against NCP are induced during infection but, in principle, not upon vaccination. The validation of this system led to its international recognition as the OIE index test. The fitness of this serosurvey tool to assess viral circulation in systematically vaccinated populations was demonstrated through its extensive application in most regions in South America. The experience attained in these regions supported the incorporation of the "free of FMD with vaccination" provisions into the OIE code. Likewise, it opened the way to alternatives to the "stamping out" policy. The results gave input to an old controversy related to the real epidemiological significance, if any, of carrier animals under the vaccination conditions in South America, and supported the development of recommendations and guidelines that are being implemented for serosurveys that go with control measures in vaccinated populations.

  13. Expression of enterovirus 71 capsid protein VP1 in Escherichia coli and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei; Zhou, Yaping; Cao, Limin; Ding, Cuijun; Ji, Yun; Jiang, Qinbo; Liu, Xiping; Li, Xiang; Hou, Xueling; Peng, Hongjun; Shi, Weifeng

    2013-12-01

    The VPl gene of enterovirus 71 (EV71) was synthesized, construct a recombinant plasmid pET15b/VP1 and expressed in E. coli BL21. The recombinant VP1 protein could specifically react with EV71-infected patient sera without the cross-reaction with serum antibodies of coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), A4, A5, B3 and B5 as well as echovirus 6. In acute and convalescent phases, IgM and IgG antibodies of 182 serum samples were detected by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein as a coated antigen. The results showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of IgM antibodies in serum samples for the diagnosis of EV71 infection were 90.1, 98.4, 98.8 and 88.7%, respectively; similarly, those of IgG antibodies in serum samples were 82.4, 89.1, 91.5 and 78.1%, respectively. Five of 80 samples (6.25%) from CA16-infected patients were detected positive by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein in which indicated the cross reactions and 0 of 5 samples from patients infected with other enteroviruses including CA4, CA5, CB3, CB5 and echovirus 6. Therefore, the recombinant VP1 protein of EV7l may provide a theoretical reference for establishing an effective antibody screening of IgM for EV71-infected patients with clinically suspected hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD).

  14. Expression of enterovirus 71 capsid protein VP1 in Escherichia coli and its clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Mei; Zhou, Yaping; Cao, Limin; Ding, Cuijun; Ji, Yun; Jiang, Qinbo; Liu, Xiping; Li, Xiang; Hou, Xueling; Peng, Hongjun; Shi, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    The VPl gene of enterovirus 71 (EV71) was synthesized, construct a recombinant plasmid pET15b/VP1 and expressed in E. coli BL21. The recombinant VP1 protein could specifically react with EV71-infected patient sera without the cross-reaction with serum antibodies of coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), A4, A5, B3 and B5 as well as echovirus 6. In acute and convalescent phases, IgM and IgG antibodies of 182 serum samples were detected by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein as a coated antigen. The results showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of IgM antibodies in serum samples for the diagnosis of EV71 infection were 90.1, 98.4, 98.8 and 88.7%, respectively; similarly, those of IgG antibodies in serum samples were 82.4, 89.1, 91.5 and 78.1%, respectively. Five of 80 samples (6.25%) from CA16-infected patients were detected positive by ELISA with recombinant VP1 protein in which indicated the cross reactions and 0 of 5 samples from patients infected with other enteroviruses including CA4, CA5, CB3, CB5 and echovirus 6. Therefore, the recombinant VP1 protein of EV7l may provide a theoretical reference for establishing an effective antibody screening of IgM for EV71-infected patients with clinically suspected hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). PMID:24688514

  15. Characterization of Mus musculus Papillomavirus 1 Infection In Situ Reveals an Unusual Pattern of Late Gene Expression and Capsid Protein Localization

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, Alessandra; Day, Patricia M.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Buck, Christopher B.; Pang, Yuk-Ying S.; Lowy, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Full-length genomic DNA of the recently identified laboratory mouse papillomavirus 1 (MusPV1) was synthesized in vitro and was used to establish and characterize a mouse model of papillomavirus pathobiology. MusPV1 DNA, whether naked or encapsidated by MusPV1 or human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) capsids, efficiently induced the outgrowth of papillomas as early as 3 weeks after application to abraded skin on the muzzles and tails of athymic NCr nude mice. High concentrations of virions were extracted from homogenized papillomatous tissues and were serially passaged for >10 generations. Neutralization by L1 antisera confirmed that infectious transmission was capsid mediated. Unexpectedly, the skin of the murine back was much less susceptible to virion-induced papillomas than the muzzle or tail. Although reporter pseudovirions readily transduced the skin of the back, infection with native MusPV1 resulted in less viral genome amplification and gene expression on the back, including reduced expression of the L1 protein and very low expression of the L2 protein, results that imply skin region-specific control of postentry aspects of the viral life cycle. Unexpectedly, L1 protein on the back was predominantly cytoplasmic, while on the tail the abundant L1 was cytoplasmic in the lower epithelial layers and nuclear in the upper layers. Nuclear localization of L1 occurred only in cells that coexpressed the minor capsid protein, L2. The pattern of L1 protein staining in the infected epithelium suggests that L1 expression occurs earlier in the MusPV1 life cycle than in the life cycle of high-risk HPV and that virion assembly is regulated by a previously undescribed mechanism. PMID:24067981

  16. Characterization of Mus musculus papillomavirus 1 infection in situ reveals an unusual pattern of late gene expression and capsid protein localization.

    PubMed

    Handisurya, Alessandra; Day, Patricia M; Thompson, Cynthia D; Buck, Christopher B; Pang, Yuk-Ying S; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2013-12-01

    Full-length genomic DNA of the recently identified laboratory mouse papillomavirus 1 (MusPV1) was synthesized in vitro and was used to establish and characterize a mouse model of papillomavirus pathobiology. MusPV1 DNA, whether naked or encapsidated by MusPV1 or human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) capsids, efficiently induced the outgrowth of papillomas as early as 3 weeks after application to abraded skin on the muzzles and tails of athymic NCr nude mice. High concentrations of virions were extracted from homogenized papillomatous tissues and were serially passaged for >10 generations. Neutralization by L1 antisera confirmed that infectious transmission was capsid mediated. Unexpectedly, the skin of the murine back was much less susceptible to virion-induced papillomas than the muzzle or tail. Although reporter pseudovirions readily transduced the skin of the back, infection with native MusPV1 resulted in less viral genome amplification and gene expression on the back, including reduced expression of the L1 protein and very low expression of the L2 protein, results that imply skin region-specific control of postentry aspects of the viral life cycle. Unexpectedly, L1 protein on the back was predominantly cytoplasmic, while on the tail the abundant L1 was cytoplasmic in the lower epithelial layers and nuclear in the upper layers. Nuclear localization of L1 occurred only in cells that coexpressed the minor capsid protein, L2. The pattern of L1 protein staining in the infected epithelium suggests that L1 expression occurs earlier in the MusPV1 life cycle than in the life cycle of high-risk HPV and that virion assembly is regulated by a previously undescribed mechanism.

  17. A novel tetravalent formulation combining the four aggregated domain III-capsid proteins from dengue viruses induces a functional immune response in mice and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Suzarte, Edith; Gil, Lázaro; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Izquierdo, Alienys; García, Angélica; López, Lázaro; Álvarez, Maylin; Pérez, Yusleydis; Castro, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2015-08-01

    Our group developed a subunit vaccine candidate against dengue virus based on two different viral regions: the domain III of the envelope protein and the capsid protein. The novel chimeric protein from dengue-2 virus [domain III-capsid (DIIIC-2)], when presented as aggregated incorporating oligodeoxynucleotides, induced anti-viral and neutralizing antibodies, a cellular immune response and conferred significant protection to mice and monkeys. The remaining constructs were already obtained and properly characterized. Based on this evidence, this work was aimed at assessing the immune response in mice of the chimeric proteins DIIIC of each serotype, as monovalent and tetravalent formulations. Here, we demonstrated the immunogenicity of each protein in terms of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, without antigen competition on the mixture forming the formulation tetra DIIIC. Accordingly, significant protection was afforded as measured by the limited viral load in the mouse encephalitis model. The assessment of the tetravalent formulation in non-human primates was also conducted. In this animal model, it was demonstrated that the formulation induced neutralizing antibodies and memory cell-mediated immune response with IFN-γ-secreting and cytotoxic capacity, regardless the route of immunization used. Taken together, we can assert that the tetravalent formulation of DIIIC proteins constitutes a promising vaccine candidate against dengue virus, and propose it for further efficacy experiments in monkeys or in the dengue human infection model, as it has been recently proposed.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus capsid assembly protein precursor (pUL80.5) interacts with itself and with the major capsid protein (pUL86) through two different domains.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, L J; Baxter, M K; Plafker, S M; Gibson, W

    1997-01-01

    We have used the yeast GAL4 two-hybrid system to examine interactions between the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major capsid protein (MCP, encoded by UL86) and the precursor assembly protein (pAP, encoded by UL80.5 and cleaved at its carboxyl end to yield AP) and found that (i) the pAP interacts with the MCP through residues located within the carboxy-terminal 21 amino acids of the pAP, called the carboxyl conserved domain (CCD); (ii) the pAP interacts with itself through a separate region, called the amino conserved domain (ACD), located between amino acids His34 and Arg52 near the amino end of the molecule; (iii) the simian CMV (SCMV) pAP and AP can interact with or replace their HCMV counterparts in these interactions, whereas the herpes simplex virus pAP and AP homologs cannot; and (iv) the HCMV and SCMV maturational proteinase precursors (ACpra, encoded by UL80a and APNG1, respectively) can interact with the pAP and MCP. The ACD and CCD amino acid sequences are highly conserved among members of the betaherpesvirus group and appear to have counterparts in the alpha- and gammaherpesvirus pAP homologs. Deleting the ACD from the HCMV pAP, or substituting Ala for a conserved Leu in the ACD, eliminated detectable pAP self-interaction and also substantially reduced MCP binding in the two-hybrid assay. This finding indicates that the pAP self-interaction influences the pAP-MCP interaction. Immunofluorescence studies corroborated the pAP-MCP interaction detected in the GAL4 two-hybrid experiments and showed that nuclear transport of the MCP was mediated by pAP but not AP. We conclude that the pAP interacts with the MCP, that this interaction is mediated by the CCD and is influenced by pAP self-interaction, and that one function of the pAP-MCP interaction may be to provide a controlled mechanism for transporting the MCP into the nucleus. PMID:8985337

  19. Neutralization of human papillomavirus by specific nanobodies against major capsid protein L1.

    PubMed

    Minaeian, Sara; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Broom, Oliver Jay

    2012-05-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical cancer in developing countries. Rapid diagnosis and initiation of treatment of the HPV infection are critical. Various methods have been employed to reduce the immunogenicity of antibodies targeting HPV serotypes. Nanobodies are the smallest fragments of naturally occurring single-domain antibodies with their antigenbinding site compromised into a single domain. Nanobodies have remarkable properties such as high stability, solubility, and high homology to the human VH3 domain. In this study, a phagemid library was employed to enrich for nanobodies against the L1 protein of the human papilloma virus. Binding reactivity of the selected clones was evaluated using phage enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA). Finally, two nanobodies (sm5 and sm8) with the best reactivity against the Gardasil vaccine and the purified HPV-16 L1 protein were expressed and purified using a Ni(+)-NTA column. The accuracy of expression and purification of the nanobodies was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting assays. In vitro studies demonstrated that neutralization was achieved by the selected nanobodies. The ease of generation and unique features of these molecules make nanobodies promising molecules for the new generation of HPV diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revealed Splenic Targeting of Canine Parvovirus Capsid Protein VP2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Wang, Haiming; Yan, Dan; Wei, Yanquan; Cao, Yuhua; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xiangtao; Luo, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhijun; Sun, Shiqi; Guo, Huichen

    2016-03-21

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious infectious virus, whose infectious mechanism remains unclear because of acute gastroenteritis and the lack of an efficient tool to visualize the virus in real time during virology research. In this study, we developed an iron oxide nanoparticle supported by graphene quantum dots (GQD), namely, FeGQD. In this composite material, GQD acts as a stabilizer; thus, vacancies are retained on the surface for further physical adsorption of the CPV VP2 protein. The FeGQD@VP2 nanocomposite product showed largely enhanced colloidal stability in comparison with bare FeGQD, as well as negligible toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. The composite displayed high uptake into transferrin receptor (TfR) positive cells, which are distinguishable from FeGQD or TfR negative cells. In addition, the composite developed a significant accumulation in spleen rather than in liver, where bare FeGQD or most iron oxide nanoparticles gather. As these evident targeting abilities of FeGQD@VP2 strongly suggested, the biological activity of CPV VP2 was retained in our study, and its biological functions might correspond to CPV when the rare splenic targeting ability is considered. This approach can be applied to numerous other biomedical studies that require a simple yet efficient approach to track proteins in vivo while retaining biological function and may facilitate virus-related research.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revealed Splenic Targeting of Canine Parvovirus Capsid Protein VP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yufei; Wang, Haiming; Yan, Dan; Wei, Yanquan; Cao, Yuhua; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xiangtao; Luo, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhijun; Sun, Shiqi; Guo, Huichen

    2016-03-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious infectious virus, whose infectious mechanism remains unclear because of acute gastroenteritis and the lack of an efficient tool to visualize the virus in real time during virology research. In this study, we developed an iron oxide nanoparticle supported by graphene quantum dots (GQD), namely, FeGQD. In this composite material, GQD acts as a stabilizer; thus, vacancies are retained on the surface for further physical adsorption of the CPV VP2 protein. The FeGQD@VP2 nanocomposite product showed largely enhanced colloidal stability in comparison with bare FeGQD, as well as negligible toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. The composite displayed high uptake into transferrin receptor (TfR) positive cells, which are distinguishable from FeGQD or TfR negative cells. In addition, the composite developed a significant accumulation in spleen rather than in liver, where bare FeGQD or most iron oxide nanoparticles gather. As these evident targeting abilities of FeGQD@VP2 strongly suggested, the biological activity of CPV VP2 was retained in our study, and its biological functions might correspond to CPV when the rare splenic targeting ability is considered. This approach can be applied to numerous other biomedical studies that require a simple yet efficient approach to track proteins in vivo while retaining biological function and may facilitate virus-related research.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Revealed Splenic Targeting of Canine Parvovirus Capsid Protein VP2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufei; Wang, Haiming; Yan, Dan; Wei, Yanquan; Cao, Yuhua; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu; Dai, Jianwu; Liu, Xiangtao; Luo, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhijun; Sun, Shiqi; Guo, Huichen

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious infectious virus, whose infectious mechanism remains unclear because of acute gastroenteritis and the lack of an efficient tool to visualize the virus in real time during virology research. In this study, we developed an iron oxide nanoparticle supported by graphene quantum dots (GQD), namely, FeGQD. In this composite material, GQD acts as a stabilizer; thus, vacancies are retained on the surface for further physical adsorption of the CPV VP2 protein. The FeGQD@VP2 nanocomposite product showed largely enhanced colloidal stability in comparison with bare FeGQD, as well as negligible toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. The composite displayed high uptake into transferrin receptor (TfR) positive cells, which are distinguishable from FeGQD or TfR negative cells. In addition, the composite developed a significant accumulation in spleen rather than in liver, where bare FeGQD or most iron oxide nanoparticles gather. As these evident targeting abilities of FeGQD@VP2 strongly suggested, the biological activity of CPV VP2 was retained in our study, and its biological functions might correspond to CPV when the rare splenic targeting ability is considered. This approach can be applied to numerous other biomedical studies that require a simple yet efficient approach to track proteins in vivo while retaining biological function and may facilitate virus-related research. PMID:26996514

  3. Cell culture adaptation mutations in foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid proteins: implications for receptor interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we describe the adaptive changes fixed on the capsid of several foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A strains during propagation in cell monolayers. Viruses passaged extensively in three cell lines (BHK-21, LFBK and IB-RS-2), consistently gained several positively charged amino acids...

  4. Role of the inner protein capsid on in vitro human rotavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sandino, A M; Jashes, M; Fa