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Sample records for aavso international variable

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AAVSO International Variable Star Index VSX (Watson+, 2006-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C.; Henden, A. A.; Price, A.

    2016-08-01

    This file contains Galactic stars known or suspected to be variable. It lists all stars that have an entry in the AAVSO International Variable Star Index (VSX; http://www.aavso.org/vsx). The database consisted initially of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS) and the New Catalogue of Suspected Variables (NSV) and was then supplemented with a large number of variable star catalogues, as well as individual variable star discoveries or variables found in the literature. Effort has also been invested to update the entries with the latest information regarding position, type and period and to remove duplicates. The VSX database is being continually updated and maintained. For historical reasons some objects outside of the Galaxy have been included. (3 data files).

  2. The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Travis; Templeton, M.; Price, A.; Henden, A.

    2006-12-01

    Founded in 1911 and headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) is a non-profit worldwide scientific and educational organization of professional and amateur astronomers dedicated to the observing and research of variable stars. The AAVSO International Database has over 13 million observations contributed by over 2,500 observers from around the world. The AAVSO receives thousands of data requests per year from the astronomical community. AAVSO observers also contribute to active research programs and community support activities like target-of-opportunity monitoring and coordinated observing campaigns, as well as providing early notification of rare events like novae and supernovae. In 2006, the AAVSO received over 700,000 new observations. Approximately 2/3rds were photometric (UBVRIJH) and about 3/5ths of AAVSO active observers reside outside the United States. The AAVSO is also active in training amateurs in observing techniques, data mining, and data analysis and also runs an active education and public outreach (E/PO) program including the NSF-funded Hands-On Astrophysics Curriculum. AAVSO data is available for download in near real-time at www.aavso.org.

  3. AAVSO Long-Period Variable Section Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Kate; Simonsen, Mike

    2009-05-01

    The first of the new AAVSO "sections" is the LPV section. This section has decided to "own" SR, L & RV stars, as well as Miras. There is an LPV Section Wiki, and there has been much discussion on the AAVSO discussion e-mail list regarding the type and number of stars that should be included in the AAVSO LPV Programs. One of our first major tasks is to produce a list of stars to recommend to observers, stars for which the observers can feel that their work will be of value in the present & future age of automated surveys. The core of the list is the AAVSO "legacy stars". The legacy stars will include those stars that have a long & rich history with the AAVSO (more than 15,000 AAVSO observations in 50+ years) and those that have been the subject of many scientific publications. The remaining LPV program stars will include those with at least 5,000 observations in the AAVSO International database, those too bright for most surveys, those that are in fields too crowded for the surveys, plus any that are specifically requested by researchers. The AAVSO Binocular Program will include stars with minima brighter than about 10th magnitude, visible in binoculars for the majority of their cycles.

  4. The AAVSO as a Resource for Variable Star Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Stella

    2016-07-01

    The AAVSO was formed in 1911 as a group of US-based amateur observers obtaining data in support of professional astronomy projects. Now, it has evolved into an International Organization with members and observers from both the professional and non-professional astronomical community, contributing photometry to a public photometric database of about 22,000 variable objects, and using it for research projects. As such, the AAVSO's main claim to fame is that it successfully engages backyard Astronomers, educators, students and professional astronomers in astronomical research. I will present the main aspects of the association and how it has evolved with time to become a premium resource for variable star researchers. I will also discuss the various means that the AAVSO is using to support cutting-edge variable star science, and how it engages its members in projects building a stronger international astronomical community.

  5. AAVSO and the International Year of Light (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) The United Nations General Assembly has officially designated 2015 to be the International Year of Light (IYL). Modeled in part on the earlier International Year of Astronomy (IYA), this cross-disciplinary, international educational and outreach project will celebrate the importance of light in science, technology, cultural heritage, and the arts. It ties in with several important anniversaries, such as the 1000th anniversary of the publication of Ibn Al Haythem's “Book of Optics,” the 150th anniversary of Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism, the centenary of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, and the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. Because variable stars are defined as such due to the variability of the light we observe from them, all of the AAVSO programs, regardless of type of variable or instrumentation (eye, DSLR, PEP, or CCD) have natural tie-ins to the study of light. This poster will highlight a number of specific ways that AAVSO members and the organization as a whole can become intimately involved with this unique outreach opportunity.

  6. 20 Million Observations: The AAVSO International Database and Its First Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, E. O.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) turns 100 in 2011 - a century of service to the astronomical community! Another milestone was reached in 2011: the AAVSO International Database (AID) received its 20 millionth variable star observation! The AID contains observations of over 14,750 objects contributed by over 7,500 amateur and professional astronomers worldwide. Data on hundreds of objects extend from the AAVSO's founding in 1911 or earlier (mid-1800s) to present. Some objects' data are of shorter duration but of intense, high-precision coverage. Historical datasets come from published/unpublished professional/amateur observations, astronomical plate collections, and contributed archives of other variable star observing organizations. Hundreds of observations are added to the AID daily as observers upload their data in near real-time. Approximately 69% (~13.9M) of AID observations are visual, 30.4% (~6.2M) CCD (BVRI, unfiltered, Sloan colors, others), 0.5% (~75K) PEP (BVJH), and 0.1% (~17K) photographic/photovisual. Many objects have exclusively visual data, some PEP or CCD data only, and many a combination of types and bands. Objects range from young stellar objects through highly evolved stars. Included are intrinsic variables - pulsating (SX Phe stars through Miras and semiregulars) and eruptive (cataclysmic variables of all types) - and extrinsic variables - eclipsing binaries, rotating (RS CVns) - and exoplanets and suspected variables. Blazars, polars, quasars, HMXBs - today's AID is a thriving, exciting resource! The AID is maintained in a dynamic MySQL database, easily accessible to contributors and users alike through the AAVSO website (http://www.aavso.org). The Light Curve Generator, Quick Look page (recent observations), and Data Download form offer different ways to view/investigate your targets. Quality control performed from submission through validation ensures reliable data for your research. Visit the AAVSO

  7. Utilizing the AAVSO's Variable Star Index (VSX) In Undergraduate Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Among the many important services that the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) provides to the astronomical community is the Variable Star Index (VSX - https://www.aavso.org/vsx/). This online catalog of variable stars is the repository of data on over 334,000 variable stars, including information on spectral type, range of magnitude, period, and type of variable, among other properties. A number of these stars were identified as being variable through automated telescope surveys, such as ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey). The computer code of this survey classified newly discovered variables as best it could, but a significant number of false classifications have been noted. The reclassification of ASAS variables in the VSX data, as well as a closer look at variables identified as miscellaneous type in VSX, are two of many projects that can be undertaken by interested undergraduates. In doing so, students learn about the physical properties of various types of variable stars as well as statistical analysis and computer software, especially the VStar variable star data visualization and analysis tool that is available to the astronomical community free of charge on the AAVSO website (https://www.aavso.org/vstar-overview). Two such projects are described in this presentation, the first to identify BY Draconis variables erroneously classified as Cepheids in ASAS data, and the second to identify SRD semiregular variables misidentified as "miscellaneous" in VSX.

  8. The GTN-AAVSO Blazar Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, L. R.; Spear, G. G.; Graves, T.; Slater, G.; Price, A.

    2004-08-01

    The GLAST Telescope Network (GTN) is a collaboration among students, teachers, amateur astronomers, small college observatories, and professional astronomers who will obtain observations of base-line activity levels and follow-up observations for bright blazars, one of the key science objectives for NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. A key partner in the GTN is the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO, a non-profit international scientific and educational organization that has considerable experience with handling, processing, and displaying large amounts of data and with coordinating observers from every corner of the globe. The GTN-AAVSO blazar program will recommend observing sequences, and provide advice and mentoring for observing techniques and data reduction. The program will archive magnitude estimates using the AAVSO database system and lightcurve generator, as well as CCD images of blazar fields. The program will also employ the online image archiving system developed by the GTN. Images of blazar fields will be available for subsequent analysis by contributors to the program, and by the GLAST science team for mission planning and follow-up studies. We will present examples of the AAVSO lightcurve generator, examples of the GTN image archive system, plus examples of the data we are currently accumulating. The GTN-AAVSO collaboration is partially funded by the NASA's GLAST Education and Public Outreach Program.

  9. The GTN-AAVSO Blazar Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, G. G.; Mattei, J. A.; Price, A.; Graves, T.; Borders, T.; Slater, G.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    The GLAST Telescope Network (GTN) is a collaboration among observers and small observatories who will obtain observations of base-line activity levels and follow-up observations for bright blazars. These AGNs have their jets pointed directly toward us, and are one of the key science objectives for NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. Funded by the GLAST Education and Public Outreach Program, the GTN consists of students, teachers, amateur astronomers, small college observatories, and professional astronomers. The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) is a non-profit international scientific and educational organization of thousands of advanced amateur and professional astronomers interested in stars or star-like objects that change in brightness. With millions of variable star observations dating back more than 90 years, the AAVSO has unique experience with handling, processing, and displaying large amounts of data and with coordinating observers from every corner of the globe. The GTN-AAVSO blazar program will recommend observing programs, and provide advice and mentoring for observing techniques and data reduction. The program will archive magnitude estimates and measurements of blazars, as well as CCD images of blazar fields. The GTN-AAVSO program will employ the AAVSO database system and lightcurve generator (http://www.aavso.org/adata/curvegenerator.shtml) to archive magnitude estimates. The magnitudes will either be visual estimates or CCD measurements. Magnitudes are submitted online, and will be immediately available to the public for use in planning observing programs and estimating current activity levels. The GTN-AAVSO program will also employ the online image archiving system developed by the GTN. Images of blazar fields will be available for subsequent analysis by contributors to the program, and by the GLAST science team for mission planning and follow-up studies. We will present examples of the AAVSO

  10. AAVSO in the Big Data Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Stella; Templeton, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    The AAVSO was formed in 1911 as a group of US-based amateur observers obtaining data in support of professional astronomer’s projects. Now, it has now evolved into an international organization with members and observers in all continents, contributing photometry to a public database of more than 150,000 variable objects. This database, being the core of the AAVSO’s portfolio, is also used to communicate science with the public while providing opportunities to citizens working alongside professional astronomers on science projects. We discuss the various means the AAVSO is using to engage the public in science and communicate scientific results, and the Association's role in the Big Data Era.

  11. Professional Astronomers in Service to the AAVSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saladyga, Michael; Waagen, E. O.

    2011-05-01

    Throughout its 100-year history, the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) has welcomed professional astronomers to its membership ranks, and has encouraged their participation as organization leaders. The AAVSO has been fortunate to have many distinguished professionals serve as officers (Directors, Presidents, Council), and as participants in its various scientific and organizational committees.

  12. Professional Astronomers in Service to the AAVSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saladyga, M.; Waagen, E. O.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) Throughout its 100-year history, the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) has welcomed professional astronomers to its membership ranks, and has encouraged their participation as organization leaders. The AAVSO has been fortunate to have over 60 distinguished professionals serve as officers (Directors, Presidents, Council), and as participants in its various scientific and organizational committees.

  13. AAVSO Solar Observers Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, R.

    2013-06-01

    (Abstract only) For visual solar observers there has been no biological change in the "detector" (human eye) - at century scales (eye + visual cortex) does not change much over time. Our capacity to "integrate" seeing distortions is not just simple averaging! The visual cortex plays an essential role, and until recently only the SDO-HMI (Solar Dynamics Observatory, Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) has had the capacity to detect the smallest sunspots, called pores. Prior to this the eye was superior to photography and CCD. Imaged data are not directly comparable or substitutable to counts by eye, as the effects of sensor/optical resolution and seeing will have a different influence on the resulting sunspot counts for images when compared to the human eye. Also contributing to the complex task of counting sunspots is differentiating between a sunspot (which is usually defined as having a darker center (umbra) and lighter outer ring (penumbra)) and a pore, made even more complex by the conflicting definitions of the word "pore" in the solar context: "pore" can mean a small spot without penumbra or "pore" can mean a random intergranular blemish that is not a true sunspot. The overall agreement is that the smallest spot size is near 2,000 km or ~3 arc sec, (Loughhead, R. E. and Bray, R. J. 1961, Australian J. Phys., 14, 347). Sunspot size is dictated by granulation dynamics rather than spot size (cancellation of convective motion), and by the lifetime of the pore, which averages from 10 to 30 minutes. There is no specific aperture required for AAVSO observers contributing sunspot observations. However, the detection of the smallest spots is influenced by the resolution of the telescope. Two factors to consider are the theoretical optical resolution (unobstructed aperture), Rayleigh criterion: theta = 138 / D(mm), and Dawes criterion: theta = 116 / D(mm) (http://www.telescope-optics.net/telescope_resolution.htm). However, seeing is variable with time; daytime range will

  14. The AAVSO Photoelectric Photometry Program in its Scientific and Socio-Historic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, John R.

    2011-05-01

    Photoelectric photometry began in the 1900s through the work of Guthnick, Stebbins, and others who constructed and used photometers based on the recently-discovered photoelectric effect. The mid 20th century saw a confluence of several areas of amateur interest: astronomy, telescope making, radio and electronics, and general interest in space. This is the time when AAVSO photoelectric photometry (PEP) began, with observers using mostly hand-built photometers on hand-built telescopes. The 1980s brought a revolution: affordable off-the-shelf solid-state photometers, and infrastructure such as the International Amateur-Professional Photoelectric Photometry (IAPPP) conferences, books, and journal. The AAVSO developed a formal PEP program in the early 1980s. Its emphasis was on long-term monitoring of pulsating red giants. It was competing, not always successfully, with programs such as active sun-like binaries (RS CVn stars) which offered "instant gratification" in the form of publicity and quick publications. Nevertheless, the AAVSO PEP program has, through careful organization, motivation, and feedback to observers, produced extensive scientific results. In this presentation, I shall describe, as examples, my own work, its scientific significance, its educational benefit to dozens of my students, and its satisfaction to the observers. To some extent, the AAVSO PEP program has been superceded by its CCD program, but there is still a useful place for ongoing PEP observations of thousands of variable stars. Reference: http://www.aavso.org/sites/default/files/newsletter/PEP/lastpepnl.pdf Acknowledgements: I thank NSERC Canada for research support, my students, and AAVSO staff and observers, especially Howard Landis.

  15. The AAVSO 2011 Demographic and Background Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.

    2012-04-01

    In 2011, the AAVSO conducted a survey of 615 people who are or were recently active in the organization. The survey included questions about their demographic background and variable star interests. Data are descriptively analyzed and compared with prior surveys. Results show an organization of very highly educated, largely male amateur and professional astronomers distributed across 108 countries. Participants tend to be loyal, with the average time of involvement in the AAVSO reported as 14 years. Most major demographic factors have not changed much over time. However, the average age of new members is increasing. Also, a significant portion of the respondents report being strictly active in a non-observing capacity, reflecting the growing mission of the organization. Motivations of participants are more aligned with scientific contribution than with that reported by other citizen science projects. This may help explain why a third of all respondents are an author or co-author of a paper in an astronomical journal. Finally, there is some evidence that participation in the AAVSO has a greater impact on the respondents' view of their role in astronomy compared to that expected through increasing amateur astronomy experience alone.

  16. The AAVSO Widow—Or Should We Say Spouse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. R.

    2012-06-01

    In past discussions of AAVSO observers over our first century of progress, the familial consequences of membership received little attention. However, non-astronomer friends commonly ask AAVSO observers, “But how does your wife feel about your spending so much time at the telescope and not in bed with her?” Although our Directors have not all been “observers,” they too are forced to keep unusual office hours, answer telephones in the middle of the night, and so on. This paper attempts to portray the many surprising ways in which the AAVSO spouse (not all observers are male nor directors female!) responds to their partner’s pre-occupation with variable stars.

  17. From Archives to Analysis: Computers Redefine the AAVSO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Grant

    1992-10-01

    Recent advances in computer technology and program development promise great progress for the AAVSO in the near future. Not only have we improved our methods of archiving and evaluating variable star observations, but we will also soon be ready to enter the field of substantial in-house data analysis.

  18. Astronomical League Observing Programs Supported by the AAVSO (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, M.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Astronomical League provides many different observing programs designed to provide direction and goals for League members. The programs have certificates and pins to recognize the observers' accomplishments and for demonstrating their observing skills with a variety of instruments and objects. The AAVSO supports a Variable Star Observing award and the Astronomical League has recently agreed to adopt a new Binocular Variable Star Program.

  19. Microinertia and internal variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovski, Arkadi; Ván, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The description of microinertia in micromorphic continua is discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In the framework of dual internal variables, the microinertia stems from a thermodynamic equation of state related to the internal variable, which has the properties similar to mechanical momentum.

  20. Reconsidering the History of the AAVSO-Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas R.

    2001-06-01

    A review of the history of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) reveals that its development in the first half of the twentieth century requires reconsideration in two important respects. This first part of a two-part paper eals with one historical issue, the founding of the association and it operation during its first six years, including the role played by Edward Charles Pickering, and Harvard College Observatory, and recognizes that William Tyler Olcott played a more prominent role than has previously been acknowledged.

  1. Cataclysmic variables to be monitored for HST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-09-01

    Drs. Boris Gaensicke (Warwick University), Joseph Patterson (Columbia University, Center for Backyard Astrophysics), and Arne Henden (AAVSO), on behalf of a consortium of 16 astronomers, requested the help of AAVSO observers in monitoring the ~40 cataclysmic variables in support of Hubble Space Telescope observations in the coming months. The HST COS (Cosmic Origins Spectrograph) will be carrying out far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of ~40 CVs sequentially, with the aim to measure the temperatures, atmospheric compositions, rotation rates, and eventually masses of their white dwarfs. The primary purpose of the monitoring is to know whether each target is in quiescence immediately prior to the observation window; if it is in outburst it will be too bright for the HST instrumentation. Based on the information supplied by the AAVSO, the HST scheduling team will make the decision (usually) the evening before the scheduled observing time as to whether to go forward with the HST observations. For CCD observers, simultaneous photometry [shortly before, during, and after the HST observations] would be ideal. B filter would be best for a light curve, although for the magnitude estimates, V would be best. Finder charts may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. If the target is seen in outburst, please contact the AAVSO immediately and post a message to the Observations and Campaigns & Observations Reports forum (http://www.aavso.org/forum). This campaign will run the better part of a year or longer. See full Alert Notice for more details and list of objects.

  2. The American Association of Variable Star Observers as a Professional-Amateur Astronomical Community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Stella; 6173540484

    2016-06-01

    The AAVSO was formed in 1911 as a group of US-based amateur observers obtaining data in support of professional astronomy projects. Now, it has evolved into an International Organization with members and observers in all continents, contributing photometry to a public database of about 22,000 variable objects. I will present main aspects of the association and how it has evolved with time to a premium resource for variable star research. I will also discuss current projects and opportunities for Professional-Amateur collaborations within the AAVSO, building a stronger international community of variable star observers!

  3. Aperture Fever and the Quality of AAVSO Visual Estimates: mu Cephei as an Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. G.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) At the limits of human vision the eye can reach precisions of 10% or better in brightness estimates for stars. So why did the quality of AAVSO visual estimates suddenly drop to 50% or worse for many stars following World War II? Possibly it is a consequence of viewing variable stars through ever-larger aperture instruments than was the case previously, a time when many variables were observed without optical aid. An example is provided by the bright red supergiant variable mu Cephei, a star that has the potential to be a calibrating object for the extragalactic distance scale if its low-amplitude brightness variations are better defined. It appears to be a member of the open cluster Trumpler 37, so its distance and luminosity can be established provided one can pinpoint the amount of interstellar extinction between us and it. mu Cep appears to be a double-mode pulsator, as suggested previously in the literature, but with periods of roughly 700 and 1,000 days it is unexciting to observe and its red color presents a variety of calibration problems. Improving quality control for such variable stars is an issue important not only to the AAVSO, but also to science in general.

  4. THE SHAPE OF LONG OUTBURSTS IN U GEM TYPE DWARF NOVAE FROM AAVSO DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-10-01

    We search the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) archives of the two best-studied dwarf novae in an attempt to find light curves for long outbursts that are extremely well characterized. The systems are U Gem and SS Cyg. Our goal is to search for embedded precursors such as those that have been found recently in the high-fidelity Kepler data for superoutbursts (SOs) of some members of the SU UMa subclass of dwarf novae. For the vast majority of AAVSO data, the combination of low data cadence and large errors associated with individual measurements precludes one from making any strong statement about the shape of the long outbursts. However, for a small number of outbursts, extensive long-term monitoring with digital photometry yields high-fidelity light curves. We report the discovery of embedded precursors in two of three candidate long outbursts. This is the first time that such embedded precursors have been found in dwarf novae above the period gap in other than kepler data, and reinforces van Paradijs' finding that long outbursts in dwarf novae above the period gap and SOs in systems below the period gap constitute a unified class. The thermal-tidal instability to account for SOs in the SU UMa stars predicts embedded precursors only for short orbital period dwarf novae, therefore the presence of embedded precursors in long orbital period systems-U Gem and SS Cyg-argues for a more general mechanism to explain long outbursts.

  5. Estimating internal variability under changing external forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olonscheck, Dirk; Notz, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    A robust estimate of internal variability is crucial for a wide range of climate-study applications, be it model evaluation, predictions, projections, or attribution studies. While internal variability can readily be estimated from standard pre-industrial control simulations, under changing forcing ensemble simulations are required to estimate internal variability. However, such estimate is only possible for those models that provide several ensemble simulations. To overcome this limitation, we here show how internal variability for a changing forcing can be estimated for all models from their pre-industrial control simulation provided that at least some models of the ensemble provide several simulations. To obtain the total internal variability of forced simulations largely independent of the ensemble size of individual models, we correct for the small ensemble sizes the models provide. This allows us to show that across the CMIP5 model ensemble, the time-period-averaged internal variability of global-mean surface temperature remains unchanged for historical and future simulations even for large CO2 forcing, while the time-period-averaged internal variability of most sea-ice-related variables decreases proportionally to their mean state. This emergent constraint for sea ice allows one to roughly estimate the internal variability simply based on the mean state and illuminates how the changing external forcing alters the system's internal variability. Our findings show that the internal variability estimate from each pre-industrial control simulation can be used for the present and translated to the future and thus limits the need of large ensembles for internal variability studies. Applying our approach to model evaluation of sea-ice simulations, we confirm that the plausibility of simulations differs widely and that internal variability can explain most of the model's deviation from the observed trend, but often not the model's deviation from the mean state. The

  6. The AAVSO Photoelectric Photometry Program in Its Scientific and Socio-Historic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, I review the work of the AAVSO in the area of photoelectric photometry (PEP). This work was influenced by several trends: in science, in technology, and in the sociology of amateur astronomy. Through the 1980s, the AAVSO photoelectric photometry program competed with other such programs and, in recent years, has been overshadowed by CCD photometry programs. Nevertheless, the AAVSO PEP program has, through careful organization, motivation, and feedback, produced extensive scientific results, and can continue to do so. In the case of my own research, AAVSO PEP observations have also contributed significantly to the education of my students.

  7. Bounds on internal state variables in viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1993-01-01

    A typical viscoplastic model will introduce up to three types of internal state variables in order to properly describe transient material behavior; they are as follows: the back stress, the yield stress, and the drag strength. Different models employ different combinations of these internal variables--their selection and description of evolution being largely dependent on application and material selection. Under steady-state conditions, the internal variables cease to evolve and therefore become related to the external variables (stress and temperature) through simple functional relationships. A physically motivated hypothesis is presented that links the kinetic equation of viscoplasticity with that of creep under steady-state conditions. From this hypothesis one determines how the internal variables relate to one another at steady state, but most importantly, one obtains bounds on the magnitudes of stress and back stress, and on the yield stress and drag strength.

  8. Citizen Sky, An Update on the AAVSO's New Citizen Science Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Rebecca; Price, A.; Henden, A.; Stencel, R.; Kloppenborg, B.

    2011-01-01

    Citizen Sky is a multi-year, NSF-funded, citizen science project focusing on the bright variable star, epsilon Aurigae. Citizen Sky goes beyond simple observing to include a major data analysis component. The goal is to introduce the participant to the full scientific process from background research to paper writing for a peer-reviewed journal. The first year of the project, 2009-10, was dedicated to developing project infrastructure, educating participants about epsilon Aurigae, and training these participants to observe the star and report their data. Looking forward, years two and three of the project will focus on assembling teams of participants to work on their own analysis and research. Results will be published in a special issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of the AAVSO. This project has been made possible by the National Science Foundation.

  9. An Overview of the Evolution of the AAVSO's Information Technology Infrastructure Between 1965-1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Richard C. S.; Saladyga, M.; Waagen, E. O.

    2011-05-01

    We trace the history and usage of computers and data processing equipment at the AAVSO HQ between its beginings in the 1960s to 1997. We focus on equipment, people, and the purpose such computational power was put to use. We examine how the AAVSO evolved its use of computing and data processing resources as the technology evolved in order to further its mission.

  10. The Birch Street Irregulars: mysteries found and resolved in the AAVSO data archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara J.; Saladyga, Michael; Mattei, Janet A.

    As they evaluate AAVSO data, AAVSO technical staff members run across several kinds of errors. This paper takes a humorous and Sherlock Holmes-style look at some of the most common kinds of errors detected, from observers recording the wrong Julian Date, misidentifying stars, transposing entries on the observer form, to garden-variety data entry errors.

  11. Hands-On Astrophysics: Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, J. A.; Percy, J. R.

    1999-12-01

    Hands-On Astrophysics (HOA): Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education, is a project recently developed by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) with funds from the National Science Foundation. HOA uses the unique methods and the international database of the AAVSO to develop and integrate students' math and science skills through variable star observation and analysis. It can provide an understanding of basic astronomy concepts, as well as interdisciplinary connections. Most of all, it motivates the user by exposing them to the excitement of doing real science with real data. Project materials include: a database of 600,000 variable star observations; VSTAR (a data plotting and analysis program), and other user friendly software; 31 slides and 14 prints of five constellations; 45 variable star finder charts; an instructional videotape in three 15-minute segments; and a 560-page student's and teacher's manual. These materials support the National Standards for Science and Math education by directly involving the students in the scientific process. Hands-On Astrophysics is designed to be flexible. It is organized so that it can be used at many levels, in many contexts: for classroom use from high school to college level, or for individual projects. In addition, communication and support can be found through the AAVSO home page on the World Wide Web: http://www.aavso.org. The HOA materials can be ordered through this web site or from the AAVSO, 25 Birch Street Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. We gratefully acknowledge the education grant ESI-9154091 from the National Science Foundation which funded the development of this project.

  12. AAVSO Visual Sunspot Observations vs. SDO HMI Sunspot Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, R.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) The most important issue with regard to using the SDO HMI data from the National Solar Observatory (NSO, http://www.nso.edu/staff/fwatson/STARA) is that their current model for creating sunspot counts does not split in groups and consequently does not provide a corresponding group count and Wolf number. As it is a different quantity, it cannot be mixed with the data from our sunspot networks. For the AAVSO with about seventy stations contributing each day, adding HMI sunspot data would anyway hardly change the resulting index. Perhaps, the best use of HMI data is for an external validation, by exploiting the fact that HMI provides a series that is rather close to the sunspot number and is acquired completely independently. So, it is unlikely to suffer from the same problems (jumps, biases) at the same time. This validation only works for rather short durations, as the lifetime of space instruments is limited and aging effects are often affecting the data over the mission. In addition, successive instruments have different properties: for example, the NSO model has not managed yet to reconcile the series from MDI and HMI. There is a ~10-15% jump. The first challenge that should be addressed by AAVSO using HMI data is the splitting in groups and deriving group properties. Then, together with the sunspot counts and areas per group, a lot more analyses and diagnostics can be derived (like the selective disappearance of the smallest sunspots?), that can help interpreting trends in the ratio SSN/other solar indices and many other solar effects.

  13. Monitoring of Bright Giant Variables requested in support of ground-based spectroscopy and for long-term study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, Travis; Price, Aaron; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2011-05-01

    Dr. Steve Howell (NASA) and Dr. Travis Rector (University of Alaska, Anchorage) have requested AAVSO observations of several bright giant variable stars of diverse classes in support of spectroscopic observations to be made at Kitt Peak National Observatory between 2011 May 30 and 2011 June 01. Long-term monitoring of these objects is also encouraged. The goal of the project is to determine if the surface temperatures and radii of these stars change in a recognizable pattern over long timescales. Priority targets are Z UMa, R CrB, SX Her, TT Oph, TX Oph, AC Her, and R Sct. Additional targets are R Vir, Y CVn, g Her, UU Her, UZ Oph, V453 Oph, XX Oph, TZ Oph, V564 Oph, T Lyr, AD Aql, AR Sgr, V5569 Sgr, EP Lyr, and EU Del. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  14. Early-Time Flux Measurements of SN 2014J Obtained with Small Robotic Telescopes: Extending the AAVSO Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, B.; Plaggenborg, T.; Zheng, W.; Shivvers, I.; Itagaki, K.; Filippenko, A. V.; Kunz, J.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, early-time photometry of supernova (SN) 2014J is presented, extending the AAVSO CCD database to prediscovery dates. The applicability of NASA's small robotic MicroObservatory Network telescopes for photometric measurements is evaluated. Prediscovery and postdiscovery photometry of SN 2014J is measured from images taken by two different telescopes of the network, and is compared to measurements from the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope and the Itagaki Observatory. In the early light-curve phase (which exhibits stable spectral behavior with constant color indices), these data agree with reasonably high accuracy (better than 0.05 mag around maximum brightness, and 0.15 mag at earlier times). Owing to the changing spectral energy distribution of the SN and the different spectral characteristics of the systems used, differences increase after maximum light. We augment light curves of SN 2014J downloaded from the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) online database with these data, and consider the complete brightness evolution of this important Type Ia SN. Furthermore, the first detection presented here (Jan. 15.427, 2014) appears to be one of the earliest observations of SN 2014J yet published, taken less than a day after the SN exploded.

  15. Variable-cycle reciprocating internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.P.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a variable cycle internal combustion engine. It comprises: a block the block having at least one cylinder chamber disposed therein; a pair of opposed pistons mounted in the cylinder chamber; a first rotating crankshaft and a second rotating crankshaft, each crankshaft connected to a different one of the pistons; means for synchronizing the speed and relative phase relationship of the crankshaft, the synchronizing means connected to at least one of the crankshafts; a harmonic gear drive assembly for selectively adjusting the rotation phase relationship between the crankshaft during operation of the engine. The harmonic gear drive assembly being connected to the synchronizing means.

  16. The Shape of Long Outbursts in U Gem Type Dwarf Novae from AAVSO Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-01-01

    We search the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) archives of the two best studied dwarf novae in an attempt to find light curves for long out bursts that are extremely well-characterized. The systems are U Gem and S8 Cyg. Our goal is to search for embedded precursors such as those that have been found recently in the high fidelity Kepler data for superoutbursts of some members of the 8U UMa subclass of dwarf novae. For the vast majority of AAV80 data, the combination of low data cadence and large errors associated with individual measurements precludes one from making any strong statement about the shape of the long outbursts. However, for a small number of outbursts, extensive long term monitoring with digital photometry yields high fidelity light curves. We report the finding of embedded precursors in two of three candidate long outbursts. This reinforces van Paradijs' finding that long outbursts in dwarf novae above the period gap and superoutbursts in systems below the period gap constitute a unified class. The thermal-tidal instability to account for superoutbursts in the SU UMa stars predicts embedded precursors only for short orbital period dwarf novae, therefore the presence of embedded precursors in long orbital period systems - U Gem and SS Cyg - argues for a more general mechanism to explain long outbursts.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AAVSO Photometric All Sky Survey (APASS) DR9 (Henden+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, A. A.; Templeton, M.; Terrell, D.; Smith, T. C.; Levine, S.; Welch, D.

    2016-01-01

    The AAVSO Photometric All Sky Survey (APASS) project is designed to bridge the gap between the shallow Tycho2 two-bandpass photometric catalog that is complete to V=11 and the deeper, but less spatially-complete catalogs like SDSS or PanSTARRS. It can be used for calibration of a specific field; for obtaining spectral information about single sources, determining reddening in a small area of the sky; or even obtaining current-epoch astrometry for rapidly moving objects. The survey is being performed at two locations: near Weed, New Mexico in the Northern Hemisphere; and at CTIO in the Southern Hemisphere. Each site consists of dual bore-sighted 20cm telescopes on a single mount, designed to obtain two bandpasses of information simultaneously. Each telescope covers 9 square degrees of sky with 2.5arcsec pixels, with the main survey taken with B,V,g',r',i' filters and covering the magnitude range 10Variable Star Observers is responsible for the overall management of the survey; a team of professional astronomers participate in the data analysis. The project was initially funded by the Robert Martin Ayers Sciences Fund, with a follow-on grant from the National Science Foundation. (1 data file).

  18. The History of AAVSO Charts, Part III: The Henden Era (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, M.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) In this paper we pick up where “The History of AAVSO Charts, Part II: The 1960s Through 2006” left off and discuss the evolution of the automated chart plotter, the comp star database, the new tools available to the chart and sequences team and Director Arne Henden's influence and legacy.

  19. Symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth O. Waagen

    2012-09-01

    The symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst, according to observations reported to the AAVSO and confirmed by spectroscopy by Ulisse Munari et al. Prompted by an observation and comment from John Bortle (Stormville, NY) (16 June 2012, visual magnitude 12.2) about a possible outburst, Steven O'Connor (St. George's, Bermuda) obtained an observation (10 August 2012, 11.44V) that confirmed V4018 Sgr was bright. His subsequent BVRI observations in September and visual observations by Bortle and Andrew Pearce (Nedlands, Western Australia) show the system brightening and at V magnitude 11.07 as of 2012 Sep. 17.091 UT. Ulisse Munari (INAF Astr. Obs. Padua, Italy) and colleagues Paolo Valisa and Sergio Dallaporta (ANS Collaboration), after being informed by the AAVSO of the bright state of V4018 Sgr, carried out spectroscopy. Munari writes: "A low resolution, absolutely fluxed 4000-8650 Ang spectrum of V4018 Sgr was obtained on Sept 13.90 UT with the 0.6m telescope ! of the Schiaparelli Observatory in Varese (Italy). It shows the spectrum of the M giant overwhelmed by a blue continuum up to 6000 Ang, and all high ionization emission lines typical of quiescence are gone, leaving only hydrogen Balmer and weak HeI lines in emission. The spectrum looks like a template one for a symbiotic star in outburst. CCD photometry was obtained on Sept 13.79 UT and provides V=11.027 ± 0.002, B-V=+0.621 ± 0.003. The B-V color is appreciably bluer and the V magnitude much brighter than typical in quiescence (on average V=13.3, B-V=+1.09; Henden and Munari 2008, Baltic Astronomy 17, 293), and support the idea V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst." According to Munari, the last bright outburst of V4018 Sgr was underway in June 1990. Observations in the AAVSO International Database from Albert Jones (Nelson, New Zealand) beginning in May 1992 show the variable at visual magnitude 11.0, with fluctuations between 10.5 and 11.9 through October 1995. Numerous ! other observers

  20. External and Internal Scanning: Identifying Variables that Affect Your School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Jerry J.

    1989-01-01

    Principals and others involved in strategic or operational planning decisions need a data collection process with a systematic internal and external scanning structure. Internal data originate from students, school climate, finance, and human resource variables. External data include demography, government finance and budgetary allocations,…

  1. Variable camshaft timing for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.; Dembosky, S.K.

    1991-09-10

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine. It comprises a rotatable crankshaft; a camshaft, the camshaft being rotatable about its longitudinal central axis and being subject to a unidirectionally acting torque during the rotation thereof; first means mounted on the camshaft, the first means being oscillatable with respect to the camshaft about the longitudinal central axis of the camshaft at least through a limited arc; second means keyed to the camshaft for rotation therewith; rotary movement transmitting means interconnecting the crankshaft and one of the first means and the second means for transmitting rotary movement from the crankshaft to the camshaft; a first hydraulic cylinder having a body end pivotably attached to one of the first means and the second means and a piston end pivotably attached to the other of the first means and the second means; a second hydraulic cylinder having a body end pivotably attached to the one of the first means and the second means and a piston end pivotably attached to the other of the first means and the second means, the second hydraulic cylinder and the first hydraulic cylinder being disposed to act in opposite directions.

  2. Anne S. Young: Professor and Variable Star Observer Extraordinaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, K.

    2012-06-01

    One of the original eight members of the AAVSO, but not well known today, was Professor Anne Sewell Young of Mount Holyoke College. Miss Young taught there for thirty-seven years, and trained many women astronomers during the first third of the 20th century. This paper will attempt to present her life as an inspiring teacher, as well as a contributor of more than 6,500 variable star observations to the AAVSO.

  3. Does internal climate variability impact radiative feedback estimates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonko, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    A lot of attention has been focussed on the inter-model spread in equilibrium climate sensitivity and the radiative feedbacks that contribute to it as a measure of our uncertainty of the climate system's response to external forcing. But how accurate is an estimate of this uncertainty derived purely from model-to-model differences? Recent work has highlighted the importance of factors such as differences resulting from methodology (Klocke et al., 2013) as well as internal climate variability (Deser et al., 2012), which have historically not been included in multi-model assessments. While an increasing number of models participating in Coupled Model Intercomparison Projects (CMIP) provide several ensemble members for certain simulations, the ensemble sizes are generally not large enough to fully sample climate's intrinsic variability. Here we use a large 40 member ensemble of simulations performed with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model Version 3 to asses the impact of internal variability on radiative feedback estimates. We find that the spread in individual feedbacks among ensemble members corresponds to 25% of CMIP3 inter-model spread. Deser, C., A. Phillips, V. Bourdette and H. Teng (2012): Uncertainty in climate change projections: the role of internal variability, Clim. Dyn., 38, 527-546. Klocke, D., J. Quaas and B. Stevens (2013): Assessment of different metrics for physical climate feedbacks, Clim. Dyn., DOI 10.1007/s00382-013-1757-1

  4. Observing Campaign on Hubble's First Variable in M31: M31_V1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2010-07-01

    . Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp); Rc magnitudes of comparison stars are in the chart-associated photometry table. An R-band finder chart from the Isaac Newton 2.5-m telescope provided by Arne Henden is available. Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and links to images and charts.

  5. A Southwest Pacific Coral Perspective on ENSO Variability: Precessional Forcing vs. Internal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, T. M.; Partin, J. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Maupin, C. R.; Vara, M. A.; Shen, C. C.; Taylor, F. W.

    2014-12-01

    ENSO variability is manifest in the western Pacific through heat and moisture exchanges associated with the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Forward modeling (pseudoproxy analysis) results and published coral proxy records from the tropical Pacific indicate that in addition to the central and eastern Pacific regions, corals from the WPWP and SPCZ regions skillfully record ENSO variability. Some studies suggest that precessional forcing directly reduces/enhances ENSO variability. Other studies suggest that internal variability is the primary control on Holocene ENSO changes. Herein, we use coral proxy records from the tropical Pacific and numerical simulations to better understand the response of ENSO to precessional forcing and internal variability. We extend the coral record of ENSO variability using a new modern coral record from the Solomon Islands (1716-2008 CE) and a select suite of Holocene fossil coral records from the WPWP. The new modern coral record captures large ENSO events with considerable skill, providing new evidence for potential large ENSO events during the early 18th and 19th centuries, events that are not represented in current coral and/or multi-proxy reconstructions. We also note that long periods of reduced ENSO activity can occur during intervals with near constant precessional forcing at modern values. The fossil coral records provide discrete time windows into ENSO variability over the Holocene. These records provide evidence of similar patterns of ENSO activity during intervals with different precessional configurations. The modern and fossil coral records imply a strong influence of internal variability in the modulation of ENSO, which may make it difficult to establish a direct control of precessional forcing on ENSO variability over the Holocene.

  6. The International Space University's variable gravity research facility design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A manned mission to Mars will require long travel times between Earth and Mars. However, exposure to long-duration zero gravity is known to be harmful to the human body. Some of the harmful effects are loss of heart and lung capacity, inability to stand upright, muscular weakness and loss of bone calcium. A variable gravity research facility (VGRF) that would be placed in low Earth orbit (LEO) was designed by students of the International Space University 1989 Summer Session held in Strasbourg, France, to provide a testbed for conducting experiments in the life and physical sciences in preparation for a mission to Mars. This design exercise was unique because it addressed all aspects concerning a large space project. The VGRF design was described which was developed by international participants specializing in the following areas: the politics of international cooperation, engineering, architecture, in-space physiology, material and life science experimentation, data communications, business, and management.

  7. International Consensus Document (ICON): Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Francisco A.; Barlan, Isil; Chapel, Helen; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz T.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; de la Morena, M. Teresa; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco J.; Hammarström, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Quinti, Isabella; Routes, John M.; Tang, Mimi L.K.; Warnatz, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology initiated an international coalition among the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the World Allergy Organization; and the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology on common variable immunodeficiency. An author group was formed and then divided into individual committees. Within the committee, teams of authors were subgrouped to generate content for specific sections of the document. Content was derived from literature searches, relevant published guidelines, and clinical experience. After a draft of the document was assembled, it was collectively reviewed and revised by the authors. Where evidence was lacking or conflicting, the information presented represents the consensus expert opinion of the group. The full document was then independently reviewed by 5 international experts in the field, none of whom was among the authors of the original. The comments of these reviewers were incorporated before submission for publication. PMID:26563668

  8. The International Space University's variable gravity research facility design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1991-09-01

    A manned mission to Mars will require long travel times between Earth and Mars. However, exposure to long-duration zero gravity is known to be harmful to the human body. Some of the harmful effects are loss of heart and lung capacity, inability to stand upright, muscular weakness and loss of bone calcium. A variable gravity research facility (VGRF) that would be placed in low Earth orbit (LEO) was designed by students of the International Space University 1989 Summer Session held in Strasbourg, France, to provide a testbed for conducting experiments in the life and physical sciences in preparation for a mission to Mars. This design exercise was unique because it addressed all aspects concerning a large space project. The VGRF design was described which was developed by international participants specializing in the following areas: the politics of international cooperation, engineering, architecture, in-space physiology, material and life science experimentation, data communications, business, and management.

  9. International Space University variable gravity research facility design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1994-03-01

    A manned mission to Mars will require long travel times between Earth and Mars. However, exposure to long-duration zero gravity is known to be harmful to the human body. Some of the harmful effects are loss of heart and lung capacity, inability to stand upright, muscular weakness, and loss of bone calcium. A variable gravity research facility (VGRF) that will be placed in low Earth orbit (LEO) was designed by students of the International Space University 1989 Summer Session held in Strasbourg, France, to provide a testbed for conducting experiments in the life and physical sciences in preparation for a mission to Mars. This design exercise was unique because it addressed all aspects concerning a large space project. This report describes the VGRF design that was developed by international participants specializing in the following areas: the politics of international cooperation; engineering, architecture; in-space physiological, materials, and life science experimentation; data communications; and business and management.

  10. The Periodicity Analysis of Semiregular Variable Star EV Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terziev, E.; Percy, J. R.; Henden, A. A.

    2011-10-01

    EV Aquarii is a variable star which was formerly misclassified as a cataclysmic variable, but photometric observations and colour indices have since indicated that it is most likely a semiregular M giant. The authors of this paper have used self-correlation analysis and Fourier analysis to determine the variability profile of the star. Data from the AAVSO International Database, the All-Sky Automated Survey, The Amateur Sky Survey, and co-author Arne Henden were used. The period of variation has been found to be 123.6 days ± 2.1 days. The amplitude of this variation is not constant; it changes with time between approximately 0.4 and 1.0 magnitude. There were no indications of a longer secondary period, though there has been observed an instance of a transient period of variation on a shorter timescale of about 40 days. There was no evidence found of periodic variation of the color differences.

  11. Forcing, feedback and internal variability in global temperature trends.

    PubMed

    Marotzke, Jochem; Forster, Piers M

    2015-01-29

    Most present-generation climate models simulate an increase in global-mean surface temperature (GMST) since 1998, whereas observations suggest a warming hiatus. It is unclear to what extent this mismatch is caused by incorrect model forcing, by incorrect model response to forcing or by random factors. Here we analyse simulations and observations of GMST from 1900 to 2012, and show that the distribution of simulated 15-year trends shows no systematic bias against the observations. Using a multiple regression approach that is physically motivated by surface energy balance, we isolate the impact of radiative forcing, climate feedback and ocean heat uptake on GMST--with the regression residual interpreted as internal variability--and assess all possible 15- and 62-year trends. The differences between simulated and observed trends are dominated by random internal variability over the shorter timescale and by variations in the radiative forcings used to drive models over the longer timescale. For either trend length, spread in simulated climate feedback leaves no traceable imprint on GMST trends or, consequently, on the difference between simulations and observations. The claim that climate models systematically overestimate the response to radiative forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations therefore seems to be unfounded. PMID:25631444

  12. ICCS 2009 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 3: Variables Derived from the Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brese, Falk; Jung, Michael; Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Schulz, Wolfram; Zuehlke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    This supplement contains documentation on all the derived variables contained in the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) 2009 data files that are based on survey variables. These variables were used to report data in the ICCS 2009 international reports, and are made available as part of the ICCS 2009 International Database…

  13. The Quest for Identifying BY Draconis Stars within a Data Set of 3,548 Candidate Cepheid Variable Stars (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) A spreadsheet of 3,548 automatically classified candidate Cepheid variable stars from the ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey) photometry data was provided to AAVSO (American Association of Variable Star Observers) members for analysis. It was known that the computer filters had significantly overpopulated the list. Patrick Wils originally investigated a small subset of the data using 2MASS, PPMXL, and ROTSE data, and discovered that the vast majority of the 84 candidates he surveyed appeared to have been misidentified, demonstrating the need to reclassify these variables. The most common misidentification seemed to be of BY Draconis stars (K and M spotted dwarfs), which led to an ongoing project to systematically identify BY Draconis stars from this data set. The stars are sorted using the International Variable Star Index (VSX) information and ASAS light curves to search for prior reclassification by other authors in the time since the initial population of the candidate list (e.g. using ROTSE data), along with infrared photometry (2MASS) and proper motion (PPMXL) data. An analysis of light curves and phase plots using the AAVSO software vstar is the final step in identifying potential BY Draconis stars. The goal of this project has been to submit updated identifications for these stars to VSX. This final presentation on this project will identify the last set of reclassified BY Draconis stars and discuss future directions for this research.

  14. Assessment and interpretation of internal doses: uncertainty and variability.

    PubMed

    Paquet, F; Bailey, M R; Leggett, R W; Harrison, J D

    2016-06-01

    Internal doses are calculated on the basis of knowledge of intakes and/or measurements of activity in bioassay samples, typically using reference biokinetic and dosimetric models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). These models describe the behaviour of the radionuclides after ingestion, inhalation, and absorption to the blood, and the absorption of the energy resulting from their nuclear transformations. They are intended to be used mainly for the purpose of radiological protection: that is, optimisation and demonstration of compliance with dose limits. These models and parameter values are fixed by convention and are not subject to uncertainty. Over the past few years, ICRP has devoted a considerable amount of effort to the revision and improvement of models to make them more physiologically realistic. ICRP models are now sufficiently sophisticated for calculating organ and tissue absorbed doses for scientific purposes, and in many other areas, including toxicology, pharmacology and medicine. In these specific cases, uncertainties in parameters and variability between individuals need to be taken into account. PMID:27044362

  15. Decadal modulation of global surface temperature by internal climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Aiguo; Fyfe, John C.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Dai, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernible warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations, which on average project strong warming. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific, intensifying trade winds, changes in El Niño activity, increasing volcanic activity and decreasing solar irradiance. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyse observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called `hiatus' period since about 2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from those associated with GHG-induced warming or aerosol-induced cooling. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.

  16. Decadal Modulation of Global Surface Temperature By Internal Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, A.; Fyfe, J. C.; Xie, S. P.; Dai, X.

    2014-12-01

    Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernable warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations which on average project strong warming. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific, intensifying trade winds, changes in El Niño activity, increasing volcanic activity and decreasing solar irradiance. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyze observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land since 1920. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called "hiatus" period since about 2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from GHG-induced warming. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.

  17. International Students: Distinguishing Noncognitive Variables from Social Interaction Patterns. Research Report No. 8-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sue H.; Sedlacek, William E.

    In response to a call for more theoretical linkages in the literature on international students, the relationship between noncognitive variables and social interactions was investigated in this study. Both variables have been associated with international students' success. International students (N=124) (at the University of Maryland, College…

  18. On the role of internal atmospheric variability in ENSO dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li

    In the first part of this dissertation we use an Intermediate Coupled Model to develop a quantitative test to validate the null hypothesis that low-frequency variation of ENSO predictability may be caused by stochastic processes. Three "perfect model scenario" prediction experiments are carried out, where the model is forced either solely by stochastic forcing or additionally by decadal-varying backgrounds with different amplitudes. These experiments indicate that one can not simply reject the null hypothesis unless the decadal-varying backgrounds are unrealistically strong. The second part of this dissertation investigates the extent to which internal atmospheric variability (IAV) can influence ENSO variation, and examines the underlying physical mechanisms linking IAV to ENSO variability with the aid of a newly developed coupled model consisting of an atmospheric general circulation model and a Zebiak-Cane type of reduced gravity ocean model. A novel noise filter algorithm is developed to suppress IAV in the coupled model. A long control coupled simulation, where the filter is not employed, demonstrates that the coupled model captures many statistical properties of the observed ENSO behavior. It further shows that the development of El Nino is linked to a boreal spring phenomenon referred to as the Pacific Meridional Model (MM). The MM, characterized by an anomalous north-south SST gradient and anomalous surface circulation in the northeasterly trade regime with maximum variance in boreal spring, is inherent to thermodynamic ocean-atmosphere coupling in the Intertropical Convergence Zone latitude. The Northern Pacific Oscillation provides one source of external forcing to excite it. This result supports the hypothesis that the MM works as a conduit for extratropical atmospheric influence on ENSO. A set of coupled simulations, where the filter is used to suppress IAV, indicate that reducing IAV in both wind stress and heat flux substantially weakens ENSO variance

  19. On the use of internal state variables in thermoviscoplastic constitutive equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. H.; Beek, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The general theory of internal state variables are reviewed to apply it to inelastic metals in use in high temperature environments. In this process, certain constraints and clarifications will be made regarding internal state variables. It is shown that the Helmholtz free energy can be utilized to construct constitutive equations which are appropriate for metallic superalloys. Internal state variables are shown to represent locally averaged measures of dislocation arrangement, dislocation density, and intergranular fracture. The internal state variable model is demonstrated to be a suitable framework for comparison of several currently proposed models for metals and can therefore be used to exhibit history dependence, nonlinearity, and rate as well as temperature sensitivity.

  20. Constraint-Led Changes in Internal Variability in Running

    PubMed Central

    Haudum, Anita; Birklbauer, Jürgen; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a one-time application of elastic constraints on movement-inherent variability during treadmill running. Eleven males ran two 35-min intervals while surface EMG was measured. In one of two 35-min intervals, after 10 min of running without tubes, elastic tubes (between hip and heels) were attached, followed by another 5 min of running without tubes. To assess variability, stride-to-stride iEMG variability was calculated. Significant increases in variability (36 % to 74 %) were observed during tube running, whereas running without tubes after the tube running block showed no significant differences. Results show that elastic tubes affect variability on a muscular level despite the constant environmental conditions and underline the nervous system's adaptability to cope with somehow unpredictable constraints since stride duration was unaltered. Key points The elastic constraints led to an increase in iEMG variability but left stride duration variability unaltered. Runners adapted to the elastic cords, evident in an iEMG variability decrease over time towards normal running. Hardly any aftermaths were observed in the iEMG analyses when comparing normal running after the constrained running block to normal running. PMID:24149117

  1. A new interpretation of internal-variable theory in finite thermo-viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, ZhuPing; Dui, GuanSuo; Yang, ShengYou

    2013-03-01

    Based on the non-equilibrium thermodynamics, an internal- variable theory in thermo-viscoelasticity at finite deformation was proposed by Huang in 1999. In this theory, a modified stretch of the molecular chain was introduced, and hence the molecular network model in rubber elasticity was extended to take into account the viscous and thermal effects of the material. The viscous dissipation of the material can then be described by means of these internal variables, which appear in the expression of the modified stretch. In order to give a clearer explanation on the physical implication of the internal variables, a connection between the internal-variable theory and theoretical formulation based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient in existing literature is presented in this paper, which allows the above internal-variable theory to be more systematic.

  2. The Serial Effect on Internal and External Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherre, Maria Marta Pereira; Naro, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of concord phenomena in Rio de Janeiro spoken Portuguese found that, in the serial context, the linguistic system is so highly constrained that external, and even internal, influences are blocked. Authors conclude that strong constraints should be identified and further studies undertaken to understand the interplay of the diverse forces…

  3. Costa Rica Variable Star Observation Program: Continuation of the research started in the Second Astronomical Observation Regional Campaign TAD/IAU Tegucigalpa Honduras, 1998.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya Rodriguez, E.

    1998-11-01

    In the last months of January and February, it was the Second Astronomical Observation Regional Campaign TAD/IAU in the Suyapa Astronomical Observatory, Tegucigalpa, Honduras; sponsored by the International Astronomical Union, Honduras Government and the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Honduras. In that opportunity, during the campaign, it began a variable star observation program, according to international regulation of the American Association of Variable Stars Observers (AAVSO). The activities were about the use of general experimental techniques that allow people to do studies naked eye, with telescopes or photometers depending on the observed star magnitude. The continuation in Costa Rica of that research added to some gotten results will be presented in this work.

  4. Hierarchical Internal Variables Reflecting Microstructural Properties: Application to Cardiac Muscle Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Jüri; Vendelin, Marko; Maugin, Gérard A.

    2000-09-01

    The formalism of internal state variables is proposed for describing the processes of deformation in muscles. Due to the complicated hierarchical microstructure of soft tissues where macroscopic stress states depend upon the sliding of molecules and ion concentrations, the internal variables are switched in successively forming a certain hierarchy. This hierarchy is a general property for complicated materials with different microscopic processes influencing the macroscopic behaviour. Based on that property a novel concept of hierarchical internal variables is defined (up to the knowledge of authors first time) and embedded into the framework of the existing formalism. The discussion based on an example of cardiac muscle contraction illustrates the advantages of this approach.

  5. Internal versus SST-forced atmospheric variability as simulated by an atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Harzallah, A.; Sadourny, R.

    1995-03-01

    The variability of atmospheric flow is analyzed by separating it into an internal part due to atmospheric dynamics only and an external (or forced) part due to the variability of sea surface temperature forcing. The two modes of variability are identified by performing an ensemble of seven independent long-term simulations of the atmospheric response to observed SST (1970-1988) with the LMD atmospheric general circulation model. The forced variability is defined from the analysis of the ensemble mean and the internal variability from the analysis of deviations from the ensemble mean. Emphasis is put on interannual variability of sea level pressure and 500-hPa geopotential height for the Northern Hemisphere winter. In view of the large systematic errors related to the relatively small number of realizations, unbiased variance estimators have been developed. Although statistical significance is not reached in some extratropical regions, large significant extratropical responses are found at the North Pacific-Alaska sector for SLP and over western Canada and the Aleutians for 500-hPa geopotential height. The influence of SST variations on internal variability is also examined by using a 7-year simulation using the climatological SST seasonal cycle. It is found that interannual SST changes strongly influence the geographical distribution of internal variability; in particular, it tends to increase it over oceans. EOF decompositions, showing that the model realistically simulates the leading observed variability modes. The geographical structure of internal variability patterns is found to be similar to that of total variability, although similar modes tend to evolve rather differently in time. The zonally symmetric seesaw dominates the internal variability for both observed and climatologically prescribed SST. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Variable compression ratio device for internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.

    2004-03-23

    An internal combustion engine, particularly suitable for use in a work machine, is provided with a combustion cylinder, a cylinder head at an end of the combustion cylinder and a primary piston reciprocally disposed within the combustion cylinder. The cylinder head includes a secondary cylinder and a secondary piston reciprocally disposed within the secondary cylinder. An actuator is coupled with the secondary piston for controlling the position of the secondary piston dependent upon the position of the primary piston. A communication port establishes fluid flow communication between the combustion cylinder and the secondary cylinder.

  7. Variable Star Photometry at West Challow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the facilities and observing programme of a small personal observatory set up in the UK for CCD photometry of variable stars. Its development has been driven by the belief that committed amateurs can make a valuable scientific contribution to the study of variable stars. Observing projects carried out at WCO are described including examples of Pro-Am collaboration and contributions to the observing programmes of the BAAVSS, AAVSO and CBA.

  8. Climate variability and campylobacter infection: an international study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari Kovats, R.; Edwards, Sally J.; Charron, Dominique; Cowden, John; D'Souza, Rennie M.; Ebi, Kristie L.; Gauci, Charmaine; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Hajat, Shakoor; Hales, Simon; Hernández Pezzi, Gloria; Kriz, Bohumir; Kutsar, Kuulo; McKeown, Paul; Mellou, Kassiani; Menne, Bettina; O'Brien, Sarah; Pelt, Wilfrid; Schmid, Hans

    2005-03-01

    Campylobacter is among the most important agents of enteritis in developed countries. We have described the potential environmental determinants of the seasonal pattern of infection with campylobacter in Europe, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Specifically, we investigated the role of climate variability on laboratory-confirmed cases of campylobacter infection from 15 populations. Regression analysis was used to quantify the associations between timing of seasonal peaks in infection in space and time. The short-term association between weekly weather and cases was also investigated using Poisson regression adapted for time series data. All countries in our study showed a distinct seasonality in campylobacter transmission, with many, but not all, populations showing a peak in spring. Countries with milder winters have peaks of infection earlier in the year. The timing of the peak of infection is weakly associated with high temperatures 3 months previously. Weekly variation in campylobacter infection in one region of the UK appeared to be little affected by short-term changes in weather patterns. The geographical variation in the timing of the seasonal peak suggests that climate may be a contributing factor to campylobacter transmission. The main driver of seasonality of campylobacter remains elusive and underscores the need to identify the major serotypes and routes of transmission for this disease.

  9. The Relative Contribution of Internal and Model Variabilities to the Uncertainty in Decadal Climate Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobach, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2016-04-01

    Decadal climate predictions, which are initialized with observed conditions, are characterized by two main sources of uncertainties--internal and model variabilities. The former is due to the sensitivity of the models to the initial conditions, and the latter is due to the different predictions of different models. There is not much that can be done to reduce the internal variability; however, there are several methods for reducing the model variability--for example, using an ensemble weighted according to the past performance of the models rather than an equally weighted ensemble. Quantifying the contribution of each of these sources can help in assessing the potential reduction of the total uncertainty of these climate predictions. We used an ensemble of climate model simulations, from the CMIP5 decadal experiments, that includes different climate models and several initializations for each of the models, to analyze the uncertainties on a decadal time scale. Time series of the monthly and annual means of the surface temperature and wind components were established for the variability analysis. The analysis focused on the contributions of the internal and model variabilities and the total uncertainty. We found that different definitions of the anomaly resulted in different conclusions regarding the variability of the ensemble. However, some features of the uncertainty were common to all the anomalies we considered. In particular, we found that (i) over decadal time scales, there is no considerable increase in the uncertainty with time; (ii) the model variability is more sensitive to the annual cycle than the internal variability (this, in turn, results in a maximal uncertainty during the winter in the northern hemisphere); (iii) the uncertainty of the surface temperature prediction is dominated by the model variability, whereas the uncertainty of the surface wind components is determined by both the model and the internal variabilities. Analysis of the spatial

  10. Internal and Forced Low-Frequency Surface Temperature Variability at Global and Regional Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, M. E.; Steinman, B. A.; Miller, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    There is evidence for internal models of decadal and multidecadal surface temperature variability that possess relatively narrowband spectral signatures. Among these are the so-called Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation ("AMO") and Pacific Decadal Oscillation ("PDO"). Separating these internal variability components from long-term forced temperature changes, however, is a non-trivial task. We apply a semi-empirical approach that combines climate observations and model-simulations to estimate Atlantic- and Pacific-based internal multidecadal variability (termed 'AMO' and 'PMO', respectively). Using analyses of coupled global climate model simulations, we show that our approach correctly identifies the internal variability components, while several alternative approaches overestimate and misidentify these components and their contribution to hemispheric mean temperatures. Using our method, the AMO and PMO are found to project in nearly equal proportion onto internal multidecadal variability in Northern Hemisphere mean temperature (termed 'NMO'). A recent NMO cooling trend which contributes to the slowdown or "false pause" in warming of the past decade is seen to reflect a competition between a modest positive peak in the AMO and a substantially negative-trending PMO.

  11. Internal Variability-Generated Uncertainty in East Asian Climate Projections Estimated with 40 CCSM3 Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shuai-Lei; Luo, Jing-Jia; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Regional climate projections are challenging because of large uncertainty particularly stemming from unpredictable, internal variability of the climate system. Here, we examine the internal variability-induced uncertainty in precipitation and surface air temperature (SAT) trends during 2005–2055 over East Asia based on 40 member ensemble projections of the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3). The model ensembles are generated from a suite of different atmospheric initial conditions using the same SRES A1B greenhouse gas scenario. We find that projected precipitation trends are subject to considerably larger internal uncertainty and hence have lower confidence, compared to the projected SAT trends in both the boreal winter and summer. Projected SAT trends in winter have relatively higher uncertainty than those in summer. Besides, the lower-level atmospheric circulation has larger uncertainty than that in the mid-level. Based on k-means cluster analysis, we demonstrate that a substantial portion of internally-induced precipitation and SAT trends arises from internal large-scale atmospheric circulation variability. These results highlight the importance of internal climate variability in affecting regional climate projections on multi-decadal timescales. PMID:26930402

  12. Internal Variability-Generated Uncertainty in East Asian Climate Projections Estimated with 40 CCSM3 Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuai-Lei; Luo, Jing-Jia; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Regional climate projections are challenging because of large uncertainty particularly stemming from unpredictable, internal variability of the climate system. Here, we examine the internal variability-induced uncertainty in precipitation and surface air temperature (SAT) trends during 2005-2055 over East Asia based on 40 member ensemble projections of the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3). The model ensembles are generated from a suite of different atmospheric initial conditions using the same SRES A1B greenhouse gas scenario. We find that projected precipitation trends are subject to considerably larger internal uncertainty and hence have lower confidence, compared to the projected SAT trends in both the boreal winter and summer. Projected SAT trends in winter have relatively higher uncertainty than those in summer. Besides, the lower-level atmospheric circulation has larger uncertainty than that in the mid-level. Based on k-means cluster analysis, we demonstrate that a substantial portion of internally-induced precipitation and SAT trends arises from internal large-scale atmospheric circulation variability. These results highlight the importance of internal climate variability in affecting regional climate projections on multi-decadal timescales. PMID:26930402

  13. Evolution of internal variables in an expanding hollow cylinder at large plastic strains.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Dinh Kien, Nguyen; Erisov, Yaroslav; Grechnikov, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating the evolution of internal variables in an expanding hollow cylinder of rigid/plastic material is proposed. The conventional constitutive equations for rigid plastic, hardening material are supplemented with quite an arbitrary set of evolution laws for internal variables assuming that the material is incompressible. No restriction is imposed on the hardening law. The problem is solved in Lagrangian coordinates. This significantly facilitates a numerical treatment of the problem. In particular, the initial/boundary value problem is reduced to a system of equations in characteristic coordinates. A finite difference scheme is used for solving these equations. An illustrative example is presented assuming that the internal variables are the equivalent plastic strain and a damage parameter. PMID:27066385

  14. On the Temporal Variability of Low-Mode Internal Tides in the Deep Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurements of internal tides are typically characterized by high temporal variability, with strong dependence on stratification, mesoscale eddies, and background currents commonly observed. Thus, it is surprising to find phase-locked internal tides detectable by satellite altimetry. An important question is how much tidal variability is missed by altimetry. We address this question in several ways. We subset the altimetry by season and find only very small changes -- an important exception being internal tides in the South China Sea where we observe strong seasonal dependence. A wavenumber-domain analysis confirms that throughout most of the global ocean there is little temporal variability in altimetric internal-tide signals, at least in the first baroclinic mode, which is the mode that dominates surface elevation. The analysis shows higher order modes to be significantly more variable. The results of this study have important practical implications for the anticipated SWOT wide-swath altimeter mission, for which removal of internal tide signals is critical for observing non-tidal submesoscale phenomena.

  15. Internal versus external controls on age variability: Definitions, origins and implications in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, A. M.; Poole, G. C.; Payn, R. A.; Izurieta, C.; Wright, M.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Stanford, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The unsteadiness of stream water age is now well established, but the controls on the age dynamics, and the adequate representation and prediction of those dynamics, are not. A basic distinction can be made between internal variability that arises from changes in the proportions of flow moving through the diverse flow pathways of a hydrologic system, and external variability that arises from the stochasticity of inputs and outputs (such as precipitation and streamflow). In this talk I will show how these two types of age variability can be formally defined and distinguished within the framework of rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions. Internal variability implies variations in time in the rSAS function, while external variability does not. This leads naturally to the definition of several modes of internal variability, reflecting generic ways that system flowpaths may be rearranged. This rearrangement may be induced by fluctuations in the system state (such as catchment wetness), or by longer-term changes in catchment structure (such as land use change). One type of change, the 'inverse storage effect' is characterized by an increase in the release of young water from the system in response to an increase in overall system storage. This effect can be seen in many hydrologic settings, and has important implications for the effect of altered hydroclimatic conditions on solute transport through a landscape. External variability, such as increased precipitation, can induce a decrease in mean transit time (and vice versa), but this effect is greatly enhanced if accompanied by an internal shift in flow pathways that increases the relative importance of younger water. These effects will be illustrated using data from field and experimental studies.

  16. Threats to internal validity in exercise science: a review of overlooked confounding variables.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Pyne, David B; Martin, David T

    2015-10-01

    Internal validity refers to the degree of control exerted over potential confounding variables to reduce alternative explanations for the effects of various treatments. In exercise and sports-science research and routine testing, internal validity is commonly achieved by controlling variables such as exercise and warm-up protocols, prior training, nutritional intake before testing, ambient temperature, time of testing, hours of sleep, age, and gender. However, a number of other potential confounding variables often do not receive adequate attention in sports physiology and performance research. These confounding variables include instructions on how to perform the test, volume and frequency of verbal encouragement, knowledge of exercise endpoint, number and gender of observers in the room, influence of music played before and during testing, and the effects of mental fatigue on performance. In this review the authors discuss these variables in relation to common testing environments in exercise and sports science and present some recommendations with the goal of reducing possible threats to internal validity. PMID:25756869

  17. Identifying SRD Variables Among "Miscellaneous" ASAS Stars (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinonez, M.; Larsen, K.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) The International Variable Star Index (VSX) contains a large number of stars observed and analyzed by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). While ASAS is a powerful tool in terms of the sheer volume of data it collects, its automated light curve analysis is not always robust enough to reliably identify stars that are not strictly regular in their magnitude variations. As a consequence, it was suspected that potentially many variable stars of the semiregular type were instead added to the VSX under a miscellaneous (MISC) classification. A subset of these semiregular stars, known as SRD variables, has a well-defined set of parameters regarding their classification - they are of the F, G, or K spectral type, their amplitudes of light variation are between 0.1 and 4 magnitudes, and their periods of variation can span 30 to 1,100 days. Furthermore, SRD variables are giants or supergiants, and therefore typically distant with small proper motions. A search was made through stars listed as MISC in the VSX using the above parameters, as well detailed light curve analyses via the AAVSO's VStar program, in order to find ASAS SRDs that were misclassified as MISC. This study of 90 stars has yielded five new SRDs to date. In addition, some data pertaining to several stars that were not confirmed to be of the SRD type were found to contain errors, and have since been revised accordingly in VSX.

  18. Large-basin hydrological response to climate model outputs: uncertainty caused by internal atmospheric variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfan, A.; Semenov, V. A.; Gusev, E.; Motovilov, Y.; Nasonova, O.; Krylenko, I.; Kovalev, E.

    2015-06-01

    An approach is proposed to assess hydrological simulation uncertainty originating from internal atmospheric variability. The latter is one of three major factors contributing to uncertainty of simulated climate change projections (along with so-called "forcing" and "climate model" uncertainties). Importantly, the role of internal atmospheric variability is most visible over spatio-temporal scales of water management in large river basins. Internal atmospheric variability is represented by large ensemble simulations (45 members) with the ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model. Ensemble simulations are performed using identical prescribed lower boundary conditions (observed sea surface temperature, SST, and sea ice concentration, SIC, for 1979-2012) and constant external forcing parameters but different initial conditions of the atmosphere. The ensemble of bias-corrected ECHAM5 outputs and ensemble averaged ECHAM5 output are used as a distributed input for the ECOMAG and SWAP hydrological models. The corresponding ensembles of runoff hydrographs are calculated for two large rivers of the Arctic basin: the Lena and Northern Dvina rivers. A number of runoff statistics including the mean and the standard deviation of annual, monthly and daily runoff, as well as annual runoff trend, are assessed. Uncertainties of runoff statistics caused by internal atmospheric variability are estimated. It is found that uncertainty of the mean and the standard deviation of runoff has a significant seasonal dependence on the maximum during the periods of spring-summer snowmelt and summer-autumn rainfall floods. Noticeable nonlinearity of the hydrological models' results in the ensemble ECHAM5 output is found most strongly expressed for the Northern Dvina River basin. It is shown that the averaging over ensemble members effectively filters the stochastic term related to internal atmospheric variability. Simulated discharge trends are close to normally distributed around the ensemble

  19. Large-basin hydrological response to climate model outputs: uncertainty caused by the internal atmospheric variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfan, A.; Semenov, V. A.; Gusev, E.; Motovilov, Y.; Nasonova, O.; Krylenko, I.; Kovalev, E.

    2015-02-01

    An approach is proposed to assess hydrological simulation uncertainty originating from internal atmospheric variability. The latter is one of three major factors contributing to the uncertainty of simulated climate change projections (along with so-called "forcing" and "climate model" uncertainties). Importantly, the role of the internal atmospheric variability is the most visible over the spatial-temporal scales of water management in large river basins. The internal atmospheric variability is represented by large ensemble simulations (45 members) with the ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model. The ensemble simulations are performed using identical prescribed lower boundary conditions (observed sea surface temperature, SST, and sea ice concentration, SIC, for 1979-2012) and constant external forcing parameters but different initial conditions of the atmosphere. The ensemble of the bias-corrected ECHAM5-outputs as well as ensemble averaged ECHAM5-output are used as the distributed input for ECOMAG and SWAP hydrological models. The corresponding ensembles of runoff hydrographs are calculated for two large rivers of the Arctic basin: the Lena and the Northern Dvina rivers. A number of runoff statistics including the mean and the SD of the annual, monthly and daily runoff, as well as the annual runoff trend are assessed. The uncertainties of runoff statistics caused by the internal atmospheric variability are estimated. It is found that the uncertainty of the mean and SD of the runoff has a distinguished seasonal dependence with maximum during the periods of spring-summer snowmelt and summer-autumn rainfall floods. A noticeable non-linearity of the hydrological models' response to the ensemble ECHAM5 output is found most strongly expressed for the Northern Dvine River basin. It is shown that the averaging over ensemble members effectively filters stochastic term related to internal atmospheric variability. The simulated trends are close to normally distributed

  20. Studies of RV Tauri and SRD Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    AAVSO visual and Johnson V observations of 42 RV Tauri and 30 yellow semiregular (SRD) variables have been time-series analyzed with the AAVSO VSTAR package. The DCDFT routine was used to determine periods and mean amplitudes, and the WWZ (wavelet) routine was used to study changes in the amplitudes of these stars. For almost half of the stars, improved periods and/or classifications were obtained. For others, existing classifications and periods were confirmed or supported. As was previously found for a subset of RV and SRD stars: the pulsation amplitudes vary by factors of up to 10, on median time scales of about 22 pulsation periods for the RV stars, and about 25 pulsation periods for the SRD stars; these two values are not significantly different. This behavior is consistent with that of pulsating red giants and supergiants. The cause of the pulsation amplitude variations remains unknown.

  1. North Atlantic summer storm tracks over Europe dominated by internal variability over the past millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagen, Mary H.; Zorita, Eduardo; McCarroll, Danny; Zahn, Matthias; Young, Giles H. F.; Robertson, Iain

    2016-08-01

    Certain large, sustained anomalies in European temperatures in the past millennium are probably the result of internal variation. Such internal variations can modulate regional temperatures away from the expected response to greenhouse gas forcing. Here we assess the causes of European summer temperature variability over the past millennium using temperature observations, simulations and reconstructions. We find multidecadal-mean summer temperatures have varied within a span of 1 K, largely controlled by external forcing. By contrast, we find subcontinental variations, described by the temperature contrast between northern and southern Europe (the meridional temperature gradient), vary with a span of 2 K, and are controlled by internal processes. These variations are the result of redistributions of precipitation and cloud cover linked to oscillations in the position of the summer storm track. In contrast to recent twentieth-century winter-time trends, variations of the summer storm track over the past millennium show a weak response to external forcing, and instead are dominated by stochastic internal variability. We argue that the response of European summer temperatures to anthropogenic greenhouse forcing is likely to be spatially modulated by the same stochastic internal processes that have caused periods of cool, wet summers in northern Europe over the last millennium.

  2. Effect of Internal Aperture Variability on Tracer Transport in Large Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Aperture variability within individual fractures is usually neglected in modeling flow and transport through fractured media. Typically, individual fractures are assumed to be homogeneous. However, in reality, individual fractures are heterogeneous, which may affect flow and transport in fractured media. The relative importance of including in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling has been under debate for a long time. Previous studies have shown flow channeling on an individual fracture with internal variability, where the fracture is considered isolated from the rest of the fracture network. Although these studies yield some clear insights into the process, the boundary conditions are impractical for field-scale networks, where the realistic boundary conditions are determined by fracture connections in the network. Therefore, flow in a single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. In order to address the question of the importance of in-fracture variability, the internal heterogeneity of every individual fracture is incorporated into a three-dimensional fracture network, represented by a composition of intersecting fractures. The new DFN simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate a kilometer scale DFNs similar to the Forsmark, Sweden site. In our DFN model, the in-fracture aperture variability is scattered over each cell of the computational mesh along the fracture, representing by a stationary Gaussian random field with various correlation lengths. The Lagrangian particle tracking is conducted in multiple DFN realizations and the flow-dependent Lagrangian parameters, non-reacting travel time, τ, and cumulative reactivity parameter, β, are obtained along particles streamlines. It is shown that early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture aperture variability than tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the aperture variations and spatial

  3. An internal variable constitutive model for the large deformation of metals at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Stuart; Anand, Lallit

    1988-01-01

    The advent of large deformation finite element methodologies is beginning to permit the numerical simulation of hot working processes whose design until recently has been based on prior industrial experience. Proper application of such finite element techniques requires realistic constitutive equations which more accurately model material behavior during hot working. A simple constitutive model for hot working is the single scalar internal variable model for isotropic thermal elastoplasticity proposed by Anand. The model is recalled and the specific scalar functions, for the equivalent plastic strain rate and the evolution equation for the internal variable, presented are slight modifications of those proposed by Anand. The modified functions are better able to represent high temperature material behavior. The monotonic constant true strain rate and strain rate jump compression experiments on a 2 percent silicon iron is briefly described. The model is implemented in the general purpose finite element program ABAQUS.

  4. Mechanisms of the Internally Generated Decadal-to-Multidecadal Variability in the Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Schneider, E. K.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of the internally generated decadal-to-multidecadal time scale SST variability in the Atlantic, including the North Atlantic Tripole variability, the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability and the Tropical Atlantic Variability, on the basis of a 300-year 1990 control simulation (CONTROL) made with CCSM3 and in an interactive ensemble version of CCSM3 (IE-CCSM3: 6 copies of AGCM coupled to the OGCM through the flux coupler). The structures, amplitudes and time scales of these three low frequency modes from CONTROL have properties similar to the observed variability, indicating that CCSM3 is appropriate for studying their mechanisms. These modes are closely related to the variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) on decadal time scales, suggesting that all of these types of variability may be manifestations of a single decadal "mode" of variability. To understand the low frequency modes and their interaction with each other, and the interaction among different oceanic regions, we isolate weather noise forcing from other mechanisms, including the coupled feedback, the gyre circulations, wave dynamics, and AMOC. The weather noise surface fluxes, including the net heat flux, wind stress and freshwater flux, are obtained from CONTROL by removing the SST forced surface fluxes, which are averaged from an ensemble of six AGCMs forced by the CONTROL SST. The IE-CCSM3 simulations in which the specified weather noise forcing is restricted to specific regions or in which the effects of the different specified surface fluxes are isolated are carried out to determine the contributions to the Atlantic decadal modes by region and by forcing type. Our results from the weather noise forced IE-CCSM3 simulations demonstrate that weather noise is responsible for most of decadal variability in the Atlantic and reveal the interactions between the three modes.

  5. The role of internal climate variability for interpreting climate change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraun, Douglas

    2013-04-01

    When communicating information on climate change, the use of multi-model ensembles has been advocated to sample uncertainties over a range as wide as possible. To meet the demand for easily accessible results, the ensemble is often summarised by its multi-model mean signal. In rare cases, additional uncertainty measures are given to avoid loosing all information on the ensemble spread, e.g., the highest and lowest projected values. Such approaches, however, disregard the fundamentally different nature of the different types of uncertainties and might cause wrong interpretations and subsequently wrong decisions for adaptation. Whereas scenario and climate model uncertainties are of epistemic nature, i.e., caused by an in principle reducible lack of knowledge, uncertainties due to internal climate variability are aleatory, i.e., inherently stochastic and irreducible. As wisely stated in the proverb "climate is what you expect, weather is what you get", a specific region will experience one stochastic realisation of the climate system, but never exactly the expected climate change signal as given by a multi model mean. Depending on the meteorological variable, region and lead time, the signal might be strong or weak compared to the stochastic component. In cases of a low signal-to-noise ratio, even if the climate change signal is a well defined trend, no trends or even opposite trends might be experienced. Here I propose to use the time of emergence (TOE) to quantify and communicate when climate change trends will exceed the internal variability. The TOE provides a useful measure for end users to assess the time horizon for implementing adaptation measures. Furthermore, internal variability is scale dependent - the more local the scale, the stronger the influence of internal climate variability. Thus investigating the TOE as a function of spatial scale could help to assess the required spatial scale for implementing adaptation measures. I exemplify this proposal with

  6. To what extent is climate change detection at the local scale 'clouded' by internal variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalbers, Emma; Lenderink, Geert; van Meijgaard, Erik; van den Hurk, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Internal variability, i.e. the natural variability of the climate system, has been shown to be an important source of uncertainty in climate change projections of mean and (especially) extreme climate events, next to model uncertainty and uncertainty in projections of greenhouse gas emissions. To quantify the internal variability and get a robust estimate of the forced climate change response, large ensembles of climate model simulations of the same model provide essential information. For global climate models (GCMs) a number of these single model ensembles are indeed available. So far however, the size of single model ensembles for regional climate models (RCMs) has been limited to only a few members, relatively short periods or small modeling domains. Here, we use a 16 member ensemble generated with the RCM KNMI-RACMO2 driven by the GCM EC-EARTH. The initial atmospheric state of EC-EARTH was perturbed in 1850, after which each member was run until 2100 assuming the historical emission scenario until 2005 and the RCP8.5 emission scenario from 2006 onwards. Each of the EC-EARTH members was then downscaled on a 12-km resolved domain covering Western Europe including the Alps for the period 1950-2100. For this ensemble we show the climate change signal, the noise due to internal variability and the signal-to-noise ratio, and how these depend on parameter, season, location and projection period. Using an aggregated spatial probability perspective similar to Fischer et al. (2013) we also examine whether spatially aggregated responses yield more robust changes and earlier detection times of climate change. This information is particularly relevant when the output of RCMs is applied in impact studies. Firstly, with this information we can identify which of the two - internal variability or climate change - is more important for a certain timescale, requiring potentially different coping strategies. Secondly, the internal variability can be a cause for the discrepancy

  7. Simulation of Present-Climate Precipitation: Parameter Perturbations and Internal Variability with the GFDL Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, L.; Neelin, J. D.; Jacob, R. L.; Zhao, M.; Held, I.; Moore, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    We found that internal variability is a substantial source of uncertainty for local climatological precipitation in an ensemble of perturbed physics experiments (PPE) in which we also perturbed the atmospheric initial conditions. The ensemble consists of about seventy 50-year long AMIP simulations performed with the GFDL model at 1x1 degree resolution. Our goal is to describe the dependence of the local precipitation climatology to the value of each parameter being perturbed in the ensemble; and we found that a quadratic dependence is appropriate for the entrainment in convective clouds (Fig.1a) with the quadratic term acting to compensate the effect of the linear term: the magnitude of the latter is in fact 20-30% larger and of opposite sign in all major convective areas in the Tropics. About 50% of the grid points show such behavior (Fig.1b) when an ensemble of initial conditions is employed. To assess the impact of internal variability we repeated the analysis using only one run for each parameter value and found that the confidence with which the fitting parameters are established is strongly decreased: a difference in the magnitude of the reconstructed precipitation of about 10-30% is obtained, when precipitation is evaluated at the standard value of the entrainment coefficient (Fig.1c); and the number of grid points in which the null hypothesis of "no quadratic dependence" is rejected halves (Fig.1d). Preliminary results on the joint impact of internal variability and temporal span of the simulations indicate that an increased uncertainty of about 10% occurs when only 20 of the 50 years of simulations are considered. Lastly, in exploring model optimization we found that a PPE often cannot be discerned from the internal variability in a simulation length of 50 years.

  8. Pre-onset land surface processes and `internal' interannual variabilities of the Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subodh K.; Halder, Subhadeep; Kumar, K. Krishna; Goswami, B. N.

    2011-06-01

    It is proposed that, land-atmosphere interaction around the time of monsoon onset could modulate the first episode of climatological intraseasonal oscillation (CISO) and may generate significant `internal' interannual variation in the Indian summer monsoon rainfall. The regional climate model RegCM3 is used over Indian monsoon domain for 27 years of control simulation. In order to prove the hypothesis, another two sets of experiment are performed using two different boundary conditions (El Niño year and non-ENSO year). In each of these experiments, a single year of boundary conditions are used repeatedly year after year to generate `internal' interannual monsoon variability. Simulation of monsoon climate in the control model run is found to be in reasonably good agreement with observation. However, large rainfall bias is seen over Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The interannual monsoon rainfall variability are of the same order in two experiments, which suggest that the external influences may not be important on the generation of `internal' monsoon rainfall variability. It is shown that, a dry (wet) pre-onset land-surface condition increases (decreases) rainfall in June which in turn leads to an anomalous increase (decrease) in seasonal (JJAS) rainfall. The phase and amplitude of CISO are modulated during May-June and beyond that the modulation of CISO is quite negligible. Though the pre-onset rainfall is unpredictable, significant modulation of the post-onset monsoon rainfall by it can be exploited to improve predictive skill within the monsoon season.

  9. Impacts of climate change and internal climate variability on french rivers streamflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayon, Gildas; Boé, Julien; Martin, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the impacts of climate change often requires to set up long chains of modeling, from the model to estimate the future concentration of greenhouse gases to the impact model. Throughout the modeling chain, sources of uncertainty accumulate making the exploitation of results for the development of adaptation strategies difficult. It is proposed here to assess the impacts of climate change on the hydrological cycle over France and the associated uncertainties. The contribution of the uncertainties from greenhouse gases emission scenario, climate models and internal variability are addressed in this work. To have a large ensemble of climate simulations, the study is based on Global Climate Models (GCM) simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 5 (CMIP5), including several simulations from the same GCM to properly assess uncertainties from internal climate variability. Simulations from the four Radiative Concentration Pathway (RCP) are downscaled with a statistical method developed in a previous study (Dayon et al. 2015). The hydrological system Isba-Modcou is then driven by the downscaling results on a 8 km grid over France. Isba is a land surface model that calculates the energy and water balance and Modcou a hydrogeological model that routes the surface runoff given by Isba. Based on that framework, uncertainties uncertainties from greenhouse gases emission scenario, climate models and climate internal variability are evaluated. Their relative importance is described for the next decades and the end of this century. In a last part, uncertainties due to internal climate variability on streamflows simulated with downscaled GCM and Isba-Modcou are evaluated against observations and hydrological reconstructions on the whole 20th century. Hydrological reconstructions are based on the downscaling of recent atmospheric reanalyses of the 20th century and observations of temperature and precipitation. We show that the multi-decadal variability

  10. Long-term Internal Variability of the Tropical Pacific Atmosphere-Ocean System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi Bordbar, Mohammad; Martin, Thomas; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2016-04-01

    The tropical Pacific has featured some remarkable trends during the recent decades such as an unprecedented strengthening of the Trade Winds, a strong cooling of sea surface temperatures (SST) in the eastern and central part, thereby slowing global warming and strengthening the zonal SST gradient, and highly asymmetric sea level trends with an accelerated rise relative to the global average in the western and a drop in the eastern part. These trends have been linked to an anomalously strong Pacific Walker Circulation, the major zonal atmospheric overturning cell in the tropical Pacific sector, but the origin of the strengthening is controversial. Here we address the question as to whether the recent decadal trends in the tropical Pacific atmosphere-ocean system are within the range of internal variability, as simulated in long unforced integrations of global climate models. We show that the recent trends are still within the range of long-term internal decadal variability. Further, such variability strengthens in response to enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations, which may further hinder detection of anthropogenic climate signals in that region.

  11. Efficient Signal Processing in Random Networks that Generate Variability: A Comparison of Internally Generated and Externally Induced Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Nishikawa, Isao; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Toyoizumi, Taro

    Source of cortical variability and its influence on signal processing remain an open question. We address the latter, by studying two types of balanced randomly connected networks of quadratic I-F neurons, with irregular spontaneous activity: (a) a deterministic network with strong connections generating noise by chaotic dynamics (b) a stochastic network with weak connections receiving noisy input. They are analytically tractable in the limit of large network-size and channel time-constant. Despite different sources of noise, spontaneous activity of these networks are identical unless majority of neurons are simultaneously recorded. However, the two networks show remarkably different sensitivity to external stimuli. In the former, input reverberates internally and can be read out over long time, but in the latter, inputs rapidly decay. This is further enhanced with activity-dependent plasticity at input synapses producing marked difference in decoding inputs from neural activity. We show, this leads to distinct performance of the two networks to integrate temporally separate signals from multiple sources, with the deterministic chaotic network activity serving as reservoir for Monte Carlo sampling to perform near optimal Bayesian integration, unlike its stochastic counterpart.

  12. Soil internal drainage: temporal stability and spatial variability in succession bean-black oat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, M. M. S.; Libardi, P. L.; Moreira, N. B.; Sousa, H. H. F.; Neiverth, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    There are a variety of studies considering the soil water content, but those who consider the flow of water, which are translated by deep drainage and capillary rise are scarce, especially those who assess their spatio-temporal variability, due to its laborious obtaining. Large areas have been considered homogeneous, but show considerable spatial variability inherent in the soil, causing the appearance of zones of distinct physical properties. In deep, sandy soils where the groundwater level is far below the root zone of interference, internal drainage is one of the factors limiting the supply of water to the soil surface, and possibly one of the biggest factors that determines what kinds satisfactory development of plants present in a given landscape. The forms of relief may also be indicators of changes in soil properties, because this variability is caused by small changes that affect the slope of the pedogenetic processes and the transport and storage of water in the soil profile, i.e., the different trajectories of water flow in different forms of the landscape, is the cause of variability. The objectives of this research were: i) evaluate the spatial and temporal stability of internal soil water drainage in a place near and another distant from the root system in a bean-black-oat succession and ii) verify their spatial variability in relation to relief. With the hydraulic conductivity obtained by the instantaneous profile method and the total potential gradient obtained from the difference in readings of tensiometers installed at depths of 0.35 and 0.45 and 0.75 and 0.85 m in 60 sampling points totaling 1680 and 1200 observations during the cultivation of beans and oats, respectively, was obtained so the internal drainage / capillary rise through the Darcy-Buckingham equation. To evaluate the temporal stability the method used was the relative difference and Spearman correlation test and the spatial variability was analyzed as geostatistical methodology

  13. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Painter, Scott L.; Gable, Carl W.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-08-01

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer-scale field-scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.

  14. Evaluating the effect of internal aperture variability on transport in kilometer scale discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Painter, Scott L.; Gable, Carl W.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-06-17

    The apertures of natural fractures in fractured rock are highly heterogeneous. However, in-fracture aperture variability is often neglected in flow and transport modeling and individual fractures are assumed to have uniform aperture distribution. The relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling within kilometer18 scale field–scale fracture networks has been under a matter of debate for a long time because the flow in each single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. Computational limitations have previously prohibited researchers from investigating the relative importance of in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling withinmore » large-scale fracture networks. We address this question by incorporating internal heterogeneity of individual fractures into 23 flow simulations within kilometer scale three-dimensional fracture networks, where fracture intensity, P32 (ratio between total fracture area and domain volume) is between 0.027 and 0.031 [1/m]. A recently developed discrete fracture network (DFN) simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate DFNs that include in-fracture aperture variability represented by a stationary log-normal stochastic field with various correlation lengths and variances. The Lagrangian transport parameters, non-reacting travel time and cumulative retention, are calculated along particles streamlines. It is observed that due to local flow channeling early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture variability than the tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the in-fracture transmissivity variations and spatial correlation length is observed.« less

  15. Austral winter external and internal atmospheric variability between 1980 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Lin, Hai; Hansen, Felicitas; Gollan, Gereon; Jung, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    We examine the interannual variability of the seasonal mean atmospheric circulation in the Southern Hemisphere during austral winter. The three major modes are identified by rotated empirical orthogonal function (REOF) analysis. As expected, REOF1 is associated with the Southern Annular Mode which is dominated by internal atmospheric dynamics. REOF2 displays a wave train, linked to the western North Pacific monsoon and the Pacific-Japan pattern in East Asia in the same season; REOF3 resembles the Pacific-South American pattern. Externally forced variability strongly projects on both REOF2 and REOF3 so that in the ensemble mean, an atmospheric model with prescribed observed sea surface temperature captures considerable parts of the time evolution of REOF2 (50%) and REOF3 (25%), suggesting a potential predictability for the two modes.

  16. Teleconnections and internal variability of the Asian Monsoon in the last 1000 years from paleoclimate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehfeld, Kira; Goswami, Bedartha; Marwan, Norbert; Breitenbach, Sebastian; Lechleitner, Franziska; Molkenthin, Nora; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Asian monsoon is a climate phenomenon with global reach, impacting on 60% of the world's population, and extremes in its dynamics affect both the people and the economies of Asia. Investigating past climate changes in the Asian monsoon system offers a unique key to understanding its future behavior under anthropogenic perturbation, because our global past is the only truthful realization of the "Earth System experiment" we can access. Paleoclimate data are hereby the only witnesses that testify directly about the state of the Earth system in the past. However, in order to be able to infer on the climatic processes reflected in the proxy data, three inherent challenges need to be met: the datasets are heterogeneously sampled in time (i), space (ii) and time itself is a variable that needs to be reconstructed, which (iii) introduces additional uncertainties. Addressing these issues using adapted similarity estimators, flexible network measures and numerical simulation, we infer spatio-temporal dependencies from paleoclimate networks. We then investigate, to what extent the decadal-scale variability recorded in the paleoclimate data from trees, speleothems, sediments and ice cores is due to internal variability of the Indian and the East Asian monsoon systems, and how potential teleconnections with the El Niño southern oscillation, the North Atlantic oscillation, and solar variability have varied over the last 1000 years.

  17. Variability in the Position of the Retropharyngeal Internal Carotid Artery: A Potential Surgical Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ajay; Shah, Akash D.; Zhang, Zhigang; Phillips, C. Douglas; Young, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The retropharyngeal internal carotid artery (ICA) is a well-described arterial anomaly with important implications for patients undergoing pharyngeal approach surgical procedures. Existing clinical and imaging classification schemes for a retropharyngeal ICA take into account arterial distance to the pharyngeal mucosal wall. We describe a case of mobility of a retropharyngeal ICA between short-interval imaging studies. The possibility of respiratory variability or other etiologies causing such changes in retropharyngeal carotid position have not been described previously. Our findings suggest that imaging findings from a single study alone may not be sufficient to confidently exclude this clinically significant arterial anomaly. PMID:22614949

  18. Internal state variable approach for predicting stiffness reductions in fibrous laminated composites with matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, D. H.; Harris, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model utilizing the internal state variable concept is proposed for predicting the upper bound of the reduced axial stiffnesses in cross-ply laminates with matrix cracks. The axial crack opening displacement is explicitly expressed in terms of the observable axial strain and the undamaged material properties. A crack parameter representing the effect of matrix cracks on the observable axial Young's modulus is calculated for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy material systems. The results show that the matrix crack opening displacement and the effective Young's modulus depend not on the crack length, but on its ratio to the crack spacing.

  19. Emotional variability in mother-adolescent conflict interactions and internalizing problems of mothers and adolescents: dyadic and individual processes.

    PubMed

    Van der Giessen, Daniëlle; Hollenstein, Tom; Hale, William W; Koot, Hans M; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan

    2015-02-01

    Emotional variability reflects the ability to flexibly switch among a broad range of positive and negative emotions from moment-to-moment during interactions. Emotional variability during mother-adolescent conflict interactions is considered to be important for healthy socio-emotional functioning of mothers and adolescents. The current observational study examined whether dyadic emotional variability, maternal emotional variability, and adolescent emotional variability during conflict interactions in early adolescence predicted mothers' and adolescents' internalizing problems five years later. We used data from 92 mother-adolescent dyads (Mage T1 = 13.05; 65.20 % boys) who were videotaped at T1 while discussing a conflict. Emotional variability was derived from these conflict interactions and it was observed for mother-adolescent dyads, mothers and adolescents separately. Mothers and adolescents also completed questionnaires in early adolescence (T1) and five years later in late adolescence (T6) on mothers' internalizing problems, and adolescents' anxiety and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that less dyadic emotional variability in early adolescence predicted relative increases in mothers' internalizing problems, adolescents' depressive symptoms, and adolescents' anxiety symptoms from early to late adolescence. Less maternal emotional variability only predicted relative increases in adolescents' anxiety symptoms over time. The emotional valence (e.g., types of emotions expressed) of conflict interactions did not moderate the results. Taken together, findings highlighted the importance of considering limited emotional variability during conflict interactions in the development, prevention, and treatment of internalizing problems of mothers and adolescents. PMID:25070359

  20. Design strategies for the International Space University's variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    A variable gravity research facility named 'Newton' was designed by 58 students from 13 countries at the International Space University's 1989 summer session at the Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourge, France. The project was comprehensive in scope, including a political and legal foundation for international cooperation, development and financing; technical, science and engineering issues; architectural design; plausible schedules; and operations, crew issues and maintenance. Since log-term exposure to zero gravity is known to be harmful to the human body, the main goal was to design a unique variable gravity research facility which would find a practical solution to this problem, permitting a manned mission to Mars. The facility would not duplicate other space-based facilities and would provide the flexibility for examining a number of gravity levels, including lunar and Martian gravities. Major design alternatives included a truss versus a tether based system which also involved the question of docking while spinning or despinning to dock. These design issues are described. The relative advantages or disadvantages are discussed, including comments on the necessary research and technology development required for each.

  1. Internal variability of Earth’s energy budget simulated by CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. D.; McNeall, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We analyse a large number of multi-century pre-industrial control simulations from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) to investigate relationships between: net top-of-atmosphere radiation (TOA), globally averaged surface temperature (GST), and globally integrated ocean heat content (OHC) on decadal timescales. Consistent with previous studies, we find that large trends (˜0.3 K dec-1) in GST can arise from internal climate variability and that these trends are generally an unreliable indicator of TOA over the same period. In contrast, trends in total OHC explain 95% or more of the variance in TOA for two-thirds of the models analysed; emphasizing the oceans’ role as Earth’s primary energy store. Correlation of trends in total system energy (TE ≡ time integrated TOA) against trends in OHC suggests that for most models the ocean becomes the dominant term in the planetary energy budget on a timescale of about 12 months. In the context of the recent pause in global surface temperature rise, we investigate the potential importance of internal climate variability in both TOA and ocean heat rearrangement. The model simulations suggest that both factors can account for O (0.1 W m-2) on decadal timescales and may play an important role in the recently observed trends in GST and 0-700 m (and 0-1800 m) ocean heat uptake.

  2. Variable Star Astronomy Education & Public Outreach Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Donna L.

    2008-05-01

    The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) published a comprehensive variable star curriculum, "Hands-On Astrophysics, Variable Stars in Science, Math, and Computer Education" in 1997. The curriculum, funded by the National Science Foundation, was developed for a comprehensive audience -- amateur astronomers, classroom educators, science fair projects, astronomy clubs, family learning, and anyone interested in learning about variable stars. Some of the activities from the Hands-On Astrophysics curriculum have been incorporated into the educational materials for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Educational and Public Outreach (EPO) Office. On two occasions, in 2000 and 2001, triggered by alerts from amateur astronomers, Chandra observed the outburst of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of amateur variable star astronomers and Chandra X-Ray scientists provided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena. Once again, the Chandra and AAVSO have teamed up -- this time to promote variable star education. The Hands-On Astrophysics curriculum is being re-designed and updated from the original materials to a web-based format. The new version, re-named Variable Star Astronomy, will provide formal and informal educators, and especially amateur astronomers, educational materials to help promote interest in and knowledge of variable stars.

  3. Partitioning internal variability and model uncertainty components in a multireplicate multimodel ensemble of hydrometeorological future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingray, Benoit; Saïd, Mériem; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Gailhlard, Joël; Mezghani, Abdelkader

    2014-05-01

    A simple and robust framework was proposed by Hingray and Mériem (2013) for the partitioning of the different components of internal variability and model uncertainty in a multireplicate multimodel ensemble (MRMME) of climate projections obtained for a suite of statistical downscaling models (SDMs) and global climate models (GCMs). It is based on the quasi-ergodic assumption for transient climate simulations. Model uncertainty components are estimated from the noise-free signals of each modeling chain using a two-way ANOVA framework. The residuals from the noise-free signal are used to estimate the large and small scale internal variability (IV) components associated with each considered GCM/SDM configuration. This framework makes it possible to take into account all runs and replicates available from any climate ensemble of opportunity. This quasi-ergodic ANOVA framework was applied to the MRMME of hydrometeorological simulations produced for the Upper Durance River basin (French Alps) over the 1860-2100 period within the RIWER2030 research project (http://www.lthe.fr/RIWER2030/). The different uncertainty sources were quantified as a function of lead time for projected changes in temperature, precipitation, evaporation losses, snow cover and discharges (Lafaysse et al., 2013). For temperature, GCM uncertainty prevails and, as opposed to IV, SDM uncertainty is non-negligible. Significant warming and in turn significant changes are predicted for evaporation, snow cover and seasonality of discharges. For precipitation, GCM and SDM uncertainty components are of the same order. Despite high model uncertainty, the non-zero climate change response of simulation chains is significant and annual precipitation is expected to decrease. However, high values are obtained for the large and small scale components of IV, inherited respectively from the GCMs and the different replicates of a given SDM. The same applies for annual discharge. The uncertainty in values that could

  4. Variability of internally generated turbulence in an estuary, from 100 days of continuous observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Philip M.; Visbeck, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed observations of internally generated turbulence in a sheared, stratified natural flow, as well as an analysis of the external factors leading to its generation and temporal variability. Multi-month time series of vertical profiles of velocity, acoustic backscatter (0.5 Hz), and turbulence parameters were collected with two moored acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) in the Hudson River estuary, and estuary-long transects of water density were collected 30 times. ADCP backscatter is used for visualization of coherent turbulent structures and evaluation of surface wave biases to the turbulence measurements. Benefits of the continuous long-term turbulence record include our capturing: (1) the seasonality of turbulence due to changing riverflow, (2) hysteresis in stratification and turbulence over the fortnightly cycle of tidal range, and (3) intermittent events such as breaking internal waves. Internal mixing layers (IMLs) are defined as turbulent regions above the logarithmic velocity layer, and the bottom boundary layer (BBL) is defined as the continuously turbulent range of heights above the bed. A cross-correlation analysis reveals how IML and BBL turbulence vary with stratification and external forcing from tidal range, river flow, and winds. Turbulence in both layers is maximal at spring tide and minimal when most stratified, with one exception—IML turbulence at a site with changing channel depth and width is maximal at times of maximum stratification and freshwater input.

  5. The Effects of Internal-External Locus of Control and Selected Demographic Variables on Rational-Irrational Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Janice E.; And Others

    This study evaluated whether or not locus of control mediates rational-irrational beliefs. Data were generated investigating the impact of an internal-external orientation and selected demographic variables (age, race, gender, education, and occupation) on rational-irrational beliefs. Independent variables were locus of control and demographic…

  6. Invited Review: A review of deterministic effects in cyclic variability of internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, Charles E.; Kaul, Brian C.; Daw, C. Stuart; Wagner, Robert M.; Edwards, K. Dean; Green, Johney B.

    2015-02-18

    Here we review developments in the understanding of cycle to cycle variability in internal combustion engines, with a focus on spark-ignited and premixed combustion conditions. Much of the research on cyclic variability has focused on stochastic aspects, that is, features that can be modeled as inherently random with no short term predictability. In some cases, models of this type appear to work very well at describing experimental observations, but the lack of predictability limits control options. Also, even when the statistical properties of the stochastic variations are known, it can be very difficult to discern their underlying physical causes and thus mitigate them. Some recent studies have demonstrated that under some conditions, cyclic combustion variations can have a relatively high degree of low dimensional deterministic structure, which implies some degree of predictability and potential for real time control. These deterministic effects are typically more pronounced near critical stability limits (e.g. near tipping points associated with ignition or flame propagation) such during highly dilute fueling or near the onset of homogeneous charge compression ignition. We review recent progress in experimental and analytical characterization of cyclic variability where low dimensional, deterministic effects have been observed. We describe some theories about the sources of these dynamical features and discuss prospects for interactive control and improved engine designs. In conclusion, taken as a whole, the research summarized here implies that the deterministic component of cyclic variability will become a pivotal issue (and potential opportunity) as engine manufacturers strive to meet aggressive emissions and fuel economy regulations in the coming decades.

  7. Invited Review: A review of deterministic effects in cyclic variability of internal combustion engines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Finney, Charles E.; Kaul, Brian C.; Daw, C. Stuart; Wagner, Robert M.; Edwards, K. Dean; Green, Johney B.

    2015-02-18

    Here we review developments in the understanding of cycle to cycle variability in internal combustion engines, with a focus on spark-ignited and premixed combustion conditions. Much of the research on cyclic variability has focused on stochastic aspects, that is, features that can be modeled as inherently random with no short term predictability. In some cases, models of this type appear to work very well at describing experimental observations, but the lack of predictability limits control options. Also, even when the statistical properties of the stochastic variations are known, it can be very difficult to discern their underlying physical causes andmore » thus mitigate them. Some recent studies have demonstrated that under some conditions, cyclic combustion variations can have a relatively high degree of low dimensional deterministic structure, which implies some degree of predictability and potential for real time control. These deterministic effects are typically more pronounced near critical stability limits (e.g. near tipping points associated with ignition or flame propagation) such during highly dilute fueling or near the onset of homogeneous charge compression ignition. We review recent progress in experimental and analytical characterization of cyclic variability where low dimensional, deterministic effects have been observed. We describe some theories about the sources of these dynamical features and discuss prospects for interactive control and improved engine designs. In conclusion, taken as a whole, the research summarized here implies that the deterministic component of cyclic variability will become a pivotal issue (and potential opportunity) as engine manufacturers strive to meet aggressive emissions and fuel economy regulations in the coming decades.« less

  8. An experimental assessment of internal variables constitutive models for viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, F. C. L.; Castello, D. A.; Magluta, C.; Rochinha, F. A.; Roitman, N.

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at presenting an experimental assessment of a constitutive model used to describe viscoelastic behavior. This strategy is built on the basic principles of the Verification and Validation (V&V) philosophy. The mechanical model used to describe the viscoelastic behavior is a constitutive one based on the concept of internal variables. The parameter estimation of the model is performed using frequency domain data through the Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm. A set of different experimental set-ups were built in order to span the structural operational domain from which data can be measured. The model validation is performed based on the use of validation metrics which take into account uncertainties both in the model predictions and observed data.

  9. Recent Hadley cell expansion: The role of internal atmospheric variability in reconciling modeled and observed trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have reported that global climate models underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion, with the implication that such models are missing key processes of the climate system. We show here that integrations of a chemistry-climate model forced with observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs), greenhouse gases, and ozone-depleting substances can produce 1980 to 2009 expansion trends comparable to those found in most reanalyses data products. Correct representation of the SSTs changes is important for the Northern Hemisphere, while correct representation of stratospheric ozone changes is important for the Southern Hemisphere. The ensemble mean trend (which captures only the forced response) is nearly always much weaker than trends in reanalyses. This suggests that a large fraction of the recently observed changes may, in fact, be a consequence of internal atmospheric variability and not a response of the climate system to anthropogenic forcings.

  10. International workshop on Time-Variable Phenomena in the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; West, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Many of the scientifically interesting phenomena that occur in the Jovian system are strongly time variable. Some are episodic (e.g., Io volcanism); some are periodic (wave transport in Jupiters atmosphere); and some are exceedingly complex (magnetosphere - Io - Torus-Auroral interactions) and possibly unstable. To investigate this class of phenomena utilizing Voyager data and, in the future, Galileo results, a coherent program of ground based and earth-orbital observations, and of theory that spans the time between the missions, is required. To stimulate and help define the basis of such a scientific program researchers organized an International Workshop on the subject with the intent of publishing the proceedings which would represent the state of knowledge in 1987.

  11. The Influence of Internal Model Variability in GEOS-5 on Interhemispheric CO2 Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Melissa; Erickson, David; Kendall, Wesley; Fu, Joshua; Ott, Leslie; Pawson, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An ensemble of eight atmospheric CO2 simulations was completed employing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Earth Observation System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) for the years 2000-2001, each with initial meteorological conditions corresponding to different days in January 2000 to examine internal model variability. Globally, the model runs show similar concentrations of CO2 for the two years, but in regions of high CO2 concentrations due to fossil fuel emissions, large differences among different model simulations appear. The phasing and amplitude of the CO2 cycle at Northern Hemisphere locations in all of the ensemble members is similar to that of surface observations. In several southern hemisphere locations, however, some of the GEOS-5 model CO2 cycles are out of phase by as much as four months, and large variations occur between the ensemble members. This result indicates that there is large sensitivity to transport in these regions. The differences vary by latitude-the most extreme differences in the Tropics and the least at the South Pole. Examples of these differences among the ensemble members with regard to CO2 uptake and respiration of the terrestrial biosphere and CO2 emissions due to fossil fuel emissions are shown at Cape Grim, Tasmania. Integration-based flow analysis of the atmospheric circulation in the model runs shows widely varying paths of flow into the Tasmania region among the models including sources from North America, South America, South Africa, South Asia and Indonesia. These results suggest that interhemispheric transport can be strongly influenced by internal model variability.

  12. The influence of internal model variability in GEOS-5 on interhemispheric CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Melissa; Erickson, David; Kendall, Wesley; Fu, Joshua; Ott, Lesley; Pawson, Steven

    2012-05-01

    An ensemble of eight atmospheric CO2 simulations was completed employing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Earth Observation System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) for the years 2000-2001, each with initial meteorological conditions corresponding to different days in January 2000 to examine internal model variability. Globally, the model runs show similar concentrations of CO2 for the two years, but in regions of high CO2 concentrations due to fossil fuel emissions, large differences among different model simulations appear. The phasing and amplitude of the CO2 cycle at Northern Hemisphere locations in all of the ensemble members is similar to that of surface observations. In several southern hemisphere locations, however, some of the GEOS-5 model CO2 cycles are out of phase by as much as four months, and large variations occur between the ensemble members. This result indicates that there is large sensitivity to transport in these regions. The differences vary by latitude—the most extreme differences in the Tropics and the least at the South Pole. Examples of these differences among the ensemble members with regard to CO2 uptake and respiration of the terrestrial biosphere and CO2 emissions due to fossil fuel emissions are shown at Cape Grim, Tasmania. Integration-based flow analysis of the atmospheric circulation in the model runs shows widely varying paths of flow into the Tasmania region among the models including sources from North America, South America, South Africa, South Asia and Indonesia. These results suggest that interhemispheric transport can be strongly influenced by internal model variability.

  13. Winter variability in the western Gulf of Maine: Part 1: Internal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. S.

    2011-09-01

    During the winter 1997-1998, a field program was conducted in Wilkinson Basin-western Gulf of Maine-as part of a study of winter convective mixing. The field program consisted of (1) Wilkinson basin-scale hydrographic surveys, (2) a tight three-mooring array with ˜100 m separations measured temperature and conductivity at rates of 2-15 min and (3) a single pair of upward/downward-looking pair acoustic Doppler current profiling (ADCP) instruments measured currents with 8 m vertical resolution over the 270 m water column in north-central Wilkinson basin at a rate of 10 min. The moored array measurements below the mixed layer (˜100 m depth) between 11 January and 6 February 1998 were dominated by a combination of the relatively strong semidiurnal external (depth-independent or barotropic) tide; upon which were superposed a weaker phase-locked semidiurnal internal tide and a very weak water column mean currents of about 1 cm/s southward or approximately across the local isobaths. The harmonic analysis of a vertical average of the relatively uniform ADCP velocities in the well-mixed upper 123 m of the water column, defined the external tidal currents which were dominated by a nearly rectilinear, across-isobath (326°T) M 2 semidiurnal tidal current of about 15 cm/s. The depth-dependent residual current field, which was created by subtracting the external tidal current, consisted of (1) clockwise-rotating semidiurnal internal tidal currents of about 5 cm/s below the mixed layer; (2) clockwise-rotating inertial currents; and (3) a considerably less energetic subtidal current variability. The results from both frequency-domain empirical orthogonal function and tidal harmonic analyses of the of isotherm displacement series at each of the three moorings in the 100 m array mutually confirm an approximate east-northeastward phase propagation of the dominant M 2 semidiurnal internal tide across Wilkinson Basin. Further investigation supports the idea that this winter internal

  14. Internal and external forcing of sea level variability in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis L.; Landerer, Felix W.

    2015-11-01

    The variability of sea level in the Black Sea is forced by a combination of internal and external processes of atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial origin. We use a combination of satellite altimetry and gravity, tide gauge, river discharge, and atmospheric re-analysis data to provide a comprehensive up-to-date analysis of sea level variability in the Black Sea and to quantify the role of different environmental factors that force the variability. The Black Sea is part of a large-scale climatic system that includes the Mediterranean and the North Atlantic. The seasonal sea level budget shows similar contributions of fresh water fluxes (precipitation, evaporation, and river discharge) and the Black Sea outflow, while the impact of the net surface heat flux is smaller although not negligible. We find that the nonseasonal sea level time series in the Black and Aegean seas are significantly correlated, the latter leading by 1 month. This lag is attributed to the adjustment of sea level in the Black Sea to externally forced changes of sea level in the Aegean Sea and to the impact of river discharge. The nonseasonal sea level budget in the Black Sea is dominated by precipitation and evaporation over the sea itself, but external processes such as river discharge and changes in the outflow can also cause some large synoptic-scale sea level anomalies. Sea level is strongly coupled to terrestrial water storage over the Black Sea drainage basin, which is modulated by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). We show that during the low/high NAO southwesterly/northeasterly winds near the Strait of Gibraltar and southerly/northerly winds over the Aegean Sea are able to dynamically increase/decrease sea level in the Mediterranean and Black seas, respectively.

  15. Validation of satellite-derived land surface variables - international coordination and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Validation and quality assessment are important components in the processing chain of satellite-derived land surface products. While most products nowadays are being validated by the responsible space agency, common validation data sets and methods across products from different agencies are still under development. The aim of the Land Product Validation Sub-group (Committee on Earth Observation Satellites) is to internationally coordinate intercomparison and validation efforts of satellite-derived land surface variables. Main components of the proposed validation concept are a peer-reviewed protocol describing standard methods and the identification of fiducial reference data and reference sites where new validation methods and algorithms can be tested. The identified methods, fiducial reference data, and satellite product subsets are then integrated in an online platform to generate standardized validation reports. This presentation summarizes the state of validation of satellite-derived products as assessed by LPV. LPV currently covers albedo, FAPAR, LAI, land cover, snow cover, land surface temperature, soil moisture, phenology, and fire/burnt area. For a selected set of above variables, a summary of validation methods, available in situ data, challenges, and validation stage are provided. We conclude with the identification of methodological gaps and data needs for a sustainable validation of satellite-based terrestrial Essential Climate and Biodiversity Variables in support of the climate observing system and biodiversity and ecosystem services assessments. The presentation is thought to highlight achievements by LPV, as well as to reach out to the satellite product user community and to measurement networks interested in supporting validation efforts with reference data.

  16. Internal Dynamics and Boundary Forcing Characteristics Associated with Interannual Variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.- M.; Kim, K.-M.; Yang, S.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a description of the internal dynamics and boundary forcing characteristics of two major components of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM), i.e., the South Asian (SAM) and the Southeast-East Asian monsoon (SEAM). The description is based on a new monsoon-climate paradigm in which the variability of ASM is considered as the outcome of the interplay of a "fast" and an "intermediate" monsoon subsystem, under the influenced of the "slow" varying external forcings. Two sets of regional monsoon indices derived from dynamically consistent rainfall and wind data are used in this study. For SAM, the internal dynamics is represented by that of a "classical" monsoon system where the anomalous circulation is governed by Rossby-wave dynamics, i.e., generation of anomalous vorticity induced by an off-equatorial heat source is balanced by planetary vorticity advection. On the other hand, the internal dynamics of SEAM is characterized by a "hybrid" monsoon system featuring multi-cellular meridional circulation over the East Asian section, extending from the deep tropics to midlatitudes. These meridional-cells link tropical heating to extratropical circulation system via the East Asian jetstream, and are responsible for the characteristic occurrences of zonally oriented anomalous rainfall patterns over East Asian and the subtropical western Pacific. In the extratropical regions, the major upper level vorticity balance is by anomalous vorticity advection and generation by the anomalous divergent circulation. A consequence of this is that compared to SAM, the SEAM is associated with stronger teleconnection patterns to regions outside the ASM. A strong SAM is linked to basin-scale sea surface temperature (SST) fluctuation with significant signal in the equatorial eastern Pacific. During the boreal spring SST warming in the Arabian Sea and the subtropical western Pacific may lead to a strong SAM. For SEAM, interannual variability is tied to SSTA over the Sea of

  17. Understanding the Southeast United States "Warming Hole": Forced Response or Internal Variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascioli, N. R.; Fiore, A. M.; Previdi, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observed summertime temperatures in the southeast United States did not change significantly from 1895 to 2011 despite the fact that temperatures averaged over the entire U.S. have increased by 0.65°C during this time. A variety of possible causes have been suggested to explain this southeast U.S. "warming hole", including changes in Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) due to internal variability, forcing from anthropogenic aerosols, and changes in local hydrology due to land-use change. Here we investigate some of these mechanisms using the GFDL-CM3 chemistry climate model, one of the CMIP5 models best able to capture the observed warming hole. We use the "aerosol only" and "greenhouse gas only" single forcing simulations to further develop our understanding of the potential drivers of the warming hole. We find that in both simulations, temperatures in the southeast U.S. exhibit a weaker response to anthropogenic forcing compared with the rest of the country, suggesting a preferred regional mode of response that is largely independent of the type of forcing. Increasing anthropogenic aerosols weaken the Bermuda High, reducing the transport of moisture into the southeast U.S. from the Gulf of Mexico. Accordingly, total cloud fraction, precipitation, and soil moisture content are also reduced. These changes are associated with an increase in the surface absorption of shortwave (SW) radiation, thus offsetting the expected cooling due to the radiative effects of the aerosols, and creating a "cooling hole" in the aerosol only simulation. In the greenhouse gas only simulation, there is an opposite-signed response, with increases in the Bermuda High strength and moisture flux into the southeast U.S, and decreases in the surface SW absorption. Finally, the impacts of Pacific and Atlantic SST changes, both forced and internal, on the simulated temperature in the southeast U.S. are also discussed.

  18. Variability of Ionosphere over Africa: Results from International Heliophysical Year IHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiu, Babatunde

    Space Environment Research Centre of Kyushu University, Japan, installed 13 units of Magnetic Data Acquisition Systems MAGDAS over Africa during the International Heliophysical Year IHY. Institute for Scientific Research Bolton College USA in collaboration with the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy, has jointly placed over 15 units of GPS systems over Africa suitable for total electron content TEC and ionospheric scintillation studies. Magnetic records from 10 stations along the African 96o Magnetic Meridian (Geographical 30o -40o East) were examined for Solar quiet daily Sq variation due in the three geomagnetic field components H, D and Z. Latitudinal variations of Sq in the geomagnetic components were examined. Signatures of equatorial electrojet and worldwide Sq were identified and studied in detail. H field experienced more variation within the equatorial electrojet zone. Diurnal and seasonal variations of the geomagnetic variations in the three components were discussed. Levels of inter-relationships between the Sq and its variability in the three components were statistically derived and interpreted in line with the mechanisms responsible for the variations of the geomagnetic field. Data from 2 magnetic observatories within equatorial electrojet EEJ strip and 2 stations outside the EEJ strip were employed to evaluate and study the signatures of the Equatorial electrojet over the African sector. The transient variations of the EEJ at two almost parallel axes using Lagos-Ilorin and Nairobi-Addis pairs were examined. The EEJ appear stronger in East than West Africa. The magnitudes and patterns of variation of EEJ strength along the two axes were examined for any simultaneity or otherwise of responses to ionospheric processes. The flow gradient of EEJ along the African sector was estimated and its diurnal variation studied. Complementarily data from GPS was used to study diurnal and seasonal

  19. Collaborations with Arne on Cataclysmic Variables (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, P.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) The start of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in 2002 marked the beginning of a 14-year-long collaboration with Arne on the photometry of cataclysmic variables. Starting with the USNO Flagstaff station, and continuing with AAVSOnet, Arne and the AAVSO members contributed ground based followup of SDSS candidate CVs to determine their orbital periods and characteristics. In addition, many scientific studies using spacecraft observations with HST, XMM, and GALEX were enabled and improved due to their contemporaneous ground-based photometry. Some of the primary results in the 39 publications resulting from this long term collaboration will be summarized.

  20. Application of the Bammann inelasticity internal state variable constitutive model to geological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherburn, J. A.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Bammann, D. J.; Baumgardner, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    We describe how the Bammann internal state variable (ISV) constitutive approach, which has proven highly successful in modelling deformation processes in metals, can be applied with great benefit to silicate rocks and other geological materials in modelling their deformation dynamics. In its essence, ISV theory provides a constitutive framework to account for changing history states that arise from inelastic dissipative microstructural evolution of a polycrystalline solid. In this paper, we restrict our attention to a Bammann ISV elastic-viscoplastic model with temperature and strain rate dependence and use isotropic hardening and anisotropic hardening as our two ISVs. We show the Bammann model captures the inelastic behaviour of olivine aggregates (with and without water), lherzolite (with and without water), Carrara marble and rock salt using some experimental data found in the literature. These examples illustrate that when more experimental stress-strain data are gathered on other rock materials, much more realistic numerical simulation of rock behaviour becomes feasible. Though not available in the literature, we outline a set of experiments to obtain unique Bammann ISV model constants.

  1. An internal state variable mapping approach for Li-Plating diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Guangxing; Wang, Pingfeng

    2016-08-01

    Li-ion battery failure becomes one of major challenges for reliable battery applications, as it could cause catastrophic consequences. Compared with capacity fading resulted from calendar effects, Li-plating induced battery failures are more difficult to identify, as they causes sudden capacity loss leaving limited time for failure diagnosis. This paper presents a new internal state variable (ISV) mapping approach to identify values of immeasurable battery ISVs considering changes of inherent parameters of battery system dynamics for Li-plating diagnosis. Employing the developed ISV mapping approach, an explicit functional relationship model between measurable battery signals and immeasurable battery ISVs can be developed. The developed model can then be used to identify ISVs from an online battery system for the occurrence identification of Li-plating. Employing multiphysics based simulation of Li-plating using COMSOL, the proposed Li-plating diagnosis approach is implemented under different conditions in the case studies to demonstrate its efficacy in diagnosis of Li-plating onset timings.

  2. TIMSS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 3: Variables Derived from the Student, Home, Teacher, and School Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Arora, Alka, Ed.; Stanco, Gabrielle M., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement contains documentation on all the derived variables contained in the TIMSS 2011 data files that are based on background questionnaire variables. These variables were used to report background data in the TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics and TIMSS 2011 International Results in Science reports, and are made available…

  3. TEDS-M 2008 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 3: Variables Derived from the Educator and Future Teacher Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brese, Falk, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This supplement contains documentation on all the derived variables contained in the TEDS-M educator and future teacher data files. These derived variables were used to report data in the TEDS-M international reports. The variables that constitute the scales and indices are made available as part of the TEDS-M International Database to be used in…

  4. The Contribution of Background Variables, Internal and External Resources to Life Satisfaction among Adolescents in Residential Treatment Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschitz-Elhawi, Racheli; Itzhaky, Haya; Michal, Hefetz

    2008-01-01

    The article deals with the contribution of background variables (gender, years of residence in a treatment center, and family status), internal resource (self-esteem), and external resources (peer, family and significant other support, sense of belonging to the community) to life satisfaction among adolescents living in residential treatment…

  5. An Analysis of Basic Construction Variables of Racing Wheelchairs Used in the 1984 International Games for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Sherril L.; Kimura, Iris F.

    1987-01-01

    A photographic analysis of racing wheelchairs used by cerebral palsy class four athletes and amputee athletes at the 1984 International Games for the Disabled was undertaken in order to analyze seven wheelchair construction variables in relation to performance outcome, distance raced, and type of disability of the user. (Author/MT)

  6. Systematic attribution of observed Southern Hemisphere circulation trends to external forcing and internal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, C. L. E.; O'Kane, T. J.; Monselesan, D. P.; Risbey, J. S.; Horenko, I.

    2015-09-01

    A critical question in the global warming debate concerns the causes of the observed trends of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric circulation over recent decades. Secular trends have been identified in the frequency of occurrence of circulation regimes, namely the positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the hemispheric wave-3 pattern which is associated with blocking. Previous studies into the causes of these secular trends have either been purely model based, have not included observational forcing data or have mixed external forcing with indices of internal climate variability impeding a systematic and unbiased attribution of the causes of the secular trends. Most model studies also focused mainly on the austral summer season. However, the changes to the storm tracks have occurred in all seasons and particularly in the austral winter and early spring when midlatitude blocking is most active and stratospheric ozone should not play a role. Here we systematically attribute the secular trends over the recent decades using a non-stationary clustering method applied to both reanalysis and observational forcing data from all seasons. While most previous studies emphasized the importance of stratospheric ozone depletion in causing austral summer SH circulation trends, we show observational evidence that anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations have been the major driver of these secular trends in the SAM and blocking when all seasons are considered. Our results suggest that the recovery of the ozone hole might delay the signal of global warming less strongly than previously thought and that effects from all seasons are likely crucial in understanding the causes of the secular trends.

  7. Systematic Attribution of Observed Southern Hemispheric Circulation Trends to External Forcing and Internal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, Christian; O'Kane, Terence; Monselesan, Didier; Risbey, James; Horenko, Illia

    2015-04-01

    A critical question in the global warming debate concerns the causes of the observed trends of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric circulation over recent decades. Secular trends have been identified in the frequency of occurrence of circulation regimes, namely the positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the hemispheric wave 3 pattern which is associated with blocking. Previous studies into the causes of these secular trends have either been purely model based, have not included observational forcing data or have mixed external forcing with indices of internal climate variability impeding a systematic and unbiased attribution of the causes of the secular trends. Most model studies also focused mainly on the austral summer season. However, the changes to the storm tracks have occurred in all seasons and particularly in the winter and early spring when mid-latitude blocking is most active and stratospheric ozone plays no role. Here we systematically attribute the secular trends over the recent decades using a non-stationary clustering method applied to both reanalysis and observational forcing data from all seasons. While most previous studies emphasized the importance of stratospheric ozone depletion in causing summer SH circulation trends, we show observational evidence that anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations have been the major driver of these secular trends in the SAM and blocking when all seasons are considered. Our results suggest that the recovery of the ozone hole might delay the signal of global warming less strongly than previously thought and that seasonal effects are likely crucial in understanding the causes of the secular trends.

  8. Systematic attribution of observed southern hemispheric circulation trends to external forcing and internal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, C. L. E.; O'Kane, T. J.; Monselesan, D. P.; Risbey, J. S.; Horenko, I.

    2015-04-01

    A critical question in the global warming debate concerns the causes of the observed trends of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric circulation over recent decades. Secular trends have been identified in the frequency of occurrence of circulation regimes, namely the positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the hemispheric wave 3 pattern which is associated with blocking. Previous studies into the causes of these secular trends have either been purely model based, have not included observational forcing data or have mixed external forcing with indices of internal climate variability impeding a systematic and unbiased attribution of the causes of the secular trends. Most model studies also focused mainly on the austral summer season. However, the changes to the storm tracks have occurred in all seasons and particularly in the austral winter and early spring when mid-latitude blocking is most active and stratospheric ozone should not a play a role. Here we systematically attribute the secular trends over the recent decades using a non-stationary clustering method applied to both reanalysis and observational forcing data from all seasons. While most previous studies emphasized the importance of stratospheric ozone depletion in causing austral summer SH circulation trends, we show observational evidence that anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations have been the major driver of these secular trends in the SAM and blocking when all seasons are considered. Our results suggest that the recovery of the ozone hole might delay the signal of global warming less strongly than previously thought and that effects from all seasons are likely crucial in understanding the causes of the secular trends.

  9. Adhesion of living cells revealed by variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-02-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is a widespread technique to study cellular process occurring near the contact region with the glass substrate. In this field, determination of the accurate distance from the surface to the plasma membrane constitutes a crucial issue to investigate the physical basis of cellular adhesion process. However, quantitative interpretation of TIRF pictures regarding the distance z between a labeled membrane and the substrate is not trivial. Indeed, the contrast of TIRF images depends on several parameters more and less well known (local concentration of dyes, absorption cross section, angular emission pattern…). The strategy to get around this problem is to exploit a series of TIRF pictures recorded at different incident angles in evanescent regime. This technique called variable-angle TIRF microscopy (vaTIRFM), allowing to map the membrane-substrate separation distance with a nanometric resolution (10-20 nm). vaTIRFM was developed by Burmeister, Truskey and Reichert in the early 1990s with a prism-based TIRF setup [Journal of Microscopy 173, 39-51 (1994)]. We propose a more convenient prismless setup, which uses only a rotatable mirror to adjust precisely the laser beam on the back focal plane of the oil immersion objective (no azimuthal scanning is needed). The series of TIRF images permit us to calculate accurately membrane-surface distances in each pixel. We demonstrate that vaTIRFM are useful to quantify the adhesion of living cells for specific and unspecific membrane-surface interactions, achieved on various functionalized substrates with polymers (BSA, poly-L-lysin) or extracellular matrix proteins (collagen and fibronectin).

  10. Variability of nonlinear internal waves in the South China Sea affected by the Kuroshio and mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xu; Chen, Xueen; Park, Jae-Hun

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations of nonlinear internal waves in the South China Sea reveal seasonal to interannual variability. During two selected segments of inverted echo sounder observations, tidal forcing in Luzon Strait is almost identical, but the observed amplitudes of nonlinear internal waves in the South China Sea are very different. The effects of the Kuroshio and mesoscale eddies, reproduced by HYbrid Cooridnate Ocean Model (HYCOM) reanalysis simulation, are then investigated. The Kuroshio can enhance the zonal tilt of the thermocline and induce intruding flow in Luzon Strait. During the two selected segments, different thermocline slopes did not significantly change the internal tide generation, but the intruding flow may result in a 11% difference in the amplitude of generated M2 internal tides. During the two selected segments, mesoscale eddies appeared on the path of internal wave propagation, a cold eddy in one case and a warm one in the other. The eddies changed local stratification and induced additional background currents, thus affecting the nonlinear evolution of internal tides. In addition, wave front steering due to the mesoscale eddies dramatically affected the observed amplitude changes of the nonlinear internal waves: the edge, rather than the center, of the nonlinear internal wave front passed through the observational stations, resulting in reduced amplitude in the observations.

  11. The Association between Tax Structure and Cigarette Price Variability: Findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Project

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ce; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Fong, Geoffrey T; Thompson, Mary; O’Connor, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that more opportunities exist for tax avoidance when cigarette excise tax structure departs from a uniform specific structure. However, the association between tax structure and cigarette price variability has not been thoroughly studied in the existing literature. Objective To examine how cigarette tax structure is associated with price variability. The variability of self-reported prices is measured using the ratios of differences between higher and lower prices to the median price such as the IQR-to-median ratio. Methods We used survey data taken from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Project in 17 countries to conduct the analysis. Cigarette prices were derived using individual purchase information and aggregated to price variability measures for each surveyed country and wave. The effect of tax structures on price variability was estimated using Generalised Estimating Equations after adjusting for year and country attributes. Findings Our study provides empirical evidence of a relationship between tax structure and cigarette price variability. We find that, compared to the specific uniform tax structure, mixed uniform and tiered (specific, ad valorem or mixed) structures are associated with greater price variability (p≤0.01). Moreover, while a greater share of the specific component in total excise taxes is associated with lower price variability (p≤0.05), a tiered tax structure is associated with greater price variability (p≤0.01). The results suggest that a uniform and specific tax structure is the most effective tax structure for reducing tobacco consumption and prevalence by limiting price variability and decreasing opportunities for tax avoidance. PMID:25855641

  12. Application of high performance computing for studying cyclic variability in dilute internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    FINNEY, Charles E A; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Stoyanov, Miroslav K; Wagner, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in dilute internal combustion engines are manifest in cyclic variability (CV) in engine performance measures such as integrated heat release or shaft work. Understanding the factors leading to CV is important in model-based control, especially with high dilution where experimental studies have demonstrated that deterministic effects can become more prominent. Observation of enough consecutive engine cycles for significant statistical analysis is standard in experimental studies but is largely wanting in numerical simulations because of the computational time required to compute hundreds or thousands of consecutive cycles. We have proposed and begun implementation of an alternative approach to allow rapid simulation of long series of engine dynamics based on a low-dimensional mapping of ensembles of single-cycle simulations which map input parameters to output engine performance. This paper details the use Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility to investigate CV in a gasoline direct-injected spark-ignited engine with a moderately high rate of dilution achieved through external exhaust gas recirculation. The CONVERGE CFD software was used to perform single-cycle simulations with imposed variations of operating parameters and boundary conditions selected according to a sparse grid sampling of the parameter space. Using an uncertainty quantification technique, the sampling scheme is chosen similar to a design of experiments grid but uses functions designed to minimize the number of samples required to achieve a desired degree of accuracy. The simulations map input parameters to output metrics of engine performance for a single cycle, and by mapping over a large parameter space, results can be interpolated from within that space. This interpolation scheme forms the basis for a low-dimensional metamodel which can be used to mimic the dynamical behavior of corresponding high-dimensional simulations. Simulations of high-EGR spark

  13. History of Amateur Variable Star Observations in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, S.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) Japan has about 100 years of history of variable star observing since Naozo Ichinohe, professional astronomer in Tokyo Observatory, observed d Cep in 1906. The first amateur variable star observer is Yoshihiko Kasai, who began observing variable stars in 1918. I introduce a brief history of Japanese amateur variable star observation, including topics of variable star organizations, nova and supernova hunters, collaborations with the AAVSO and the world, PEP and CCD observations. I also introduce the most active variable star observer, Hiroaki Narumi, who made over 260,000 visual estimates since 1975. VSOLJ was established in 1987 in collaborations with the variable star sections of Nihon Tenmon Kenkyu-kai (NTK) and the Oriental Astronomical Association (OAA). VSOLJ maintains a database of Japanese variable star observations (http://vsolj.cetus-net.org) and publishes the Variable Star Bulletin in English.

  14. An efficient numerical method for predicting the evolution of internal variables and springback in bending under tension at large strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    2013-12-01

    Quite a general elastic/plastic material model including evolution equations for internal variables is adopted to predict the distribution of material properties and springback in plane strain bending under tension at large strains. A transformation equation to connect Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates is used to reduce the original boundary value problem to a system of hyperbolic equations. This system is then solved by the method of characteristics combined with a finite difference scheme. In a particular case of elastic/plastic hardening materials (in this case the only internal variable is the equivalent plastic strain) an analytic solution is available in the literature. Using this solution it is demonstrated that the accuracy of the numerical method is very high.

  15. Does internal climate variability overwhelm climate change signals in streamflow? The upper Po and Rhone basin case studies.

    PubMed

    Fatichi, S; Rimkus, S; Burlando, P; Bordoy, R

    2014-09-15

    Projections of climate change effects in streamflow are increasingly required to plan water management strategies. These projections are however largely uncertain due to the spread among climate model realizations, internal climate variability, and difficulties in transferring climate model results at the spatial and temporal scales required by catchment hydrology. A combination of a stochastic downscaling methodology and distributed hydrological modeling was used in the ACQWA project to provide projections of future streamflow (up to year 2050) for the upper Po and Rhone basins, respectively located in northern Italy and south-western Switzerland. Results suggest that internal (stochastic) climate variability is a fundamental source of uncertainty, typically comparable or larger than the projected climate change signal. Therefore, climate change effects in streamflow mean, frequency, and seasonality can be masked by natural climatic fluctuations in large parts of the analyzed regions. An exception to the overwhelming role of stochastic variability is represented by high elevation catchments fed by glaciers where streamflow is expected to be considerably reduced due to glacier retreat, with consequences appreciable in the main downstream rivers in August and September. Simulations also identify regions (west upper Rhone and Toce, Ticino river basins) where a strong precipitation increase in the February to April period projects streamflow beyond the range of natural climate variability during the melting season. This study emphasizes the importance of including internal climate variability in climate change analyses, especially when compared to the limited uncertainty that would be accounted for by few deterministic projections. The presented results could be useful in guiding more specific impact studies, although design or management decisions should be better based on reliability and vulnerability criteria as suggested by recent literature. PMID:24418218

  16. Evidence for Context Switching in the Effects of Average Item Length and Item-Length Variability on Internal Consistency.

    PubMed

    Hamby, Tyler; Ickes, William; Babcock, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of 3 item characteristics-the average number of words per item, within-scale variability in item length, and item "direction"-on internal consistency reliability and interitem correlation. In Study 1, we examined the effects of these variables on overall scale-level reliability using 444 subscales from 9 personality scales. In Study 2, we examined interitem correlation at the paired-item level using 477 nonredundant item pairs from 14 personality scales. Lower scale reliability was associated with more average words per item, greater within-scale variability in item length, and a greater percentage of reverse-keyed items. Similarly, smaller interitem correlations were associated with a greater degree of mismatch in item length between the paired items and with a mismatch (vs. match) in the items' respective "directions." The pattern of results across both studies supports our notion that lower internal consistency results from increased context switching; that is, from the confusion that occurs when respondents must switch back and forth between the interpretive frames pertaining to short versus long items, or between items pertaining to one pole of a personality dimension and its "opposite" pole. Suggestions for maximizing the internal consistency of personality scales are proposed. PMID:26959763

  17. Spurious One-Month and One-Year Periods in Visual Observations of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Visual observations of variable stars, when time-series analyzed with some algorithms such as DC-DFT in vstar, show spurious periods at or close to one synodic month (29.5306 days), and also at about a year, with an amplitude of typically a few hundredths of a magnitude. The one-year periods have been attributed to the Ceraski effect, which was believed to be a physiological effect of the visual observing process. This paper reports on time-series analysis, using DC-DFT in vstar, of visual observations (and in some cases, V observations) of a large number of stars in the AAVSO International Database, initially to investigate the one-month periods. The results suggest that both the one-month and one-year periods are actually due to aliasing of the stars' very low-frequency variations, though they do not rule out very low-amplitude signals (typically 0.01 to 0.02 magnitude) which may be due to a different process, such as a physiological one. Most or all of these aliasing effects may be avoided by using a different algorithm, which takes explicit account of the window function of the data, and/or by being fully aware of the possible presence of and aliasing by very low-frequency variations.

  18. Connecting wind-driven upwelling and offshore stratification to nearshore internal bores and oxygen variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Ryan K.; Woodson, C. Brock; Leary, Paul R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-06-01

    This study utilizes field observations in southern Monterey Bay, CA, to examine how regional-scale upwelling and changing offshore (shelf) conditions influence nearshore internal bores. We show that the low-frequency wind forcing (e.g., upwelling/relaxation time scales) modifies the offshore stratification and thermocline depth. This in turn alters the strength and structure of observed internal bores in the nearshore. An internal bore strength index is defined using the high-pass filtered potential energy density anomaly in the nearshore. During weak upwelling favorable conditions and wind relaxations, the offshore thermocline deepens. In this case, both the amplitude of the offshore internal tide and the strength of the nearshore internal bores increase. In contrast, during strong upwelling conditions, the offshore thermocline shoals toward the surface, resulting in a decrease in the offshore internal tide amplitude. As a result, cold water accumulates in the nearshore (nearshore pooling), and the internal bore strength index decreases. Empirical orthogonal functions are utilized to support the claim that the bore events contribute to the majority of the variance in cross-shelf exchange and transport in the nearshore. Observed individual bores can drive shock-like drops in dissolved oxygen (DO) with rapid onset times, while extended upwelling periods with reduced bore activity produce longer duration, low DO events.

  19. Amplification and Suppression of Internal Waves by Tides Over Variable Bottom Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, V.; Stashchuk, N.

    2006-12-01

    The energy exchange between internal waves and barotropic currents over inclined bottom topography is studied theoretically and in the framework of the numerical model. The energy balance equation derived for a continuously stratified fluid predicts that energy can either be transferred towards or away from the internal wave depending on the direction of propagation of both the wave and current. Four scenarios of wave-flow interaction over the inclined bottom were identified. Internal wave extracts energy from the background tidal flow during its propagation upslope-upstream or downslope-downstream and its amplitude grows. The wave loses energy propagating downslope-upstream or upslope-downstream and reduces in amplitude. This mechanism of suppression or amplification of internal waves by a current over an inclined bottom is verified numerically. Being applied to the area of the Knight Inlet sill, a high resolution fully nonlinear, non- hydrostatic model reproduces the packets of internal waves generated by supercritical tidal flow over the sill. Careful inspection of the wave fields revealed the presence of an irregular wave structure within wave packets, viz. internal waves are not arranged by amplitude. This phenomenon, obtained numerically and observed in- situ, is treated in terms of the mechanism of wave-flow interaction: the energy exchange between the tidal current and generated internal waves over the inclined bottom topography is the reason for the absence of traditional rank-ordered waves in the packet. This work was supported by NERC grant NE/C50747X/1.

  20. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    Many countries--reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems--are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy (RE) on the grid. Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Colorado and Texas), for example, have effectively integrated variable RE utilizing diverse approaches. Analysis of the results from these case studies reveals a wide range of mechanisms that can be used to accommodate high penetrations of variable RE (e.g., from new market designs to centralized planning). Nevertheless, the myriad approaches collectively suggest that governments can best enable variable RE grid integration by implementing best practices in five areas of intervention: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations.

  1. Internal shocks driven by accretion flow variability in the compact jet of the black hole binary GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drappeau, S.; Malzac, J.; Belmont, R.; Gandhi, P.; Corbel, S.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, compact jets have been playing a growing role in the understanding of accreting black hole engines. In the case of X-ray binary systems, compact jets are usually associated with the hard state phase of a source outburst. Recent observations of GX 339-4 have demonstrated the presence of a variable synchrotron spectral break in the mid-infrared band that was associated with its compact jet. In the model used in this study, we assume that the jet emission is produced by electrons accelerated in internal shocks driven by rapid fluctuations of the jet velocity. The resulting spectral energy distribution (SED) and variability properties are very sensitive to the Fourier power spectrum density (PSD) of the assumed fluctuations of the jet Lorentz factor. These fluctuations are likely to be triggered by the variability of the accretion flow which is best traced by the X-ray emission. Taking the PSD of the jet Lorentz factor fluctuations to be identical to the observed X-ray PSD, our study finds that the internal shock model successfully reproduces the radio to infrared SED of the source at the time of the observations as well as the reported strong mid-infrared spectral variability.

  2. Does accretion flow variability drives internal shocks in the compact jet of the black hole binary GX 339-4?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drappeau, Samia

    Recent observations of GX 339-4 have demonstrated the presence of a variable synchrotron spectral break in the mid-infrared band that was associated with the compact jet. We assume that the jet emission is produced by electrons accelerated in internal shocks driven by rapid fluctuations of the jet velocity. The resulting spectral energy distribution (SED) and variability properties are then very sensitive to the Fourier power spectrum density (PSD) of the assumed fluctuations of the jet Lorentz factor. These fluctuations are likely to be triggered by the variability of the accretion flow which is best traced by the X-ray emission. In this talk, I present an internal shock jet model where the PSD of the jet Lorentz factor fluctuations are taken identical to the observed X-ray PSD of GX 339-4. This model successfully reproduces the radio to infrared SED of the source at the time of the observation as well as the strong mid-infrared spectral variability. Our study confirms previous findings and contributes additional evidence that suggests jet physics and properties of the accretion flow in the vicinity of a compact object are deeply connected.

  3. PIRLS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 3: Variables Derived from the Student, Home, Teacher, and School Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Drucker, Kathleen T., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement contains documentation on all the derived variables contained in the PIRLS and prePIRLS 2011 data files that are based on background questionnaire variables. These variables were used to report background data in the PIRLS 2011 International Results in Reading report, and are made available as part of this database to be used in…

  4. Relationship between ICT Variables and Mathematics Achievement Based on PISA 2006 Database: International Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzeller, Cem Oktay; Akin, Ayca

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the predicting power of mathematics achievement from ICT variables including the Internet/entertainment use (IEU), program/software use (PRGUSE), confidence in internet tasks (INTCONF) and confidence in ICT high level tasks (HIGHCONF) based on PISA 2006 data. This study indicates that the ICT variables…

  5. Advancing Variable Star Astronomy: The Centennial History of the American Association of Variable Star Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas R.; Saladyga, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Preface; Part I. Pioneers in Variable Star Astronomy Prior to 1909: 1. The emergence of variable star astronomy - a need for observations; 2. A need for observers; Part II. The Founding of the AAVSO - The William Tyler Olcott Era: 3. The amateur's amateur; 4. Amateurs in the service of science; Part III. The Leon Campbell Era: 5. Leon Campbell to the rescue; 6. Formalizing relationships; 7. The Pickering Memorial Endowment; 8. Fading of the Old Guard; 9. Growing pains and distractions; Part IV. The Service Bureau - The Margaret Mayall Era: 10. Learning about independence; 11. Eviction from Harvard College Observatory; 12. Actions and reactions; 13. In search of a home; 14. Survival on Brattle Street; 15. AAVSO achievements; 16. Breathing room on Concord Avenue; Part V. Analysis and Science: The Janet Mattei Era: 17. The growth of a director; 18. Learning the ropes the hard way; 19. Managing with renewed confidence; 20. Expanding the scientific charter; Part VI. Accelerating Observational Science - The Arne Henden Era: 21. Bridging the gap; 22. Accelerating the science - the Henden era begins; Epilogue; Appendices; Index.

  6. Internal and External Barriers, Cognitive Style, and the Career Development Variables of Focus and Indecision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Peter A.; Patton, Wendy; Bartrum, Dee

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and thirty final year high school students were administered scales tapping optimism/pessimism, self-esteem, external career barriers, career decision-making self-efficacy, career focus and career indecision. It was hypothesised, first, that cognitive style optimism/pessimism) would predict both internal (self-esteem) and external…

  7. Advising and Acculturation Variables as Predictors of Satisfaction, Sense of Belonging, and Persistence among International Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mataczynski, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Guided by the work of Hurtado and Carter (1997) as an alternative to Tinto's theory of student departure (1993), the purpose of this quantitative study was to explore the relationship of institutional and cultural factors to satisfaction with academic advising, sense of belonging to campus and retention among international undergraduate…

  8. Why do some Cataclysmic Variables Turn Off? (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeycutt, K.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) VY Scl Stars are a class of CVs which fade by as much as five magnitudes at irregular intervals. Dedicated long-term monitoring programs are needed to study such phenomena. We discuss VY Scl stars and other kinds of long-term CV variability, with an emphasis on collaborations with Arne Henden in these studies. We also discuss Arne's work with early low-light-level detectors, experience that has contributed to his broad knowledge of photometric techniques that has been so valuable to the AAVSO. We then show observational evidence that starspots on the secondary star are responsible for CV low states.

  9. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This study documents the diverse approaches to effective integration of variable renewable energy among six countries -- Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Western region-Colorado and Texas)-- and summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. Each country has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. The ability to maintain a broad ecosystem perspective, to organize and make available the wealth of experiences, and to ensure a clear path from analysis to enactment should be the primary focus going forward.

  10. Temperature variability caused by internal tides in the coral reef ecosystem of Hanauma bay, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katharine A.; Rocheleau, Greg; Merrifield, Mark A.; Jaramillo, Sergio; Pawlak, Geno

    2016-03-01

    Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve is a shallow bay (<30 m depth) on the island of O'ahu, Hawai'i, offshore of which tidal flow over deep ridge topography (500-1000 m depth) is known to generate semidiurnal frequency internal tides. A field experiment was conducted during March to June 2009 to determine whether the deep internal tides propagate shoreward to influence variability in temperature and currents in the bay environment. Temperature observations in the bay exhibit a diurnal cycle that is strongest near the surface (upper 10 m) and is associated with solar heating. In early summer (May-June), as the upper mixed layer warms and a shallow seasonal thermocline develops, temperature fluctuations in deeper bay waters (>15 m depth) become dominated by large semidiurnal variations (up to 2.7 °C) that are attributed to the internal tide. These temperature drops caused by the internal tide occur consistently twice a day under summer stratification at depths as shallow as 15 m, while smaller temperature drops (up to 1.8 °C) occur occasionally at 5 m. Although semidiurnal band temperatures vary seasonally, semidiurnal band currents exhibit similar magnitudes in spring and summer. This suggests that the weak temperature fluctuations in spring are due to the bay residing entirely in the upper mixed layer at this time of year, while internal tide energy continues to influence currents. Observations made along a cross-shore/vertical transect at the center of the bay with an autonomous underwater vehicle highlight the structure of cold intrusions that fill a large portion of the bay as well as the relationship between temperature, salinity, chlorophyll, and backscatter. Near-bottom, advective heat flux estimates at the mouth of the bay indicate that the internal tide tends to advect cold water into the bay primarily on the northeast side of the bay entrance, with cold water outflow on the opposite side. The observations highlight the role of the internal tide along with

  11. Static Investigation of a Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle With Variable Internal Contouring Ability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Mills, Charles T. L.; Mason, Mary L.

    1997-01-01

    The thrust efficiency and vectoring performance of a convergent-divergent nozzle were investigated at static conditions in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The diamond-shaped nozzle was capable of varying the internal contour of each quadrant individually by using cam mechanisms and retractable drawers to produce pitch and yaw thrust vectoring. Pitch thrust vectoring was achieved by either retracting the lower drawers to incline the throat or varying the internal flow-path contours to incline the throat. Yaw thrust vectoring was achieved by reducing flow area left of the nozzle centerline and increasing flow area right of the nozzle centerline; a skewed throat deflected the flow in the lateral direction.

  12. Internal combustion engine with rotary valve assembly having variable intake valve timing

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Craig N.; Cross, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    An internal combustion engine has rotary valves associated with movable shutters operable to vary the closing of intake air/fuel port sections to obtain peak volumetric efficiency over the entire range of speed of the engine. The shutters are moved automatically by a control mechanism that is responsive to the RPM of the engine. A foot-operated lever associated with the control mechanism is also used to move the shutters between their open and closed positions.

  13. Imaging Variable Stars with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, M.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of astronomical sources, ranging from objects in our solar system to objects in the early Universe, have revolutionized our knowledge of the Universe its origins and contents. I highlight results from HST observations of variable stars obtained during the past twenty or so years. Multiwavelength observations of numerous variable stars and stellar systems were obtained using the superb HST imaging capabilities and its unprecedented angular resolution, especially in the UV and optical. The HST provided the first detailed images probing the structure of variable stars including their atmospheres and circumstellar environments. AAVSO observations and light curves have been critical for scheduling of many of these observations and provided important information and context for understanding of the imaging results of many variable sources. I describe the scientific results from the imaging observations of variable stars including AGBs, Miras, Cepheids, semiregular variables (including supergiants and giants), YSOs and interacting stellar systems with a variable stellar components. These results have led to an unprecedented understanding of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these objects and their place in the stellar evolutionary chains, and in the larger context of the dynamic evolving Universe.

  14. Imaging Variable Stars with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2011-05-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of astronomical sources, ranging from objects in our solar system to objects in the early Universe, have revolutionized our knowledge of the Universe its origins and contents.I will highlight results from HST observations of variable stars obtained during the past twenty or so years. Multiwavelength observations of numerous variable stars and stellar systems were obtained using the superb HST imaging capabilities and its unprecedented angular resolution, especially in the UV and optical. The HST provided the first detailed images probing the structure of variable stars including their atmospheres and circumstellar environments. AAVSO observations and light curves have been critical for scheduling of many of these observations and provided important information and context for understanding of the imaging results of many variable sources. I will describe the scientific results from the imaging observations of variable stars including AGBs, Miras, Cepheids, semi-regular variables (including supergiants and giants), YSOs and interacting stellar systems with a variable stellar components. These results have led to an unprecedented understanding of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these objects and their place in the stellar evolutionary chains, and in the larger context of the dynamic evolving Universe.

  15. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets. Best Practices from International Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Arent, Douglas J.

    2012-04-30

    Many countries—reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems—are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  16. Internal Variability Versus Anthropogenic Forcing on Sea Level and Its Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Marta; Marzeion, Ben; Dangendorf, Sönke; Slangen, Aimée B. A.; Palanisamy, Hindumathi; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we review and update detection and attribution studies in sea level and its major contributors during the past decades. Tide gauge records reveal that the observed twentieth-century global and regional sea level rise is out of the bounds of its natural variability, evidencing thus a human fingerprint in the reported trends. The signal varies regionally, and it partly depends on the magnitude of the background variability. The human fingerprint is also manifested in the contributors of sea level for which observations are available, namely ocean thermal expansion and glaciers' mass loss, which dominated the global sea level rise over the twentieth century. Attribution studies provide evidence that the trends in both components are clearly dominated by anthropogenic forcing over the second half of the twentieth century. In the earlier decades, there is a lack of observations hampering an improved attribution of causes to the observed sea level rise. At certain locations along the coast, the human influence is exacerbated by local coastal activities that induce land subsidence and increase the risk of sea level-related hazards.

  17. Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Wind Power Forecasting: An International Comparison: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B. M.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Lovholm, A. L.; Berge, E.; Miettinen, J.; Holttinen, H.; Cutululis, N.; Litong-Palima, M.; Sorensen, P.; Dobschinski, J.

    2013-10-01

    One of the critical challenges of wind power integration is the variable and uncertain nature of the resource. This paper investigates the variability and uncertainty in wind forecasting for multiple power systems in six countries. An extensive comparison of wind forecasting is performed among the six power systems by analyzing the following scenarios: (i) wind forecast errors throughout a year; (ii) forecast errors at a specific time of day throughout a year; (iii) forecast errors at peak and off-peak hours of a day; (iv) forecast errors in different seasons; (v) extreme forecasts with large overforecast or underforecast errors; and (vi) forecast errors when wind power generation is at different percentages of the total wind capacity. The kernel density estimation method is adopted to characterize the distribution of forecast errors. The results show that the level of uncertainty and the forecast error distribution vary among different power systems and scenarios. In addition, for most power systems, (i) there is a tendency to underforecast in winter; and (ii) the forecasts in winter generally have more uncertainty than the forecasts in summer.

  18. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets. Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Arent, Douglas J.

    2012-04-30

    Many countries - reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems - are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  19. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  20. Floral aroma improvement of Muscat spirits by packed column distillation with variable internal reflux.

    PubMed

    Matias-Guiu, Pau; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Orriols, Ignacio; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; López, Francisco

    2016-12-15

    The organoleptic quality of wine distillates depends on raw materials and the distillation process. Previous work has shown that rectification columns in batch distillation with fixed reflux rate are useful to obtain distillates or distillate fractions with enhanced organoleptic characteristics. This study explores variable reflux rate operating strategies to increase the levels of terpenic compounds in specific distillate fractions to emphasize its floral aroma. Based on chemical and sensory analyses, two distillate heart sub-fractions obtained with the best operating strategy found, were compared with a distillate obtained in a traditional alembic. Results have shown that a drastic reduction of the reflux rate at an early stage of the heart cut produced a distillate heart sub-fraction with a higher concentration of terpenic compounds and lower levels of negative aroma compounds. Therefore, this sub-fraction presented a much more noticeable floral aroma than the distillate obtained with a traditional alembic. PMID:27451153

  1. Forced and internal variability in temperature simulations and reconstructions of the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Donado, Laura; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Garcia-Bustamante, Elena; Smerdon, Jason S.; Luterbacher, Juerg; Raible, Christoph C.

    2016-04-01

    The relatively short ranges of external forcing variability within the CE represent a challenge in as much as the consistency between simulations and reconstructions can be affected by the large uncertainties in their respective responses to the external forcings. One of the core questions within this work relates therefore the extent to which a straight response to the external forcing can be identified during the period under study and whether this signal is common to simulated and reconstructed temperature. This study is based on an exhaustive compilation, analysis and intercomparison of the available hemispherical and global temperature reconstructions as well as a complete ensemble of simulations including both PMIP3/CMIP5 and non-PMIP3 model experiments. In addition, the various external forcing configurations applied to the models are characterized and a Total External Forcing, including all the individual forcing contributors, is developed for each experiment. Based on the linear relationship found at multidecadal and longer timescales during the last millennium between the temperature and the total external forcing, a quantitative metric of the ratio of response, the so-called Last Millennium Transient Climate Response (LMTCR), is obtained and compared for simulations and reconstructions. Within the LMTCR context, a significant quantitative consistency between the simulations and reconstructions is addressed. This work also offers a discussion about the impact that a range of generally accepted methodological approaches might have on the reconstructed ensemble uncertainties and their influences on model-data comparison exercises. A segregation among the various existing spatial targets within the NH, based on the different level of temperatura variability observed in the series, suggests a lower level of model-data consistency during the MCA than previously reported.

  2. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    DOEpatents

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.

    2003-09-02

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  3. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.; Park, Chan Seung

    2011-11-01

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  4. Modified internal state variable models of plasticity using nonlocal integrals in damage and gradients in dislocation density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahad, Fazle Rabbi

    To enhance material performance at different length scales, this study strives to develop a reliable analytical and computational tool with the help of internal state variables spanning micro and macro-level behaviors. First, the practical relevance of a nonlocal damage integral added to an internal state variable (BCJ) model is studied to alleviate numerical instabilities associated within the post-bifurcation regime. The characteristic length scale in the nonlocal damage, which is mathematical in nature, can be calibrated using a series of notch tensile tests. Then the same length scale from the notch tests is used in solving the problem of a high-velocity (between 89 and 107 m/s) rigid projectile colliding against a 6061-T6 aluminum-disk. The investigation indicates that incorporating a characteristic length scale to the constitutive model eliminates the pathological mesh-dependency associated with material instabilities. In addition, the numerical calculations agree well with experimental data. Next, an effort is made rather to introduce a physically motivated length scale than to apply a mathematical-one in the deformation analysis. Along this line, a dislocation based plasticity model is developed where an intrinsic length scale is introduced in the forms of spatial gradients of mobile and immobile dislocation densities. The spatial gradients are naturally invoked from balance laws within a consistent kinematic and thermodynamic framework. An analytical solution of the model variables is derived at homogenous steady state using the linear stability and bifurcation analysis. The model qualitatively captures the formation of dislocation cell-structures through material instabilities at the microscopic level. Finally, the model satisfactorily predicts macroscopic mechanical behaviors - e.g., multi-strain rate uniaxial compression, simple shear, and stress relaxation - and validates experimental results.

  5. Monitoring the internal structure of poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) microgels with variable cross-link concentration.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Florian; Balaceanu, Andreea; Feoktystov, Artem; Pipich, Vitaliy; Wu, Yaodong; Allgaier, Jürgen; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Pich, Andrij; Schneider, Gerald J

    2014-12-23

    The combination of a set of complementary techniques allows us to construct an unprecedented and comprehensive picture of the internal structure, temperature dependent swelling behavior, and the dependence of these properties on the cross-linker concentration of microgel particles based on N-vinylcaprolactam (VCL). The microgels were synthesized by precipitation polymerization using different amounts of cross-linking agent. Characterization was performed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) using two complementary neutron instruments to cover a uniquely broad Q-range with one probe. Additionally we used dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Previously obtained nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) results on the same PVCL particles are utilized to round the picture off. Our study shows that both the particle radius and the cross-link density and therefore also the stiffness of the microgels rises with increasing cross-linker content. Hence, more cross-linker reduces the swelling capability distinctly. These findings are supported by SANS and AFM measurements. Independent DLS experiments also found the increase in particle size but suggest an unchanged cross-link density. The reason for the apparent contradiction is the indirect extraction of the parameters via a model in the evaluation of DLS measurements. The more direct approach in AFM by evaluating the cross section profiles of observed microgel particles gives evidence of significantly softer and more deformable particles at lower cross-linker concentrations and therefore verifies the change in cross-link density. DSC data indicate a minor but unexpected shift of the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) to higher temperatures and exposes a more heterogeneous internal structure of the microgels with increasing cross-link density. Moreover, a change in the total energy transfer during the VPT gives evidence that the strength

  6. Whole-Cell Scan using Automatic Variable-Angle and Variable-Illumination-Depth Pseudo—Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Xu, Aoshuang; Marchuk, Kyle; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning

    2011-08-01

    An automatic calibration and angle-scanning prism-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM) was modified to function in both TIRFM and pseudo-TIRFM modes. When the incident angle of the excitation laser beam was controlled to be larger than the critical angle, the instrument served as a variable-angle TIRFM. A homemade computer program automatically calibrates the laser illumination spot in the sample to overlap with the center of the microscope's field of view. Then, by measuring the fluorescence intensities at different incident angles, the z-positions of fluorescent nanospheres close to the cell basolateral membrane can be extracted. When the incident angle is reduced to be in the subcritical range, the instrument works as a pseudo-TIRFM. The whole cell body from bottom to top can be imaged in a vertical scan process. Furthermore, the illumination field depth in the pseudo-TIRFM can be controlled by changing the incident angle or the horizontal position of the laser spot.

  7. Role of forced and internal variability in Pacific sea-level trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nezio, P. N.; Karamperidou, C.; Deser, C.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations show that sea-level rise (SLR) is not uniform, in particular in the Pacific Ocean. During the last 20 years, the tropical western Pacific has been rising at a rate of ~9 mm/year (three times faster than the global rate of ~3 mm/year). Conversely, sea-level over the eastern tropical Pacific has slightly decreased. These spatially varying trends have been generally attributed to decadal fluctuations in atmospheric circulation associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). However, controversy remains over whether the accelerated SLR over the tropical western Pacific is man-made. We explore this issue using the large ensemble of historical simulations performed with the Community Earth System Model (CESM-LE). The simulated sea-surface height (SSH) trends exhibit large spread among the 30 ensemble members. A large fraction (40%) of the spread is explained by two modes associated the PDO. Using CESM-LE we develop a methodology to estimate SSH trends associated with observed trends in atmospheric circulation. The resulting circulation-adjusted SSH trends exhibit spatial patterns in remarkable agreement with the satellite-derived sea-level trends (pattern correlation = 0.8). Furthermore, the observed atmospheric circulation trends are within the range of unforced trends simulated by CESM-LE. Together, these results suggest that the accelerated SLR in the western northern tropical Pacific is likely the response to unforced multi-decadal variability in the Walker circulation and the Aleutian Low.

  8. Analysis of damage in MMC components using an internal state variable model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.

    1989-01-01

    A metal-matrix composite (MMC) model was developed which includes the concept of damage evolution. The evolution of damage is assumed to be governed by a Kachanov-type equation. This viscoplastic damage model was implemented in the finite element code, MARC. Both uniaxial (creep) and multiaxial (an internally pressurized thick-walled cylinder) problems were analyzed using this implementation. Some preliminary results are presented which consider monotonic (constant) loadings. The creep curves including damage for four fiber orientations are presented. As expected, the minimum creep occurs when load is applied in a direction parallel to the fibers. The tangential strains at the inner radius of a thick-walled MMC-cylinder for four fiber orientations are shown with damage included. The cylinder exhibits the maximum creep resistance when the fibers are oriented in the circumferential direction, perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. Time-to-failure for the thick-walled cylinder for the same fiber orientation angles is also shown. As expected, the life of the cylinder can be increased by orientating the fibers in the circumferential direction, perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. The results, although qualitative, indicate that significant benefits in creep-resistance and service life can be achieved by using MMC materials as structural materials for high-temperature design.

  9. Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications

    DOEpatents

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.; Cole, Roger L.

    1997-01-01

    An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

  10. Supernova 2013aa in NGC 5643 = PSN J14323388-4413278

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-02-01

    Announces discovery of SN 2013aa in NGC 5643 = PSN J14323388-4413278 by Stuart Parker (Canterbury, New Zealand) on 2013 Feb. 13.621 UT at red mag 11.9 on a 30-s unfiltered CCD image taken at his Parkdale Observatory in the course of the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS). Coordinates (2000.0): R.A. 14 32 33.88 Decl. -44 13 27.8. SN 2013aa is 74" west and 180" south of the nucleus of NGC 5643 (measured by C. Drescher, Calamvale, QLD, Australia). Spectroscopy by J. T. Parrent et al. on Feb. 15.38 (FLOYDS) and on 2013 Feb. 15.70 UT (GMOS) shows SN 2013aa to be a type-Ia supernova, discovered a few days before maximum light. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database using the name SN 2013aa. Announced as a transient in AAVSO Special Notice #337 (Matthew Templeton, AAVSO), and as a supernova in CBET 3416 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.) and in ATel #4817 (J. T. Parrent et al.). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  11. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Cheriton, Olivia M.

    2016-06-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the importance regional upwelling on water column density structure, potentially accounting for the majority of the variability in internal tidal energy flux across the shelf. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15-25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7-14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave-current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux was almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave-current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus upwelling/relaxation dynamics are primarily responsible for variability

  12. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberger, Kurt; Storlazzi, Curt; Cheriton, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the importance regional upwelling on water column density structure, potentially accounting for the majority of the variability in internal tidal energy flux across the shelf. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15–25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7–14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave–current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux was almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave–current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus upwelling/relaxation dynamics are primarily responsible for

  13. Amplitude Spectrum Variability in gamma Dor and delta Sct Pulsating Variable Stars Observed by the NASA Kepler Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Kosak, Katie; Bradley, Paul A.; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2015-08-01

    The NASA Kepler spacecraft data has revealed a large number of new multimode nonradially pulsating gamma Dor and delta Sct variable stars. The Kepler high precision long time-series photometry makes it possible to study amplitude variations of the frequencies. We summarize recent literature on amplitude and frequency variations in nonradially pulsating variables. We apply several methods, including those we have developed, and the wavelet technique of the VStar software (http://www.aavso.org/vstar-overview), to study amplitude variability in about a dozen gamma Doradus or delta Scuti candidate variable stars observed for several quarters as part of the Kepler Guest Observer program. We discuss the magnitude and timescale of the amplitude variations, and the presence or absence of correlations between amplitude variations for different frequencies of a given star. We discuss proposed causes of amplitude spectrum variability that will require further investigation.

  14. Revisiting trends in wetness and dryness in the presence of internal climate variability and water limitations over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Allan, Richard P.; Zwiers, Francis; Lawrence, David M.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    2015-12-01

    A theoretically expected consequence of the intensification of the hydrological cycle under global warming is that on average, wet regions get wetter and dry regions get drier (WWDD). Recent studies, however, have found significant discrepancies between the expected pattern of change and observed changes over land. We assess the WWDD theory in four climate models. We find that the reported discrepancy can be traced to two main issues: (1) unforced internal climate variability strongly affects local wetness and dryness trends and can obscure underlying agreement with WWDD, and (2) dry land regions are not constrained to become drier by enhanced moisture divergence since evaporation cannot exceed precipitation over multiannual time scales. Over land, where the available water does not limit evaporation, a "wet gets wetter" signal predominates. On seasonal time scales, where evaporation can exceed precipitation, trends in wet season becoming wetter and dry season becoming drier are also found.

  15. International Solar Cycle Studies [ISCS] Working Group 2: solar magnetic field variability - from the lower atmosphere through the inner corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard A.; Michels, Donald

    This report is a summary of activities and plans relating to the International Solar Cycle Studies (ISCS) Working Group 2, which is concerned with solar magnetic field variability, from the lower atmosphere through the inner corona. Whilst the Working Group carries a rather general title, the activities are focusing on several well defined topics - in particular the onset of coronal mass ejection events. Recognising the large number of scientific meetings worldwide, the working style of this group is aimed at improving communication, information exchange and collaboration making use of existing meetings and with a minimum of red tape. The core of the activity is through the use of the World Wide Web and e-mail. In this way, this Working Group does not introduce extra effort, but provides a better focus for on-going projects.

  16. Modeling the zonal disintegration of rocks near deep level tunnels by gradient internal variable continuous phase transition theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoxiang, Chen; Qi, Chengzhi; Peng, Liu; Kairui, Li; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of alternating damage zones surrounding underground openings (commonly known as zonal disintegration) is treated as a "far from thermodynamic equilibrium" dynamical process or a nonlinear continuous phase transition phenomenon. The approach of internal variable gradient theory with diffusive transport, which may be viewed as a subclass of Landau's phase transition theory, is adopted. The order parameter is identified with an irreversible strain quantity, the gradient of which enters into the expression for the free energy of the rock system. The gradient term stabilizes the material behavior in the post-softening regime, where zonal disintegration occurs. The results of a simplified linearized analysis are confirmed by the numerical solution of the nonlinear problem.

  17. Internal variable model for magneto-mechanical behaviour of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys Ni-Mn-Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsinger, L.; Lexcellent, C.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, a predictive model of field-induced strain in Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloy (FSMA) is proposed. This phenomenological scalar magneto-mechanical model is built in the frame of thermodynamic of irreversible process. The strain mechanism corresponds to the reorientation process of twinned martensite platelets at constant temperature. In this model, physical microstructure parameters are chosen as variables: volume fraction z of one martensite variant and ratio α of magnetic domain width. Pure mechanical behaviour of FSMA is supposed to be decomposed in reversible (or anhysteretic) part and irreversible one. From dissipation, a yield function written in terms of energy, has been introduced to determine when reorientation of twinned martensite platelets (via internal variable z) could occur. Pure magnetic behaviour is supposed to be non-liner reversible. The coupling between magnetism and mechanics is introduced in the expression of magnetisation via microstructure parameters z and a. The good prediction capability of the proposed model is shown by an identification made on experiments performed by O'Handley & Murray: simulations of strain induced by pure mechanical loading or by applied magnetic field under constant compressive stress, are presented and compared with these experiments. These first results are very promising.

  18. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, P.C.; Hansen, C.N.

    1994-11-18

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multi-fuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this Final Report.

  19. EE Cep observations requested for upcoming eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-07-01

    The AAVSO requests observations for the upcoming eclipse of EE Cephei, a long-period eclipsing variable. EE Cep has a period of 2,050 days, and shows strong variations in the eclipse light curve from one event to the next. Observations are needed to study the morphology of the upcoming eclipse, which will be used to better understand the shape of the eclipsing disk and how it precesses. Mid-eclipse is predicted to be August 23, 2014, but the early stages of the eclipse may begin as much as a month earlier. EE Cep is being observed by a number of amateur and professional astronomers using multiple telescopes at multiple wavelengths. Among these is a collaboration (see https://sites.google.com/site/eecep2014campaign/) headed by Cezary Galan at the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland; several individual AAVSO observers are already participating in this effort. The AAVSO is not currently a partner in that campaign, but all data submitted to the AAVSO will be publicly available. The AAVSO strongly encourages observers to begin following this star now, and to continue observations into October 2014 at least. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  20. Mechanisms of internally generated decadal-to-multidecadal variability of SST in the Atlantic Ocean in a coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Schneider, Edwin K.; Wu, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms of the internally generated decadal-to-multidecadal variability of SST in the Atlantic Ocean are investigated in a long control simulation of the Community Climate System Model version 3 with constant external forcing. The interactive ensemble (IE) coupling strategy, with an ensemble of atmospheric GCMs (AGCM) coupled to an ocean model, a sea-ice model and a land model, is used to diagnose the roles of various processes in the coupled GCM (CGCM). The noise components of heat flux, wind stress and fresh water flux of the control simulation, determined from the CGCM surface fluxes by subtracting the SST-forced surface fluxes, estimated as the ensemble mean of AGCM simulations, are applied at the ocean surface of the IE in different regions and in different combinations. The IE simulations demonstrate that the climate variability in the control simulation is predominantly forced by noise. The local noise forcing is found to be responsible for the SST variability in the Atlantic Ocean, with noise heat flux and noise wind stress playing a critical role. The control run Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) index is decomposed into interannual, decadal and multidecadal modes based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition. The AMV multidecadal mode, a combination of 50- and 100-year modes, is examined in detail. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) pattern in the atmosphere, dominated by the noise component, forces the multidecadal mode through noise heat flux and noise wind stress. The noise wind stress forcing on the multidecadal mode is associated with ocean dynamics, including gyre adjustment and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The AMV decadal mode is also found to be related to noise NAO forcing. The associated ocean dynamics are connected with both noise heat flux and noise wind stress, but the AMOC related to the decadal mode is more likely to be forced by noise heat flux. For both multidecadal and decadal modes, the

  1. Strategies for Creating Cornerstone Education Projects for the International Year of Astronomy 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Isbell, D.

    2008-12-01

    The General Assembly of the United Nations has designated 2009 as the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009), a year-long global education program to commemorates the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first astronomical observations through a telescope. IYA2009 has an importance well beyond what can be accomplished in just one year. The main goal is to use this year to build sustainable, long-term education programs for measurable changes in science literacy in school children and in the public at large. The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) with headquarters in Tucson and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) with headquarters in Washington D.C. are leading the coordination of IYA2009 activities in the United States under a grant from the National Science Foundation. NASA is also playing a large role. NOAO and AAS are working closely with United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the International Astronomical Union (IAU), Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO), The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA), and other trusted astronomy partners worldwide. Through collaboration and coordination, the participating partners will convey the excitement of personal discovery, the merits of the scientific process, and the pleasure of sharing new and fundamental knowledge about the Universe. This talk will describe the goals of the major cornerstone projects led by the United States including the Galileoscope education kit, dark skies education, image exhibition, and Galileo teacher training project. This work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation Astronomy Division. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  2. Robust integration schemes for generalized viscoplasticity with internal-state variables. Part 1: Theoretical developments and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Li, Wei

    1995-01-01

    This two-part report is concerned with the development of a general framework for the implicit time-stepping integrators for the flow and evolution equations in generalized viscoplastic models. The primary goal is to present a complete theoretical formulation, and to address in detail the algorithmic and numerical analysis aspects involved in its finite element implementation, as well as to critically assess the numerical performance of the developed schemes in a comprehensive set of test cases. On the theoretical side, the general framework is developed on the basis of the unconditionally-stable, backward-Euler difference scheme as a starting point. Its mathematical structure is of sufficient generality to allow a unified treatment of different classes of viscoplastic models with internal variables. In particular, two specific models of this type, which are representative of the present start-of-art in metal viscoplasticity, are considered in applications reported here; i.e., fully associative (GVIPS) and non-associative (NAV) models. The matrix forms developed for both these models are directly applicable for both initially isotropic and anisotropic materials, in general (three-dimensional) situations as well as subspace applications (i.e., plane stress/strain, axisymmetric, generalized plane stress in shells). On the computational side, issues related to efficiency and robustness are emphasized in developing the (local) interative algorithm. In particular, closed-form expressions for residual vectors and (consistent) material tangent stiffness arrays are given explicitly for both GVIPS and NAV models, with their maximum sizes 'optimized' to depend only on the number of independent stress components (but independent of the number of viscoplastic internal state parameters). Significant robustness of the local iterative solution is provided by complementing the basic Newton-Raphson scheme with a line-search strategy for convergence. In the present first part of the

  3. Robust integration schemes for generalized viscoplasticity with internal-state variables. Part 2: Algorithmic developments and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wei; Saleeb, Atef F.

    1995-01-01

    This two-part report is concerned with the development of a general framework for the implicit time-stepping integrators for the flow and evolution equations in generalized viscoplastic models. The primary goal is to present a complete theoretical formulation, and to address in detail the algorithmic and numerical analysis aspects involved in its finite element implementation, as well as to critically assess the numerical performance of the developed schemes in a comprehensive set of test cases. On the theoretical side, the general framework is developed on the basis of the unconditionally-stable, backward-Euler difference scheme as a starting point. Its mathematical structure is of sufficient generality to allow a unified treatment of different classes of viscoplastic models with internal variables. In particular, two specific models of this type, which are representative of the present start-of-art in metal viscoplasticity, are considered in applications reported here; i.e., fully associative (GVIPS) and non-associative (NAV) models. The matrix forms developed for both these models are directly applicable for both initially isotropic and anisotropic materials, in general (three-dimensional) situations as well as subspace applications (i.e., plane stress/strain, axisymmetric, generalized plane stress in shells). On the computational side, issues related to efficiency and robustness are emphasized in developing the (local) interative algorithm. In particular, closed-form expressions for residual vectors and (consistent) material tangent stiffness arrays are given explicitly for both GVIPS and NAV models, with their maximum sizes 'optimized' to depend only on the number of independent stress components (but independent of the number of viscoplastic internal state parameters). Significant robustness of the local iterative solution is provided by complementing the basic Newton-Raphson scheme with a line-search strategy for convergence. In the present second part of

  4. Epsilon Aur monitoring during predicted pulsation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    Dr. Robert Stencel (University of Denver Astronomy Program) has requested that AAVSO observers monitor epsilon Aurigae from now through the end of the observing season. "Studies of the long-term, out-of-eclipse photometry of this enigmatic binary suggest that intervals of coherent pulsation occur at roughly 1/3 of the 27.1-year orbital period. Kloppenborg, et al. noted that stable variation patterns develop at 3,200-day intervals' implying that 'the next span of dates when such events might happen are circa JD ~2457000 (2014 December)'. "These out-of-eclipse light variations often have amplitudes of ~0.1 magnitude in U, and ~0.05 in V, with characteristic timescales of 60-100 days. The AAVSO light curve data to the present may indicate that this coherent phenomenon has begun, but we encourage renewed efforts by observers...to help deduce whether these events are internal to the F star, or externally-driven by tidal interaction with the companion star." Nightly observations or one observation every few days (CCD/PEP/DSLR, VUBR (amplitude too small for visual)) are requested. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Epsilon Aur was the subject of major international campaigns and the AAVSO's Citizen Sky project as it went through its 27.1-year eclipse in 2009-2011. Over 700 observers worldwide submitted over 20,000 multicolor observations to the AAVSO International Database for this project. Much information on eps Aur is available from the AAVSO, including material on the Citizen Sky website (http://www.aavso.org/epsilon-aurigae and http://www.citizensky.org/content/star-our-project). The Journal of the AAVSO, Volume 40, No. 2 (2012) was devoted to discussion of and research results from this event. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  5. FAST OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF A NAKED-EYE BURST-MANIFESTATION OF THE PERIODIC ACTIVITY OF AN INTERNAL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-08-10

    We imaged the position of the naked-eye burst, GRB080319B, before, during, and after its gamma-ray activity with sub-second temporal resolution using the TORTORA wide-field camera. The burst optical prompt emission, which reached 5.3 mag, has been detected, and its periodic optical variability has been discovered in the form of four equidistant flashes with a duration of several seconds. We also detected a strong correlation (r {approx} 0.82) between optical and gamma-ray light curves with a 2 s delay of the optical emission with respect to the gamma-ray emission. The revealed temporal structure of the optical light curve in comparison with the gamma-ray light curve can be interpreted in the framework of the model of shell collisions in the ejecta containing a significant neutron component. All observed emission features reflect the non-stationary behavior of the burst internal engine-supposedly, a hyperaccreting solar-mass black hole formed in the collapse of a massive stellar core.

  6. A self-consistent estimate for linear viscoelastic polycrystals with internal variables inferred from the collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Q. H.; Brenner, R.; Castelnau, O.; Moulinec, H.; Suquet, P.

    2012-03-01

    The correspondence principle is customarily used with the Laplace-Carson transform technique to tackle the homogenization of linear viscoelastic heterogeneous media. The main drawback of this method lies in the fact that the whole stress and strain histories have to be considered to compute the mechanical response of the material during a given macroscopic loading. Following a remark of Mandel (1966 Mécanique des Milieux Continus(Paris, France: Gauthier-Villars)), Ricaud and Masson (2009 Int. J. Solids Struct. 46 1599-1606) have shown the equivalence between the collocation method used to invert Laplace-Carson transforms and an internal variables formulation. In this paper, this new method is developed for the case of polycrystalline materials with general anisotropic properties for local and macroscopic behavior. Applications are provided for the case of constitutive relations accounting for glide of dislocations on particular slip systems. It is shown that the method yields accurate results that perfectly match the standard collocation method and reference full-field results obtained with a FFT numerical scheme. The formulation is then extended to the case of time- and strain-dependent viscous properties, leading to the incremental collocation method (ICM) that can be solved efficiently by a step-by-step procedure. Specifically, the introduction of isotropic and kinematic hardening at the slip system scale is considered.

  7. A guide to using material model No. 11 in NIKE2D: An internal variable, viscoplasticity model

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, E.C.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.

    1990-10-30

    The need to accurately model the superplastic forming process which is highly rate and temperature dependent motivated the evaluation of Bammann's internal variable, viscoplasticity material model. The model is based upon the concepts of unified creep plasticity, but employs a yield surface for efficient implementation into large-scale numerical computer codes. It has proven elsewhere to be quite successful in describing large strain, thermal-mechanical behavior of crystalline materials. Features of the model enable it to simulate the apparent strain-rate behavior exhibited by many metals above one half the melt temperature. It is the efficient incorporation of features that make the model attractive for use in finite element modeling of metal deformation processes. Although this model was implemented into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's NIKE2D finite element program in 1986, there have been no known reports of successful use by NIKE2D users. The purpose of this report is to provide the user the proper format to input model parameters, a procedure for determining appropriate values for material constants from experimental data, and supplemental information on the model relevant to the implementation in the NIKE2D finite element program. Detailed accounts of the theoretical aspects of the model can be found in the cited references. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Time-Referenced Effects of an Internal vs. External Focus of Attention on Muscular Activity and Compensatory Variability

    PubMed Central

    Hossner, Ernst-Joachim; Ehrlenspiel, Felix

    2010-01-01

    The paralysis-by-analysis phenomenon, i.e., attending to the execution of one's movement impairs performance, has gathered a lot of attention over recent years (see Wulf, 2007, for a review). Explanations of this phenomenon, e.g., the hypotheses of constrained action (Wulf et al., 2001) or of step-by-step execution (Masters, 1992; Beilock et al., 2002), however, do not refer to the level of underlying mechanisms on the level of sensorimotor control. For this purpose, a “nodal-point hypothesis” is presented here with the core assumption that skilled motor behavior is internally based on sensorimotor chains of nodal points, that attending to intermediate nodal points leads to a muscular re-freezing of the motor system at exactly and exclusively these points in time, and that this re-freezing is accompanied by the disruption of compensatory processes, resulting in an overall decrease of motor performance. Two experiments, on lever sequencing and basketball free throws, respectively, are reported that successfully tested these time-referenced predictions, i.e., showing that muscular activity is selectively increased and compensatory variability selectively decreased at movement-related nodal points if these points are in the focus of attention. PMID:21833285

  9. The Sun as a variable star: Solar and stellar irradiance variations; Colloquium of the International Astronomical Union, 143rd, Boulder, CO, Jun. 20-25, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M. (Editor); Froehlich, Claus (Editor); Hudson, Hugh S. (Editor); Tobiska, W. Kent (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Variations in solar and stellar irradiances have long been of interest. An International Astronomical Union (IAU) colloquium reviewed such relevant subjects as observations, theoretical interpretations, and empirical and physical models, with a special emphasis on climatic impact of solar irradiance variability. Specific topics discussed included: (1) General Reviews on Observations of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (2) Observational Programs for Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (3) Variability of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Related to the Network, Active Regions (Sunspots and Plages), and Large-Scale Magnetic Structures; (4) Empirical Models of Solar Total and Spectral Irradiance Variability; (5) Solar and Stellar Oscillations, Irradiance Variations and their Interpretations; and (6) The Response of the Earth's Atmosphere to Solar Irradiance Variations and Sun-Climate Connections.

  10. Sunlight in the Spotlight in the International Year of Light (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) One of the main focuses of the International Year of Light (IYL) is interdisciplinary education and outreach. While variable stars in general provide myriad opportunities to accomplish this, one variable star in particular—our sun—offers unique opportunities in this vein. From conducting ground-based safe solar observations with white light and hydrogen alpha filters, to highlighting satellite observations at other wavelengths and spectroscopy, observing our nearest star provides a solid basis from which to explore the electromagnetic spectrum (and the relevant technologies used to study it). The IYL highlights cultural astronomy, the history of science, and the important role women have played in our understanding of the natural world. Not only was the primary deity in many cultures the sun god or goddess, but the motions of the sun across the heavens were carefully studied using sundials, astrolabes, and monolithic structures (including Stonehenge). Sunspots were discovered long before the invention of the telescope, and their occurrences carefully recorded. Today, these records (along with records of another important way the sun interacts with our planet, namely the creation of aurora) extend our understanding of the solar cycle backwards in time across the centuries to before the time of Galileo. Women have played an important role in our observation and understanding of the sun, including Annie Maunder at the Royal Greenwich Observatory and Elizabeth Brown, Solar Section Director of the British Astronomical Association. The sun also played a central role in verifying Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (itself celebrating its centenary during the IYL). This poster will provide examples of sun-centered projects and activities that can be used during the IYL and beyond to educate and interest citizens young and old about our nearest star, with an eye to especially highlighting the importance of the ongoing work of the Solar Section of

  11. Electrochemical state and internal variables estimation using a reduced-order physics-based model of a lithium-ion cell and an extended Kalman filter

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzel, KD; Aldrich, LL; Trimboli, MS; Plett, GL

    2015-03-15

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the present value of electrochemical internal variables in a lithium-ion cell in real time, using readily available measurements of cell voltage, current, and temperature. The variables that can be estimated include any desired set of reaction flux and solid and electrolyte potentials and concentrations at any set of one-dimensional spatial locations, in addition to more standard quantities such as state of charge. The method uses an extended Kalman filter along with a one-dimensional physics-based reduced-order model of cell dynamics. Simulations show excellent and robust predictions having dependable error bounds for most internal variables. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of forced and internal variability in the AMO through analyses of SST data from CMIP5 historical simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, B. A.; Mann, M. E.; Miller, S. K.; Emanuel, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) is a mode of North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) variability that has substantial impacts on Northern Hemisphere precipitation and temperature patterns, as well as Atlantic hurricane activity. Climate models and paleoclimate data suggest that the warm AMO phase can enhance drought in the American mid- and southwest, increase rainfall intensity and amounts in North Eastern Brazil and the African Sahel region, and increase the number of severe Atlantic hurricanes. While models and instrumental data provide some support for the AMO as an internal climate ';oscillation', questions remain regarding the proportion of AMO variability resulting from internal and external forcing, and more specifically, how much of the recent (i.e. late 20th century) north Atlantic warming is anthropogenically forced. Several studies have addressed these issues and proposed various methods for diagnosing the AMO using historical climate model simulations (e.g. from CMIP3) and instrumental data. Here we present results from analyses of the North Atlantic region in historical simulations from Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5). Our approach involves (1) analyzing a grand ensemble mean based on averaging realizations of all available models, such that random, internal variability components cancel and only a forced component remains; (2) for all models with at least four realizations, estimating a forced component by averaging multiple realizations and estimating internal variability components from the residual series of individual realizations and (3) analyzing control simulations for the corresponding models to assess whether or not there is evidence of enhanced AMO-like internal variability.

  13. Internalizing and externalizing problem behavior and early adolescent substance use: a test of a latent variable interaction and conditional indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Matthew D; Colder, Craig R; Hawk, Larry W; Read, Jennifer P; Wieczorek, William F; Lengua, Liliana J

    2014-09-01

    Externalizing problem behavior is a robust predictor of early adolescent substance use (SU); however, findings regarding internalizing problems have been mixed, suggesting that there may be important moderators of the relationship between internalizing problems and SU. The present study used a community sample (mean age was 12.1 at the first assessment, 55% women, 83% White) to test a longitudinal latent variable interaction structural equation model to examine whether externalizing problems moderated the relationship between internalizing problems and SU. Peer delinquency was tested as a mediator in the model and prior levels of the mediator and outcome were controlled at each wave to establish temporal precedence. Results suggested that (1) internalizing problems were protective against associating with deviant peers, but only at high levels of externalizing symptomatology, (2) higher levels of peer delinquency were associated with increases in SU, and (3) peer delinquency mediated the effect of the problem behavior interaction on SU. Our findings suggest that the impact of internalizing problems on peer delinquency and SU needs to be considered in the context of externalizing problems. Moreover, developmental models involving internalizing symptoms should consider that internalizing symptoms are generally protective against substance use in early adolescence. PMID:25134030

  14. Internalizing and externalizing problem behavior and early adolescent substance use: A test of a latent variable interaction and conditional indirect effects

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Matthew D.; Colder, Craig R.; Hawk, Larry W.; Read, Jennifer P.; Wieczorek, William F.; Lengua, Liliana J.

    2014-01-01

    Externalizing problem behavior is a robust predictor of early adolescent substance use (SU); however findings regarding internalizing problems have been mixed, suggesting that there may be important moderators of the relationship between internalizing problems and SU. The present study used a community sample (mean age was 12.1 at the first assessment, 55% female, 83% White) to test a longitudinal latent variable interaction structural equation model to examine whether externalizing problems moderated the relationship between internalizing problems and SU. Peer delinquency was tested as a mediator in the model and prior levels of the mediator and outcome were controlled at each wave to establish temporal precedence. Results suggested that (1) internalizing problems were protective against associating with deviant peers, but only at high levels of externalizing symptomatology, (2) higher levels of peer delinquency were associated with increases in SU, and (3) peer delinquency mediated the effect of the problem behavior interaction on SU. Our findings suggest that the impact of internalizing problems on peer delinquency and SU needs to be considered in the context of externalizing problems. Moreover, developmental models involving internalizing symptoms should consider that internalizing symptoms are generally protective against substance use in early adolescence. PMID:25134030

  15. The test of variables of attention (TOVA): Internal consistency (Q1 vs. Q2 and Q3 vs. Q4) in children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The internal consistency of the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA) was examined in a cohort of 6- to 12-year-old children (N = 63) strictly diagnosed with ADHD. The internal consistency of errors of omission (OMM), errors of commission (COM), response time (RT), and response time variability (RTV...

  16. Biotic and abiotic variables affecting internalization and fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates in leafy green roots.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Webb, Cathy C; Davey, Lindsey E; Payton, Alison S; Flitcroft, Ian D; Doyle, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Preharvest internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into the roots of leafy greens is a food safety risk because the pathogen may be systemically transported to edible portions of the plant. In this study, both abiotic (degree of soil moisture) and biotic (E. coli O157:H7 exposure, presence of Shiga toxin genes, and type of leafy green) factors were examined to determine their potential effects on pathogen internalization into roots of leafy greens. Using field soil that should have an active indigenous microbial community, internalized populations in lettuce roots were 0.8 to 1.6 log CFU/g after exposure to soil containing E. coli O157:H7 at 5.6 to 6.1 log CFU/g. Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into leafy green plant roots was higher when E. coli O157:H7 populations in soil were increased to 7 or 8 log CFU/g or when the soil was saturated with water. No differences were noted in the extent to which internalization of E. coli O157:H7 occurred in spinach, lettuce, or parsley roots; however, in saturated soil, maximum levels in parsley occurred later than did those in spinach or lettuce. Translocation of E. coli O157:H7 from roots to leaves was rare; therefore, decreases observed in root populations over time were likely the result of inactivation within the plant tissue. Shiga toxin-negative (nontoxigenic) E. coli O157:H7 isolates were more stable than were virulent isolates in soil, but the degree of internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into roots did not differ between isolate type. Therefore, these nontoxigenic isolates could be used as surrogates for virulent isolates in field trials involving internalization. PMID:24853507

  17. Internal ice - Sheet variability as source for the multi-century and millennial-scale iceberg events during the Holocene? A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bügelmayer-Blaschek, Marianne; Roche, Didier M.; Renssen, Hans; Andrews, John T.

    2016-04-01

    The climate of the Holocene, the current interglacial covering the past 11,700 years, has been relatively stable compared to previous periods. Nevertheless, repeating occurrence of rapid natural climate changes that challenged human society are seen in proxy reconstructions. Ocean sediment cores for example display prominent peaks of enhanced ice rafted debris (IRD) during the Holocene with a multi-decadal to millennial scale periodicity. Different mechanisms were proposed that caused these enhanced IRD events, for example variations in the incoming total solar irradiance (TSI), volcanic eruptions and the combination of internal climate variability and external forcings. We investigate the probable mechanisms causing the occurrence of IRD-events over the past 6000 years using a fully coupled climate - ice-sheet - iceberg model (iLOVECLIM). We performed 19 experiments that differ in the applied forcings (TSI, volcanic) and the initial atmospheric conditions. To explore internal ice sheet variability one further experiment was done with fixed climate conditions. All the model runs displayed prominent peaks of enhanced iceberg melt flux (IMF), independent of the chosen experimental set-up. The spectral analysis of the experiments with the ice-sheet - climate model coupled displays significant peaks at 2000, 1000 years in all the experiments and at 500 years in most runs. The experiment with fixed climate conditions displays one significant peak of about 1500 years related to internal ice sheet variability. This frequency is modulated to 2000 and 1000 years in all the experiments with a coupled climate - ice sheet due to interactions between the climate components. We further investigate the impact of minimum TSI events on the timing and occurrence of enhanced IMF. In the experimental set-up that was forced with idealized sinusoidal TSI variations (±4 Wm-2), we find a significant occurrence of an increased iceberg melt flux about 60 years after the minimum TSI value

  18. Predictors of International Graduate Student Success in U.S. Universities: Analysis of Noncognitive Student Variables and Institutional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Rania

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between Sedlacek's (2004b) student noncognitive variables (positive self-concept, realistic self-appraisal, successfully handling the system, preference for long-term goals, leadership experience, presence of a strong support person, community service, and knowledge of the…

  19. Southern High Latitude Climate and Internal Variability Influence on Eastern Equatorial Pacific Thermostad Temperatures during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalansky, J.; Rosenthal, Y.; Herbert, T.

    2014-12-01

    Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) plays a critical role in transporting heat, nutrients and CO2 from the Southern Ocean to the base of the equatorial thermocline in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP). In turn, the heat and nutrients storage below the thermocline (~100-500 m) in the EEP can exert large effect on Earth's climate through ocean-atmosphere heat and CO2 exchange. Here we present a centennially resolved Holocene subsurface temperature reconstruction using Mg/Ca of Neogloboquadrina dutertrei from the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP). In the EEP N. dutertrei calcifies at about ~125 m which is below the Equatorial Undercurrent and the upper limit of the thermostad water in this region. During the early Holocene N. dutertrei temperatures vary between 14.5˚C and 16.5˚C, whereas by 8 kyr B.P. the temperature drops to 13˚C. The cooling by 8 kyr is also observed in the bottom water (~400 m) temperature reconstructions from Uvigerina spp. The early Holocene cooling of the thermostad water is likely linked to southern high latitude climate variability attributed to changes in the southern westerly winds (SWW). We posit that a more southern position of the SWW in the early Holocene increased the influence of warm subtropical water into the formation region of and thereby warming SAMW. Additionally, a southward position of the SWW increased SAMW production causing the southern high latitude signal to reach farther into the EEP. After 8 ky, thermostad temperatures show millennial and centennial variability, with low temperature between 4.8-3.6 kyr followed by high temperatures during the next 500 years. High resolution record of the last 2,000 years also show multidecadal to multicentennial thermostad temperature variability. The timing of this variability does not follow the Northern Hemisphere temperature variability including the Little Ice Age and Medieval Climate Anomaly. We conclude that in absence of a strong climate signal from the southern high latitudes

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MRP1) homolog has a novel gene structure containing two variable internal exons.

    PubMed

    Grailles, Marine; Brey, Paul T; Roth, Charles W

    2003-03-27

    Drosophila melanogaster has a gene very similar to human MRP1 that encodes a full ABC-transporter containing three membrane-spanning domains and two nucleotide-binding domains. This 19 exon insect gene, dMRP (FBgn0032456), spans slightly more than 22 kb. The cDNA SD07655 representing this gene was sequenced and found to contain sequences from 12 exons including single copies of two exons having multiple genomic copies. The gene contains two variant copies of exon 4 and seven of exon 8. While a cDNA contains only one version of each variable exon, all forms of these variable exons were detected in adult fly mRNA. These results predict that Drosophila could make 14 different MRP isoforms from a single gene by substituting different variable exons. This is the first report of any organism using differential splicing of alternative, internal exons, to produce such a large array of MRP isoforms having the same size, but with limited and defined internal variations. Defining the functional differences in the dMRP isoforms should provide clues to the structure/function relationships of the amino acids in these MRP domains, both for the insect enzyme and for those of other species. PMID:12706887

  1. International Observing Campaign: Photometry and Spectroscopy of P Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, E.; Bauer, T.

    2012-04-01

    In this combined campaign on the Luminous Blue Variable star P Cygni we are trying for the first time by way of contemporaneous measurements of photometric V brightness and Ha equivalent width (EW) to realize a longterm monitoring of the intrinsic Ha-line flux. The photometric observers of AAVSO and BAV (Germany) and a spectroscopic observer group (Japan, France, Spain, Germany) started observing for this campaign in November 2008 at the request of Bernd Hanisch and one of us (EP) in order to continue former investigations whose results were based on multi-daily averaging of V and EW. Additional data from literature enable us to represent the quantitative behavior of the Ha-line flux for the timespan August 2005 to December 2011, which behavior reflects variabilities in mass-loss rate, stellar wind density, and ionization structure.

  2. Anne S. Young: Professor and Variable Star Observer Extraordinaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, Katherine

    2011-05-01

    Anne Sewell Young (1871-1961) was one of the eight original members of the AAVSO, to which she contributed more than 6500 observations over 33 years. She also taught astronomy for 37 years at Mount Holyoke College; among her students was Helen Sawyer Hogg. This paper will look at her life and career both at Mount Holyoke and with the AAVSO.

  3. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, K. J.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Cheriton, O. M.; McPhee-Shaw, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the relative importance of internal tides on the resuspension and transport of seabed sediment. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15-25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7-14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave-current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux is almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave-current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus, the internal tide and upwelling/relaxation dynamics are important in the transport of sediment during the relatively quiescent summer months.

  4. 3D finite element simulation of microstructure evolution in blade forging of Ti-6Al-4V alloy based on the internal state variable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiao; Wu, Bin; Li, Miao-Quan

    2012-02-01

    The physically-based internal state variable (ISV) models were used to describe the changes of dislocation density, grain size, and flow stress in the high temperature deformation of titanium alloys in this study. The constants of the present models could be identified based on experimental results, which were conducted at deformation temperatures ranging from 1093 K to 1303 K, height reductions ranging from 20% to 60%, and the strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 s-1. The physically-based internal state variable models were implemented into the commercial finite element (FE) code. Then, a three-dimensional (3D) FE simulation system coupling of deformation, heat transfer, and microstructure evolution was developed for the blade forging of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. FE analysis was carried out to simulate the microstructure evolution in the blade forging of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Finally, the blade forging tests of Ti-6Al-4V alloy were performed to validate the results of FE simulation. According to the tensile tests, it is seen that the mechanical properties, such as tensile strength and elongation, satisfy the application requirements well. The maximum and minimum differences between the calculated and experimental grain size of primary α phase are 11.71% and 4.23%, respectively. Thus, the industrial trials show a good agreement with FE simulation of blade forging.

  5. Modeling and observations of high-frequency flow variability and internal waves at a Caribbean reef spawning aggregation site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Tal; Heyman, William D.; Houser, Chris; Kjerfve, Björn

    2011-05-01

    The characteristics and forcing mechanisms of high-frequency flow variations (periods of minutes to days) were investigated near Gladden Spit, a reef promontory off the coast of Belize. Direct field observations and a high-resolution (50-m grid size) numerical ocean model are used to describe the flow variations that impact the initial dispersion of eggs and larvae from this site, which serves as a spawning aggregation site for many species of reef fishes. Idealized sensitivity model experiments isolate the role of various processes, such as internal waves, wind, tides, and large-scale flow variations. The acute horizontal curvature and steep topography of the reef intensify the flow, create small-scale convergence and divergence zones, and excite high-frequency oscillations and internal waves. Although the tides in this area are relatively small (˜10-cm amplitude), the model simulations show that tides can excite significant high-frequency flow variations near the reef, which suggests that the preference of fish to aggregate and spawn in the days following the time of full moon may not be coincidental. Even small variations in remote flows (2-5 cm s-1) due to say, meso-scale eddies, are enough to excite near-reef oscillations. Model simulations and the observations further suggest that the spawning site at the tip of the reef provides initial strong dispersion for eggs, but then the combined influence of the along-isobath flow and the westward wind will transport the eggs and larvae downstream of Gladden Spit toward less turbulent region, which may contribute to enhanced larval survival.

  6. Nova Scorpii 2015 == PNV J17032620-3504140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2015-02-01

    AAVSO Alert Notice 508 announces the discovery of Nova Scorpii 2015 = PNV J17032620-3504140 [V1535 Sco] by Tadashi Kojima (Gunma-ken, Japan) at unfiltered DSLR magnitude 8.1, using a 150-mm f/2.8 lens and digital camera, on 2015 February 11.837 UT. Coordinates: RA: 17 03 26.18 , Decl: -35 04 17.6 (2000.0). Echelle spectra by Frederick Walter (Stony Brook University) taken on 2015 February 13.40 UT and reported in Astronomer's Telegram #7060 indicate the presence of strong H-alpha with FWHM of 2000 km/s, along with several other emission features. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  7. Nova Monocerotis 2012 = PNV J06393874+0553520

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-08-01

    The discovery is reported of Nova Monocerotis 2012 = PNV J06393874+0553520 by Shigehisa Fujikawa (Kanonji City, Kagawa Prefecture, Japan, reported by Mitsuru Soma, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) at magnitude C=9.4 on 2012 Aug. 09.8048 UT. Coordinates: 06 39 38.74 +05 53 52.0 (2000.0). Spectroscopy by multiple teams indicate a classical nova evolving toward the nebular phase. Announced on IAU CBAT Central Bureau Electronic Telegram 3202 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details, particularly regarding spectra and nearby stars, and observations of Nova Mon 2012 already reported to the AAVSO.

  8. Nova Lupi 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-08-01

    Announcement of discovery of Nova Lupi 2011 = PNV J14542000-5505030. Discovered by Nicholas Brown (Quinns Rocks, Western Australia) on 2011 Aug. 4.73 UT at unfiltered mag=10.2 (tmax 400 film). Posted on the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams Transient Object Confirmation Page (TOCP) as PNV J14542000-5505030. Spectra obtained by Fred Walter (SUNY Stony Brook) 2011 August 9.0132 UT with the SMARTS 1.5m RC spectrograph at Cerro Tololo and reported in ATEL #3536 confirms that the object is an Fe II nova near maximum. Initially announced in [vsnet-alert 13560] (Nicholas Brown) and in AAVSO Special Notice #247 (Arne Henden). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  9. Nova in Eridanus (KT Eri = N Eri 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2009-12-01

    The discovery is reported of Nova Eri 2009 = KT Eri by K. Itagaki, Yamagata, Japan, on Nov. 25.536 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.1. Spectra from several sources indicates KT Eri is a He/N nova. Pre-discovery images indicate KT Eri actually reached 5th magnitude, and the apparent progenitor is relatively bright at 15th magnitude. Initially announced in CBET 2050 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.) and AAVSO Special Notice #181 (Elizabeth O. Waagen), with additional information in Special Notices #182 (Arne A. Henden) and #183 (Henden) and CBETs 2053 and 2055 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  10. Nova in Sagittarius (V5585 Sgr = N Sgr 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery is reported of Nova Sgr 2010 = V5585 Sgr by John Seach (Chatsworth Island, NSW, Australia) on 2010 Jan. 20.72 UT at approximately 8.5, using a DSLR with 50-mm f/1.4 lens and orange filter. Spectra by H. Maehara (Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University) indicates that this object is a Fe II class nova. Previously announced in IAU CBET 2140 (Daniel W. E. Green, Editor) and AAVSO Special Notice #190 (Matthew Templeton); additional information from CBET 2142 (Green) and IAU Circular 9112 (Green). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  11. On the adequacy of the fixed locations of the surface-based international network for inferring interannual ozone variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Schlesinger, B. M.; Kaveeshwar, V. G.; Angell, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of the geographical distribution and the number of the surface stations in the ozone detecting network on changes in global ozone inferred from the surface measurements is investigated by comparison with information obtained from satellite backscattered UV observations on the Nimbus 4 with nearly complete global coverage for the period 1970-1972. Results show that the geographical distribution of the stations does not properly represent different latitudes. While the number of stations in the north temperate zone appears adequate to represent monthly ozone averages to within 0.5% except during the early phase of the Northern Hemisphere spring maximum, the resultant error in the derived change in north temperature zone ozone between 1970-1972 is 0.5%. In the tropical and south temperate zones the smaller number of stations reduces precision, and the ozone averages for use in deriving seasonal variability and trends are uncertain by about 1%. However, in the south temperature zone, the average from the sample may differ as much as 5% in some months from the averages derived from the full set. It is concluded that the resulting uncertainty in the global averages is comparable in size to typical yearly changes.

  12. Nova Delphini 2013 = PNV J20233073+2046041

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-08-01

    Announces the discovery of Nova Delphini 2013 = PNV J20233073+2046041 = V339 Del by Koichi Itagaki (Teppo-cho, Yamagata, Japan) on 2013 Aug. 14.584 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude mag 6.8. Spectra by numerous professional and amateur astronomers show strong H-alpha and H-beta emission and P Cygni profile emission lines, all pointing to a pre-maximum classical nova. For details on spectra, see CBET 3628 and the IAU Circular to be announced shortly. Postings to the AAVSO Spectroscopy Forum (http://www.aavso.org/forums/variable-star-observing/spectroscopy) also contain information on spectra, as well as observing and reporting instructions for spectroscopists. Charts for Nova Del 2013 may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (VSP) at http://www.aavso.org/vsp. We have created a binocular sequence for this nova that can be plotted using the Binocular Chart option on VSP. Over 750 observations have been submitted to the AAVSO International Database since the nova's discovery two days ago; the most recent observations show Nova Del 2013 has brightened to visual magnitude 4.4. Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Announced on IAU CBAT CBET 3628 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Nova Del 2013 was designated PNV J20233073+2046041 when it was posted on the CBAT TOCP webpage. See full Alert Notice for more details, observations, and links to images.

  13. Genetic variability in Melipona quinquefasciata (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini) from northeastern Brazil determined using the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1).

    PubMed

    Pereira, J O P; Freitas, B M; Jorge, D M M; Torres, D C; Soares, C E A; Grangeiro, T B

    2009-01-01

    Melipona quinquefasciata is a ground-nesting South American stingless bee whose geographic distribution was believed to comprise only the central and southern states of Brazil. We obtained partial sequences (about 500-570 bp) of first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) nuclear ribosomal DNA from Melipona specimens putatively identified as M. quinquefasciata collected from different localities in northeastern Brazil. To confirm the taxonomic identity of the northeastern samples, specimens from the state of Goiás (Central region of Brazil) were included for comparison. All sequences were deposited in GenBank (accession numbers EU073751-EU073759). The mean nucleotide divergence (excluding sites with insertions/deletions) in the ITS1 sequences was only 1.4%, ranging from 0 to 4.1%. When the sites with insertions/deletions were also taken into account, sequence divergences varied from 0 to 5.3%. In all pairwise comparisons, the ITS1 sequence from the specimens collected in Goiás was most divergent compared to the ITS1 sequences of the bees from the other locations. However, neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis showed that all ITS1 sequences from northeastern specimens along with the sample of Goiás were resolved in a single clade with a bootstrap support of 100%. The ITS1 sequencing data thus support the occurrence of M. quinquefasciata in northeast Brazil. PMID:19554762

  14. Mental Health and Its Associated Variables Among International Students at a Japanese University: With Special Reference to Their Financial Status.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kumi; Eskandarieh, Sharareh; Obayashi, Yoshihide; Arai, Asuna; Tamashiro, Hiko

    2015-12-01

    We attempted to identify the risk factors that may affect mental health status of the international students and we conducted the survey using a self-administered questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. The students were divided into two groups; (1) those who received scholarships and (2) those who didn't since we thought the division represented practical patterns of their financial status. The associations of socio-demographic characteristics with depressive symptoms were examined. Of the 726 students, 480 (66.1%) responded and 207 (43.1%) had depressive symptoms. The logistic regression analysis indicated that quality of sleep, amount of exercise, and housing conditions--but not financial status--were statistically associated with the risk of developing depressive symptoms. Although the inversion of the cause and effect is yet to be ascertained, the students who are unsatisfied with their housing conditions, quality of sleep and less exercise need more attention. PMID:25225076

  15. Nocturnal sleep-related variables from 24-h free-living waist-worn accelerometry: International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tudor-Locke, C; Mire, E F; Barreira, T V; Schuna, J M; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kurpad, A; Kuriyan, R; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Sarmiento, O L; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Zhao, P; Church, T S; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the process of identifying and defining nocturnal sleep-related variables (for example, movement/non-movement indicators of sleep efficiency, waking episodes, midpoint and so on) using the unique 24-h waist-worn free-living accelerometer data collected in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE). Methods: Seven consecutive days of 24-h waist-worn accelerometer (GT3X+, ActiGraph LLC) data were collected from over 500 children at each site. An expert subgroup of the research team with accelerometry expertize, frontline data collectors and data managers met on several occasions to categorize and operationally define nocturnal accelerometer signal data patterns. The iterative process was informed by the raw data drawn from a sub set of the US data, and culminated in a refined and replicable delineated definition for each identified nocturnal sleep-related variable. Ultimately based on 6318 participants from all 12 ISCOLE sites with valid total sleep episode time (TSET), we report average clock times for nocturnal sleep onset, offset and midpoint in addition to sleep period time, TSET and restful sleep efficiency (among other derived variables). Results: Nocturnal sleep onset occurred at 2218 hours and nocturnal sleep offset at 0707 hours. The mean midpoint was 0243 hours. The sleep period time of 529.6 min (8.8 h) was typically accumulated in a single episode, making the average TSET very similar in duration (529.0 min). The mean restful sleep efficiency ranged from 86.8% (based on absolute non-movement of 0 counts per minute) to 96.0% (based on relative non-movement of <100 counts per minute). Conclusions: These variables extend the potential of field-based 24-h waist-worn accelerometry to distinguish and categorize the underlying robust patterns of movement/non-movement signals conveying magnitude, duration, frequency and periodicity during the nocturnal sleep period. PMID:27152185

  16. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in November/December 2012: Comparison of Observations by Instruments on the International Space Station and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G.; Schmidtke, G.; Erhardt, C.; Nikutowski, B.; Shapiro, A. I.; Bolduc, C.; Lean, J.; Krivova, N.; Charbonneau, P.; Cessateur, G.; Haberreiter, M.; Melo, S.; Delouille, V.; Mampaey, B.; Yeo, K. L.; Schmutz, W.

    2014-12-01

    Onboard the International Space Station (ISS), two instruments are observing the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) at wavelengths from 16 to 2900 nm. Although the ISS platform orientation generally precludes pointing at the Sun more than 10 - 14 days per month, in November/December 2012 a continuous period of measurements was obtained by implementing an ISS `bridging' maneuver. This enabled observations to be made of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) during a complete solar rotation. We present these measurements, which quantify the impact of active regions on SSI, and compare them with data simultaneously gathered from other platforms, and with models of spectral irradiance variability. Our analysis demonstrates that the instruments onboard the ISS have the capability to measure SSI variations consistent with other instruments in space. A comparison among all available SSI measurements during November-December 2012 in absolute units with reconstructions using solar proxies and observed solar activity features is presented and discussed in terms of accuracy.

  17. Heat transfer phase change paint test (OH-42) of a Rockwell International SSV orbiter in the NASA/LRC Mach 8 variable density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R.; Creel, T. R., Jr.; Lawing, P.; Quan, M.; Dye, W.; Cummings, J.; Gorowitz, H.; Craig, C.; Rich, G.

    1973-01-01

    Phase change paint tests of a Rockwell International .00593-scale space shuttle orbiter were conducted in the Langley Research Center's Variable Density Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to determine the effects of various wing/underbody configurations on the aerodynamic heating rates and boundary layer transition during simulated entry conditions. Several models were constructed. Each varied from the other in either wing cuff radius, airfoil thickness, or wing-fuselage underbody blending. Two ventral fins were glued to the fuselage underside of one model to test the interference heating effects. Simulated Mach 8 entry data were obtained for each configuration at angles of attack ranging from 25 to 40 deg, and a Reynolds number variation of one million to eight million. Elevon, bodyflap, and rudder flare deflections were tested. Oil flow visualization and Schlieren photographs were obtained to aid in reducing the phase change paint data as well as to observe the flow patterns peculiar to each configuration.

  18. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  19. Optical Variability of X-Ray Bright Southern Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, C.; Sokoloski, J.

    2004-12-01

    We performed weekly B- and V-band observations of four X-ray bright southern symbiotic binary stars -- CD-43 14304, Hen 3-1591, LMC S63, and SMC LN 358 -- using the 1.3-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We began optical monitoring in August 2003 for two of the objects (LMC S63 and SMC LN 358) and in January 2004 for the other two objects (CD-43 14304 and Hen 3-1591). None of the four survey objects experienced a major outburst during the monitoring period. We did, however, detect small-amplitude ( 0.1 mag) optical variability on a time scale of tens of days, for the first time, in each of the four systems. Both the structure and amplitude of the variations are roughly the same in the B band and V band in all of the symbiotics in our sample except one (LMC S63), and is most consistent with the idea that the week-time-scale variability originates with the hot component (most likely an accreting white dwarf) rather than the red giant. We compare the variability properties of our small sample of X-ray-bright symbiotic stars to those of samples of both X-ray-bright and X-ray-dim symbiotic stars from the database of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).

  20. Final Technical Report on Scaling Models of the Internal Variability of Clouds DoE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63773

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Kristinka

    2008-04-24

    The purpose of this proposal is to gain a better understanding of the space-time correlations of atmospheric fluctuations in clouds through application of methods from statistical physics to high resolution, continuous data sets of cloud observations available at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program archive. In this report we present the accomplishments achieved during the four year period. Starting with the most recent one, we report on two break-throughs in our research that make the fourth year of the project exceptionally successful and markedly outperforming the objectives. The first break-through is on characterization of the structure of cirrus radiative properties at large, intermediate and small, generating cells scales by applying the Fokker-Planck equation method and other methods to ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations collected at the Southern Great Plains site. The second break-through is that we show that different characterizations of the cirrus radiative properties are obtained for different synoptic scale environments. We outline a stochastic approach to investigate the internal structure of radiative properties of cirrus clouds based on empirical modeling and draw conclusions about cirrus dynamical properties in the context of the synoptic environment. Results on the structure of cirrus dynamical properties are consistent with the structure of cirrus based on aircraft in situ measurements, with results from ground-based Raman lidar, and with results from model studies. These achievements would not have been possible without the accomplishments from the previous years on a number of problems that involve application of methods of analysis such as the Fokker-Planck equation approach, Tsallis nonextensive statistical mechanics, detrended fluctuation analysis, and others. These include stochastic analysis of neutrally stratified cirrus layers, internal variability and turbulence in cirrus, dynamical model and

  1. Predicted no effect concentration derivation as a significant source of variability in environmental hazard assessments of chemicals in aquatic systems: an international analysis.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Thorsten; Diamond, Jerry; Dobson, Stuart; Howe, Paul; Kielhorn, Janet; Koennecker, Gustav; Lee-Steere, Chris; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Schneider, Uwe; Sugaya, Yoshio; Taylor, Ken; Dam, Rick Van; Stauber, Jenny L

    2014-01-01

    Environmental hazard assessments for chemicals are carried out to define an environmentally "safe" level at which, theoretically, the chemical will not negatively affect any exposed biota. Despite this common goal, the methodologies in use are very diverse across different countries and jurisdictions. This becomes particularly obvious when international scientists work together on documents with global scope, e.g., in the World Health Organization (WHO) International Program on Chemical Safety. In this article, we present a study that describes the extent of such variability and analyze the reasons that lead to different outcomes in deriving a "safe level" (termed the predicted no effect concentration [PNEC] throughout this article). For this purpose, we chose 5 chemicals to represent well-known substances for which sufficient high-quality aquatic effects data were available: ethylene glycol, trichloroethylene, nonylphenol, hexachlorobenzene, and copper (Cu). From these data, 2 data sets for each chemical were compiled: the full data set, that contained all information from selected peer-review sources, and the base data set, a subsample of the full set simulating limited data. Scientists from the European Union (EU), United States, Canada, Japan, and Australia independently carried out hazard assessments for each of these chemicals using the same data sets. Their reasoning for key study selection, use of assessment factors, or use of probabilistic methods was comprehensively documented. The observed variation in the PNECs for all chemicals was up to 3 orders of magnitude, and this was not simply due to obvious factors such as the size of the data set or the methodology used. Rather, this was due to individual decisions of the assessors within the scope of the methodology used, especially key study selection, acute versus chronic definitions, and size of assessment factors. Awareness of these factors, together with transparency of the decision-making process, would

  2. 20 MHz Forward-imaging Single-element Beam Steering with an Internal Rotating Variable-Angle Reflecting Surface: Wire phantom and Ex vivo pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, David T.; Li, Xiang; Park, Jinhyoung; Chen, Ruimin; Chabok, Hamid; Barukh, Arthur; Zhou, Qifa; Elgazery, Mahmoud; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Feasibility is demonstrated for a forward-imaging beam steering system involving a single-element 20 MHz angled-face acoustic transducer combined with an internal rotating variable-angle reflecting surface (VARS). Rotation of the VARS structure, for a fixed position of the transducer, generates a 2-D angular sector scan. If these VARS revolutions were to be accompanied by successive rotations of the single-element transducer, 3-D imaging would be achieved. In the design of this device, a single-element 20 MHz PMN-PT press-focused angled-face transducer is focused on the circle of midpoints of a micro-machined VARS within the distal end of an endoscope. The 2-D imaging system was tested in water bath experiments with phantom wire structures at a depth of 10 mm, and exhibited an axial resolution of 66 μm and a lateral resolution of 520 μm. Chirp coded excitation was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, and to increase the depth of penetration. Images of an ex vivo cow eye were obtained. This VARS-based approach offers a novel forward-looking beam-steering method, which could be useful in intra-cavity imaging. PMID:23122968

  3. 20 MHz forward-imaging single-element beam steering with an internal rotating variable-angle reflecting surface: Wire phantom and ex vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    Raphael, David T; Li, Xiang; Park, Jinhyoung; Chen, Ruimin; Chabok, Hamid; Barukh, Arthur; Zhou, Qifa; Elgazery, Mahmoud; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-02-01

    Feasibility is demonstrated for a forward-imaging beam steering system involving a single-element 20MHz angled-face acoustic transducer combined with an internal rotating variable-angle reflecting surface (VARS). Rotation of the VARS structure, for a fixed position of the transducer, generates a 2-D angular sector scan. If these VARS revolutions were to be accompanied by successive rotations of the single-element transducer, 3-D imaging would be achieved. In the design of this device, a single-element 20MHz PMN-PT press-focused angled-face transducer is focused on the circle of midpoints of a micro-machined VARS within the distal end of an endoscope. The 2-D imaging system was tested in water bath experiments with phantom wire structures at a depth of 10mm, and exhibited an axial resolution of 66μm and a lateral resolution of 520μm. Chirp coded excitation was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, and to increase the depth of penetration. Images of an ex vivo cow eye were obtained. This VARS-based approach offers a novel forward-looking beam-steering method, which could be useful in intra-cavity imaging. PMID:23122968

  4. Superorbital variability of the X-ray flux in the Be-donor binaries SXP 138, GX-304, and γ Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashkina, A. A.; Abolmasov, P. K.; Biryukov, A. V.; Shakura, N. I.

    2015-06-01

    RXTE observations of the X-ray binary systems SXP 138, GX-304, and γ Cas in 1997-2011 have shown for the first time that these objects (X-ray binaries with Be donors) display X-ray flux variations on timescales of ˜1000 days. This timescale is about 10 times longer than their orbital periods, and is comparable to the total time of the observations. The observed variations are apparently not strictly periodic and represent stochastic variability, as is characteristic of such systems in the optical. γ Cas is considered as an example. The series of optical observations of this system available in the AAVSO database covers 78 years, and is much longer than the timescale of the variability studied. Our analysis of this series has shown that γ Cas variability on a timescale of tens of years is predominantly stochastic with a power-law spectrum.

  5. A Multi-Model Assessment for the 2006 and 2010 Simulations under the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase 2 over North America: Part II. Evaluation of Column Variable Predictions Using Satellite Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the context of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative phase 2 (AQMEII2) project, this part II paper performs a multi-model assessment of major column abundances of gases, radiation, aerosol, and cloud variables for 2006 and 2010 simulations with three on...

  6. The Intersection of Environmental Variability, Policy, and Human Values: International Treaties, Yukon River Salmon, and Food Security in a Changing Arctic (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, S.; Loring, P. A.; Murray, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    2009 was a particularly devastating year for rural communities of the Yukon River in Alaska. For a number of reasons, including annual variability in Chinook and Chum salmon runs, imperfect monitoring and information, “best practices” management decisions by regulatory agencies, and international treaty obligations related to conservation and total allowable catch allocation, the smokehouses and freezers of many Alaska Native families, particularly those in up-river communities in the Yukon Flats region, are empty; a problem that has prompted Alaska’s Governor Sean Parnell to ask the US Federal Government to declare a disaster. However, depending on whom you ask, this year’s management of these resources, which provide food security and enable self-reliance in rural communities, may be evaluated as a failure or as a success. How can we reconcile an institutional assessment that claims success as defined in terms of internationally-agreed upon conservation and escapement goals, with the negative economic and health impacts on communities? We use this case to illustrate how the whole Yukon River watershed and drainage, including Alaska and Canada, provides an elegant, geographic context for the discussion and analysis of the human dimensions of environmental change and regional sustainability. Policymakers have arguably gone to great lengths to reconcile competing ‘uses’ of the Yukon River, including commercial and subsistence uses as well as conservation goals, but while managers continue to strive to be ‘adaptive learners’ in their approach to balancing these goals, the impacts on rural communities are immediate and cumulative, synergistic, temporally and spatially scaled, and directly related to rural livelihoods, community health, well-being and sustainability. The cost of this ‘adaptive’ process may be too high, both for the ecosystem and for the people who live there. Are we asking too much of the Yukon River? Are we asking too much of the

  7. Impact of preparation method and variables on the internal structure, morphology, and presence of liposomes in phytantriol-Pluronic(®) F127 cubosomes.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Seyedeh Parinaz; Ribeiro, Iris Renata; Boyd, Ben J; Loh, Watson

    2016-09-01

    The formation of significant proportions of liposomes during the preparation of dispersed cubic phase particles presents a problem in trying to understanding cubosome behavior with a view to use in applications such as drug delivery. In this study, the variables impacting on liposome formation during cubosome production were interrogated. Bottom-up (BU) and top-down (TD) approaches were employed to prepare submicron sized liquid crystalline dispersions (cubosomes) of phytantriol in water with varying amounts of Pluronic(®)F127 (F127) as a stabilizer. In the BU approach, ethanol was used as a hydrotrope and was later removed using a rotary evaporator, whereas in the TD approach the bulk liquid gel was dispersed using ultrasonication. We aimed at finding the optimum ratio of phytantriol-to-F127 resulting in stable, liposome-free dispersions, whether this depends on the preparation method and the resulting morphology of the particles. The average particle size and zeta potential of the samples were measured using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) images showed a substantial number of liposomes in addition to cubosomes in the dispersion containing 4-1 (w/w) phytantriol-to-F127 prepared by the BU approach compared to very low liposome content with the TD approach. The effects of the amount of F127 in both approaches, amount of ethanol on the BU method and temperature on the TD method were investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The cubosomes displayed cubic double-diamond (Pn3m) internal structure with a lattice parameter of approximately 6nm. In summary using the TD approach, with 4:1 phytantriol:F127 provided stable cubosome dispersion with minimal liposome co-existence. PMID:27315333

  8. The Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Field Variable Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flewelling, Heather

    2016-01-01

    We present the first Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Field Variable Star Catalog (PS1-MDF-VSC). The Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) telescope is a 1.8 meter survey telescope with a 1.4 Gigapixel camera, located in Haleakala, Hawaii. The Medium Deep survey, which consists of 10 fields located uniformly across the sky, totaling 70 square degrees, is observed each night, in 2-3 filters per field, with 8 exposures per filter, resulting in 3000-4000 data points per star over a time span of 3.5 years. To find the variables, we select objects with > 200 detections, and remove those flagged as saturated. No other cuts are used. There are approximately 2.4 million objects that fit this criteria, with magnitudes between 13th and 24th. These objects are then passed through a lomb-scargle fitting routine to determine periodicity. After a periodicity cut, the candidates are classified by eye into different types of variable stars. We have identified several thousand periodic variable stars, with periods ranging between a few minutes to a few days. We compare our findings to the variable star catalogs within Vizier and AAVSO. In particular, for field MD02, we recover all the variables that are faint in Vizier, and we find good agreement with the periods reported in Vizier.

  9. Eclipse of epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2009-07-01

    The bright, long-period, eclipsing binary star epsilon Aurigae is predicted to begin its next eclipse late July or early August of 2009. Epsilon Aurigae is now past solar conjunction and has reappeared as a morning object. All observers -- both visual and instrumental -- are encouraged to contribute observations of the eclipse during the next two years, beginning immediately for morning observers. Observations are urgently requested right now because it is less likely to be observed in the morning, and the eclipse will begin within the next month. The AAVSO is participating in a global campaign to record this eclipse as part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 celebrations, organized by the Citizen Sky project (http://www.citizensky.org). For experienced visual observers, please observe this star on a weekly basis, using charts available via VSP from the AAVSO website. For novice visual observers, we recommend participating in this observing program by following the Citizen Sky 10-Star tutorial program, which provides a simple training experience in variable star observing. Photoelectric observers belonging to the AAVSO PEP-V program may submit data as usual via the WebObs feature of the AAVSO website Blue&Gold section. Photoelectric observers may also contribute reduced observations in all filters (including infrared J- and H-bands) directly to the AAVSO via WebObs. Observers using wide-field CCD and DSLR systems are also encouraged to participate; avoid saturating the star. For those with narrower-field systems (D < 2 degrees), we recommend taking a large number (10-100) of very short exposures and then stacking the resulting images. Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Aaron Price is coordinating Citizen Sky for the AAVSO, and Dr. Robert Stencel and Jeffrey Hopkins are co-leading the precision photometry efforts.

  10. V556 Serpentis = Nova Ser 2013 = PNV J18090346-1112345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-12-01

    Announces the discovery of V556 Serpentis = Nova Ser 2013 = PNV J18090346-1112345 by Koichi Itagaki (Teppo-cho, Yamagata, Japan) at unfiltered CCD magnitude mag 12.3 on 2013 Nov. 24.384 UT. Spectra obtained by Munari and Valisa on Nov. 25.792 UT and by Itoh et al. on Nov. 25.37 show the variable to be a reddened classical nova past maximum. Spectroscopy details may be found in CBET 3724. Announced on IAU CBAT Central Bureau Electronic Telegram 3724 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.) and IAU Circular 9264 (Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  11. AH Her Observing Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-05-01

    Dr. Juan Echevarria (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) and colleagues request AAVSO assistance in a campaign on the Z Cam-type cataclysmic variable AH Her being carried out 2013 May 29 - June 18. They will be making photometric and spectroscopic observations of AH Her using the 2.1m and 0.84m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Observatory (SPM). Their goal is to carry out a radial velocity study of the system components using modern detectors; no study of AH Her has been made since the one by Horne, Wade, and Szkody in 1980-1981 (1986MNRAS.219..791H). Photometry and spectroscopy are requested. AH Her, for decades a reasonably "regular" Z Cam system, began exhibiting significantly anomalous behavior in ~2007. Since then it has experienced brief periods of fairly typical behavior interspersed with more anomalous intervals, including some unprecedented behavior. Most recently, it has returned to a more normal pattern of outbursts shape-wise but it is not back to its normal amplitude or frequency. AAVSO data will be essential for correlation in order to determine the precise time(s) of minimum occurring during the campaign. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  12. Time series analysis of the cataclysmic variable V1101 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Alexander C.

    This work reports on the application of various time series analysis techniques to a two month portion of the light curve of the cataclysmic variable V1101 Aquilae. The system is a Z Cam type dwarf nova with an orbital period of 4.089 hours and an active outburst cycle of 15.15 days due to a high mass transfer rate. The system's light curve also displays higher frequency variations, known as negative sumperhums, with a period of 3.891 hours and a period deficit of --5.1%. The amplitude of the negative superhumps varies as an inverse function of system brightness, with an amplitude of 0.70358 during outburst and 0.97718 during quiescence (relative flux units). These variations are believed to be caused by the contrast between the accretion disk and the bright spot. An O--?C diagram was constructed and reveals the system's evolution. In general, during the rise to outburst, the disk moment of inertia decreases as mass is lost from the disk, causing the precession period of the tilted disk to increase and with it the negative superhump period. The decline of outburst is associated with the opposite effects. While no standstills were observed in this data, they are present in the AAVSO data and the results agree with the conditions for Z Cam stars.

  13. Examination of Science Achievement in the 8th Grade Level in Turkey in Terms of National and International Exams Depending upon Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atalmis, Erkan H.; Avgin, Sakine S.; Demir, Papatya; Yildirim, Bilal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of demographic characteristics of students in Turkey upon their performance in TIMSS, an international assessment exam and Secondary Education Transition Examination which is a national exam (OGS). One of the fields of sciences, biology is taken into account as student performance. As a result…

  14. Does the School Performance Variable Used in the International Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) Study Reflect Students' School Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder-Puig, Rosemarie; Griebler, Robert; Samdal, Oddrun; King, Matthew A.; Freeman, John; Duer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Given the pressure that educators and policy makers are under to achieve academic standards for students, understanding the relationship of academic success to various aspects of health is important. The international Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) questionnaire, being used in 41 countries with different school and…

  15. An Examination of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 Turkish Database with the Aim of Exploring the Relationship between Homework Variables and Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzeller, Cem Oktay; Akin, Ayca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the amount of time spent on homework in all subjects (HTAS), the time spent on mathematics homework (MHT), confidence in doing mathematics homework (HCM) and the mathematics achievement of students in Turkey, based on data from the programme for international student assessment…

  16. Technical Report and User's Guide for the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA): 2009 Data Files and Database with U.S. Specific Variables. NCES 2011-025

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopstock, Paul J.; Pelczar, Marisa P.

    2011-01-01

    This technical report and user's guide is designed to provide researchers with an overview of the design and implementation of the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), as well as with information on how to access the PISA 2009 data. This information is meant to supplement that presented in Organization for Economic Cooperation…

  17. Variability of butterfat content in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.): combination and correlation with other seed-derived traits at the International Cocoa Genebank, Trinidad

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cocoa butterfat and cocoa powder are key economic products from the cacao tree (Theobroma cacao L.). In this study, 323 accessions from the International Cocoa Genebank, Trinidad were analysed for bean number (BNO), bean size as bean length x bean width (BLW), bean mass (BM), bean mass per fruit (BM...

  18. Nova Scorpii 2011 = PNV J16551100-3838120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-06-01

    Announces the discovery of Nova Scorpii 2011 = PNV J16551100-3838120 by John Seach (Chatsworth Island, NSW, Australia) on 2011 June 1.40 UT at magnitude 9.5 (DSLR + orange filter). Spectra by Bernard Heathcote (South Yarra, Vic, Australia) on Jun 2.4896 UT, A. Arai, T. Kajikawa, and M. Nagashima (Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan) on 2011 June 2.68 UT, and Masayuki Yamanaka and Ryosuke Itoh (Hiroshima University, Japan) on Jun 2 UT indicate a highly-reddened classical nova. Initially reported to the AAVSO by Seach and announced in AAVSO Special Notice #240 (Arne Henden) and IAU CBET 2735 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). The object was designated PNV J18102135-2305306 when posted on the Central Bureau's Transient Objects Confirmation Page (TOCP) webpage. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details, observations, and links to images. [Nova Sco 2011 subsequently assigned the name V1312 Sco

  19. Nova Centauri 2013 = PNV J13544700-5909080

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-12-01

    Announces the discovery of V1369 Cen = Nova Cen 2013 = PNV J13544700-5909080 by John Seach (Chatsworth Island, NSW, Australia) at unfiltered magnitude 5.5 on 2013 December 02.692 UT. Low-resolution spectra obtained by Locke on Dec. 03.3776 UT and by Kaufman on Dec. 03.621 UT show strong Ha and Hb emission lines, indicating the object is a nova. Announced on IAU CBAT Central Bureau Electronic Telegram 3732 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  20. Nova Sco 2013 = PNV J17335943-3606216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-06-01

    Announcement of discovery of Nova Sco 2013 = PNV J17335943-3606216 by Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan) at unfiltered CCD magnitude 11.1 on 2013 June 03.6146 UT. Coordinates: R.A. = 17 33 59.44, Decl.= -36 06 20.7 (2000.0). Confirmed as nova (likely highly reddened) via spectra by C. Buil (Toulouse, France) taken on 2013 June 3.960 UT and by T. Bohlsen (Armidale, NSW, Australia) on 2013 June 4. Announced on IAU CBET 3542 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  1. A stable isotope-labeled internal standard is essential for correcting for the interindividual variability in the recovery of lapatinib from cancer patient plasma in quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianmei; Wiegand, Richard; LoRusso, Patricia; Li, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The development and validation of a LC-MS/MS method is often performed using pooled human plasma, which may fail to account for variations in interindividual matrices. Since calibrator standards and quality control samples are routinely prepared in pooled human plasma, variations in the extraction recovery and/or matrix effect between pooled plasma and individual patient plasma can cause erroneous measurements. Using both pooled human plasma as well as individual healthy donor and cancer patient plasma samples, we evaluated the analytical performance of two classes of internal standards (i.e., non-isotope-labeled and isotope-labeled) in the quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of lapatinib. After exhaustive extraction with organic solvent, the recovery of lapatinib, a highly plasma protein-bound drug, varied up to 2.4-fold (range, 29 – 70%) in 6 different donors of plasma and varied up to 3.5-fold (range, 16 – 56%) in the pretreatment plasma samples from 6 cancer patients. No apparent matrix effects were observed for lapatinib in both pooled and individual donor or patient plasma samples. The calibration curve range was 5 – 5000 ng/ml of lapatinib in plasma. Both the non-isotope-labeled (zileuton) and isotope-labeled (lapatinib-d3) internal standard methods showed acceptable specificity, accuracy (within 100 ± 10%), and precision (< 11%) in the determination of lapatinib in pooled human plasma. Nevertheless, only the isotope-labeled internal standard could correct for the interindividual variability in the recovery of lapatinib from patient plasma samples. As inter- and intra-patient matrix variability is commonly presented in the clinical setting, this study provides an example underscoring the importance of using a stable isotope-labeled internal standard in quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis for therapeutic drug monitoring or pharmacokinetic evaluation. PMID:24189203

  2. Fisetin yeast-based bio-capsules via osmoporation: effects of process variables on the encapsulation efficiency and internalized fisetin content.

    PubMed

    de Câmara, Antonio Anchieta; Dupont, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Gervais, Patrick; Rosenthal, Amauri; Correia, Roberta Targino Pinto; Pedrini, Márcia Regina da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Osmoporation is an innovative method that can be used with food-grade yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as natural encapsulating matrices. This technique overcomes barriers that difficult encapsulation and enables the internalization of fragile bioactive molecules such as fisetin into yeasts. In the present study, we assessed the effects of concentration, osmotic pressure, and temperature on the encapsulation efficiency (EE) and internalized fisetin content (IF). Two different quantification strategies were investigated: direct extraction (DE) without cell washing or freeze-drying steps and indirect extraction (IE) performed after washings with ethanol and freeze-drying. Our results showed that osmoporation improved EE (33 %) and IF (1.199 mg). The best experimental conditions were found by using DE. High-resolution images showed that the yeast cell envelope was preserved during osmoporation at 30 MPa and 84 % of yeast cells remained viable after treatment. Washing cells with organic solvent led to decreased EE (0.65 %) and IF (0.023 mg). This was probably due to either damages caused to yeast cell envelope or fisetin dragged out of cell. Overall, the results demonstrated the adequacy and relevant biotechnological potential of yeasts as encapsulating matrices for hydrophobic compounds. This fresh biotechnological approach has proven to be a promising tool for the production of bioactive-rich food products. PMID:26980099

  3. Citizen Science for the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron; De Pree, C.; Fortson, L.; French, R.; Hartman, M.; Jacoby, S.; Raddick, J.; Stencel, R.

    2009-01-01

    The IYA 2009 working group on Research Experiences for Students, Teachers, and Citizen-Scientists is planning a multi-year project centering on the naked eye variable star Epsilon Aurigae. It begins with a "Ten Star Training Program" of stars easy to observe from suburban locations with the naked eye, which was launched in late 2008. Participants will be trained both in observing and also in basic data analysis of photometric datasets (light curve and period analysis). In the summer of IYA 2009, third-magnitude Eps Aur will experience its next eclipse, which occurs every 27.1 years and lasts 714 days, nearly two years! However, the program is not limited to Eps Aur and will likely include other occultation events such as monitoring mutual eclipses of satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Planning is still underway and the scope of the project is dependent upon proper funding. Results from a summer needs analysis workshop of citizen science providers will be included. Advice and offers to help are welcome. More info is at http://www.aavso.org/iya.

  4. A multi-model assessment for the 2006 and 2010 simulations under the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase 2 over North America: Part II. Evaluation of column variable predictions using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Zhang, Yang; Hogrefe, Christian; Pouliot, George; Knote, Christoph; Hodzic, Alma; San Jose, Roberto; Perez, Juan L.; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Baro, Rocio; Makar, Paul; Bennartz, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Within the context of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative Phase 2 (AQMEII2) project, this part II paper performs a multi-model assessment of major column abundances of gases, radiation, aerosol, and cloud variables for 2006 and 2010 simulations with three online-coupled air quality models over the North America using available satellite data. It also provides the first comparative assessment of the capabilities of the current generation of online-coupled models in simulating column variables. Despite the use of different model configurations and meteorological initial and boundary conditions, most simulations show comparable model performance for many variables. The evaluation results show an excellent agreement between all simulations and satellite-derived radiation variables including downward surface solar radiation, longwave radiation, and top-of-atmospheric outgoing longwave radiation, as well as precipitable water vapor with domain-average normalized mean biases (NMBs) of typically less than 5% and correlation coefficient (R) typically more than 0.9. Most simulations perform well for column-integrated abundance of CO with domain-average NMBs of -9.4% to -2.2% in 2006 and -12.1% to 4.6% in 2010 and from reasonably well to fair for column NO2, HCHO, and SO2, with domain-average NMBs of -37.7% to 2.1%, -27.3% to 59.2%, and 16.1% to 114.2% in 2006, respectively, and, 12.9% to 102.1%, -25.0% to 87.6%, -65.2% to 7.4% in 2010, respectively. R values are high for CO and NO2 typically between 0.85 and 0.9 (i.e., R2 of 0.7-0.8). Tropospheric ozone residuals are overpredicted by all simulations due to overestimates of ozone profiles from boundary conditions. Model performance for cloud-related variables is mixed and generally worse compared to gases and radiation variables. Cloud fraction (CF) is well reproduced by most simulations. Other aerosol/cloud related variables such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), cloud optical thickness, cloud liquid

  5. Obituary: Janet Akyüz Mattei, 1943-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas R.; Willson, Lee Anne

    2004-12-01

    period variables. She accelerated a ten-year project to digitize all of AAVSO's archived as well as current data, without which a century of AAVSO observations would now be nearly inaccessible. In the mid-1970s professional interest in the cataclysmic variables began to ramp up. When she received the first requests for an AAVSO visual observing campaign coordinated with observations by orbiting observatories as well as large ground based telescopes, Janet accepted the invitation as both an opportunity and a challenge. AAVSO observers responded marvelously and, coupled with Janet's astute forecasting of when cataclysmic variables were likely to brighten again, the program emerged as one of the major technical successes of her tenure. Many AAVSO members will never forget their excitement when France Córdova came to our Fall meeting in 1978 to announce to the astronomical world that X-rays from SS Cyg had been detected by HEAO-1 on the first occasion after the satellite reached orbit when AAVSO observers reported that the star was brightening to a maximum. It was a moment of tremendous pride for everyone, most of all for Janet. It was a success that was repeated frequently in over six hundred subsequent coordinated observing runs with various satellites. This success greatly increased the impact of AAVSO on current astronomical research, enhanced its reputation, and also provided a more immediate thrill for the observers than the ongoing commitment to monitor slowly varying stars. The late 1970s and early 1980s were a period of substantial inflation in our nation's economy. Furthermore, staff turnover slowed progress with the data processing work, while observations coming to AAVSO from international variable star organizations and independent observers, especially from behind the iron curtain, were increasing rapidly. Faced with rising costs at the same time additional staff was needed to pursue the data processing problems, Janet reacted characteristically: she began

  6. Monitoring requested for developing planetary systems dust production study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2015-03-01

    Dr. George Rieke (University of Arizona) and colleagues have requested AAVSO assistance in monitoring four stars with developing planetary systems: RZ Psc, HD 15407A, V488 Per, and HD 23514. This campaign is similar to the one conducted in 2013 (see AAVSO Alert Notice 482). Dr. Rieke writes: "We have obtained 130 hours of time on the Spitzer Space Telescope to continue monitoring planetary debris disks for variability. We are asking for help from AAVSO for this program. Debris disks [are] systems of dust and particles associated with planetary systems...There are about a dozen planetary systems in which there is evidence that massive collisions are occurring right now, collisions that are building planets in much the same way that a large body added most of its mass to that of the Earth and created the Moon as a byproduct when the Solar System was young...A key part of our program is to obtain optical photometry of the same stars that we are observing in the infrared under the Spitzer program. The optical data are needed to verify that any changes we see in the infrared are not just driven by changes in the brightness of the star, but are truly due to changes in the structure or dust content of the debris disk. AAVSO observers provided this support for our previous program, as summarized in a paper [in preparation]; all of those who contributed data are co-authors of the paper. We request AAVSO to take similar observations for the new program...", which begins immediately and runs in two segments, now through May and September through December [target information and satellite schedule in full Alert Notice 511]. Observations in V are requested, with a S/N of about 100 so that the accuracy will be 1-2%. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for schedule and other details.

  7. Discipline and Internalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Martin L.

    1994-01-01

    Although Grusec and Goodnow make interesting suggestions concerning discipline variables that may affect internalization, their ideas are not integrated into a theory, and their definition of internalization is limited because parent-child similarity may result from children's attributing their values to parents. A theory linking discipline and…

  8. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proposed contribution of glucose variability to the development of the complications of diabetes beyond that of glycemic exposure is supported by reports that oxidative stress, the putative mediator of such complications, is greater for intermittent as opposed to sustained hyperglycemia. Variability of glycemia in ambulatory conditions defined as the deviation from steady state is a phenomenon of normal physiology. Comprehensive recording of glycemia is required for the generation of any measurement of glucose variability. To avoid distortion of variability to that of glycemic exposure, its calculation should be devoid of a time component. PMID:23613565

  9. Transformed photometry of young stars in Cha requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Peter Abraham (Konkoly Observatory, Budapest, Hungary) requested the assistance of AAVSO observers in monitoring eight young stars in Chamaeleon in support of photometry he and his colleagues will be obtaining with the VLT/ISAAC (infrared) and Herschel Space Observatory (far-infrared) during January-February 2013. The targets are CR Cha, CT Cha, HP Cha (Glass I), VW Cha, VZ Cha, WW CHa, WX Cha, XX Cha. Calibrated, transformed VRI photometry is requested to precisely monitor changes in the optical brightness and colors of these objects. Calibration and transformation of the photometry is crucial - if all of the data are not on the same system and particularly if the colors are not transformed, it will be extremely difficult to correlate the data usefully. Previous observations indicate that the stars are highly variable. Brightness changes can be expected from a few tenths of a magnitude to up to 1-2 magnitudes on a timescale of a few days to a few weeks. Observers are asked to try to obtain one to two sets of VRI images per night. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  10. Spectroscopy and photometry campaign on three bright Wolf Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-06-01

    Dr. Noel Richardson (Universite de Montreal) and colleagues have invited AAVSO observers to participate in an international professional-amateur spectroscopy and photometry campaign on the Wof Rayet stars WR 134, WR 135, and WR 137 (HD 191765, HD 192103, and HD 192641). The campaign has begun and runs through September 17, 2013. The purpose of the campaign is to study clumping aspects of the strong winds and changes present in large structures in the stellar winds in these WR stars. Spectroscopy and UBVRI time-series observations are requested. Supplemental targets to be observed if time permits are V905 Sco (HD 160529) and V4375 Sgr (HD 316285). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Photometry should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Details of the campaign are given at: http://www.stsci.de/wr134/index.htm. Instructions for sending spectroscopy data to Dr. Richardson are given at http! ://www.stsci.de/wr134/pdf/data_transfer.pdf.

  11. Data Evolution in VSX: Making a Good Thing Better

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, S.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) A review of the current status of the AAVSO International Variable Star Index (VSX) is presented. Starting with an heterogeneous set of catalogs automatically imported, the data included in VSX have been constantly evolving and the role of observers contributing their new discoveries or revising known variable stars is growing more important each day. Examples are given of the improvements made in several aspects of star data such as identification, classification, elimination of duplicate entries, and updates.

  12. Variable Stars and Constant Commitments: The Stellar Career of Dorrit Hoffleit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2011-05-01

    Astronomer, educator, and science historian Dorrit Hoffleit (1907-2007) was widely respected by the amateur and professional astronomical community as a mentor and an ardent supporter of independent research. Her more than 600 catalogues, books, articles, book reviews, and news columns cover myriad aspects of astronomy, from variable stars and stellar properties to meteor showers, quasars, and rocketry. She also made important contributions to the history of astronomy. Hoffleit worked at the Harvard College Observatory from 1927-1956, where she discovered over 1200 variable stars. When Director Harlow Shapley retired from Harvard, Hoffleit gave up her tenured position and moved to Yale University, where she was placed in charge of the Yale Catalog of Bright Stars. At the same time, she was offered a position as director of the Maria Mitchell Observatory on Nantucket Island in Massachusetts. Hoffleit split her dual positions into six-month stints and remained director at the Mitchell Observatory for 21 years, developing a summer research program that engaged more than 100 undergraduate students (all but three of them women) in variable star research. Up until shortly before her death, she continued to work tirelessly on selected projects, and she was in high demand as a collaborator with colleagues at Yale and elsewhere. She was especially devoted to the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) in part because it brought together amateur and professional astronomers in collaboration. She served on the organization's council for 23 years and as its president from 1961-1963. In 2002, the AAVS0 published her autobiography, Misfortunes as Blessings in Disguise, in which Hoffleit explains how she always felt blessed by the opportunities in her life, even those which initially seemed misfortunes, and above all else valued creativity, flexibility, collegiality, and intellectual freedom in her professional life.

  13. Obituary: Janet Akyüz Mattei, 1943-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Thomas R.; Willson, Lee Anne

    2004-12-01

    period variables. She accelerated a ten-year project to digitize all of AAVSO's archived as well as current data, without which a century of AAVSO observations would now be nearly inaccessible. In the mid-1970s professional interest in the cataclysmic variables began to ramp up. When she received the first requests for an AAVSO visual observing campaign coordinated with observations by orbiting observatories as well as large ground based telescopes, Janet accepted the invitation as both an opportunity and a challenge. AAVSO observers responded marvelously and, coupled with Janet's astute forecasting of when cataclysmic variables were likely to brighten again, the program emerged as one of the major technical successes of her tenure. Many AAVSO members will never forget their excitement when France Córdova came to our Fall meeting in 1978 to announce to the astronomical world that X-rays from SS Cyg had been detected by HEAO-1 on the first occasion after the satellite reached orbit when AAVSO observers reported that the star was brightening to a maximum. It was a moment of tremendous pride for everyone, most of all for Janet. It was a success that was repeated frequently in over six hundred subsequent coordinated observing runs with various satellites. This success greatly increased the impact of AAVSO on current astronomical research, enhanced its reputation, and also provided a more immediate thrill for the observers than the ongoing commitment to monitor slowly varying stars. The late 1970s and early 1980s were a period of substantial inflation in our nation's economy. Furthermore, staff turnover slowed progress with the data processing work, while observations coming to AAVSO from international variable star organizations and independent observers, especially from behind the iron curtain, were increasing rapidly. Faced with rising costs at the same time additional staff was needed to pursue the data processing problems, Janet reacted characteristically: she began

  14. Nova in Scorpius (V1311 Sco = N Sco 2010 No. 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2010-05-01

    Announcement is made of the independent discovery of N Sco 2010 No. 2 = V1311 Sco by four teams of observers: Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan) on 2010 Apr. 25.788 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.6; Hideo Nishimura (Miyawaki, Kakegawa, Shizuoka-ken, Japan) on Apr. 25.763 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.3; Tadashi Kojima (Tsumagoi, Agatsuma-gun, Gunma-ken, Japan) on Apr. 25.738 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.8; and Yukio Sakurai (Mito, Ibaraki-ken, Japan) on Apr. 25.734 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.8. Low-resolution spectra taken by H. Koberger (Vilaflor, Tenerife) and W. Vollmann (Vienna, Austria) on Apr. 27.199, and by H. Maehara (Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University, Japan) on Apr. 29.704 UT, confirm a classical nova. A low-resolution spectrum by K. Kinugasa, H. Takahashi, and O. Hashimoto (Gunma Astronomical Observatory, China) suggests a He/N nova in decline. Initially announced in CBET 2262 (D. W. E. Green, ed.) and AAVSO Special Notice #207 (Waagen), with additional information in CBET 2265 (Green) and IAU Circular 9142 (Green). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details, observations, and links to images.

  15. Supernova 2011fe in M101 (NGC 5457) = PSN J14030581+5416254

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-08-01

    The discovery is reported of Supernova 2011fe in NGC 5457 = PSN J14030581+5416254 by the Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory, Peter Nugent et al., on 2011 Aug. 24 UT at magnitude 17.2 (g-band, calibrated with respect to the USNO catalog. (Credit for an independent discovery by Mathew Marulla and Tavi Grenier was later rescinded by D. Green, Gentral Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams.) A spectrum obtained on 2011 Aug. 24 UT indicates that SN 2011fe is probably a Type Ia supernova at a very early phase. SN 2011fe was initially announced in ATEL #3581 (Peter Nugent et al.), AAVSO Special Notice #250 (Matthew Templeton), and Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBAT) Electronic Telegram 2792 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). According to Green, the object was designated PSN J14030581+5416254 when posted on the CBAT Transient Objects Confirmation Page (TOCP) webpage. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details, observations, and links to images.

  16. Monitoring of the dwarf nova U Geminorum in support of HST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-12-01

    Dr. Michael Shara (American Museum of Natural History, Columbia University) requested dense coverage of the dwarf nova U Gem in support of HST Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations scheduled now through February 20, 2013. The purpose of the AAVSO observations is twofold. First, they are to provide status information to the HST schedulers so they can be certain U Gem will not be in outburst during the observations. Second, they are to be used for correlation with and interpretation of spectra obtained by HST/COS in an effort to determine the dominant energy source in dwarf novae (and thus the physical mechanism of dwarf novae outbursts), fundamental information still not known about this class of objects (current theories do not explain all of the observational evidence). Visual observations and multicolor photometry of U Gem are requested through March 7, 2013. Calibrated UBVRcIc CCD observations are particularly requested; U-band photometry is especially valuable as HST/COS will be observing U Gem in the ultraviolet. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  17. Nova Sco 2011 No. 2 = PNV J16364440-4132340 = PNV J16364300-4132460

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-09-01

    Announcement of discovery of Nova Sco 2011 No. 2 = PNV J16364440-4132340 = PNV J16364300-4132460. Discovered independently by John Seach (Chatsworth Island, NSW, Australia, on 2011 Sep. 06.37 UT at mag=9.8 (DSLR)) and by Yuji Nakamura (Kameyama, Mie, Japan, on 2011 Sep. 06.4313 UT at mag=9.7 C (CCD)). Posted on the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams Transient Object Confirmation Page (TOCP) as PNV J16364440-4132340 (Nakamura) and PNV J16364300-4132460 (Seach); identifications consolidated in VSX under PNV J16364440-4132340. Spectra obtained by A. Arai et al. on 2011 Sep. 7.42 UT suggest a highly reddened Fe II-type classical nova. Spectra by F. Walter and J. Seron obtained Sep. 2011 8.091 UT confirm a young galactic nova; they report spectra are reminiscent of an early recurrent nova. Initially announced in AAVSO Special Notice #251 (Matthew Templeton) and IAU Central Bureau Electronic Telegram 2813 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  18. Nova Sagittarii 2014 = PNV J18250860-2236024 AND Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-02-01

    Details of discovery of Nova Sagittarii 2014 (PNV J18250860-2236024) and procedures for observing and reporting observations are announced. Discovered by Sigeru Furuyama (Tone-machi, Ibaraki-ken, Japan) andreported by S. Nakano (Sumoto, Japan) at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.7 on 2014 Jan. 26.857 UT. Coordinates: R.A. 18 25 08.60 Decl. = -22 36 02.4 (2000.0). Nova Sgr 2014 is Fe II-type classical nova past maximum, per low-resolution spectra obtained by A. Arai on 2014 Jan. 30.87 UT. Announced in IAU CBAT CBET 3802 (D. W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations. Also, an Erratum is reported. In AAVSO Alert Notice 496, Mati Morel (MMAT, Thornton, NSW, Australia) was credited with the discovery of the 1989 outburst of V745 Sco. The discoverer was William Liller (LIW, Vina del Mar, Chile), who observed V745 Sco on 1989 July 30.08 UT at magnitude 9.7 (PROBLICOM discovery using 2415 film with orange filter).

  19. Nova Sagittarii 2015 = PNV J18142514-2554343

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2015-02-01

    AAVSO Alert Notice 509 announces the discovery of Nova Sagittarii 2015 = PNV J18142514-2554343 [V5667 Sgr]. Independent discoveries were made as follows: Hideo Nishimura (Shizuoka-ken, Japan) on 2015 February 12.840 UT at DSLR magnitude 11.2, using 200-mm f/3.2 lens + digital camera; Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan) on 2015 February 12.87837 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 10.9, using a 105-mm f/4 camera lens (+SBIG STL6303E camera). Coordinates: R.A. 18 14 25.14 Dec. -25 54 34.3 (2000.0). Echelle spectra by Frederick Walter (Stony Brook University) taken on the night of 2015 February 15/16 UT near maximum light indicate that N Sgr 2015 is a classical Fe II nova. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  20. Multicolor photometry of triple system b Per requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Bob Zavala (U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff) has requested AAVSO assistance in obtaining multicolor photometry of the bright triple system b Per in order to prepare for and detect a possible eclipse of the AB components by the C component predicted for 2013 January 23. Multi-color photometric observations of 4.5V b Per are requested 2013 January 23 through February 04. Based on a revised period of 702.45 ± 0.05 days, the next time of minimum light is predicted for HJD = 2456321.35 ± 0.05 (UT 2013 January 28 20:24UT ± 1.5 hours). The eclipse may last for up to four days, so the coverage requested will provide both a baseline out-of-eclipse light curve and a multi-color eclipse light curve for analysis. Photometry is needed at the level of 0.02-0.03 magnitude or better, as the eclipse may be as deep as 0.1 magnitude. For PEP observers, V coverage, and B if possible, is requested. DSLR observers should use whatever band(s) are available to them. Finder charts may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and links.

  1. Supernova 2013dy in NGC 7250 (Lacerta) = PSN J22181760+4034096

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-07-01

    Announcement of independent discovery of Supernova 2013dy in NGC 7250 = PSN J22181760+4034096, a magnitude-17 (unfiltered CCD) Type-Ia supernova that has brightened to 13.5 (visual). Information based on IAU CBAT CBET 3588 (D. W. E. Green, ed.) and observations submitted to the AAVSO. Discovery details: discovered by Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS), reported by C. Casper et al., 2013 July 10.45 UT, 17.0 U; discovered by Kuniaki Goto (Miyoshi-shi, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan), communicated by S. Itoh, 2013 July 11.735 UT, ~16 U. Coordinates (2000.0) R.A. = 22 18 17.60, Decl.= +40 34 09.6, SN offset 2.1" west, 24.9" north from the nucleus of NGC 7250. Spectroscopy indicating Type-Ia SN one to two weeks before maximum from three sources: D. D. Balam et al. on Jul 13.31 UT; J.-J. Zhang et al. on Jul 14.75 UT; and W. Zheng et al. on Jul 11.7. Visual and photometric observations requested; data submission to the AAVSO International Database using name SN 2013dy requested. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). See full Alert Notice for more details.

  2. Monitoring of V380 Oph requested in support of HST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-08-01

    On behalf of a large Hubble Space Telescope consortium of which they are members, Dr. Joseph Patterson (Columbia University, Center for Backyard Astrophysics) and Dr. Arne Henden (AAVSO) requested observations from the amateur astronomer community in support of upcoming HST observations of the novalike VY Scl-type cataclysmic variable V380 Oph. The HST observations will likely take place in September but nightly visual observations are needed beginning immediately and continuing through at least October 2012. The astronomers plan to observe V380 Oph while it is in its current low state. Observations beginning now are needed to determine the behavior of this system at minimum and to ensure that the system is not in its high state at the time of the HST observations. V380 Oph is very faint in its low state: magnitude 17 to 19 and perhaps even fainter. Nightly snapshot observations, not time series, are requested, as is whatever technique - adding frames, lengthening exposur! es, etc. - necessary to measure the magnitude. It is not known whether V380 Oph is relatively inactive at minimum or has flares of one to two magnitudes; it is this behavior that is essential to learn in order to safely execute the HST observations. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details. NOTE: This campaign was subsequently cancelled when it was learned V830 Oph was not truly in its low state. See AAVSO Alert Notice 468 for details.

  3. Observations of AA Tau requested to schedule XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-08-01

    Dr. Hans Moritz Guenther (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) has requested nightly observations of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau in order to schedule x-ray observations with XMM-Newton that have been planned for between 2013 August 15 and September 15. The purpose of the AAVSO observations is to determine whether AA Tau is at a suitable magnitude for the satellite observations. Taurus is difficult to observe during this time period but that is exactly why AAVSO assistance is needed! AA Tau is a morning object, and also, many of the professional ground-based telescopes are offline because of the US southwest monsoon season. Since it is critical to know the brightness of AA Tau, AAVSO observations will be truly essential. Nightly visual and snapshot (not more than once per night) observations beginning now and continuing through September 20 are needed. Coverage beginning ahead of the XMM window is requested because there is a one- to two-week lead time for the target to be inserted into the telescope schedule. Continuing the nightly observations a few days beyond the end of the XMM window will give better optical context for the x-ray data. AA Tau ranges between ~12.8V and ~16.1V; since December 2011 or earlier it has been at ~14.5V. The most recent observation in the AAVSO International Database shows it at 14.779V on 2013 Feb 5 (J. Roe, Bourbon, MO). Dr. Guenther writes, "AA Tau is surrounded by a thick accretion disk which is seen nearly edge-on. For decades the light curve of AA Tau showed regular eclipsing events when the accretion funnel rotated through the line of sight. However, earlier this year J. Bouvier and his group found that this behavior changed dramatically: AA Tau now seems to be deeply absorbed all the time (V band 14.5 mag). In collaboration with this group we will perform X-ray observations of AA Tau with the XMM-Newton satellite." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plo! tter (http://www.aavso

  4. Cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, Paula; Cropper, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Recent observations of cataclysmic variables (CVs) at different wavelengths are reviewed, with a focus on their implications for theoretical models. Consideration is given to disk CVs (the flux distribution of the disk and changes during dwarf-nova outbursts), magnetic CVs (flux distributions and components), and the underlying stars. Typical data are presented in graphs, tables, and sample spectra, and it is concluded that more detailed multiwavelength observations are needed to improve models of radiative transfer and viscosity effects in accretion disks.

  5. Analysis of the Petersen Diagram of Double Mode High Amplitude delta Scuti Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furgoni, R.

    2016-06-01

    I created the Petersen diagram relative to all the Double Mode High Amplitude ? Scuti stars listed in the AAVSO's International Variable Star Index (Watson et al. 2007-2015) up to date December 29, 2015. For the first time I noticed that the ratio between the two periods P1/P0 seems in evident linear relation with the duration of the period P0, a finding never explicitly described in literature regarding this topic.

  6. On Observer Internal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    1986-06-01

    Human observers behave as if they have two sources of intrinsic variability, commonly referred to as internal noise. One component (here referred to as "constant") is independent of the external noise level but does depend on mean display luminance. The other component (referred to as "induced") is directly proportional to the external noise level and dominates when the display noise is easily visible. The induced internal noise is predicted by two models - one based on intrinsic signal parameter jitter and the other on a zone of indecision. Spectral density is the appropriate measure for internal noise.

  7. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  8. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  9. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes an improvement in a variable camshaft timing system for an internal combustion engine having intake and exhaust valves and a camshaft for each of the intake and exhaust valves, an intake sprocket and an exhaust sprocket keyed to their respective camshaft, only one of the camshafts being directly driven by an engine crankshaft, and a timing chain engaging both sprockets. The improvement comprising a single bracket carrying at least one idler sprocket engaging the timing chain, the bracket being mounted for movement to alter the timing relationship between the intake and exhaust sprockets.

  10. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Variable rate debt instruments. 1.1275-5 Section 1.1275-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1275-5 Variable rate debt instruments. (a) Applicability—(1)...

  11. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Variable rate debt instruments. 1.1275-5 Section 1.1275-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1275-5 Variable rate debt instruments....

  12. Operating Reserves and Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2011-08-01

    This report tries to first generalize the requirements of the power system as it relates to the needs of operating reserves. It also includes a survey of operating reserves and how they are managed internationally in system operations today and then how new studies and research are proposing they may be managed in the future with higher penetrations of variable generation.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of variable stars in open clusters (Zejda+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zejda, M.; Paunzen, E.; Baumann, B.; Mikulasek, Z.; Liska, J.

    2012-08-01

    The catalogue of variable stars in open clusters were prepared by cross-matching of Variable Stars Index (http://www.aavso.org/vsx) version Apr 29, 2012 (available online, Cat. B/vsx) against the version 3.1. catalogue of open clusters DAML02 (Dias et al. 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl) available on the website http://www.astro.iag.usp.br/~wilton. The open clusters were divided into two categories according to their size, where the limiting diameter was 60 arcmin. The list of all suspected variables and variable stars located within the fields of open clusters up to two times of given cluster radius were generated (Table 1). 8938 and 9127 variable stars are given in 461 "smaller" and 74 "larger" clusters, respectively. All found variable stars were matched against the PPMXL catalog of positions and proper motions within the ICRS (Roeser et al., 2010AJ....139.2440R, Cat. I/317). Proper motion data were included in our catalogue. Unfortunately, a homogeneous data set of mean cluster proper motions has not been available until now. Therefore we used the following sources (sorted alphabetically) to compile a new catalogue: Baumgardt et al. (2000, Cat. J/A+AS/146/251): based on the Hipparcos catalogue Beshenov & Loktin (2004A&AT...23..103B): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Dias et al. (2001, Cat. J/A+A/376/441, 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Dias et al. (2006, Cat. J/A+A/446/949): based on the UCAC2 catalog (Zacharias et al., 2004AJ....127.3043Z, Cat. I/289) Frinchaboy & Majewski (2008, Cat. J/AJ/136/118): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Kharchenko et al. (2005, J/A+A/438/1163): based on the ASCC2.5 catalogue (Kharchenko, 2001KFNT...17..409K, Cat. I/280) Krone-Martins et al. (2010, Cat. J/A+A/516/A3): based on the Bordeaux PM2000 proper motion catalogue (Ducourant et al., 2006A&A...448.1235D, Cat. I/300) Robichon et al. (1999, Cat. J/A+A/345/471): based on the Hipparcos catalogue van Leeuwen (2009A&A...497..209V): based on the new

  14. Neural variability, or lack thereof

    PubMed Central

    Masquelier, Timothée

    2013-01-01

    We do not claim that the brain is completely deterministic, and we agree that noise may be beneficial in some cases. But we suggest that neuronal variability may be often overestimated, due to uncontrolled internal variables, and/or the use of inappropriate reference times. These ideas are not new, but should be re-examined in the light of recent experimental findings: trial-to-trial variability is often correlated across neurons, across trials, greater for higher-order neurons, and reduced by attention, suggesting that “intrinsic” sources of noise can only account for a minimal part of it. While it is obviously difficult to control for all internal variables, the problem of reference time can be largely avoided by recording multiple neurons at the same time, and looking at statistical structures in relative latencies. These relative latencies have another major advantage: they are insensitive to the variability that is shared across neurons, which is often a significant part of the total variability. Thus, we suggest that signal-to-noise ratios in the brain may be much higher than usually thought, leading to reactive systems, economic in terms of number of neurons, and energy efficient. PMID:23444270

  15. CCD Campaign to Observe AH Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2006-04-01

    Dr. Pamela Gay, Harvard University, has requested optical observations of the RR Lyrae variable star AH Leonis in order to study the Blazhko cycle and other periodicities in this star. Coordinates, finding chart/sequence, observing instructions, and link to AAVSO Variable Star of the Season article on AH Leo (http://www.aavso.org/vstar/vsots/) are provided.

  16. Internal Validity: A Must in Research Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahit, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    In experimental research, internal validity refers to what extent researchers can conclude that changes in dependent variable (i.e. outcome) are caused by manipulations in independent variable. The causal inference permits researchers to meaningfully interpret research results. This article discusses (a) internal validity threats in social and…

  17. International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kenn; Habermann, Ulla; Chowdhury, Omar Faruque; Guerra, Iraida Manzanilla

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Introduction to International Perspectives" (Allen); "Volunteerism in the Welfare State: The Case of Denmark" (Habermann); "Grassroots Organizing in Bangladesh" (Chowdhury); and "Volunteerism in Latin America" (Guerra). (SK)

  18. Predoctoral interns' nondisclosure in supervision.

    PubMed

    Hess, Shirley A; Knox, Sarah; Schultz, Jill M; Hill, Clara E; Sloan, Lea; Brandt, Susan; Kelley, Frances; Hoffman, Mary Ann

    2008-07-01

    In interviews with 14 counseling center predoctoral interns regarding a significant nondisclosure in supervision, eight interns reported good supervisory relationships and six indicated that they experienced problematic supervisory relationships. Nondisclosures for the interns in good supervisory relationships related to personal reactions to clients, whereas nondisclosures for interns in problematic supervisory relationships related to global dissatisfaction with the supervisory relationship. In both groups, interns mentioned concerns about evaluation and negative feelings as typical reasons for nondisclosure. Additional reasons for nondisclosure for interns in problematic supervision were power dynamics, inhibiting demographic or cultural variables, and the supervisor's theoretical orientation. Both groups described negative effects of nondisclosure on themselves and their relationships with clients. Interns in problematic supervision also reported that nondisclosures had negative effects on the supervisory relationship. PMID:18815992

  19. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith Edward; Moser, William Elliott; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald; Knox, Kevin Jay

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  20. Algorithms + Observations = VStar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, D.

    2012-05-01

    VStar is a multi-platform, free, open source application for visualizing and analyzing time-series data. It is primarily intended for use with variable star observations, permitting light curves and phase plots to be created, viewed in tabular form, and filtered. Period search and model creation are supported. Wavelet-based time-frequency analysis permits change in period over time to be investigated. Data can be loaded from the AAVSO International Database or files of various formats. vstar's feature set can be expanded via plug-ins, for example, to read Kepler mission data. This article explores vstar's beginnings from a conversation with Arne Henden in 2008 to its development since 2009 in the context of the AAVSO's Citizen Sky Project. Science examples are provided and anticipated future directions are outlined.

  1. Essential biodiversity variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, H.M.; Ferrier, S.; Walters, M.; Geller, G.N.; Jongman, R.H.G.; Scholes, R.J.; Bruford, M.W.; Brummitt, N.; Butchart, S.H.M.; Cardoso, A.C.; Coops, N.C.; Dulloo, E.; Faith, D.P.; Freyhof, J.; Gregory, R.D.; Heip, C.; Höft, R.; Hurtt, G.; Jetz, W.; Karp, D.S.; McGeoch, M.A.; Obura, D.; Onada, Y.; Pettorelli, N.; Reyers, B.; Sayre, R.; Scharlemann, J.P.W.; Stuart, S.N.; Turak, E.; Walpole, M.; Wegmann, M.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the rate of biodiversity loss and averting dangerous biodiversity change are international goals, reasserted by the Aichi Targets for 2020 by Parties to the United Nations (UN) Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) after failure to meet the 2010 target (1, 2). However, there is no global, harmonized observation system for delivering regular, timely data on biodiversity change (3). With the first plenary meeting of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) soon under way, partners from the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) (4) are developing—and seeking consensus around—Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) that could form the basis of monitoring programs worldwide.

  2. International Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  3. Monitoring of Northern dwarf novae for radio jets campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-10-01

    accreting binary systems. These observations will decide if either CVs do show jets and thus support a universal link between accretion and ejection, or if they do not show jets, further constraining future jet models." The radio jet, if it exists in any of these nine systems, is expected to be seen shortly after the beginning of the outburst (as it was in SS Cyg). Catching the outburst as it is just starting and reporting that information to AAVSO HQ immediately is crucial, as the astronomers need to be alerted, make their decision whether to trigger the VLA observations, and allow enough time for the VLA to start the observations. Please observe these systems NIGHTLY (visual, CCD V) and report all observations as soon as is practical. In the event of an outburst, please report your observations as quickly as you can via WebObs, and also notify Dr. Matthew Templeton and Elizabeth Waagen at AAVSO Headquarters and Deanne Coppejans. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and information on the targets.

  4. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  5. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  6. Digital Archiving: Where the Past Lives Again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    The process of digital archiving for variable star data by manual entry with an Excel spreadsheet is described. Excel-based tools including a Step Magnitude Calculator and a Julian Date Calculator for variable star observations where magnitudes and Julian dates have not been reduced are presented. Variable star data in the literature and the AAVSO International Database prior to 1911 are presented and reviewed, with recent archiving work being highlighted. Digitization using optical character recognition software conversion is also demonstrated, with editing and formatting suggestions for the OCR-converted text.

  7. The Taiwanese-American occultation survey project stellar variability. III. Detection of 58 new variable stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ishioka, R.; Wang, S.-Y.; Zhang, Z.-W.; Lehner, M. J.; Cook, K. H.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Marshall, S. L.; Schwamb, M. E.; Wang, J.-H.; Wen, C.-Y.; Alcock, C.; Protopapas, P.; Axelrod, T.; Bianco, F. B.; Byun, Y.-I.; Chen, W. P.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Kim, D.-W.; Rice, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey project is designed for the detection of stellar occultations by small-size Kuiper Belt Objects, and it has monitored selected fields along the ecliptic plane by using four telescopes with a 3 deg{sup 2} field of view on the sky since 2005. We have analyzed data accumulated during 2005-2012 to detect variable stars. Sixteen fields with observations of more than 100 epochs were examined. We recovered 85 variables among a total of 158 known variable stars in these 16 fields. Most of the unrecovered variables are located in the fields observed less frequently. We also detected 58 variable stars which are not listed in the International Variable Star Index of the American Association of Variable Star Observers. These variable stars are classified as 3 RR Lyrae, 4 Cepheid, 1 δ Scuti, 5 Mira, 15 semi-regular, and 27 eclipsing binaries based on the periodicity and the profile of the light curves.

  8. Internal shim

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Blizinski, Theodore W.

    2003-05-13

    An internal shim used to accurately measure spaces in conjunction with a standard small probe has a shim top and a chassis. The internal shim is adjustably fixed within the space to be measured using grippers that emerge from the chassis and which are controlled by an arm pivotably attached to the shim top. A standard small probe passes through the shim along guides on the chassis and measures the distance between the exterior of the chassis and the boundary. By summing the measurements on each side of the chassis and the width of the chassis, the dimension of the space can be determined to within 0.001 inches.

  9. International Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pests and diseases of plants in agriculture are a shared international problem. Yet some of the very places that pest invaders come from often lack the institutional structure and organization necessary to help in understanding the biology of the pest or disease. Strengthening entomology by stimulat...

  10. International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, R. Stephen

    In a world characterized by increasing global interdependence, the provision of international education programs must be an essential concern of the community college president. Frequently, these programs are considered too sophisticated for community college students or are misconceived as: (1) pleasure junkets; (2) strategies for increasing…

  11. International Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havard-Williams, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Discussion of standardization on an international scale for resource sharing--cooperation, coordination, interlibrary loans, cooperative acquisition and cataloging--focuses on a definition of standards; the development of standards for cataloging; public, school, and university libraries; and library education. A 60-item bibliography is included.…

  12. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabb, Winston; Bender, David R.; Haycock, Ken; Horodyski, John

    2001-01-01

    Includes three annual reports: one from the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, the Special Libraries Association, and a report on innovations in Canadian libraries that discusses electronic initiatives, partnerships, books and publishing, school libraries, national issues, local challenges, and funding. (LRW)

  13. International Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Donald A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This issue begins with a conceptual introduction to economic specialization, exports and imports, and the importance of international trade. Four instructional units follow this introduction, beginning with a preschool and kindergarten unit called "Traders and Travelers," which involves young students in five activities that illustrate our…

  14. Internal Poverty and Teen Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tamera M.; Martin Sue S.; Young, Michael E.; Ting, Ling

    2001-01-01

    Examined selected predictor variables from baseline 1988 wave of data, taken from the National Education Longitudinal Study, in relation to pregnancy status. Results indicated statistically significant difference in locus of control between those females who became pregnant later in adolescence (external) and those who did not (internal).…

  15. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    mechanism it was determined that the single cam design did not have enough flexibility to satisfy three critical OEM requirements simultaneously, (maximum valve lift variation, intake valve opening timing and valve closing duration), and a new approach would be necessary. After numerous internal design reviews including several with the OEM a dual cam design was developed that had the flexibility to meet all motion requirements. The second cam added complexity to the mechanism however the cost was offset by the deletion of the electric motor required in the previous design. New patent applications including detailed drawings and potential valve motion profiles were generated and alternate two cam designs were proposed and evaluated for function, cost, reliability and durability. Hardware was designed and built and testing of sample hardware was successfully completed on an engine test stand. The mechanism developed during the course of this investigation can be applied by Original Equipment Manufacturers, (OEM), to their advanced diesel engines with the ultimate goal of reducing emissions and improving fuel economy. The objectives are: (1) Develop an optimal, cost effective, variable valve actuation (VVA) system for advanced low temperature diesel combustion processes. (2) Design and model alternative mechanical approaches and down-select for optimum design. (3) Build and demonstrate a mechanism capable of application on running engines.

  16. Latent Variable Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsboom, Denny

    2008-01-01

    This paper formulates a metatheoretical framework for latent variable modeling. It does so by spelling out the difference between observed and latent variables. This difference is argued to be purely epistemic in nature: We treat a variable as "observed" when the inference from data structure to variable structure can be made with certainty and as…

  17. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, S.J.

    1988-05-17

    A variable camshaft timing system in combination with an internal combustion engine having at least one cylinder, a rotatable member such as a crankshaft, and an intake and exhaust valve coupled to an intake camshaft and an exhaust camshaft respectively, the system is described comprising: a pulley wheel fixedly attached at one end of each of the intake and exhaust camshafts and the crankshaft; belt means interconnecting each of the pulley wheels for transferring rotational motion from the crankshaft to the intake and exhaust camshafts; first and second idler arm means pivotally attached to the engine, each of the idler arm means having a pivoting arm, a cam follower arm and an idler wheel in operative contact with the belt means; positioning cam means operatively coupled to each of the cam follower arms of the idler arm means; a control means responsive to various engine operating parameters for generating motor control signals; and electric motor means responsive to the motor control signals and operatively coupled to rotate the positioning cams means for positioning each of the idler arm means for changing the relative rotational position between the input camshaft and the exhaust camshaft.

  18. The Orbital Periods and Variability of the Nova-Like BK Lyncis (PG 0917+342) and the Dwarf Nova WW Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwald, F. A.; Thorstensen, J. R.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Robertson, J. W.; Smith, Robert Connon

    1995-12-01

    Long-term light curves of the cataclysmic variable BK Lyn (PG 0917+342) from the Indiana Automated CCD photometric telescope (``RoboScope'') and the Harvard College Observatory plate archive reveal no dwarf nova outbursts. Two radial velocity studies show its orbital period to be 107.97 +/- 0.07 minutes, confirming that it does have an orbital period shorter than the 2 -- 3-hour orbital period gap for cataclysmic variables. Whether this is a nova-like below the period gap or a dwarf nova with rare outbursts resembling WZ Sge is still unclear, but anomalously high angular momentum loss below the period gap may imply that magnetic stellar-wind braking still works below the period gap---but mass-losing secondary stars there are thought to be fully convective, and therefore should not have magnetic braking. If BK Lyn is a genuine nova-like beneath the period gap, it may provide evidence of magnetic activity occurring in the faintest M dwarfs, here in an interacting binary. A radial velocity study resolves a long-standing aliasing problem and shows that the orbital period of the dwarf nova WW Cet is 0.17578 +/- 0.00013 d (4.22 hours). Its long-term light curves from RoboScope, AAVSO, Harvard archive, and VSS, RASNZ observations are examined. WW Cet does not have the characteristic standstills of the Z Cam stars, but does wander in quiescence by well over one magnitude. This and the orbital period become of interest in the context of recent speculation (Livio M., Pringle J. E., 1994, ApJ, 427, 956) that the low states of the VY Scl stars may be produced by star spots moving over L_1, choking off the mass flow, and that dwarf novae with orbital periods between 3 and 4 hours may be rare because of this.

  19. Teaching International Law: Concepts in International Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starbird, Caroline; Pettit, Jenny; Singleton, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to introduce students to public international law. Topics covered include international public organizations, such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization, international courts, international human rights law, international trade law, and international environmental law. The goal of each study is to examine how…

  20. Monitoring of CH Cyg requested for Chandra and HST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-03-01

    Dr. Margarita Karovska, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, has requested visual and photometric observations of the symbiotic variable CH Cyg in preparation for and support of Chandra and HST observations scheduled for later in March 2012. Dr. Karovska's observations will be a followup investigation of the central region of CH Cyg and its jet that was discovered a couple of years ago. AAVSO observations are requested in order to monitor the state of the system and correlate with the satellite observations. Visual observations and CCD/PEP observations in all bands - U through J and H - are requested. Daily observations now through April 2012 and high-speed photometry through March would be appreciated. CH Cyg is currently at visual magnitude 7.7. Halpha, OIII region, and optical spectroscopy are also requested. More details on the exact dates and times of the satellite observations will be announced when they become available, but daily monitoring should begin now. [HST observations scheduled for 2012 March 18; Chandra delayed some days due to X-class solar flare of 2012 March 7.] Coordinates: RA 19 24 33.07 Dec. +50 14 29.1 (J2000.0). Finder charts may be created and data from the AAVSO International Database may be viewed, plotted, or downloaded (www.aavso.org).

  1. Supernova 2013E in IC 2532 = PSN J10000552-3414013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Announcement of the discovery of Supernova 2013E in IC 2532 = PSN J10000552-3414013 by Stuart Parker (Canterbury, New Zealand) on 2013 Jan. 4.58 UT at red mag 14.8 on a 30-s unfiltered CCD image taken in the course of the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS). Coordinates (2000.0): R.A. 10 00 05 .52 Decl. -34 14 01.3; SN 2013E is 2" east and 19" south of the nucleus of IC 2532. Spectroscopy obtained 2013 Jan. 6.16 UT by the Carnegie Supernova Project and reported by N. Morrell (LCO) et al. indicates that SN 2013E is a type-Ia supernova several days before maximum brightness. Announced on IAU CBET 3378 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  2. Supernova 2011at = PSN J09285756-1448206 in MCG -02-24-27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-03-01

    Announces the discovery of SN 2011at = PSN J09285756-1448206 in MCG -02-24-27 by Lou Cox, Jack Newton, and Tim Puckett (Ellijay, GA, in the course of the Puckett Observatory Supernova Search) on 2011 March 10.214 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 14.5. Spectra obtained March 11.81 UT with the Swift satellite (+UVOT) by F. Bufano (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF), Osservatorio Astronomico di Catania), S. Benetti (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova), and A. Pastorello (Queen's University, Belfast, et al.); and on March 12 UT with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+FAST) by M. Calkins (reported by G. H. Marion, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group) show SN 2011at to be a type-Ia supernova a few days before/around maximum. The object was designated PSN J09285756-1448206 when posted on the Central Bureau's Transient Objects Confirmation Page (TOCP) webpage. Initially announced in CBET 2676 (Daniel W. ! E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  3. [Internal migration].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  4. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  5. Operating internationally

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    When Enron Power Corp. took over a 28 MW power facility at the former US Naval base in Subic Bay, the Philippines, the company was required to employ 139 people to run the plant. This large labor force was necessary not because of the plant's operational needs, but because of local labor practices and unemployment pressures. Independent power companies have become all too familiar with the high cost and complexity of developing projects in emerging international markets. Some of the most significant issues involve taxation, unfamiliar legal systems, changing regulations, and foreign investment restrictions. In addition, questions about currency exchange, national credit worthiness, and political stability add to the difficulty of international development. However, one of the most daunting challenges centers not on development, but on long-term operations and maintenance (O M). A key concern is finding qualified labor. Most developers and O M companies agree that local people should run the plant, with the top person, or persons, thoroughly trained in the developer's company philosophy.

  6. Control system for variable geometry turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Abo, T.; Ueno, T.; Sumizawa, A.

    1987-08-11

    A control system is described for a variable geometry turbocharger for an internal combustion engine including a turbine having a variable area inflow passage, the turbine being operated in response to an exhaust gas flow supplied through the variable area inflow passage, and a compressor adapted to be driven by the turbine. The control system consists of means for detecting operating conditions of the engine, a control means including arithmetic means which calculates a first control value for controlling the cross-sectional area of the variable area inflow passage to provide a suitable supercharging pressure of intake air supplied to the engine in response to the detected operating conditions of the engine, a first variable geometry valve means for changing the cross-sectional area of the variable area inflow passage, means for actuating the variable geometry valve means in accordance with the first control value; and a limiter means for changing the first control value so as to restrict a reduction of the cross sectional area of the variable area inflow passage when the calculated control value has reached a predetermined value after being changed to reduce the cross-sectional area of the variable area inflow passage.

  7. Variability as an Operant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holth, Per

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments on operant variability by Neuringer and colleagues (e.g., Neuringer, 1986, 2002; Page & Neuringer, 1985) have been repeatedly cited as showing that behavioral variability can be reinforced by making reinforcement contingent on it. They showed that the degree of variability in pigeons' eight-peck sequences, as measured by U…

  8. Many Variables Determine Campus Safety Staffing Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    College and university administrators must take into account a number of variables in determining the appropriate staffing levels for their campus public safety function, according to a white paper released by International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA). The report is entitled, "Establishing Appropriate Staffing…

  9. Internal variables in the local-equilibrium approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-05-01

    We explore the basis and consequences of the formalism known in the literature as the method of local equilibrium. Contemporary controversies regarding the foundations of thermodynamics are rooted not only in different sets of concepts and principles, but also in semantics. An attempt is made here to use a consistent group of terms, each of whose dictionary meaning corresponds to its physical nature as closely as possible. Since the intention is to study irreversible processes in systems in which even locally there prevails a state of nonequilibrium, the term local equilibrium is abandoned in favor of the phrase principle of local state. In defining the thermodynamic state of system, a distinction is made between the intensive parameters which appear in the physical space and those which describe states of constrained equilibrium in the Gibbsian phase space. The principle of local state is applied by association with every nonequilibrium state n and accompanying equilibrium state e of equal values of U, a, {alpha}, and by asserting that the entropy {bar S} assignable in physical space and temperature {bar T} measured in it can be approximated by the values S and T calculated in the Gibbsian phase space by standard, classical methods. A continuous sequence of accompanying equilibrium states is called an accompanying reversible process, it is conceived as an adiabatic projection of the continuous sequence of nonequilibrium states. The essential part of the method consists in the formulation of the Gibbs equation for the accompanying reversible process in the phase space. It is noted that the local-state approximation, made explicit in this paper, has been used and tested in fluid mechanics though its validity is contested in contemporary continuum mechanics and mechanics of solids.

  10. The EPICS process variable gateway -- Version 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2005-01-01

    The EPICS Process Variable Gateway is both a Channel Access Server and Channel Access Client that provides a means for many clients, typically on different subnets, to access a process variable while making only one connection to the server that owns the process variable. It also provides additional access security beyond that implemented on the server. It thus protects critical servers while providing suitably restricted access to needed process variables. The original version of the Gateway worked with EPICS Base 3.13 but required a special version, since the changes necessary for its operation were never incorporated into EPICS Base. Version 2 works with any standard EPICS Base 3.14.6 or later and has many improvements in both performance and features over the older version. The Gateway is now used at many institutions and has become a stable, high-performance application. It is capable of handling tens of thousands of process variables with hundreds of thousands of events per second. It has run for over three months in a production environment without having to be restarted. It has many internal process variables that can be used to monitor its state using standard EPICS client tools, such as MEDM and StripTool. Other internal process variables can be used to stop the Gateway, make several kinds of reports, or change the access security without stopping the Gateway. It can even be started on remote workstations from MEDM by using a Secure Shell script. This paper will describe the new Gateway and how it is used. The Gateway is both a server (like an EPICS Input/Output Controller (IOC)) and a client (like the EPICS Motif Editor and Display Manager (MEDM), StripTool, and others). Clients connect to the server side, and the client side connects to IOCs and other servers, possibly other Gateways. See Fig. 1. There are perhaps three principal reasons for using the Gateway: (1) it allows many clients to access a process variable while making only one connection to

  11. Reanalyses and Essential Climate Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Reanalyses are a potentially powerful climate data collection driven by observations but also subjected to model bias. Additionally, reanalyses can produce and use essential climate variables in a consistent method. For example, snow cover and soil moisture (among other variables) will eventually be assimilated into the reanalyses, but also provide crucial validation data. Sea surface temperature can be prescribed or assimilated in a coupled reanalysis. The strength of reanalysis lies in the ancillary data that is produced from the modeling components but not routinely observed thereby providing more complete Earth system information. The weakness in this concept is that the model derived data can be affected by model bias and may also change relative to the available observing system. Here, we will review the status of existing reanalyses and the ECVs being considered for the workshop. Purpose of Michael Bosilovich's contribution to the workshop: Michael Bosilovich will represent US reanalysis community in this international discussion of Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) and the relative nature of reanalyses to ECVs.

  12. Internationally Comparable Health Indices

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Erik; Kapteyn, Arie; Andreyeva, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    One of the most intractable problems in international health research is the lack of comparability of health measures across countries or cultures. We develop a cross-country measurement model for health in which functional limitations, self-reports of health, and a physical measure are interrelated to construct health indices. To establish comparability across countries, we define the measurement scales by the physical measure while other parameters vary by country to reflect cultural and linguistic differences in response patterns. We find significant cross-country variation in response styles of health reports along with variability in genuine health that is related to differences in national income. Our health indices achieve satisfactory reliability of about 80% and their gradients by age, income, and wealth for the most part show the expected patterns. Moreover, the health indices correlate much more strongly with income and net worth than self reported health measures. PMID:20572201

  13. Problem of hidden variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Emilio

    1992-10-01

    The problem of hidden variables in quantum mechanics is formalized as follows. A general or contextual (noncontextual) hidden-variables theory is defined as a mapping f: Q×M → C (f: Q→C) where Q is the set of projection operators in the appropriate (quantum) Hilbert space, M is the set of maximal Boolean subalgebras of Q and C is a (classical) Boolean algebra. It is shown that contextual (noncontextual) hidden-variables always exist (do not exist).

  14. Variable Renewable Energy: a Regulatory Roadmap (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    There is not a one-size-fits-all approach to the regulation of variable renewable energy (VRE), but international experience reveals many approaches that are proving successful. Drawing upon research and experiences from various international contexts, the 21st Century Power Partnership in conjunction with the Clean Energy Solutions Center and Clean Energy Regulators Initiative identified key issues and ideas that have emerged as variable deployment has grown. The Power Partnership research, published in 2014, identified four broad categories of regulatory issues.

  15. Environmental concerns and international migration.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1996-01-01

    "This article focuses on international migration occurring as a result of environmental changes and processes. It briefly reviews attempts to conceptualize environment-related migration and then considers the extent to which environmental factors have been and may be significant in initiating migration. Following is an examination of migration as an independent variable in the migration-environment relationship. Finally, ethical and policy dimensions are addressed." PMID:12291410

  16. The ROSAT variable sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Giommi, P.; White, N. E.

    1996-01-01

    The spectral and timing characteristics from a sample, of 91 objects, of the variable sources obtained using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test technique are presented. The data were extracted from the catalog constructed by White, Giommi and Angelini, the WGACAT, based on the pointed observations from the Rosat missions. The application of the test revealed more than 2400 individual variable candidates, with 'sq chi' greater than 12. The sample of these variable sources, mostly unidentified, probably contains many flare stars, a few cataclysmic variables and a possible transient source.

  17. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  18. Processes of Internal and International Migration from Chitwan, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Bohra, Pratikshya; Massey, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examine which factors predict internal and international migration from Chitwan, a flat valley located in the South-Central region of Nepal, seeking to measure the effect of theoretically specified variables such as human capital, social capital, physical capital, and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions while controlling for demographic variables. We use data from the Chitwan Valley Family Study (CVFS) to estimate a series of discrete time event history models of first and repeat migration to three competing destinations: other locations within Chitwan, other districts within Nepal, and places outside of Nepal. Results support hypotheses derived from neoclassical economics, the theory of new economics of migration, social capital theory, and cumulative causation theory. Our results underscore the need for a synthetic theoretical model that incorporates factors operating at the individual, household, and community levels. The use of multiple explanatory models yields a clearer picture of the forces driving internal and international migration from rural districts in developing nations such as Nepal. PMID:21423821

  19. Defining International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Holly Moran

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the three facets of international education: international studies, international education exchange, and technical assistance. Also explores the effects of internationalizing higher education and the present state of international education. (EV)

  20. Observations of the eclipsing binary b Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Robert Zavala (USNO-Flagstaff) et al. request V time-series observations of the bright variable star b Persei 7-21 January 2015 UT, in hopes of catching a predicted eclipse on January 15. This is a follow-up to the February 2013 campaign announced in Alert Notice 476, and will be used as a photometric comparison for upcoming interferometric observations with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) in Arizona. b Per (V=4.598, B-V=0.054) is ideal for photoelectric photometers or DSLR cameras. Telescopic CCD observers may observe by stopping down larger apertures. Comparison and check stars assigned by PI: Comp: SAO 24412, V=4.285, B-V = -0.013; Check: SAO 24512, V=5.19, B-V = -0.05. From the PI: "[W]e wanted to try and involve AAVSO observers in a follow up to our successful detection of the b Persei eclipse of Feb 2013, AAVSO Alert Notice 476 and Special Notice 333. Our goal now is to get good time resolution photometry as the third star passes in front of the close ellipsoidal binary. The potential for multiple eclipses exists. The close binary has a 1.5 day orbital period, and the eclipsing C component requires about 4 days to pass across the close binary pair. The primary eclipse depth is 0.15 magnitude. Photometry to 0.02 or 0.03 mags would be fine to detect this eclipse. Eclipse prediction date (JD 2457033.79 = 2015 01 11 UT, ~+/- 1 day) is based on one orbital period from the 2013 eclipse." More information is available at PI's b Persei eclipse web page: http://inside.warren-wilson.edu/~dcollins/bPersei/. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and information on the targets.

  1. 26 CFR 1.467-5 - Section 467 rental agreements with variable interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Section 467 rental agreements with variable... rental agreements with variable interest. (a) Variable interest on deferred or prepaid rent—(1) In... 467 rental agreements providing variable interest. For purposes of this section, a rental...

  2. 26 CFR 1.467-5 - Section 467 rental agreements with variable interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Section 467 rental agreements with variable... Section 467 rental agreements with variable interest. (a) Variable interest on deferred or prepaid rent—(1... section 467 rental agreements providing variable interest. For purposes of this section, a...

  3. 26 CFR 1.467-5 - Section 467 rental agreements with variable interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Section 467 rental agreements with variable... Section 467 rental agreements with variable interest. (a) Variable interest on deferred or prepaid rent—(1... section 467 rental agreements providing variable interest. For purposes of this section, a...

  4. 26 CFR 1.467-5 - Section 467 rental agreements with variable interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Section 467 rental agreements with variable... Section 467 rental agreements with variable interest. (a) Variable interest on deferred or prepaid rent—(1... section 467 rental agreements providing variable interest. For purposes of this section, a...

  5. PIRLS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of International Background Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Drucker, Kathleen T., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement describes national adaptations made to the international version of the PIRLS/prePIRLS 2011 background questionnaires. This information provides users with a guide to evaluate the availability of internationally comparable data for use in secondary analyses involving the PIRLS/prePIRLS 2011 background variables. Background…

  6. TIMSS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of International Background Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Arora, Alka, Ed.; Stanco, Gabrielle M., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement describes national adaptations made to the international version of the TIMSS 2011 background questionnaires. This information provides users with a guide to evaluate the availability of internationally comparable data for use in secondary analyses involving the TIMSS 2011 background variables. Background questionnaire adaptations…

  7. Predicting Supervisor, Peer, and Self Ratings of Intern Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegel-Flom, Penelope

    1975-01-01

    Relationships between the ratings of interns by their supervisors, their peers, and the interns themselves on four dimensions are compared and analyzed in relationship to earlier measures of aptitude, achievement, and personality. Findings reported show supervisor ratings to be highest and admission variables to be unrelated to intern performance.…

  8. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  9. Variable Synthetic Capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feedback amplifier circuit synthesizes electronically variable capacitance. Variable Synthetic Capacitor is amplifier circuit with follower/feedback configuration. Effective input capacitance depends on input set current. If synthetic capacitor is connected across resonant element of oscillator, oscillator frequency controlled via input set current. Circuit especially suitable for fine frequency adjustments of piezoelectric-crystal or inductor/capacitor resonant oscillators.

  10. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  11. Latent Variable Interaction Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    2002-01-01

    Used simulation to study two different approaches to latent variable interaction modeling with continuous observed variables: (1) a LISREL 8.30 program and (2) data analysis through PRELIS2 and SIMPLIS programs. Results show that parameter estimation was similar but standard errors were different. Discusses differences in ease of implementation.…

  12. 26 CFR 1.1275-5 - Variable rate debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... The debt instrument must provide that a qualified floating rate or objective rate in effect at any... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Variable rate debt instruments. 1.1275-5....1275-5 Variable rate debt instruments. (a) Applicability—(1) In general. This section provides...

  13. Application of Singular Spectrum Analysis to Solar Irradiance Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M.; Varadi, Ferenc

    1995-01-01

    Studies of solar variability improve our knowledge of the internal structure and dynamical processes taking place within the Sun that lead to solar irradiance changes. Becuase of the astrophysical and climatic significance of irradiance variability, considerable effort has been devoted to model and understand its physical origin.

  14. Variable speed drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A variable speed drive wherein a first embodiment is comprised of a pivotally mounted prime mover coupled to a rotary fluid output device, such as a fan or pump, through a variable and fixed pulley drive arrangement is described. The pivotal position of the prime mover and accordingly the pitch diameter of variable pulley means is controlled in accordance with fluid motor means coupled to the prime mover. This is actuated in response to a fluid feedback control signal derived from a sensed output of the rotary fluid output device. The pivotal motion of the prime mover imparts an arcuate motion to the variable pulley means which effects a speed variation of the rotary fluid output device in accordance with the variation of the pitch diameter ratio of opposing variable and fixed pulley means.

  15. Basic properties and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querci, Francois R.

    1987-01-01

    Giant and supergiant M, S, and C stars are discussed in this survey of research. Basic properties as determined by spectra, chemical composition, photometry, or variability type are discussed. Space motions and space distributions of cool giants are described. Distribution of these stars in our galaxy and those nearby is discussed. Mira variables in particular are surveyed with emphasis on the following topics: (1) phase lag phenomenon; (2) Mira light curves; (3) variations in color indices; (4) determination of multiple periods; (5) correlations between quantities such as period length, light-curve shape, infrared (IR) excess, and visible and IR color diagram; (6) semiregular (SR) variables and different time scales in SR light variations; (7) irregular variable Lb and Lc stars; (8) different time-scale light variations; (9) hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars, in particular RCB stars; and (10) irreversible changes and rapid evolution in red variable stars.

  16. Solar Activity-driven Variability of Instrumental Data Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martayan, C.; Smette, A.; Hanuschik, R.; van Der Heyden, P.; Mieske, S.

    2016-06-01

    The unexplained variability of the data quality from Very Large Telescope instruments and the frequency of power cuts have been investigated. Origins for the variability in ambient temperature variations, software, data reduction pipelines and internal to hardware could be discarded. The most probable cause appears to be correlated with the evolution of the cosmic ray rate, and also with solar and terrestrial geomagnetic activity. We report on the consequences of such variability and describe how the observatory infrastructure, instruments and data are affected.

  17. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy: Challenges and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Milligan, M.; Lew, D.

    2013-09-01

    In the U.S., a number of utilities are adopting higher penetrations of renewables, driven in part by state policies. While power systems have been designed to handle the variable nature of loads, the additional supply-side variability and uncertainty can pose new challenges for utilities and system operators. However, a variety of operational and technical solutions exist to help integrate higher penetrations of wind and solar generation. This paper explores renewable energy integration challenges and mitigation strategies that have been implemented in the U.S. and internationally, including forecasting, demand response, flexible generation, larger balancing areas or balancing area cooperation, and operational practices such as fast scheduling and dispatch.

  18. Janet Akyüz Mattei (1943-2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, R. D.

    2004-06-01

    It is with great sadness that we report that Dr Janet A. Mattei, the Director of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO), died on 2004 March 22 after a seven-month battle with acute myelogenous leukaemia.

  19. Ionospheric variability over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Mosert, M.; Corbella, R.; Erazu, M.; de La Zerda, L.

    The understanding of ionospheric variability is important for the user of ionospheric models. A satellite designer or operator needs to know not only monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. In order to contribute to the studies on ionospheric variability, in this paper values of critical frequencies of F2, F1 and E regions and M(3000)F2 factor measured at 4 Japanese stations are used. Data correspond to equinoxes, solstices, high and low solar activity. Quartiles and median values are used to specify variability, because they have the advantage of being less affected by large deviations that can occur during magnetic storms. The results are similar for the considered stations and show that the highest variability correspond to foF2. For March high solar activity the variability of fof2 decreases during hours of maximum ionisation. The M3000F2 factor, in general, shown low variability. Akita (39.72° N, 140.13° E) showed the highest variability for the three frequencies. Moreover, it can be seen that quartiles are not equidistant from the median value.

  20. Variability study for saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Hansen, E. K.; Williams, V. J.

    2005-10-01

    This report is a summary of the bench-scale experimental studies performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to establish the viability of a grout-based variability study. In order for a variability study to be useful, the property measurements of the fresh and cured Saltstone must be reproducible with an inherent variation that is small compared to the changes in the properties measured over the expected range of variability for a Salt Batch. This scoping task addressed the issue of reproducibility for Saltstone.

  1. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  2. Variability of blowfly head optomotor responses.

    PubMed

    Rosner, R; Egelhaaf, M; Grewe, J; Warzecha, A K

    2009-04-01

    Behavioural responses of an animal are variable even when the animal experiences the same sensory input several times. This variability can arise from stochastic processes inherent to the nervous system. Also, the internal state of an animal may influence a particular behavioural response. In the present study, we analyse the variability of visually induced head pitch responses of tethered blowflies by high-speed cinematography. We found these optomotor responses to be highly variable in amplitude. Most of the variability can be attributed to two different internal states of the flies with high and low optomotor gain, respectively. Even within a given activity state, there is some variability of head optomotor responses. The amount of this variability differs for the two optomotor gain states. Moreover, these two activity states can be distinguished on a fine timescale and without visual stimulation, on the basis of the occurrence of peculiar head jitter movements. Head jitter goes along with high gain optomotor responses and haltere oscillations. Halteres are evolutionary transformed hindwings that oscillate when blowflies walk or fly. Their main function is to serve as equilibrium organs by detecting Coriolis forces and to mediate gaze stabilisation. However, their basic oscillating activity was also suggested to provide a gain-modulating signal. Our experiments demonstrate that halteres are not necessary for high gain head pitch to occur. Nevertheless, we find the halteres to be responsible for one component of head jitter movements. This component may be the inevitable consequence of their function as equilibrium and gaze-stabilising organs. PMID:19329750

  3. Finding New Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) Initial findings are presented for several new variable stars that have been identified using CCD photometry done with the 0.9-meter telescope located at the BYU West Mountain Observatory.

  4. INTEGRAL and Cataclysmic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Blazek, M.; Galis, R.; Kocka, M.

    2010-07-15

    The results of investigations of cataclysmic variables (CVs) with the ESA INTEGRAL satellite are briefly presented and discussed. It is evident that the satellite serves as an efficient tool to study some of these objects.

  5. Discovery of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurochkin, N. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented methods of discovering variable stars are reviewed, specifically the blink comparator, color contrast method, positive-negative method, and television method. Among the empirical methods discussed, the Van Gent method is the most important.

  6. Variable star data online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Roger; Wilson, Andy; Poyner, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Roger Pickard, Andy Wilson and Gary Poyner describe the online database of the British Astronomical Association Variable Star Section, a treasure trove of observations stretching back nearly 125 years.

  7. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per-ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that, due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions and differing harvest, collection and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  8. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  9. Solar Variability and Terrestrial Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.

    The thermal conditions on Planet Earth are primarily the function of the energy in- put from the Sun. The variations in climate on Planet Earth is, however, primarily the function of the redistribution and reorganisation of the internal terrestrial heat balance. Solar variability may affect terrestrial climate (1) by direct changes in irradiance, a fac- tor, however, which is known to be very small, (2) by the solar wind interaction with the geomagnetic field increasing and decreasing the shielding capacity to infalling cosmic-ray, which is known to affect the formation of clouds thereby also affecting global terrestrial climat, and (3) by the solar wind interaction with the geomagnetic field leading to changes in the EarthSs rate of rotation which affect ocean and atmo- sphere circulation thereby also affecting global climate (and sea level). INTAS Project 97-301008 concerns the interaction between geomagnetic field changes and global climatic changes. No doubts, we see important links between externally and internally driven changes in the EarthSs geomagnetic field and changes in terrestrial climate.

  10. Rainfall variability modelling in Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nduwayezu, E.; Kanevski, M.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    Support to climate change adaptation is a priority in many International Organisations meetings. But is the international approach for adaptation appropriate with field reality in developing countries? In Rwanda, the main problems will be heavy rain and/or long dry season. Four rainfall seasons have been identified, corresponding to the four thermal Earth ones in the south hemisphere: the normal season (summer), the rainy season (autumn), the dry season (winter) and the normo-rainy season (spring). The spatial rainfall decreasing from West to East, especially in October (spring) and February (summer) suggests an «Atlantic monsoon influence» while the homogeneous spatial rainfall distribution suggests an «Inter-tropical front » mechanism. The torrential rainfall that occurs every year in Rwanda disturbs the circulation for many days, damages the houses and, more seriously, causes heavy losses of people. All districts are affected by bad weather (heavy rain) but the costs of such events are the highest in mountains districts. The objective of the current research is to proceed to an evaluation of the potential rainfall risk by applying advanced geospatial modelling tools in Rwanda: geostatistical predictions and simulations, machine learning algorithm (different types of neural networks) and GIS. The research will include rainfalls variability mapping and probabilistic analyses of extreme events.

  11. Hidden variables: the resonance factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Juliana H. J.

    2009-08-01

    In 1900 Max Karl Planck performed his famous black-body radiation work which sparked the quantum revolution. Re-examination of that work has revealed hidden variables, consistent with Einstein's famous sentiment that quantum mechanics is incomplete due to the existence of "hidden variables". The recent discovery of these previously hidden variables, which have been missing from foundational equations for more than one hundred years, has important implications for theoretical, experimental and applied sciences and technologies. Planck attempted to integrate the new "resonant Hertzian (electromagnetic) waves", with existing Helmholtz theories on energy and thermodynamics. In his famous January 1901, paper on black-body radiation, Planck described two significant hypotheses - his well known Quantum Hypothesis, and his more obscure Resonance Hypothesis. Few scientists today are aware that Planck hypothesized resonant electromagnetic energy as a form of non-thermal energy available to perform work on a molecular basis, and that Planck's Resonance Hypothesis bridged the gap between classical Helmholtz energy state dynamics of the bulk macrostate, and energy state dynamics of the molecular microstate. Since the black-body experimental data involved only a thermal effect and not a resonant effect, Planck excluded the resonant state in his black-body derivation. He calculated Boltzmann's constant "kB" using completely thermal/entropic data, arriving at a value of 1.38 ×10-23 J K-1 per molecule, representing the internal energy of a molecule under completely thermal conditions. He further hypothesized, however, that if resonant energy was present in a system, the resonant energy would be "free to be converted into work". Planck seems to have been caught up in the events of the quantum revolution and never returned to his Resonance Hypothesis. As a result, a mathematical foundation for resonance dynamics was never completed. Boltzmann's constant was adopted into

  12. VARIABLE-THROW CAM

    DOEpatents

    Godsil, E.C.; Robinson, E.Y.

    1963-07-16

    A variable-throw cam comprising inner and outer eccentric sleeves which are adjustably locked together is described. The cam throw is varied by unlocking the inner and outer sleeves, rotating the outer sleeve relative to the inner one until the desired throw is obtained, and locking the sleeves together again. The cam is useful in applications wherein a continuously-variable throw is required, e.g., ram-and-die pressing operations, cyclic fatigue testing of materials, etc. (AEC)

  13. Variable contour securing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebus, P. P.; Packer, P. N.; Haynie, C. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A variable contour securing system has a retaining structure for a member whose surface contains a variable contour. The retaining mechanism includes a spaced array of adjustable spindles mounted on a housing. Each spindle has a base member support cup at one end. A vacuum source is applied to the cups for seating the member adjacent to the cups. A locking mechanism sets the spindles in a predetermined position once the member has been secured to the spindle support cups.

  14. Campaign to monitor the recurrent nova T Pyx throughout 2011 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-04-01

    Further to AAVSO Alert Notice 436, a fast photometry observing campaign has been initiated by Dr. Bradley Schaefer (Louisiana State University) to monitor the recurrent nova T Pyxidis throughout its current eruption. The goal is to obtain nearly-fulltime coverage of T Pyx with time resolution of minutes until T Pyx is lost behind the Sun around the start of August. The eruption lasts roughly 9 months, but we will only go from now until the end of July (3.5 months) when T Pyx is lost behind the Sun. [The campaign was subsequently extended throughout the full duration of the eruption; see AAVSO Special Notice #254.] The work on this eruption will largely be aimed at testing whether T Pyx will become a Type Ia supernova, as recurrent novae are one of the best candidate systems for Type Ia supernova progenitors, and T Pyx is the lynchpin of many arguments and discussions regarding the longstanding progenitor problem. T Pyx is only one of ten known recurrent novae in the Milky Way galaxy. It has erupted in 1890, 1902, 1920, 1944, and 1966 (no eruptions were missed during this interval). T Pyx was discovered in outburst - the first since December 7, 1966 - by M. Linnolt (Ocean View, HI, United States) at visual magnitude 13.0 on 2011 April 14.2931, and confirmed by A. Plummer (Linden, NSW, Australia) at visual magnitude 12.2 on April 14.3847 and S. Kerr (Glenlee, QLD, Australia) at visual magnitude 11.3 on April 14.4410. As of April 15.6271, it had brightened to visual magnitude 8.3 (A. Pearce, Nedlands, WA, Australia). If it behaves as in past eruptions, it can be expected to brighten to magnitude 6. All observations - visual, CCD, PEP, and CCD time series - are encouraged. V filter is preferred for CCD/PEP observations, with second choice B filter, then Rc, then unfiltered. Comparison stars have been selected and observing instructions are given. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.! org/vsp). Observations

  15. Alpha Com eclipse observing campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-12-01

    Drs. Matthew W. Muterspaugh and Gregory W. Henry (Tennessee State University) have requested AAVSO observers' ssistance in monitoring the possible Algol-like binary star alpha Com before, during, and after the eclipse they have predicted for mid-to-late January 2015. The PIs will be using the Fairborn Observatory automated photometric telescopes on Mt. Hopkins, but they are requesting additional observations not only to supplement theirs but also specifically to have good coverage in the event of bad weather at Mt. Hopkins. Alf Com has a 26-year period and is 4.32V at maximum. The expected amplitude of the eclipse is about 0.8 magnitude and the duration somewhere between 28 and 45 hours. The eclipse is predicted for January 25 ± three days (JD 2457047 ± 3). Muterspaugh at al. first calculated the possibility of a 2015 eclipse in 2010 (AJ). Muterspaugh and Henry recently published an article with updated information (arXiv 2014). V and/or R photometry (other bands welcome) is requested, with a minimal cadence of one measurement/2 hours, to make sure the eclipse is caught right as it begins and to ensure having multiple data points on any unseen objects that might eclipse as well. During eclipse, continuous observations are important. Infrared (H-band) observations could be interesting, should the CHARA array image the event. The precision photometry in the weeks before and after the eclipse is requested in order to catch possible evidence for planets or other materials around the eclipsing star. Updated astrometry from the current epoch would greatly improve the eclipse preductions. Charts with comparison star sequence for alf Com may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). The PIs recommend using the comparison stars HD 113848 (39 Com, HR 4946, HIP 63948, V=5.990, B-V=0.39, F4V) and HD 114520 (HIP 64312, V=6.820, B-V=0.46,F2II). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See AAVSO Alert Notice 506

  16. Community College Internal Auditors: Internal Audit Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ronna; And Others

    This guidebook includes information compiled by the "Audit Manual" committee of Community College Internal Auditors (CCIA) from several California community college districts regarding their internal auditing practices. The first section of the guidebook discusses the purpose of internal audits, indicating that audits assist members of the…

  17. Deconstructed transverse mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Virzi, Joseph S.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large transverse mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" transverse mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed transverse mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed transverse variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.

  18. Soil variability in engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Natural geomaterials, as soils and rocks, show spatial variability and heterogeneity of physical and mechanical properties. They can be measured by in field and laboratory testing. The heterogeneity concerns different values of litho-technical parameters pertaining similar lithological units placed close to each other. On the contrary, the variability is inherent to the formation and evolution processes experienced by each geological units (homogeneous geomaterials on average) and captured as a spatial structure of fluctuation of physical property values about their mean trend, e.g. the unit weight, the hydraulic permeability, the friction angle, the cohesion, among others. The preceding spatial variations shall be managed by engineering models to accomplish reliable designing of structures and infrastructures. Materon (1962) introduced the Geostatistics as the most comprehensive tool to manage spatial correlation of parameter measures used in a wide range of earth science applications. In the field of the engineering geology, Vanmarcke (1977) developed the first pioneering attempts to describe and manage the inherent variability in geomaterials although Terzaghi (1943) already highlighted that spatial fluctuations of physical and mechanical parameters used in geotechnical designing cannot be neglected. A few years later, Mandelbrot (1983) and Turcotte (1986) interpreted the internal arrangement of geomaterial according to Fractal Theory. In the same years, Vanmarcke (1983) proposed the Random Field Theory providing mathematical tools to deal with inherent variability of each geological units or stratigraphic succession that can be resembled as one material. In this approach, measurement fluctuations of physical parameters are interpreted through the spatial variability structure consisting in the correlation function and the scale of fluctuation. Fenton and Griffiths (1992) combined random field simulation with the finite element method to produce the Random

  19. Neuroanatomical variability of religiosity.

    PubMed

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Barbey, Aron K; Su, Michael; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that religiosity, a set of traits variably expressed in the population, is modulated by neuroanatomical variability. We tested this idea by determining whether aspects of religiosity were predicted by variability in regional cortical volume. We performed structural magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 40 healthy adult participants who reported different degrees and patterns of religiosity on a survey. We identified four Principal Components of religiosity by Factor Analysis of the survey items and associated them with regional cortical volumes measured by voxel-based morphometry. Experiencing an intimate relationship with God and engaging in religious behavior was associated with increased volume of R middle temporal cortex, BA 21. Experiencing fear of God was associated with decreased volume of L precuneus and L orbitofrontal cortex BA 11. A cluster of traits related with pragmatism and doubting God's existence was associated with increased volume of the R precuneus. Variability in religiosity of upbringing was not associated with variability in cortical volume of any region. Therefore, key aspects of religiosity are associated with cortical volume differences. This conclusion complements our prior functional neuroimaging findings in elucidating the proximate causes of religion in the brain. PMID:19784372

  20. Félix de Roy: a life of variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shears, J.

    2011-08-01

    Félix de Roy (1883-1942), an internationally recognised amateur astronomer, made significant contributions to variable star research. As an active observer, he made some 91,000 visual estimates of a number of different variable stars. A Belgian national, he took refuge in England during World War I. While there, de Roy became well enough known to serve later as Director of the BAA Variable Star Section for seventeen years. Through this office, and his connections with other organisations around the world, he encouraged others to pursue the observation of variable stars. Not merely content to accumulate observational data, de Roy also analysed the data and published numerous papers.

  1. Variables Separation in Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Valery

    2004-12-01

    To solve the problem of exact integration of the field equations or equations of motion of matter in curved spacetimes one can use a class of Riemannian metrics for which the simplest equations of motion can be integrated by the complete separation of variables method. Here, we consider the particular case of the class of Stäckel metrics. These metrics admit integration of the Hamilton Jacobi equation for test particle by the complete separation of variables method. It appears that the other important equations of motion (Klein Gordon Fock, Dirac,Weyl) in curved spacetimes can be integrated by complete separation of variables method only for the metrics, belonging to the class of Stäckel spaces.

  2. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  3. Variable Lifting Index (VLI)

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300

  4. Low emission internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  5. An Overview of the AAVSO's Information Technology Infrastructure From 1967 to 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, R. C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Computer technology and data processing swept both society and the sciences like a wave in the latter half of the 20th century. We trace the AAVSO’s usage of computational and data processing technology from its beginnings in 1967, through 1997. We focus on equipment, people, and the purpose such computational power was put to, and compare and contrast the organization’s use of hardware and software with that of the wider industry.

  6. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  7. BISAC Variable Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology and Libraries, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents revision of Book Industry Systems Advisory Committee (BISAC) format designed specifically for electronic transmission of purchase orders for monograph or series titles combining fixed and variable length data fields which was approved in January 1983. Special characters, sample address descriptions, summary of fixed records, glossary, and…

  8. Variable capacity gasification burner

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, D.I.

    1985-03-05

    A variable capacity burner that may be used in gasification processes, the burner being adjustable when operating in its intended operating environment to operate at two different flow capacities, with the adjustable parts being dynamically sealed within a statically sealed structural arrangement to prevent dangerous blow-outs of the reactants to the atmosphere.

  9. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  10. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  11. Variable camber rotor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L.; Cowan, J.; Mchugh, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Deployment of variable camber concepts on helicopter rotors was analytically assessed. It was determined that variable camber extended the operating range of helicopters provided that the correct compromise can be obtained between performance/loads gains and mechanical complexity. A number of variable camber concepts were reviewed on a two dimensional basis to determine the usefulness of leading edge, trailing edge and overall camber variation schemes. The most powerful method to vary camber was through the trailing edge flaps undergoing relatively small motions (-5 deg to +15 deg). The aerodynamic characteristics of the NASA/Ames A-1 airfoil with 35% and 50% plain trailing edge flaps were determined by means of current subcritical and transonic airfoil design methods and used by rotor performance and loads analysis codes. The most promising variable camber schedule reviewed was a configuration with a 35% plain flap deployment in an on/off mode near the tip of a blade. Preliminary results show approximately 11% reduction in power is possible at 192 knots and a rotor thrust coefficient of 0.09. The potential demonstrated indicates a significant potential for expanding the operating envelope of the helicopter. Further investigation into improving the power saving and defining the improvement in the operational envelope of the helicopter is recommended.

  12. Slotted variable camber flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Variable camber actuator assemblies broaden the range of speeds at which lift to drag performance is maximized for slotted flap wings. Lift is improved over a broader range of cruising speeds by varying wing camber with rotational flap movements that do not introduce wing slots and induced drag. Forward flaps are secured to forward flange links which extended from, and are a part of forward flap linkage assemblies. The forward flaps rotate about flap pivots with their rotational displacement controlled by variable camber actuator assemblies located between the forward flaps and the forward flange links. Rear flaps are held relative to the forward flaps by rear flap linkage assemblies which may act independently from the forward flap linkage assemblies and the variable camber actuator assemblies. Wing camber is varied by rotating the flaps with the variable camber actuator assemblies while the flaps are in a deployed or tucked position. Rotating the flaps in a tucked position does not introduce significant wing surface discontinuities, and reduces aircraft fuel consumption on most flight profiles.

  13. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  14. Genetic variability in Macadamia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic variability analysis involving 45 accessions of Macadamia including four species, M. integrifolia, M. tetraphylla, M. ternifolia, and M. hildebrandii and a wild relative, Hicksbeachia pinnatifolia was performed usingeight enzyme systems encoded by 16 loci (Gpi-1 and 2, Idh-1 and 2, Lap, Md...

  15. Climate Variability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Climate Variability Program briefly describes research activities of 40 Principal Investigators who are funded by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Research Division. The report is focused on the year 1998. Utilization of satellite observations is a singularity of research on climate science and technology at JPL. Research at JPL has two foci: generate new knowledge and develop new technology.

  16. Variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer cost savings to a producer; however, the full potential of the benefits and savings cannot be realized if water ...

  17. Variable Rate Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers with the ability to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer a producer great cost savings; however, the full potential of these benefits and savings cannot...

  18. Tides and Decadal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms by which oceanic tides and decadal variability in the oceans are connected. We distinguish between variability caused by tides and variability observed in the tides themselves. Both effects have been detected at some level. The most obvious connection with decadal timescales is through the 18.6-year precession of the moon's orbit plane. This precession gives rise to a small tide of the same period and to 18.6-year modulations in the phase and amplitudes of short-period tides. The 18.6-year "node tide" is very small, no more than 2 cm anywhere, and in sea level data it is dominated by the ocean's natural Variability. Some authors have naively attributed climate variations with periods near 19 years directly to the node tide, but the amplitude of the tide is too small for this mechanism to be operative. The more likely explanation (Loder and Garrett, JGR, 83, 1967-70, 1978) is that the 18.6-y modulations in short-period tides, especially h e principal tide M2, cause variations in ocean mixing, which is then observed in temperature and other climatic indicators. Tidally forced variability has also been proposed by some authors, either in response to occasional (and highly predictable) tidal extremes or as a nonlinear low-frequency oscillation caused by interactions between short-period tides. The former mechanism can produce only short-duration events hardly more significant than normal tidal ranges, but the latter mechanism can in principle induce low-frequency oscillations. The most recent proposal of this type is by Keeling and Whorf, who highlight the 1800-year spectral peak discovered by Bond et al. (1997). But the proposal appears contrived and should be considered, in the words of Munk et al. (2002), "as the most likely among unlikely candidates."

  19. Grain Size and Morphological Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, E. L.; Reniers, A. J.; Macmahan, J. H.; Thornton, E. B.

    2009-12-01

    Grain size on natural beaches has traditionally been assumed to be uniform and modeling efforts assume a single mean grain size for an entire beach environment. Many recent studies contradict this assumption and suggest that sediment grain size on a beach is not homogeneous and that variations in sediment size and supply are important in sediment transport and morphodynamics at all scales. Unfortunately, measuring grain size is tedious and time consuming. Therefore, in spite of the evidence pointing to the importance of grain size in sediment transport and morphodynamics, many previous studies have been based on only a few field samples. Rubin (2004) introduced a technique for measuring surface grain size in situ in rivers and deeper coastal waters, using a digital camera and auto-correlation of digital images. Using this technique, information about the surface grain size distribution can be obtained quickly and inexpensively. Following Rubin (2004), we have developed a mobile digital imaging system (DIS) for surveying grain size on beaches. The DIS was used during three experiments: RCEX and REX, both rip current experiments in Monterey, CA (April 2007 and April 2009) and Truc Vert ’08, a multi-institutional, international experiment, on the Atlantic coast of France in March 2008. In 2007 and 2008 spatial surveys of surface grain size were completed every few days over large (~500x500m) intertidal areas. The 2009 experiment focused on twice-daily sampling of two cross shore lines to examine temporal grain size variability of the intertidal beach. Preliminary results suggest that grain size varies spatially with the morphology of beach features (eg, rip channels and shoals) and temporally with changes in tide level, wave energy, and morphodynamics. These data are being used to examine the relationship between morphological, sedimentological and hydrodynamic variability.

  20. Natural variability of the climate as predicted by a simple ocean model with parameterized thermohaline circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.G.; Li, S.

    1995-12-31

    Variability of the Earth`s climate can take place on many time scales as a result of internal features. This natural variability is important to humans since it affects such important human enterprises as agriculture, floods, droughts, etc. The authors investigate natural variability within a simple ocean model.

  1. Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with various combinations of internal geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of five geometric design parameters on the internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The geometric variables on the expansion-ramp surface of the upper flap consisted of ramp chordal angle, ramp length, and initial ramp angle. On the lower flap, the geometric variables consisted of flap angle and flap length. Both internal performance and static-pressure distributions on the centerlines of the upper and lower flaps were obtained for all 43 nozzle configurations tested.

  2. [Socioeconomic variables and fertility].

    PubMed

    Arguello, O

    1980-08-01

    While making comparative analyses of data collected by the World Fertility Survey regarding Latin America, a group of investigators of CELADE (Centro Latinoamericano de Demografia) realized that the selection of economic variables for the study of fertility had serious limitations. Such limitations did not allow the elaboration of a theory which took into account the complicated process of fertility, in all its socioeconomic, cultural, and psychological manifestations. Thus, this paper intends to lay the theoretical basis for the selection of all relevant variables, distinguishing, for example, the average fertility of women according to area of residence, place of early socialization, migrant status, social status, occupation of husband, level of instruction, occupation, and all changes in occupational activities of women in fertile age. PMID:12336394

  3. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  4. Variable Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, T.; Iwashita, Y.; Kumada, M.; Spencer, C.M.; /SLAC

    2007-05-23

    A permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) is one of the candidates for the final focus lens in a linear collider. An over 120 T/m strong variable permanent magnet quadrupole is achieved by the introduction of saturated iron and a 'double ring structure'. A fabricated PMQ achieved 24 T integrated gradient with 20 mm bore diameter, 100 mm magnet diameter and 20 cm pole length. The strength of the PMQ is adjustable in 1.4 T steps, due to its 'double ring structure': the PMQ is split into two nested rings; the outer ring is sliced along the beam line into four parts and is rotated to change the strength. This paper describes the variable PMQ from fabrication to recent adjustments.

  5. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  6. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

  7. Variable laser attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, S.R.

    1987-05-29

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

  8. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  9. Variable percentage sampler

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    A remotely operable sampler is provided for obtaining variable percentage samples of nuclear fuel particles and the like for analyses. The sampler has a rotating cup for a sample collection chamber designed so that the effective size of the sample inlet opening to the cup varies with rotational speed. Samples of a desired size are withdrawn from a flowing stream of particles without a deterrent to the flow of remaining particles.

  10. Climate Variability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Climate Variability Program briefly describes research activities of Principal Investigators who are funded by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Research Division. The report is focused on the year 2001. Utilization of satellite observations is a singularity of research on climate science and technology at JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Research at JPL has two foci: generate new knowledge and develop new technology.

  11. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  12. Grain Size and Morphological Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmahan, J.; Gallagher, E.; Reniers, A.; Thornton, E.

    2008-12-01

    Grain size on natural beaches has traditionally been assumed to be uniform and modeling efforts assume a single mean grain size for an entire beach environment. Many recent studies contradict this assumption and suggest that sediment grain size on a beach is not homogeneous and that variations in sediment size and supply are important in sediment transport and morphodynamics at all scales. Unfortunately, measuring grain size is difficult, tedious and time consuming. Therefore, in spite of the evidence pointing to the importance of grain size in sediment transport and morphodynamics, many previous studies have been based on only a few field samples. Rubin (2004) introduced a technique for measuring surface grain size in situ in rivers and deeper coastal waters, using a digital camera and auto-correlation of digital images. Using this technique, information about the surface grain size distribution can be obtained quickly and inexpensively. Following Rubin (2004), we have developed a mobile digital imaging system (DIS) for surveying grain size on beaches. The DIS was used during two experiments: RCEX, a rip current experiment in Monterey, CA in April 2007 and Truc Vert '08, a multi-institutional, international experiment, on the Atlantic coast of France in March 2008. Preliminary results suggest that grain size varies spatially with the morphology of beach features and temporally with changes in tide level, wave energy, and morphodynamics. These data are being used to examine the relationship between morphological, sedimentological and hydrodynamic variability.

  13. IUE observations of cataclysmic variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula

    1993-06-01

    Twenty two approved International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) programs were studied over a 14 year period. These programs are listed. The observations and subsequent analysis centered on cataclysmic variables (close binaries with a late main sequence star transferring material to a primary white dwarf via an accretion disk). The early studies highlighted the flux distribution of the accretion disk at outburst and quiescence, while later studies accomplished time-resolved observations throughout the orbital cycles, the study of the outflowing winds present at outburst, the study of the white dwarf in those systems with low accretion rate. There are 39 publications resulting from this work which are listed. These results include those for individual systems (Stepanian's star, Lanning 10, AM Her, MV Lyr, TV Col, VW Hyi, T Leo, IR Gem, TT Ari, Z Cam, BV Pup, IP Peg, PG1030+590, V1315 Aql, SW UMa, V426 Oph, WZ Sge, BY Cam, and U Gem) as well as review articles in journals and publications from reviews at meetings that summarize the impact of IUE on the study of accretion disks, white dwarfs, and hot spots resulting from stream impact as well as magnetic accretion columns.

  14. IUE observations of cataclysmic variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, Paula

    1993-01-01

    Twenty two approved International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) programs were studied over a 14 year period. These programs are listed. The observations and subsequent analysis centered on cataclysmic variables (close binaries with a late main sequence star transferring material to a primary white dwarf via an accretion disk). The early studies highlighted the flux distribution of the accretion disk at outburst and quiescence, while later studies accomplished time-resolved observations throughout the orbital cycles, the study of the outflowing winds present at outburst, the study of the white dwarf in those systems with low accretion rate. There are 39 publications resulting from this work which are listed. These results include those for individual systems (Stepanian's star, Lanning 10, AM Her, MV Lyr, TV Col, VW Hyi, T Leo, IR Gem, TT Ari, Z Cam, BV Pup, IP Peg, PG1030+590, V1315 Aql, SW UMa, V426 Oph, WZ Sge, BY Cam, and U Gem) as well as review articles in journals and publications from reviews at meetings that summarize the impact of IUE on the study of accretion disks, white dwarfs, and hot spots resulting from stream impact as well as magnetic accretion columns.

  15. A Comparison of International and Domestic Tertiary Students in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Dempsey, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    In this study international and domestic students were compared on variables such as accommodation and financial satisfaction, social support, mismatched expectations, academic stress, dysfunctional coping, and psychological distress. International and domestic students (N = 86 for each group), enrolled at a large Australian university based in a…

  16. Conversion Intentions of Interns: What Are the Motivating Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Jessica L.; Good, Linda K.; Gardner, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate interns' supervisory support expectations, psychological contract obligations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement opportunities and affective organisational commitment in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how these variables influence interns' conversion intentions.…

  17. Estimating the Growth of Internal Evidence Guiding Perceptual Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Casimir J. H.; Davies, J. Rhys

    2011-01-01

    Perceptual decision-making is thought to involve a gradual accrual of noisy evidence. Temporal integration of the evidence reduces the relative contribution of dynamic internal noise to the decision variable, thereby boosting its signal-to-noise ratio. We aimed to estimate the internal evidence guiding perceptual decisions over time, using a novel…

  18. Relations between Internalizing and Externalizing Problems in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Lisanne L.; Otten, Roy; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Kuijpers, Rowella C. W. M.; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood internalizing and externalizing problems are closely related and often co-occur. Directional models have been employed to test how these problems are related, while few studies have tested a third variables model. Objective: This study investigates whether internalizing and externalizing problems are reciprocally or…

  19. Personal and Contextual Factors Related to Internalizing Problems during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliva, Alfredo; Parra, Águeda; Reina, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over the past decades, ample empirical evidence has been collected about the factors linked to internalizing problems during adolescence. However, there is a lack of research that use holistic approaches to study the joint analysis of a series of contextual and personal variables considered to be related to internalizing problems.…

  20. Internal-External Control and Responses to Others Needing Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamiell, James T.; Phares, E. Jerry

    Internal-external control is an important individual differences variable that was introduced in a systematic series of social learning studies by Rotter. The I-E dimension refers to the degree to which people view themselves as responsible for the occurrence or lack of occurrence of reinforcement (internals), as opposed to viewing luck, fate,…

  1. Some Personal Thoughts on TV Corvi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, D. H.

    2015-06-01

    As part of the AAVSO's role in celebrating the United Nations' International Year of Light, I have been asked to prepare a brief retrospective on my interest in Clyde Tombaugh's star, TV Corvi. Because of the clever light pollution ordinances that have governed the night sky surrounding the area around Tucson, Arizona, and the International Dark Sky Association, our Jarnac Observatory has been blessed with a dark night sky that often permits observations down to 19th magnitude, the star's suspected minimum magnitude. Preparing this article has also helped me to understand that variable star observing is not just science; it is community. My own understanding of the behavior of Tombaugh's Star is gathered from my long friendship with Clyde Tombaugh, discoverer of Pluto and the scientist who opened the door to the Kuiper Belt to other AAVSO observers over many years, Steve Howell, from the Planetary Science Institute, who alerted me to the possibility that one component of TV Crv is a brown dwarf, and the pure joy of being able to observe this faint variable star under a dark sky.

  2. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePlus

    ... partner – it's your best friend. Welcome. The Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) is a 501 (c) 3 non- ... and cures is your participation in the Hepatitis Foundation International Registry. Whether you are affected, a caregiver, ...

  3. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Register for the 25th Annual ITNS Symposium The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) cordially invites transplant nurses ... Barriers (PDF) This pocket guide, developed by the International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS), provides an overview of ...

  4. Postpartum Support International

    MedlinePlus

    ... An Emergency Help in my Area: Support Map International Support PSI Warmline (English and Spanish) PSI Ayuda ... Psychosis Related Tragedies Order PSI Conference Recordings The International Marcé Society Research and Review Multi-Language Resources ...

  5. Melanoma International Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gershenwald, MD May 09, 2015 Our Awards Melanoma International Foundation Our Mission: To develop personalized strategies with ... the state of Pennsylvania, certificate #29498 © 2013 Melanoma International Foundation. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of ...

  6. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-08-15

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality.

  7. Zoonoses and climate variability.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Rocio; Sandoval, Claudia M; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Vivas, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Leishmaniasis in the Americas is transmitted by Lutzomyia spp., which have many animal reservoirs. Previous studies indicated potential changes in vectors of climate-related distribution, but impact outcomes need to be further studied. We report climatic and El Niño events during 1985-2002 that may have had an impact on leishmaniasis in 11 southern departments of Colombia: Amazonas, Caquetá, Cauca (Ca), Huila, Meta (Mt), Nariño, Putumayo (Py), Tolima, Valle (Va), Vaupes (Vp), and Vichada. Climatic data were obtained by satellite and epidemiologic data were obtained from the Health Ministry. NOAA climatic classification and SOI/ONI indexes were used as indicators of global climate variability. Yearly variation comparisons and median trend deviations were made for disease incidence and climatic variability. During this period there was considerable climatic variability, with a strong El Niño for 6 years and a strong La Niña for 8. During this period, 19,212 cases of leishmaniasis were registered, for a mean of 4756.83 cases/year. Disease in the whole region increased (mean of 4.98%) during the El Niño years in comparison to the La Niña years, but there were differences between departments with increases during El Niño (Mt 6.95%, Vp 4.84%), but the rest showed an increase during La Niña (1.61%-64.41%). Differences were significant in Va (P= 0.0092), Py (P= 0.0001), Ca (P= 0.0313), and for the whole region (P= 0.0023), but not in the rest of the departments. The importance of climate change is shown by shifts in insect and animal distributions. These data reflect the importance of climate on transmission of leishmaniasis and open further investigations related to forecasting and monitoring systems, where understanding the relationship between zoonoses and climate variability could help to improve the management of these emerging and reemerging diseases. PMID:19120241

  8. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  9. Climate Variability and Change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a science strategy outlining the major natural science issues facing the Nation in the next decade. The science strategy consists of six science directions of critical importance, focusing on areas where natural science can make a substantial contribution to the well-being of the Nation and the world. This fact sheet focuses on climate variability and change and how USGS research can strengthen the Nation with information needed to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

  10. Unit III: International Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxey, Phyllis

    1983-01-01

    This lesson helps students understand the global network involved in international events. Students have an opportunity to examine the impact of international law and the role of international organizations, national governments, and private individuals in the effort to secure the release of United States hostages in Iran. (AM)

  11. A Realistic International Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Criticizes college textbooks for adopting a "party line" of laissez-faire economic doctrine which asserts the benefits of free trade. Offers an alternative interpretation of international trade, covering such topics as the effect of unregulated international trade on wage levels, and international lending. (JDH)

  12. Improving Internal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonus, Thaddeus, Ed.

    Guidelines for developing the internal communications of colleges and universities, researching internal communication needs, and increasing information flow through traditional and nontraditional media are provided in 11 articles. Titles and authors include the following: "Work for an Open Internal Communication Policy" (Thaddeus Bonus); "Five…

  13. Building Internationally Literate Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Katie; Philip, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How can we as librarians bring children and books from a variety of cultures and backgrounds together to create a more internationally literate community? This workshop addresses that question with a discussion of what it means to be internationally literate as well as internationally-minded, followed by an outline of some evaluation criteria…

  14. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  15. Specification of ISS Plasma Environment Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Neergaard, Linda F.; Bui, Them H.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Barsamian, H.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Quantifying spacecraft charging risks and associated hazards for the International Space Station (ISS) requires a plasma environment specification for the natural variability of ionospheric temperature (Te) and density (Ne). Empirical ionospheric specification and forecast models such as the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model typically only provide long term (seasonal) mean Te and Ne values for the low Earth orbit environment. This paper describes a statistical analysis of historical ionospheric low Earth orbit plasma measurements from the AE-C, AE-D, and DE-2 satellites used to derive a model of deviations of observed data values from IRI-2001 estimates of Ne, Te parameters for each data point to provide a statistical basis for modeling the deviations of the plasma environment from the IRI model output. Application of the deviation model with the IRI-2001 output yields a method for estimating extreme environments for the ISS spacecraft charging analysis.

  16. Specification of the ISS Plasma Environment Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Neergaard, Linda F.; Bui, Them H.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Barsamian, H.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying the spacecraft charging risks and corresponding hazards for the International Space Station (ISS) requires a plasma environment specification describing the natural variability of ionospheric temperature (Te) and density (Ne). Empirical ionospheric specification and forecast models such as the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model typically only provide estimates of long term (seasonal) mean Te and Ne values for the low Earth orbit environment. Knowledge of the Te and Ne variability as well as the likelihood of extreme deviations from the mean values are required to estimate both the magnitude and frequency of occurrence of potentially hazardous spacecraft charging environments for a given ISS construction stage and flight configuration. This paper describes the statistical analysis of historical ionospheric low Earth orbit plasma measurements used to estimate Ne, Te variability in the ISS flight environment. The statistical variability analysis of Ne and Te enables calculation of the expected frequency of Occurrence of any particular values of Ne and Te, especially those that correspond to possibly hazardous spacecraft charging environments. The database used in the original analysis included measurements from the AE-C, AE-D, and DE-2 satellites. Recent work on the database has added additional satellites to the database and ground based incoherent scatter radar observations as well. Deviations of the data values from the IRI estimated Ne, Te parameters for each data point provide a statistical basis for modeling the deviations of the plasma environment from the IRI model output. This technique, while developed specifically for the Space Station analysis, can also be generalized to provide ionospheric plasma environment risk specification models for low Earth orbit over an altitude range of 200 km through approximately 1000 km.

  17. Variable venturi type carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Tahata, M.

    1986-09-02

    A variable venturi type carburetor is described comprising a carburetor body provided with a suction passage therein for flow of air through the passage, a slide valve supported by the body for slidable movement across the suction passage to serve as a variable venturi, a butterfly throttle valve pivotably supported by the carburetor body downstream of the slide valve, interlocking means connecting the slide valve and the butterfly throttle valve together for operating in correspondence with one another, operating means connected to one of the valves for operating the same by application of an external force thereto. A low-speed fuel nozzle opens into the suction passage in the vicinity of the butterfly throttle valve, an intermediate and a high speed main fuel nozzle opens into the suction passage opposite the slide valve, and a low and intermediate-speed primary fuel nozzle opens into the suction passage between the slide valve and the butterfly throttle valve. The slide valve includes a bottom portion having a front side surface facing upstream in the suction passage and a rear side surface facing downstream in the suction passage, the front and rear side surfaces having lower edges which are located in the same horizontal plane, the rear side surface being provided with an inverted cutaway.

  18. Glycemic variability: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Satya Krishna, Surabhi Venkata; Kota, Sunil K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT) had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV) is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice. PMID:23961476

  19. Variable speed transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, W.S.

    1987-08-11

    This patent describes a variable speed transmission for transmitting rotational forces between a first shaft and a second shaft wherein a sprocket is mounted on the first shaft and a variable effective diameter pulley, having opposed inclined chain-belt engaging surfaces, is mounted on the second shaft, an endless chain-belt assembly for transmitting rotational forces. The assembly has side edges thereon, comprising: a first portion defining the edges of the chain-belt assembly and having a plurality of links defining a surface corresponding to the opposed inclined chain-belt engaging surfaces on the pulley; and a second portion intermediate of the first portion having a plurality of links for engaging the teeth on the sprocket, the links being joined by a plurality of pins extending transverse to the links; and a flexible shield mounted over the links and retained relative thereto by the pins wherein the flexible shield surrounds the links of the second portion of the chain-belt assembly and retains lubrication for the second portion and to prevent same for communicating to the first portion of the chain-belt assembly.

  20. International students' enrollment in IPTA by using multilevel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, Phoong Seuk; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul

    2012-09-01

    The increases of demand on knowledge-based and production-based market force the growth of higher education. International students' enrollment contributes to economic growth and increase country's income, university reputation and name; promote the competitive of education and training markets. This paper used multilevel analysis to study the international students' enrollment in Malaysia public university. Student's background variables and institution background variables were study in this paper and the relationship among them also been investigated. Result shows that institution type is a significance factor on international students' enrollment in Malaysia public university.

  1. Current Climate Variability & Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Criswell, B.; Elliott, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    Current Climate Variability & Change is the ninth among a suite of ten interconnected, sequential labs that address all 39 climate-literacy concepts in the U.S. Global Change Research Program's Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. The labs are as follows: Solar Radiation & Seasons, Stratospheric Ozone, The Troposphere, The Carbon Cycle, Global Surface Temperature, Glacial-Interglacial Cycles, Temperature Changes over the Past Millennium, Climates & Ecosystems, Current Climate Variability & Change, and Future Climate Change. All are inquiry-based, on-line products designed in a way that enables students to construct their own knowledge of a topic. Questions representative of various levels of Webb's depth of knowledge are embedded in each lab. In addition to the embedded questions, each lab has three or four essential questions related to the driving questions for the lab suite. These essential questions are presented as statements at the beginning of the material to represent the lab objectives, and then are asked at the end as questions to function as a summative assessment. For example, the Current Climate Variability & Change is built around these essential questions: (1) What has happened to the global temperature at the Earth's surface, in the middle troposphere, and in the lower stratosphere over the past several decades?; (2) What is the most likely cause of the changes in global temperature over the past several decades and what evidence is there that this is the cause?; and (3) What have been some of the clearly defined effects of the change in global temperature on the atmosphere and other spheres of the Earth system? An introductory Prezi allows the instructor to assess students' prior knowledge in relation to these questions, while also providing 'hooks' to pique their interest related to the topic. The lab begins by presenting examples of and key differences between climate variability (e.g., Mt. Pinatubo eruption) and

  2. Catalogues of variable stars from Parenago to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.

    2006-04-01

    After World War II, the International Astronomical Union made Soviet astronomers responsible for variable-star catalogues. This work has been continued ever since the first edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars compiled by the team headed by P.P. Parenago and B.V. Kukarkin and published in 1948. Currently, the catalogue work is a joint project of the Institute of Astronomy (Russian Academy of Sciences) and the Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow University). This paper is a brief review of recent trends in the field of variable-star catalogues. Problems as well as new prospects related to modern large-scale automatic photometric sky surveys are discussed.

  3. Turbo-generator control with variable valve actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk, Carl T.

    2011-02-22

    An internal combustion engine incorporating a turbo-generator and one or more variably activated exhaust valves. The exhaust valves are adapted to variably release exhaust gases from a combustion cylinder during a combustion cycle to an exhaust system. The turbo-generator is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the exhaust system and rotationally harness energy therefrom to produce electrical power. A controller is adapted to command the exhaust valve to variably open in response to a desired output for the turbo-generator.

  4. Direct Relationship Between Perceptual and Motor Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liston, Dorion B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2010-01-01

    The time that elapses between stimulus onset and the onset of a saccadic eye movement is longer and more variable than can be explained by neural transmission times and synaptic delays (Carpenter, 1981, in: Eye Movements: Cognition & Visual Perception, Earlbaum). In theory, noise underlying response-time (RT) variability could arise at any point along the sensorimotor cascade, from sensory noise arising Vvithin the early visual processing shared Vvith perception to noise in the motor criterion or commands necessary to trigger movements. These two loci for internal noise can be distinguished empirically; sensory internal noise predicts that response time Vvill correlate Vvith perceived stimulus magnitude whereas motor internal noise predicts no such correlation. Methods. We used the data described by Liston and Stone (2008, JNS 28:13866-13875), in which subjects performed a 2AFC saccadic brightness discrimination task and the perceived brightness of the chosen stimulus was then quantified in a second 21FC perceptual task. Results. We binned each subject's data into quartiles for both signal strength (from dimmest to brightest) and RT (from slowest to fastest) and analyzed the trends in perceived brightness. We found significant effects of both signal strength (as expected) and RT on normalized perceived brightness (both p less than 0.0001, 2-way ANOVA), without significant interaction (p = 0.95, 2-way ANOVA). A plot of normalized perceived brightness versus normalized RT show's that more than half of the variance was shared (r2 = 0.56, P less than 0.0001). To rule out any possibility that some signal-strength related artifact was generating this effect, we ran a control analysis on pairs of trials with repeated presentations of identical stimuli and found that stimuli are perceived to be brighter on trials with faster saccades (p less than 0.001, paired t-test across subjects). Conclusion. These data show that shared early visual internal noise jitters perceived

  5. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  6. Observational constraints on interannual variability projections in CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodina, Aleksandra; Fischer, Erich M.; Knutti, Reto

    2014-05-01

    Impacts of climate change are sensitive not only to changes in the mean state but also to potential changes in the internal variability of the climate system at diurnal to interannual and multi-decadal time scales. Internal variability arises from nonlinear interactions and complex feedbacks between ocean, sea ice, atmosphere and land surface without any external forcing. However, an external forcing may change both magnitude, spatial patterns and the time scales of these variations. It is crucial to understand whether and on what temporal and spatial scales internal variability will undergo changes under anthropogenic radiative forcing and to identify the underlying mechanisms. To address these questions, we here use model simulations of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 database (CMIP5) with historical (1850-2005) - RCP8.5 (2006-2100) concentration pathway. First, we show over which latitudes CMIP5 models simulate robust changes in variability. Second, we explore whether models with low present-day internal variability project changes that substantially differ from those models with high present-day internal variability. Such an inter-model relationship is found over the high-latitudes of both hemispheres. For the regions and seasons, for which a relationship across the multi-model ensemble exists, we use observations and reanalyses, to constrain the model projections. This model constraint is based on the assumption that models with a more realistic representation of present-day variability yield more reliable projections. Once a relationship is identified, physical understanding becomes crucial because it must have a strong physical grounding to justify the constraint. We explore mechanisms that explain the inter-model correlation between current variability and its future change especially at high latitudes. We use a "joint projection" approach, which is based on the fact that multiple climate variables are correlated over different scales in

  7. The variable density aircraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    In the variable density aircraft concept the aircraft's density is varied by varying its volume. This is accomplished by combining a variable volume hull, which is called the dynapod, with intrinsic means for the controlled variation of a mass of working fluid or substance within the aircraft. The dynapod is a hinged structure and follows the volumetric variations of the working fluid. The result is a variable density hull, which with the attachment of power plants, etc., becomes a variable density aircraft.

  8. Variable-Resolution GCMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Variable resolution GCMs using a global stretched grid (SG) with enhanced regional resolute over multiple (four) areas of interest represent a viable new approach to regional climate and climate change studies and applications. The four areas, one at each global quadrant, include major global monsoonal circulations over North America, South America, India-China, and Australia. The SG-approach is an ideal tool for representing consistent interactions of global/large- and regional/mesoscales. It is an alternative to the widely used nested-grid approach. Several existing SG-GCMs are briefly described. The major discussion is based on the GEOS (Goddard Earth Observing System) SG-GCM regional climate simulations.

  9. Variable mixer propulsion cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundell, D. J.; Mchugh, D. P.; Foster, T.; Brown, R. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A design technique, method and apparatus are delineated for controlling the bypass gas stream pressure and varying the bypass ratio of a mixed flow gas turbine engine in order to achieve improved performance. The disclosed embodiments each include a mixing device for combining the core and bypass gas streams. The variable area mixing device permits the static pressures of the core and bypass streams to be balanced prior to mixing at widely varying bypass stream pressure levels. The mixed flow gas turbine engine therefore operates efficiently over a wide range of bypass ratios and the dynamic pressure of the bypass stream is maintained at a level which will keep the engine inlet airflow matched to an optimum design level throughout a wide range of engine thrust settings.

  10. Variable cycle engine

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, A.P.; Sprunger, E.V.

    1980-09-16

    A variable cycle turboshaft engine includes a remote fan system and respective high and low pressure systems for selectively driving the fan system in such a manner as to provide VTOL takeoff capability and minimum specific fuel consumption (SFC) at cruise and loiter conditions. For takeoff the fan system is primarily driven by the relatively large low pressure system whose combustor receives the motive fluid from a core bypass duct and, for cruise and loiter conditions, the fan system is driven by both a relatively small high pressure core and the low pressure system with its combustor inoperative. A mixer is disposed downstream of the high pressure system for mixing the relatively cold air from the bypass duct and the relatively hot air from the core prior to its flow to the low pressure turbine.

  11. Variable speed controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Younger, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This report details a new design for a variable speed controller which can be used to operate lunar machinery without the astronaut using his or her upper body. In order to demonstrate the design, a treadle for an industrial sewing machine was redesigned to be used by a standing operator. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from sit down to stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with a sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator along with the ergonomics involved. Included with the design analysis are suggestions for possible uses for the speed controller in other applications.

  12. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability; implement satellite analysis procedures in support of this effort, and to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis forecast systems at the National Meteorological Center (NMC). Composite satellite radiance patterns describe features detectable well before the development of synoptic scale tropical plumes. These typical features were extracted from historical files of Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) radiance observations for a pair of tropical plumes which developed during January 1989. Signals were inserted into the NMC operational medium range forecast model and a suite of model integrations were conducted. Many of the 48 h model errors of the historical forecasts were eliminated by the inclusion of more complete satellite observations. Three studies in satellite radiance analysis progressed. An analysis which blended TOVS moisture channels, OLR observations and European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model analysis to generate fields of total precipitable water comparable to those estimated from Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) mu-wave observations. This study demonstrated that a 10 y climatology of precipitable water over the oceans is feasible, using available infrared observations (OLR and TOVS) and model analysis (ECMWF, NMC or similar quality). The estimates are sensitive to model quality and the estimating model must be updated with operational model changes. Coe developed a set of tropical plume and ITCZ composites from TOVS observations, and from NMC and ECMWF analyses which had been passed through a radiative transfer model to simulate TOVS radiances. The composites have been completed as well as many statistical diagnostics of individual TOVS channels. Analysis of the computations is commencing. Chung has initiated a study of the

  13. Preservice Teachers' Understanding of Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sue; Bergman, Judy

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the research on middle school students' understanding of variables and explores preservice elementary and middle school teachers' knowledge of variables. According to research studies, middle school students have limited understanding of variables. Many studies have examined the performance of middle school students and offered…

  14. Predicting Teacher Retention Using Stress and Support Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Daniel A.; Seal, Andrea K.; Martin, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Teacher attrition is a significant international concern facing administrators. Although a considerable amount of literature exists related to the causes of job dissatisfaction and teachers leaving the profession, relatively few theoretical models test the complex interrelationships between these variables. The goal of this paper is to…

  15. Identification of the Predicator Variables of Candidate Teacher Teaching Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozpolat, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the internal and external teaching motivations of 3rd and 4th year students of the Faculty of Education of Cumhuriyet University are predicted by the variables of gender, department, year level, conscious preference of department they are studying in, whether there is a teacher in their family,…

  16. As International as They Would Let Us Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy has always crossed borders, continents, and oceans. AAVSO itself has roughly half its membership residing outside the USA. In this excessively long paper, I look briefly at ancient and medieval beginnings and more extensively at the 18th and 19th centuries, plunge into the tragedies associated with World War I, and then try to say something relatively cheerful about subsequent events. Most of the people mentioned here you will have heard of before (Eratosthenes, Copernicus, Kepler, Olbers, Lockyer, Eddington…) others, just as important, perhaps not (von Zach, Gould, Argelander, Freundlich…). Division into heroes and villains is neither necessary nor possible, though some of the stories are tragic. In the end, all one can really say about astronomers' efforts to keep open channels of communication that others wanted to choke off is, "the best we can do is the best we can do."

  17. Post-Polio Health International including International Ventilator Users Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... post-polio.org. Check out International Ventilator Users Network Post-Polio Health International's mission is to enhance ... Polio Health International (PHI) Including International Ventilator Users Network 4207 Lindell Blvd., #110, Saint Louis, MO 63108- ...

  18. The International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.

    2007-01-01

    In 1957 a program of international research, inspired by the International Polar Years of 1882 and 1932, was organized as the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to study global phenomena of the Earth and geospace. Fifty years later, the world s space science community will again come together for international programs of scientific collaboration: the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), the Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY), and the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007. This time, research will extend out into the Heliosphere to focus on solar-terrestrial-planetary interactions. The ambitious plans for the IHY, eGY and IPY incorporate the activities of scientists in 191 nations, as well as the IGY Gold Historical Preservation initiative, plus a series of coordinated campaigns involving more than 100 instruments and models, education and public outreach programs, a developing nations instrument development program, and opportunities for supported research worldwide. The presentation will focus on the efforts and operations which will make these activities possible.

  19. International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, J. M.; Harrison, R.; Poland, A.; St.Cyr, O. C.; Thompson, B. J.; Rabin, Douglas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 1957 a program of international research, inspired by the International Polar Years of 1882-83 and 1932-33, was organized as the International Geophysical Year (IGY) to study global phenomena of the Earth and geospace. The IGY involved about 60,000 scientists from 66 nations, working at thousands of stations, from pole to pole to obtain simultaneous, global observations on Earth and in space. There had never been anything like it before. The fiftieth anniversary of the International Geophysical Year will occur in 2007. We propose to organize an international program of scientific collaboration for this time period called the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Like it predecessors, the IHY will focus on fundamental global questions of Earth science.

  20. Color and Variability Characteristics of Point Sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, M E; Everett, M E; Howell, S B

    2005-03-07

    The authors present an analysis of the color and variability characteristics for point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey (FSVS). The FSVS cataloged {approx} 23 square degrees in BVI filters from {approx} 16-24 mag to investigate variability in faint sources at moderate to high Galactic latitudes. Point source completeness is found to be >83% for a selected representative sample (V - 17.5-22.0 mag, B-V = 0.0-1.5) containing both photometric B, V detections and 80% of the time-sampled V data available compared to a basic internal source completeness of 99%. Multi-epoch (10-30) observations in V spanning minutes to years modeled by light curve simulations reveal amplitude sensitivities to {approx} 0.015-0.075 mag over a representative V = 18-22 mag range. Periodicity determinations appear viable to time-scales of an order 1 day or less using the most sampled fields ({approx} 30 epochs). The fraction of point sources is found to be generally variable at 5-8% over V = 17.5-22.0 mag. For V brighter than 19 mag, the variable population is dominated by low amplitude (< 0.05 mag) and blue (B-V < 0.35) sources, possibly representing a population of {gamma} Doradus stars. Overall, the dominant population of variable sources are bluer than B-V = 0.65 and have Main Sequence colors, likely reflecting larger populations of RR Lyrae, SX Phe, {gamma} Doradus, and W UMa variables.

  1. International safeguards data authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, R.B.; Smith, C.E.; DeLand, S.M.; Manatt, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    The International Safeguards community is becoming increasingly reliant on information stored in electronic form. In international monitoring and related activities it must be possible to verify and maintain the integrity of this electronic information. This paper discusses the use of data authentication technology to assist in accomplishing this task. The paper provides background information, identifies the relevance to international safeguards, discusses issues related to export controls, algorithm patents, key management and the use of commercial vs. custom software.

  2. Ethics of international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, Kp; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Education and research together are vital components of academic institutions and globalization has improved health care education and research in numerous ways, one of which is multinational/transnational research/international collaboration. Usually academic institutions of high-income countries and institutions in low-income countries participate in collaboration. These collaborative research are guided by international ethics codes proposed by the international ethics committee to avoid stringent follow/unethical practices. PMID:25709946

  3. Rotor internal friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  4. Neural variability: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Dinstein, Ilan; Heeger, David J; Behrmann, Marlene

    2015-06-01

    Although we may not realize it, our brain function varies markedly from moment to moment such that our brain responses exhibit substantial variability across trials even in response to a simple repeating stimulus. Should we care about such within-subject variability? Are there developmental, cognitive, and clinical consequences to having a brain that is more or less variable/noisy? Although neural variability seems to be beneficial for learning, excessive levels of neural variability are apparent in individuals with different clinical disorders. We propose that measuring distinct types of neural variability in autism and other disorders is likely to reveal crucial insights regarding their neuropathology. We further discuss the importance of studying neural variability more generally across development and aging in humans. PMID:25979849

  5. Eighth International Conference on Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grousset, Francis; Peterson, Larry; Delaney, Peggie; Elderfield, Harry; Emeis, Kay; Haug, Gerald; Stocker, Thomas; Wang, Pinxian

    Every three years since 1983, the paleoceanographic community has come together at a different venue to share new data and discoveries at the International Conference on Paleoceanography (ICP). For the recent ICP-8, France was the host country for a conference focused on the theme of “An Ocean View of Global Change.” The Environnements et Paleoenvironnement Oceanique (EPOC) paleoceanography group of the University Bordeaux I acted as the local organizing committee.Scientific presentations at ICP-8 addressed the latest discoveries in paleoceanography and highlighted both emerging and as-yet-unsolved questions on global climate change. Thirty-five speakers, invited by the ICP-8 Science Committee, gave overview talks during morning sessions organized around five major scientific themes. These themes were Cenozoic-Mesozoic Oceans; Carbonate and Silica Systems of the Pleistocene Ocean; Biogeochemical Cycles of the Past; High-Frequency Climate Variability; and Interhemispheric Ocean-Continent-Climate Linkages.

  6. EM International. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    It is the intent of EM International to describe the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) various roles and responsibilities within the international community. Cooperative agreements and programs, descriptions of projects and technologies, and synopses of visits to international sites are all highlighted in this semiannual journal. Focus on EM programs in this issue is on international collaboration in vitrification projects. Technology highlights covers: in situ sealing for contaminated sites; and remote sensors for toxic pollutants. Section on profiles of countries includes: Arctic contamination by the former Soviet Union, and EM activities with Germany--cooperative arrangements.

  7. International Comparisions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    International Comparisions Database (Web, free access)   The International Comparisons Database (ICDB) serves the U.S. and the Inter-American System of Metrology (SIM) with information based on Appendices B (International Comparisons), C (Calibration and Measurement Capabilities) and D (List of Participating Countries) of the Comit� International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA). The official source of the data is The BIPM key comparison database. The ICDB provides access to results of comparisons of measurements and standards organized by the consultative committees of the CIPM and the Regional Metrology Organizations.

  8. Residual stresses calculation in autofrettage using variable material properties method

    SciTech Connect

    Jahed, H.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Autofrettaged cylinders are used for variety of applications in chemical and nuclear industries where large internal pressures have to be withstood. Autofrettage is in the process by which beneficial residual stresses are introduced into thick-walled tubes by initially subjected the tube to high internal pressure which causes inelastic deformation. Here, the variable material properties method is employed to obtain elastic-plastic analysis of an autofrettaged tube. This method develops inelastic solution from the elastic solution by treating the material properties as field variables. The distribution of these parameters are obtained in an iterative manner as a part of the solution. An energy based scheme is used to update these variables. The residual stress field of autofrettaged tubes based on the actual material curve and isotropic and kinematic hardening models are obtained. The results are shown to be in good agreement with the published experimental and finite element results.

  9. Titan's Variable Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine the effects of the incident plasma distribution function and the flow velocity. We closely examine the results on Titan's induced magnetosphere and the resulting pickup ion properties.

  10. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  11. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  12. Variability of phonetograms.

    PubMed

    Gramming, P; Sundberg, J; Akerlund, L

    1991-01-01

    Various sources of phonetogram variation were investigated, i.e. graphs showing voice sound pressure level (SPL) for a speaker's loudest and softest phonation at different fundamental frequencies. The short-term SPL variation within a vocalization was analyzed for 10 female and 10 male normal speakers and for 10 female patients with nonorganic dysphonia, i.e. patients with insufficient voices and no indication of pathology according to microlaryngostroboscopy. This variability was about 5 dB in soft phonation and less in loud phonation. The agreement between 2 investigators independently determining SPL for identical vocalizations by means of a sound-level meter was also studied and found to be quite good. The long-term variation was analyzed in 1 male and 1 female normal subject in 15 phonetogram recordings made on different days; the standard deviation averaged across fundamental frequency and subjects was found to be approximately 3 dB. The implications of these findings for a clinical use of phonetograms are discussed. PMID:1916550

  13. Nova-like variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    On grounds of different observable characteristics five classes of nova-like objects are distinguished: the UX Ursae Majoris stars, the antidwarf novae, the DQ Herculis stars, the AM Herculis stars, and the AM Canum Venaticorum stars. Some objects have not been classified specifically. Nova-like stars share most observable features with dwarf novae, except for the outburst behavior. The understanding is that dwarf novae, UX Ursae Majoris stars, and anti-dwarf novae are basically the same sort of objects. The difference between them is that in UX Ursae Majoris stars the mass transfer through the accretion disc always is high so the disc is stationary all the time; in anti-dwarf novae for some reason the mass transfer occasionally drops considerably for some time, and in dwarf novae it is low enough for the disc to undergo semiperiodic changes between high and low accretion events. DQ Herculis stars are believed to possess weakly magnetic white dwarfs which disrupt the inner disc at some distance from the central star; the rotation of the white dwarf can be seen as an additional photometric period. In AM Herculis stars, a strongly magnetic white dwarf entirely prevents the formation of an accretion disk and at the same time locks the rotation of the white dwarf to the binary orbit. Finally, AM Canum Venaticorum stars are believed to be cataclysmic variables that consist of two white dwarf components.

  14. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  15. Extragalactic Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Neill, James D.

    2005-03-01

    SALT is uniquely poised to make major inroads in the study of extragalactic cataclysmic variables (CVs) - novae and dwarf novae. The ability to search an external galaxy for erupting CVs night after night, for months at a time, AND to obtain confirmatory spectra within a night of discovery is unique and invaluable. We present several examples of multi-week to multi-month searches for extragalactic CVs with 1 to 4 meter-class telescopes. In particular, we have detected the first erupting dwarf novae in the LMC and placed a lower limit on the number of CVs in that galaxy. We have also observed the Local Group dwarf ellipticals M32 and NGC 205 in their entirety every clear night over a 4.5 month interval. In this survey we discovered one nova each in M32 and NGC 205, far more than previous nova surveys led us to expect. A similar search in M81 again reveals more novae than expected, and demonstrates, conclusively, that novae are predominantly a bulge population in spiral galaxies. Finally we report the detection of intergalactic tramp novae in the Fornax cluster, and emphasize that these are valuable tracers of stars stripped from their hosts during galaxy harassment. The insights gained during these preliminary studies illustrate how valuable SALT campaigns on extragalactic CVs will be.

  16. VSX: The Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C. L.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO International Variable Star Index (VSX), the most comprehensive and up-to-date assemblage of publicly-maintained variable star data on the planet, will be undergoing a major overhaul in the coming year to greatly improve the database design, as well as the Web-based user interface. Five years after its official launch, VSX has evolved into an essential component of the AAVSO enterprise information architecture, tightly integrated with many of the technical organization’s other mission-critical processes. However, its unique configuration and functionality are largely based on decades-old data formats and outmoded Web methodologies which will generally not scale well under the anticipated deluge of data from large-scale synoptic surveys. Here, we present the justifications and vision for VSX 2.0, the next generation of this indispensable research tool, including overviews of the creation of a brand new, fully-normalized, database schema, and the ground-up redesign of the front-end Web interface.

  17. Variables, variability, and variations research: implications for medical informatics.

    PubMed Central

    Holzemer, W L; Reilly, C A

    1995-01-01

    Variations research is one important strategy in the quality management movement designed to improve the quality of health care and to control costs. Information systems are being utilized in variations research to provide an array of potential variables, to provide measures of the variability inherent in these variables, and to assist with the study of the linkages of patient and provider characteristics with interventions and outcomes. This article presents a systems model of inputs, processes, and outcomes with explication of factors related to client, provider, and setting as a heuristic strategy for variable specification. The implications of variable specification, the design and measurement of variability, and the key issue of control in variations research are linked with a discussion of the implications for medical informatics. PMID:7614119

  18. International Cooperation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawney, Timothy; Feldstein, Karen

    International cooperation is a cornerstone principle of NASA’s activities, especially within the activities of the Science Mission Directorate. Nearly two thirds of the flight missions in which NASA leads or participates involve international cooperation. Numerous ground based activities also rely on international cooperation, whether because of unique expertise, unique geography, or the need for a global response. Going forward, in an era of tighter budgets and a more integrated global perspective, NASA and the rest of the space agencies around the world will be forced to work more closely together, in a broader array of activities than ever before, in order to be able to afford to push the boundaries of space exploration. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of NASA’s current international science cooperative activities. It will include a discussion of why NASA conducts international cooperation and look at the mechanisms through which international cooperation can occur at NASA, including peer-to-peer development of relationships. It will also discuss some of the limiting factors of international cooperation, such as export control, and ways in which to manage those constraints. Finally, the presentation would look at some of the present examples where NASA is working to increase international cooperation and improve coordination. Case studies will be used to demonstrate these mechanisms and concepts. For example, NASA continues to participate in international coordination groups such as the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) and International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG), but is expanding into new areas as well. NASA is one of the leaders in expanding and improving international coordination in the area of Near-Earth Object detection, characterization, and mitigation. Having participated in the first meetings of such groups as the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Missions Planning

  19. The international lithosphere program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinn, Edward A.

    The International Lithosphere Program is a new international interdisciplinary research program in the solid earth sciences that has been established by the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) at the joint request of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) and the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS). Its goal is a better understanding of the development of the earth, particularly those aspects upon which human society depends for its well-being.The International Lithosphere Program (ILP) is a natural sequel to a series of international cooperative projects in the geosciences that began with the International Geophysical Year in 1957-58 and continued with the Upper Mantle Project in the 1960's and the International Geodynamics Project (IGP) in the 1970's. In 1977, IUGG and IUGS established an inter-union task group to consider the possibility of a successor to the IGP for the 1980's. The task group, under cochairmen Carl Kisslinger (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado), foreign secretary of the American Geophysical Union, and J. Henning Illies (Geophysical Institute, University of Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany), invited suggestions and comments from the two unions and the national committees in the member countries. Their report, which was completed late in 1978, proposed a new project on the dynamics, origin, and evolution of the lithosphere. This proposal was approved by the IUGS Executive Committee in December 1979 and by the IUGS Council in June 1980. An inter-union steering committee, established in 1979 under the joint chairmanship of Kisslinger and Illies, developed the organizational framework and constitution of the new program. These were approved by resolution of the ICSU Governing Board in September 1980, and the Inter-Union Commission on the Lithosphere (ICL) was established to implement the program. National members of ICSU were urged to establish

  20. Principal nonlinear dynamical modes of climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, Dmitry; Gavrilov, Andrey; Feigin, Alexander; Loskutov, Evgeny; Kurths, Juergen

    2015-10-01

    We suggest a new nonlinear expansion of space-distributed observational time series. The expansion allows constructing principal nonlinear manifolds holding essential part of observed variability. It yields low-dimensional hidden time series interpreted as internal modes driving observed multivariate dynamics as well as their mapping to a geographic grid. Bayesian optimality is used for selecting relevant structure of nonlinear transformation, including both the number of principal modes and degree of nonlinearity. Furthermore, the optimal characteristic time scale of the reconstructed modes is also found. The technique is applied to monthly sea surface temperature (SST) time series having a duration of 33 years and covering the globe. Three dominant nonlinear modes were extracted from the time series: the first efficiently separates the annual cycle, the second is responsible for ENSO variability, and combinations of the second and the third modes explain substantial parts of Pacific and Atlantic dynamics. A relation of the obtained modes to decadal natural climate variability including current hiatus in global warming is exhibited and discussed.

  1. Increased Brain Signal Variability Accompanies Lower Behavioral Variability in Development

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Kovacevic, Natasa; Itier, Roxane J.

    2008-01-01

    As the brain matures, its responses become optimized. Behavioral measures show this through improved accuracy and decreased trial-to-trial variability. The question remains whether the supporting brain dynamics show a similar decrease in variability. We examined the relation between variability in single trial evoked electrical activity of the brain (measured with EEG) and performance of a face memory task in children (8–15 y) and young adults (20–33 y). Behaviorally, children showed slower, more variable response times (RT), and less accurate recognition than adults. However, brain signal variability increased with age, and showed strong negative correlations with intrasubject RT variability and positive correlations with accuracy. Thus, maturation appears to lead to a brain with greater functional variability, which is indicative of enhanced neural complexity. This variability may reflect a broader repertoire of metastable brain states and more fluid transitions among them that enable optimum responses. Our results suggest that the moment-to-moment variability in brain activity may be a critical index of the cognitive capacity of the brain. PMID:18604265

  2. Monitoring and Study of V2672 Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, Arne A.; Munari, Ulisse

    2010-09-01

    the August 2009 outburst. We've added BVRI comparison stars, calibrated at Sonoita, to VSP/VSD. Please update any observations that you submitted to the AAVSO so that everyone is on the same scale. 3) Future monitoring. If the recurrent nova classification is correct, this star will go into outburst again, likely within a few years. Since the known outburst was short, the monitoring needs to be consistent and nightly. There may also be other activity on the star, including lower-amplitude outbursts. Non-detections should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database; positive detections of outbursts should be brought to our attention. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). See full Alert Notice for more details.

  3. A Catalogue of Dynamic Parameters Describing the Variability of the Middle Stratosphere During the Northern Winters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labitzke, K.; Goretzki, B.

    1982-01-01

    The international variability of the middle stratosphere during the winter in the Northern Hemisphere is discussed. Monthly mean temperatures over the North Pole are presented along with charts of mean zonal wind velocities at 60 deg N.

  4. You, The International Citizen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Barbara G.; And Others

    This student booklet is intended to introduce students to the concept of the international citizen. Students need a deep knowledge and thorough understanding of the interdependent world. The activities booklet is divided into three parts. Part 1, "You, The International Citizen," contains: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "The All-American Kid"; (3) "We…

  5. International. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dee Anna, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on international issues from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "The Management of Technological Change within Faculties in International American Schools" (Martine Audeoud); (2) "Going Global: Using a Website Development Project To Teach Technology…

  6. International Trade and Protectionism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    This unit is designed to investigate the reasons for international trade and the issue of trade protectionism by focusing on the case study of the U.S. trade relationship with Taiwan. The unit begins with a simulation that highlights the concepts of global interdependence, the need for international trade, and the distribution of the world's…

  7. Teaching International Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, James M.

    The accelerated pace of society suggests that social education be clearly formulated from a conceptual golobal framework, recognizing the oneness of earth and man's sharing of a common fate, and that the curriculum be designed from a point of view toward improving international understanding. Effective approaches in international relations…

  8. Research in International Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolby, Nadine; Rahman, Aliya

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, international education has existed at the margins of educational research. However, in the current context of globalization, international education has moved closer to the center of educational research throughout the world. In this article, the authors identify, describe, and analyze six distinct research approaches to…

  9. International Education (Working Paper).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruson, Edward S.

    The history, objectives, and funding patterns for international education are discussed. Attention is directed toward the language and area study centers of the U.S. Office of Education, undergraduate/graduate and scholarly exchange programs, and the support of advanced research in international studies. The main source of funds for language and…

  10. Issues in International Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Eight articles address issues and programs in international rehabilitation. The issue is introduced by a message from the Assistant Secretary of the United States Department of Education for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, Robert R. Davila. Next, "A History of International Rehabilitation" (Nora Ellen Groce) reports on…

  11. Internal Evaluation, Historically Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The author analyzes the growth and nature of internal evaluation from the 1960s to the present and suggests that internal evaluation has been on the increase because of its perceived importance. Although the 1960s were characterized by a rich intellectual development of evaluation theory and practice, the fiscal conservatism of the 1980s ushered…

  12. Alberta's International Education Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch.

    Globalization is driving rapid change in knowledge, skills, and innovation. The economic well-being of future generations of Albertans depends on investment in education today to ensure that the knowledge and skills acquired continues to be in demand in international communities. International student recruitment in both the basic education and…

  13. International Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Richard F.

    In response to global changes and a growing focus on international affairs, Foothill and De Anza Colleges have developed a number of international education programs. Since their beginnings, both colleges have hosted full-time students from other countries under the F-1 Visa Program. Another program, Campus Abroad, is a partnership arrangement…

  14. Developing Productive International Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Diane C.

    1999-01-01

    Describes ways to develop productive international teams in the international marketplace. Discusses obstacles, including language and distance; a model for effective global team performance; cultural differences; shared goals; communication; lack of information; leadership; work procedures; compensation; lack of knowledge or skills; and hindered…

  15. International Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schabel, H. G.

    The International Resource Management program enables undergraduate students of the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, College of Natural Resources to complete an academic minor in International Resource Management. The program attempts to alert students and faculty to global environmental issues and their interconnectedness with a variety of…

  16. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  17. Dependence of Internal Friction on Folding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An outstanding challenge in protein folding is understanding the origin of “internal friction” in folding dynamics, experimentally identified from the dependence of folding rates on solvent viscosity. A possible origin suggested by simulation is the crossing of local torsion barriers. However, it was unclear why internal friction varied from protein to protein or for different folding barriers of the same protein. Using all-atom simulations with variable solvent viscosity, in conjunction with transition-path sampling to obtain reaction rates and analysis via Markov state models, we are able to determine the internal friction in the folding of several peptides and miniproteins. In agreement with experiment, we find that the folding events with greatest internal friction are those that mainly involve helix formation, while hairpin formation exhibits little or no evidence of friction. Via a careful analysis of folding transition paths, we show that internal friction arises when torsion angle changes are an important part of the folding mechanism near the folding free energy barrier. These results suggest an explanation for the variation of internal friction effects from protein to protein and across the energy landscape of the same protein. PMID:25721133

  18. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  19. Variable Cosmological Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2003-06-01

    In the spherically symmetric case the dominant energy condition, together with the requirement of regularity of a density and finiteness of the mass, defines the family of asymptotically flat globally regular solutions to the Einstein minimally coupled equations which includes the class of metrics asymptotically de Sitter as r --> 0 and asymptotically Schwarzschild as r --> ∞. A source term connects smoothly de Sitter vacuum in the origin with the Minkowski vacuum at infinity and corresponds to anisotropic vacuum defined macroscopically by the algebraic structure of its stress-energy tensor invariant under boosts in the radial direction. Dependently on parameters, geometry describes vacuum nonsingular black and white holes, and self-gravitating particle-like structures. ADM mass for this class is related to both de Sitter vacuum trapped inside an object and to breaking of space-time symmetry. This class of metrics is easily extended to the case of nonzero cosmological constant at infinity. The source term connects then smoothly two de Sitter vacua and corresponds to extension of the Einstein cosmological term Λgμν to an r-dependent cosmological term Λμν. In this approach a constant scalar Λ associated with a vacuum density Λ = 8πGρvac, becomes a tensor component Λtt associated explicitly with a density component of a perfect fluid tensor whose vacuum properties follow from its symmetry and whose variability follows from the Bianchi identities. In this review we outline and discuss Λμν geometry and its applications.

  20. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  1. VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1959-10-31

    This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

  2. Preparing for the primary care clinic: an ambulatory boot camp for internal medicine interns

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Lindsay M.; Bird, Amber-Nicole; Oyler, Julie L.; Lee, Wei Wei; Shah, Sachin D.; Pincavage, Amber T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Internal medicine (IM) interns start continuity clinic with variable ambulatory training. Multiple other specialties have utilized a boot camp style curriculum to improve surgical and procedural skills, but boot camps have not been used to improve interns’ ambulatory knowledge and confidence. The authors implemented and assessed the impact of an intern ambulatory boot camp pilot on primary care knowledge, confidence, and curricular satisfaction. Methods During July 2014, IM interns attended ambulatory boot camp. It included clinically focused case-based didactic sessions on common ambulatory topics as well as orientation to the clinic and electronic medical records. Interns anonymously completed a 15-question pre-test on topics covered in the boot camp as well as an identical post-test after the boot camp. The interns were surveyed regarding their confidence and satisfaction. Results Thirty-eight interns participated in the boot camp. Prior to the boot camp, few interns reported confidence managing common outpatient conditions. The average pre-test knowledge score was 46.3%. The average post-test knowledge score significantly improved to 76.1% (p<0.001). All interns reported that the boot camp was good preparation for clinics and 97% felt that the boot camp boosted their confidence. Conclusions The ambulatory boot camp pilot improved primary care knowledge, and interns thought it was good preparation for clinic. The ambulatory boot camp was well received and may be an effective way to improve the preparation of interns for primary care clinic. Further assessment of clinical performance and expansion to other programs and specialties should be considered. PMID:26609962

  3. Variable Selection through Correlation Sifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jim C.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    Many applications of computational biology require a variable selection procedure to sift through a large number of input variables and select some smaller number that influence a target variable of interest. For example, in virology, only some small number of viral protein fragments influence the nature of the immune response during viral infection. Due to the large number of variables to be considered, a brute-force search for the subset of variables is in general intractable. To approximate this, methods based on ℓ1-regularized linear regression have been proposed and have been found to be particularly successful. It is well understood however that such methods fail to choose the correct subset of variables if these are highly correlated with other "decoy" variables. We present a method for sifting through sets of highly correlated variables which leads to higher accuracy in selecting the correct variables. The main innovation is a filtering step that reduces correlations among variables to be selected, making the ℓ1-regularization effective for datasets on which many methods for variable selection fail. The filtering step changes both the values of the predictor variables and output values by projections onto components obtained through a computationally-inexpensive principal components analysis. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of our method on synthetic datasets and on novel applications in virology. These include HIV viral load analysis based on patients' HIV sequences and immune types, as well as the analysis of seasonal variation in influenza death rates based on the regions of the influenza genome that undergo diversifying selection in the previous season.

  4. Internal vibrations of a molecule consisting of rigid segments. I - Non-interacting internal vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X. M.; Craven, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    For molecular crystals, a procedure is proposed for interpreting experimentally determined atomic mean square anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) in terms of the overall molecular vibration together with internal vibrations with the assumption that the molecule consists of a set of linked rigid segments. The internal librations (molecular torsional or bending modes) are described using the variable internal coordinates of the segmented body. With this procedure, the experimental ADPs obtained from crystal structure determinations involving six small molecules (sym-trinitrobenzene, adenosine, tetra-cyanoquinodimethane, benzamide, alpha-cyanoacetic acid hydrazide and N-acetyl-L-tryptophan methylamide) have been analyzed. As a consequence, vibrational corrections to the bond lengths and angles of the molecule are calculated as well as the frequencies and force constants for each internal torsional or bending vibration.

  5. Variable Selection for Qualitative Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, L.; Zhu, J.; Murphy, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we discuss variable selection for decision making with focus on decisions regarding when to provide treatment and which treatment to provide. Current variable selection techniques were developed for use in a supervised learning setting where the goal is prediction of the response. These techniques often downplay the importance of interaction variables that have small predictive ability but that are critical when the ultimate goal is decision making rather than prediction. We propose two new techniques designed specifically to find variables that aid in decision making. Simulation results are given along with an application of the methods on data from a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of depression. PMID:21179592

  6. Quantum Backreaction on Classical'' Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A. Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London SW7 2BZ )

    1995-01-30

    A mathematically consistent procedure for coupling quasiclassical and quantum variables through coupled Hamilton-Heisenberg equations of motion is derived from a variational principle. During evolution, the quasiclassical variables become entangled with the quantum variables with the result that the value of the quasiclassical variables depends on the quantum state. This provides a formalism to compute the backreaction of any quantum system on a quasiclassical one. In particular, it leads to a natural candidate for a theory of gravity coupled to quantized matter in which the gravitational field is not quantized.

  7. AUTOMATED VARIABLE STAR CLASSIFICATION USING THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D. I.; Harrison, T. E.; McNamara, B. J. E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu

    2009-08-15

    We have identified 4659 variable objects in the Northern Sky Variability Survey. We have classified each of these objects into one of the five variable star classes: (1) Algol/{beta} Lyr systems including semidetached, and detached eclipsing binaries, (2) W Ursae Majoris overcontact and ellipsoidal variables, (3) long-period variables such as Cepheid and Mira-type objects, (4) RR Lyr pulsating variables, and (5) short-period variables including {delta} Scuti stars. All the candidates have outside of eclipse magnitudes of {approx}10-13. The primary classification tool is the use of Fourier coefficients combined with period information and light-curve properties to make the initial classification. Brief manual inspection was done on all light curves to remove nonperiodic variables that happened to slip through the process and to quantify any errors in the classification pipeline. We list the coordinates, period, Two Micron All Sky Survey colors, total amplitude variation, and any previous classification of the object. 548 objects previously identified as Algols in our previous paper are not included here.

  8. Variable Sampling Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey, S.; Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of an optical system (for example, a telescope) is limited by the misalignments and manufacturing imperfections of the optical elements in the system. The impact of these misalignments and imperfections can be quantified by the phase variations imparted on light traveling through the system. Phase retrieval is a methodology for determining these variations. Phase retrieval uses images taken with the optical system and using a light source of known shape and characteristics. Unlike interferometric methods, which require an optical reference for comparison, and unlike Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors that require special optical hardware at the optical system's exit pupil, phase retrieval is an in situ, image-based method for determining the phase variations of light at the system s exit pupil. Phase retrieval can be used both as an optical metrology tool (during fabrication of optical surfaces and assembly of optical systems) and as a sensor used in active, closed-loop control of an optical system, to optimize performance. One class of phase-retrieval algorithms is the iterative transform algorithm (ITA). ITAs estimate the phase variations by iteratively enforcing known constraints in the exit pupil and at the detector, determined from modeled or measured data. The Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM) technique is a new method for enforcing these constraints in ITAs. VSM is an open framework for addressing a wide range of issues that have previously been considered detrimental to high-accuracy phase retrieval, including undersampled images, broadband illumination, images taken at or near best focus, chromatic aberrations, jitter or vibration of the optical system or detector, and dead or noisy detector pixels. The VSM is a model-to-data mapping procedure. In VSM, fully sampled electric fields at multiple wavelengths are modeled inside the phase-retrieval algorithm, and then these fields are mapped to intensities on the light detector, using the properties

  9. Variable Star Catalogs: Their Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.; Kazarovets, E. V.; Kireeva, N. N.; Pastukhova, E. N.; Durlevich, O. V.

    2010-02-01

    After the second World War, the International Astronomical Union made astronomers of the Soviet Union responsible for variable-star catalogues. This work has been continued ever since the first edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars compiled by the team headed by P. P. Parenago and B. V. Kukarkin and published in 1948. Currently, the catalogue work is a joint project of the Institute of Astronomy (Russian Academy of Sciences) and Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow University). This paper is a brief review of recent trends in the field of variable-star catalogues. We discuss problems as well as new prospects related to modern large-scale automatic photometric sky surveys, and outline the state of discussions on the future of the variable-star catalogues in the profile commissions of the IAU.

  10. Waves: Internal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Oceanic internal tides are internal waves with tidal periodicities. They are ubiquitous throughout the ocean, although generally more pronounced near large bathymetric features such as mid-ocean ridges and continental slopes. The internal vertical displacements associated with these waves can be extraordinarily large. Near some shelf breaks where the surface tides are strong, internal displacements (e.g., of an isothermal surface) can exceed 200 meters. Displacements of 10 meters in the open ocean are not uncommon. The associated current velocities are usually comparable to or larger than the currents of the surface tide. On continental shelves internal tides can occasionally generate packets of internal solitons, which are detectable in remote sensing imagery. Other common nonlinear features are generation of higher harmonics (e.g., 6-hr waves) and wave breaking. Internal tides are known to be an important energy source for mixing of shelf waters. Recent research suggests that they may also be a significant energy source for deep-ocean mixing.

  11. NASA International Environmental Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie; Valek, Susan

    2010-01-01

    For nearly five decades, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been preeminent in space exploration. NASA has landed Americans on the moon, robotic rovers on Mars, and led cooperative scientific endeavors among nations aboard the International Space Station. But as Earth's population increases, the environment is subject to increasing challenges and requires more efficient use of resources. International partnerships give NASA the opportunity to share its scientific and engineering expertise. They also enable NASA to stay aware of continually changing international environmental regulations and global markets for materials that NASA uses to accomplish its mission. Through international partnerships, NASA and this nation have taken the opportunity to look globally for solutions to challenges we face here on Earth. Working with other nations provides NASA with collaborative opportunities with the global science/engineering community to explore ways in which to protect our natural resources, conserve energy, reduce the use of hazardous materials in space and earthly applications, and reduce greenhouse gases that potentially affect all of Earth's inhabitants. NASA is working with an ever-expanding list of international partners including the European Union, the European Space Agency and, especially, the nation of Portugal. Our common goal is to foster a sustainable future in which partners continue to explore the universe while protecting our home planet's resources for future generations. This brochure highlights past, current, and future initiatives in several important areas of international collaboration that can bring environmental, economic, and other benefits to NASA and the wider international space community.

  12. The ``Werkgroep Veranderlijke Sterren'' of Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wils, P.; Broens, E.; Hautecler, H.; Van Loo, F.

    2012-06-01

    The “Werkgroep Veranderlijke Sterren” (Working Group on Variable Stars) of the Belgian “Vereniging Voor Sterrenkunde” (Society for Astronomy) was founded in 1969. The group and its individual members have been among the pioneers in several areas of amateur variable star astronomy: CV alert bulletin boards and telegrams, CCD observing, automatic handling of observations and online availability of the data, collaboration with professional astronomers, telescope automation, remote observing, and data-mining. Realizing the importance of international collaboration for a small group, there has always been a close contact with other variable star organisations. As a result also the first European meeting of the AAVSO was hosted in Brussels in 1990.

  13. International energy annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  14. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  15. The International Trade Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, K.; Mukherjee, G.; Manna, S. S.

    Bilateral trade relationships in the international level between pairs of countries in the world give rise to the notion of the International Trade Network (ITN). This network has attracted the attention of network researchers as it serves as an excellent example of the weighted networks, the link weight being defined as a measure of the volume of trade between two countries. In this paper we analyzed the international trade data for 53 years and studied in detail the variations of different network related quantities associated with the ITN. Our observation is that the ITN has also a scale invariant structure like many other real-world networks.

  16. THE COLOR VARIABILITY OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Knecht, Matthias; Hogg, David W.; Shields, Joseph C.; Maoz, Dan; Bovy, Jo

    2012-01-10

    We quantify quasar color variability using an unprecedented variability database-ugriz photometry of 9093 quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, observed over 8 years at {approx}60 epochs each. We confirm previous reports that quasars become bluer when brightening. We find a redshift dependence of this blueing in a given set of bands (e.g., g and r), but show that it is the result of the flux contribution from less-variable or delayed emission lines in the different SDSS bands at different redshifts. After correcting for this effect, quasar color variability is remarkably uniform, and independent not only of redshift, but also of quasar luminosity and black hole mass. The color variations of individual quasars, as they vary in brightness on year timescales, are much more pronounced than the ranges in color seen in samples of quasars across many orders of magnitude in luminosity. This indicates distinct physical mechanisms behind quasar variability and the observed range of quasar luminosities at a given black hole mass-quasar variations cannot be explained by changes in the mean accretion rate. We do find some dependence of the color variability on the characteristics of the flux variations themselves, with fast, low-amplitude, brightness variations producing more color variability. The observed behavior could arise if quasar variability results from flares or ephemeral hot spots in an accretion disk.

  17. Modeling Learner Variability in CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heift, Trude

    2008-01-01

    This article describes challenges and benefits of modeling learner variability in Computer-Assisted Language Learning. We discuss the learner model of "E-Tutor," a learner model that addresses learner variability by focusing on certain aspects and/or features of the learner's interlanguage. Moreover, we introduce the concept of phrase descriptors,…

  18. Students' Misconceptions about Random Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachapova, Farida; Kachapov, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    This article describes some misconceptions about random variables and related counter-examples, and makes suggestions about teaching initial topics on random variables in general form instead of doing it separately for discrete and continuous cases. The focus is on post-calculus probability courses. (Contains 2 figures.)

  19. Variability in human body size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The range of variability found among homogeneous groups is described and illustrated. Those trends that show significantly marked differences between sexes and among a number of racial/ethnic groups are also presented. Causes of human-body size variability discussed include genetic endowment, aging, nutrition, protective garments, and occupation. The information is presented to aid design engineers of space flight hardware and equipment.

  20. Operant Variability: Procedures and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Armando; Tonneau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Barba's (2012) article deftly weaves three main themes in one argument about operant variability. From general theoretical considerations on operant behavior (Catania, 1973), Barba derives methodological guidelines about response differentiation and applies them to the study of operant variability. In the process, he uncovers unnoticed features of…