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Sample records for ab inito quantum

  1. Ab initio quantum chemistry: methodology and applications.

    PubMed

    Friesner, Richard A

    2005-05-10

    This Perspective provides an overview of state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemical methodology and applications. The methods that are discussed include coupled cluster theory, localized second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, multireference perturbation approaches, and density functional theory. The accuracy of each approach for key chemical properties is summarized, and the computational performance is analyzed, emphasizing significant advances in algorithms and implementation over the past decade. Incorporation of a condensed-phase environment by means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics or self-consistent reaction field techniques, is presented. A wide range of illustrative applications, focusing on materials science and biology, are discussed briefly.

  2. Quantum Fragment Based ab Initio Molecular Dynamics for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Xianwei; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2015-12-08

    Developing ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods for practical application in protein dynamics is of significant interest. Due to the large size of biomolecules, applying standard quantum chemical methods to compute energies for dynamic simulation is computationally prohibitive. In this work, a fragment based ab initio molecular dynamics approach is presented for practical application in protein dynamics study. In this approach, the energy and forces of the protein are calculated by a recently developed electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (EE-GMFCC) method. For simulation in explicit solvent, mechanical embedding is introduced to treat protein interaction with explicit water molecules. This AIMD approach has been applied to MD simulations of a small benchmark protein Trpcage (with 20 residues and 304 atoms) in both the gas phase and in solution. Comparison to the simulation result using the AMBER force field shows that the AIMD gives a more stable protein structure in the simulation, indicating that quantum chemical energy is more reliable. Importantly, the present fragment-based AIMD simulation captures quantum effects including electrostatic polarization and charge transfer that are missing in standard classical MD simulations. The current approach is linear-scaling, trivially parallel, and applicable to performing the AIMD simulation of proteins with a large size.

  3. Surface Segregation Energies of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy method. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameterization. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. The ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation for the most part, but predicted relaxations from quantum approximate calculations are used in selected cases to compute approximate relaxed ab initio segregation energies. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with other quantum approximate and ab initio theoretical work, and available experimental results.

  4. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2004-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit heats of segregation for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent LMTO-based parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation, while the ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of a segregation model driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  5. Ab initio Quantum Chemical and Experimental Reaction Kinetics Studies in the Combustion of Bipropellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-24

    NUMBER (Include area code) 24 March 2017 Briefing Charts 01 March 2017 - 31 March 2017 Ab initio Quantum Chemical and Experimental Reaction Kinetics...Laboratory AFRL/RQRS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB, CA 93524 *Email: ghanshyam.vaghjiani@us.af.mil Ab initio Quantum Chemical and Experimental Reaction ...Clearance 17161 Zador et al., Prog. Energ. Combust. Sci., 37 371 (2011) Why Quantum Chemical Reaction Kinetics Studies? DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for

  6. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  7. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  8. UTChem - A Program for Ab Initio Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, Takeshi; Nakano, Haruyuki; Nakajima, Takahito

    2003-06-18

    UTChem is a quantum chemistry software developed by Hirao's group at the University of Tokyo. UTChem is a research product of our work to develop new and better theoretical methods in quantum chemistry.

  9. Perspective: Ab initio force field methods derived from quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Guidez, Emilie B.; Bertoni, Colleen; Gordon, Mark S.

    2018-03-01

    It is often desirable to accurately and efficiently model the behavior of large molecular systems in the condensed phase (thousands to tens of thousands of atoms) over long time scales (from nanoseconds to milliseconds). In these cases, ab initio methods are difficult due to the increasing computational cost with the number of electrons. A more computationally attractive alternative is to perform the simulations at the atomic level using a parameterized function to model the electronic energy. Many empirical force fields have been developed for this purpose. However, the functions that are used to model interatomic and intermolecular interactions contain many fitted parameters obtained from selected model systems, and such classical force fields cannot properly simulate important electronic effects. Furthermore, while such force fields are computationally affordable, they are not reliable when applied to systems that differ significantly from those used in their parameterization. They also cannot provide the information necessary to analyze the interactions that occur in the system, making the systematic improvement of the functional forms that are used difficult. Ab initio force field methods aim to combine the merits of both types of methods. The ideal ab initio force fields are built on first principles and require no fitted parameters. Ab initio force field methods surveyed in this perspective are based on fragmentation approaches and intermolecular perturbation theory. This perspective summarizes their theoretical foundation, key components in their formulation, and discusses key aspects of these methods such as accuracy and formal computational cost. The ab initio force fields considered here were developed for different targets, and this perspective also aims to provide a balanced presentation of their strengths and shortcomings. Finally, this perspective suggests some future directions for this actively developing area.

  10. Ab initio quantum chemical study of electron transfer in carboranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Ranjit; Pineda, Andrew C.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2005-05-01

    The electron transfer (ET) properties of 10- and 12-vertex carboranes are investigated by the ab initio Hartree-Fock method within the Marcus-Hush (MH) two-state model and the Koopman theorem (KT) approach. The calculated value of the ET coupling matrix element, VAB, is consistently higher in the KT approach than in the MH two-state model. For the carborane molecules functionalized by -CH 2 groups at C-vertices, VAB strongly depends on the relative orientation of the planes containing the terminal -CH 2 groups. The predicted conformation dependence of VAB offers a molecular mechanism to control ET between two active centers in molecular systems.

  11. Amorphous Ge quantum dots embedded in crystalline Si: ab initio results.

    PubMed

    Laubscher, M; Küfner, S; Kroll, P; Bechstedt, F

    2015-10-14

    We study amorphous Ge quantum dots embedded in a crystalline Si matrix through structure modeling and simulation using ab initio density functional theory including spin-orbit interaction and quasiparticle effects. Three models are generated by replacing a spherical region within diamond Si by Ge atoms and creating a disordered bond network with appropriate density inside the Ge quantum dot. After total-energy optimisations of the atomic geometry we compute the electronic and optical properties. We find three major effects: (i) the resulting nanostructures adopt a type-I heterostructure character; (ii) the lowest optical transitions occur only within the Ge quantum dots, and do not involve or cross the Ge-Si interface. (iii) for larger amorphous Ge quantum dots, with diameters of about 2.0 and 2.7 nm, absorption peaks appear in the mid-infrared spectral region. These are promising candidates for intense luminescence at photon energies below the gap energy of bulk Ge.

  12. Cobalt-doped ZnO nanocrystals: quantum confinement and surface effects from ab initio methods.

    PubMed

    Schoenhalz, Aline L; Dalpian, Gustavo M

    2013-10-14

    Cobalt-doped ZnO nanocrystals were studied through ab initio methods based on the Density Functional Theory. Both quantum confinement and surface effects were explicitly taken into account. When only quantum confinement effects are considered, Co atoms interact through a superexchange mechanism, stabilizing an antiferromagnetic ground state. Usually, this is the case for high quality nanoparticles with perfect surface saturation. When the surfaces were considered, a strong hybridization between the Co atoms and surfaces was observed, strongly changing their electronic and magnetic properties. Our results indicated that the surfaces might qualitatively change the properties of impurities in semiconductor nanocrystals.

  13. Ab initio theory of the N2V defect in diamond for quantum memory implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udvarhelyi, Péter; Thiering, Gergő; Londero, Elisa; Gali, Adam

    2017-10-01

    The N2V defect in diamond is characterized by means of ab initio methods relying on density functional theory calculated parameters of a Hubbard model Hamiltonian. It is shown that this approach appropriately describes the energy levels of correlated excited states induced by this defect. By determining its critical magneto-optical parameters, we propose to realize a long-living quantum memory by N2V defect, i.e., H 3 color center in diamond.

  14. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces and Quantum Dynamics for Polyatomic Bimolecular Reactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bina; Zhang, Dong H

    2018-05-08

    There has been great progress in the development of potential energy surfaces (PESs) and quantum dynamics calculations in the gas phase. The establishment of a fitting procedure for highly accurate PESs and new developments in quantum reactive scattering on reliable PESs allow accurate characterization of reaction dynamics beyond triatomic systems. This review will give the recent development in our group in constructing ab initio PESs based on neural networks and the time-dependent wave packet calculations for bimolecular reactions beyond three atoms. Bimolecular reactions of current interest to the community, namely, OH + H 2 , H + H 2 O, OH + CO, H + CH 4 , and Cl + CH 4 , are focused on. Quantum mechanical characterization of these reactions uncovers interesting dynamical phenomena with an unprecedented level of sophistication and has greatly advanced our understanding of polyatomic reaction dynamics.

  15. Ab initio quantum direct dynamics simulations of ultrafast photochemistry with Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Symonds, Christopher; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2017-08-01

    The Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) method is a quantum dynamics technique which allows treatment of a large number of quantum nuclear degrees of freedom. This paper presents a review of MCE and its recent applications, providing a summary of the formalisms, including its ab initio direct dynamics versions and also giving a summary of recent results. Firstly, we describe the Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest version 2 (MCEv2) method and its applicability to direct dynamics and report new calculations which show that the approach converges to the exact result in model systems with tens of degrees of freedom. Secondly, we review previous ;on the fly; ab initio Multiple Cloning (AIMC-MCE) MCE dynamics results obtained for systems of a similar size, in which the calculations treat every electron and every nucleus of a polyatomic molecule on a fully quantum basis. We also review the Time Dependent Diabatic Basis (TDDB) version of the technique and give an example of its application. We summarise the details of the sampling techniques and interpolations used for calculation of the matrix elements, which make our approach efficient. Future directions of work are outlined.

  16. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  17. Approximate Quantum Dynamics using Ab Initio Classical Separable Potentials: Spectroscopic Applications.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Barak; Sagiv, Lior; Gerber, R Benny

    2017-03-14

    Algorithms for quantum molecular dynamics simulations that directly use ab initio methods have many potential applications. In this article, the ab initio classical separable potentials (AICSP) method is proposed as the basis for approximate algorithms of this type. The AICSP method assumes separability of the total time-dependent wave function of the nuclei and employs mean-field potentials that govern the dynamics of each degree of freedom. In the proposed approach, the mean-field potentials are determined by classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The nuclear wave function can thus be propagated in time using the effective potentials generated "on the fly". As a test of the method for realistic systems, calculations of the stationary anharmonic frequencies of hydrogen stretching modes were carried out for several polyatomic systems, including three amino acids and the guanine-cytosine pair of nucleobases. Good agreement with experiments was found. The method scales very favorably with the number of vibrational modes and should be applicable for very large molecules, e.g., peptides. The method should also be applicable for properties such as vibrational line widths and line shapes. Work in these directions is underway.

  18. Spectroscopic fingerprints of toroidal nuclear quantum delocalization via ab initio path integral simulations.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Ole; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2013-04-05

    We investigate the quantum-mechanical delocalization of hydrogen in rotational symmetric molecular systems. To this purpose, we perform ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations of a methanol molecule to characterize the quantum properties of hydrogen atoms in a representative system by means of their real-space and momentum-space densities. In particular, we compute the spherically averaged momentum distribution n(k) and the pseudoangular momentum distribution n(kθ). We interpret our results by comparing them to path integral samplings of a bare proton in an ideal torus potential. We find that the hydroxyl hydrogen exhibits a toroidal delocalization, which leads to characteristic fingerprints in the line shapes of the momentum distributions. We can describe these specific spectroscopic patterns quantitatively and compute their onset as a function of temperature and potential energy landscape. The delocalization patterns in the projected momentum distribution provide a promising computational tool to address the intriguing phenomenon of quantum delocalization in condensed matter and its spectroscopic characterization. As the momentum distribution n(k) is also accessible through Nuclear Compton Scattering experiments, our results will help to interpret and understand future measurements more thoroughly. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ab initio quantum chemical calculation of electron transfer matrix elements for large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linda Yu; Friesner, Richard A.; Murphy, Robert B.

    1997-07-01

    Using a diabatic state formalism and pseudospectral numerical methods, we have developed an efficient ab initio quantum chemical approach to the calculation of electron transfer matrix elements for large molecules. The theory is developed at the Hartree-Fock level and validated by comparison with results in the literature for small systems. As an example of the power of the method, we calculate the electronic coupling between two bacteriochlorophyll molecules in various intermolecular geometries. Only a single self-consistent field (SCF) calculation on each of the monomers is needed to generate coupling matrix elements for all of the molecular pairs. The largest calculations performed, utilizing 1778 basis functions, required ˜14 h on an IBM 390 workstation. This is considerably less cpu time than would be necessitated with a supermolecule adiabatic state calculation and a conventional electronic structure code.

  20. Quantum transition state dynamics of the cyclooctatetraene unimolecular reaction on ab initio potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokizaki, Chihiro; Yoshida, Takahiko; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The cyclooctatetraene (COT) anion has a stable D4h structure that is similar to the transition state configurations of the neutral C-C bond-alternation (D4h ↔ D8h ↔ D4h) and ring-inversion (D2d ↔ D4h ↔ D2d) unimolecular reactions. The previously measured photodetachment spectrum of COT- revealed the reaction dynamics in the vicinity of the two transition states on the neutral potential energy surface. In this work, the photodetachment spectrum is calculated quantum mechanically on ab initio-level potential energy surfaces within a three degree-of-freedom reduced-dimensionality model. Very good agreement has been obtained between theory and experiment, providing reliable interpretations for the experimental spectrum. A detailed picture of the reactive molecular dynamics of the COT unimolecular reaction in the transition state region is also discussed.

  1. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E., E-mail: tmarkland@stanford.edu

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding asmore » a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.« less

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  3. Energy barriers and rates of tautomeric transitions in DNA bases: ab initio quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumalee; Majumdar, Rabi; Das, Gourab K; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2005-12-01

    Tautomeric transitions of DNA bases are proton transfer reactions, which are important in biology. These reactions are involved in spontaneous point mutations of the genetic material. In the present study, intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC) analyses through ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for the individual DNA bases A, T, G, C and also A:T and G:C base pairs to estimate the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers using MP2/6-31G** method for tautomeric transitions. Relatively higher values of kinetic barriers (about 50-60 kcal/mol) have been observed for the single bases, indicating that tautomeric alterations of isolated single bases are quite unlikely. On the other hand, relatively lower values of the kinetic barriers (about 20-25 kcal/mol) for the DNA base pairs A:T and G:C clearly suggest that the tautomeric shifts are much more favorable in DNA base pairs than in isolated single bases. The unusual base pairing A':C, T':G, C':A or G':T in the daughter DNA molecule, resulting from a parent DNA molecule with tautomeric shifts, is found to be stable enough to result in a mutation. The transition rate constants for the single DNA bases in addition to the base pairs are also calculated by computing the free energy differences between the transition states and the reactants.

  4. QMCPACK: an open source ab initio quantum Monte Carlo package for the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongnim; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Beaudet, Todd D.; Benali, Anouar; Chandler Bennett, M.; Berrill, Mark A.; Blunt, Nick S.; Josué Landinez Borda, Edgar; Casula, Michele; Ceperley, David M.; Chiesa, Simone; Clark, Bryan K.; Clay, Raymond C., III; Delaney, Kris T.; Dewing, Mark; Esler, Kenneth P.; Hao, Hongxia; Heinonen, Olle; Kent, Paul R. C.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Li, Ying Wai; Lopez, M. Graham; Luo, Ye; Malone, Fionn D.; Martin, Richard M.; Mathuriya, Amrita; McMinis, Jeremy; Melton, Cody A.; Mitas, Lubos; Morales, Miguel A.; Neuscamman, Eric; Parker, William D.; Pineda Flores, Sergio D.; Romero, Nichols A.; Rubenstein, Brenda M.; Shea, Jacqueline A. R.; Shin, Hyeondeok; Shulenburger, Luke; Tillack, Andreas F.; Townsend, Joshua P.; Tubman, Norm M.; Van Der Goetz, Brett; Vincent, Jordan E.; ChangMo Yang, D.; Yang, Yubo; Zhang, Shuai; Zhao, Luning

    2018-05-01

    QMCPACK is an open source quantum Monte Carlo package for ab initio electronic structure calculations. It supports calculations of metallic and insulating solids, molecules, atoms, and some model Hamiltonians. Implemented real space quantum Monte Carlo algorithms include variational, diffusion, and reptation Monte Carlo. QMCPACK uses Slater–Jastrow type trial wavefunctions in conjunction with a sophisticated optimizer capable of optimizing tens of thousands of parameters. The orbital space auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method is also implemented, enabling cross validation between different highly accurate methods. The code is specifically optimized for calculations with large numbers of electrons on the latest high performance computing architectures, including multicore central processing unit and graphical processing unit systems. We detail the program’s capabilities, outline its structure, and give examples of its use in current research calculations. The package is available at http://qmcpack.org.

  5. QMCPACK : an open source ab initio quantum Monte Carlo package for the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and solids

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jeongnim; Baczewski, Andrew T.; Beaudet, Todd D.; ...

    2018-04-19

    QMCPACK is an open source quantum Monte Carlo package for ab-initio electronic structure calculations. It supports calculations of metallic and insulating solids, molecules, atoms, and some model Hamiltonians. Implemented real space quantum Monte Carlo algorithms include variational, diffusion, and reptation Monte Carlo. QMCPACK uses Slater-Jastrow type trial wave functions in conjunction with a sophisticated optimizer capable of optimizing tens of thousands of parameters. The orbital space auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method is also implemented, enabling cross validation between different highly accurate methods. The code is specifically optimized for calculations with large numbers of electrons on the latest high performancemore » computing architectures, including multicore central processing unit (CPU) and graphical processing unit (GPU) systems. We detail the program’s capabilities, outline its structure, and give examples of its use in current research calculations. The package is available at http://www.qmcpack.org.« less

  6. QMCPACK : an open source ab initio quantum Monte Carlo package for the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongnim; Baczewski, Andrew T.; Beaudet, Todd D.

    QMCPACK is an open source quantum Monte Carlo package for ab-initio electronic structure calculations. It supports calculations of metallic and insulating solids, molecules, atoms, and some model Hamiltonians. Implemented real space quantum Monte Carlo algorithms include variational, diffusion, and reptation Monte Carlo. QMCPACK uses Slater-Jastrow type trial wave functions in conjunction with a sophisticated optimizer capable of optimizing tens of thousands of parameters. The orbital space auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method is also implemented, enabling cross validation between different highly accurate methods. The code is specifically optimized for calculations with large numbers of electrons on the latest high performancemore » computing architectures, including multicore central processing unit (CPU) and graphical processing unit (GPU) systems. We detail the program’s capabilities, outline its structure, and give examples of its use in current research calculations. The package is available at http://www.qmcpack.org.« less

  7. QMCPACK: an open source ab initio quantum Monte Carlo package for the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and solids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongnim; Baczewski, Andrew T; Beaudet, Todd D; Benali, Anouar; Bennett, M Chandler; Berrill, Mark A; Blunt, Nick S; Borda, Edgar Josué Landinez; Casula, Michele; Ceperley, David M; Chiesa, Simone; Clark, Bryan K; Clay, Raymond C; Delaney, Kris T; Dewing, Mark; Esler, Kenneth P; Hao, Hongxia; Heinonen, Olle; Kent, Paul R C; Krogel, Jaron T; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Li, Ying Wai; Lopez, M Graham; Luo, Ye; Malone, Fionn D; Martin, Richard M; Mathuriya, Amrita; McMinis, Jeremy; Melton, Cody A; Mitas, Lubos; Morales, Miguel A; Neuscamman, Eric; Parker, William D; Pineda Flores, Sergio D; Romero, Nichols A; Rubenstein, Brenda M; Shea, Jacqueline A R; Shin, Hyeondeok; Shulenburger, Luke; Tillack, Andreas F; Townsend, Joshua P; Tubman, Norm M; Van Der Goetz, Brett; Vincent, Jordan E; Yang, D ChangMo; Yang, Yubo; Zhang, Shuai; Zhao, Luning

    2018-05-16

    QMCPACK is an open source quantum Monte Carlo package for ab initio electronic structure calculations. It supports calculations of metallic and insulating solids, molecules, atoms, and some model Hamiltonians. Implemented real space quantum Monte Carlo algorithms include variational, diffusion, and reptation Monte Carlo. QMCPACK uses Slater-Jastrow type trial wavefunctions in conjunction with a sophisticated optimizer capable of optimizing tens of thousands of parameters. The orbital space auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method is also implemented, enabling cross validation between different highly accurate methods. The code is specifically optimized for calculations with large numbers of electrons on the latest high performance computing architectures, including multicore central processing unit and graphical processing unit systems. We detail the program's capabilities, outline its structure, and give examples of its use in current research calculations. The package is available at http://qmcpack.org.

  8. Ab initio optimization principle for the ground states of translationally invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models.

    PubMed

    Ran, Shi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and fundamental numeric scheme dubbed as ab initio optimization principle (AOP) is proposed for the ground states of translational invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models. The idea is to transform a nondeterministic-polynomial-hard ground-state simulation with infinite degrees of freedom into a single optimization problem of a local function with finite number of physical and ancillary degrees of freedom. This work contributes mainly in the following aspects: (1) AOP provides a simple and efficient scheme to simulate the ground state by solving a local optimization problem. Its solution contains two kinds of boundary states, one of which play the role of the entanglement bath that mimics the interactions between a supercell and the infinite environment, and the other gives the ground state in a tensor network (TN) form. (2) In the sense of TN, a novel decomposition named as tensor ring decomposition (TRD) is proposed to implement AOP. Instead of following the contraction-truncation scheme used by many existing TN-based algorithms, TRD solves the contraction of a uniform TN in an opposite way by encoding the contraction in a set of self-consistent equations that automatically reconstruct the whole TN, making the simulation simple and unified; (3) AOP inherits and develops the ideas of different well-established methods, including the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD), network contractor dynamics, density matrix embedding theory, etc., providing a unified perspective that is previously missing in this fields. (4) AOP as well as TRD give novel implications to existing TN-based algorithms: A modified iTEBD is suggested and the two-dimensional (2D) AOP is argued to be an intrinsic 2D extension of DMRG that is based on infinite projected entangled pair state. This paper is focused on one-dimensional quantum models to present AOP. The benchmark is given on a transverse Ising

  9. New ab initio potential surfaces and three-dimensional quantum dynamics for transition state spectroscopy in ozone photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Koichi; Morokuma, Keiji; Le Quéré, Frederic; Leforestier, Claude

    1992-04-01

    New ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the ground and B ( 1B 2) states of ozone have been calculated with the CASSCF-SECI/DZP method to describe the three-dimensional photodissociation process. The dissociation energy of the ground state and the vertical barrier height of the B PES are obtained to be 0.88 and 1.34 eV, respectively, in better agreement with the experimental values than the previous calculation. The photodissociation autocorrelation function, calculated on the new B PES, based on exact three-dimensional quantum dynamics, reproduces well the main recurrence feature extracted from the experimental spectra.

  10. The many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method for time-dependent ab-initio quantum simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M., E-mail: jeanmichel.sellier@parallel.bas.bg; Dimov, I.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of ab-initio approaches is the simulation of many-body quantum systems from the first principles of quantum mechanics. These methods are traditionally based on the many-body Schrödinger equation which represents an incredible mathematical challenge. In this paper, we introduce the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method in the context of distinguishable particles and in the absence of spin-dependent effects. Despite these restrictions, the method has several advantages. First of all, the Wigner formalism is intuitive, as it is based on the concept of a quasi-distribution function. Secondly, the Monte Carlo numerical approach allows scalability on parallel machines that is practicallymore » unachievable by means of other techniques based on finite difference or finite element methods. Finally, this method allows time-dependent ab-initio simulations of strongly correlated quantum systems. In order to validate our many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method, as a case study we simulate a relatively simple system consisting of two particles in several different situations. We first start from two non-interacting free Gaussian wave packets. We, then, proceed with the inclusion of an external potential barrier, and we conclude by simulating two entangled (i.e. correlated) particles. The results show how, in the case of negligible spin-dependent effects, the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method provides an efficient and reliable tool to study the time-dependent evolution of quantum systems composed of distinguishable particles.« less

  11. Ab initio relaxation times and time-dependent Hamiltonians within the steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilki; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum systems driven by time-dependent Hamiltonians are considered here within the framework of steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT) and used to study the thermodynamic characteristics of such systems. In doing so, a generalization of the SEAQT framework valid for all such systems is provided, leading to the development of an ab initio physically relevant expression for the intrarelaxation time, an important element of this framework and one that had as of yet not been uniquely determined as an integral part of the theory. The resulting expression for the relaxation time is valid as well for time-independent Hamiltonians as a special case and makes the description provided by the SEAQT framework more robust at the fundamental level. In addition, the SEAQT framework is used to help resolve a fundamental issue of thermodynamics in the quantum domain, namely, that concerning the unique definition of process-dependent work and heat functions. The developments presented lead to the conclusion that this framework is not just an alternative approach to thermodynamics in the quantum domain but instead one that uniquely sheds new light on various fundamental but as of yet not completely resolved questions of thermodynamics.

  12. Reductive half-reaction of aldehyde oxidoreductase toward acetaldehyde: Ab initio and free energy quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Johannes M; Werner, Hans-Joachim; Mata, Ricardo A; Metz, Sebastian; Thiel, Walter

    2010-01-21

    Energy and free energy barriers for acetaldehyde conversion in aldehyde oxidoreductase are determined for three reaction pathways using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations on the solvated enzyme. Ab initio single-point QM/MM energies are obtained at the stationary points optimized at the DFT(B3LYP)/MM level. These ab initio calculations employ local correlation treatments [LMP2 and LCCSD(T0)] in combination with augmented triple- and quadruple-zeta basis sets, and the final coupled cluster results include MP2-based corrections for basis set incompleteness and for the domain approximation. Free energy perturbation (FEP) theory is used to generate free energy profiles at the DFT(B3LYP)/MM level for the most important reaction steps by sampling along the corresponding reaction paths using molecular dynamics. The ab initio and FEP QM/MM results are combined to derive improved estimates of the free energy barriers, which differ from the corresponding DFT(B3LYP)/MM energy barriers by about 3 kcal mol(-1). The present results confirm the qualitative mechanistic conclusions from a previous DFT(B3LYP)/MM study. Most favorable is a three-step Lewis base catalyzed mechanism with an initial proton transfer from the cofactor to the Glu869 residue, a subsequent nucleophilic attack that yields a tetrahedral intermediate (IM2), and a final rate-limiting hydride transfer. The competing metal center activated pathway has the same final step but needs to overcome a higher barrier in the initial step on the route to IM2. The concerted mechanism has the highest free energy barrier and can be ruled out. While confirming the qualitative mechanistic scenario proposed previously on the basis of DFT(B3LYP)/MM energy profiles, the present ab initio and FEP QM/MM calculations provide corrections to the barriers that are important when aiming at high accuracy.

  13. Ab Initio Path Integral Molecular Dynamics Study of the Nuclear Quantum Effect on Out-of-Plane Ring Deformation of Hydrogen Maleate Anion.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yukio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2014-01-14

    Ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulation was performed to understand the nuclear quantum effect on the out-of-plane ring deformation of hydrogen maleate anion and investigate the existence of a stable structure with ring deformation, which was suggested in experimental observation (Fillaux et al., Chem. Phys. 1999, 120, 387-403). The isotope effect and the temperature effect are studied as well. We first investigated the nuclear quantum effect on the proton transfer. In static calculation and classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, the proton in the hydrogen bond is localized to either oxygen atom. On the other hand, the proton is located at the center of two oxygen atoms in quantum ab initio PIMD simulations. The nuclear quantum effect washes out the barrier of proton transfer. We next examined the nuclear quantum effect on the motion of hydrogen maleate anion. Principal component analysis revealed that the out-of-plane ring bending modes have dominant contribution to the entire molecular motion. In quantum ab initio PIMD simulations, structures with ring deformation were the global minimum for the deuterated isotope at 300 K. We analyzed the out-of-plane ring bending mode further and found that there are three minima along a ring distortion mode. We successfully found a stable structure with ring deformation of hydrogen maleate for the first time, to our knowledge, using theoretical calculation. The structures with ring deformation found in quantum simulation of the deuterated isotope allowed the proton transfer to occur more frequently than the planar structure. Static ab initio electronic structure calculation found that the structures with ring deformation have very small proton transfer barrier compared to the planar structure. We suggest that the "proton transfer driven" mechanism is the origin of stabilization for the structure with out-of-plane ring deformation.

  14. Steel — ab Initio: Quantum Mechanics Guided Design of New Fe-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Ulrich; Bleck, Wolfgang; Saeed-Akbari, Alireza

    This contribution reports the results of the collaborative research unit SFB 761 "Steel — ab initio", a cooperative project between RWTH Aachen University and the Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research in Düsseldorf (MPIE) financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG). For the first time, it is exploited how ab initio approaches may lead to a detailed understanding and thus to a specific improvement of material development. The challenge lies in the combination of abstract natural science theories with rather engineering-like established concepts. Aiming at the technological target of the development of a new type of structural materials based on Fe-Mn-C alloys, the combination of ab initio and engineering methods is new, but could be followed quite successfully. Three major topics are treated in this research unit: a) development of a new method for material- and process-development based on ab initio calculations; b) design of a new class of structural materials with extraordinary property combinations; c) acceleration of development time and reduction of experimental efforts and complexity for material- and process-development. In the present work, an overview of the results of the first five years as well as an outlook for the upcoming three-year period is given.

  15. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2015-05-01

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H2O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previous spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 0-4000 cm-1 is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.

  16. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H2O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previous spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 0-4000 cm(-1) is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.

  17. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit

    DOE PAGES

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here we perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N = 1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy F xc of the macroscopic electron gas withmore » an unprecedented accuracy of | Δ V | / | V | , | Δ F xc | / | F | xc ~ 10 $-$3. Finally, a comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of F xc by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.« less

  18. Ab initio theory of spin-orbit coupling for quantum bits in diamond exhibiting dynamic Jahn-Teller effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gali, Adam; Thiering, Gergő

    Dopants in solids are promising candidates for implementations of quantum bits for quantum computing. In particular, the high-spin negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy defect (NV) in diamond has become a leading contender in solid-state quantum information processing. The initialization and readout of the spin is based on the spin-selective decay of the photo-excited electron to the ground state which is mediated by spin-orbit coupling between excited states states and phonons. Generally, the spin-orbit coupling plays a crucial role in the optical spinpolarization and readout of NV quantum bit (qubit) and alike. Strong electron-phonon coupling in dynamic Jahn-Teller (DJT) systems can substantially influence the effective strength of spin-orbit coupling. Here we show by ab initio supercell density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling is strongly damped by DJT effect in the triplet excited state that has a consequence on the rate of non-radiative decay. This theory is applied to the ground state of silicon-vacancy (SiV) and germanium-vacancy (GeV) centers in their negatively charged state that can also act like qubits. We show that the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in SiV and GeV centers is in the 100 GHz region, in contrast to the NV center of 10 GHz region. Our results provide deep insight in the nature of SiV and GeV qubits in diamond. EU FP7 DIADEMS project (Contract No. 611143).

  19. Development of a Polarizable Force Field For Proteins via Ab Initio Quantum Chemistry: First Generation Model and Gas Phase Tests

    PubMed Central

    KAMINSKI, GEORGE A.; STERN, HARRY A.; BERNE, B. J.; FRIESNER, RICHARD A.; CAO, YIXIANG X.; MURPHY, ROBERT B.; ZHOU, RUHONG; HALGREN, THOMAS A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results of developing a methodology suitable for producing molecular mechanics force fields with explicit treatment of electrostatic polarization for proteins and other molecular system of biological interest. The technique allows simulation of realistic-size systems. Employing high-level ab initio data as a target for fitting allows us to avoid the problem of the lack of detailed experimental data. Using the fast and reliable quantum mechanical methods supplies robust fitting data for the resulting parameter sets. As a result, gas-phase many-body effects for dipeptides are captured within the average RMSD of 0.22 kcal/mol from their ab initio values, and conformational energies for the di- and tetrapeptides are reproduced within the average RMSD of 0.43 kcal/mol from their quantum mechanical counterparts. The latter is achieved in part because of application of a novel torsional fitting technique recently developed in our group, which has already been used to greatly improve accuracy of the peptide conformational equilibrium prediction with the OPLS-AA force field.1 Finally, we have employed the newly developed first-generation model in computing gas-phase conformations of real proteins, as well as in molecular dynamics studies of the systems. The results show that, although the overall accuracy is no better than what can be achieved with a fixed-charges model, the methodology produces robust results, permits reasonably low computational cost, and avoids other computational problems typical for polarizable force fields. It can be considered as a solid basis for building a more accurate and complete second-generation model. PMID:12395421

  20. Multiple emissions of benzil at room temperature and 77 K and their assignments from ab initio quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Jana, Barnali; Bose, Debosreeta; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Multiple emissions have been observed from benzil under different conditions in solutions at room temperature as well as in low temperature glass matrices at 77 K. Low temperature emission has been monitored in rigid matrices frozen under different conditions of illumination. Steady state and time-resolved results together with the ab initio quantum chemical calculations provide, for the first time, the assignments of the different fluorescence bands to the different geometries and/or electronic states of the fluorophore molecule. It is revealed that the skew form of benzil emits from the first (S1) as well as the second excited singlet (S2) states depending on the excitation wavelength, while the relaxed transplanar conformer fluoresces only from the S1 state. The yet unexplored emission band peaking at around 360 nm has been assigned to originate from the S2 state. Ab initio calculations using the density functional theory at B3LYP/6-31G** level corroborate well with the experimental observations.

  1. Multiple emissions of benzil at room temperature and 77 K and their assignments from ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Jana, Barnali; Bose, Debosreeta; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2011-01-28

    Multiple emissions have been observed from benzil under different conditions in solutions at room temperature as well as in low temperature glass matrices at 77 K. Low temperature emission has been monitored in rigid matrices frozen under different conditions of illumination. Steady state and time-resolved results together with the ab initio quantum chemical calculations provide, for the first time, the assignments of the different fluorescence bands to the different geometries and∕or electronic states of the fluorophore molecule. It is revealed that the skew form of benzil emits from the first (S(1)) as well as the second excited singlet (S(2)) states depending on the excitation wavelength, while the relaxed transplanar conformer fluoresces only from the S(1) state. The yet unexplored emission band peaking at around 360 nm has been assigned to originate from the S(2) state. Ab initio calculations using the density functional theory at B3LYP∕6-31G∗∗ level corroborate well with the experimental observations.

  2. Vibrational energy transport in acetylbenzonitrile described by an ab initio-based quantum tier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Yagi, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroto; Takami, Toshiya; Stock, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Performing comprehensive quantum-chemical calculations, a vibrational Hamiltonian of acetylbenzonitrile is constructed, on the basis of which a quantum-mechanical "tier model" is developed that describes the vibrational dynamics following excitation of the CN stretch mode. Taking into account 36 vibrational modes and cubic and quartic anharmonic couplings between up to three different modes, the tier model calculations are shown to qualitatively reproduce the main findings of the experiments of Rubtsov and coworkers (2011), including the energy relaxation of the initially excited CN mode and the structure-dependent vibrational transport. Moreover, the calculations suggest that the experimentally measured cross-peak among the CN and CO modes does not correspond to direct excitation of the CO normal mode but rather reflects excited low-frequency vibrations that anharmonically couple to the CO mode. Complementary quasiclassical trajectory calculations are found to be in good overall agreement with the quantum calculations.

  3. Ab initio calculation of transport properties between PbSe quantum dots facets with iodide ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Patterson, R.; Chen, W.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, J.; Huang, S.; Shrestha, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2018-01-01

    The transport properties between Lead Selenide (PbSe) quantum dots decorated with iodide ligands has been studied using density functional theory (DFT). Quantum conductance at each selected energy levels has been calculated along with total density of states and projected density of states. The DFT calculation is carried on using a grid-based planar augmented wave (GPAW) code incorporated with the linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) mode and Perdew Burke Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional. Three iodide ligand attached low index facets including (001), (011), (111) are investigated in this work. P-orbital of iodide ligand majorly contributes to density of state (DOS) at near top valence band resulting a significant quantum conductance, whereas DOS of Pb p-orbital shows minor influence. Various values of quantum conductance observed along different planes are possibly reasoned from a combined effect electrical field over topmost surface and total distance between adjacent facets. Ligands attached to (001) and (011) planes possess similar bond length whereas it is significantly shortened in (111) plane, whereas transport between (011) has an overall low value due to newly formed electric field. On the other hand, (111) plane with a net surface dipole perpendicular to surface layers leading to stronger electron coupling suggests an apparent increase of transport probability. Apart from previously mentioned, the maximum transport energy levels located several eVs (1 2 eVs) from the edge of valence band top.

  4. Anharmonic and Quantum Fluctuations in Molecular Crystals from Ab Initio Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Mariana; Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    Molecular crystals often exist in multiple competing polymorphs which are challenging to be predicted computationally, but show significantly different physicochemical properties. This challenge is not due only to the combinatorial search space, but also to the complex interplay of subtle effects determine the relative stability of different structures. Here we estimate all contributions to the free energies of these systems with density-functional theory, including the oft-neglected anharmonic contributions and nuclear quantum effects, by using a series of different flavors of thermodynamic integration. As an example, for the two most stable forms of paracetamol we find that anharmonic contributions, different descriptions of van der Waals interactions, and nuclear quantum effects all matter to quantitatively determine the stability of different phases. Our studies indicate that anharmonic free energies could play an important role for molecular crystals composed by large molecules and opens the way for a systematic inclusion of these effects in order to obtain a predictive screening of structures.

  5. Ab Initio Simulation of Charge Transfer at the Semiconductor Quantum Dot/TiO 2 Interface in Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Xin, Xukai; Li, Bo; Jung, Jaehan; ...

    2014-07-24

    Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have emerged as a promising solar architecture for next-generation solar cells. The QDSSCs exhibit a remarkably fast electron transfer from the quantum dot (QD) donor to the TiO 2 acceptor with size quantization properties of QDs that allows for the modulation of band energies to control photoresponse and photoconversion efficiency of solar cells. In order to understand the mechanisms that underpin this rapid charge transfer, the electronic properties of CdSe and PbSe QDs with different sizes on the TiO 2 substrate are simulated using a rigorous ab initio density functional method. Our method capitalizes onmore » localized orbital basis set, which is computationally less intensive. Quite intriguingly, a remarkable set of electron bridging states between QDs and TiO 2 occurring via the strong bonding between the conduction bands of QDs and TiO 2 is revealed. Such bridging states account for the fast adiabatic charge transfer from the QD donor to the TiO 2 acceptor, and may be a general feature for strongly coupled donor/acceptor systems. All the QDs/TiO 2 systems exhibit type II band alignments, with conduction band offsets that increase with the decrease in QD size. This facilitates the charge transfer from QDs donors to TiO 2 acceptors and explains the dependence of the increased charge transfer rate with the decreased QD size.« less

  6. Quantum free energy landscapes from ab initio path integral metadynamics: Double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer is concerted but not correlated.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergei D; Grant, Ian M; Marx, Dominik

    2015-09-28

    With the goal of computing quantum free energy landscapes of reactive (bio)chemical systems in multi-dimensional space, we combine the metadynamics technique for sampling potential energy surfaces with the ab initio path integral approach to treating nuclear quantum motion. This unified method is applied to the double proton transfer process in the formic acid dimer (FAD), in order to study the nuclear quantum effects at finite temperatures without imposing a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or reducing the dimensionality. Importantly, the ab initio path integral metadynamics technique allows one to treat the hydrogen bonds and concomitant proton transfers in FAD strictly independently and thus provides direct access to the much discussed issue of whether the double proton transfer proceeds via a stepwise or concerted mechanism. The quantum free energy landscape we compute for this H-bonded molecular complex reveals that the two protons move in a concerted fashion from initial to product state, yet world-line analysis of the quantum correlations demonstrates that the protons are as quantum-uncorrelated at the transition state as they are when close to the equilibrium structure.

  7. Characterization of Asia 1 sdAb from Camels Bactrianus (C. bactrianus) and Conjugation with Quantum Dots for Imaging FMDV in BHK-21 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Youjun; Sun, Shiqi; Zhou, Guangqing; Jin, Ye; Tian, Hong; Wu, Jinyan; Liu, Xiangtao

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), caused by FMD virus (FMDV), is a highly contagious viral disease affecting cloven-hoofed animals. Camelids have a unique immunoglobulin profile, with the smallest functional heavy-chain antibodies (sdAb or VHH) naturally devoid of light chains with antigen-binding capacity. We screened and characterized five sdAbs against FMDV by immunized library from C. bactrianus with Asia 1 virus-like particles (VLPs). Three of five recombinant sdAbs were stably expressed in E.coli, remained highly soluble, and were serotype-specific for VP1 protein of FMDV Asia 1 by ELISA. These failed to completely neutralize the Asia 1 virus. According to the KD value of binding affinity to three sdAbs, which ranged from 0.44 to 0.71 nm by SPR, sdAb-C6 was selected and conjugated with Zn/CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to form a QDs-C6 probe, which was used to trace and image the subcellular location of FMDV in BHK-21 cells. The results show that FMD virions were observed from 3 h.p.i., and most of virions were distributed on one side of the nucleus in the cytoplasm. We demonstrate the utility of sdAbs as functionalized QDs are powerful tools for FMDV research. PMID:23737944

  8. Ab Initio Studies of Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions of Inter-Metallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava; Hanagud, Sathya

    2009-06-01

    Shock-induced and shock assisted chemical reactions of intermetallic mixtures are studied by many researchers, using both experimental and theoretical techniques. The theoretical studies are primarily at continuum scales. The model frameworks include mixture theories and meso-scale models of grains of porous mixtures. The reaction models vary from equilibrium thermodynamic model to several non-equilibrium thermodynamic models. The shock-effects are primarily studied using appropriate conservation equations and numerical techniques to integrate the equations. All these models require material constants from experiments and estimates of transition states. Thus, the objective of this paper is to present studies based on ab initio techniques. The ab inito studies, to date, use ab inito molecular dynamics. This paper presents a study that uses shock pressures, and associated temperatures as starting variables. Then intermetallic mixtures are modeled as slabs. The required shock stresses are created by straining the lattice. Then, ab initio binding energy calculations are used to examine the stability of the reactions. Binding energies are obtained for different strain components super imposed on uniform compression and finite temperatures. Then, vibrational frequencies and nudge elastic band techniques are used to study reactivity and transition states. Examples include Ni and Al.

  9. [Structural and Dipole Structure Peculiarities of Hoogsteen Base Pairs Formed in Complementary Nucleobases according to ab initio Quantum Mechanics Studies].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Y M

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanics studies for the detection of structure and dipole structure peculiarities of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson-Crick base pairs, were performed during our work. These base pairs are formed as a result of complementary interactions. It was revealed, that adenine-thymine Hoogsteen base pair and adenine-thymine Watson-Crick base pairs can be formed depending on initial configuration. Cytosine-guanine Hoogsteen pairs are formed only when cytosine was originally protonated. Both types of Hoogsteen pairs have noticeable difference in the bond distances and angles. These differences appeared in purine as well as in pyrimidine parts of the pairs. Hoogsteen pairs have mostly shorter hydrogen bond lengths and significantly larger angles of hydrogen bonds and larger angles between the hydrogen bonds than Watson-Crick base pairs. Notable differences are also observed with respect to charge distribution and dipole moment. Quantitative data on these differences are shown in our work. It is also reported that the values of local parameters (according to Cambridge classification of the parameters which determine DNA properties) in Hoogsteen base pairs, are greatly different from Watson-Crick ones.

  10. On the use of symmetry in the ab initio quantum mechanical simulation of nanotubes and related materials.

    PubMed

    Noel, Yves; D'arco, Philippe; Demichelis, Raffaella; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M; Dovesi, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Nanotubes can be characterized by a very high point symmetry, comparable or even larger than the one of the most symmetric crystalline systems (cubic, 48 point symmetry operators). For example, N = 2n rototranslation symmetry operators connect the atoms of the (n,0) nanotubes. This symmetry is fully exploited in the CRYSTAL code. As a result, ab initio quantum mechanical large basis set calculations of carbon nanotubes containing more than 150 atoms in the unit cell become very cheap, because the irreducible part of the unit cell reduces to two atoms only. The nanotube symmetry is exploited at three levels in the present implementation. First, for the automatic generation of the nanotube structure (and then of the input file for the SCF calculation) starting from a two-dimensional structure (in the specific case, graphene). Second, the nanotube symmetry is used for the calculation of the mono- and bi-electronic integrals that enter into the Fock (Kohn-Sham) matrix definition. Only the irreducible wedge of the Fock matrix is computed, with a saving factor close to N. Finally, the symmetry is exploited for the diagonalization, where each irreducible representation is separately treated. When M atomic orbitals per carbon atom are used, the diagonalization computing time is close to Nt, where t is the time required for the diagonalization of each 2M x 2M matrix. The efficiency and accuracy of the computational scheme is documented. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces: Tests of dynamical assumptions using quantum models and ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Bret, E-mail: jackson@chem.umass.edu; Nattino, Francesco; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces is of great practical and fundamental importance. Not only is it the rate-limiting step in the steam reforming of natural gas, the reaction exhibits interesting mode-selective behavior and a strong dependence on the temperature of the metal. We present a quantum model for this reaction on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces based on the reaction path Hamiltonian. The dissociative sticking probabilities computed using this model agree well with available experimental data with regard to variation with incident energy, substrate temperature, and the vibrational state of the incident molecule. We significantly expand the vibrationalmore » basis set relative to earlier studies, which allows reaction probabilities to be calculated for doubly excited initial vibrational states, though it does not lead to appreciable changes in the reaction probabilities for singly excited initial states. Sudden models used to treat the center of mass motion parallel to the surface are compared with results from ab initio molecular dynamics and found to be reasonable. Similar comparisons for molecular rotation suggest that our rotationally adiabatic model is incorrect, and that sudden behavior is closer to reality. Such a model is proposed and tested. A model for predicting mode-selective behavior is tested, with mixed results, though we find it is consistent with experimental studies of normal vs. total (kinetic) energy scaling. Models for energy transfer into lattice vibrations are also examined.« less

  12. Network-Forming Nanoclusters in Binary As-S/Se Glasses: From Ab Initio Quantum Chemical Modeling to Experimental Evidences.

    PubMed

    Hyla, M

    2017-12-01

    Network-forming As 2 (S/Se) m nanoclusters are employed to recognize expected variations in a vicinity of some remarkable compositions in binary As-Se/S glassy systems accepted as signatures of optimally constrained intermediate topological phases in earlier temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry experiments. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations performed using the cation-interlinking network cluster approach show similar oscillating character in tendency to local chemical decomposition but obvious step-like behavior in preference to global phase separation on boundary chemical compounds (pure chalcogen and stoichiometric arsenic chalcogenides). The onsets of stability are defined for chalcogen-rich glasses, these being connected with As 2 Se 5 (Z = 2.29) and As 2 S 6 (Z = 2.25) nanoclusters for As-Se and As-S glasses, respectively. The physical aging effects result preferentially from global phase separation in As-S glass system due to high localization of covalent bonding and local demixing on neighboring As 2 Se m+1 and As 2 Se m-1 nanoclusters in As-Se system. These nanoclusters well explain the lower limits of reversibility windows in temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, but they cannot be accepted as signatures of topological phase transitions in respect to the rigidity theory.

  13. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2015-05-21

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H{sub 2}O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previousmore » spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 0–4000 cm{sup −1} is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.« less

  14. Heats of Segregation of BCC Metals Using Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian; Chaka, Anne; Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    Many multicomponent alloys exhibit surface segregation, in which the composition at or near a surface may be substantially different from that of the bulk. A number of phenomenological explanations for this tendency have been suggested, involving, among other things, differences among the components' surface energies, molar volumes, and heats of solution. From a theoretical standpoint, the complexity of the problem has precluded a simple, unified explanation, thus preventing the development of computational tools that would enable the identification of the driving mechanisms for segregation. In that context, we investigate the problem of surface segregation in a variety of bcc metal alloys by computing dilute-limit heats of segregation using both the quantum-approximate energy method of Bozzolo, Ferrante and Smith (BFS), and all-electron density functional theory. In addition, the composition dependence of the heats of segregation is investigated using a BFS-based Monte Carlo procedure, and, for selected cases of interest, density functional calculations. Results are discussed in the context of a simple picture that describes segregation behavior as the result of a competition between size mismatch and alloying effects

  15. Atomic Spectral Methods for Ab Initio Molecular Electronic Energy Surfaces: Transitioning From Small-Molecule to Biomolecular-Suitable Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jeffrey D; Ben-Nun, Michal; Rollin, Kyle; Bromley, Michael W J; Li, Jiabo; Hinde, Robert J; Winstead, Carl L; Sheehy, Jeffrey A; Boatz, Jerry A; Langhoff, Peter W

    2016-08-25

    Continuing attention has addressed incorportation of the electronically dynamical attributes of biomolecules in the largely static first-generation molecular-mechanical force fields commonly employed in molecular-dynamics simulations. We describe here a universal quantum-mechanical approach to calculations of the electronic energy surfaces of both small molecules and large aggregates on a common basis which can include such electronic attributes, and which also seems well-suited to adaptation in ab initio molecular-dynamics applications. In contrast to the more familiar orbital-product-based methodologies employed in traditional small-molecule computational quantum chemistry, the present approach is based on an "ex-post-facto" method in which Hamiltonian matrices are evaluated prior to wave function antisymmetrization, implemented here in the support of a Hilbert space of orthonormal products of many-electron atomic spectral eigenstates familiar from the van der Waals theory of long-range interactions. The general theory in its various forms incorporates the early semiempirical atoms- and diatomics-in-molecules approaches of Moffitt, Ellison, Tully, Kuntz, and others in a comprehensive mathematical setting, and generalizes the developments of Eisenschitz, London, Claverie, and others addressing electron permutation symmetry adaptation issues, completing these early attempts to treat van der Waals and chemical forces on a common basis. Exact expressions are obtained for molecular Hamiltonian matrices and for associated energy eigenvalues as sums of separate atomic and interaction-energy terms, similar in this respect to the forms of classical force fields. The latter representation is seen to also provide a long-missing general definition of the energies of individual atoms and of their interactions within molecules and matter free from subjective additional constraints. A computer code suite is described for calculations of the many-electron atomic eigenspectra and

  16. Vibrational Properties of Hydrogen-Bonded Systems Using the Multireference Generalization to the "On-the-Fly" Electronic Structure within Quantum Wavepacket ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (QWAIMD).

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Li, Xiaohu; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2014-06-10

    We discuss a multiconfigurational treatment of the "on-the-fly" electronic structure within the quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics (QWAIMD) method for coupled treatment of quantum nuclear effects with electronic structural effects. Here, multiple single-particle electronic density matrices are simultaneously propagated with a quantum nuclear wavepacket and other classical nuclear degrees of freedom. The multiple density matrices are coupled through a nonorthogonal configuration interaction (NOCI) procedure to construct the instantaneous potential surface. An adaptive-mesh-guided set of basis functions composed of Gaussian primitives are used to simplify the electronic structure calculations. Specifically, with the replacement of the atom-centered basis functions positioned on the centers of the quantum-mechanically treated nuclei by a mesh-guided band of basis functions, the two-electron integrals used to compute the electronic structure potential surface become independent of the quantum nuclear variable and hence reusable along the entire Cartesian grid representing the quantum nuclear coordinates. This reduces the computational complexity involved in obtaining a potential surface and facilitates the interpretation of the individual density matrices as representative diabatic states. The parametric nuclear position dependence of the diabatic states is evaluated at the initial time-step using a Shannon-entropy-based sampling function that depends on an approximation to the quantum nuclear wavepacket and the potential surface. This development is meant as a precursor to an on-the-fly fully multireference electronic structure procedure embedded, on-the-fly, within a quantum nuclear dynamics formalism. We benchmark the current development by computing structural, dynamic, and spectroscopic features for a series of bihalide hydrogen-bonded systems: FHF(-), ClHCl(-), BrHBr(-), and BrHCl(-). We find that the donor-acceptor structural features are in good

  17. Recent advances in jointed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations of biological macromolecules: schemes and applications coupled to ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Tateno, Masaru

    2010-10-20

    We review the recent research on the functional mechanisms of biological macromolecules using theoretical methodologies coupled to ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) treatments of reaction centers in proteins and nucleic acids. Since in most cases such biological molecules are large, the computational costs of performing ab initio calculations for the entire structures are prohibitive. Instead, simulations that are jointed with molecular mechanics (MM) calculations are crucial to evaluate the long-range electrostatic interactions, which significantly affect the electronic structures of biological macromolecules. Thus, we focus our attention on the methodologies/schemes and applications of jointed QM/MM calculations, and discuss the critical issues to be elucidated in biological macromolecular systems. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  18. Quantum Dynamics Scattering Study of AB+CDE Reactions: A Seven Dimensional Treatment for the H2+C2H Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou

    2003-01-01

    A time-dependent wave-packet approach is presented for the quantum dynamics study of the AB+CDE reaction system for zero total angular momentum. A seven-degree-of-freedom calculation is employed to study the chemical reaction of H2+C2H yields H + C2H2 by treating C2H as a linear molecule. Initial state selected reaction probabilities are presented for various initial ro-vibrational states. This study shows that vibrational excitation of H2 enhances the reaction probability, whereas the excitation of C2H has only a small effect on the reactivity. An integral cross section is also reported for the initial ground states of H2 and C2H. The theoretical and experimental results agree with each other very well when the calculated seven dimensional results are adjusted to account for the lower transition state barrier heights found in recent ab initio calculations.

  19. Quantum-Chemical ab initio Calculations on the Three Isomers of Diborabenzene (C4H4B2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaswinder; Wang, Yuekui; Raabe, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Quantum-chemical ab initio calculations up to the ZPE+CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/6- 311++G** level were performed on three possible structural isomers of diborabenzene (C4H4B2). All three molecules were found to be local minima on the C4H4B2 energy surface and to have closed shell singlet ground states. While the ground states of the 1,3- and 1,4-isomer are planar and of C2v and D2h symmetry, respectively, 1,2-diborabenzene is non-planar with a C2 axis passing through the center of the BB bond and the middle of the opposite carbon-carbon bond as the only symmetry element. The energetically most favourable 1,3-diborabenzene was found to be about 19 and 36 kcal/mol lower in energy than the 1,2- and the 1,4-isomer. Planar 1,3- and 1,4-diborabenzene have three doubly occupied π orbitals while non-planar 1,2-diborabenzene has also three doubly occupied orbitals which can be derived from the π orbitals of its 3.7 kcal/mol energetically less favourable planar form ("π-like" orbitals). The lowest unoccupied orbitals of all three isomers have σ symmetry with large coefficients at the two boron atoms. These orbitals are lower in energy than the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of e. g. benzene and pyridine and might cause pronounced acceptor properties which could be one of the reasons for the elusiveness of the title compounds. The results of bond separation reactions show that cyclic conjugation stabilizes all three diborabenzenes relative to their isolated fragments. The most effective stabilization energy of about 24 kcal/mol was found for the energetically lowest 1,3-isomer. This value amounts to approximately one third of the experimental value for the bond separation energy of pyridine. In all cases the energetically lowest triplet states are significantly (16 - 24 kcal/mol) higher in energy than the singlet ground states. Also among the triplets the 1,3-isomer is the energetically most fabourable species.

  20. Time-Domain Ab Initio Analysis of Excitation Dynamics in a Quantum Dot/Polymer Hybrid: Atomistic Description Rationalizes Experiment.

    PubMed

    Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-07-08

    Hybrid organic/inorganic polymer/quantum dot (QD) solar cells are an attractive alternative to the traditional cells. The original, simple models postulate that one-dimensional polymers have continuous energy levels, while zero-dimensional QDs exhibit atom-like electronic structure. A realistic, atomistic viewpoint provides an alternative description. Electronic states in polymers are molecule-like: finite in size and discrete in energy. QDs are composed of many atoms and have high, bulk-like densities of states. We employ ab initio time-domain simulation to model the experimentally observed ultrafast photoinduced dynamics in a QD/polymer hybrid and show that an atomistic description is essential for understanding the time-resolved experimental data. Both electron and hole transfers across the interface exhibit subpicosecond time scales. The interfacial processes are fast due to strong electronic donor-acceptor, as evidenced by the densities of the photoexcited states which are delocalized between the donor and the acceptor. The nonadiabatic charge-phonon coupling is also strong, especially in the polymer, resulting in rapid energy losses. The electron transfer from the polymer is notably faster than the hole transfer from the QD, due to a significantly higher density of acceptor states. The stronger molecule-like electronic and charge-phonon coupling in the polymer rationalizes why the electron-hole recombination inside the polymer is several orders of magnitude faster than in the QD. As a result, experiments exhibit multiple transfer times for the long-lived hole inside the QD, ranging from subpicoseconds to nanoseconds. In contrast, transfer of the short-lived electron inside the polymer does not occur beyond the first picosecond. The energy lost by the hole on its transit into the polymer is accommodated by polymer's high-frequency vibrations. The energy lost by the electron injected into the QD is accommodated primarily by much lower-frequency collective and

  1. Ab initio calculation of the G peak intensity of graphene: Laser-energy and Fermi-energy dependence and importance of quantum interference effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Sven; Wirtz, Ludger

    2017-05-01

    We present the results of a diagrammatic, fully ab initio calculation of the G peak intensity of graphene. The flexibility and generality of our approach enables us to go beyond the previous analytical calculations in the low-energy regime. We study the laser and Fermi energy dependence of the G peak intensity and analyze the contributions from resonant and nonresonant electronic transitions. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate the importance of quantum interference and nonresonant states for the G peak process. Our method of analysis and computational concept is completely general and can easily be applied to study other materials as well.

  2. Full-Dimensional Quantum Calculations of Vibrational Levels of NH4(+) and Isotopomers on An Accurate Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua-Gen; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-04-14

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH4(+)) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH4(+) and ND4(+) exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v1 + v3) + v2 + v4. The low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data is better than 1 cm(-1).

  3. Ab initio implementation of quantum trajectory mean-field approach and dynamical simulation of the N{sub 2}CO photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Binbin; Liu, Lihong; Cui, Ganglong

    2015-11-21

    In this work, the recently introduced quantum trajectory mean-field (QTMF) approach is implemented and employed to explore photodissociation dynamics of diazirinone (N{sub 2}CO), which are based on the high-level ab initio calculation. For comparison, the photodissociation process has been simulated as well with the fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) and the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) methods. Overall, the dynamical behavior predicted by the three methods is consistent. The N{sub 2}CO photodissociation at λ > 335 nm is an ultrafast process and the two C—N bonds are broken in a stepwise way, giving birth to CO and N{sub 2} as themore » final products in the ground state. Meanwhile, some noticeable differences were found in the QTMF, FSSH, and AIMS simulated time constants for fission of the C—N bonds, excited-state lifetime, and nonadiabatic transition ratios in different intersection regions. These have been discussed in detail. The present study provides a clear evidence that direct ab initio QTMF approach is one of the reliable tools for simulating nonadiabatic dynamics processes.« less

  4. Increasing the efficiency and accuracy of time-resolved electronic spectra calculations with on-the-fly ab initio quantum dynamics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanicek, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    Rigorous quantum-mechanical calculations of coherent ultrafast electronic spectra remain difficult. I will present several approaches developed in our group that increase the efficiency and accuracy of such calculations: First, we justified the feasibility of evaluating time-resolved spectra of large systems by proving that the number of trajectories needed for convergence of the semiclassical dephasing representation/phase averaging is independent of dimensionality. Recently, we further accelerated this approximation with a cellular scheme employing inverse Weierstrass transform and optimal scaling of the cell size. The accuracy of potential energy surfaces was increased by combining the dephasing representation with accurate on-the-fly ab initio electronic structure calculations, including nonadiabatic and spin-orbit couplings. Finally, the inherent semiclassical approximation was removed in the exact quantum Gaussian dephasing representation, in which semiclassical trajectories are replaced by communicating frozen Gaussian basis functions evolving classically with an average Hamiltonian. Among other examples I will present an on-the-fly ab initio semiclassical dynamics calculation of the dispersed time-resolved stimulated emission spectrum of the 54-dimensional azulene. This research was supported by EPFL and by the Swiss National Science Foundation NCCR MUST (Molecular Ultrafast Science and Technology) and Grant No. 200021124936/1.

  5. Cooperative effects in the structuring of fluoride water clusters: Ab initio hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical model incorporating polarizable fluctuating charge solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, Richard A.; Vincent, Mark A.; Malcolm, Nathaniel O. J.; Hillier, Ian H.; Burton, Neil A.

    1998-08-01

    A new hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical model of solvation is developed and used to describe the structure and dynamics of small fluoride/water clusters, using an ab initio wave function to model the ion and a fluctuating charge potential to model the waters. Appropriate parameters for the water-water and fluoride-water interactions are derived, with the fluoride anion being described by density functional theory and a large Gaussian basis. The role of solvent polarization in determining the structure and energetics of F(H2O)4- clusters is investigated, predicting a slightly greater stability of the interior compared to the surface structure, in agreement with ab initio studies. An extended Lagrangian treatment of the polarizable water, in which the water atomic charges fluctuate dynamically, is used to study the dynamics of F(H2O)4- cluster. A simulation using a fixed solvent charge distribution indicates principally interior, solvated states for the cluster. However, a preponderance of trisolvated configurations is observed using the polarizable model at 300 K, which involves only three direct fluoride-water hydrogen bonds. Ab initio calculations confirm this trisolvated species as a thermally accessible state at room temperature, in addition to the tetrasolvated interior and surface structures. Extension of this polarizable water model to fluoride clusters with five and six waters gave less satisfactory agreement with experimental energies and with ab initio geometries. However, our results do suggest that a quantitative model of solvent polarization is fundamental for an accurate understanding of the properties of anionic water clusters.

  6. Quantum state preparation of homonuclear molecular ions enabled via a cold buffer gas: An ab initio study for the H2+ and the D2+ case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, S.; Kortunov, I.; Hernández Vera, M.; Gianturco, F.; da Silva, H.

    2017-04-01

    Precision vibrational spectroscopy of the molecular hydrogen ions is of significant interest for determining fundamental constants, for searching for new forces, and for testing quantum electrodynamics calculations. Future experiments can profit from the ability of preparing molecular hydrogen ions at ultralow kinetic energy and in preselected internal states, with respect to vibration, rotation, and spin degrees of freedom. For the homonuclear ions (H2+ , D2+ ), direct laser cooling of the rotational degree of freedom is not feasible. We show by quantum calculations that rotational cooling by cold He buffer gas is an effective approach. For this purpose we have computed the energy-dependent cross sections for rotationally elastic and inelastic collisions, h2+ (v =0 ,N ) +He → h2+ (v =0 ,N') +He (where h =H ,D ) , using ab initio coupled-channel calculations. We find that rotational cooling to the lowest rotational state is possible within tens of seconds under experimentally realistic conditions. We furthermore describe possible protocols for the preparation of a single quantum state, where also the spin state is well defined.

  7. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational levels of NH 4 + and isotopomers on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface

    DOE PAGES

    Hua -Gen Yu; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-29

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH 4 +) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH 4 + and ND 4 + exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v 1 + v 3) + v 2 + v 4. As a result, the low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data ismore » better than 1 cm –1.« less

  8. Quantum calculations of the rate constant for the O(3P)+HCl reaction on new ab initio 3A″ and 3A' surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tiao; Bowman, Joel M.; Peterson, K. A.; Ramachandran, B.

    2003-11-01

    We report the thermal rate constant of the O(3P)+HCl→OH+Cl reaction calculated from 200 to 3200 K, using new fits to extensive ab initio calculations [B. Ramachandran and K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9590 (2003), preceding paper]. The rate constants are obtained for both the 3A″ and 3A' surfaces using exact quantum reactive scattering calculations for selected values of the total angular momentum and the J-shifting approximation for both the 3A″ and 3A' surfaces. The results are compared with the ICVT/μOMT rate constants calculated by the POLYRATE program and all available experimental data. Other related high-energy reaction channels are also studied qualitatively for their contribution to the total thermal rate constant at high temperature.

  9. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculation of the reaction probability for the Cl-+PH2Cl→ClPH2+Cl- reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Pooria; Lundberg, Marcus; Karlsson, Hans O.

    2013-11-01

    The SN2 substitution reactions at phosphorus play a key role in organic and biological processes. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the prototype reaction Cl-+PH2Cl→ClPH2+Cl-, using one and two-dimensional models. A potential energy surface, showing an energy well for a transition complex, was generated using ab initio electronic structure calculations. The one-dimensional model is essentially reflection free, whereas the more realistic two-dimensional model displays involved resonance structures in the reaction probability. The reaction rate is almost two orders of magnitude smaller for the two-dimensional compared to the one-dimensional model. Energetic errors in the potential energy surface is estimated to affect the rate by only a factor of two. This shows that for these types of reactions it is more important to increase the dimensionality of the modeling than to increase the accuracy of the electronic structure calculation.

  10. Embedding Fragment ab Initio Model Potentials in CASSCF/CASPT2 Calculations of Doped Solids: Implementation and Applications.

    PubMed

    Swerts, Ben; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Lindh, Roland; Seijo, Luis; Barandiaran, Zoila; Clima, Sergiu; Pierloot, Kristin; Hendrickx, Marc F A

    2008-04-01

    In this article, we present a fragment model potential approach for the description of the crystalline environment as an extension of the use of embedding ab initio model potentials (AIMPs). The biggest limitation of the embedding AIMP method is the spherical nature of its model potentials. This poses problems as soon as the method is applied to crystals containing strongly covalently bonded structures with highly nonspherical electron densities. The newly proposed method addresses this problem by keeping the full electron density as its model potential, thus allowing one to group sets of covalently bonded atoms into fragments. The implementation in the MOLCAS 7.0 quantum chemistry package of the new method, which we call the embedding fragment ab inito model potential method (embedding FAIMP), is reported here, together with results of CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations. The developed methodology is applied for two test problems: (i) the investigation of the lowest ligand field states (2)A1 and (2)B1 of the Cr(V) defect in the YVO4 crystal and (ii) the investigation of the lowest ligand field and ligand-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states at the Mn(II) substitutional impurity doped into CaCO3. Comparison with similar calculations involving AIMPs for all environmental atoms, including those from covalently bounded units, shows that the FAIMP treatment of the YVO4 units surrounding the CrO4(3-) cluster increases the excitation energy (2)B1 → (2)A1 by ca. 1000 cm(-1) at the CASSCF level of calculation. In the case of the Mn(CO3)6(10-) cluster, the FAIMP treatment of the CO3(2-) units of the environment give smaller corrections, of ca. 100 cm(-1), for the ligand-field excitation energies, which is explained by the larger ligands of this cluster. However, the correction for the energy of the lowest LMCT transition is found to be ca. 600 cm(-1) for the CASSCF and ca. 1300 cm(-1) for the CASPT2 calculation.

  11. Ab initio rate constants from hyperspherical quantum scattering: Application to H+C2H6 and H+CH3OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Clary, David C.

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics and kinetics of the abstraction reactions of H atoms with ethane and methanol have been studied using a quantum mechanical procedure. Bonds being broken and formed are treated with explicit hyperspherical quantum dynamics. The ab initio potential energy surfaces for these reactions have been developed from a minimal number of grid points (average of 48 points) and are given by analytical functionals. All the degrees of freedom except the breaking and forming bonds are optimized using the second order perturbation theory method with a correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta basis set. Single point energies are calculated on the optimized geometries with the coupled cluster theory and the same basis set. The reaction of H with C2H6 is endothermic by 1.5 kcal/mol and has a vibrationally adiabatic barrier of 12 kcal/mol. The reaction of H with CH3OH presents two reactive channels: the methoxy and the hydroxymethyl channels. The former is endothermic by 0.24 kcal/mol and has a vibrationally adiabatic barrier of 13.29 kcal/mol, the latter reaction is exothermic by 7.87 kcal/mol and has a vibrationally adiabatic barrier of 8.56 kcal/mol. We report state-to-state and state-selected cross sections together with state-to-state rate constants for the title reactions. Thermal rate constants for these reactions exhibit large quantum tunneling effects when compared to conventional transition state theory results. For H+CH3OH, it is found that the CH2OH product is the dominant channel, and that the CH3O channel contributes just 2% at 500 K. For both reactions, rate constants are in good agreement with some measurements.

  12. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of ground-state tunneling splitting of malonaldehyde using an accurate ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Bowman, Joel M.; Carter, Stuart; Tew, David P.

    2008-06-01

    Quantum calculations of the ground vibrational state tunneling splitting of H-atom and D-atom transfer in malonaldehyde are performed on a full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The PES is a fit to 11 147 near basis-set-limit frozen-core CCSD(T) electronic energies. This surface properly describes the invariance of the potential with respect to all permutations of identical atoms. The saddle-point barrier for the H-atom transfer on the PES is 4.1 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the reported ab initio value. Model one-dimensional and ``exact'' full-dimensional calculations of the splitting for H- and D-atom transfer are done using this PES. The tunneling splittings in full dimensionality are calculated using the unbiased ``fixed-node'' diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method in Cartesian and saddle-point normal coordinates. The ground-state tunneling splitting is found to be 21.6 cm-1 in Cartesian coordinates and 22.6 cm-1 in normal coordinates, with an uncertainty of 2-3 cm-1. This splitting is also calculated based on a model which makes use of the exact single-well zero-point energy (ZPE) obtained with the MULTIMODE code and DMC ZPE and this calculation gives a tunneling splitting of 21-22 cm-1. The corresponding computed splittings for the D-atom transfer are 3.0, 3.1, and 2-3 cm-1. These calculated tunneling splittings agree with each other to within less than the standard uncertainties obtained with the DMC method used, which are between 2 and 3 cm-1, and agree well with the experimental values of 21.6 and 2.9 cm-1 for the H and D transfer, respectively.

  13. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of ground-state tunneling splitting of malonaldehyde using an accurate ab initio potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J; Bowman, Joel M; Carter, Stuart; Tew, David P

    2008-06-14

    Quantum calculations of the ground vibrational state tunneling splitting of H-atom and D-atom transfer in malonaldehyde are performed on a full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The PES is a fit to 11 147 near basis-set-limit frozen-core CCSD(T) electronic energies. This surface properly describes the invariance of the potential with respect to all permutations of identical atoms. The saddle-point barrier for the H-atom transfer on the PES is 4.1 kcalmol, in excellent agreement with the reported ab initio value. Model one-dimensional and "exact" full-dimensional calculations of the splitting for H- and D-atom transfer are done using this PES. The tunneling splittings in full dimensionality are calculated using the unbiased "fixed-node" diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method in Cartesian and saddle-point normal coordinates. The ground-state tunneling splitting is found to be 21.6 cm(-1) in Cartesian coordinates and 22.6 cm(-1) in normal coordinates, with an uncertainty of 2-3 cm(-1). This splitting is also calculated based on a model which makes use of the exact single-well zero-point energy (ZPE) obtained with the MULTIMODE code and DMC ZPE and this calculation gives a tunneling splitting of 21-22 cm(-1). The corresponding computed splittings for the D-atom transfer are 3.0, 3.1, and 2-3 cm(-1). These calculated tunneling splittings agree with each other to within less than the standard uncertainties obtained with the DMC method used, which are between 2 and 3 cm(-1), and agree well with the experimental values of 21.6 and 2.9 cm(-1) for the H and D transfer, respectively.

  14. Multiphase Equation of State and Strength Properties of Beryllium from AB INITIO and Quantum Molecular Dynamics Calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Sollier, A.; Legrand, Ph.

    2007-12-01

    In the framework of density functional theory, static properties and phonon spectra of beryllium have been calculated under high compression (for pressures up to 4 Mbar) for two solid phases: hexagonal compact (hcp) and body-centered cubic (bcc). The melting curve and some isotherms in the liquid phase have been calculated using quantum molecular dynamics. The coupling of these theoretical data to a quasi-harmonic approach (phonon moments) allows us to suggest a new theoretical phase diagram and to build a multiphase equation of state (EOS) valid in a large range of pressure and temperature. The resulting Hugoniot curves as well as the evolution of the longitudinal sound speed with both pressure and temperature are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  15. Optical, Fluorescence with quantum analysis of hydrazine (1, 3- Dinitro Phenyl) by DFT and Ab initio approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecily Mary Glory, D.; Sambathkumar, K.; Madivanane, R.; Velmurugan, G.; Gayathri, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.; Venkatachalapathy, M.; Rajkamal, N.

    2018-07-01

    Experimental and computational study of molecular structure, vibrational and UV-spectral analysis of Hydrazine (1, 3- Dinitrophenyl) (HDP) derivatives. The crystal was grown by slow cooling method and the crystalline perfection of single crystals was evaluated by high resolution X-ray diffractometry (HRXRD) using a multicrystal X-ray diffractometer. Fluorescence, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of HDP crystal were recorded. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of normal co-ordinate analysis (NCA) followed by scaled quantum force field methodology (SQMFF). NMR studies have confirmed respectively the crystal structure and functional groups of the grown crystal. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) result complements the experimental findings. The calculated MESP, UV, HOMO-LUMO energies show that charge transfer done within the molecule. And various thermodynamic parameters are studied. Fukui determines the local reactive site of electrophilic, nucleophilic, descriptor.

  16. The excited J = 01 Σu+ levels of D2: Measurements and ab initio quantum defect study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass-Maujean, M.; Jungen, Ch.; Dickenson, G. D.; de Oliveira, N.; Ubachs, W.

    2016-02-01

    The DESIRS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron facility, equipped with a vacuum ultraviolet Fourier-transform spectrometer has been used to measure P (N″ = 1) (N -N″ = - 1) absorption transitions of the D2 molecule. Some 44 P-lines were assigned and their transition frequencies determined up to excitation energies of 134,000 cm-1 above the ground state, thereby extending the earlier work by various authors, and considerably improving the spectral accuracy (<0.1 cm-1). The assignments have been aided by first principles multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) calculations. These calculations also provide predictions of the autoionization widths of the upper levels which agree well with the observed resonance widths.

  17. Ab-initio quantum transport simulation of self-heating in single-layer 2-D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieger, Christian; Szabo, Aron; Bunjaku, Teutë; Luisier, Mathieu

    2017-07-01

    Through advanced quantum mechanical simulations combining electron transport and phonon transport from first-principles, self-heating effects are investigated in n-type transistors with single-layer MoS2, WS2, and black phosphorus as channel materials. The selected 2-D crystals all exhibit different phonon-limited mobility values, as well as electron and phonon properties, which have a direct influence on the increase in their lattice temperature and on the power dissipated inside their channel as a function of the applied gate voltage and electrical current magnitude. This computational study reveals (i) that self-heating plays a much more important role in 2-D materials than in Si nanowires, (ii) that it could severely limit the performance of 2-D devices at high current densities, and (iii) that black phosphorus appears less sensitive to this phenomenon than transition metal dichalcogenides.

  18. Mechanistic Insights into Radical-Mediated Oxidation of Tryptophan from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations and QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Moore, Jamie M; Wang, John; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2016-05-12

    An assessment of the mechanisms of (•)OH and (•)OOH radical-mediated oxidation of tryptophan was performed using density functional theory calculations and ab initio plane-wave Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored site with a barrierless reaction in the gas phase. The subsequent degradation of this adduct through a H atom transfer to water was intermittently observed in aqueous-phase molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OOH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored pathway, in contrast to the situation in the model system ethylene, where concerted addition to the double bond is preferred. From the (•)OOH position 2 adduct QM/MM simulations show that formation of oxy-3-indolanaline occurs readily in an aqueous environment. The observed transformation starts from an initial rupture of the O-O bond followed by a H atom transfer with the accompanying loss of an (•)OH radical to solution. Finally, classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to equate observed differential oxidation rates of various tryptophan residues in monoclonal antibody fragments. It was found that simple parameters derived from simulation correlate well with the experimental data.

  19. Interaction energies for the purine inhibitor roscovitine with cyclin-dependent kinase 2: correlated ab initio quantum-chemical, DFT and empirical calculations.

    PubMed

    Dobes, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Strnad, Miroslav; Hobza, Pavel

    2006-05-24

    The interaction between roscovitine and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) was investigated by performing correlated ab initio quantum-chemical calculations. The whole protein was fragmented into smaller systems consisting of one or a few amino acids, and the interaction energies of these fragments with roscovitine were determined by using the MP2 method with the extended aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. For selected complexes, the complete basis set limit MP2 interaction energies, as well as the coupled-cluster corrections with inclusion of single, double and noninteractive triples contributions [CCSD(T)], were also evaluated. The energies of interaction between roscovitine and small fragments and between roscovitine and substantial sections of protein (722 atoms) were also computed by using density-functional tight-binding methods covering dispersion energy (DFTB-D) and the Cornell empirical potential. Total stabilisation energy originates predominantly from dispersion energy and methods that do not account for the dispersion energy cannot, therefore, be recommended for the study of protein-inhibitor interactions. The Cornell empirical potential describes reasonably well the interaction between roscovitine and protein; therefore, this method can be applied in future thermodynamic calculations. A limited number of amino acid residues contribute significantly to the binding of roscovitine and cdk2, whereas a rather large number of amino acids make a negligible contribution.

  20. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-28

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  1. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Genderen, E. van; Clabbers, M. T. B.; Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics

    A specialized quantum area detector for electron diffraction studies makes it possible to solve the structure of small organic compound nanocrystals in non-cryo conditions by direct methods. Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e{sup −} Å{sup −2} s{sup −1}) were collected at roommore » temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014)« less

  2. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To studymore » defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. These results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy.« less

  3. Covalent Linking Greatly Enhances Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Fullerene-Quantum Dot Nanocomposites: Time-Domain Ab Initio Study.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Victor V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2013-01-03

    Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics combined with time-domain density functional theory are used to study electron transfer (ET) from a CdSe quantum dot (QD) to the C60 fullerene, occurring in several types of hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. By unveiling the time dependence of the ET process, we show that covalent bonding between the QD and C60 is particularly important to ensure ultrafast transmission of the excited electron from the QD photon-harvester to the C60 electron acceptor. Despite the close proximity of the donor and acceptor species provided by direct van der Waals contact, it leads to a notably weaker QD-C60 interaction than a lengthy molecular bridge. We show that the ET rate in a nonbonded mixture of QDs and C60 can be enhanced by doping. The photoinduced ET is promoted primarily by mid- and low-frequency vibrations. The study establishes the basic design principles for enhancing photoinduced charge separation in nanoscale light harvesting materials.

  4. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    DOE PAGES

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; ...

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To studymore » defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. Lastly, these results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.« less

  5. Ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics of the ultrafast electron injection from a PbSe quantum dot into the TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2011-11-30

    Following recent experiments [Science 2010, 328, 1543; PNAS 2011, 108, 965], we report an ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) simulation of the ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from a PbSe quantum dot (QD) into the rutile TiO(2) (110) surface. The system forms the basis for QD-sensitized semiconductor solar cells and demonstrates that ultrafast interfacial ET is instrumental for achieving high efficiencies in solar-to-electrical energy conversion. The simulation supports the observation that the ET successfully competes with energy losses due to electron-phonon relaxation. The ET proceeds by the adiabatic mechanism because of strong donor-acceptor coupling. High frequency polar vibrations of both QD and TiO(2) promote the ET, since these modes can rapidly influence the donor-acceptor state energies and coupling. Low frequency vibrations generate a distribution of initial conditions for ET, which shows a broad variety of scenarios at the single-molecule level. Compared to the molecule-TiO(2) interfaces, the QD-TiO(2) system exhibits pronounced differences that arise due to the larger size and higher rigidity of QDs relative to molecules. Both donor and acceptor states are more delocalized in the QD system, and the ET is promoted by optical phonons, which have relatively low frequencies in the QD materials composed of heavy elements. In contrast, in molecular systems, optical phonons are not thermally accessible under ambient conditions. Meanwhile, TiO(2) acceptor states resemble surface impurities due to the local influence of molecular chromophores. At the same time, the photoinduced ET at both QD-TiO(2) and molecule-TiO(2) interfaces is ultrafast and occurs by the adiabatic mechanism, as a result of strong donor-acceptor coupling. The reported state-of-the-art simulation generates a detailed time-domain atomistic description of the interfacial ET process that is fundamental to a wide variety of applications.

  6. Core molecule dependence of energy migration in phenylacetylene nanostar dendrimers: Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Ryohei; Minami, Takuya; Fukui, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2008-06-01

    The core molecule dependence of energy (exciton) migration in phenylacetylene nanostar dendrimers is investigated using the ab initio molecular orbital (MO)-configuration interaction based quantum master equation approach. We examine three kinds of core molecular species, i.e., benzene, anthracene, and pentacene, with different highest occupied MO-lowest unoccupied MO (HOMO-LUMO) gaps, which lead to different orbital interactions between the dendron parts and the core molecule. The nanostars bearing anthracene and pentacene cores are characterized by multistep exciton states with spatially well-segmented distributions: The exciton distributions of high-lying exciton states are spatially localized well in the periphery region, whereas those of low-lying exciton states are done in the core region. On the other hand, for the nanostar bearing benzene core, which also has multistep exciton states, the spatial exciton distributions of low-lying exciton states are delocalized over the dendron and the core regions. It is found that the former nanostars exhibit nearly complete exciton migration from the periphery to the core molecule in contrast to the latter one, in which significant exciton distribution remains in the dendron parts attached to the core after the exciton relaxation, although all these dendrimers exhibit fast exciton relaxation from the initially populated states. It is predicted from the analysis based on the MO correlation diagrams and the relative relaxation factor that the complete exciton migration to the core occurs not only when the HOMO-LUMO gap of the core molecule is nearly equal to that of the dendron parts attached to the core (anthracene case) but also when fairly smaller than that (pentacene case), whereas the complete migration is not achieved when the HOMO-LUMO gap of the core is larger than that of the dendron parts (benzene case). These results suggest that the fast and complete exciton migration of real dendrimers could be realized by

  7. Ab initio vel ex eventu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, P. A.; Treder, H.-J.

    Der gegenwärtige Stand der physikalischen Erkenntnis, in Sonderheit die Atomistik und die Quantentheorie, ermöglicht (in wohldefinierten Energie-Bereichen) eine ab initio-Berechnung aller physikalischen und chemischen Prozesse und Strukturen. Die Schrödinger-Gleichung erlaubt zusammen mit den Prinzipien der Quantenstatistik (Pauli-Prinzip) aus dem Planckschen Wirkungsquantum h und den atomischen Konstanten die Berechnung aller Energieumsätze, Zeitabläufe etc., die insbesondere die chemische Physik bestimmen. Die Rechenresultate gelten auch quantitativ bis auf die unvermeidliche Stochastik.Die ab initio-Berechnungen korrespondieren einerseits und sind andererseits komplementär zu den auf den Methoden der theoretischen Chemie und der klassischen Thermodynamik beruhenden Ergebnissen ex eventu. Die theoretische Behandlung ab initio führt zu mathematischen Experimenten, die die Laboratoriums-Experimente ergänzen oder auch substituieren.Translated AbstractAb initio vel ex eventuThe present state of physical knowledge, in peculiar atomistic and quantum theory, makes an ab initio calculation of all physical and chemical processes and structures possible (in well defined reaches of energy). The Schrödinger equation together with the principles of quantum statistics (Pauli principle) permits from the Planck and atomistic constants to calculate all exchanges of energy, courses of time, etc. which govern chemical physics. The calculated results are valid even quantitatively apart from the unavoidable stochastics.These ab initio calculations on the one hand correspond and are on the other complimentary to results ex eventu based on the methods of theoretical chemistry and classical thermodynamics. Theoretical treatment ab initio leads to mathematical experiments which add to or even substitute experiments in the laboratory.

  8. Ab-initio calculations of the proton location in topaz-OH, Al2SiO4(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakov, S. V.; Wunder, B.

    The position of hydrogen in the structure of topaz-OH was determined by means of ab-initio quantum-mechanic calculations. Static lattice energy calculations predict the existence of four non-equivalent positions of protons, which are characterized by O4-H1... O1, O4-H2... O2, O4-H3... O3 and O4-H4... O4 hydrogen bonds. The distribution of the protons between positions of local equilibrium is controlled by the proton-proton avoidance rule and the strength of the hydrogen bonds. The most favourable configuration of hydrogen atoms is achieved for adjacent protons, which form O4-H3... O3 and O4-H4... O4 hydrogen bonds, respectively. The thermal excitation of atoms at a temperature of 55 K is large enough for the hydrogen atoms occasionally to change their positions to form O4-H1... O1 and O4-H2... O2 bonds. At ambient pressures and higher temperatures the protons are in a dynamic exchange between the allowed positions of local minima. As a consequence, for nearly room-temperature conditions, the dynamic change between different structural configurations leads to the violation of all possible symmetry elements and with that to space group #E5/E5#1. The flipping of the protons between different sites is achieved by simple rotation of the OH-dipole and does not produce any significant distortion of the framework of topaz, whose symmetry remains that of the space group Pbnm. Therefore, no reduction of symmetry has been observed in former X-ray studies on topaz-OH. Calculated IR absorption spectra of topaz-OH were found to be in good agreement with measured spectra. According to the calculations, the two favourable configurations of protons might correspond to the measured peak splitting within the OH-stretching range. An experimentally observed low-frequency band at 3520 cm-1 was assigned to the OH-stretching of the O4-H3... O3 bond, while the band at 3600 cm-1 was attributed to OH-stretching of the O4-H4... O4 hydrogen bond. The broad peak in FAR-IR frequency range at 100

  9. A new ab initio potential energy surface of LiClH (1A') system and quantum dynamics calculation for Li + HCl (v = 0, j = 0-2) → LiCl + H reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Rui Shan; Zhai, Huan Chen; Yan, Wei; Gao, Feng; Lin, Shi Ying

    2017-04-01

    A new ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground state of Li + HCl reactive system has been constructed by three-dimensional cubic spline interpolation of 36 654 ab initio points computed at the MRCI+Q/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory. The title reaction is found to be exothermic by 5.63 kcal/mol (9 kcal/mol with zero point energy corrections), which is very close to the experimental data. The barrier height, which is 2.99 kcal/mol (0.93 kcal/mol for the vibrationally adiabatic barrier height), and the depth of van der Waals minimum located near the entrance channel are also in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. This study also identified two more van der Waals minima. The integral cross sections, rate constants, and their dependence on initial rotational states are calculated using an exact quantum wave packet method on the new PES. They are also in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements.

  10. NH2- in a cold ion trap with He buffer gas: Ab initio quantum modeling of the interaction potential and of state-changing multichannel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Vera, Mario; Yurtsever, Ersin; Wester, Roland; Gianturco, Franco A.

    2018-05-01

    We present an extensive range of accurate ab initio calculations, which map in detail the spatial electronic potential energy surface that describes the interaction between the molecular anion NH2 - (1A1) in its ground electronic state and the He atom. The time-independent close-coupling method is employed to generate the corresponding rotationally inelastic cross sections, and then the state-changing rates over a range of temperatures from 10 to 30 K, which is expected to realistically represent the experimental trapping conditions for this ion in a radio frequency ion trap filled with helium buffer gas. The overall evolutionary kinetics of the rotational level population involving the molecular anion in the cold trap is also modelled during a photodetachment experiment and analyzed using the computed rates. The present results clearly indicate the possibility of selectively detecting differences in behavior between the ortho- and para-anions undergoing photodetachment in the trap.

  11. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    PubMed Central

    van Genderen, E.; Clabbers, M. T. B.; Das, P. P.; Stewart, A.; Nederlof, I.; Barentsen, K. C.; Portillo, Q.; Pannu, N. S.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Gruene, T.; Abrahams, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e− Å−2 s−1) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014). PMID:26919375

  12. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector.

    PubMed

    van Genderen, E; Clabbers, M T B; Das, P P; Stewart, A; Nederlof, I; Barentsen, K C; Portillo, Q; Pannu, N S; Nicolopoulos, S; Gruene, T; Abrahams, J P

    2016-03-01

    Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼ 0.013 e(-) Å(-2) s(-1)) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014).

  13. Ab Initio-Based Predictions of Hydrocarbon Combustion Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-15

    There are two prime objectives of the research. One is to develop and apply efficient methods for using ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs...31-Mar-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Ab Initio -Based Predictions of Hydrocarbon Combustion Chemistry The...Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 hydrocarbon combustion, ab initio quantum chemistry, potential energy surfaces, chemical

  14. Quantum-mechanical ab initio simulation of the Raman and IR spectra of Mn3Al2Si3O12 spessartine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzano, Loredana; Meyer, Alessio; Demichelis, Raffaella; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Dovesi, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    The IR and Raman spectra of spessartine garnet Mn3Al2Si3O12, are simulated with the periodic ab initio CRYSTAL code by adopting an all-electron Gaussian-type basis set and the B3LYP Hamiltonian. The frequencies of the 25 Raman active modes (3 of A 1 g , 8 of E g and 14 of F 2 g symmetry) and of the two sets of 17 F 1 u transverse-optical and longitudinal-optical frequencies are generated, as well as the IR oscillator strength. The agreement between calculated and experimental data is excellent: for the IR and Raman sets, the mean absolute difference overline{|Updelta|} is 4.0 and 6.8 cm-1, respectively. Isotopic substitution permits to highlight the Mn, Al and Si participation to the various zones of the spectrum. Graphical animation, available on the authors’ web-site ( http://www.crystal.unito.it/vibs/garnets/spessartine/ ), provides a very readable description of the movement of atoms and groups in each vibrational mode.

  15. Equation of state of U2Mo up-to Mbar pressure range: Ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, D.; Sahoo, B. D.; Joshi, K. D.; Kaushik, T. C.

    2018-04-01

    Experimentally, U2Mo is known to exist in tetragonal structure at ambient conditions. In contrast to experimental reports, the past theoretical studies carried out in this material do not find this phase to be stable structure at zero pressure. In order to examine this discrepancy between experiment and theory, we have performed ab-initio electronic band structure calculations on this material. In our theoretical study, we have attempted to search for lowest enthalpy structure at ambient as well at high pressure up to 200 GPa, employing evolutionary structure search algorithm in conjunction with ab-inito method. Our investigations suggest that a hexagonal structure with space group symmetry P6/mmm is the lowest enthalpy structure not only at ambient pressure but also up to pressure range of ˜200 GPa. To further, substantiate the results of these static lattice calculations the elastic and lattice dynamical stability has also been analysed. The theoretical isotherm derived from these calculations has been utilized to determine the Hugoniot of this material. Various physical properties such as zero pressure equilibrium volume, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative has also been derived from theoretical isotherm.

  16. Ab initio study of novel carbon nanofoam structure as an anode material for Li secondary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanjin; Park, Sora; Kang, Seoung-Hun; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2014-03-01

    Using ab inito density functional theory, we investigate the adsorption and diffusion properties of Li atoms on a new carbon nanostructure, which may be used as an anode of Li secondary battery. We focus on a special carbon nanofoam structure consisting of Schwarzite structures with negative Gaussian curvature as core parts, which are interconnected through (4,4) CNT segments. Considering the symmetry of the nanofoam structure, we find various Li adsorption sites exhibiting relatively large binding energies (>= 2 . 00 eV). Based on these adsorption sites, we identify several diffusion paths on the outside or inside surface of the nanofoam structure and examine the diffusion barriers along the paths. Our results show that Li atom can diffuse almost freely due to its low energy barriers on both outside and inside surfaces. Finally, we also evaluate the energy gain tendency and the volume expansion as well as the average binding energy while adding Li atoms to estimate the Li-capacity and recyclability of the system, which are important characterisitics for anode materials. We conclude that the carbon nanofoam structure would be better as an anode material than graphite in Li capacity and volume expansion.

  17. Absence of quantum anomalous Hall state in 4 d transition-metal-doped B i2S e3 : An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bei; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Junyi

    2017-11-01

    The realization of insulating ferromagnetic states in topological insulator (TI) systems, with sufficiently high Curie temperatures (TC) and large magnetically induced gaps, has been the key bottleneck towards the realization of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). Despite the limited reports on 3 d or 4 f transition-metal (TM)-doped B i2S e3 , there remains a lack of systematic studies on 4 d TMs, which may be potential candidates since the atomic sizes of 4 d TMs and that of Bi are similar. Here, we report a theoretical work that probes the magnetic behaviors of the 4 d TM-doped B i2S e3 system. We discovered that among the 4 d TMs, Nb and Mo can create magnetic moments of 1.76 and 2.96 μ B in B i2S e3 , respectively. While Mo yields a stable gapless antiferromagnetic ground state, Nb favors a strong ferromagnetic order, with the magnetic coupling strength (TC) ˜6 times of that induced by the traditional Cr impurity. Yet, we found that Nb is still unfavorable to support the QAH state in B i2S e3 because of the reduced correlation in the t2 g band that gives a gapless character. This rationale is not only successful in interpreting why Nb, the strongest candidate among 4 d TMs for achieving ferromagnetism in B i2S e3 , actually cannot lead to QAHE in the B i2S e3 system even with the assistance of codoping but also is particularly important to fully understand the mechanism of acquisition of insulating ferromagnetic states inside TI. On the other hand, we discovered that Mo-doped B i2S e3 favors strong antiferromagnetic states and may lead to superconducting states.

  18. Full-dimensional quantum dynamics study of the H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H → H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reaction on an ab initio potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liuyang; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049; Shao, Kejie

    2016-05-21

    This work performs a time-dependent wavepacket study of the H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H → H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The PES is constructed using neural network method based on 68 478 geometries with energies calculated at UCCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVTZ level and covers H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H↔H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} → HCCH{sub 2}, and HCCH{sub 2} radial isomerization reaction regions. The reaction dynamics of H{sub 2} + C{sub 2}H → H + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} are investigated using full-dimensional quantum dynamics method. The initial-state selected reactionmore » probabilities are calculated for reactants in eight vibrational states. The calculated results showed that the H{sub 2} vibrational excitation predominantly enhances the reactivity while the excitation of bending mode of C{sub 2}H slightly inhibits the reaction. The excitations of two stretching modes of C{sub 2}H molecule have negligible effect on the reactivity. The integral cross section is calculated with J-shift approximation and the mode selectivity in this reaction is discussed. The rate constants over 200-2000 K are calculated and agree well with the experimental measured values.« less

  19. Memories of AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    I had the good fortune to be a student of A. B. Migdal - AB, as we called him in person or in his absence - and to work in the sector he headed at the Kurchatov Institute, along with his other students and my friends, including Vitya Galitsky, Spartak Belyayev and Tolya Larkin. I was especially close with AB in the second half of the 1950s, the years most important for my formation, and AB's contribution to this formation was very great. To this day, I've often quoted AB on various occasions, as it's hard to put things better or more precisely than he did; I tell friends stories heard from AB, because these stories enhance life as AB himself enhanced it; my daughter is named Tanya after AB's wife Tatyana Lvovna, and so on. In what follows, I'll recount a few episodes in my life in which AB played an important or decisive role, and then will share some other memories of AB...

  20. Electronic couplings for molecular charge transfer: Benchmarking CDFT, FODFT, and FODFTB against high-level ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubas, Adam; Hoffmann, Felix; Heck, Alexander; Oberhofer, Harald; Elstner, Marcus; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a database (HAB11) of electronic coupling matrix elements (Hab) for electron transfer in 11 π-conjugated organic homo-dimer cations. High-level ab inito calculations at the multireference configuration interaction MRCI+Q level of theory, n-electron valence state perturbation theory NEVPT2, and (spin-component scaled) approximate coupled cluster model (SCS)-CC2 are reported for this database to assess the performance of three DFT methods of decreasing computational cost, including constrained density functional theory (CDFT), fragment-orbital DFT (FODFT), and self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (FODFTB). We find that the CDFT approach in combination with a modified PBE functional containing 50% Hartree-Fock exchange gives best results for absolute Hab values (mean relative unsigned error = 5.3%) and exponential distance decay constants β (4.3%). CDFT in combination with pure PBE overestimates couplings by 38.7% due to a too diffuse excess charge distribution, whereas the economic FODFT and highly cost-effective FODFTB methods underestimate couplings by 37.6% and 42.4%, respectively, due to neglect of interaction between donor and acceptor. The errors are systematic, however, and can be significantly reduced by applying a uniform scaling factor for each method. Applications to dimers outside the database, specifically rotated thiophene dimers and larger acenes up to pentacene, suggests that the same scaling procedure significantly improves the FODFT and FODFTB results for larger π-conjugated systems relevant to organic semiconductors and DNA.

  1. Sampling the potential energy surface of a DNA duplex damaged by a food carcinogen: Force field parameterization by ab initio quantum calculations and conformational searching using molecular mechanics computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangyang

    1999-07-01

    The heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4, 5-f) quinoline (IQ) is one of a number of carcinogens found in barbecued meat and fish. It induces tumors in mammals and is probably involved in human carcinogenesis, because of great exposure to such food carcinogens. IQ is biochemically activated to a derivative which reacts with DNA to form a covalent adduct. This adduct may deform the DNA and consequently cause a mutation. which may initiate carcinogenesis. To understand this cancer initiating event, it is necessary to obtain atomic resolution structures of the damaged DNA. No such structures are available experimentally due to synthesis difficulties. Therefore, we employ extensive molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations for this purpose. The major IQ-DNA adduct in the specific DNA sequence d(5'G1G2C G3CCA3') - d(5'TGGCGCC3') with IQ modified at G3 is studied. The d(5'G1G2C G3CC3') sequence has recently been shown to be a hot-spot for mutations when IQ modification is at G3. Although this sequence is prone to -2 deletions via a ``slippage mechanism'' even when unmodified, a key question is why IQ increases the mutation frequency of the unmodified DNA by about 104 fold. Is there a structural feature imposed by IQ that is responsible? The molecular mechanics and dynamics program AMBER for nucleic acids with the latest force field was chosen for this work. This force field has been demonstrated to reproduce well the B-DNA structure. However, some parameters, the partial charges, bond lengths and angles, dihedral parameters of the modified residue, are not available in the AMBER database. We parameterized the force field using high level ab initio quantum calculations. We created 800 starting conformations which uniformly sampled in combination at 18° intervals three torsion angles that govern the IQ-DNA orientations, and energy minimized them. The most important structures are abnormal; the IQ damaged guanine is rotated out of its standard B

  2. FTA-ABS test

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out a possible false-negative result. Normal Results A negative or nonreactive result means that you ... meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean A positive FTA-ABS is often a ...

  3. mAbs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The twenty two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) currently marketed in the U.S. have captured almost half of the top-20 U.S. therapeutic biotechnology sales for 2007. Eight of these products have annual sales each of more than $1 B, were developed in the relatively short average period of six years, qualified for FDA programs designed to accelerate drug approval, and their cost has been reimbursed liberally by payers. With growth of the product class driven primarily by advancements in protein engineering and the low probability of generic threats, mAbs are now the largest class of biological therapies under development. The high cost of these drugs and the lack of generic competition conflict with a financially stressed health system, setting reimbursement by payers as the major limiting factor to growth. Advances in mAb engineering are likely to result in more effective mAb drugs and an expansion of the therapeutic indications covered by the class. The parallel development of biomarkers for identifying the patient subpopulations most likely to respond to treatment may lead to a more cost-effective use of these drugs. To achieve the success of the current top-tier mAbs, companies developing new mAb products must adapt to a significantly more challenging commercial environment. PMID:20061824

  4. Ab Initio Studies of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the current understanding of ozone depletion chemistry, particularly with regards the formation of the so-called Antarctic ozone hole, will be presented together with an outline as to how ab initio quantum chemistry can be used to further our understanding of stratospheric chemistry. The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results will be shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  5. Quantum Theory of Jaynes' Principle, Bayes' Theorem, and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haken, Hermann

    2014-12-01

    After a reminder of Jaynes' maximum entropy principle and of my quantum theoretical extension, I consider two coupled quantum systems A,B and formulate a quantum version of Bayes' theorem. The application of Feynman's disentangling theorem allows me to calculate the conditional density matrix ρ (A|B) , if system A is an oscillator (or a set of them), linearly coupled to an arbitrary quantum system B. Expectation values can simply be calculated by means of the normalization factor of ρ (A|B) that is derived.

  6. Quantum-chemical study of model chemisorption structures on copper-containing catalysts. Communicat ion 1. ab-initio calculations of CuCo and CuCo/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzminskii, M.B.; Bagator'yants, A.A.; Kazanskii, V.B.

    1986-08-01

    The authors perform ab-initio calculations, by the SCF MO LCAO method, of the electronic and geometric structure of the systems CuCO /SUP n+/ (n=0, 1) and potential curves of CO, depending on the charge state of the copper, with variation of all geometric parameters. The calculations of open-shell electronic states were performed by the unrestricted SCF method in a minimal basis set (I, STO-3G for the C and O, and MINI-1' for the Cu) and in a valence two-exponential basis set (II, MIDI-1 for the C and O, and MIDI'2' for the Cu). The principal results from the calculation inmore » the more flexible basis II are presented and the agreement between the results obtained in the minimal basis I and these data is then analyzed qualitatively.« less

  7. Towards ab initio Calculations with the Dynamical Vertex Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Anna; Kaufmann, Josef; Gunacker, Patrik; Pickem, Matthias; Thunström, Patrik; Tomczak, Jan M.; Held, Karsten

    2018-04-01

    While key effects of the many-body problem — such as Kondo and Mott physics — can be understood in terms of on-site correlations, non-local fluctuations of charge, spin, and pairing amplitudes are at the heart of the most fascinating and unresolved phenomena in condensed matter physics. Here, we review recent progress in diagrammatic extensions to dynamical mean-field theory for ab initio materials calculations. We first recapitulate the quantum field theoretical background behind the two-particle vertex. Next we discuss latest algorithmic advances in quantum Monte Carlo simulations for calculating such two-particle quantities using worm sampling and vertex asymptotics, before giving an introduction to the ab initio dynamical vertex approximation (AbinitioDΓA). Finally, we highlight the potential of AbinitioDΓA by detailing results for the prototypical correlated metal SrVO3.

  8. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  9. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of the dissociation energy, zero-point, and 10 K properties of H7+/D7+ clusters using an ab initio potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Barragán, Patricia; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Qu, Chen; Prosmiti, Rita; Bowman, Joel M

    2013-07-14

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and path-integral Monte Carlo computations of the vibrational ground state and 10 K equilibrium state properties of the H7 (+)/D7 (+) cations are presented, using an ab initio full-dimensional potential energy surface. The DMC zero-point energies of dissociated fragments H5 (+)(D5 (+))+H2(D2) are also calculated and from these results and the electronic dissociation energy, dissociation energies, D0, of 752 ± 15 and 980 ± 14 cm(-1) are reported for H7 (+) and D7 (+), respectively. Due to the known error in the electronic dissociation energy of the potential surface, these quantities are underestimated by roughly 65 cm(-1). These values are rigorously determined for first time, and compared with previous theoretical estimates from electronic structure calculations using standard harmonic analysis, and available experimental measurements. Probability density distributions are also computed for the ground vibrational and 10 K state of H7 (+) and D7 (+). These are qualitatively described as a central H3 (+)/D3 (+) core surrounded by "solvent" H2/D2 molecules that nearly freely rotate.

  10. Outburst in Mira AB?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2003-09-01

    The nearby system Mira AB composed of an aging AGB star (Mira A) and a WD companion (Mira B) offers a unique laboratory for studying wind accretion processes, a poorly understood phenomenon in many sources. Recent Chandra ACIS-S Obs.(70ks on 12/6/03; PI.M.Karovska) resolved for the first time the components (~0.6") in X-rays, and detected a new bright soft source (< 0.7 keV) in addition to the harder (1-4 keV) emission from Mira B. The new source is spatially and spectrally separated from Mira B and likely associated with Mira A. This is the first detection of X-rays from an AGB star. This source was not detected by ROSAT in 1993 or recently by XMM 8/03 (AAS/03,J.Kastner), and could be a transient phenomenon. Model fitting shows that the soft X-ray emission is likely several emission lines, rather then a continuum; with ACIS spectral resolution we cannot resolve or identify these lines. We propose a 40ks LETG+HRC-S obs. to identify the lines and determine the emission mechanism.

  11. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pantcheva, Mina B.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior chamber drainage angle surgery, namely trabeculotomy and goniotomy, has been commonly utilized in children for many years. Its’ reported success has ranged between 68% and 100% in infants and young children with congenital glaucoma. However, the long-term success of these procedures has been limited in adults presumably due to the formation of anterior synechiae (AS) in the postoperative phase. Recently, ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome™ has emerged as a novel surgical approach to effectively and selectively remove and ablate the trabecular meshwork and the inner wall of the Schlemm’s canal in an attempt to avoid AS formation or other forms of wound healing with resultant closure of the cleft. This procedure seems to have an appealing safety profile with respect to early hypotony or infection if compared to trabeculectomy or glaucoma drainage device implantation. This might be advantageous in some of the impoverish regions of the Middle East and Africa where patients experience difficulties keeping up with their postoperative visits. It is important to note that no randomized trial comparing the Trabectome to other glaucoma procedures appears to have been published to date. Trabectome surgery is not a panacea, however, and it is associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may require additional glaucoma surgery as well as a high incidence of hyphema. Reported results show that postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) remains, at best, in the mid-teen range making it undesirable in patients with low-target IOP goals. A major advantage of Trabectome surgery is that it does not preclude further glaucoma surgery involving the conjunctiva, such as a trabeculectomy or drainage device implantation. As prospective randomized long-term clinical data become available, we will be better positioned to elucidate the exact role of this technique in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium. PMID:21180426

  12. The coherent interlayer resistance of a single, rotated interface between two stacks of AB graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K. M. Masum; Sylvia, Somaia S.; Ge, Supeng; Neupane, Mahesh; Lake, Roger K.

    2013-12-01

    The coherent, interlayer resistance of a misoriented, rotated interface between two stacks of AB graphite is determined for a variety of misorientation angles. The quantum-resistance of the ideal AB stack is on the order of 1 to 10 mΩ μm2. For small rotation angles, the coherent interlayer resistance exponentially approaches the ideal quantum resistance at energies away from the charge neutrality point. Over a range of intermediate angles, the resistance increases exponentially with cell size for minimum size unit cells. Larger cell sizes, of similar angles, may not follow this trend. The energy dependence of the interlayer transmission is described.

  13. Accurate study on the quantum dynamics of the He + HeH(+) (X1Σ+) reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface for the lowest 1(1)A' electronic singlet state.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenwu; Zhang, Peiyu

    2013-02-21

    A time-dependent quantum wave packet method is used to investigate the dynamics of the He + HeH(+)(X(1)Σ(+)) reaction based on a new potential energy surface [Liang et al., J. Chem. Phys.2012, 136, 094307]. The coupled channel (CC) and centrifugal-sudden (CS) reaction probabilities as well as the total integral cross sections are calculated. A comparison of the results with and without Coriolis coupling revealed that the number of K states N(K) (K is the projection of the total angular momentum J on the body-fixed z axis) significantly influences the reaction threshold. The effective potential energy profiles of each N(K) for the He + HeH(+) reaction in a collinear geometry indicate that the barrier height gradually decreased with increased N(K). The calculated time evolution of CC and CS probability density distribution over the collision energy of 0.27-0.36 eV at total angular momentum J = 50 clearly suggests a lower reaction threshold of CC probabilities. The CC cross sections are larger than the CS results within the entire energy range, demonstrating that the Coriolis coupling effect can effectively promote the He + HeH(+) reaction.

  14. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification. The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to an extra phase factor in wavefunction. We proposed a superconducting quantum Faraday cage to detect temporal interference effect as a consequence of scalar AB phase. Using the superconducting quantum circuit model, the physical system is solved and resulting AB effect is predicted. Further discussion in this chapter shows that treating the experimental apparatus quantum mechanically, spatial scalar AB effect, proposed by Aharanov-Bohm, can't be observed. Either a decoherent interference apparatus is used to observe spatial scalar AB effect, or a quantum Faraday cage is used to observe temporal scalar AB effect. The second study involves protecting a quantum system from losing coherence, which is crucial to any practical quantum computation scheme. We present a theory to encode any qubit, especially superconducting qubits, into a universal quantum degeneracy point (UQDP) where low frequency noise is suppressed significantly. Numerical simulations for superconducting charge qubit using experimental parameters show that its coherence time is prolong by two orders of magnitude using our universal degeneracy point approach. With this improvement, a set of universal quantum gates can be performed at high fidelity without losing too much quantum coherence. Starting in 2004, the use of circuit QED has enabled the manipulation of superconducting qubits with photons. We applied quantum optical approach to model coupled resonators and obtained a four-wave mixing toolbox to operate photons

  15. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  16. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    PubMed Central

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  17. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-25

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  18. A walk through the approximations of ab initio multiple spawning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignolet, Benoit; Curchod, Basile F. E.

    2018-04-01

    Full multiple spawning offers an in principle exact framework for excited-state dynamics, where nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states are represented by a set of coupled trajectory basis functions that follow classical trajectories. The couplings between trajectory basis functions can be approximated to treat molecular systems, leading to the ab initio multiple spawning method which has been successfully employed to study the photochemistry and photophysics of several molecules. However, a detailed investigation of its approximations and their consequences is currently missing in the literature. In this work, we simulate the explicit photoexcitation and subsequent excited-state dynamics of a simple system, LiH, and we analyze (i) the effect of the ab initio multiple spawning approximations on different observables and (ii) the convergence of the ab initio multiple spawning results towards numerically exact quantum dynamics upon a progressive relaxation of these approximations. We show that, despite the crude character of the approximations underlying ab initio multiple spawning for this low-dimensional system, the qualitative excited-state dynamics is adequately captured, and affordable corrections can further be applied to ameliorate the coupling between trajectory basis functions.

  19. A walk through the approximations of ab initio multiple spawning.

    PubMed

    Mignolet, Benoit; Curchod, Basile F E

    2018-04-07

    Full multiple spawning offers an in principle exact framework for excited-state dynamics, where nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states are represented by a set of coupled trajectory basis functions that follow classical trajectories. The couplings between trajectory basis functions can be approximated to treat molecular systems, leading to the ab initio multiple spawning method which has been successfully employed to study the photochemistry and photophysics of several molecules. However, a detailed investigation of its approximations and their consequences is currently missing in the literature. In this work, we simulate the explicit photoexcitation and subsequent excited-state dynamics of a simple system, LiH, and we analyze (i) the effect of the ab initio multiple spawning approximations on different observables and (ii) the convergence of the ab initio multiple spawning results towards numerically exact quantum dynamics upon a progressive relaxation of these approximations. We show that, despite the crude character of the approximations underlying ab initio multiple spawning for this low-dimensional system, the qualitative excited-state dynamics is adequately captured, and affordable corrections can further be applied to ameliorate the coupling between trajectory basis functions.

  20. Ab initio theories for light nuclei and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezerlis, Alexandros

    2016-09-01

    In this talk I will touch upon several features of modern ab initio low-energy nuclear theory. I will start by discussing what ``ab initio'' means in this context. Specifically, I will spend some time going over nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions and their connections with the underlying theory of Quantum Chromodynamics. I will then show how these interactions are used to describe light nuclei using essentially exact few-body methods. I will then discuss heavier systems, especially those of astrophysical relevance, as well as the methods used to tackle them. This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI).

  1. Dispersion Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms: Testing the London Equation Using ab Initio Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.

    2011-01-01

    A computational chemistry experiment is described in which students can use advanced ab initio quantum mechanical methods to test the ability of the London equation to account quantitatively for the attractive (dispersion) interactions between rare gas atoms. Using readily available electronic structure applications, students can calculate the…

  2. AB 1725: A Comprehensive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Board of Governors.

    A summary and analysis is provided of California Assembly Bill (AB) 1725, a reform bill that provides new direction and support for the state's community colleges. The analysis addresses each of the eight sections of the bill: (1) mission, highlighting reforms related to mission statements, transfer core curriculum, remedial limits, articulation…

  3. Registration of nine sorghum seed parent (A/B) lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nine sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] A1 cyto plasmic-genic male sterile seed parent (A) and their maintainer (B) lines [KS 133A/B, KS 134A/B, KS 135A/B, KS 136A/B, KS 137A/B, KS 138A/B, KS 139A/B, KS 140A/B and KS 141A/B] were released by the Kansas State University, Agricultural Research Cent...

  4. Ab Initio Studies of Halogen and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  5. R2C: improving ab initio residue contact map prediction using dynamic fusion strategy and Gaussian noise filter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Jin, Qi-Yu; Zhang, Biao; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2016-08-15

    Inter-residue contacts in proteins dictate the topology of protein structures. They are crucial for protein folding and structural stability. Accurate prediction of residue contacts especially for long-range contacts is important to the quality of ab inito structure modeling since they can enforce strong restraints to structure assembly. In this paper, we present a new Residue-Residue Contact predictor called R2C that combines machine learning-based and correlated mutation analysis-based methods, together with a two-dimensional Gaussian noise filter to enhance the long-range residue contact prediction. Our results show that the outputs from the machine learning-based method are concentrated with better performance on short-range contacts; while for correlated mutation analysis-based approach, the predictions are widespread with higher accuracy on long-range contacts. An effective query-driven dynamic fusion strategy proposed here takes full advantages of the two different methods, resulting in an impressive overall accuracy improvement. We also show that the contact map directly from the prediction model contains the interesting Gaussian noise, which has not been discovered before. Different from recent studies that tried to further enhance the quality of contact map by removing its transitive noise, we designed a new two-dimensional Gaussian noise filter, which was especially helpful for reinforcing the long-range residue contact prediction. Tested on recent CASP10/11 datasets, the overall top L/5 accuracy of our final R2C predictor is 17.6%/15.5% higher than the pure machine learning-based method and 7.8%/8.3% higher than the correlated mutation analysis-based approach for the long-range residue contact prediction. http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/R2C/Contact:hbshen@sjtu.edu.cn Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group in practice.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Hu, Weifeng; Nakatani, Naoki; Sharma, Sandeep; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2015-01-21

    The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) is a tool that can be applied to a wide variety of interesting problems in quantum chemistry. Here, we examine the density matrix renormalization group from the vantage point of the quantum chemistry user. What kinds of problems is the DMRG well-suited to? What are the largest systems that can be treated at practical cost? What sort of accuracies can be obtained, and how do we reason about the computational difficulty in different molecules? By examining a diverse benchmark set of molecules: π-electron systems, benchmark main-group and transition metal dimers, and the Mn-oxo-salen and Fe-porphine organometallic compounds, we provide some answers to these questions, and show how the density matrix renormalization group is used in practice.

  7. Ab Initio Analysis of Auger-Assisted Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Kim, Joonghan; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-01-15

    Quantum confinement in nanoscale materials allows Auger-type electron-hole energy exchange. We show by direct time-domain atomistic simulation and analytic theory that Auger processes give rise to a new mechanism of charge transfer (CT) on the nanoscale. Auger-assisted CT eliminates the renown Marcus inverted regime, rationalizing recent experiments on CT from quantum dots to molecular adsorbates. The ab initio simulation reveals a complex interplay of the electron-hole and charge-phonon channels of energy exchange, demonstrating a variety of CT scenarios. The developed Marcus rate theory for Auger-assisted CT describes, without adjustable parameters, the experimental plateau of the CT rate in the region of large donor-acceptor energy gap. The analytic theory and atomistic insights apply broadly to charge and energy transfer in nanoscale systems.

  8. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  9. Development and application of ab initio QM/MM methods for mechanistic simulation of reactions in solution and in enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2013-01-01

    Determining the free energies and mechanisms of chemical reactions in solution and enzymes is a major challenge. For such complex reaction processes, combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method is the most effective simulation method to provide an accurate and efficient theoretical description of the molecular system. The computational costs of ab initio QM methods, however, have limited the application of ab initio QM/MM methods. Recent advances in ab initio QM/MM methods allowed the accurate simulation of the free energies for reactions in solution and in enzymes and thus paved the way for broader application of the ab initio QM/MM methods. We review here the theoretical developments and applications of the ab initio QM/MM methods, focusing on the determination of reaction path and the free energies of the reaction processes in solution and enzymes. PMID:24146439

  10. Ab initio study of H + + H 2 collisions: Elastic/inelastic and charge transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saieswari, A.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2007-12-01

    An ab initio full configuration interaction study has been undertaken to obtain the global potential energy surfaces for the ground and the first excited electronic state of the H + + H 2 system employing Dunning's cc-pVQZ basis set. Using the ab initio approach the corresponding quasi-diabatic potential energy surfaces and coupling potentials have been obtained. A time-independent quantum mechanical study has been also undertaken for both the inelastic and charge transfer processes at the experimental collision energy Ec.m. = 20.0 eV and the preliminary results show better agreement with the experimental data as compared to the earlier available theoretical studies.

  11. Timing of AB And eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, V. S.; Ibrahimov, M. A.; Gaynullina, E. R.; Karimov, R. G.; Hafizov, B. M.; Satovskii, B. L.; Krushevska, V. N.; Kuznyetsova, Yu. G.; Bogomazov, A. I.; Irsmambetova, T. R.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims timing the eclipses of the short period low mass binary star AB And. The times of minima are taken from the literature and from our observations in October 2013 (22 times of minima) and in August 2014 (23 times of minima). We find and discuss an inaccuracy in the determination of the types of minima in the previous investigation by Li et al. (2014). We study the secular evolution of the central binary's orbital period and the possibility of the existence of third and fourth companions in the system.

  12. Quantum probability and conceptual combination in conjunctions.

    PubMed

    Hampton, James A

    2013-06-01

    I consider the general problem of category conjunctions in the light of Pothos & Busemeyer (P&B)'s quantum probability (QP) account of the conjunction fallacy. I argue that their account as presented cannot capture the "guppy effect" - the case in which a class is a better member of a conjunction A^B than it is of either A or B alone.

  13. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  14. Many-body optimization using an ab initio monte carlo method.

    PubMed

    Haubein, Ned C; McMillan, Scott A; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in computing power have made it possible to study solvated molecules using ab initio quantum chemistry. Inclusion of discrete solvent molecules is required to determine geometric information about solute/solvent clusters. Monte Carlo methods are well suited to finding minima in many-body systems, and ab initio methods are applicable to the widest range of systems. A first principles Monte Carlo (FPMC) method was developed to find minima in many-body systems, and emphasis was placed on implementing moves that increase the likelihood of finding minimum energy structures. Partial optimization and molecular interchange moves aid in finding minima and overcome the incomplete sampling that is unavoidable when using ab initio methods. FPMC was validated by studying the boron trifluoride-water system, and then the method was used to examine the methyl carbenium ion in water to demonstrate its application to solvation problems.

  15. Ab initio simulation of particle momentum distributions in high-pressure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, M.

    2014-12-01

    Applying pressure to water reduces the average oxygen-oxygen distance, and facilitates the delocalisation of protons along the hydrogen bond. This pressure-induced delocalisation is further enhanced by the quantum nature of hydrogen nuclei, which is very significant even well above room temperature. Here we will evaluate the quantum kinetic energy and the particle momentum distribution of hydrogen and oxygen nuclei in water at extreme pressure, using ab initio path integral molecular dynamics. We will show that (transient) dissociation of water molecules induce measurable changes in the kinetic energy hydrogen atoms, although current deep inelastic scattering experiments are probably unable to capture the heterogeneity of the sample.

  16. Free Quantum Field Theory from Quantum Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    After leading to a new axiomatic derivation of quantum theory (see D'Ariano et al. in Found Phys, 2015), the new informational paradigm is entering the domain of quantum field theory, suggesting a quantum automata framework that can be regarded as an extension of quantum field theory to including an hypothetical Planck scale, and with the usual quantum field theory recovered in the relativistic limit of small wave-vectors. Being derived from simple principles (linearity, unitarity, locality, homogeneity, isotropy, and minimality of dimension), the automata theory is quantum ab-initio, and does not assume Lorentz covariance and mechanical notions. Being discrete it can describe localized states and measurements (unmanageable by quantum field theory), solving all the issues plaguing field theory originated from the continuum. These features make the theory an ideal framework for quantum gravity, with relativistic covariance and space-time emergent solely from the interactions, and not assumed a priori. The paper presents a synthetic derivation of the automata theory, showing how the principles lead to a description in terms of a quantum automaton over a Cayley graph of a group. Restricting to Abelian groups we show how the automata recover the Weyl, Dirac and Maxwell dynamics in the relativistic limit. We conclude with some new routes about the more general scenario of non-Abelian Cayley graphs. The phenomenology arising from the automata theory in the ultra-relativistic domain and the analysis of corresponding distorted Lorentz covariance is reviewed in Bisio et al. (Found Phys 2015, in this same issue).

  17. Polarization effects on quantum levels in InN/GaN quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong

    2009-12-02

    Polarization effects on quantum states in InN/GaN quantum wells have been investigated by means of ab initio calculation and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Through the position-dependent partial densities of states, our results show that the polarization modified by the strain with different well thickness leads to an asymmetry band bending of the quantum well. The quantum levels are identified via the band structures and their square wave function distributions are analyzed by the partial charge densities. Further theoretical and experimental comparison of the imaginary part of the dielectric function show that the overall transition probability increases under larger polarization fields, which can be attributable to the fact that the excited quantum states of 2h have a greater overlap with 1e states and enhance other hole quantum states in the well by a hybridization. These results would provide a new approach to improve the transition probability and light emission by enhancing the polarization fields in a proper way.

  18. On the Origin of Quantum Diffusion Coefficient and Quantum Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Aseem

    2016-03-01

    Synchronizability of space and time experiences between different inhabitants of a spacetime is abstracted as a fundamental premise of Classical physics. Absence thereof i.e. desynchronization between space and time experiences of a system under study and the observer is then studied for a single dimension single particle system. Desynchronization fundamentally makes probability concepts enter physics ab-initio and not as secondary tools to deal with situations wherein incomplete information in situation following perfectly deterministic dynamics demands its introduction. Desynchronization model based on Poisson distribution of events vis-à-vis an observer, leads to expectation of particle's motion as a Brownian motion deriving Nelson's quantum diffusion coefficient naturally, without needing to postulate it. This model also incorporates physical effects akin to those of Bohm's Quantum Potential, again without needing any sub-quantum medium. Schrodinger's equation is shown to be derivable incorporating desynchronization only of space while Quantum Field Theory is shown to model desynchronization of time as well. Fundamental suggestion of the study is that it is desynchronization that is at the root of quantum phenomena rather than sub-micro scales of spacetime. Absence of possibility of synchronization between system's space and time and those of observer is studied. Mathematical modeling of desynchronized evolution explains some intriguing aspects of Quantum Mechanical theory.

  19. Solvent (acetone-butanol: ab) production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article describes production of butanol [acetone-butanol-ethanol, (also called AB or ABE or solvent)] by fermentation using both traditional and current technologies. AB production from agricultural commodities, such as corn and molasses, was an important historical fermentation. Unfortunately,...

  20. An efficient and accurate molecular alignment and docking technique using ab initio quality scoring

    PubMed Central

    Füsti-Molnár, László; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    An accurate and efficient molecular alignment technique is presented based on first principle electronic structure calculations. This new scheme maximizes quantum similarity matrices in the relative orientation of the molecules and uses Fourier transform techniques for two purposes. First, building up the numerical representation of true ab initio electronic densities and their Coulomb potentials is accelerated by the previously described Fourier transform Coulomb method. Second, the Fourier convolution technique is applied for accelerating optimizations in the translational coordinates. In order to avoid any interpolation error, the necessary analytical formulas are derived for the transformation of the ab initio wavefunctions in rotational coordinates. The results of our first implementation for a small test set are analyzed in detail and compared with published results of the literature. A new way of refinement of existing shape based alignments is also proposed by using Fourier convolutions of ab initio or other approximate electron densities. This new alignment technique is generally applicable for overlap, Coulomb, kinetic energy, etc., quantum similarity measures and can be extended to a genuine docking solution with ab initio scoring. PMID:18624561

  1. Quantum memristors

    DOE PAGES

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; ...

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantummore » regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.« less

  2. Ab Initio energetics of SiO bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Hühn, Carolin; Erlebach, Andreas; Mey, Dorothea; Wondraczek, Lothar; Sierka, Marek

    2017-10-15

    A multilevel approach that combines high-level ab initio quantum chemical methods applied to a molecular model of a single, strain-free SiOSi bridge has been used to derive accurate energetics for SiO bond cleavage. The calculated SiO bond dissociation energy and the activation energy for water-assisted SiO bond cleavage of 624 and 163 kJ mol -1 , respectively, are in excellent agreement with values derived recently from experimental data. In addition, the activation energy for H 2 O-assisted SiO bond cleavage is found virtually independent of the amount of water molecules in the vicinity of the reaction site. The estimated reaction energy for this process including zero-point vibrational contribution is in the range of -5 to 19 kJ mol -1 . © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ab initio molecular simulations with numeric atom-centered orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Gehrke, Ralf; Hanke, Felix; Havu, Paula; Havu, Ville; Ren, Xinguo; Reuter, Karsten; Scheffler, Matthias

    2009-11-01

    We describe a complete set of algorithms for ab initio molecular simulations based on numerically tabulated atom-centered orbitals (NAOs) to capture a wide range of molecular and materials properties from quantum-mechanical first principles. The full algorithmic framework described here is embodied in the Fritz Haber Institute "ab initio molecular simulations" (FHI-aims) computer program package. Its comprehensive description should be relevant to any other first-principles implementation based on NAOs. The focus here is on density-functional theory (DFT) in the local and semilocal (generalized gradient) approximations, but an extension to hybrid functionals, Hartree-Fock theory, and MP2/GW electron self-energies for total energies and excited states is possible within the same underlying algorithms. An all-electron/full-potential treatment that is both computationally efficient and accurate is achieved for periodic and cluster geometries on equal footing, including relaxation and ab initio molecular dynamics. We demonstrate the construction of transferable, hierarchical basis sets, allowing the calculation to range from qualitative tight-binding like accuracy to meV-level total energy convergence with the basis set. Since all basis functions are strictly localized, the otherwise computationally dominant grid-based operations scale as O(N) with system size N. Together with a scalar-relativistic treatment, the basis sets provide access to all elements from light to heavy. Both low-communication parallelization of all real-space grid based algorithms and a ScaLapack-based, customized handling of the linear algebra for all matrix operations are possible, guaranteeing efficient scaling (CPU time and memory) up to massively parallel computer systems with thousands of CPUs.

  4. Time-dependent wave packet simulations of transport through Aharanov-Bohm rings with an embedded quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Kreisbeck, C; Kramer, T; Molina, R A

    2017-04-20

    We have performed time-dependent wave packet simulations of realistic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) devices with a quantum dot embedded in one of the arms of the interferometer. The AB ring can function as a measurement device for the intrinsic transmission phase through the quantum dot, however, care has to be taken in analyzing the influence of scattering processes in the junctions of the interferometer arms. We consider a harmonic quantum dot and show how the Darwin-Fock spectrum emerges as a unique pattern in the interference fringes of the AB oscillations.

  5. Unified ab initio approaches to nuclear structure and reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume; ...

    2016-04-13

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of the nuclear forces, with two-, three- and possibly higher many-nucleon components, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD-employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. After a brief overview of the field, we focus on ab initio many-body approaches—built upon the no-core shell model—that are capable of simultaneously describing both bound and scattering nuclear states, and present results for resonances in light nuclei, reactions important for astrophysics and fusion research. In particular, we review recent calculations of resonances in the 6He halo nucleus, of five- and six-nucleon scattering, and an investigation of the role of chiral three-nucleon interactions in the structure of 9Be. Further, we discuss applications to the 7Bemore » $${({\\rm{p}},\\gamma )}^{8}{\\rm{B}}$$ radiative capture. Lastly, we highlight our efforts to describe transfer reactions including the 3H$${({\\rm{d}},{\\rm{n}})}^{4}$$He fusion.« less

  6. New insights into mechanistic photoisomerization of ethylene-bridged azobenzene from ab initio multiple spawning simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Yating; Fang, Qiu

    2017-02-14

    Ethylene-bridged azobenzene (br-AB) has aroused broad interests due to its unique photoswitching properties. Numerous dynamical simulations have been performed for the br-AB photoisomerization, which focused mainly on the conformational effect and the funnel role of minimum-energy conical intersection (MECI) on the mechanism. In the present work, we use the "full quantum" ab initio multiple spawning method to simulate the br-AB photoisomerization, which provides new insights into the mechanism. Upon irradiation of br-AB to the first excited singlet state (S 1 ), most of the excess energies are trapped in the azo-moiety. Since the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution is slower than the S 1 relaxation processes, the nonadiabatic transition from S 1 to the ground state (S 0 ) occurs in the vicinity of high-energy crossing seam and even the largest probabilities of the S 1 → S 0 transition are not distributed in the MECI regions. Once decaying to the S 0 state through the high-energy region, the subsequent isomerization and re-formation of the initial isomer are ultrafast processes in the S 0 state. It is the nonergodic behavior of the S 1 and S 0 dynamics that is mainly responsible for the unique photoswitching properties of the ethylene-bridged azobenzene, which will be discussed in detail.

  7. Topological Semimetals Studied by Ab Initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Motoaki; Okugawa, Ryo; Murakami, Shuichi

    2018-04-01

    In topological semimetals such as Weyl, Dirac, and nodal-line semimetals, the band gap closes at points or along lines in k space which are not necessarily located at high-symmetry positions in the Brillouin zone. Therefore, it is not straightforward to find these topological semimetals by ab initio calculations because the band structure is usually calculated only along high-symmetry lines. In this paper, we review recent studies on topological semimetals by ab initio calculations. We explain theoretical frameworks which can be used for the search for topological semimetal materials, and some numerical methods used in the ab initio calculations.

  8. Quantum frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  9. Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  10. Oriented conjugates of monoclonal and single-domain antibodies with quantum dots for flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Millot, Jean-Marc; Chames, Patrick; Baty, Daniel; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Nabiev, Igor

    2012-03-01

    Ideal diagnostic nanoprobes should not exceed 15 nm in size and should contain high-affinity homogeneously oriented capture molecules on their surface. An advanced procedure for antibody (Ab) reduction was used to cleave each Ab into two functional half-Abs, 75-kDa heavy-light chain fragments, each containing an intact antigen-binding site. Affinity purification of half-Abs followed by their linkage to quantum dots (QDs) yielded oriented QD-Ab conjugates whose functionality was considerably improved compared to those obtained using the standard protocols. Ultrasmall diagnostic nanoprobes were engineered through oriented conjugation of QDs with 13-kDa single-domain Abs (sdAbs) derived from llama IgG. sdAbs were tagged with QDs via an additional cysteine residue specifically integrated into the C-terminal region of sdAb using genetic engineering. This approach made it possible to obtain sdAb-QD nanoprobes <12 nm in diameter comprising four copies of sdAbs linked to the same QD in an oriented manner. sdAb-QD conjugates against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and HER2 exhibited an extremely high specificity in flow cytometry; the quality of immunohistochemical labeling of biopsy samples was found to be superior to that of labeling according to the current "gold standard" protocols of anatomo-pathological practice. The nano-bioengineering approaches developed can be extended to oriented conjugation of Abs and sdAbs with different semiconductor, noble metal, or magnetic nanoparticles.

  11. Attaching quantum dots to HER2 specific phage antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Viet Ha; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Huyen La, Thi; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Huan Le, Quang; Thuan Tong, Kim; Liem Nguyen, Quang; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2010-06-01

    This work presents the results of the attachment of Qdot 655 ITKTM amino (PEG) quantum dots (QDs) (Invitrogen) and CdTe QDs (provided by Institute of Materials Science, VAST) to HER2 (Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2) specific phage antibodies (Abs) (provided by Institute of Biotechnology, VAST) in solution. The QDs were attached to the phage display specific HER2 Abs to form a complex QD-Ab. The QDs and complex QD-Ab were characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence images show the QDs conjugated to the phage. Due to the QDs attaching to the surface, the phage dimensions were amplified, so its shape could be observed by optical microscopy. The complex QD-Ab was stable and lasted for a month. The results illustrate the value of the HER2 phage-QD complex as a cancer detection platform.

  12. Magnetic edge states in Aharonov-Bohm graphene quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Farghadan, R., E-mail: rfarghadan@kashanu.ac.ir; Heidari Semiromi, E.; Saffarzadeh, A.

    2013-12-07

    The effect of electron-electron interaction on the electronic structure of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) graphene quantum rings (GQRs) is explored theoretically using the single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian and the mean-field Hubbard model. The electronic states and magnetic properties of hexagonal, triangular, and circular GQRs with different sizes and zigzag edge terminations are studied. The results show that, although the AB oscillations in the all types of nanoring are affected by the interaction, the spin splitting in the AB oscillations strongly depends on the geometry and the size of graphene nanorings. We found that the total spin of hexagonal and circular rings is zeromore » and therefore, no spin splitting can be observed in the AB oscillations. However, the non-zero magnetization of the triangular rings breaks the degeneracy between spin-up and spin-down electrons, which produces spin-polarized AB oscillations.« less

  13. Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Dorit

    In the last few years, theoretical study of quantum systems serving as computational devices has achieved tremendous progress. We now have strong theoretical evidence that quantum computers, if built, might be used as a dramatically powerful computational tool, capable of performing tasks which seem intractable for classical computers. This review is about to tell the story of theoretical quantum computation. I l out the developing topic of experimental realizations of the model, and neglected other closely related topics which are quantum information and quantum communication. As a result of narrowing the scope of this paper, I hope it has gained the benefit of being an almost self contained introduction to the exciting field of quantum computation. The review begins with background on theoretical computer science, Turing machines and Boolean circuits. In light of these models, I define quantum computers, and discuss the issue of universal quantum gates. Quantum algorithms, including Shor's factorization algorithm and Grover's algorithm for searching databases, are explained. I will devote much attention to understanding what the origins of the quantum computational power are, and what the limits of this power are. Finally, I describe the recent theoretical results which show that quantum computers maintain their complexity power even in the presence of noise, inaccuracies and finite precision. This question cannot be separated from that of quantum complexity because any realistic model will inevitably be subjected to such inaccuracies. I tried to put all results in their context, asking what the implications to other issues in computer science and physics are. In the end of this review, I make these connections explicit by discussing the possible implications of quantum computation on fundamental physical questions such as the transition from quantum to classical physics.

  14. Spectral monitoring of AB Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Díaz, L. F.; Oostra, B.

    2017-07-01

    The Astronomical Observatory of the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia, did a spectral monitoring during 2014 and 2015 to AB Aurigae, the brightest Herbig Ae/be star in the northern hemisphere. The aim of this project is applying spectral techniques, in order to identify specific features that could help us not only to understand how this star is forming, but also to establish a pattern to explain general star formation processes. We have recorded 19 legible spectra with a resolving power of R = 11,0000, using a 40 cm Meade telescope with an eShel spectrograph, coupled by a 50-micron optical fiber. We looked for the prominent absorption lines, the Sodium doublet at 5890Å and 5896Å, respectively and Magnesium II at 4481Å; to measure radial velocities of the star, but, we did not find a constant value. Instead, it ranges from 15 km/s to 32 km/s. This variability could be explained by means of an oscillation or pulsation of the external layers of the star. Other variabilities are observed in some emission lines: Hα, Hβ, He I at 5876Å and Fe II at 5018Å. It seems this phenomenon could be typical in stars that are forming and have a circumstellar disk around themselves. This variability is associated with the nonhomogeneous surface of the star and the interaction that it has with its disk. Results of this interaction could be seen also in the stellar wind ejected by the star. More data are required in order to look for a possible period in the changes of radial velocity of the star, the same for the variability of He I and Fe II, and phenomena present in Hα. We plan to take new data in January of 2017.

  15. Modeling study of the ABS relay valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai; Xu, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    The ABS (anti-lock braking system) relay valve is the key component of anti-lock braking system in most commercial vehicles such as trucks, tractor-trailers, etc. In this paper, structure of ABS relay valve and its work theory were analyzed. Then a mathematical model of ABS relay valve, which was investigated by dividing into electronic part, magnetic part, pneumatic part and mechanical part, was set up. The displacement of spools and the response of pressure increasing, holding, releasing of ABS relay valve were simulated and analyzed under conditions of control pressure 500 KPa, braking pressure 600 KPa, atmospheric pressure 100 KPa and air temperature 310 K. Thisarticle provides reliable theory for improving the performance and efficiency of anti-lock braking system of vehicles.

  16. Quantum Foundations of Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert

    2009-03-01

    The main foundational issue for quantum information is: What is quantum information about? What does it refer to? Classical information typically refers to physical properties, and since classical is a subset of quantum information (assuming the world is quantum mechanical), quantum information should--and, it will be argued, does--refer to quantum physical properties represented by projectors on appropriate subspaces of a quantum Hilbert space. All sorts of microscopic and macroscopic properties, not just measurement outcomes, can be represented in this way, and are thus a proper subject of quantum information. The Stern-Gerlach experiment illustrates this. When properties are compatible, which is to say their projectors commute, Shannon's classical information theory based on statistical correlations extends without difficulty or change to the quantum case. When projectors do not commute, giving rise to characteristic quantum effects, a foundation for the subject can still be constructed by replacing the ``measurement and wave-function collapse'' found in textbooks--an efficient calculational tool, but one giving rise to numerous conceptual difficulties--with a fully consistent and paradox free stochastic formulation of standard quantum mechanics. This formulation is particularly helpful in that it contains no nonlocal superluminal influences; the reason the latter carry no information is that they do not exist.

  17. mAbs: a business perspective.

    PubMed

    Scolnik, Pablo A

    2009-01-01

    The twenty two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) currently marketed in the U.S. have captured almost half of the top-20 U.S. therapeutic biotechnology sales for 2007. Eight of these products have annual sales each of more than $1 B, were developed in the relatively short average period of six years, qualified for FDA programs designed to accelerate drug approval, and their cost has been reimbursed liberally by payers. With growth of the product class driven primarily by advancements in protein engineering and the low probability of generic threats, mAbs are now the largest class of biological therapies under development. The high cost of these drugs and the lack of generic competition conflict with a financially stressed health system, setting reimbursement by payers as the major limiting factor to growth. Advances in mAb engineering are likely to result in more effective mAb drugs and an expansion of the therapeutic indications covered by the class. The parallel development of biomarkers for identifying the patient subpopulations most likely to respond to treatment may lead to a more cost-effective use of these drugs. To achieve the success of the current top-tier mAbs, companies developing new mAb products must adapt to a significantly more challenging commercial environment.

  18. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  19. Quantum games as quantum types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbecque, Yannick

    In this thesis, we present a new model for higher-order quantum programming languages. The proposed model is an adaptation of the probabilistic game semantics developed by Danos and Harmer [DH02]: we expand it with quantum strategies which enable one to represent quantum states and quantum operations. Some of the basic properties of these strategies are established and then used to construct denotational semantics for three quantum programming languages. The first of these languages is a formalisation of the measurement calculus proposed by Danos et al. [DKP07]. The other two are new: they are higher-order quantum programming languages. Previous attempts to define a denotational semantics for higher-order quantum programming languages have failed. We identify some of the key reasons for this and base the design of our higher-order languages on these observations. The game semantics proposed in this thesis is the first denotational semantics for a lambda-calculus equipped with quantum types and with extra operations which allow one to program quantum algorithms. The results presented validate the two different approaches used in the design of these two new higher-order languages: a first one where quantum states are used through references and a second one where they are introduced as constants in the language. The quantum strategies presented in this thesis allow one to understand the constraints that must be imposed on quantum type systems with higher-order types. The most significant constraint is the fact that abstraction over part of the tensor product of many unknown quantum states must not be allowed. Quantum strategies are a new mathematical model which describes the interaction between classical and quantum data using system-environment dialogues. The interactions between the different parts of a quantum system are described using the rich structure generated by composition of strategies. This approach has enough generality to be put in relation with other

  20. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    -- 4. Mesoscopic superconductivity with unconventional superconductor or ferromagnet. Ultraefficient microrefrigerators realized with ferromagnet-superconductor junctions / F. Giazotto et al. Anomalous charge transport in triplet superconductor junctions by the synergy effect of the proximity effect and the mid gap Andreev resonant states / Y. Tanaka and S. Kashiwaya. Paramagnetic and glass states in superconductive YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] ceramics of sub-micron scale grains / H. Deguchi et al. Quantum properties of single-domain triplet superconductors / A. M. Gulian and K. S. Wood. A numerical study of Josephson current in p wave superconducting junctions / Y. Asano et al. Tilted bi-crystal sapphire substrates improve properties of grain boundary YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] junctions and extend their Josephson response to THZ frequencies / E. Stepantsov et al. Circuit theory analysis of AB-plane tunnel junctions of unconventional superconductor Bi[symbol]Sr[symbol]Ca[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] / I. Shigeta et al. Transport properties of normal metal/anisotropic superconductor junctions in the eutectic system Sr[symbol]RuO[symbol]Ru / M. Kawamura et al. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in d-wave superconductor Josephson / S. Kawabata et al. Quasiparticle states of high-T[symbol] oxides observed by a Zeeman magnetic field response / S. Kashiwaya et al. Experimentally realizable devices for controlling the motion of magnetic flux quanta in anisotropic superconductors: vortex lenses, vortex diodes and vortex pumps / S. Savel'ev and F. Nori. Stability of vortex-antivortex "molecules" in mesoscopic superconducting triangles / V. R. Misko et al. Superconducting network with magnetic decoration - Hofstadter butterfly in spatially modulated magnetic field / Y. Iye et al. Observation of paramagnetic supercurrent in mesoscopic superconducting rings and disks using multiple-small-tunnel-junction method / A. Kanda et al. Guidance of vortices in high

  1. Quantum space and quantum completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurić, Tajron

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the question whether quantum gravity can "smear out" the classical singularity we analyze a certain quantum space and its quantum-mechanical completeness. Classical singularity is understood as a geodesic incompleteness, while quantum completeness requires a unique unitary time evolution for test fields propagating on an underlying background. Here the crucial point is that quantum completeness renders the Hamiltonian (or spatial part of the wave operator) to be essentially self-adjoint in order to generate a unique time evolution. We examine a model of quantum space which consists of a noncommutative BTZ black hole probed by a test scalar field. We show that the quantum gravity (noncommutative) effect is to enlarge the domain of BTZ parameters for which the relevant wave operator is essentially self-adjoint. This means that the corresponding quantum space is quantum complete for a larger range of BTZ parameters rendering the conclusion that in the quantum space one observes the effect of "smearing out" the singularity.

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo Methods for First Principles Simulation of Liquid Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergely, John Robert

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate microscopic description of water structure and dynamics is of great interest to molecular biology researchers and in the physics and quantum chemistry simulation communities. This dissertation describes efforts to apply quantum Monte Carlo methods to this problem with the goal of making progress toward a fully "ab initio"…

  3. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  4. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  5. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  6. Quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers.

    PubMed

    Schuld, Maria; Petruccione, Francesco

    2018-02-09

    Quantum machine learning witnesses an increasing amount of quantum algorithms for data-driven decision making, a problem with potential applications ranging from automated image recognition to medical diagnosis. Many of those algorithms are implementations of quantum classifiers, or models for the classification of data inputs with a quantum computer. Following the success of collective decision making with ensembles in classical machine learning, this paper introduces the concept of quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers. Creating the ensemble corresponds to a state preparation routine, after which the quantum classifiers are evaluated in parallel and their combined decision is accessed by a single-qubit measurement. This framework naturally allows for exponentially large ensembles in which - similar to Bayesian learning - the individual classifiers do not have to be trained. As an example, we analyse an exponentially large quantum ensemble in which each classifier is weighed according to its performance in classifying the training data, leading to new results for quantum as well as classical machine learning.

  7. Quantum microbiology.

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T; Masson, L

    2011-01-01

    During his famous 1943 lecture series at Trinity College Dublin, the reknown physicist Erwin Schrodinger discussed the failure and challenges of interpreting life by classical physics alone and that a new approach, rooted in Quantum principles, must be involved. Quantum events are simply a level of organization below the molecular level. This includes the atomic and subatomic makeup of matter in microbial metabolism and structures, as well as the organic, genetic information code of DNA and RNA. Quantum events at this time do not elucidate, for example, how specific genetic instructions were first encoded in an organic genetic code in microbial cells capable of growth and division, and its subsequent evolution over 3.6 to 4 billion years. However, due to recent technological advances, biologists and physicists are starting to demonstrate linkages between various quantum principles like quantum tunneling, entanglement and coherence in biological processes illustrating that nature has exerted some level quantum control to optimize various processes in living organisms. In this article we explore the role of quantum events in microbial processes and endeavor to show that after nearly 67 years, Schrödinger was prophetic and visionary in his view of quantum theory and its connection with some of the fundamental mechanisms of life.

  8. Predicting vapor-liquid phase equilibria with augmented ab initio interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Sadus, Richard J.

    2017-06-01

    The ability of ab initio interatomic potentials to accurately predict vapor-liquid phase equilibria is investigated. Monte Carlo simulations are reported for the vapor-liquid equilibria of argon and krypton using recently developed accurate ab initio interatomic potentials. Seventeen interatomic potentials are studied, formulated from different combinations of two-body plus three-body terms. The simulation results are compared to either experimental or reference data for conditions ranging from the triple point to the critical point. It is demonstrated that the use of ab initio potentials enables systematic improvements to the accuracy of predictions via the addition of theoretically based terms. The contribution of three-body interactions is accounted for using the Axilrod-Teller-Muto plus other multipole contributions and the effective Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potentials. The results indicate that the predictive ability of recent interatomic potentials, obtained from quantum chemical calculations, is comparable to that of accurate empirical models. It is demonstrated that the Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potential can be used in combination with accurate two-body ab initio models for the computationally inexpensive and accurate estimation of vapor-liquid phase equilibria.

  9. Ab Initio Studies of Chlorine Oxide and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of chlorine oxide and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. In particular the geometrical structures, vibrational spectra, and heats of formation Of ClNO2, CisClONO, and trans-ClONO are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the ab initio results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve the experimental controversy. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of ClONO2, HONO2, ClOOC17 ClOOH, and HOOH will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of the experimental studies.

  10. Predicting vapor-liquid phase equilibria with augmented ab initio interatomic potentials.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Sadus, Richard J

    2017-06-28

    The ability of ab initio interatomic potentials to accurately predict vapor-liquid phase equilibria is investigated. Monte Carlo simulations are reported for the vapor-liquid equilibria of argon and krypton using recently developed accurate ab initio interatomic potentials. Seventeen interatomic potentials are studied, formulated from different combinations of two-body plus three-body terms. The simulation results are compared to either experimental or reference data for conditions ranging from the triple point to the critical point. It is demonstrated that the use of ab initio potentials enables systematic improvements to the accuracy of predictions via the addition of theoretically based terms. The contribution of three-body interactions is accounted for using the Axilrod-Teller-Muto plus other multipole contributions and the effective Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potentials. The results indicate that the predictive ability of recent interatomic potentials, obtained from quantum chemical calculations, is comparable to that of accurate empirical models. It is demonstrated that the Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potential can be used in combination with accurate two-body ab initio models for the computationally inexpensive and accurate estimation of vapor-liquid phase equilibria.

  11. In/ITO whisker and optoelectronic properties of ITO films deposited by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jung-Hsiung; Yeh, Sung-Wei; Teoh, Lay Gaik

    2012-07-15

    ITO films were deposited on a glass substrate using ion beam sputtering, with oxygen flow rates from 0.5 to 2 sccm. The films consisted of randomly oriented ITO nanoparticles and metallic indium (In) with {l_brace}101{r_brace} facets, following the specific crystallographic relationship of [010]{sub In}//[110]{sub ITO}; (001){sub In}//(001){sub ITO} with habit planes (100){sub In}//(011){sub ITO}, when fabricated using a low oxygen flow rate. Oxygen flow rate in excess of 2.0 sccm results in the growth of amorphous films. The epitaxial In nanoparticles probably act as seeds for the development of curved ITO whiskers as small as 10 nm and extend upmore » to 100 nm in length along the [100] direction, with poorly defined shape, possibly due to the tapering and bending of the whisker to form a tilt boundary about the [011] zone axis of the ITO. The ITO whisker growth was facilitated by the In globular tips in the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. The films prepared using a series of oxygen flow rates showed different chemical-bonding states, electric resistivity and optical transparency; as a result of phase and microstructural changes.« less

  12. Ab initio theory and modeling of water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mohan; Ko, Hsin-Yu; Remsing, Richard C.; Calegari Andrade, Marcos F.; Santra, Biswajit; Sun, Zhaoru; Selloni, Annabella; Car, Roberto; Klein, Michael L.; Perdew, John P.; Wu, Xifan

    2017-01-01

    Water is of the utmost importance for life and technology. However, a genuinely predictive ab initio model of water has eluded scientists. We demonstrate that a fully ab initio approach, relying on the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) density functional, provides such a description of water. SCAN accurately describes the balance among covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions that dictates the structure and dynamics of liquid water. Notably, SCAN captures the density difference between water and ice Ih at ambient conditions, as well as many important structural, electronic, and dynamic properties of liquid water. These successful predictions of the versatile SCAN functional open the gates to study complex processes in aqueous phase chemistry and the interactions of water with other materials in an efficient, accurate, and predictive, ab initio manner. PMID:28973868

  13. Ab initio theory and modeling of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Ko, Hsin-Yu; Remsing, Richard C; Calegari Andrade, Marcos F; Santra, Biswajit; Sun, Zhaoru; Selloni, Annabella; Car, Roberto; Klein, Michael L; Perdew, John P; Wu, Xifan

    2017-10-10

    Water is of the utmost importance for life and technology. However, a genuinely predictive ab initio model of water has eluded scientists. We demonstrate that a fully ab initio approach, relying on the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) density functional, provides such a description of water. SCAN accurately describes the balance among covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions that dictates the structure and dynamics of liquid water. Notably, SCAN captures the density difference between water and ice I h at ambient conditions, as well as many important structural, electronic, and dynamic properties of liquid water. These successful predictions of the versatile SCAN functional open the gates to study complex processes in aqueous phase chemistry and the interactions of water with other materials in an efficient, accurate, and predictive, ab initio manner.

  14. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  15. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    1995-04-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  16. Atomic defects in monolayer WSe2 tunneling FETs studied by systematic ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jixuan; Fan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jiezhi; Jiang, Xiangwei

    2018-05-01

    Atomic defects in monolayer WSe2 tunneling FETs (TFETs) are studied through systematic ab initio calculations aiming at performance predictions and enhancements. The effects of various defect positions and different passivation atoms are characterized in WSe2 TFETs by rigorous ab initio quantum transport simulations. It is suggested that the Se vacancy (VSe) defect located in the gate-controlled channel region tends to increase the OFF current (I off), whereas it can be well suppressed by oxygen passivation. It is demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) passivation at the source-side tunneling region can largely suppress I off, leading to an impressively improved on–off ratio (I on/I off) compared with that without any defect. However, it is also observed that randomly positioned atomic defects tend to induce significant fluctuation of the TFET output. Further discussions are made with focus on the performance-variability trade-off for robust circuit design.

  17. Diode laser surgery. Ab interno and ab externo versus conventional surgery in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Karp, C L; Higginbotham, E J; Edward, D P; Musch, D C

    1993-10-01

    Fibroblastic proliferation of subconjunctival tissues remains a primary mechanism of failure in filtration surgery. Minimizing the surgical manipulation of episcleral tissues may reduce scarring. Laser sclerostomy surgery involves minimal tissue dissection, and is gaining attention as a method of potentially improving filter duration in high-risk cases. Twenty-five New Zealand rabbits underwent filtration surgery in one eye, and the fellow eye remained as the unoperated control. Ten rabbits underwent ab externo diode laser sclerostomy surgery, ten underwent ab interno diode sclerostomy surgery, and five had posterior sclerostomy procedures. Filtration failure was defined as a less-than-4-mmHg intraocular pressure (IOP) difference between the operative and control eyes. The mean time to failure for the ab externo, ab interno, and conventional posterior sclerostomy techniques measured 17.4 +/- 11.5, 13.1 +/- 6.7, and 6.0 +/- 3.1 days, respectively. In a comparison of the laser-treated groups with the conventional procedure, the time to failure was significantly longer (P = 0.02) for the ab externo filter. The mean ab interno sclerostomy duration was longer than the posterior lip procedure, but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.15). The overall level of IOP reduction was similar in the three groups. These data suggest that diode laser sclerostomy is a feasible technique in rabbits, and the ab externo approach resulted in longer filter duration than the conventional posterior lip procedure in this model.

  18. The AB Doradus system revisited: The dynamical mass of AB Dor A/C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azulay, R.; Guirado, J. C.; Marcaide, J. M.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Ros, E.; Tognelli, E.; Jauncey, D. L.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Reynolds, J. E.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The study of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars with model-independent measurements of their masses is essential to check the validity of theoretical models of stellar evolution. The well-known PMS binary AB Dor A/C is an important benchmark for this task, since it displays intense and compact radio emission, which makes possible the application of high-precision astrometric techniques to this system. Aims: We aim to revisit the dynamical masses of the components of AB Dor A/C to refine earlier comparisons between the measurements of stellar parameters and the predictions of stellar models. Methods: We observed in phase-reference mode the binary AB Dor A/C, 0.2'' separation, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 8.4 GHz. The astrometric information resulting from our observations was analyzed along with previously reported VLBI, optical (Hipparcos), and infrared measurements. Results: The main star AB Dor A is clearly detected in all the VLBI observations, which allowed us to analyze the orbital motion of the system and to obtain model-independent dynamical masses of 0.90 ± 0.08 M⊙ and 0.090 ± 0.008 M⊙, for AB Dor A and AB Dor C, respectively. Comparisons with PMS stellar evolution models favor and age of 40-50 Myr for AB Dor A and of 25-120 Myr for AB Dor C. Conclusions: We show that the orbital motion of the AB Dor A/C system is remarkably well determined, leading to precise estimates of the dynamical masses. Comparison of our results with the prediction of evolutionary models support the observational evidence that theoretical models tend to slightly underestimate the mass of the low-mass stars.

  19. Exploring the Nature of the H[subscript 2] Bond. 2. Using Ab Initio Molecular Orbital Calculations to Obtain the Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Glendening, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    A project for students in an upper-level course in quantum or computational chemistry is described in which they are introduced to the concepts and applications of a high quality, ab initio treatment of the ground-state potential energy curve (PEC) for H[subscript 2] and D[subscript 2]. Using a commercial computational chemistry application and a…

  20. Picturing Quantum Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob; Kissinger, Aleks

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Guide to reading this textbook; 3. Processes as diagrams; 4. String diagrams; 5. Hilbert space from diagrams; 6. Quantum processes; 7. Quantum measurement; 8. Picturing classical-quantum processes; 9. Picturing phases and complementarity; 10. Quantum theory: the full picture; 11. Quantum foundations; 12. Quantum computation; 13. Quantum resources; 14. Quantomatic; Appendix A. Some notations; References; Index.

  1. Quantum Metaphotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    for and success in achieving single quantum dot vacuum Rabi splitting in 2004 (quantum strong coupling, currently 1,354 citations) [6, 7] was...Ell, O. B. Shchekin, and D. G. Deppe, “Vacuum Rabi splitting with a single quantum dot in a photonic crystal nanocavity.” Nature 432, 200-203 (2004...7. G. Khitrova, H. M. Gibbs, M. Kira, S. W. Koch, and A. Scherer, “Vacuum Rabi splitting in semiconductors.” Nature Physics 2, 81 (2006). 8. G

  2. SEER Abstracting Tool (SEER*Abs)

    Cancer.gov

    With this customizable tool, registrars can collect and store data abstracted from medical records. Download the software and find technical support and reference manuals. SEER*Abs has features for creating records, managing abstracting work and data, accessing reference data, and integrating edits.

  3. Determination of the electronic energy levels of colloidal nanocrystals using field-effect transistors and Ab-initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Degoli, Elena; Spallanzani, Nicola; Krishnan, Gopi; Kooi, Bart Jan; Ghica, Corneliu; Yarema, Maksym; Heiss, Wolfgang; Pulci, Olivia; Ossicini, Stefano; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2014-08-27

    Colloidal nanocrystals electronic energy levels are determined by strong size-dependent quantum confinement. Understanding the configuration of the energy levels of nanocrystal superlattices is vital in order to use them in heterostructures with other materials. A powerful method is reported to determine the energy levels of PbS nanocrystal assemblies by combining the utilization of electric-double-layer-gated transistors and advanced ab-initio theory. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Photodissociation of phenol via nonadiabatic tunneling: Comparison of two ab initio based potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua

    2017-09-01

    The nonadiabatic tunneling-facilitated photodissociation of phenol is investigated using a reduced-dimensional quantum model on two ab initio-based coupled potential energy surfaces (PESs). Although dynamics occurs largely on the lower adiabat, the proximity to a conical intersection between the S1 and S2 states requires the inclusion of both the geometric phase (GP) and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (DBOC). The lifetime of the lowest-lying vibronic state is computed using the diabatic and various adiabatic models. The GP and DBOC terms are found to be essential on one set of PESs, but have a small impact on the other.

  5. Structure of alcohol cluster ions in the gas phase, according to spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisilov, A. V.; Lantsuzskaya, E. V.; Levina, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced ion mobility and scattering cross sections are calculated from experimentally obtained spectra of the ion mobility of linear aliphatic alcohols with carbon atom numbers from 2 to 9. A linear increase in the scattering cross sections as the molecular weight grows is found. According to the results from experiments and quantum chemical calculations, alcohol cluster ions do not form a compact structure. Neither are dipole moments compensated for during dimerization, in contrast to the aldehydes and ketones described earlier. It was concluded from ab initio calculations that charge delocalization in monomeric and dimeric ions of alcohols increases the dipole moment many times over.

  6. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a `consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are not entailed by the precepts of quantum mechanics. Thus whatever is proved is not a feature of quantum mechanics, but is a property of a theory that tries to combine quantum theory with quasi-classical features that go beyond what is entailed by quantum theory itself. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by establishing, instead, properties of a system modified by adding properties alien to the original system. Hence Griffiths' rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his `consistent quantum theory' shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive version of quantum theory. An added section responds to Griffiths' reply, which cites general possibilities of ambiguities that might make what is to be proved ill-defined, and hence render the pertinent `consistent framework' ill defined. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question, which, both by its physical formulation and by explicit identification, specify the framework to be used. Griffiths confirms the validity of the proof insofar as that pertinent framework is used. The section also shows

  7. Quantum Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-14

    Lent 6 I We have studied transmission in quantum waveguides in the presence of resonant cavities. This work was inspired by our previous modeling of the...conductance of resonantly- coupled quantum wire systems. We expected to find qualitatively the same phenomena as in the much studied case of double...transmission peaks does not give the location of the quasi-bound3 states, like for double-barrier resonant tunneling. In current work, we study

  8. Investigation of polarization effects in the gramicidin A channel from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Timko, Jeff; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2012-11-28

    Polarization is an important component of molecular interactions and is expected to play a particularly significant role in inhomogeneous environments such as pores and interfaces. Here we investigate the effects of polarization in the gramicidin A ion channel by performing quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and comparing the results with those obtained from classical MD simulations with non-polarizable force fields. We consider the dipole moments of backbone carbonyl groups and channel water molecules as well as a number of structural quantities of interest. The ab initio results show that the dipole moments of the carbonyl groups and water molecules are highly sensitive to the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) they participate in. In the absence of a K(+) ion, water molecules in the channel are quite mobile, making the H-bond network highly dynamic. A central K(+) ion acts as an anchor for the channel waters, stabilizing the H-bond network and thereby increasing their average dipole moments. In contrast, the K(+) ion has little effect on the dipole moments of the neighboring carbonyl groups. The weakness of the ion-peptide interactions helps to explain the near diffusion-rate conductance of K(+) ions through the channel. We also address the sampling issue in relatively short ab initio MD simulations. Results obtained from a continuous 20 ps ab initio MD simulation are compared with those generated by sampling ten windows from a much longer classical MD simulation and running each window for 2 ps with ab initio MD. Both methods yield similar results for a number of quantities of interest, indicating that fluctuations are fast enough to justify the short ab initio MD simulations.

  9. Oriented conjugation of single-domain antibodies and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Brazhnik, Kristina; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based biodetection routinely employs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for targeting. However, the large size of mAbs limits the number of ligands per nanoparticle and severely restricts the bioavailability and distribution of these probes in a sample. Furthermore, conventional conjugation techniques provide nanoprobes with irregular orientation of mAbs on the nanoparticle surface and often provoke mAb unfolding. Here, we describe a protocol for engineering a new generation of ultrasmall diagnostic nanoprobes through oriented conjugation of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with 13 kDa single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) derived from llama immunoglobulin G (IgG). The sdAbs are conjugated with QDs in a highly oriented manner via an additional cysteine residue specifically integrated into the sdAb C-terminus. The resultant nanoprobes are <12 nm in diameter, ten times smaller in volume compared to the known alternatives. They have been proved highly efficient in flow cytometry and immunuhistochemical diagnostics. This approach can be easily extended to other semiconductor and plasmonic nanoparticles.

  10. Quantum computing: Quantum advantage deferred

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andrew M.

    2017-12-01

    A type of optics experiment called a boson sampler could be among the easiest routes to demonstrating the power of quantum computers. But recent work shows that super-classical boson sampling may be a long way off.

  11. Masses and activity of AB Doradus B a/b. The age of the AB Dor quadruple system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, U.; Czesla, S.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Robrade, J.; Engels, D.; Wieringa, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the close binary AB Dor Ba/b (Rst137B). Our study comprises astrometric orbit measurements, optical spectroscopy, X-ray and radio observations. Using all available adaptive optics images of AB Dor B taken with VLT/NACO from 2004 to 2009, we tightly constrain its orbital period to 360.6 ± 1.5 days. We present the first orbital solution of Rst 137B and estimate the combined mass of AB Dor Ba+b as 0.69+0.02-0.24 M⊙, slightly exceeding previous estimates based on IR photometry. Our determined orbital inclination of Rst 137B is close to the axial inclination of AB Dor A inferred from Doppler imaging. Our VLT/UVES spectra yield high rotational velocities of ≥30 km s-1 for both components Ba and Bb, in accord with previous measurements, which corresponds to rotation periods significantly shorter than one day. Our combined spectral model, using PHOENIX spectra, yields an effective temperature of 3310 ± 50 K for the primary and approximately 60 K less for the secondary. The optical spectra presumably cover a chromospheric flare and show that at least one component of Rst 137B is significantly active. Activity and weak variations are also found in our simultaneous XMM-Newton observations, while our ATCA radio data yield constant fluxes at the level of previous measurements. Using evolutionary models, our newly determined stellar parameters confirm that the age of Rst 137B is between 50 and 100 Myr. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 383.D-1002(A) and the ESO Science Archive Facility. Using data obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and NASA. Using data obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) operated by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

  12. Ab initio calculation of infrared intensities for hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an ab initio SCF quantum mechanical study are used to derive estimates for the infrared intensities of the fundamental vibrations of hydrogen peroxide. Atomic polar tensors (APTs) were calculated on the basis of a 4-31G basis set, and used to derive absolute intensities for the vibrational transitions. Comparison of the APTs calculated for H2O2 with those previously obtained for H2O and CH3OH, and of the absolute intensities derived from the H2O2 APTs with those derived from APTs transferred from H2O and CH3OH, reveals the sets of values to differ by no more than a factor of two, supporting the validity of the theoretical calculation. Values of the infrared intensities obtained correspond to A1 = 14.5 km/mol, A2 = 0.91 km/mol, A3 = 0.058 km/mol, A4 = 123 km/mol, A5 = 46.2 km/mol, and A6 = 101 km/mol. Charge, charge flux and overlap contributions to the dipole moment derivatives are also computed.

  13. Ab initio calculation of infrared intensities for hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1982-04-01

    Results of an ab initio SCF quantum mechanical study are used to derive estimates for the infrared intensities of the fundamental vibrations of hydrogen peroxide. Atomic polar tensors (APTs) were calculated on the basis of a 4-31G basis set, and used to derive absolute intensities for the vibrational transitions. Comparison of the APTs calculated for H2O2 with those previously obtained for H2O and CH3OH, and of the absolute intensities derived from the H2O2 APTs with those derived from APTs transferred from H2O and CH3OH, reveals the sets of values to differ by no more than a factor of two, supporting the validity of the theoretical calculation. Values of the infrared intensities obtained correspond to A1 = 14.5 km/mol, A2 = 0.91 km/mol, A3 = 0.058 km/mol, A4 = 123 km/mol, A5 = 46.2 km/mol, and A6 = 101 km/mol. Charge, charge flux and overlap contributions to the dipole moment derivatives are also computed.

  14. Ab initio predictions of the symmetry energy and recent constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammarruca, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The symmetry energy plays a crucial role in the structure and the dynamics of neutron-rich systems, including the formation of neutron skins, the location of neutron drip lines, as well as intriguing correlations with the structure of compact stars. With experimental efforts in progress or being planned to shed light on the less known aspects of the nuclear chart, microscopic predictions based on ab initio approaches are very important. In recent years, chiral effective field theory has become popular because of its firm connection with quantum chromodynamics and its systematic approach to the development of nuclear forces. Predictions of the symmetry energy obtained from modern chiral interactions will be discussed in the light of recent empirical constraints extracted from heavy ion collisions at 400 MeV per nucleon at GSI. Applications of our equations of state to neutron-rich systems will also be discussed, with particular emphasis on neutron skins, which are sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  15. Ab initio thermodynamic results for warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) - an exotic state where electrons are quantum degenerate and ions may be strongly correlated - is ubiquitous in dense astrophysical plasmas and highly compressed laboratory systems including inertial fusion. Accurate theoretical predictions require precision thermodynamic data for the electron gas at high density and finite temperature around the Fermi temperature. First such data have been obtained by restricted path integral Monte Carlo (restricted PIMC) simulations and transformed into analytical fits for the free energy. Such results are also key input for novel finite temperature density functional theory. However, the RPIMC data of Ref. 1 are limited to moderate densities, and even there turned out to be surprisingly inaccurate, which is a consequence of the fermion sign problem. These problems were recently overcome by the development of alternative QMC approaches in Kiel (configuration PIMC and permutation blocking PIMC) and Imperial College (Density matrix QMC). The three methods have their strengths and limitations in complementary parameter regions and provide highly accurate thermodynamic data for the electronic contributions in WDM. While the original results were obtained for small particle numbers, recently accurate finite size corrections were derived allowing to compute ab initio thermodynamic data with an unprecedented accuracy of better than 0.3 percent. This provides the final step for the use as benchmark data for experiments and models of Warm dense matter. Co-authors: T. Schoof, S. Groth, T. Dornheim, F. D. Malone, M. Foulkes, and T. Sjostroem, Funded by: DFG via SFB-TR24 and project BO1366-10.

  16. Quantum Transmemetic Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * A Quantum Model of Free Will * Quantum Acquisition of Knowledge * Thinking as a Quantum Algorithm * Counterfactual Measurement as a Model of Intuition * Quantum Modification of Freud's Model of Consciousness * Conclusion * Acknowledgements * References

  17. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  18. Deep Space Quantum Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohageg, M.; Strekalov, D.; Dolinar, S.; Shaw, M.; Yu, N.

    2018-02-01

    The Deep Space Quantum Link will test the effects of gravity on quantum systems, test the non-locality of quantum states at deep space distances, and perform long distance quantum teleportation to an Earth-based receiver.

  19. Quantum correlations in multipartite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Heshmati, A.; Karimi, N.; Yahyavi, M.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum entanglement is the most famous type of quantum correlation between elements of a quantum system that has a basic role in quantum communication protocols like quantum cryptography, teleportation and Bell inequality detection. However, it has already been shown that various applications in quantum information theory do not require entanglement. Quantum discord as a new kind of quantum correlations beyond entanglement, is the most popular candidate for general quantum correlations. In this paper, first we find the entanglement witness in a particular multipartite quantum system which consists of a N-partite system in 2 n -dimensional space. Then we give an exact analytical formula for the quantum discord of this system. At the end of the paper, we investigate the additivity relation of the quantum correlation and show that this relation is satisfied for a N-partite system with 2 n -dimensional space.

  20. Long distance quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiu-Xiu; Sun, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Quantum teleportation is a core protocol in quantum information science. Besides revealing the fascinating feature of quantum entanglement, quantum teleportation provides an ultimate way to distribute quantum state over extremely long distance, which is crucial for global quantum communication and future quantum networks. In this review, we focus on the long distance quantum teleportation experiments, especially those employing photonic qubits. From the viewpoint of real-world application, both the technical advantages and disadvantages of these experiments are discussed.

  1. Ab Initio Computation of Dynamical Properties: Pressure Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Drouin, Brian

    2014-06-01

    Rotational spectroscopy of polar molecules is the main observational tool in many areas of astrophysics, for gases of low densities (n ˜ 102 - 108 cm-3). Spectral line shapes in astrophysical media are largely dominated by turbulence-induced Doppler effects and natural line broadening are negligible. However line broadening remains an important tool for denser gases, like planetary high atmospheres. Understanding the excitation schemes of polar molecules requires the knowledge of excitation transfer rate due to collisional excitation, between the polar molecule and the ambient gas, usually H2. Transport properties in ionized media also require a precise knowledge of momentum transfer rates by elastic collisions. In order to assess the theoretically computed cross section and energy/momentum transfer rates, direct absolute experiments are scarce. The best way is to measure not individual scattering events but rather the global effect of the buffer gas, thanks to the pressure broadening cross sections, whose magnitude can be measured without any scaling parameters. At low temperatures, both elastic and inelastic scattering amplitudes are tested. At higher temperature, depending on the interaction strength, only inelastic scattering cross section are shown to play a significant role 1 ,2. Thanks to the advances of computer capabilities, it has become practical to compute spectral line parameters fromab initio quantum chemistry. In particular, the theory of rotational line broadening is readily incorporated into scattering quantum dynamical theory, like close-coupling schemes. The only approximations used in the computation are the isolated collision/isolated line approximations. We compute the non-binding interaction potential with high precision quantum chemistry and fit the resulting ab initio points onto a suitable functional. We have recently computed several such systems, for molecules in H2 buffer gas: H2O,3 H2CO,4 HCO+ .5 Detailed computations taking into

  2. Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bellac, Michel

    2006-03-01

    Quantum physics allows us to understand the nature of the physical phenomena which govern the behavior of solids, semi-conductors, lasers, atoms, nuclei, subnuclear particles and light. In Quantum Physics, Le Bellac provides a thoroughly modern approach to this fundamental theory. Throughout the book, Le Bellac teaches the fundamentals of quantum physics using an original approach which relies primarily on an algebraic treatment and on the systematic use of symmetry principles. In addition to the standard topics such as one-dimensional potentials, angular momentum and scattering theory, the reader is introduced to more recent developments at an early stage. These include a detailed account of entangled states and their applications, the optical Bloch equations, the theory of laser cooling and of magneto-optical traps, vacuum Rabi oscillations, and an introduction to open quantum systems. This is a textbook for a modern course on quantum physics, written for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Completely original and contemporary approach, using algebra and symmetry principles Introduces recent developments at an early stage, including many topics that cannot be found in standard textbooks. Contains 130 physically relevant exercises

  3. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  4. Ab Initio Infrared and Raman Spectra.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    equilibrium and non -equilibrium systems. It b pointed out that a similar ab !ni- te QFC molecular dynamic approach could be used to compute other types of...applied to -2- equilibrium and non -equilibrium system. It is pointed out that a similar oh im- ib QFCT molecular dynamic approach could be used to...desire to be able to experimentally identify and understand transient species or states (such as those existing during the course of chemical

  5. CCD Observation of STF1169AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Colette; Anderson, David; Morales, Robin; Gerow, Thomas; Ramirez, Brandon; Whipp, Paul; Rowe, David; Freed, Rachel; Genet, Russell

    2018-01-01

    Binary star system STF1169AB was observed on April 9th, 2017 using the 17-inch Corrected Dall-Kirkham, Optical Tube Assembly Astrograph Telescope at the Sierra Remote Observatory. Ten images were taken using a Charge-Coupled Device, allowing position angle and separation to be calculated to within 1.2% standard error. The position angle was recorded as 14.95 degrees and the separation as 20.73 arc seconds.

  6. Ab Initio Crystal Field for Lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2017-03-13

    An ab initio methodology for the first-principle derivation of crystal-field (CF) parameters for lanthanides is described. The methodology is applied to the analysis of CF parameters in [Tb(Pc) 2 ] - (Pc=phthalocyanine) and Dy 4 K 2 ([Dy 4 K 2 O(OtBu) 12 ]) complexes, and compared with often used approximate and model descriptions. It is found that the application of geometry symmetrization, and the use of electrostatic point-charge and phenomenological CF models, lead to unacceptably large deviations from predictions based on ab initio calculations for experimental geometry. It is shown how the predictions of standard CASSCF (Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field) calculations (with 4f orbitals in the active space) can be systematically improved by including effects of dynamical electronic correlation (CASPT2 step) and by admixing electronic configurations of the 5d shell. This is exemplified for the well-studied Er-trensal complex (H 3 trensal=2,2',2"-tris(salicylideneimido)trimethylamine). The electrostatic contributions to CF parameters in this complex, calculated with true charge distributions in the ligands, yield less than half of the total CF splitting, thus pointing to the dominant role of covalent effects. This analysis allows the conclusion that ab initio crystal field is an essential tool for the decent description of lanthanides. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm’s canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  8. Quantum Finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2007-09-01

    Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Synopsis; Part I. Fundamental Concepts of Finance: 2. Introduction to finance; 3. Derivative securities; Part II. Systems with Finite Number of Degrees of Freedom: 4. Hamiltonians and stock options; 5. Path integrals and stock options; 6. Stochastic interest rates' Hamiltonians and path integrals; Part III. Quantum Field Theory of Interest Rates Models: 7. Quantum field theory of forward interest rates; 8. Empirical forward interest rates and field theory models; 9. Field theory of Treasury Bonds' derivatives and hedging; 10. Field theory Hamiltonian of forward interest rates; 11. Conclusions; Appendix A: mathematical background; Brief glossary of financial terms; Brief glossary of physics terms; List of main symbols; References; Index.

  9. Quantum machine learning for quantum anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nana; Rebentrost, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Anomaly detection is used for identifying data that deviate from "normal" data patterns. Its usage on classical data finds diverse applications in many important areas such as finance, fraud detection, medical diagnoses, data cleaning, and surveillance. With the advent of quantum technologies, anomaly detection of quantum data, in the form of quantum states, may become an important component of quantum applications. Machine-learning algorithms are playing pivotal roles in anomaly detection using classical data. Two widely used algorithms are the kernel principal component analysis and the one-class support vector machine. We find corresponding quantum algorithms to detect anomalies in quantum states. We show that these two quantum algorithms can be performed using resources that are logarithmic in the dimensionality of quantum states. For pure quantum states, these resources can also be logarithmic in the number of quantum states used for training the machine-learning algorithm. This makes these algorithms potentially applicable to big quantum data applications.

  10. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  11. Data and Analysis of the Double Stars STFA 10AB and STFA 1744AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcilla, Marisa; Bowden, Sam; DeBlase, Jacqueline; Hall, Anthony; Hall, Corielyn; Hernandez, Alyssa; Renna, Danielle; Rodriguez, Fatima; Salazar, Cassandra; Sanchez, Andres; Teeter, Dayton; Brewer, Mark; Funk, Benjamin; Gillette, Travis; Sharpe, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Eighth grade students at Vanguard Preparatory School measured the double stars STFA 10AB and STFA 1744AB. A 22-inch Newtonian Alt/Az telescope and a 14-inch Celestron Schmidt Cassegrain telescope were used. The star Bellatrix was used as the calibration star to determine the scale constant of the 22-inch telescope to be 7.8 “/tick marks. The double star STFA 1744AB was used as the calibration star to determine the scale constant of the 14-inch telescope to be 5.1 “/tick marks. The separation and position angle of STFA 10AB was determined by the 22-inch telescope to be 347.9” and 339.3°. The separation and position angle of STFA 1744AB was determined by the 14-inch telescope to be 3.6” and 158.1°. The measurements that were calculated were compared to the most recent measurements listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog.

  12. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Changlani, Hitesh J.; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U{sup ∗}/t tomore » be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models.« less

  13. Dynamics and Novel Mechanisms of SN2 Reactions on ab Initio Analytical Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Szabó, István; Czakó, Gábor

    2017-11-30

    We describe a novel theoretical approach to the bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S N 2) reactions that is based on analytical potential energy surfaces (PESs) obtained by fitting a few tens of thousands high-level ab initio energy points. These PESs allow computing millions of quasi-classical trajectories thereby providing unprecedented statistical accuracy for S N 2 reactions, as well as performing high-dimensional quantum dynamics computations. We developed full-dimensional ab initio PESs for the F - + CH 3 Y [Y = F, Cl, I] systems, which describe the direct and indirect, complex-forming Walden-inversion, the frontside attack, and the new double-inversion pathways as well as the proton-transfer channels. Reaction dynamics simulations on the new PESs revealed (a) a novel double-inversion S N 2 mechanism, (b) frontside complex formation, (c) the dynamics of proton transfer, (d) vibrational and rotational mode specificity, (e) mode-specific product vibrational distributions, (f) agreement between classical and quantum dynamics, (g) good agreement with measured scattering angle and product internal energy distributions, and (h) significant leaving group effect in accord with experiments.

  14. Sensitivity-Enhancement of FRET Immunoassays by Multiple-Antibody Conjugation on Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Annio, Giacomo; Jennings, Travis; Tagit, Oya; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2018-05-23

    Quantum dots (QDs) are not only advantageous for color-tuning, improved brightness, and high stability, but their nanoparticle surfaces also allow for the attachment of many biomolecules. Because IgG antibodies (ABs) are in the same size range of biocompatible QDs and the AB orientation after conjugation to the QD is often random, it is difficult to predict if few or many ABs per QD will lead to an efficient AB-QD conjugate. This is particularly true for homogeneous Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sandwich immunoassays, for which the ABs on the QD must bind a biomarker that needs to bind a second AB-FRET-conjugate. Here, we investigate the performance of Tb-to-QD FRET immunoassays against total prostate specific antigen (TPSA) by changing the number of ABs per QD while leaving all the other assay components unchanged. We first characterize the AB-QD conjugation by various spectroscopic, microscopic, and chromatographic techniques and then quantify the TPSA immunoassay performance regarding sensitivity, limit of detection, and dynamic range. Our results show that an increasing conjugation ratio leads to significantly enhanced FRET immunoassays. These findings will be highly important for developing QD-based immunoassays in which the concentrations of both ABs and QDs can significantly influence the assay performance.

  15. Towards an ab initio description of correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Chuck-Hou

    Strongly-correlated materials are a rich playground for physical phenomena, exhibiting complex phase diagrams with many competing orders. Ab initio insights into materials combined with physical ideas provide the ability to identify the organizing principles driving the correlated electronic behavior and pursue first-principles design of new compounds. Realistic modeling of correlated materials is an active area of research, especially with the recent merger of density functional theory (DFT) with dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). This thesis is structured in two parts. The first describes the methods and algorithmic developments which drive advances in DFT+DMFT. In Ch. 2 and 3, we provide an overview of the two foundational theories, DMFT and DFT. In the second half of Ch. 3, we describe some of the principles guiding the combination of the two theories to form DFT+DMFT. In Ch. 4, we describe the algorithm lying at the heart of modern DFT+DMFT implementations, the hybridization expansion formulation of continuous-time quantum monte carlo (CTQMC) for the general Anderson impurity problem, as well as a fast rejection algorithm for speeding-up the local trace evaluation. The final chapter in the methods section describes an algorithm for direct sampling of the partition function, and thus the free energy and entropy, of simple Anderson impurity models within CTQMC. The second part of the thesis is a collection of applications of our ab initio approach to key correlated materials. We first apply our method to plutonium binary alloys (Ch. 6), which when supplemented with slave-boson mean-field theory, allows us to understand the observed photoemission spectra. Ch. 7 describes the computation of spectra and optical conductivity for rare-earth nickelates grown as epitaxial thin films. In the final two chapters, we turn our attention to the high-temperature superconductors. In the first, we show that the charge-transfer energy is a key chemical variable which controls

  16. Hybrid classical/quantum simulation for infrared spectroscopy of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Yuki; Sasaoka, Kenji; Ube, Takuji; Ishiguro, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a hybrid classical/quantum simulation method to calculate the infrared (IR) spectrum of water. The proposed method achieves much higher accuracy than conventional classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at a much lower computational cost than ab initio MD simulations. The IR spectrum of water is obtained as an ensemble average of the eigenvalues of the dynamical matrix constructed by ab initio calculations, using the positions of oxygen atoms that constitute water molecules obtained from the classical MD simulation. The calculated IR spectrum is in excellent agreement with the experimental IR spectrum.

  17. Quantum Gambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, Lior; Vaidman, Lev; Wiesner, Stephen

    1999-04-01

    We present a two-party protocol for ``quantum gambling,'' a new task closely related to coin tossing. The protocol allows two remote parties to play a gambling game such that in a certain limit it becomes a fair game. No unconditionally secure classical method is known to accomplish this task.

  18. Quantum rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  19. Quantum dice

    SciTech Connect

    Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano, E-mail: autoricerca@gmail.com

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote [42]: “Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the ‘old one.’ I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.” In this paper we take seriously Einstein’s famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how to perform measurements on a single die, tomore » create typical quantum interference effects, and how to connect (entangle) two identical dice, to maximally violate Bell’s inequality. -- Highlights: •Rolling a die is a quantum process admitting a Hilbert space representation. •Rolling experiments with a single die can produce interference effects. •Two connected dice can violate Bell’s inequality. •Correlations need to be created by the measurement, to violate Bell’s inequality.« less

  20. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  1. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of a...

  2. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of a...

  3. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of a...

  4. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of a...

  5. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of a...

  6. Ab initio studies of dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1989-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of the dissociative recombination of O2(+) and N2(+) are reported. An approach for calculating autoionization widths from high-principal-quantum-number Rydberg states is summarized, and an example is presented for the lowest dissociative state of O2. For O2(+), the 1Sigma(+)u state is the sole source of O(1S) from the lowest 10 vibrational levels of the ion. Rate coefficients for generating O(1S) and O(1D) at ionospheric temperatures are reported.

  7. Undoing Gender Through Legislation and Schooling: the Case of AB 537 and AB 394 IN California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-11-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools have an unconscious acceptance of heteronormativity and gendered norms, which undermines both the spirit and language of these laws. This paper examines how California schools can both change standard practices and realise the transformative social change that laws like AB 537 and AB 394 can instigate. I assert that the systemic implementation of these laws, through the adoption, enforcement and evaluation of existing AB 537 Task Force Recommendations, is necessary for their success. My second assertion is that AB 537 and AB 394 have the potential to change and reconstitute gender-based and heteronormative standards at school sites.

  8. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  9. Quantal Study of the Exchange Reaction for N + N2 using an ab initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The N + N2 exchange rate is calculated using a time-dependent quantum dynamics method on a newly determined ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground A" state. This ab initio PES shows a double barrier feature in the interaction region with the barrier height at 47.2 kcal/mol, and a shallow well between these two barriers, with the minimum at 43.7 kcal/mol. A quantum dynamics wave packet calculation has been carried out using the fitted PES to compute the cumulative reaction probability for the exchange reaction of N + N2(J=O). The J - K shift method is then employed to obtain the rate constant for this reaction. The calculated rate constant is compared with experimental data and a recent quasi-classical calculation using a LEPS PES. Significant differences are found between the present and quasiclassical results. The present rate calculation is the first accurate 3D quantal dynamics study for N + N2 reaction system and the ab initio PES reported here is the first such surface for N3.

  10. Ab initio calculation of the potential bubble nucleus 34Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguet, T.; Somà, V.; Lecluse, S.; Barbieri, C.; Navrátil, P.

    2017-03-01

    Background: The possibility that an unconventional depletion (referred to as a "bubble") occurs in the center of the charge density distribution of certain nuclei due to a purely quantum mechanical effect has attracted theoretical and experimental attention in recent years. Based on a mean-field rationale, a correlation between the occurrence of such a semibubble and an anomalously weak splitting between low angular-momentum spin-orbit partners has been further conjectured. Energy density functional and valence-space shell model calculations have been performed to identify and characterize the best candidates, among which 34Si appears as a particularly interesting case. While the experimental determination of the charge density distribution of the unstable 34Si is currently out of reach, (d ,p ) experiments on this nucleus have been performed recently to test the correlation between the presence of a bubble and an anomalously weak 1 /2--3 /2- splitting in the spectrum of 35Si as compared to 37S. Purpose: We study the potential bubble structure of 34Si on the basis of the state-of-the-art ab initio self-consistent Green's function many-body method. Methods: We perform the first ab initio calculations of 34Si and 36S. In addition to binding energies, the first observables of interest are the charge density distribution and the charge root-mean-square radius for which experimental data exist in 36S. The next observable of interest is the low-lying spectroscopy of 35Si and 37S obtained from (d ,p ) experiments along with the spectroscopy of 33Al and 35P obtained from knock-out experiments. The interpretation in terms of the evolution of the underlying shell structure is also provided. The study is repeated using several chiral effective field theory Hamiltonians as a way to test the robustness of the results with respect to input internucleon interactions. The convergence of the results with respect to the truncation of the many-body expansion, i.e., with respect to

  11. Antibiotic stewardship through the EU project "ABS International".

    PubMed

    Allerberger, Franz; Frank, Annegret; Gareis, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance requires implementation of antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programs. The project "ABS International--implementing antibiotic strategies for appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals in member states of the European Union" was started in September 2006 in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia. A training program for national ABS trainers was prepared and standard templates for ABS tools (antibiotic list, guides for antibiotic treatment and surgical prophylaxis, antibiotic-related organization) and valid process measures, as well as quality indicators for antibiotic use were developed. Specific ABS tools are being implemented in up to five healthcare facilities in each country. Although ABS International clearly focuses on healthcare institutions, future antimicrobial stewardship programs must also cover public education and antibiotic prescribing in primary care.

  12. Molecular Spectroscopy by Ab Initio Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Due to recent advances in methods and computers, the accuracy of ab calculations has reached a point where these methods can be used to provide accurate spectroscopic constants for small molecules; this will be illustrated with several examples. We will show how ab initio calculations where used to identify the Hermann infrared system in N2 and two band systems in CO. The identification of all three of these band systems relied on very accurate calculations of quintet states. The analysis of the infrared spectra of cool stars requires knowledge of the intensity of vibrational transitions in SiO for high nu and J levels. While experiment can supply very accurate dipole moments for nu = 0 to 3, this is insufficient to construct a global dipole moment function. We show how theory, combined by the experiment, can be used to generate the line intensities up to nu = 40 and J = 250. The spectroscopy of transition metal containing systems is very difficult for both theory and experiment. We will discuss the identification of the ground state of Ti2 and the spectroscopy of AlCu as examples of how theory can contribute to the understanding of these complex systems.

  13. Focused Wind Mass Accretion in Mira AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita; de Val-Borro, M.; Hack, W.; Raymond, J.; Sasselov, D.; Lee, N. P.

    2011-05-01

    At a distance of about only 100pc, Mira AB is the nearest symbiotic system containing an Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star (Mira A), and a compact accreting companion (Mira B) at about 0.5" from Mira A. Symbiotic systems are interacting binaries with a key evolutionary importance as potential progenitors of a fraction of asymmetric Planetary Nebulae, and SN type Ia, cosmological distance indicators. The region of interaction has been studied using high-angular resolution, multiwavelength observations ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. Our results, including high-angular resolution Chandra imaging, show a "bridge" between Mira A and Mira B, indicating gravitational focusing of the Mira A wind, whereby components exchange matter directly in addition to the wind accretion. We carried out a study using 2-D hydrodynamical models of focused wind mass accretion to determine the region of wind acceleration and the characteristics of the accretion in Mira AB. We highlight some of our results and discuss the impact on our understanding of accretion processes in symbiotic systems and other detached and semidetached interacting systems.

  14. Quantum oligopoly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. F.; Kiang, D.

    2003-12-01

    Based upon a modification of Li et al.'s "minimal" quantization rules (Phys. Lett. A306(2002) 73), we investigate the quantum version of the Cournot and Bertrand oligopoly. In the Cournot oligopoly, the profit of each of the N firms at the Nash equilibrium point rises monotonically with the measure of the quantum entanglement. Only at maximal entanglement, however, does the Nash equilibrium point coincide with the Pareto optimal point. In the Bertrand case, the Bertrand Paradox remains for finite entanglement (i.e., the perfectly competitive stage is reached for any N>=2), whereas with maximal entanglement each of the N firms will still have a non-zero shared profit. Hence, the Bertrand Paradox is completely resolved. Furthermore, a perfectly competitive market is reached asymptotically for N → ∞ in both the Cournot and Bertrand oligopoly.

  15. Quantum Foam

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2018-01-16

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  16. Quantum nonlocality

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-04-01

    It is argued that the validity of the predictions of quantum theory in certain spin-correlation experiments entails a violation of Einstein's locality idea that no causal influence can act outside the forward light cone. First, two preliminary arguments suggesting such a violation are reviewed. They both depend, in intermediate stages, on the idea that the results of certain unperformed experiments are physically determinate. The second argument is entangled also with the problem of the meaning of physical reality. A new argument having neither of these characteristics is constructed. It is based strictly on the orthodox ideas of Bohr and Heisenberg,more » and has no realistic elements, or other ingredients, that are alien to orthodox quantum thinking.« less

  17. Machine Learning Force Field Parameters from Ab Initio Data

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Li, Hui; Pickard, Frank C.

    Machine learning (ML) techniques with the genetic algorithm (GA) have been applied to determine a polarizable force field parameters using only ab initio data from quantum mechanics (QM) calculations of molecular clusters at the MP2/6-31G(d,p), DFMP2(fc)/jul-cc-pVDZ, and DFMP2(fc)/jul-cc-pVTZ levels to predict experimental condensed phase properties (i.e., density and heat of vaporization). The performance of this ML/GA approach is demonstrated on 4943 dimer electrostatic potentials and 1250 cluster interaction energies for methanol. Excellent agreement between the training data set from QM calculations and the optimized force field model was achieved. The results were further improved by introducing an offset factor duringmore » the machine learning process to compensate for the discrepancy between the QM calculated energy and the energy reproduced by optimized force field, while maintaining the local “shape” of the QM energy surface. Throughout the machine learning process, experimental observables were not involved in the objective function, but were only used for model validation. The best model, optimized from the QM data at the DFMP2(fc)/jul-cc-pVTZ level, appears to perform even better than the original AMOEBA force field (amoeba09.prm), which was optimized empirically to match liquid properties. The present effort shows the possibility of using machine learning techniques to develop descriptive polarizable force field using only QM data. The ML/GA strategy to optimize force fields parameters described here could easily be extended to other molecular systems.« less

  18. Optical properties of highly compressed polystyrene: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Colgan, J. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kilcrease, D. P.

    2017-10-01

    Using all-electron density functional theory, we have performed an ab initio study on x-ray absorption spectra of highly compressed polystyrene (CH). We found that the K -edge shifts in strongly coupled, degenerate polystyrene cannot be explained by existing continuum-lowering models adopted in traditional plasma physics. To gain insights into the K -edge shift in warm, dense CH, we have developed a model designated as "single mixture in a box" (SMIAB), which incorporates both the lowering of the continuum and the rising of the Fermi surface resulting from high compression. This simple SMIAB model correctly predicts the K -edge shift of carbon in highly compressed CH in good agreement with results from quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations. Traditional opacity models failed to give the proper K -edge shifts as the CH density increased. Based on QMD calculations, we have established a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) for CH in a wide range of densities and temperatures [ρ =0.1 -100 g /c m3 and T =2000 -1 000 000 K ]. The FPOT gives much higher Rosseland mean opacity compared to the cold-opacity-patched astrophysics opacity table for warm, dense CH and favorably compares to the newly improved Los Alamos atomic model for moderately compressed CH (ρCH≤10 g /c m3 ), but remains a factor of 2 to 3 higher at extremely high densities (ρCH≥50 g /c m3 ). We anticipate the established FPOT of CH will find important applications to reliable designs of high-energy-density experiments. Moreover, the understanding of K -edge shifting revealed in this study could provide guides for improving the traditional opacity models to properly handle the strongly coupled and degenerate conditions.

  19. Optical properties of highly compressed polystyrene: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Colgan, J. P.

    Using all-electron density functional theory, we have performed an ab initio study on x ray absorption spectra of highly compressed polystyrene (CH). Here, we found that the K-edge shifts in strongly coupled, degenerate polystyrene cannot be explained by existing continuum-lowering models adopted in traditional plasma physics. To gain insights into the K edge shift in warm, dense CH, we have developed a model designated as “single-mixture-in-a-box” (SMIAB), which incorporates both the lowering of continuum and the rising of Fermi surface resulting from high compression. This simple SMIAB model correctly predicts the K-edge shift of carbon in highly compressed CH inmore » good agreement with results from quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) calculations. Traditional opacity models failed to give the proper K-edge shifts as the CH density increased. Based on QMD calculations, we have established a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) for CH in a wide range of densities and temperatures [p = 0.1 to 100 g/cm 3 and T = 2000 to 1,000,000 K]. The FPOT gives much higher Rosseland mean opacity compared to the cold-opacity–patched astrophysics opacity table for warm, dense CH and favorably compares to the newly improved Los Alamos ATOMIC model for moderately compressed CH (pCH ≤10 g/cm 3) but remains a factor of 2 to 3 higher at extremely high densities (pCH ≥ 50 g/cm 3). We anticipate the established FPOT of CH will find important applications to reliable designs of high-energy-density experiments. Moreover, the understanding of K-edge shifting revealed in this study could provide guides for improving the traditional opacity models to properly handle the strongly coupled and degenerate conditions.« less

  20. Optical properties of highly compressed polystyrene: An ab initio study

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Colgan, J. P.; ...

    2017-10-16

    Using all-electron density functional theory, we have performed an ab initio study on x ray absorption spectra of highly compressed polystyrene (CH). Here, we found that the K-edge shifts in strongly coupled, degenerate polystyrene cannot be explained by existing continuum-lowering models adopted in traditional plasma physics. To gain insights into the K edge shift in warm, dense CH, we have developed a model designated as “single-mixture-in-a-box” (SMIAB), which incorporates both the lowering of continuum and the rising of Fermi surface resulting from high compression. This simple SMIAB model correctly predicts the K-edge shift of carbon in highly compressed CH inmore » good agreement with results from quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) calculations. Traditional opacity models failed to give the proper K-edge shifts as the CH density increased. Based on QMD calculations, we have established a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) for CH in a wide range of densities and temperatures [p = 0.1 to 100 g/cm 3 and T = 2000 to 1,000,000 K]. The FPOT gives much higher Rosseland mean opacity compared to the cold-opacity–patched astrophysics opacity table for warm, dense CH and favorably compares to the newly improved Los Alamos ATOMIC model for moderately compressed CH (pCH ≤10 g/cm 3) but remains a factor of 2 to 3 higher at extremely high densities (pCH ≥ 50 g/cm 3). We anticipate the established FPOT of CH will find important applications to reliable designs of high-energy-density experiments. Moreover, the understanding of K-edge shifting revealed in this study could provide guides for improving the traditional opacity models to properly handle the strongly coupled and degenerate conditions.« less

  1. Ab initio kinetics of gas phase decomposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2010-12-09

    The thermal and kinetic aspects of gas phase decomposition reactions can be extremely complex due to a large number of parameters, a variety of possible intermediates, and an overlap in thermal decomposition traces. The experimental determination of the activation energies is particularly difficult when several possible reaction pathways coexist in the thermal decomposition. Ab initio calculations intended to provide an interpretation of the experiment are often of little help if they produce only the activation barriers and ignore the kinetics of the decomposition process. To overcome this ambiguity, a theoretical study of a complete picture of gas phase thermo-decomposition, including reaction energies, activation barriers, and reaction rates, is illustrated with the example of the β-octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) molecule by means of quantum-chemical calculations. We study three types of major decomposition reactions characteristic of nitramines: the HONO elimination, the NONO rearrangement, and the N-NO(2) homolysis. The reaction rates were determined using the conventional transition state theory for the HONO and NONO decompositions and the variational transition state theory for the N-NO(2) homolysis. Our calculations show that the HMX decomposition process is more complex than it was previously believed to be and is defined by a combination of reactions at any given temperature. At all temperatures, the direct N-NO(2) homolysis prevails with the activation barrier at 38.1 kcal/mol. The nitro-nitrite isomerization and the HONO elimination, with the activation barriers at 46.3 and 39.4 kcal/mol, respectively, are slow reactions at all temperatures. The obtained conclusions provide a consistent interpretation for the reported experimental data.

  2. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A development of quantum theory that was initiated in the 1920s by Werner Heisenberg (1901-76) and Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961). The theory drew on a proposal made in 1925 Prince Louis de Broglie (1892-1987), that particles have wavelike properties (the wave-particle duality) and that an electron, for example, could in some respects be regarded as a wave with a wavelength that depended on its mo...

  3. Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    information representation and processing technology, although faster than the wheels and gears of the Charles Babbage computation machine, is still in...the same computational complexity class as the Babbage machine, with bits of information represented by entities which obey classical (non-quantum...nuclear double resonances Charles M Bowden and Jonathan P. Dowling Weapons Sciences Directorate, AMSMI-RD-WS-ST Missile Research, Development, and

  4. Experimental quantum forgery of quantum optical money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Chimczak, Grzegorz; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Unknown quantum information cannot be perfectly copied (cloned). This statement is the bedrock of quantum technologies and quantum cryptography, including the seminal scheme of Wiesner's quantum money, which was the first quantum-cryptographic proposal. Surprisingly, to our knowledge, quantum money has not been tested experimentally yet. Here, we experimentally revisit the Wiesner idea, assuming a banknote to be an image encoded in the polarization states of single photons. We demonstrate that it is possible to use quantum states to prepare a banknote that cannot be ideally copied without making the owner aware of only unauthorized actions. We provide the security conditions for quantum money by investigating the physically-achievable limits on the fidelity of 1-to-2 copying of arbitrary sequences of qubits. These results can be applied as a security measure in quantum digital right management.

  5. Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Quantum Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-06-01

    Quantum communication provides an absolute security advantage, and it has been widely developed over the past 30 years. As an important branch of quantum communication, quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) promotes high security and instantaneousness in communication through directly transmitting messages over a quantum channel. The full implementation of a quantum protocol always requires the ability to control the transfer of a message effectively in the time domain; thus, it is essential to combine QSDC with quantum memory to accomplish the communication task. In this Letter, we report the experimental demonstration of QSDC with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory for the first time in principle. We use the polarization degrees of freedom of photons as the information carrier, and the fidelity of entanglement decoding is verified as approximately 90%. Our work completes a fundamental step toward practical QSDC and demonstrates a potential application for long-distance quantum communication in a quantum network.

  6. Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Quantum Memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-06-02

    Quantum communication provides an absolute security advantage, and it has been widely developed over the past 30 years. As an important branch of quantum communication, quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) promotes high security and instantaneousness in communication through directly transmitting messages over a quantum channel. The full implementation of a quantum protocol always requires the ability to control the transfer of a message effectively in the time domain; thus, it is essential to combine QSDC with quantum memory to accomplish the communication task. In this Letter, we report the experimental demonstration of QSDC with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory for the first time in principle. We use the polarization degrees of freedom of photons as the information carrier, and the fidelity of entanglement decoding is verified as approximately 90%. Our work completes a fundamental step toward practical QSDC and demonstrates a potential application for long-distance quantum communication in a quantum network.

  7. Multiscale Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations with Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Wu, Jingheng; Yang, Weitao

    2016-10-11

    Molecular dynamics simulation with multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods is a very powerful tool for understanding the mechanism of chemical and biological processes in solution or enzymes. However, its computational cost can be too high for many biochemical systems because of the large number of ab initio QM calculations. Semiempirical QM/MM simulations have much higher efficiency. Its accuracy can be improved with a correction to reach the ab initio QM/MM level. The computational cost on the ab initio calculation for the correction determines the efficiency. In this paper we developed a neural network method for QM/MM calculation as an extension of the neural-network representation reported by Behler and Parrinello. With this approach, the potential energy of any configuration along the reaction path for a given QM/MM system can be predicted at the ab initio QM/MM level based on the semiempirical QM/MM simulations. We further applied this method to three reactions in water to calculate the free energy changes. The free-energy profile obtained from the semiempirical QM/MM simulation is corrected to the ab initio QM/MM level with the potential energies predicted with the constructed neural network. The results are in excellent accordance with the reference data that are obtained from the ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation or corrected with direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies. Compared with the correction using direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies, our method shows a speed-up of 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. It demonstrates that the neural network method combined with the semiempirical QM/MM calculation can be an efficient and reliable strategy for chemical reaction simulations.

  8. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties ofmore » a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo tunneling from quantum chemistry to quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    Quantum tunneling is ubiquitous across different fields, from quantum chemical reactions and magnetic materials to quantum simulators and quantum computers. While simulating the real-time quantum dynamics of tunneling is infeasible for high-dimensional systems, quantum tunneling also shows up in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, which aim to simulate quantum statistics with resources growing only polynomially with the system size. Here we extend the recent results obtained for quantum spin models [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 180402 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.180402], and we study continuous-variable models for proton transfer reactions. We demonstrate that QMC simulations efficiently recover the scaling of ground-state tunneling rates due to the existence of an instanton path, which always connects the reactant state with the product. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of quantum chemical reactions and quantum annealing, where quantum tunneling is expected to be a valuable resource for solving combinatorial optimization problems.

  10. Anti-GD2 mAbs and next-generation mAb-based agents for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perez Horta, Zulmarie; Goldberg, Jacob L; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated efficacy in the clinic, becoming an important approach for cancer immunotherapy. Due to its limited expression on normal tissue, the GD2 disialogangloside expressed on neuroblastoma cells is an excellent candidate for mAb therapy. In 2015, dinutuximab (an anti-GD2 mAb) was approved by the US FDA and is currently used in a combination immunotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Here, we review the extensive preclinical and clinical development of anti-GD2 mAbs and the different mechanisms by which they mediate tumor cell killing. In addition, we discuss different mAb-based strategies that capitalize on the targeting ability of anti-GD2 mAbs to potentially deliver, as monotherapy, or in combination with other treatments, improved antitumor efficacy. PMID:27485082

  11. Quantum Computer Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermin, N. David

    2007-08-01

    Preface; 1. Cbits and Qbits; 2. General features and some simple examples; 3. Breaking RSA encryption with a quantum computer; 4. Searching with a quantum computer; 5. Quantum error correction; 6. Protocols that use just a few Qbits; Appendices; Index.

  12. Quantum coherence and correlations in quantum system

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Zhengjun; Li, Yongming; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Criteria of measure quantifying quantum coherence, a unique property of quantum system, are proposed recently. In this paper, we first give an uncertainty-like expression relating the coherence and the entropy of quantum system. This finding allows us to discuss the relations between the entanglement and the coherence. Further, we discuss in detail the relations among the coherence, the discord and the deficit in the bipartite quantum system. We show that, the one-way quantum deficit is equal to the sum between quantum discord and the relative entropy of coherence of measured subsystem. PMID:26094795

  13. Quantum probability and quantum decision-making.

    PubMed

    Yukalov, V I; Sornette, D

    2016-01-13

    A rigorous general definition of quantum probability is given, which is valid not only for elementary events but also for composite events, for operationally testable measurements as well as for inconclusive measurements, and also for non-commuting observables in addition to commutative observables. Our proposed definition of quantum probability makes it possible to describe quantum measurements and quantum decision-making on the same common mathematical footing. Conditions are formulated for the case when quantum decision theory reduces to its classical counterpart and for the situation where the use of quantum decision theory is necessary. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. QUANTUM: The Exhibition - quantum at the museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforest, Martin; Olano, Angela; Day-Hamilton, Tobi

    Distilling the essence of quantum phenomena, and how they are being harnessed to develop powerful quantum technologies, into a series of bite-sized, elementary-school-level pieces is what the scientific outreach team at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing was tasked with. QUANTUM: The Exhibition uses a series of informational panels, multimedia and interactive displays to introduce visitors to quantum phenomena and how they will revolutionize computing, information security and sensing. We'll discuss some of the approaches we took to convey the essence and impact of quantum mechanics and technologies to a lay audience while ensuring scientific accuracy.

  15. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  16. Ab Initio Optimized Effective Potentials for Real Molecules in Optical Cavities: Photon Contributions to the Molecular Ground State

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a simple scheme to efficiently compute photon exchange-correlation contributions due to the coupling to transversal photons as formulated in the newly developed quantum-electrodynamical density-functional theory (QEDFT).1−5 Our construction employs the optimized-effective potential (OEP) approach by means of the Sternheimer equation to avoid the explicit calculation of unoccupied states. We demonstrate the efficiency of the scheme by applying it to an exactly solvable GaAs quantum ring model system, a single azulene molecule, and chains of sodium dimers, all located in optical cavities and described in full real space. While the first example is a two-dimensional system and allows to benchmark the employed approximations, the latter two examples demonstrate that the correlated electron-photon interaction appreciably distorts the ground-state electronic structure of a real molecule. By using this scheme, we not only construct typical electronic observables, such as the electronic ground-state density, but also illustrate how photon observables, such as the photon number, and mixed electron-photon observables, for example, electron–photon correlation functions, become accessible in a density-functional theory (DFT) framework. This work constitutes the first three-dimensional ab initio calculation within the new QEDFT formalism and thus opens up a new computational route for the ab initio study of correlated electron–photon systems in quantum cavities. PMID:29594185

  17. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N., E-mail: molotkov@issp.ac.ru

    2011-03-15

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  18. From quantum coherence to quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuan; Mao, Yuanyuan; Luo, Shunlong

    2017-06-01

    In quantum mechanics, quantum coherence of a state relative to a quantum measurement can be identified with the quantumness that has to be destroyed by the measurement. In particular, quantum coherence of a bipartite state relative to a local quantum measurement encodes quantum correlations in the state. If one takes minimization with respect to the local measurements, then one is led to quantifiers which capture quantum correlations from the perspective of coherence. In this vein, quantum discord, which quantifies the minimal correlations that have to be destroyed by quantum measurements, can be identified as the minimal coherence, with the coherence measured by the relative entropy of coherence. To advocate and formulate this idea in a general context, we first review coherence relative to Lüders measurements which extends the notion of coherence relative to von Neumann measurements (or equivalently, orthonomal bases), and highlight the observation that quantum discord arises as minimal coherence through two prototypical examples. Then, we introduce some novel measures of quantum correlations in terms of coherence, illustrate them through examples, investigate their fundamental properties and implications, and indicate their applications to quantum metrology.

  19. Interference of quantum market strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan; Syska, Jacek

    2003-02-01

    Recent development in quantum computation and quantum information theory allows to extend the scope of game theory for the quantum world. The paper is devoted to the analysis of interference of quantum strategies in quantum market games.

  20. Ab Initio Reactive Computer Aided Molecular Design

    DOE PAGES

    Martínez, Todd J.

    2017-03-21

    Few would dispute that theoretical chemistry tools can now provide keen insights into chemical phenomena. Yet the holy grail of efficient and reliable prediction of complex reactivity has remained elusive. Fortunately, recent advances in electronic structure theory based on the concepts of both element- and rank-sparsity, coupled with the emergence of new highly parallel computer architectures, have led to a significant increase in the time and length scales which can be simulated using first principles molecular dynamics. This then opens the possibility of new discovery-based approaches to chemical reactivity, such as the recently proposed ab initio nanoreactor. Here, we arguemore » that due to these and other recent advances, the holy grail of computational discovery for complex chemical reactivity is rapidly coming within our reach.« less

  1. Ab Initio Reactive Computer Aided Molecular Design

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez, Todd J.

    Few would dispute that theoretical chemistry tools can now provide keen insights into chemical phenomena. Yet the holy grail of efficient and reliable prediction of complex reactivity has remained elusive. Fortunately, recent advances in electronic structure theory based on the concepts of both element- and rank-sparsity, coupled with the emergence of new highly parallel computer architectures, have led to a significant increase in the time and length scales which can be simulated using first principles molecular dynamics. This then opens the possibility of new discovery-based approaches to chemical reactivity, such as the recently proposed ab initio nanoreactor. Here, we arguemore » that due to these and other recent advances, the holy grail of computational discovery for complex chemical reactivity is rapidly coming within our reach.« less

  2. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; ...

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis frommore » primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.« less

  3. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis frommore » primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.« less

  4. i-PI: A Python interface for ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; More, Joshua; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2014-03-01

    Recent developments in path integral methodology have significantly reduced the computational expense of including quantum mechanical effects in the nuclear motion in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. However, the implementation of these developments requires a considerable programming effort, which has hindered their adoption. Here we describe i-PI, an interface written in Python that has been designed to minimise the effort required to bring state-of-the-art path integral techniques to an electronic structure program. While it is best suited to first principles calculations and path integral molecular dynamics, i-PI can also be used to perform classical molecular dynamics simulations, and can just as easily be interfaced with an empirical forcefield code. To give just one example of the many potential applications of the interface, we use it in conjunction with the CP2K electronic structure package to showcase the importance of nuclear quantum effects in high-pressure water. Catalogue identifier: AERN_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 138626 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3128618 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: Multiple architectures. Operating system: Linux, Mac OSX, Windows. RAM: Less than 256 Mb Classification: 7.7. External routines: NumPy Nature of problem: Bringing the latest developments in the modelling of nuclear quantum effects with path integral molecular dynamics to ab initio electronic structure programs with minimal implementational effort. Solution method: State-of-the-art path integral molecular dynamics techniques are implemented in a Python interface. Any electronic structure code can be patched to receive the atomic

  5. A permutationally invariant full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface for the abstraction and exchange channels of the H + CH{sub 4} system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun, E-mail: jli15@cqu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131; Chen, Jun

    2015-05-28

    We report a permutationally invariant global potential energy surface (PES) for the H + CH{sub 4} system based on ∼63 000 data points calculated at a high ab initio level (UCCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ) using the recently proposed permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method. The small fitting error (5.1 meV) indicates a faithful representation of the ab initio points over a large configuration space. The rate coefficients calculated on the PES using tunneling corrected transition-state theory and quasi-classical trajectory are found to agree well with the available experimental and previous quantum dynamical results. The calculated total reaction probabilities (J{sub tot} = 0) including themore » abstraction and exchange channels using the new potential by a reduced dimensional quantum dynamic method are essentially the same as those on the Xu-Chen-Zhang PES [Chin. J. Chem. Phys. 27, 373 (2014)].« less

  6. The accuracy of ab initio calculations without ab initio calculations for charged systems: Kriging predictions of atomistic properties for ions in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Davie, Stuart J.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2018-06-01

    Using the machine learning method kriging, we predict the energies of atoms in ion-water clusters, consisting of either Cl- or Na+ surrounded by a number of water molecules (i.e., without Na+Cl- interaction). These atomic energies are calculated following the topological energy partitioning method called Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQAs). Kriging predicts atomic properties (in this case IQA energies) by a model that has been trained over a small set of geometries with known property values. The results presented here are part of the development of an advanced type of force field, called FFLUX, which offers quantum mechanical information to molecular dynamics simulations without the limiting computational cost of ab initio calculations. The results reported for the prediction of the IQA components of the energy in the test set exhibit an accuracy of a few kJ/mol, corresponding to an average error of less than 5%, even when a large cluster of water molecules surrounding an ion is considered. Ions represent an important chemical system and this work shows that they can be correctly taken into account in the framework of the FFLUX force field.

  7. Quantum geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitrik, Oliverio; Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.

    2017-05-01

    The study of plate tectonic motion is important to generate theoretical models of the structure and dynamics of the Earth. In turn, understanding tectonic motion provides insight to develop sophisticated models that can be used for earthquake early warning systems and for nuclear forensics. Tectonic geodesy uses the position of a network of points on the surface of earth to determine the motion of tectonic plates and the deformation of the earths crust. GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar are commonly used techniques used in tectonic geodesy. In this paper we will describe the feasibility of interferometric synthetic aperture quantum radar and its theoretical performance for tectonic geodesy.

  8. Quantum Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhanov, V. F.

    2016-10-01

    In March 2013, following an accurate processing of available measurement data, the Planck Scientific Collaboration published the highest-resolution photograph ever of the early Universe when it was only a few hundred thousand years old. The photograph showed galactic seeds in sufficient detail to test some nontrivial theoretical predictions made more than thirty years ago. Most amazing was that all predictions were confirmed to be remarkably accurate. With no exaggeration, we may consider it established experimentally that quantum physics, which is normally assumed to be relevant on the atomic and subatomic scale, also works on the scale of the entire Universe, determining its structure with all its galaxies, stars, and planets.

  9. History of California's AB 1725 and Its Major Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Tab

    This paper addresses the history of California's Assembly Bill 1725 (AB 1725) legislation and describes its major provisions. Signed in 1988 by Governor George Deukmejian, AB 1725's focus is to emphasize the new role of California community colleges as postsecondary institutions committed to transferring students, offering remedial courses, and…

  10. 7 CFR Exhibits A-B to Subpart G... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false [Reserved] A Exhibits A-B to Subpart G to Part 1822 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS..., Procedures, and Authorizations Exhibits A-B to Subpart G to Part 1822 [Reserved] ...

  11. Towards Accurate Ab Initio Predictions of the Spectrum of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have carried out extensive ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of methane, and these results are used to compute vibrational energy levels. We include basis set extrapolations, core-valence correlation, relativistic effects, and Born- Oppenheimer breakdown terms in our calculations. Our ab initio predictions of the lowest lying levels are superb.

  12. 34 CFR Appendixes A-B to Part 682 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] A Appendixes A-B to Part 682 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Appendixes A-B to Part 682 [Reserved] ...

  13. IR Spectra of (HCOOH)2 and (DCOOH)2: Experiment, VSCF/VCI, and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Calculations Using Full-Dimensional Potential and Dipole Moment Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M

    2018-05-17

    We report quantum VSCF/VCI and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) calculations of the IR spectra of (HCOOH) 2 and (DCOOH) 2 , using full-dimensional, ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces (PES and DMS). These surfaces are fits, using permutationally invariant polynomials, to 13 475 ab initio CCSD(T)-F12a electronic energies and MP2 dipole moments. Here "AIMD" means using these ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces in the MD calculations. The VSCF/VCI calculations use all (24) normal modes for coupling, with a four-mode representation of the potential. The quantum spectra align well with jet-cooled and room-temperature experimental spectra over the spectral range 600-3600 cm -1 . Analyses of the complex O-H and C-H stretch bands are made based on the mixing of the VSCF/VCI basis functions. The comparisons of the AIMD IR spectra with both experimental and VSCF/VCI ones provide tests of the accuracy of the AIMD approach. These indicate good accuracy for simple bands but not for the complex O-H stretch band, which is upshifted from experimental and VSCF/VCI bands by roughly 300 cm -1 . In addition to testing the AIMD approach, the PES, DMS, and VSCF/VCI calculations for formic acid dimer provide opportunities for testing other methods to represent high-dimensional data and other methods that perform postharmonic vibrational calculations.

  14. Quantum Plasmonics: Quantum Information at the Nanoscale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-06

    journal. In total this project has thus far resulted in six journal articles. We are currently writing up an additional work, on direct quantum tomography...resulted in six journal articles. We are currently writing up an additional work, on direct quantum tomography on state entanglement in quantum

  15. Quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Luo, Shunlong; Mao, Yuanyuan

    2018-04-01

    We study quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics, where quantumness refers to the noncommutativity between the initial state and the evolving state. In terms of the commutator of the square roots of the initial state and the evolving state, we define a measure to quantify the quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics with respect to initial states. Quantumness-generating capability is absent in classical dynamics and hence is a fundamental characteristic of quantum dynamics. For qubit systems, we present an analytical form for this measure, by virtue of which we analyze several prototypical dynamics such as unitary dynamics, phase damping dynamics, amplitude damping dynamics, and random unitary dynamics (Pauli channels). Necessary and sufficient conditions for the monotonicity of quantumness-generating capability are also identified. Finally, we compare these conditions for the monotonicity of quantumness-generating capability with those for various Markovianities and illustrate that quantumness-generating capability and quantum Markovianity are closely related, although they capture different aspects of quantum dynamics.

  16. What is quantum in quantum randomness?

    PubMed

    Grangier, P; Auffèves, A

    2018-07-13

    It is often said that quantum and classical randomness are of different nature, the former being ontological and the latter epistemological. However, so far the question of 'What is quantum in quantum randomness?', i.e. what is the impact of quantization and discreteness on the nature of randomness, remains to be answered. In a first part, we make explicit the differences between quantum and classical randomness within a recently proposed ontology for quantum mechanics based on contextual objectivity. In this view, quantum randomness is the result of contextuality and quantization. We show that this approach strongly impacts the purposes of quantum theory as well as its areas of application. In particular, it challenges current programmes inspired by classical reductionism, aiming at the emergence of the classical world from a large number of quantum systems. In a second part, we analyse quantum physics and thermodynamics as theories of randomness, unveiling their mutual influences. We finally consider new technological applications of quantum randomness that have opened up in the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Foundations of quantum mechanics and their impact on contemporary society'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  17. Quantum Statistical Mechanics on a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raedt, H. D.; Hams, A. H.; Michielsen, K.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.

    We describe a quantum algorithm to compute the density of states and thermal equilibrium properties of quantum many-body systems. We present results obtained by running this algorithm on a software implementation of a 21-qubit quantum computer for the case of an antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on triangular lattices of different size.

  18. Quantum Steganography and Quantum Error-Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Bilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum error-correcting codes have been the cornerstone of research in quantum information science (QIS) for more than a decade. Without their conception, quantum computers would be a footnote in the history of science. When researchers embraced the idea that we live in a world where the effects of a noisy environment cannot completely be…

  19. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  20. Quantum Walk Schemes for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael S.

    Random walks are a powerful tool for the efficient implementation of algorithms in classical computation. Their quantum-mechanical analogues, called quantum walks, hold similar promise. Quantum walks provide a model of quantum computation that has recently been shown to be equivalent in power to the standard circuit model. As in the classical case, quantum walks take place on graphs and can undergo discrete or continuous evolution, though quantum evolution is unitary and therefore deterministic until a measurement is made. This thesis considers the usefulness of continuous-time quantum walks to quantum computation from the perspectives of both their fundamental power under various formulations, and their applicability in practical experiments. In one extant scheme, logical gates are effected by scattering processes. The results of an exhaustive search for single-qubit operations in this model are presented. It is shown that the number of distinct operations increases exponentially with the number of vertices in the scattering graph. A catalogue of all graphs on up to nine vertices that implement single-qubit unitaries at a specific set of momenta is included in an appendix. I develop a novel scheme for universal quantum computation called the discontinuous quantum walk, in which a continuous-time quantum walker takes discrete steps of evolution via perfect quantum state transfer through small 'widget' graphs. The discontinuous quantum-walk scheme requires an exponentially sized graph, as do prior discrete and continuous schemes. To eliminate the inefficient vertex resource requirement, a computation scheme based on multiple discontinuous walkers is presented. In this model, n interacting walkers inhabiting a graph with 2n vertices can implement an arbitrary quantum computation on an input of length n, an exponential savings over previous universal quantum walk schemes. This is the first quantum walk scheme that allows for the application of quantum error correction

  1. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provides a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  2. An ab initio study of ion induced charge transfer dynamics in collision of carbon ions with thymine.

    PubMed

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine; Tergiman, Yvette Suzanne

    2011-05-28

    Charge transfer in collisions of carbon ions on a thymine target has been studied theoretically in a wide collision range by means of ab initio quantum chemistry molecular methods. The process appears markedly anisotropic in the whole energy domain, significantly favoured in the perpendicular orientation. A specific decrease of the charge transfer cross sections at low collision energies may be pointed out and could induce an enhancement of the complementary fragmentation processes for collision energies down to about 10 eV, as observed for the low-electron fragmentation process. Such feature may be of important interest in ion-induced biomolecular radiation damage. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  3. Undoing Gender through Legislation and Schooling: The Case of AB 537 and AB 394 in California, USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools…

  4. Predicted phototoxicities of carbon nano-material by quantum mechanical calculations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research is to develop a predictive model for the phototoxicity potential of carbon nanomaterials (fullerenols and single-walled carbon nanotubes). This model is based on the quantum mechanical (ab initio) calculations on these carbon-based materials and compa...

  5. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  6. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stephen P; Lee, Keith S M; Preskill, John

    2012-06-01

    Quantum field theory reconciles quantum mechanics and special relativity, and plays a central role in many areas of physics. We developed a quantum algorithm to compute relativistic scattering probabilities in a massive quantum field theory with quartic self-interactions (φ(4) theory) in spacetime of four and fewer dimensions. Its run time is polynomial in the number of particles, their energy, and the desired precision, and applies at both weak and strong coupling. In the strong-coupling and high-precision regimes, our quantum algorithm achieves exponential speedup over the fastest known classical algorithm.

  7. Quantum State Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, Ian

    2005-10-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Brownian motion and Itô calculus; 3. Open quantum systems; 4. Quantum state diffusion; 5. Localisation; 6. Numerical methods and examples; 7. Quantum foundations; 8. Primary state diffusion; 9. Classical dynamics of quantum localisation; 10. Semiclassical theory and linear dynamics.

  8. Ab initio atomic recombination reaction energetics on model heat shield surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senese, Fredrick; Ake, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations on small hydration complexes involving the nitrate anion are reported. The self-consistent field method with accurate basis sets has been applied to compute completely optimized equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, thermochemical parameters, and stable site labilities of complexes involving 1, 2, and 3 waters. The most stable geometries in the first hydration shell involve in-plane waters bridging pairs of nitrate oxygens with two equal and bent hydrogen bonds. A second extremely labile local minimum involves out-of-plane waters with a single hydrogen bond and lies about 2 kcal/mol higher. The potential in the region of the second minimum is extremely flat and qualitatively sensitive to changes in the basis set; it does not correspond to a true equilibrium structure.

  9. reaxFF Reactive Force Field for Disulfide Mechanochemistry, Fitted to Multireference ab Initio Data.

    PubMed

    Müller, Julian; Hartke, Bernd

    2016-08-09

    Mechanochemistry, in particular in the form of single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments, is difficult to model theoretically, for two reasons: Covalent bond breaking is not captured accurately by single-determinant, single-reference quantum chemistry methods, and experimental times of milliseconds or longer are hard to simulate with any approach. Reactive force fields have the potential to alleviate both problems, as demonstrated in this work: Using nondeterministic global parameter optimization by evolutionary algorithms, we have fitted a reaxFF force field to high-level multireference ab initio data for disulfides. The resulting force field can be used to reliably model large, multifunctional mechanochemistry units with disulfide bonds as designed breaking points. Explorative calculations show that a significant part of the time scale gap between AFM experiments and dynamical simulations can be bridged with this approach.

  10. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A new N2-N2 rigid-rotor surface has been determined using extensive Ab Initio quantum chemistry calculations together with recent experimental data for the second virial coefficient. Rotational energy transfer is studied using the new potential energy surface (PES) employing the close coupling method below 200 cm(exp -1) and coupled state approximation above that. Comparing with a previous calculation based on the PES of van der Avoird et al.,3 it is found that the new PES generally gives larger cross sections for large (delta)J transitions, but for small (delta)J transitions the cross sections are either comparable or smaller. Correlation between the differences in the cross sections and the two PES will be attempted. The computed cross sections will also be compared with available experimental data.

  11. Ab Initio Vibrational Levels For HO2 and Vibrational Splittings for Hydrogen Atom Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, V. J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Hamilton, I. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate vibrational levels and wave functions for HO2 using the recently reported ab initio potential energy surface of Walch and Duchovic. There is intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer when the hydrogen atom tunnels through a T-shaped saddle point separating two equivalent equilibrium geometries, and correspondingly, the energy levels are split. We focus on vibrational levels and wave functions with significant splitting. The first three vibrational levels with splitting greater than 2/cm are (15 0), (0 7 1) and (0 8 0) where V(sub 2) is the O-O-H bend quantum number. We discuss the dynamics of hydrogen atom transfer; in particular, the O-O distances at which hydrogen atom transfer is most probable for these vibrational levels. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  12. Quantifying Ab Initio Equation of State Errors for Hydrogen-Helium Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Raymond; Morales, Miguel

    2017-06-01

    In order to produce predictive models of Jovian planets, an accurate equation of state for hydrogen-helium mixtures is needed over pressure and temperature ranges spanning multiple orders of magnitude. While extensive theoretical work has been done in this area, previous controversies regarding the equation of state of pure hydrogen have demonstrated exceptional sensitivity to approximations commonly employed in ab initio calculations. To this end, we present the results of our quantum Monte Carlo based benchmarking studies for several major classes of density functionals. Additionally, we expand upon our published results by considering the impact that ionic finite size effects and density functional errors translate to errors in the equation of state. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Ab initio perspective on the Mollwo-Ivey relation for F centers in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwald, Paul; Karsai, Ferenc; Laskowski, Robert; Gräfe, Stefanie; Blaha, Peter; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Wirtz, Ludger

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the well-known Mollwo-Ivey relation that describes the "universal" dependence of the absorption energies of F-type color centers on the lattice constant a of alkali-halide crystals, Eabs∝a-n. We perform both state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemistry and post-DFT calculations of F-center absorption spectra. By "tuning" independently the lattice constant and the atomic species we show that the scaling with the lattice constant alone (keeping the elements fixed) would yield n =2 in agreement with the "particle-in-the-box" model. Keeping the lattice constant fixed and changing the atomic species enables us to quantify the ion-size effects which are shown to be responsible for the exponent n ≈1.8 .

  14. Fully ab initio calculation of the resonant one-phonon Raman intensity of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Sven; Wirtz, Ludger

    We developed a fully ab initio, many-body perturbation theory approach for the calculation of resonant, one-phonon Raman spectra. Our general approach is applicable to any material and here we present its application to the case of graphene. Our diagrammatic, first-principles approach allows us to go beyond and improve on an earlier theoretical study by Basko, which relied on an analytical calculation in certain limits. We investigate the dependence of the G peak intensity on both the excitation energy and Fermi level. Furthermore, our method allows us to identify the relevant electronic quantum pathways and to demonstrate the importance of the contributions from non-resonant electronic transitions. We also applied our approach to the calculation of the resonant one-phonon Raman spectrum of MoS2, with our results being in good agreement with experimental data. SR acknowledges financial support from the National Research Fund (FNR) Luxembourg.

  15. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo; Mireles, Francisco

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a functionmore » of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.« less

  16. Quantum Chess: Making Quantum Phenomena Accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantwell, Christopher

    Quantum phenomena have remained largely inaccessible to the general public. There tends to be a scare factor associated with the word ``Quantum''. This is in large part due to the alien nature of phenomena such as superposition and entanglement. However, Quantum Computing is a very active area of research and one day we will have games that run on those quantum computers. Quantum phenomena such as superposition and entanglement will seem as normal as gravity. Is it possible to create such games today? Can we make games that are built on top of a realistic quantum simulation and introduce players of any background to quantum concepts in a fun and mentally stimulating way? One of the difficulties with any quantum simulation run on a classical computer is that the Hilbert space grows exponentially, making simulations of an appreciable size physically impossible due largely to memory restrictions. Here we will discuss the conception and development of Quantum Chess, and how to overcome some of the difficulties faced. We can then ask the question, ``What's next?'' What are some of the difficulties Quantum Chess still faces, and what is the future of quantum games?

  17. Spins and photons: connecting quantum registers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Lily

    2012-06-01

    Long-lived electronic and nuclear spin states have made the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond a leading candidate for quantum information processing in the solid state. Multi-qubit quantum registers formed by single defects and nearby nuclear spins can currently be controlled and detected with high fidelity. Nevertheless, development of coherent connections between distant NVs remains an outstanding challenge. One advantage to working with solid-state defects is the opportunity to integrate them with microfabricated mechanical, electronic, or optical devices; in principle, such devices could mediate interactions between registers, turning them into nodes within a larger quantum network. In the last few months, several experiments have made key steps toward realizing a coherent quantum interface between individual NV centers using a mechanical quantum bus [1] or optical channels [2,3]. This talk will explore the current state of the art, and report on recent observation of two photon quantum interference between different gate-tunable defect centers [2]. These results pave the way towards measurement-based entanglement between remote NV centers and the realization of quantum networks with solid-state spins.[4pt] [1] Kolkowitz et al., Science 335, 1603 (2012)[2] Bernien et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 043604 (2012)[3] Sipahigil et al., http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/1112.3975

  18. Quantum key management

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  19. Lead selenide quantum dot polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Dennis L.; Preske, Amanda; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Krauss, Todd D.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-01

    Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) in an Angstrom Bond AB9093 epoxy polymer matrix to form a nanocomposite were investigated. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported use of AB9093 as a QD matrix material and it was shown to out-perform the more common poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix in terms of preserving the optical properties of the QD, resulting in the first reported quantum yield (QY) for PbSe QDs in a polymer matrix, 26%. The 1-s first excitonic absorption peak of the QDs in a polymer matrix red shifted 65 nm in wavelength compared to QDs in a hexane solution, while the emission peak in the polymer matrix red shifted by 38 nm. The fluorescence QY dropped from 55% in hexane to 26% in the polymer matrix. A time resolved fluorescence study of the QDs showed single exponential lifetimes of 2.34 and 1.34 μs in toluene solution and the polymer matrix respectively.

  20. A general method for constructing multidimensional molecular potential energy surfaces from {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.; Rabitz, H.

    1996-02-01

    A general interpolation method for constructing smooth molecular potential energy surfaces (PES{close_quote}s) from {ital ab} {ital initio} data are proposed within the framework of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space and the inverse problem theory. The general expression for an {ital a} {ital posteriori} error bound of the constructed PES is derived. It is shown that the method yields globally smooth potential energy surfaces that are continuous and possess derivatives up to second order or higher. Moreover, the method is amenable to correct symmetry properties and asymptotic behavior of the molecular system. Finally, the method is generic and can be easilymore » extended from low dimensional problems involving two and three atoms to high dimensional problems involving four or more atoms. Basic properties of the method are illustrated by the construction of a one-dimensional potential energy curve of the He{endash}He van der Waals dimer using the exact quantum Monte Carlo calculations of Anderson {ital et} {ital al}. [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 99}, 345 (1993)], a two-dimensional potential energy surface of the HeCO van der Waals molecule using recent {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations by Tao {ital et} {ital al}. [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 101}, 8680 (1994)], and a three-dimensional potential energy surface of the H{sup +}{sub 3} molecular ion using highly accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations of R{umlt o}hse {ital et} {ital al}. [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 101}, 2231 (1994)]. In the first two cases the constructed potentials clearly exhibit the correct asymptotic forms, while in the last case the constructed potential energy surface is in excellent agreement with that constructed by R{umlt o}hse {ital et} {ital al}. using a low order polynomial fitting procedure. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}« less

  1. Optimization of Antibiotic Use in Hospitals – Antimicrobial Stewardship and the EU Project ABS International

    PubMed Central

    Allerberger, Franz; Lechner, Arno; Wechsler-Fördös, Agnes; Gareis, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Background The problem of antimicrobial resistance requires common strategies at the European level. Methods We report on an EU initiative fostering antibiotic (AB) stewardship (ABS) in hospitals. Results The project ‘ABS International: implementing antibiotic strategies for appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals in member states of the EU’ started in September 2006 in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia. A training program for national ABS trainers was prepared and standard templates for ABS tools (AB list, guidelines for AB treatment and surgical prophylaxis, and AB-related organization) and valid process measures as well as quality indicators for AB use were developed. Specific ABS tools are being implemented in up to five health care facilities per country. Conclusion ABS International is the first EU-funded initiative focusing on the implementation of structural measures in hospitals to promote the prudent use of ABs. PMID:18667815

  2. Structural and Biophysical Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1

    PubMed Central

    Kelker, Matthew S.; Berry, Colin; Evans, Steven L.; Pai, Reetal; McCaskill, David G.; Wang, Nick X.; Russell, Joshua C.; Baker, Matthew D.; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, J. W.; Wade, Matthew; Wess, Tim J.; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains are well known for the production of insecticidal proteins upon sporulation and these proteins are deposited in parasporal crystalline inclusions. The majority of these insect-specific toxins exhibit three domains in the mature toxin sequence. However, other Cry toxins are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated to this three-domain family and little is known of their three dimensional structures, limiting our understanding of their mechanisms of action and our ability to engineer the proteins to enhance their function. Among the non-three domain Cry toxins, the Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins from B. thuringiensis strain PS149B1 are required to act together to produce toxicity to the western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte via a pore forming mechanism of action. Cry34Ab1 is a protein of ∼14 kDa with features of the aegerolysin family (Pfam06355) of proteins that have known membrane disrupting activity, while Cry35Ab1 is a ∼44 kDa member of the toxin_10 family (Pfam05431) that includes other insecticidal proteins such as the binary toxin BinA/BinB. The Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins represent an important seed trait technology having been developed as insect resistance traits in commercialized corn hybrids for control of WCR. The structures of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 have been elucidated to 2.15 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The solution structures of the toxins were further studied by small angle X-ray scattering and native electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. We present here the first published structure from the aegerolysin protein domain family and the structural comparisons of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 with other pore forming toxins. PMID:25390338

  3. Ab Initio Values of the Thermophysical Properties of Helium as Standards

    PubMed Central

    Hurly, John J.; Moldover, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent quantum mechanical calculations of the interaction energy of pairs of helium atoms are accurate and some include reliable estimates of their uncertainty. We combined these ab initio results with earlier published results to obtain a helium-helium interatomic potential that includes relativistic retardation effects over all ranges of interaction. From this potential, we calculated the thermophysical properties of helium, i.e., the second virial coefficients, the dilute-gas viscosities, and the dilute-gas thermal conductivities of 3He, 4He, and their equimolar mixture from 1 K to 104 K. We also calculated the diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients of mixtures of 3He and 4He. For the pure fluids, the uncertainties of the calculated values are dominated by the uncertainties of the potential; for the mixtures, the uncertainties of the transport properties also include contributions from approximations in the transport theory. In all cases, the uncertainties are smaller than the corresponding experimental uncertainties; therefore, we recommend the ab initio results be used as standards for calibrating instruments relying on these thermophysical properties. We present the calculated thermophysical properties in easy-to-use tabular form. PMID:27551630

  4. Towards an ab-initio treatment of nonlocal electronic correlations with dynamical vertex approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Anna; Gunacker, Patrik; Tomczak, Jan; Thunström, Patrik; Held, Karsten

    Recently, approaches such as the dynamical vertex approximation (D ΓA) or the dual-fermion method have been developed. These diagrammatic approaches are going beyond dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) by including nonlocal electronic correlations on all length scales as well as the local DMFT correlations. Here we present our efforts to extend the D ΓA methodology to ab-initio materials calculations (ab-initio D ΓA). Our approach is a unifying framework which includes both GW and DMFT-type of diagrams, but also important nonlocal correlations beyond, e.g. nonlocal spin fluctuations. In our multi-band implementation we are using a worm sampling technique within continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo in the hybridization expansion to obtain the DMFT vertex, from which we construct the reducible vertex function using the two particle-hole ladders. As a first application we show results for transition metal oxides. Support by the ERC project AbinitioDGA (306447) is acknowledged.

  5. Vibrational inelastic and charge transfer processes in H++H2 system: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaran, Saieswari; Kumar, Sanjay

    2007-12-01

    State-resolved differential cross sections, total and integral cross sections, average vibrational energy transfer, and the relative probabilities are computed for the H++H2 system using the newly obtained ab initio potential energy surfaces at the full CI/cc-pVQZ level of accuracy which allow for both the direct vibrational inelastic and the charge transfer processes. The quantum dynamics is treated within the vibrational close-coupling infinite-order-sudden approximation approach using the two ab initio quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces. The computed collision attributes for both the processes are compared with the available state-to-state scattering experiments at Ec.m.=20eV. The results are in overall good agreement with most of the observed scattering features such as rainbow positions, integral cross sections, and relative vibrational energy transfers. A comparison with the earlier theoretical study carried out on the semiempirical surfaces (diatomics in molecules) is also made to illustrate the reliability of the potential energy surfaces used in the present work.

  6. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces and the Calculation of Accurate Vibrational Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Due to advances in quantum mechanical methods over the last few years, it is now possible to determine ab initio potential energy surfaces in which fundamental vibrational frequencies are accurate to within plus or minus 8 cm(exp -1) on average, and molecular bond distances are accurate to within plus or minus 0.001-0.003 Angstroms, depending on the nature of the bond. That is, the potential energy surfaces have not been scaled or empirically adjusted in any way, showing that theoretical methods have progressed to the point of being useful in analyzing spectra that are not from a tightly controlled laboratory environment, such as vibrational spectra from the interstellar medium. Some recent examples demonstrating this accuracy will be presented and discussed. These include the HNO, CH4, C2H4, and ClCN molecules. The HNO molecule is interesting due to the very large H-N anharmonicity, while ClCN has a very large Fermi resonance. The ab initio studies for the CH4 and C2H4 molecules present the first accurate full quartic force fields of any kind (i.e., whether theoretical or empirical) for a five-atom and six-atom system, respectively.

  7. Ab Initio Calculation of Accurate Vibrational Frequencies for Molecules of Interest in Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Due to advances in quantum mechanical methods over the last few years, it is now possible to determine ab initio potential energy surfaces in which fundamental vibrational frequencies are accurate to within +/- 8 cm(sup -1) on average, and molecular bond distances are accurate to within +/- 0.001-0.003 A, depending on the nature of the bond. That is, the potential energy surfaces have not been scaled or empirically adjusted in any way, showing that theoretical methods have progressed to the point of being useful in analyzing spectra that are not from a tightly controlled laboratory environment, such as rovibrational spectra from the interstellar medium. Some recent examples demonstrating this accuracy win be presented and discussed. These include the HNO, CH4, C2H4, and ClCN molecules. The HNO molecule is interesting due to the very large H-N anharmonicity, while ClCN has a very large Fermi resonance. The ab initio studies for the CH4 and C2H4 molecules present the first accurate full quartic force fields of any kind (i.e., whether theoretical or empirical) for a five-atom and six-atom system, respectively.

  8. Ab initio study of Pd carbonyls and CO/Pd(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, R.; Glassford, K.M.; Adams, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon monoxide chemisorption on transition metal surfaces has been one of the most extensively studied in surface science in past years due to its importance in a variety of catalytic processes, especially, automotive catalytic converters using Pt or Pd. The authors have performed ab initio studies to understand the electronic and geometric aspects of the Pd-CO bond in small carbonyl clusters and the CO covered (2 x 1)p2mg superstructure of the Pd(110) surface. They have used the standard quantum chemistry package Gaussian to study the former system and a LDA (local density approximation) formalism using ab initio pseudopotentials and amore » plane wave basis to study the latter. The latter results are preliminary; the authors intended to study thicker slabs in the future. The organization of the paper is as follows. The authors describe the methods used in their calculation in Sec. 2. In Sec. 3, they present results and discussion; here, they first look at the smallest possible clusters, viz, Pd{sub 2} and PdCO, take a brief look at the orbital chemistry involved and then move on to the study of the CO covered Pd(110) surface and examine the geometry of the near equilibrium structure.« less

  9. Andreev bound states probed in three-terminal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramich, J.; Baumgartner, A.; Schönenberger, C.

    2017-11-01

    Andreev bound states (ABSs) are well-defined many-body quantum states that emerge from the hybridization of individual quantum dot (QD) states with a superconductor and exhibit very rich and fundamental phenomena. We demonstrate several electron transport phenomena mediated by ABSs that form on three-terminal carbon nanotube (CNT) QDs, with one superconducting (S) contact in the center and two adjacent normal-metal (N) contacts. Three-terminal spectroscopy allows us to identify the coupling to the N contacts as the origin of the Andreev resonance (AR) linewidths and to determine the critical coupling strengths to S, for which a ground state (or quantum phase) transition in such S-QD systems can occur. In addition, we ascribe replicas of the lowest-energy ABS resonance to transitions between the ABS and odd-parity excited QD states, a process we call excited state ABS resonances. In the conductance between the two N contacts we find a characteristic pattern of positive and negative differential subgap conductance, which we explain by considering two nonlocal processes, the creation of Cooper pairs in S by electrons from both N terminals, and a transport mechanism we call resonant ABS tunneling, possible only in multiterminal QD devices. In the latter process, electrons are transferred via the ABS without effectively creating Cooper pairs in S. The three-terminal geometry also allows spectroscopy experiments with different boundary conditions, for example by leaving S floating. Surprisingly, we find that, depending on the boundary conditions and the device parameters, the experiments either show single-particle Coulomb blockade resonances, ABS characteristics, or both in the same measurements, seemingly contradicting the notion of ABSs replacing the single-particle states as eigenstates of the QD. We qualitatively explain these results as originating from the finite time scale required for the coherent oscillations between the superposition states after a single

  10. N-H stretching modes of adenosine monomer in solution studied by ultrafast nonlinear infrared spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Greve, Christian; Preketes, Nicholas K; Costard, Rene; Koeppe, Benjamin; Fidder, Henk; Nibbering, Erik T J; Temps, Friedrich; Mukamel, Shaul; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-07-26

    The N-H stretching vibrations of adenine, one of the building blocks of DNA, are studied by combining infrared absorption and nonlinear two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy with ab initio calculations. We determine diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities of N-H stretching vibrations in chemically modified adenosine monomer dissolved in chloroform. For the single-quantum excitation manifold, the normal mode picture with symmetric and asymmetric NH(2) stretching vibrations is fully appropriate. For the two-quantum excitation manifold, however, the interplay between intermode coupling and frequency shifts due to a large diagonal anharmonicity leads to a situation where strong mixing does not occur. We compare our findings with previously reported values obtained on overtone spectroscopy of coupled hydrogen stretching oscillators.

  11. Quantum Optical Implementations of Quantum Computing and Quantum Informatics Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-20

    4, 2005. ) 14. M. 0. Scully, "The EPR Paradox Revisted", AMO Physics Seminar, TAMU Jan. 18, 2005. 15. M. S. Zubairy, "Quantum computing: Cavity QED...the EPR dispersion relation and the average photon number. We have shown that atomic coherence is the key to the development of such a laser. In...PRISM-TAMU Symposium on Quantum Material Science, Princeton University, February 21-22, 2005. ) 21. M. 0. Scully, "From EPR to quantum eraser: The Role

  12. quantum mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    -symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on -symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a -symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathe- matics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter–antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of -synthetic materials are being developed, and the phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of -symmetric quantum mechanics. PMID:23509390

  13. SdAb heterodimer formation using leucine zippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Ellen R.; Anderson, George P.; Brozozog-Lee, P. Audrey; Zabetakis, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAb) are variable domains cloned from camel, llama, or shark heavy chain only antibodies, and are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments. SdAb derived from immunized llamas are able to bind antigens with high affinity, and most are capable of refolding after heat or chemical denaturation to bind antigen again. We hypothesized that the ability to produce heterodimeric sdAb would enable reagents with the robust characteristics of component sdAb, but with dramatically improved overall affinity through increased avidity. Previously we had constructed multimeric sdAb by genetically linking sdAb that bind non-overlapping epitopes on the toxin, ricin. In this work we explored a more flexible approach; the construction of multivalent binding reagents using multimerization domains. We expressed anti-ricin sdAb that recognize different epitopes on the toxin as fusions with differently charged leucine zippers. When the initially produced homodimers are mixed the leucine zipper domains will pair to produce heterodimers. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to confirm heterodimer formation. Surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, and fluid array assays were used to characterize the multimer constructs, and evaluate their utility in toxin detection.

  14. Ab initio gene identification in metagenomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhan; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark

    2010-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for gene identification in DNA sequences derived from shotgun sequencing of microbial communities. Accurate ab initio gene prediction in a short nucleotide sequence of anonymous origin is hampered by uncertainty in model parameters. While several machine learning approaches could be proposed to bypass this difficulty, one effective method is to estimate parameters from dependencies, formed in evolution, between frequencies of oligonucleotides in protein-coding regions and genome nucleotide composition. Original version of the method was proposed in 1999 and has been used since for (i) reconstructing codon frequency vector needed for gene finding in viral genomes and (ii) initializing parameters of self-training gene finding algorithms. With advent of new prokaryotic genomes en masse it became possible to enhance the original approach by using direct polynomial and logistic approximations of oligonucleotide frequencies, as well as by separating models for bacteria and archaea. These advances have increased the accuracy of model reconstruction and, subsequently, gene prediction. We describe the refined method and assess its accuracy on known prokaryotic genomes split into short sequences. Also, we show that as a result of application of the new method, several thousands of new genes could be added to existing annotations of several human and mouse gut metagenomes. PMID:20403810

  15. Ab initio simulations of molten Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Christopher; Asta, Mark; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Lill, James; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2010-06-01

    Convective instabilities responsible for misoriented grains in directionally solidified turbine airfoils are produced by variations in liquid-metal density with composition and temperature across the solidification zone. Here, fundamental properties of molten Ni-based alloys, required for modeling these instabilities, are calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Equations of state are derived from constant number-volume-temperature ensembles at 1830 and 1750 K for elemental, binary (Ni-X, X=Al, W, Re, and Ta) and ternary (Ni-Al-X, X=W, Re, and Ta) Ni alloys. Calculated molar volumes agree to within 0.6%-1.8% of available measurements. Predictions are used to investigate the range of accuracy of a parameterization of molar volumes with composition and temperature based on measurements of binary alloys. Structural analysis reveals a pronounced tendency for icosahedral short-range order for Ni-W and Ni-Re alloys and the calculations provide estimates of diffusion rates and their dependence on compositions and temperature.

  16. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  17. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  18. Multichannel-quantum-defect-theory treatment of preionized and predissociated triplet gerade levels of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzkin, A.; Jungen, Ch.; Ross, S. C.

    2000-12-01

    Multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) is used to calculate highly excited predissociated and preionized triplet gerade states of H2. The treatment is ab initio and is based on the clamped-nuclei quantum-defect matrices and dipole transition moments derived from quantum-chemical potential energy curves by Ross et al. [Can. J. Phys. (to be published)]. Level positions, predissociation or preionization widths and relative intensities are found to be in good agreement with those observed by Lembo et al. [Phys. Rev. A 38, 3447 (1988); J. Chem. Phys. 92, 2219 (1990)] by an optical-optical double resonance photoionization or depletion technique.

  19. [Find your way in the jungle of mAbs].

    PubMed

    Watier, H

    2017-09-01

    The rapidly increasing number of approved monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and the huge number of mAbs in clinical development are a matter of concern for who wants to easily identify targets, indications, mechanisms of action and possible adverse effects. The current nomenclature being of limited interest, simple rationales will be presented for helping practitioners in rapidly classify mAbs depending on their structure-pharmacology relationship and in evaluating their potential effects, particularly in transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Kidney allotransplantation from the AB0-incompatible donors].

    PubMed

    Goriaĭnov, V A; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N; Shishlo, L A; Morozova, M M; Ragimov, A A; Dazhkova, N G; Salimov, E L

    2013-01-01

    The experience of 28 kidney allotransplantations from the AB0-incompatible donors was analyzed. The comparative group consisted of 38 patients, who received the AB0-compatible organ. The results were assessed using the following parameters: renal function, morphology of the biopsy samples of the transplanted kidney and actuary survival of the recipients with functioning transplants in both groups. The comparative analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups, giving the right to consider the kidney allotransplantation from the AB0-incompatible donors safe and effective.

  1. Quantum optics, cavity QED, and quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Quantum optomechanics provides a universal tool to achieve the quantum control of mechanical motion. It does that in devices spanning a vast range of parameters, with mechanical frequencies from a few Hertz to GHz, and with masses from 10-20 g to several kilos. Its underlying ideas can be traced back to the study of gravitational wave antennas, quantum optics, cavity QED and laser cooling which, when combined with the recent availability of advanced micromechanical and nanomechanical devices, opens a path to the realization of macroscopic mechanical systems that operate deep in the quantum regime. At the fundamental level this development paves the way to experiments that will lead to a more profound understanding of quantum mechanics; and from the point of view of applications, quantum optomechanical techniques will provide motion and force sensing near the fundamental limit imposed by quantum mechanics (quantum metrology) and significantly expand the toolbox of quantum information science. After a brief summary of key historical developments, the talk will give a broad overview of the current state of the art of quantum optomechanics, and comment on future prospects both in applied and in fundamental science. Work supported by NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuASAR and ORCHID programs.

  2. Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    The universe, ultimately, is to be described by quantum theory. Quantum aspects of all there is, including space and time, may not be significant for many purposes, but are crucial for some. And so a quantum description of cosmology is required for a complete and consistent worldview. At any rate, even if we were not directly interested in regimes where quantum cosmology plays a role, a complete physical description could not stop at a stage before the whole universe is reached. Quantum theory is essential in the microphysics of particles, atoms, molecules, solids, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Why should one expect this ladder of scales to end at a certain size? If regimes are sufficiently violent and energetic, quantum effects are non-negligible even on scales of the whole cosmos; this is realized at least once in the history of the universe: at the big bang where the classical theory of general relativity would make energy densities diverge. 1.Lachieze-Rey, M., Luminet, J.P.: Phys. Rept. 254,135 (1995), gr-qc/9605010 2.BSDeWitt1967Phys. Rev.160511131967PhRv..160.1113D0158.4650410.1103/PhysRev.160.1113DeWitt, B.S.: Phys. Rev. 160(5), 1113 (1967) 3.Wiltshire, D.L.: In: Robson B., Visvanathan N., Woolcock W.S. (eds.) Cosmology: The Physics of the Universe, pp. 473-531. World Scientific, Singapore (1996

  3. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-07-15

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks.

  4. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks. PMID:26173556

  5. Reliable quantum communication over a quantum relay channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo, E-mail: gyongyosi@hit.bme.hu; Imre, Sandor

    2014-12-04

    We show that reliable quantum communication over an unreliable quantum relay channels is possible. The coding scheme combines the results on the superadditivity of quantum channels and the efficient quantum coding approaches.

  6. Entanglement entropy of 2D conformal quantum critical points: hearing the shape of a quantum drum.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Moore, Joel E

    2006-08-04

    The entanglement entropy of a pure quantum state of a bipartite system A union or logical sumB is defined as the von Neumann entropy of the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over one of the two parts. In one dimension, the entanglement of critical ground states diverges logarithmically in the subsystem size, with a universal coefficient that for conformally invariant critical points is related to the central charge of the conformal field theory. We find that the entanglement entropy of a standard class of z=2 conformal quantum critical points in two spatial dimensions, in addition to a nonuniversal "area law" contribution linear in the size of the AB boundary, generically has a universal logarithmically divergent correction, which is completely determined by the geometry of the partition and by the central charge of the field theory that describes the critical wave function.

  7. Revealing strategies of quorum sensing in Azospirillum brasilense strains Ab-V5 and Ab-V6.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Josiane; Abrantes, Julia Laura Fernandes; Del Cerro, Pablo; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Megías, Manuel; Hungria, Mariangela

    2018-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is an important plant-growth promoting bacterium (PGPB) that requires several critical steps for root colonization, including biofilm and exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis and cell motility. In several bacteria these mechanisms are mediated by quorum sensing (QS) systems that regulate the expression of specific genes mediated by the autoinducers N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). We investigated QS mechanisms in strains Ab-V5 and Ab-V6 of A. brasilense, which are broadly used in commercial inoculants in Brazil. Neither of these strains carries a luxI gene, but there are several luxR solos that might perceive AHL molecules. By adding external AHLs we verified that biofilm and EPS production and cell motility (swimming and swarming) were regulated via QS in Ab-V5, but not in Ab-V6. Differences were observed not only between strains, but also in the specificity of LuxR-type receptors to AHL molecules. However, Ab-V6 was outstanding in indole acetic acid (IAA) synthesis and this molecule might mimic AHL signals. We also applied the quorum quenching (QQ) strategy, obtaining transconjugants of Ab-V5 and Ab-V6 carrying a plasmid with acyl-homoserine lactonase. When maize (Zea mays L.) was inoculated with the wild-type and transconjugant strains, plant growth was decreased with the transconjugant of Ab-V5-confirming the importance of an AHL-mediated QS system-but did not affect plant growth promotion by Ab-V6.

  8. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  9. Atomic-scale investigation of nuclear quantum effects of surface water: Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Li, Xin-Zheng; Peng, Jinbo; Wang, En-Ge; Jiang, Ying

    2017-12-01

    Quantum behaviors of protons in terms of tunneling and zero-point motion have significant effects on the macroscopic properties, structure, and dynamics of water even at room temperature or higher. In spite of tremendous theoretical and experimental efforts, accurate and quantitative description of the nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) is still challenging. The main difficulty lies in that the NQEs are extremely susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. In this review article, we will highlight the recent advances of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S), which allows the access to the quantum degree of freedom of protons both in real and energy space. In addition, we will also introduce recent development of ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations at surfaces/interfaces, in which both the electrons and nuclei are treated as quantum particles in contrast to traditional ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). Then we will discuss how the combination of STM/S and PIMD are used to directly visualize the concerted quantum tunneling of protons within the water clusters and quantify the impact of zero-point motion on the strength of a single hydrogen bond (H bond) at a water/solid interface. Those results may open up the new possibility of exploring the exotic quantum states of light nuclei at surfaces, as well as the quantum coupling between the electrons and nuclei.

  10. Interfacing External Quantum Devices to a Universal Quantum Computer

    PubMed Central

    Lagana, Antonio A.; Lohe, Max A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer. PMID:22216276

  11. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lagana, Antonio A; Lohe, Max A; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer. © 2011 Lagana et al.

  12. Ab Initio Calculations of Water Line Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry

    1998-01-01

    We report on the determination of a high quality ab initiu potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function for water. This PES is empirically adjusted to improve the agreement between the computed line positions and those from the HITRAN 92 data base with J less than 6 for H2O. The changes in the PES are small, nonetheless including an estimate of core (oxygen 1s) electron correlation greatly improves the agreement with experiment. Using this adjusted PES, we can match 30,092 of the 30,117 transitions in the HITRAN 96 data base for H2O with theoretical lines. The 10,25,50,75, and 90 percentiles of the difference between the calculated and tabulated line positions are -0.11, -0.04, -0.01, 0.02, and 0.07 l/cm. Non-adiabatic effects are not explicitly included. About 3% of the tabulated line positions appear to be incorrect. Similar agreement using this adjusted PES is obtained for the oxygen 17 and oxygen 18 isotopes. For HDO, the agreement is not as good, with root-mean-square error of 0.25 l/cm for lines with J less than 6. This error is reduced to 0.02 l/cm by including a small asymmetric correction to the PES, which is parameterized by simultaneously fitting to HDO md D2O data. Scaling this correction by mass factors yields good results for T2O and HTO. The intensities summed over vibrational bands are usually in good agreement between the calculations and the tabulated results, but individual lines strengths can differ greatly. A high temperature list consisting of 307,721,352 lines is generated for H2O using our PES and dipole moment function.

  13. Open Quantum Walks and Dissipative Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    Open Quantum Walks (OQWs) have been recently introduced as quantum Markov chains on graphs [S. Attal, F. Petruccione, C. Sabot, and I. Sinayskiy, E-print: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00581553/fr/]. The formulation of the OQWs is exclusively based upon the non-unitary dynamics induced by the environment. It will be shown that OQWs are a very useful tool for the formulation of dissipative quantum computing and quantum state preparation. In particular, it will be shown how to implement single qubit gates and the CNOT gate as OQWs on fully connected graphs. Also, OQWS make possible the dissipative quantum state preparation of arbitrary single qubit states and of all two-qubit Bell states. Finally, it will be shown how to reformulate efficiently a discrete time version of dissipative quantum computing in the language of OQWs.

  14. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes.

    PubMed

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics.

  15. Quantum simulations with noisy quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, Jay

    Quantum computing is a new computational paradigm that is expected to lie beyond the standard model of computation. This implies a quantum computer can solve problems that can't be solved by a conventional computer with tractable overhead. To fully harness this power we need a universal fault-tolerant quantum computer. However the overhead in building such a machine is high and a full solution appears to be many years away. Nevertheless, we believe that we can build machines in the near term that cannot be emulated by a conventional computer. It is then interesting to ask what these can be used for. In this talk we will present our advances in simulating complex quantum systems with noisy quantum computers. We will show experimental implementations of this on some small quantum computers.

  16. Creep Behavior of ABS Polymer in Temperature-Humidity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Teagen; Selvaraj, Ramya; Hong, Seokmoo; Kim, Naksoo

    2017-04-01

    Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS), also known as a thermoplastic polymer, is extensively utilized for manufacturing home appliances products as it possess impressive mechanical properties, such as, resistance and toughness. However, the aforementioned properties are affected by operating temperature and atmosphere humidity due to the viscoelasticity property of an ABS polymer material. Moreover, the prediction of optimum working conditions are the little challenging task as it influences the final properties of product. This present study aims to develop the finite element (FE) models for predicting the creep behavior of an ABS polymeric material. In addition, the material constants, which represent the creep properties of an ABS polymer material, were predicted with the help of an interpolation function. Furthermore, a comparative study has been made with experiment and simulation results to verify the accuracy of developed FE model. The results showed that the predicted value from FE model could agree well with experimental data as well it can replicate the actual creep behavior flawlessly.

  17. Evolving trends in mAb production processes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Leslie S.; Mostafa, Sigma S.; Norman, Carnley

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have established themselves as the leading biopharmaceutical therapeutic modality. The establishment of robust manufacturing platforms are key for antibody drug discovery efforts to seamlessly translate into clinical and commercial successes. Several drivers are influencing the design of mAb manufacturing processes. The advent of biosimilars is driving a desire to achieve lower cost of goods and globalize biologics manufacturing. High titers are now routinely achieved for mAbs in mammalian cell culture. These drivers have resulted in significant evolution in process platform approaches. Additionally, several new trends in bioprocessing have arisen in keeping with these needs. These include the consideration of alternative expression systems, continuous biomanufacturing and non‐chromatographic separation formats. This paper discusses these drivers in the context of the kinds of changes they are driving in mAb production processes. PMID:29313024

  18. AB toxins: a paradigm switch from deadly to desirable.

    PubMed

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Yano, Hiroshi; Langridge, William

    2010-07-01

    To ensure their survival, a number of bacterial and plant species have evolved a common strategy to capture energy from other biological systems. Being imperfect pathogens, organisms synthesizing multi-subunit AB toxins are responsible for the mortality of millions of people and animals annually. Vaccination against these organisms and their toxins has proved rather ineffective in providing long-term protection from disease. In response to the debilitating effects of AB toxins on epithelial cells of the digestive mucosa, mechanisms underlying toxin immunomodulation of immune responses have become the focus of increasing experimentation. The results of these studies reveal that AB toxins may have a beneficial application as adjuvants for the enhancement of immune protection against infection and autoimmunity. Here, we examine similarities and differences in the structure and function of bacterial and plant AB toxins that underlie their toxicity and their exceptional properties as immunomodulators for stimulating immune responses against infectious disease and for immune suppression of organ-specific autoimmunity.

  19. Ab Initio: And a New Era of Airline Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesell, Laurence E.

    1995-01-01

    Expansion of air transportation and decreasing numbers seeking pilot training point to a shortage of qualified pilots. Ab initio training, in which candidates with no flight time are trained to air transport proficiency, could resolve the problem. (SK)

  20. Comparison of In Vitro Activity of Liposomal Nystatin against Aspergillus Species with Those of Nystatin, Amphotericin B (AB) Deoxycholate, AB Colloidal Dispersion, Liposomal AB, AB Lipid Complex, and Itraconazole

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Karen L.; Moore, Caroline B.; Denning, David W.

    1999-01-01

    We compared the in vitro activity of liposomal nystatin (Nyotran) with those of other antifungal agents against 60 Aspergillus isolates. Twelve isolates were itraconazole resistant. For all isolates, geometric mean (GM) MICs (micrograms per milliliter) were 2.30 for liposomal nystatin, 0.58 for itraconazole, 0.86 for amphotericin B (AB) deoxycholate, 9.51 for nystatin, 2.07 for liposomal AB, 2.57 for AB lipid complex, and 0.86 for AB colloidal dispersion. Aspergillus terreus (GM, 8.72 μg/ml; range, 8 to 16 μg/ml) was significantly less susceptible to all of the polyene drugs than all other species (P = 0.0001). PMID:10223948

  1. Coupling of ab initio density functional theory and molecular dynamics for the multiscale modeling of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T. Y.; Yeak, S. H.; Liew, K. M.

    2008-02-01

    A multiscale technique is developed that couples empirical molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio density functional theory (DFT). An overlap handshaking region between the empirical MD and ab initio DFT regions is formulated and the interaction forces between the carbon atoms are calculated based on the second-generation reactive empirical bond order potential, the long-range Lennard-Jones potential as well as the quantum-mechanical DFT derived forces. A density of point algorithm is also developed to track all interatomic distances in the system, and to activate and establish the DFT and handshaking regions. Through parallel computing, this multiscale method is used here to study the dynamic behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under asymmetrical axial compression. The detection of sideways buckling due to the asymmetrical axial compression is reported and discussed. It is noted from this study on SWCNTs that the MD results may be stiffer compared to those with electron density considerations, i.e. first-principle ab initio methods.

  2. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-04

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle.

  3. Post-quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Daniel J; Lange, Tanja

    2017-09-13

    Cryptography is essential for the security of online communication, cars and implanted medical devices. However, many commonly used cryptosystems will be completely broken once large quantum computers exist. Post-quantum cryptography is cryptography under the assumption that the attacker has a large quantum computer; post-quantum cryptosystems strive to remain secure even in this scenario. This relatively young research area has seen some successes in identifying mathematical operations for which quantum algorithms offer little advantage in speed, and then building cryptographic systems around those. The central challenge in post-quantum cryptography is to meet demands for cryptographic usability and flexibility without sacrificing confidence.

  4. A multiplexed quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Lan, S-Y; Radnaev, A G; Collins, O A; Matsukevich, D N; Kennedy, T A; Kuzmich, A

    2009-08-03

    A quantum repeater is a system for long-distance quantum communication that employs quantum memory elements to mitigate optical fiber transmission losses. The multiplexed quantum memory (O. A. Collins, S. D. Jenkins, A. Kuzmich, and T. A. B. Kennedy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 060502 (2007)) has been shown theoretically to reduce quantum memory time requirements. We present an initial implementation of a multiplexed quantum memory element in a cold rubidium gas. We show that it is possible to create atomic excitations in arbitrary memory element pairs and demonstrate the violation of Bell's inequality for light fields generated during the write and read processes.

  5. Counterfactual Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-01

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle.

  6. Post-quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Daniel J.; Lange, Tanja

    2017-09-01

    Cryptography is essential for the security of online communication, cars and implanted medical devices. However, many commonly used cryptosystems will be completely broken once large quantum computers exist. Post-quantum cryptography is cryptography under the assumption that the attacker has a large quantum computer; post-quantum cryptosystems strive to remain secure even in this scenario. This relatively young research area has seen some successes in identifying mathematical operations for which quantum algorithms offer little advantage in speed, and then building cryptographic systems around those. The central challenge in post-quantum cryptography is to meet demands for cryptographic usability and flexibility without sacrificing confidence.

  7. Towards a quantum internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dür, Wolfgang; Lamprecht, Raphael; Heusler, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    A long-range quantum communication network is among the most promising applications of emerging quantum technologies. We discuss the potential of such a quantum internet for the secure transmission of classical and quantum information, as well as theoretical and experimental approaches and recent advances to realize them. We illustrate the involved concepts such as error correction, teleportation or quantum repeaters and consider an approach to this topic based on catchy visualizations as a context-based, modern treatment of quantum theory at high school.

  8. Pulsed quantum optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Vanner, M. R.; Pikovski, I.; Cole, G. D.; Kim, M. S.; Brukner, Č.; Hammerer, K.; Milburn, G. J.; Aspelmeyer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Studying mechanical resonators via radiation pressure offers a rich avenue for the exploration of quantum mechanical behavior in a macroscopic regime. However, quantum state preparation and especially quantum state reconstruction of mechanical oscillators remains a significant challenge. Here we propose a scheme to realize quantum state tomography, squeezing, and state purification of a mechanical resonator using short optical pulses. The scheme presented allows observation of mechanical quantum features despite preparation from a thermal state and is shown to be experimentally feasible using optical microcavities. Our framework thus provides a promising means to explore the quantum nature of massive mechanical oscillators and can be applied to other systems such as trapped ions. PMID:21900608

  9. Quantum finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaden, Martin

    2002-12-01

    Quantum theory is used to model secondary financial markets. Contrary to stochastic descriptions, the formalism emphasizes the importance of trading in determining the value of a security. All possible realizations of investors holding securities and cash is taken as the basis of the Hilbert space of market states. The temporal evolution of an isolated market is unitary in this space. Linear operators representing basic financial transactions such as cash transfer and the buying or selling of securities are constructed and simple model Hamiltonians that generate the temporal evolution due to cash flows and the trading of securities are proposed. The Hamiltonian describing financial transactions becomes local when the profit/loss from trading is small compared to the turnover. This approximation may describe a highly liquid and efficient stock market. The lognormal probability distribution for the price of a stock with a variance that is proportional to the elapsed time is reproduced for an equilibrium market. The asymptotic volatility of a stock in this case is related to the long-term probability that it is traded.

  10. Quantum Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzel, Chad

    2017-06-01

    One of the most active areas in atomic, molecular and optical physics is the use of ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices to simulate the behaviour of electrons in condensed matter systems. The larger mass, longer length scale, and tuneable interactions in these systems allow the dynamics of atoms moving in these systems to be followed in real time, and resonant light scattering by the atoms allows this motion to be probed on a microscopic scale using site-resolved imaging. This book reviews the physics of Hubbard-type models for both bosons and fermions in an optical lattice, which give rise to a rich variety of insulating and conducting phases depending on the lattice properties and interparticle interactions. It also discusses the effect of disorder on the transport of atoms in these models, and the recently discovered phenomenon of many-body localization. It presents several examples of experiments using both density and momentum imaging and quantum gas microscopy to study the motion of atoms in optical lattices. These illustrate the power and flexibility of ultracold-lattice analogues for exploring exotic states of matter at an unprecedented level of precision.

  11. An eigenvalue approach to quantum plasmonics based on a self-consistent hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kun; Chan, C. T.

    2018-02-01

    Plasmonics has attracted much attention not only because it has useful properties such as strong field enhancement, but also because it reveals the quantum nature of matter. To handle quantum plasmonics effects, ab initio packages or empirical Feibelman d-parameters have been used to explore the quantum correction of plasmonic resonances. However, most of these methods are formulated within the quasi-static framework. The self-consistent hydrodynamics model offers a reliable approach to study quantum plasmonics because it can incorporate the quantum effect of the electron gas into classical electrodynamics in a consistent manner. Instead of the standard scattering method, we formulate the self-consistent hydrodynamics method as an eigenvalue problem to study quantum plasmonics with electrons and photons treated on the same footing. We find that the eigenvalue approach must involve a global operator, which originates from the energy functional of the electron gas. This manifests the intrinsic nonlocality of the response of quantum plasmonic resonances. Our model gives the analytical forms of quantum corrections to plasmonic modes, incorporating quantum electron spill-out effects and electrodynamical retardation. We apply our method to study the quantum surface plasmon polariton for a single flat interface.

  12. A note on AB INITIO semiconductor band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Vincenzo

    1992-09-01

    We point out that only the internal features of the DFT ab initio theoretical picture of a crystal should be used in a consistent ab initio calculation of the band structure. As a consequence, we show that ground-state band structure calculations should be performed for the system in equilibrium at zero pressure, i.e. at the computed equilibrium cell volume ω th. Examples of consequences of this attitude are considered.

  13. Quantum capacity of quantum black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Chris; Bradler, Kamil

    2014-03-01

    The fate of quantum entanglement interacting with a black hole has been an enduring mystery, not the least because standard curved space field theory does not address the interaction of black holes with matter. We discuss an effective Hamiltonian of matter interacting with a black hole that has a precise analogue in quantum optics and correctly reproduces both spontaneous and stimulated Hawking radiation with grey-body factors. We calculate the quantum capacity of this channel in the limit of perfect absorption, as well as in the limit of a perfectly reflecting black hole (a white hole). We find that the white hole is an optimal quantum cloner, and is isomorphic to the Unruh channel with positive quantum capacity. The complementary channel (across the horizon) is entanglement-breaking with zero capacity, avoiding a violation of the quantum no-cloning theorem. The black hole channel on the contrary has vanishing capacity, while its complement has positive capacity instead. Thus, quantum states can be reconstructed faithfully behind the black hole horizon, but not outside. This work sheds new light on black hole complementarity because it shows that black holes can both reflect and absorb quantum states without violating the no-cloning theorem, and makes quantum firewalls obsolete.

  14. Quantum neuromorphic hardware for quantum artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prati, Enrico

    2017-08-01

    The development of machine learning methods based on deep learning boosted the field of artificial intelligence towards unprecedented achievements and application in several fields. Such prominent results were made in parallel with the first successful demonstrations of fault tolerant hardware for quantum information processing. To which extent deep learning can take advantage of the existence of a hardware based on qubits behaving as a universal quantum computer is an open question under investigation. Here I review the convergence between the two fields towards implementation of advanced quantum algorithms, including quantum deep learning.

  15. Quantum Darwinism in Quantum Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2008-12-01

    Quantum Darwinism—the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment—was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state—a macroscopic superposition—the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  16. Quantum Darwinism in quantum Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-12-12

    Quantum Darwinism--the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment--was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state--a macroscopic superposition--the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  17. Aggregating quantum repeaters for the quantum internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Kato, Go

    2017-09-01

    The quantum internet holds promise for accomplishing quantum teleportation and unconditionally secure communication freely between arbitrary clients all over the globe, as well as the simulation of quantum many-body systems. For such a quantum internet protocol, a general fundamental upper bound on the obtainable entanglement or secret key has been derived [K. Azuma, A. Mizutani, and H.-K. Lo, Nat. Commun. 7, 13523 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms13523]. Here we consider its converse problem. In particular, we present a universal protocol constructible from any given quantum network, which is based on running quantum repeater schemes in parallel over the network. For arbitrary lossy optical channel networks, our protocol has no scaling gap with the upper bound, even based on existing quantum repeater schemes. In an asymptotic limit, our protocol works as an optimal entanglement or secret-key distribution over any quantum network composed of practical channels such as erasure channels, dephasing channels, bosonic quantum amplifier channels, and lossy optical channels.

  18. Quantifying quantum coherence with quantum Fisher information.

    PubMed

    Feng, X N; Wei, L F

    2017-11-14

    Quantum coherence is one of the old but always important concepts in quantum mechanics, and now it has been regarded as a necessary resource for quantum information processing and quantum metrology. However, the question of how to quantify the quantum coherence has just been paid the attention recently (see, e.g., Baumgratz et al. PRL, 113. 140401 (2014)). In this paper we verify that the well-known quantum Fisher information (QFI) can be utilized to quantify the quantum coherence, as it satisfies the monotonicity under the typical incoherent operations and the convexity under the mixing of the quantum states. Differing from most of the pure axiomatic methods, quantifying quantum coherence by QFI could be experimentally testable, as the bound of the QFI is practically measurable. The validity of our proposal is specifically demonstrated with the typical phase-damping and depolarizing evolution processes of a generic single-qubit state, and also by comparing it with the other quantifying methods proposed previously.

  19. Quantum Koszul formula on quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn; Williams, Liam

    2018-07-01

    Noncommutative or quantum Riemannian geometry has been proposed as an effective theory for aspects of quantum gravity. Here the metric is an invertible bimodule map Ω1⊗AΩ1 → A where A is a possibly noncommutative or 'quantum' spacetime coordinate algebra and (Ω1 , d) is a specified bimodule of 1-forms or 'differential calculus' over it. In this paper we explore the proposal of a 'quantum Koszul formula' in Majid [12] with initial data a degree - 2 bilinear map ⊥ on the full exterior algebra Ω obeying the 4-term relations

  20. Quantum optics. Gravity meets quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.

    2015-02-27

    Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity is a classical formulation but a quantum mechanical description of gravitational forces is needed, not only to investigate the coupling of classical and quantum systems but simply to give a more complete description of our physical surroundings. In this issue of Nature Photonics, Wen-Te Liao and Sven Ahrens reveal a link between quantum and gravitational physics. They propose that in the quantum-optical effect of superradiance, the world line of electromagnetic radiation is changed by the presence of a gravitational field.

  1. WatAA: Atlas of Protein Hydration. Exploring synergies between data mining and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Černý, Jiří; Schneider, Bohdan; Biedermannová, Lada

    2017-07-14

    Water molecules represent an integral part of proteins and a key determinant of protein structure, dynamics and function. WatAA is a newly developed, web-based atlas of amino-acid hydration in proteins. The atlas provides information about the ordered first hydration shell of the most populated amino-acid conformers in proteins. The data presented in the atlas are drawn from two sources: experimental data and ab initio quantum-mechanics calculations. The experimental part is based on a data-mining study of a large set of high-resolution protein crystal structures. The crystal-derived data include 3D maps of water distribution around amino-acids and probability of occurrence of each of the identified hydration sites. The quantum mechanics calculations validate and extend this primary description by optimizing the water position for each hydration site, by providing hydrogen atom positions and by quantifying the interaction energy that stabilizes the water molecule at the particular hydration site position. The calculations show that the majority of experimentally derived hydration sites are positioned near local energy minima for water, and the calculated interaction energies help to assess the preference of water for the individual hydration sites. We propose that the atlas can be used to validate water placement in electron density maps in crystallographic refinement, to locate water molecules mediating protein-ligand interactions in drug design, and to prepare and evaluate molecular dynamics simulations. WatAA: Atlas of Protein Hydration is freely available without login at .

  2. Ab Initio Modeling of Structure and Properties of Single and Mixed Alkali Silicate Glasses.

    PubMed

    Baral, Khagendra; Li, Aize; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2017-10-12

    A density functional theory (DFT)-based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been applied to simulate models of single and mixed alkali silicate glasses with two different molar concentrations of alkali oxides. The structural environments and spatial distributions of alkali ions in the 10 simulated models with 20% and 30% of Li, Na, K and equal proportions of Li-Na and Na-K are studied in detail for subtle variations among the models. Quantum mechanical calculations of electronic structures, interatomic bonding, and mechanical and optical properties are carried out for each of the models, and the results are compared with available experimental observation and other simulations. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental data. We have used the novel concept of using the total bond order density (TBOD), a quantum mechanical metric, to characterize internal cohesion in these glass models. The mixed alkali effect (MAE) is visible in the bulk mechanical properties but not obvious in other physical properties studied in this paper. We show that Li doping deviates from expected trend due to the much stronger Li-O bonding than those of Na and K doping. The approach used in this study is in contrast with current studies in alkali-doped silicate glasses based only on geometric characterizations.

  3. Development of reactive force fields using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation minimally biased to experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Arntsen, Christopher; Voth, Gregory A.

    2017-10-01

    Incorporation of quantum mechanical electronic structure data is necessary to properly capture the physics of many chemical processes. Proton hopping in water, which involves rearrangement of chemical and hydrogen bonds, is one such example of an inherently quantum mechanical process. Standard ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods, however, do not yet accurately predict the structure of water and are therefore less than optimal for developing force fields. We have instead utilized a recently developed method which minimally biases AIMD simulations to match limited experimental data to develop novel multiscale reactive molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) force fields by using relative entropy minimization. In this paper, we present two new MS-RMD models using such a parameterization: one which employs water with harmonic internal vibrations and another which uses anharmonic water. We show that the newly developed MS-RMD models very closely reproduce the solvation structure of the hydrated excess proton in the target AIMD data. We also find that the use of anharmonic water increases proton hopping, thereby increasing the proton diffusion constant.

  4. Ab initio density-functional calculations in materials science: from quasicrystals over microporous catalysts to spintronics.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jürgen

    2010-09-29

    During the last 20 years computer simulations based on a quantum-mechanical description of the interactions between electrons and atomic nuclei have developed an increasingly important impact on materials science, not only in promoting a deeper understanding of the fundamental physical phenomena, but also enabling the computer-assisted design of materials for future technologies. The backbone of atomic-scale computational materials science is density-functional theory (DFT) which allows us to cast the intractable complexity of electron-electron interactions into the form of an effective single-particle equation determined by the exchange-correlation functional. Progress in DFT-based calculations of the properties of materials and of simulations of processes in materials depends on: (1) the development of improved exchange-correlation functionals and advanced post-DFT methods and their implementation in highly efficient computer codes, (2) the development of methods allowing us to bridge the gaps in the temperature, pressure, time and length scales between the ab initio calculations and real-world experiments and (3) the extension of the functionality of these codes, permitting us to treat additional properties and new processes. In this paper we discuss the current status of techniques for performing quantum-based simulations on materials and present some illustrative examples of applications to complex quasiperiodic alloys, cluster-support interactions in microporous acid catalysts and magnetic nanostructures.

  5. Potentials of Mean Force With Ab Initio Mixed Hamiltonian Models of Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, Michel; Schenter, Gregory K.; Garrett, Bruce C.

    2003-08-01

    We give an account of a computationally tractable and efficient procedure for the calculation of potentials of mean force using mixed Hamiltonian models of electronic structure where quantum subsystems are described with computationally intensive ab initio wavefunctions. The mixed Hamiltonian is mapped into an all-classical Hamiltonian that is amenable to a thermodynamic perturbation treatment for the calculation of free energies. A small number of statistically uncorrelated (solute-solvent) configurations are selected from the Monte Carlo random walk generated with the all-classical Hamiltonian approximation. Those are used in the averaging of the free energy using the mixed quantum/classical Hamiltonian. The methodology ismore » illustrated for the micro-solvated SN2 substitution reaction of methyl chloride by hydroxide. We also compare the potential of mean force calculated with the above protocol with an approximate formalism, one in which the potential of mean force calculated with the all-classical Hamiltonian is simply added to the energy of the isolated (non-solvated) solute along the reaction path. Interestingly the latter approach is found to be in semi-quantitative agreement with the full mixed Hamiltonian approximation.« less

  6. Ab initio non-adiabatic study of the 4pσ B'' 1Σ+u state of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass-Maujean, M.; Schmoranzer, H.

    2018-05-01

    Fully ab initio non-adiabatic multichannel quantum defect calculations of the 4pσ B'' 1∑u+ energy levels, line intensities and widths, based on the latest quantum-chemical clamped-nuclei calculations of Wolniewicz and collaborators are presented for H2. The B″ state corresponds to the inner well of the ? state. The B'' v ≥ 1 levels are rapidly predissociated through vibrational coupling with the 3pσ B' 1Σ+u continuum so that coupled-equation calculations become unstable. Multichannel quantum defect theory, on the other hand, is demonstrated to be particularly suited to this situation. Experimental data as level energies, line intensities and dissociation widths were revisited and corrected. Reinvestigating previously published spectra, several new lines were assigned.

  7. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  8. Quantum Simulation of Helium Hydride Cation in a Solid-State Spin Register.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Dolde, Florian; Biamonte, Jacob; Babbush, Ryan; Bergholm, Ville; Yang, Sen; Jakobi, Ingmar; Neumann, Philipp; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Whitfield, James D; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-08-25

    Ab initio computation of molecular properties is one of the most promising applications of quantum computing. While this problem is widely believed to be intractable for classical computers, efficient quantum algorithms exist which have the potential to vastly accelerate research throughput in fields ranging from material science to drug discovery. Using a solid-state quantum register realized in a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond, we compute the bond dissociation curve of the minimal basis helium hydride cation, HeH(+). Moreover, we report an energy uncertainty (given our model basis) of the order of 10(-14) hartree, which is 10 orders of magnitude below the desired chemical precision. As NV centers in diamond provide a robust and straightforward platform for quantum information processing, our work provides an important step toward a fully scalable solid-state implementation of a quantum chemistry simulator.

  9. Multipartite quantum correlations and local recoverability

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing genuine multipartite quantum correlations in quantum physical systems has historically been a challenging problem in quantum information theory. More recently, however, the total correlation or multipartite information measure has been helpful in accomplishing this goal, especially with the multipartite symmetric quantum (MSQ) discord (Piani et al. 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 090502. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.090502)) and the conditional entanglement of multipartite information (CEMI) (Yang et al. 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 140501. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.140501)). Here, we apply a recent and significant improvement of strong subadditivity of quantum entropy (Fawzi & Renner 2014 (http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.0664)) in order to develop these quantities further. In particular, we prove that the MSQ discord is nearly equal to zero if and only if the multipartite state for which it is evaluated is approximately locally recoverable after performing measurements on each of its systems. Furthermore, we prove that the CEMI is a faithful entanglement measure, i.e. it vanishes if and only if the multipartite state for which it is evaluated is a fully separable state. Along the way, we provide an operational interpretation of the MSQ discord in terms of the partial state distribution protocol, which in turn, as a special case, gives an interpretation for the original discord quantity. Finally, we prove an inequality that could potentially improve upon the Fawzi–Renner inequality in the multipartite context, but it remains an open question to determine whether this is so. PMID:27547097

  10. Ab-initio calculation of electronic structure and optical properties of AB-stacked bilayer α-graphyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2016-09-01

    Monolayer α-graphyne is a new two-dimensional carbon allotrope with many special features. In this work the electronic properties of AA- and AB-stacked bilayers of this material and then the optical properties are studied, using first principle plane wave method. The electronic spectrum has two Dirac cones for AA stacked bilayer α-graphyne. For AB-stacked bilayer, the interlayer interaction changes the linear bands into parabolic bands. The optical spectra of the most stable AB-stacked bilayer closely resemble to that of the monolayer, except for small shifts of peak positions and increasing of their intensity. For AB-stacked bilayer, a pronounced peak has been found at low energies under the perpendicular polarization. This peak can be clearly ascribed to the transitions at the Dirac point as a result of the small degeneracy lift in the band structure.

  11. Quantum information generation, storage and transmission based on nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharov, V. V.; Makarov, V. I.

    2018-05-01

    A new approach to quantum information generation, storage and transmission is proposed. It is shown that quantum information generation and storage using an ensemble of N electron spins encounter unresolvable implementation problems (at least at the present time). As an alternative implementation we discuss two promising radical systems, one with N equivalent nuclear spins and another with N nonequivalent nuclear spins. Detailed analysis shows that only the radical system containing N nonequivalent nuclei is perfectly matched for quantum information generation, storage and transmission. We develop a procedure based on pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and we apply it to the radical system with the set of nonequivalent nuclei. The resulting EPR spectrum contains 2N transition lines, where N is the number of the atoms with the nuclear spin 1/2, and each of these lines may be encoded with a determined qudit sequence. For encoding the EPR lines we propose to submit the radical system to two magnetic pulses in the direction perpendicular to the z axis of the reference frame. As a result, the radical system impulse response may be measured, stored and transmitted through the communications channel. Confirming our development, the ab initio analysis of the system with three anion radicals was done showing matching between the simulations and the theoretical predictions. The developed method may be easily adapted for quantum information generation, storage, processing and transmission in quantum computing and quantum communications applications.

  12. Cost-Effective Method for Free-Energy Minimization in Complex Systems with Elaborated Ab Initio Potentials.

    PubMed

    Bistafa, Carlos; Kitamura, Yukichi; Martins-Costa, Marilia T C; Nagaoka, Masataka; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2018-06-12

    We describe a method to locate stationary points in the free-energy hypersurface of complex molecular systems using high-level correlated ab initio potentials. In this work, we assume a combined QM/MM description of the system although generalization to full ab initio potentials or other theoretical schemes is straightforward. The free-energy gradient (FEG) is obtained as the mean force acting on relevant nuclei using a dual level strategy. First, a statistical simulation is carried out using an appropriate, low-level quantum mechanical force-field. Free-energy perturbation (FEP) theory is then used to obtain the free-energy derivatives for the target, high-level quantum mechanical force-field. We show that this composite FEG-FEP approach is able to reproduce the results of a standard free-energy minimization procedure with high accuracy, while simultaneously allowing for a drastic reduction of both computational and wall-clock time. The method has been applied to study the structure of the water molecule in liquid water at the QCISD/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory, using the sampling from QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level. The obtained values for the geometrical parameters and for the dipole moment of the water molecule are within the experimental error, and they also display an excellent agreement when compared to other theoretical estimations. The developed methodology represents therefore an important step toward the accurate determination of the mechanism, kinetics, and thermodynamic properties of processes in solution, in enzymes, and in other disordered chemical systems using state-of-the-art ab initio potentials.

  13. Quantum Feynman Ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Ketan; Kawai, Ryoichi

    As nanotechnology advances, understanding of the thermodynamic properties of small systems becomes increasingly important. Such systems are found throughout physics, biology, and chemistry manifesting striking properties that are a direct result of their small dimensions where fluctuations become predominant. The standard theory of thermodynamics for macroscopic systems is powerless for such ever fluctuating systems. Furthermore, as small systems are inherently quantum mechanical, influence of quantum effects such as discreteness and quantum entanglement on their thermodynamic properties is of great interest. In particular, the quantum fluctuations due to quantum uncertainty principles may play a significant role. In this talk, we investigate thermodynamic properties of an autonomous quantum heat engine, resembling a quantum version of the Feynman Ratchet, in non-equilibrium condition based on the theory of open quantum systems. The heat engine consists of multiple subsystems individually contacted to different thermal environments.

  14. Changes to Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Hidema

    Quantum cryptography has become a subject of widespread interest. In particular, quantum key distribution, which provides a secure key agreement by using quantum systems, is believed to be the most important application of quantum cryptography. Quantum key distribution has the potential to achieve the “unconditionally” secure infrastructure. We also have many cryptographic tools that are based on “modern cryptography” at the present time. They are being used in an effort to guarantee secure communication over open networks such as the Internet. Unfortunately, their ultimate efficacy is in doubt. Quantum key distribution systems are believed to be close to practical and commercial use. In this paper, we discuss what we should do to apply quantum cryptography to our communications. We also discuss how quantum key distribution can be combined with or used to replace cryptographic tools based on modern cryptography.

  15. The quantum game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-04-01

    With the launch of the Quantum Technologies Flagship, the European Union is looking to become a major player in the upcoming quantum revolution, reaping benefits both for technology development and wealth creation for the European society.

  16. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-29

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  17. What is Quantum Information?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Olimpia; Fortin, Sebastian; Holik, Federico; López, Cristian

    2017-04-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. About the Concept of Information: 1. About the concept of information Sebastian Fortin and Olimpia Lombardi; 2. Representation, information, and theories of information Armond Duwell; 3. Information, communication, and manipulability Olimpia Lombardi and Cristian López; Part II. Information and quantum mechanics: 4. Quantum versus classical information Jeffrey Bub; 5. Quantum information and locality Dennis Dieks; 6. Pragmatic information in quantum mechanics Juan Roederer; 7. Interpretations of quantum theory: a map of madness Adán Cabello; Part III. Probability, Correlations, and Information: 8. On the tension between ontology and epistemology in quantum probabilities Amit Hagar; 9. Inferential versus dynamical conceptions of physics David Wallace; 10. Classical models for quantum information Federico Holik and Gustavo Martin Bosyk; 11. On the relative character of quantum correlations Guido Bellomo and Ángel Ricardo Plastino; Index.

  18. Parametric Quantum Search Algorithm as Quantum Walk: A Quantum Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinas, Demosthenes; Konstandakis, Christos

    2016-02-01

    Parametric quantum search algorithm (PQSA) is a form of quantum search that results by relaxing the unitarity of the original algorithm. PQSA can naturally be cast in the form of quantum walk, by means of the formalism of oracle algebra. This is due to the fact that the completely positive trace preserving search map used by PQSA, admits a unitarization (unitary dilation) a la quantum walk, at the expense of introducing auxiliary quantum coin-qubit space. The ensuing QW describes a process of spiral motion, chosen to be driven by two unitary Kraus generators, generating planar rotations of Bloch vector around an axis. The quadratic acceleration of quantum search translates into an equivalent quadratic saving of the number of coin qubits in the QW analogue. The associated to QW model Hamiltonian operator is obtained and is shown to represent a multi-particle long-range interacting quantum system that simulates parametric search. Finally, the relation of PQSA-QW simulator to the QW search algorithm is elucidated.

  19. Quantum Computing since Democritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaronson, Scott

    2013-03-01

    1. Atoms and the void; 2. Sets; 3. Gödel, Turing, and friends; 4. Minds and machines; 5. Paleocomplexity; 6. P, NP, and friends; 7. Randomness; 8. Crypto; 9. Quantum; 10. Quantum computing; 11. Penrose; 12. Decoherence and hidden variables; 13. Proofs; 14. How big are quantum states?; 15. Skepticism of quantum computing; 16. Learning; 17. Interactive proofs and more; 18. Fun with the Anthropic Principle; 19. Free will; 20. Time travel; 21. Cosmology and complexity; 22. Ask me anything.

  20. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  1. Testing Nonassociative Quantum Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Büyükçam, Umut

    2015-11-27

    The familiar concepts of state vectors and operators in quantum mechanics rely on associative products of observables. However, these notions do not apply to some exotic systems such as magnetic monopoles, which have long been known to lead to nonassociative algebras. Their quantum physics has remained obscure. This Letter presents the first derivation of potentially testable physical results in nonassociative quantum mechanics, based on effective potentials. They imply new effects which cannot be mimicked in usual quantum mechanics with standard magnetic fields.

  2. The quantum universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Anthony J. G.; Walters, Patrick

    This book provides a descriptive, popular account of quantum physics. The basic topics addressed include: waves and particles, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the Schroedinger equation and matter waves, atoms and nuclei, quantum tunneling, the Pauli exclusion principle and the elements, quantum cooperation and superfluids, Feynman rules, weak photons, quarks, and gluons. The applications of quantum physics to astrophyics, nuclear technology, and modern electronics are addressed.

  3. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations of the interaction between radioactive elements and imidazolium based ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, A. V. Sai; Abishek, B.; Anantharaj, R.

    2018-04-01

    The fundamental natures of the molecular level interaction and charge transfer between specific radioactive elements and ionic liquids of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([BMIM]+[NTf2]-), 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([BMIM]+[ES]-) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]+[BF4]-) were investigated utilising HF theory and B3LYP hybrid DFT. The ambiguity in reaction mechanism of the interacting species dictates to employ Effective Core Potential (ECP) basis sets such as UGBS, SDD, and SDDAll to account for the relativistic effects of deep core electrons in the system involving potential, heavy and hazardous radioactive elements present in nuclear waste. The SCF energy convergence of each system validates the characterisation of the molecular orbitals as a linear combination of atomic orbitals utilising fixed MO coefficients and the optimized geometry of each system is visualised based on which Mulliken partial charge analysis is carried out to account for the polarising behaviour of the radioactive element and charge transfer between the IL phase by comparison with the bare IL species.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS BY AB INITIO QUANTUM MECHANICAL COMPUTATION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational chemistry, in conjunction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (GC/MS/FT-IR), was used to tentatively identify seven tetrachlorobutadiene (TCBD) isomers detected in an environmental sample. Computation of the TCBD infrare...

  5. Nitrosyl Iodide, Ino: Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy Guided by AB Initio Quantum Chemical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, Stephane; Duflot, Denis; Aiba, Shohei; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    In the series of the nitrosyl halides, XNO (where X = {F, Cl, Br, I}), the millimeter-wave spectrum of INO remains so far unknown. We report our investigation on the first high-resolution rotational spectroscopy of nitrosyl iodide, INO. One of the motivation for this work comes from the growing need in developing a more complete understanding of atmospheric chemistry, especially halogen and nitrogen oxides chemistry that adversely impacts ozone levels. In the family of the nitrogen oxyhalides such as nitrosyl (XNO), nitryl (XNO), nitrite (XONO), and nitrate (XON0_2) halides, those with X = {F, Cl, Br} have been well studied, both theoretically and experimentally. However, relatively little is known about the iodine-containing analogues, although they also are of potential importance in tropospheric chemistry. In 1991, the Fourier-transform IR spectroscopic detection of INO, INO_2 and IONO_2 in the gas phase has been reported The INO molecule was generated by in situ mixing continuously I_2 and NO in a 50-cm long reaction glass tube whose outlet was connected to the absorption cell using a teflon tube. At the time of writing this abstract, 68 μ_a-type transitions (K_a = 0-10), all weak, have been successfully assigned. The hyperfine structures due to both I and N nuclei will also be presented. S.B. and D.D. acknowledge support from the Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-005 of the Programme d'Investissement d'Avenir. I. Barnes, K. H. Becker and J. Starcke, J. Phys. Chem. 1991, 95, 9736-9740.

  6. Ab initio Quantum Chemical Reaction Kinetics: Recent Applications in Combustion Chemistry (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-28

    HMX RDX  Recent Works  See Geith et al...Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, 29, 3 (2004)  ∆Hcomb(DNB) = (5195 ± 300) kJ kg-1 (bomb calorimetry and MP2/cc-pVTZ ∆Hf) cf HMX 9435 & RDX 9560 kJ...kg-1  Vd = 8660 ms-1, cf HMX 9100 & RDX 8750 ms-1  See Geith et al., Combust and Flame, 139, 358 (2004)  Recent synthesis (known since 1898 by

  7. Emergent mechanics, quantum and un-quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, John P.

    2013-10-01

    There is great interest in quantum mechanics as an "emergent" phenomenon. The program holds that nonobvious patterns and laws can emerge from complicated physical systems operating by more fundamental rules. We find a new approach where quantum mechanics itself should be viewed as an information management tool not derived from physics nor depending on physics. The main accomplishment of quantum-style theory comes in expanding the notion of probability. We construct a map from macroscopic information as data" to quantum probability. The map allows a hidden variable description for quantum states, and efficient use of the helpful tools of quantum mechanics in unlimited circumstances. Quantum dynamics via the time-dependent Shroedinger equation or operator methods actually represents a restricted class of classical Hamiltonian or Lagrangian dynamics, albeit with different numbers of degrees of freedom. We show that under wide circumstances such dynamics emerges from structureless dynamical systems. The uses of the quantum information management tools are illustrated by numerical experiments and practical applications

  8. Are Quantum Models for Order Effects Quantum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Catarina; Wichert, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    The application of principles of Quantum Mechanics in areas outside of physics has been getting increasing attention in the scientific community in an emergent disciplined called Quantum Cognition. These principles have been applied to explain paradoxical situations that cannot be easily explained through classical theory. In quantum probability, events are characterised by a superposition state, which is represented by a state vector in a N-dimensional vector space. The probability of an event is given by the squared magnitude of the projection of this superposition state into the desired subspace. This geometric approach is very useful to explain paradoxical findings that involve order effects, but do we really need quantum principles for models that only involve projections? This work has two main goals. First, it is still not clear in the literature if a quantum projection model has any advantage towards a classical projection. We compared both models and concluded that the Quantum Projection model achieves the same results as its classical counterpart, because the quantum interference effects play no role in the computation of the probabilities. Second, it intends to propose an alternative relativistic interpretation for rotation parameters that are involved in both classical and quantum models. In the end, instead of interpreting these parameters as a similarity measure between questions, we propose that they emerge due to the lack of knowledge concerned with a personal basis state and also due to uncertainties towards the state of world and towards the context of the questions.

  9. Quantum information aspects of noncommutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Bernardini, Alex E.; Leal, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Some fundamental aspects related with the construction of Robertson-Schrödinger-like uncertainty-principle inequalities are reported in order to provide an overall description of quantumness, separability and nonlocality of quantum systems in the noncommutative phase-space. Some consequences of the deformed noncommutative algebra are also considered in physical systems of interest.

  10. Quantum soldering of individual quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Roy, Xavier; Schenck, Christine L; Ahn, Seokhoon; Lalancette, Roger A; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin; Steigerwald, Michael L

    2012-12-07

    Making contact to a quantum dot: Single quantum-dot electronic circuits are fabricated by wiring atomically precise metal chalcogenide clusters with conjugated molecular connectors. These wired clusters can couple electronically to nanoscale electrodes and be tuned to control the charge-transfer characteristics (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Real quantum cybernetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grössing, Gerhard

    1987-05-01

    It is shown on the basis of quantum cybernetics that one can obtain the usual predictions of quantum theory without ever referring to complex numbered “quantum mechanical amplitudes”. Instead, a very simple formula for transition and certain conditional probabilities is developed that involves real numbers only, thus relating intuitively understandable and in principle directly observable physical quantities.

  12. Darwinism in quantum systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, A.; Toor, A. H.

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the role of quantum mechanical effects in the central stability concept of evolutionary game theory, i.e., an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Using two and three-player symmetric quantum games we show how the presence of quantum phenomenon of entanglement can be crucial to decide the course of evolutionary dynamics in a population of interacting individuals.

  13. Topological quantum distillation.

    PubMed

    Bombin, H; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2006-11-03

    We construct a class of topological quantum codes to perform quantum entanglement distillation. These codes implement the whole Clifford group of unitary operations in a fully topological manner and without selective addressing of qubits. This allows us to extend their application also to quantum teleportation, dense coding, and computation with magic states.

  14. Twisted Quantum Lax Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčo, Branislav; Schupp, Peter

    We show the construction of twisted quantum Lax equations associated with quantum groups, and solve these equations using factorization properties of the corresponding quantum groups. Our construction generalizes in many respects the AKS construction for Lie groups and the construction of M. A. Semenov-Tian-Shansky for the Lie-Poisson case.

  15. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    PubMed

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Quantum Bundle Description of Quantum Projective Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Buachalla, Réamonn

    2012-12-01

    We realise Heckenberger and Kolb's canonical calculus on quantum projective ( N - 1)-space C q [ C p N-1] as the restriction of a distinguished quotient of the standard bicovariant calculus for the quantum special unitary group C q [ SU N ]. We introduce a calculus on the quantum sphere C q [ S 2 N-1] in the same way. With respect to these choices of calculi, we present C q [ C p N-1] as the base space of two different quantum principal bundles, one with total space C q [ SU N ], and the other with total space C q [ S 2 N-1]. We go on to give C q [ C p N-1] the structure of a quantum framed manifold. More specifically, we describe the module of one-forms of Heckenberger and Kolb's calculus as an associated vector bundle to the principal bundle with total space C q [ SU N ]. Finally, we construct strong connections for both bundles.

  17. Quantum technology past, present, future: quantum energetics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang H.

    2017-04-01

    Since the development of quantum physics in the early part of the 1900s, this field of study has made remarkable contributions to our civilization. Some of these advances include lasers, light-emitting diodes (LED), sensors, spectroscopy, quantum dots, quantum gravity and quantum entanglements. In 1998, the NASA Langley Research Center established a quantum technology committee to monitor the progress in this area and initiated research to determine the potential of quantum technology for future NASA missions. The areas of interest in quantum technology at NASA included fundamental quantum-optics materials associated with quantum dots and quantum wells, device-oriented photonic crystals, smart optics, quantum conductors, quantum information and computing, teleportation theorem, and quantum energetics. A brief review of the work performed, the progress made in advancing these technologies, and the potential NASA applications of quantum technology will be presented.

  18. Masking Quantum Information is Impossible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Kavan; Pati, Arun Kumar; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2018-06-01

    Classical information encoded in composite quantum states can be completely hidden from the reduced subsystems and may be found only in the correlations. Can the same be true for quantum information? If quantum information is hidden from subsystems and spread over quantum correlation, we call it masking of quantum information. We show that while this may still be true for some restricted sets of nonorthogonal quantum states, it is not possible for arbitrary quantum states. This result suggests that quantum qubit commitment—a stronger version of the quantum bit commitment—is not possible in general. Our findings may have potential applications in secret sharing and future quantum communication protocols.

  19. Quantum Approach to Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenholm, Stig; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2005-08-01

    An essential overview of quantum information Information, whether inscribed as a mark on a stone tablet or encoded as a magnetic domain on a hard drive, must be stored in a physical object and thus made subject to the laws of physics. Traditionally, information processing such as computation occurred in a framework governed by laws of classical physics. However, information can also be stored and processed using the states of matter described by non-classical quantum theory. Understanding this quantum information, a fundamentally different type of information, has been a major project of physicists and information theorists in recent years, and recent experimental research has started to yield promising results. Quantum Approach to Informatics fills the need for a concise introduction to this burgeoning new field, offering an intuitive approach for readers in both the physics and information science communities, as well as in related fields. Only a basic background in quantum theory is required, and the text keeps the focus on bringing this theory to bear on contemporary informatics. Instead of proofs and other highly formal structures, detailed examples present the material, making this a uniquely accessible introduction to quantum informatics. Topics covered include: * An introduction to quantum information and the qubit * Concepts and methods of quantum theory important for informatics * The application of information concepts to quantum physics * Quantum information processing and computing * Quantum gates * Error correction using quantum-based methods * Physical realizations of quantum computing circuits A helpful and economical resource for understanding this exciting new application of quantum theory to informatics, Quantum Approach to Informatics provides students and researchers in physics and information science, as well as other interested readers with some scientific background, with an essential overview of the field.

  20. Thomson backscattering diagnostics of nanosecond electron bunches in high space charge regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachinda, Pavel

    The trend over the last 50 years of down-scaling the silicon transistor to achieve faster computations has led to doubling of the number of transistors and computation speed over about every two years. However, this trend cannot be maintained due to the fundamental limitations of silicon as the main material for the semiconducting industry. Therefore, there is an active search for exploration of alternate materials. Among the possible candidates that can may be able to replace silicon is graphene which has recently gained the most attention. Unique properties of graphene include exceedingly high carrier mobility, tunable band gap, huge optical density of a monolayer, anomalous quantum Hall effect, and many others. To be suitable for microelectronic applications the material should be semiconductive, i.e. have a non-zero band gap. Pristine graphene is a semimetal, but by the virtue of doping the graphene surface with different molecules and radicals a band gap can be opened. Because the electronic properties of all materials are intimately related to their atomic structure, characterization of molecular and electronic structure of functionalizing groups is of high interest. The ab-inito (from the first principles) calculations provide a unique opportunity to study the influence of the dopants and thus allow exploration of the physical phenomena in functionalized graphene structures. This ability paves the road to probe the properties based on the intuitive structural information only. A great advantage of this approach lies in the opportunity for quick screening of various atomic structures. We conducted a series of ab-inito investigations of graphene functionalized with covalently and hapticly bound groups, and demonstrated possible practical usage of functionalized graphene for microelectronic and optical applications. This investigation showed that it is possible produce band gaps in graphene (i.e., produce semiconducting graphene) of about 1 eV, without

  1. Implementing quantum Ricci curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klitgaard, N.; Loll, R.

    2018-05-01

    Quantum Ricci curvature has been introduced recently as a new, geometric observable characterizing the curvature properties of metric spaces, without the need for a smooth structure. Besides coordinate invariance, its key features are scalability, computability, and robustness. We demonstrate that these properties continue to hold in the context of nonperturbative quantum gravity, by evaluating the quantum Ricci curvature numerically in two-dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity, defined in terms of dynamical triangulations. Despite the well-known, highly nonclassical properties of the underlying quantum geometry, its Ricci curvature can be matched well to that of a five-dimensional round sphere.

  2. Quantum machine learning.

    PubMed

    Biamonte, Jacob; Wittek, Peter; Pancotti, Nicola; Rebentrost, Patrick; Wiebe, Nathan; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-09-13

    Fuelled by increasing computer power and algorithmic advances, machine learning techniques have become powerful tools for finding patterns in data. Quantum systems produce atypical patterns that classical systems are thought not to produce efficiently, so it is reasonable to postulate that quantum computers may outperform classical computers on machine learning tasks. The field of quantum machine learning explores how to devise and implement quantum software that could enable machine learning that is faster than that of classical computers. Recent work has produced quantum algorithms that could act as the building blocks of machine learning programs, but the hardware and software challenges are still considerable.

  3. Quantum machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob; Wittek, Peter; Pancotti, Nicola; Rebentrost, Patrick; Wiebe, Nathan; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-09-01

    Fuelled by increasing computer power and algorithmic advances, machine learning techniques have become powerful tools for finding patterns in data. Quantum systems produce atypical patterns that classical systems are thought not to produce efficiently, so it is reasonable to postulate that quantum computers may outperform classical computers on machine learning tasks. The field of quantum machine learning explores how to devise and implement quantum software that could enable machine learning that is faster than that of classical computers. Recent work has produced quantum algorithms that could act as the building blocks of machine learning programs, but the hardware and software challenges are still considerable.

  4. A QUANTUM MECHANICAL STUDY OF THE PROTONATION AND COVALENT HYDRATION OF QUINAZOLINE IN THE PRESENCE OF METAL CATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated the protonation and reversible covalent hydration of quinazoline in the presence of Li+, Na+, and Ca2+ ions using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations at the MP2/6-31G**//HF/6-31G*level of theory. Proton affinities, enthalpies of hydration at 298.15K (DH...

  5. Hybrid quantum computing with ancillas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy J.; Kendon, Viv

    2016-10-01

    In the quest to build a practical quantum computer, it is important to use efficient schemes for enacting the elementary quantum operations from which quantum computer programs are constructed. The opposing requirements of well-protected quantum data and fast quantum operations must be balanced to maintain the integrity of the quantum information throughout the computation. One important approach to quantum operations is to use an extra quantum system - an ancilla - to interact with the quantum data register. Ancillas can mediate interactions between separated quantum registers, and by using fresh ancillas for each quantum operation, data integrity can be preserved for longer. This review provides an overview of the basic concepts of the gate model quantum computer architecture, including the different possible forms of information encodings - from base two up to continuous variables - and a more detailed description of how the main types of ancilla-mediated quantum operations provide efficient quantum gates.

  6. Programmable Quantum Photonic Processor Using Silicon Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    quantum information processing and quantum sensing, ranging from linear optics quantum computing and quantum simulation to quantum ...transformers have driven experimental and theoretical advances in quantum simulation, cluster-state quantum computing , all-optical quantum repeaters...neuromorphic computing , and other applications. In addition, we developed new schemes for ballistic quantum computation , new methods for

  7. Quantum robots plus environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-23

    A quantum robot is a mobile quantum system, including an on board quantum computer and needed ancillary systems, that interacts with an environment of quantum systems. Quantum robots carry out tasks whose goals include making specified changes in the state of the environment or carrying out measurements on the environment. The environments considered so far, oracles, data bases, and quantum registers, are seen to be special cases of environments considered here. It is also seen that a quantum robot should include a quantum computer and cannot be simply a multistate head. A model of quantum robots and their interactions ismore » discussed in which each task, as a sequence of alternating computation and action phases,is described by a unitary single time step operator T {approx} T{sub a} + T{sub c} (discrete space and time are assumed). The overall system dynamics is described as a sum over paths of completed computation (T{sub c}) and action (T{sub a}) phases. A simple example of a task, measuring the distance between the quantum robot and a particle on a 1D lattice with quantum phase path dispersion present, is analyzed. A decision diagram for the task is presented and analyzed.« less

  8. The New Quantum Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2014-06-01

    It is shown how all the major conceptual difficulties of standard (textbook) quantum mechanics, including the two measurement problems and the (supposed) nonlocality that conflicts with special relativity, are resolved in the consistent or decoherent histories interpretation of quantum mechanics by using a modified form of quantum logic to discuss quantum properties (subspaces of the quantum Hilbert space), and treating quantum time development as a stochastic process. The histories approach in turn gives rise to some conceptual difficulties, in particular the correct choice of a framework (probabilistic sample space) or family of histories, and these are discussed. The central issue is that the principle of unicity, the idea that there is a unique single true description of the world, is incompatible with our current understanding of quantum mechanics.

  9. Quantum Secure Group Communication.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M Suhail; Al-Amri, M

    2018-03-01

    We propose a quantum secure group communication protocol for the purpose of sharing the same message among multiple authorized users. Our protocol can remove the need for key management that is needed for the quantum network built on quantum key distribution. Comparing with the secure quantum network based on BB84, we show our protocol is more efficient and securer. Particularly, in the security analysis, we introduce a new way of attack, i.e., the counterfactual quantum attack, which can steal information by "invisible" photons. This invisible photon can reveal a single-photon detector in the photon path without triggering the detector. Moreover, the photon can identify phase operations applied to itself, thereby stealing information. To defeat this counterfactual quantum attack, we propose a quantum multi-user authorization system. It allows us to precisely control the communication time so that the attack can not be completed in time.

  10. Quantum Social Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haven, Emmanuel; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Physics Concepts in Social Science? A Discussion: 1. Classical, statistical and quantum mechanics: all in one; 2. Econophysics: statistical physics and social science; 3. Quantum social science: a non-mathematical motivation; Part II. Mathematics and Physics Preliminaries: 4. Vector calculus and other mathematical preliminaries; 5. Basic elements of quantum mechanics; 6. Basic elements of Bohmian mechanics; Part III. Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Psychology: Basic Questions and Answers: 7. A brief overview; 8. Interference effects in psychology - an introduction; 9. A quantum-like model of decision making; Part IV. Other Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Economics, Finance and Brain Sciences: 10. Financial/economic theory in crisis; 11. Bohmian mechanics in finance and economics; 12. The Bohm-Vigier Model and path simulation; 13. Other applications to economic/financial theory; 14. The neurophysiological sources of quantum-like processing in the brain; Conclusion; Glossary; Index.

  11. Defects in Quantum Computers

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Zurek, Wojciech H.; ...

    2018-03-14

    The shift of interest from general purpose quantum computers to adiabatic quantum computing or quantum annealing calls for a broadly applicable and easy to implement test to assess how quantum or adiabatic is a specific hardware. Here we propose such a test based on an exactly solvable many body system–the quantum Ising chain in transverse field–and implement it on the D-Wave machine. An ideal adiabatic quench of the quantum Ising chain should lead to an ordered broken symmetry ground state with all spins aligned in the same direction. An actual quench can be imperfect due to decoherence, noise, flaws inmore » the implemented Hamiltonian, or simply too fast to be adiabatic. Imperfections result in topological defects: Spins change orientation, kinks punctuating ordered sections of the chain. Therefore, the number of such defects quantifies the extent by which the quantum computer misses the ground state, and is imperfect.« less

  12. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev’s surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computationmore » size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.« less

  13. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    DOE PAGES

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; ...

    2015-07-31

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev’s surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computationmore » size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.« less

  14. Superradiant Quantum Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Hardal, Ali Ü C; Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E

    2015-08-11

    Quantum physics revolutionized classical disciplines of mechanics, statistical physics, and electrodynamics. One branch of scientific knowledge however seems untouched: thermodynamics. Major motivation behind thermodynamics is to develop efficient heat engines. Technology has a trend to miniaturize engines, reaching to quantum regimes. Development of quantum heat engines (QHEs) requires emerging field of quantum thermodynamics. Studies of QHEs debate whether quantum coherence can be used as a resource. We explore an alternative where it can function as an effective catalyst. We propose a QHE which consists of a photon gas inside an optical cavity as the working fluid and quantum coherent atomic clusters as the fuel. Utilizing the superradiance, where a cluster can radiate quadratically faster than a single atom, we show that the work output becomes proportional to the square of the number of the atoms. In addition to practical value of cranking up QHE, our result is a fundamental difference of a quantum fuel from its classical counterpart.

  15. Defects in Quantum Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    The shift of interest from general purpose quantum computers to adiabatic quantum computing or quantum annealing calls for a broadly applicable and easy to implement test to assess how quantum or adiabatic is a specific hardware. Here we propose such a test based on an exactly solvable many body system–the quantum Ising chain in transverse field–and implement it on the D-Wave machine. An ideal adiabatic quench of the quantum Ising chain should lead to an ordered broken symmetry ground state with all spins aligned in the same direction. An actual quench can be imperfect due to decoherence, noise, flaws inmore » the implemented Hamiltonian, or simply too fast to be adiabatic. Imperfections result in topological defects: Spins change orientation, kinks punctuating ordered sections of the chain. Therefore, the number of such defects quantifies the extent by which the quantum computer misses the ground state, and is imperfect.« less

  16. Quantum information is physical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiVincenzo, D. P.; Loss, D.

    1998-03-01

    We discuss a few current developments in the use of quantum mechanically coherent systems for information processing. In each of these developments, Rolf Landauer has played a crucial role in nudging us, and other workers in the field, into asking the right questions, some of which we have been lucky enough to answer. A general overview of the key ideas of quantum error correction is given. We discuss how quantum entanglement is the key to protecting quantum states from decoherence in a manner which, in a theoretical sense, is as effective as the protection of digital data from bit noise. We also discuss five general criteria which must be satisfied to implement a quantum computer in the laboratory, and we illustrate the application of these criteria by discussing our ideas for creating a quantum computer out of the spin states of coupled quantum dots.

  17. Ab Initio Studies of Metal Hexaboride Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.

    Metal hexaborides are refractory ceramics with several qualities relevant to materials design, such as low work functions, high hardness, low thermal expansion coefficients, and high melting points, among many other properties of interest for industrial applications. Thermal and mechanical stability is a common feature provided by the covalently-bonded network boron atoms, and electronic properties can vary significantly with the resident metal. While these materials are currently employed as electron emitters and abrasives, promising uses of these materials also include catalytic applications for chemical dissociation reactions of various molecules such as hydrogen, water and carbon monoxide, for example. However, these extensions require a thorough understanding of particular mechanical and electronic properties. This dissertation is a collection of studies focused on understanding the behavior of metal hexaboride materials using computational modeling methods to investigate materials properties of these from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view. Classical modeling is performed using molecular dynamics methods with interatomic potentials obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Atomic mean-square displacements from the quasi-harmonic approximation and lattice energetic data are produced with DFT for developing the potentials. A generalized method was also developed for the inversion of cohesive energy curves of crystalline materials; pairwise interatomic potentials are extracted using detailed geometrical descriptions of the atomic interactions and a list of atomic displacements and degeneracies. The surface structure of metal hexaborides is studied with DFT using several model geometries to describe the terminal cation layouts, and these provide a basis for further studies on metal hexaboride interactions with hydrogen. The surface electronic structure calculations show that segregated regions of metal and boron

  18. Quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue-Jiao; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate an InAs quantum dot quantum cascade infrared photodetector operating at room temperature with a peak detection wavelength of 4.3 μm. The detector shows sensitive photoresponse for normal-incidence light, which is attributed to an intraband transition of the quantum dots and the following transfer of excited electrons on a cascade of quantum levels. The InAs quantum dots for the infrared absorption were formed by making use of self-assembled quantum dots in the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode and two-step strain-compensation design based on InAs/GaAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure, while the following extraction quantum stairs formed by LO-phonon energy are based on a strain-compensated InGaAs/InAlAs chirpedmore » superlattice. Johnson noise limited detectivities of 3.64 × 10{sup 11} and 4.83 × 10{sup 6} Jones at zero bias were obtained at 80 K and room temperature, respectively. Due to the low dark current and distinct photoresponse up to room temperature, this device can form high temperature imaging.« less

  19. Quantum simulation of a quantum stochastic walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govia, Luke C. G.; Taketani, Bruno G.; Schuhmacher, Peter K.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2017-03-01

    The study of quantum walks has been shown to have a wide range of applications in areas such as artificial intelligence, the study of biological processes, and quantum transport. The quantum stochastic walk (QSW), which allows for incoherent movement of the walker, and therefore, directionality, is a generalization on the fully coherent quantum walk. While a QSW can always be described in Lindblad formalism, this does not mean that it can be microscopically derived in the standard weak-coupling limit under the Born-Markov approximation. This restricts the class of QSWs that can be experimentally realized in a simple manner. To circumvent this restriction, we introduce a technique to simulate open system evolution on a fully coherent quantum computer, using a quantum trajectories style approach. We apply this technique to a broad class of QSWs, and show that they can be simulated with minimal experimental resources. Our work opens the path towards the experimental realization of QSWs on large graphs with existing quantum technologies.

  20. Recent progress of quantum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Sei

    2015-03-10

    We review the recent progress of quantum annealing. Quantum annealing was proposed as a method to solve generic optimization problems. Recently a Canadian company has drawn a great deal of attention, as it has commercialized a quantum computer based on quantum annealing. Although the performance of quantum annealing is not sufficiently understood, it is likely that quantum annealing will be a practical method both on a conventional computer and on a quantum computer.

  1. On the room-temperature phase diagram of high pressure hydrogen: an ab initio molecular dynamics perspective and a diffusion Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Ren, Xinguo; Li, Xin-Zheng; Alfè, Dario; Wang, Enge

    2014-07-14

    The finite-temperature phase diagram of hydrogen in the region of phase IV and its neighborhood was studied using the ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) and the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD). The electronic structures were analyzed using the density-functional theory (DFT), the random-phase approximation, and the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. Taking the state-of-the-art DMC results as benchmark, comparisons of the energy differences between structures generated from the MD and PIMD simulations, with molecular and dissociated hydrogens, respectively, in the weak molecular layers of phase IV, indicate that standard functionals in DFT tend to underestimate the dissociation barrier of the weak molecular layers in this mixed phase. Because of this underestimation, inclusion of the quantum nuclear effects (QNEs) in PIMD using electronic structures generated with these functionals leads to artificially dissociated hydrogen layers in phase IV and an error compensation between the neglect of QNEs and the deficiencies of these functionals in standard ab initio MD simulations exists. This analysis partly rationalizes why earlier ab initio MD simulations complement so well the experimental observations. The temperature and pressure dependencies for the stability of phase IV were also studied in the end and compared with earlier results.

  2. Research progress on quantum informatics and quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2018-03-01

    Quantum informatics is an emerging interdisciplinary subject developed by the combination of quantum mechanics, information science, and computer science in the 1980s. The birth and development of quantum information science has far-reaching significance in science and technology. At present, the application of quantum information technology has become the direction of people’s efforts. The preparation, storage, purification and regulation, transmission, quantum coding and decoding of quantum state have become the hotspot of scientists and technicians, which have a profound impact on the national economy and the people’s livelihood, technology and defense technology. This paper first summarizes the background of quantum information science and quantum computer and the current situation of domestic and foreign research, and then introduces the basic knowledge and basic concepts of quantum computing. Finally, several quantum algorithms are introduced in detail, including Quantum Fourier transform, Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, Shor’s quantum algorithm, quantum phase estimation.

  3. Quantum thermodynamic cycles and quantum heat engines. II.

    PubMed

    Quan, H T

    2009-04-01

    We study the quantum-mechanical generalization of force or pressure, and then we extend the classical thermodynamic isobaric process to quantum-mechanical systems. Based on these efforts, we are able to study the quantum version of thermodynamic cycles that consist of quantum isobaric processes, such as the quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle. We also consider the implementation of the quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle with some model systems, such as single particle in a one-dimensional box and single-mode radiation field in a cavity. These studies lay the microscopic (quantum-mechanical) foundation for Szilard-Zurek single-molecule engine.

  4. Long distance quantum communication with quantum Reed-Solomon codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Zou, Chang-Ling; Li, Linshu; Jiang, Liang; Jianggroup Team

    We study the construction of quantum Reed Solomon codes from classical Reed Solomon codes and show that they achieve the capacity of quantum erasure channel for multi-level quantum systems. We extend the application of quantum Reed Solomon codes to long distance quantum communication, investigate the local resource overhead needed for the functioning of one-way quantum repeaters with these codes, and numerically identify the parameter regime where these codes perform better than the known quantum polynomial codes and quantum parity codes . Finally, we discuss the implementation of these codes into time-bin photonic states of qubits and qudits respectively, and optimize the performance for one-way quantum repeaters.

  5. Single-server blind quantum computation with quantum circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Weng, Jian; Li, Xiaochun; Luo, Weiqi; Tan, Xiaoqing; Song, Tingting

    2018-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) enables the client, who has few quantum technologies, to delegate her quantum computation to a server, who has strong quantum computabilities and learns nothing about the client's quantum inputs, outputs and algorithms. In this article, we propose a single-server BQC protocol with quantum circuit model by replacing any quantum gate with the combination of rotation operators. The trap quantum circuits are introduced, together with the combination of rotation operators, such that the server is unknown about quantum algorithms. The client only needs to perform operations X and Z, while the server honestly performs rotation operators.

  6. Fermionic entanglement via quantum walks in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Fedichkin, Leonid E.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum walks are fundamentally different from random walks due to the quantum superposition property of quantum objects. Quantum walk process was found to be very useful for quantum information and quantum computation applications. In this paper we demonstrate how to use quantum walks as a tool to generate high-dimensional two-particle fermionic entanglement. The generated entanglement can survive longer in the presence of depolorazing noise due to the periodicity of quantum walk dynamics. The possibility to create two distinguishable qudits in a system of tunnel-coupled semiconductor quantum dots is discussed.

  7. Intermediate quantum maps for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, O.; Georgeot, B.

    2005-10-01

    We study quantum maps displaying spectral statistics intermediate between Poisson and Wigner-Dyson. It is shown that they can be simulated on a quantum computer with a small number of gates, and efficiently yield information about fidelity decay or spectral statistics. We study their matrix elements and entanglement production and show that they converge with time to distributions which differ from random matrix predictions. A randomized version of these maps can be implemented even more economically and yields pseudorandom operators with original properties, enabling, for example, one to produce fractal random vectors. These algorithms are within reach of present-day quantum computers.

  8. ABS 3D printed solutions for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolomé, E.; Bozzo, B.; Sevilla, P.; Martínez-Pasarell, O.; Puig, T.; Granados, X.

    2017-03-01

    3D printing has become a common, inexpensive and rapid prototyping technique, enabling the ad hoc fabrication of complex shapes. In this paper, we demonstrate that 3D printed objects in ABS can be used at cryogenic temperatures, offering flexible solutions in different fields. Firstly, a thermo-mechanical characterization of ABS 3D printed specimens at 77 K is reported, which allowed us to delimit the type of cryogenic uses where 3D printed pieces may be implemented. Secondly, we present three different examples where ABS 3D printed objects working at low temperatures have provided specific solutions: (i) SQUID inserts for angular magnetometry (low temperature material characterization field); (ii) a cage support for a metamaterial ;magnetic concentrator; (superconductivity application), and (iii) dedicated tools for cryopreservation in assisted reproductive techniques (medicine field).

  9. Finding Effective Models in Transition Metals using Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kiel; Wagner, Lucas K.

    There is a gap between high-accuracy ab-initio calculations, like those produced from Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), and effective lattice models such as the Hubbard model. We have developed a method that combines data produced from QMC with fitting techniques taken from data science, allowing us to determine which degrees of freedom are required to connect ab-initio and model calculations. We test this approach for transition metal atoms, where spectroscopic reference data exists. We report on the accuracy of several derived effective models that include different degrees of freedom, and comment on the quality of the parameter values we obtain from our fitting procedure. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant Number DGE-1144245 (K.T.W.) and from SciDAC Grant DE-FG02-12ER46875 (L.K.W.).

  10. Distinguishability of stacks in ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dots via spectral analysis of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bidisha; Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Cadieu, Fred J.; Peng, Le; Moug, Richard; Tamargo, Maria C.; Kuskovsky, Igor L.

    2013-02-01

    A spectral analysis of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations in photoluminescence intensity was performed for stacked type-II ZnTe/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) fabricated within multilayered Zn-Se-Te system with sub-monolayer insertions of Te. Robust AB oscillations allowed for fine probing of distinguishable QDs stacks within the ensemble of QDs. The AB transition magnetic field, B AB , changed from the lower energy side to the higher energy side of the PL spectra revealing the presence of different sets of QDs stacks. The change occurs within the spectral range, where the contributing green and blue bands of the spectra overlapped. "Bundling" in lifetime measurements is seen at transition spectral regions confirming the results.

  11. Lithium cluster anions: photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Boldyrev, Alexander I; Li, Xiang; Sarkas, Harry W; Hendricks, Jay H; Arnold, Susan T; Bowen, Kit H

    2011-01-28

    Structural and energetic properties of small, deceptively simple anionic clusters of lithium, Li(n)(-), n = 3-7, were determined using a combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The most stable isomers of each of these anions, the ones most likely to contribute to the photoelectron spectra, were found using the gradient embedded genetic algorithm program. Subsequently, state-of-the-art ab initio techniques, including time-dependent density functional theory, coupled cluster, and multireference configurational interactions methods, were employed to interpret the experimental spectra.

  12. An ABS control logic based on wheel force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, D.; Galvagno, E.; Ondrak, V.; van Leeuwen, B.; Vigliani, A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents an anti-lock braking system (ABS) control logic based on the measurement of the longitudinal forces at the hub bearings. The availability of force information allows to design a logic that does not rely on the estimation of the tyre-road friction coefficient, since it continuously tries to exploit the maximum longitudinal tyre force. The logic is designed by means of computer simulation and then tested on a specific hardware in the loop test bench: the experimental results confirm that measured wheel force can lead to a significant improvement of the ABS performances in terms of stopping distance also in the presence of road with variable friction coefficient.

  13. Student Measurements of STFA 10AB (Theta Tauri)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Sean; Estrada, Chris; Estrada, Reed; Aguilera, Sophia; Chavez, Valerie; Givens, Jalynn; Lindorfer, Sarah; Michels, Kaylie; Mobley, Makenzie; Reder, Gabriel; Renteria, Kayla; Shattles, Jenna; Wilkin, Aiden; Woodbury, Maisy; Rhoades, Breauna; Rhoades, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Eighth grade students at Vanguard Preparatory School measured the double star STFA 10AB using a 22-inch Newtonian Alt/Az telescope and a Celestron Micro Guide eyepiece. Bellatrix was used as the calibration star. The calculated means of multiple observations of STFA 10AB resulted in a separation of 45.18,” a scale constant of 7.88 arcseconds per division, and position angle of 257.9°. These measurements were compared to the most recent values in the Washington Double Star Catalog.

  14. Ab initio calculation of one-nucleon halo states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodkin, D. M.; Tchuvil'sky, Yu M.

    2018-02-01

    We develop an approach to microscopic and ab initio description of clustered systems, states with halo nucleon and one-nucleon resonances. For these purposes a basis combining ordinary shell-model components and cluster-channel terms is built up. The transformation of clustered wave functions to the uniform Slater-determinant type is performed using the concept of cluster coefficients. The resulting basis of orthonormalized wave functions is used for calculating the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of Hamiltonians built in the framework of ab initio approaches. Calculations of resonance and halo states of 5He, 9Be and 9B nuclei demonstrate that the approach is workable and labor-saving.

  15. Quasiparticle Interference Studies of Quantum Materials.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Nurit; Reiner, Jonathan; Kumar-Nayak, Abhay; Morali, Noam; Batabyal, Rajib; Yan, Binghai; Beidenkopf, Haim

    2018-06-03

    Exotic electronic states are realized in novel quantum materials. This field is revolutionized by the topological classification of materials. Such compounds necessarily host unique states on their boundaries. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of these surface states have provided a wealth of spectroscopic characterization, with the successful cooperation of ab initio calculations. The method of quasiparticle interference imaging proves to be particularly useful for probing the dispersion relation of the surface bands. Herein, how a variety of additional fundamental electronic properties can be probed via this method is reviewed. It is demonstrated how quasiparticle interference measurements entail mesoscopic size quantization and the electronic phase coherence in semiconducting nanowires; helical spin protection and energy-momentum fluctuations in a topological insulator; and the structure of the Bloch wave function and the relative insusceptibility of topological electronic states to surface potential in a topological Weyl semimetal. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Sensitivity of ab Initio vs Empirical Methods in Computing Structural Effects on NMR Chemical Shifts for the Example of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Sumowski, Chris Vanessa; Hanni, Matti; Schweizer, Sabine; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-01-14

    The structural sensitivity of NMR chemical shifts as computed by quantum chemical methods is compared to a variety of empirical approaches for the example of a prototypical peptide, the 38-residue kaliotoxin KTX comprising 573 atoms. Despite the simplicity of empirical chemical shift prediction programs, the agreement with experimental results is rather good, underlining their usefulness. However, we show in our present work that they are highly insensitive to structural changes, which renders their use for validating predicted structures questionable. In contrast, quantum chemical methods show the expected high sensitivity to structural and electronic changes. This appears to be independent of the quantum chemical approach or the inclusion of solvent effects. For the latter, explicit solvent simulations with increasing number of snapshots were performed for two conformers of an eight amino acid sequence. In conclusion, the empirical approaches neither provide the expected magnitude nor the patterns of NMR chemical shifts determined by the clearly more costly ab initio methods upon structural changes. This restricts the use of empirical prediction programs in studies where peptide and protein structures are utilized for the NMR chemical shift evaluation such as in NMR refinement processes, structural model verifications, or calculations of NMR nuclear spin relaxation rates.

  17. Bound state potential energy surface construction: ab initio zero-point energies and vibrationally averaged rotational constants.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Ryan P A

    2003-01-15

    Collins' method of interpolating a potential energy surface (PES) from quantum chemical calculations for reactive systems (Jordan, M. J. T.; Thompson, K. C.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1995, 102, 5647. Thompson, K. C.; Jordan, M. J. T.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 108, 8302. Bettens, R. P. A.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1999, 111, 816) has been applied to a bound state problem. The interpolation method has been combined for the first time with quantum diffusion Monte Carlo calculations to obtain an accurate ground state zero-point energy, the vibrationally average rotational constants, and the vibrationally averaged internal coordinates. In particular, the system studied was fluoromethane using a composite method approximating the QCISD(T)/6-311++G(2df,2p) level of theory. The approach adopted in this work (a) is fully automated, (b) is fully ab initio, (c) includes all nine nuclear degrees of freedom, (d) requires no assumption of the functional form of the PES, (e) possesses the full symmetry of the system, (f) does not involve fitting any parameters of any kind, and (g) is generally applicable to any system amenable to quantum chemical calculations and Collins' interpolation method. The calculated zero-point energy agrees to within 0.2% of its current best estimate. A0 and B0 are within 0.9 and 0.3%, respectively, of experiment.

  18. Introduction to the Neutrosophic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2014-10-01

    Neutrosophic Quantum Theory (NQT) is the study of the principle that certain physical quantities can assume neutrosophic values, instead of discrete values as in quantum theory. These quantities are thus neutrosophically quantized. A neutrosophic values (neutrosophic amount) is expressed by a set (mostly an interval) that approximates (or includes) a discrete value. An oscillator can lose or gain energy by some neutrosophic amount (we mean neither continuously nor discretely, but as a series of integral sets: S, 2S, 3S, ..., where S is a set). In the most general form, one has an ensemble of sets of sets, i.e. R1S1 ,R2S2 ,R3S3 , ..., where all Rn and Sn are sets that may vary in function of time and of other parameters. Several such sets may be equal, or may be reduced to points, or may be empty. {The multiplication of two sets A and B is classically defined as: AB ={ab, a??A and b??B}. And similarly a number n times a set A is defined as: nA ={na, a??A}.} The unit of neutrosophic energy is Hν , where H is a set (in particular an interval) that includes Planck constant h, and ν is the frequency. Therefore, an oscillator could change its energy by a neutrosophic number of quanta: Hν , 2H ν, 3H ν, etc. For example, when H is an interval [h1 ,h2 ] , with 0 <=h1 <=h2 , that contains Planck constant h, then one has: [h1 ν ,h2 ν ], [2h1 ν , 2h2 ν ], [3h1 ν , 3h2 ν ],..., as series of intervals of energy change of the oscillator. The most general form of the units of neutrosophic energy is Hnνn , where all Hn and νn are sets that similarly as above may vary in function of time and of other oscillator and environment parameters. Neutrosophic quantum theory combines classical mechanics and quantum mechanics.

  19. Ab initio Computations of the Electronic, Mechanical, and Thermal Properties of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Daw, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Refractory materials such as metallic borides, often considered as ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC), are characterized by high melting point, high hardness, and good chemical inertness. These materials have many applications which require high temperature materials that can operate with no or limited oxidation. Ab initio, first principles methods are the most accurate modeling approaches available and represent a parameter free description of the material based on the quantum mechanical equations. Using these methods, many of the intrinsic properties of these material can be obtained. We performed ab initio calculations based on density functional theory for the UHTC materials ZrB2 and HfB2. Computational results are presented for structural information (lattice constants, bond lengths, etc), electronic structure (bonding motifs, densities of states, band structure, etc), thermal quantities (phonon spectra, phonon densities of states, specific heat), as well as information about point defects such as vacancy and antisite formation energies.

  20. Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Whitfield, J D; Gillett, G G; Goggin, M E; Almeida, M P; Kassal, I; Biamonte, J D; Mohseni, M; Powell, B J; Barbieri, M; Aspuru-Guzik, A; White, A G

    2010-02-01

    Exact first-principles calculations of molecular properties are currently intractable because their computational cost grows exponentially with both the number of atoms and basis set size. A solution is to move to a radically different model of computing by building a quantum computer, which is a device that uses quantum systems themselves to store and process data. Here we report the application of the latest photonic quantum computer technology to calculate properties of the smallest molecular system: the hydrogen molecule in a minimal basis. We calculate the complete energy spectrum to 20 bits of precision and discuss how the technique can be expanded to solve large-scale chemical problems that lie beyond the reach of modern supercomputers. These results represent an early practical step toward a powerful tool with a broad range of quantum-chemical applications.

  1. Quantum discord and Maxwell's demons

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2003-01-01

    Quantum discord was proposed as an information-theoretic measure of the 'quantumness' of correlations. I show that discord determines the difference between the efficiency of quantum and classical Maxwell's demons - that is, entities that can or cannot measure nonlocal observables or carry out conditional quantum operations - in extracting work from collections of correlated quantum systems.

  2. Quantum inertia stops superposition: Scan Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2017-08-01

    Scan Quantum Mechanics is a novel interpretation of some aspects of quantum mechanics in which the superposition of states is only an approximate effective concept. Quantum systems scan all possible states in the superposition and switch randomly and very rapidly among them. A crucial property that we postulate is quantum inertia, that increases whenever a constituent is added, or the system is perturbed with all kinds of interactions. Once the quantum inertia Iq reaches a critical value Icr for an observable, the switching among its different eigenvalues stops and the corresponding superposition comes to an end, leaving behind a system with a well defined value of that observable. Consequently, increasing the mass, temperature, gravitational strength, etc. of a quantum system increases its quantum inertia until the superposition of states disappears for all the observables and the system transmutes into a classical one. Moreover, the process could be reversible. Entanglement can only occur between quantum systems because an exact synchronization between the switchings of the systems involved must be established in the first place and classical systems do not have any switchings to start with. Future experiments might determine the critical inertia Icr corresponding to different observables, which translates into a critical mass Mcr for fixed environmental conditions as well as critical temperatures, critical electric and magnetic fields, etc. In addition, this proposal implies a new radiation mechanism from astrophysical objects with strong gravitational fields, giving rise to non-thermal synchrotron emission, that could contribute to neutron star formation. Superconductivity, superfluidity, Bose-Einstein condensates, and any other physical phenomena at very low temperatures must be reanalyzed in the light of this interpretation, as well as mesoscopic systems in general.

  3. Decoherence in quantum mechanics and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1992-01-01

    A sketch of the quantum mechanics for closed systems adequate for cosmology is presented. This framework is an extension and clarification of that of Everett and builds on several aspects of the post-Everett development. It especially builds on the work of Zeh, Zurek, Joos and Zeh, and others on the interactions of quantum systems with the larger universe and on the ideas of Griffiths, Omnes, and others on the requirements for consistent probabilities of histories.

  4. Quantum Nash Equilibria and Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip Vos; Post, Jonathan Vos

    In 2004, At the Fifth International Conference on Complex Systems, we drew attention to some remarkable findings by researchers at the Santa Fe Institute (Sato, Farmer and Akiyama, 2001) about hitherto unsuspected complexity in the Nash Equilibrium. As we progressed from these findings about heteroclinic Hamiltonians and chaotic transients hidden within the learning patterns of the simple rock-paper-scissors game to some related findings on the theory of quantum computing, one of the arguments we put forward was just as in the late 1990's a number of new Nash equilibria were discovered in simple bi-matrix games (Shubik and Quint, 1996; Von Stengel, 1997, 2000; and McLennan and Park, 1999) we would begin to see new Nash equilibria discovered as the result of quantum computation. While actual quantum computers remain rather primitive (Toibman, 2004), and the theory of quantum computation seems to be advancing perhaps a bit more slowly than originally expected, there have, nonetheless, been a number of advances in computation and some more radical advances in an allied field, quantum game theory (Huberman and Hogg, 2004) which are quite significant. In the course of this paper we will review a few of these discoveries and illustrate some of the characteristics of these new "Quantum Nash Equilibria". The full text of this research can be found at http://necsi.org/events/iccs6/viewpaper.php?id-234

  5. Quantum Common Causes and Quantum Causal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John-Mark A.; Barrett, Jonathan; Horsman, Dominic C.; Lee, Ciarán M.; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2017-07-01

    Reichenbach's principle asserts that if two observed variables are found to be correlated, then there should be a causal explanation of these correlations. Furthermore, if the explanation is in terms of a common cause, then the conditional probability distribution over the variables given the complete common cause should factorize. The principle is generalized by the formalism of causal models, in which the causal relationships among variables constrain the form of their joint probability distribution. In the quantum case, however, the observed correlations in Bell experiments cannot be explained in the manner Reichenbach's principle would seem to demand. Motivated by this, we introduce a quantum counterpart to the principle. We demonstrate that under the assumption that quantum dynamics is fundamentally unitary, if a quantum channel with input A and outputs B and C is compatible with A being a complete common cause of B and C , then it must factorize in a particular way. Finally, we show how to generalize our quantum version of Reichenbach's principle to a formalism for quantum causal models and provide examples of how the formalism works.

  6. Quantum random oracle model for quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tao; Lei, Qi; Liu, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work is to provide a general security analysis tool, namely, the quantum random oracle (QRO), for facilitating the security analysis of quantum cryptographic protocols, especially protocols based on quantum one-way function. QRO is used to model quantum one-way function and different queries to QRO are used to model quantum attacks. A typical application of quantum one-way function is the quantum digital signature, whose progress has been hampered by the slow pace of the experimental realization. Alternatively, we use the QRO model to analyze the provable security of a quantum digital signature scheme and elaborate the analysis procedure. The QRO model differs from the prior quantum-accessible random oracle in that it can output quantum states as public keys and give responses to different queries. This tool can be a test bed for the cryptanalysis of more quantum cryptographic protocols based on the quantum one-way function.

  7. Procedural Quantum Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ömer, Bernhard

    2002-09-01

    While classical computing science has developed a variety of methods and programming languages around the concept of the universal computer, the typical description of quantum algorithms still uses a purely mathematical, non-constructive formalism which makes no difference between a hydrogen atom and a quantum computer. This paper investigates, how the concept of procedural programming languages, the most widely used classical formalism for describing and implementing algorithms, can be adopted to the field of quantum computing, and how non-classical features like the reversibility of unitary transformations, the non-observability of quantum states or the lack of copy and erase operations can be reflected semantically. It introduces the key concepts of procedural quantum programming (hybrid target architecture, operator hierarchy, quantum data types, memory management, etc.) and presents the experimental language QCL, which implements these principles.

  8. Quantum-secured blockchain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiktenko, E. O.; Pozhar, N. O.; Anufriev, M. N.; Trushechkin, A. S.; Yunusov, R. R.; Kurochkin, Y. V.; Lvovsky, A. I.; Fedorov, A. K.

    2018-07-01

    Blockchain is a distributed database which is cryptographically protected against malicious modifications. While promising for a wide range of applications, current blockchain platforms rely on digital signatures, which are vulnerable to attacks by means of quantum computers. The same, albeit to a lesser extent, applies to cryptographic hash functions that are used in preparing new blocks, so parties with access to quantum computation would have unfair advantage in procuring mining rewards. Here we propose a possible solution to the quantum era blockchain challenge and report an experimental realization of a quantum-safe blockchain platform that utilizes quantum key distribution across an urban fiber network for information-theoretically secure authentication. These results address important questions about realizability and scalability of quantum-safe blockchains for commercial and governmental applications.

  9. Quantum-circuit refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kuan Yen; Partanen, Matti; Lake, Russell E.; Govenius, Joonas; Masuda, Shumpei; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-05-01

    Quantum technology promises revolutionizing applications in information processing, communications, sensing and modelling. However, efficient on-demand cooling of the functional quantum degrees of freedom remains challenging in many solid-state implementations, such as superconducting circuits. Here we demonstrate direct cooling of a superconducting resonator mode using voltage-controllable electron tunnelling in a nanoscale refrigerator. This result is revealed by a decreased electron temperature at a resonator-coupled probe resistor, even for an elevated electron temperature at the refrigerator. Our conclusions are verified by control experiments and by a good quantitative agreement between theory and experimental observations at various operation voltages and bath temperatures. In the future, we aim to remove spurious dissipation introduced by our refrigerator and to decrease the operational temperature. Such an ideal quantum-circuit refrigerator has potential applications in the initialization of quantum electric devices. In the superconducting quantum computer, for example, fast and accurate reset of the quantum memory is needed.

  10. Quantum physics meets biology.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Markus; Juffmann, Thomas; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-12-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the past decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world-view of quantum coherences, entanglement, and other nonclassical effects, has been heading toward systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a "pedestrian guide" to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future "quantum biology," its current status, recent experimental progress, and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

  11. Practical quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  12. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics.

  13. Quantum Speed Limits across the Quantum-to-Classical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, B.; Chenu, A.; Margolus, N.; del Campo, A.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum speed limits set an upper bound to the rate at which a quantum system can evolve. Adopting a phase-space approach, we explore quantum speed limits across the quantum-to-classical transition and identify equivalent bounds in the classical world. As a result, and contrary to common belief, we show that speed limits exist for both quantum and classical systems. As in the quantum domain, classical speed limits are set by a given norm of the generator of time evolution.

  14. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang, E-mail: lqiu@cumt.edu.cn; Li, Song

    2015-01-15

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in (n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  15. Generalized Causal Quantum Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmeggiani, Claudio

    2007-12-01

    We shall show that is always possible to construct causal Quantum Theories fully equivalent (as predictive tools) to acausal, standard Quantum Theory, relativistic or not relativistic; we re-obtain, as a particular case, the usual Quantum Bohmian Theory. Then we consider the measurement process, in causal theories, and we conclude that the state of affairs is not really improved, with respect to standard theories.

  16. Quantum Gravitational Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Baessler, Stefan; ...

    2015-01-01

    We report that one of the main goals for improving the accuracy of quantum gravitational spectroscopy with neutrons is searches for extra short-range fundamental forces. We discuss also any progress in all competing nonneutron methods as well as constraints at other characteristic distances. Among major methodical developments related to the phenomenon of gravitational quantum states are the detailed theoretical analysis and the planning experiments on observation of gravitational quantum states of antihydrogen atoms.

  17. Secure quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Secure communication is crucial in the Internet Age, and quantum mechanics stands poised to revolutionize cryptography as we know it today. In this Review, we introduce the motivation and the current state of the art of research in quantum cryptography. In particular, we discuss the present security model together with its assumptions, strengths and weaknesses. After briefly introducing recent experimental progress and challenges, we survey the latest developments in quantum hacking and countermeasures against it.

  18. Virtual quantum subsystems.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, P

    2001-08-13

    The physical resources available to access and manipulate the degrees of freedom of a quantum system define the set A of operationally relevant observables. The algebraic structure of A selects a preferred tensor product structure, i.e., a partition into subsystems. The notion of compoundness for quantum systems is accordingly relativized. Universal control over virtual subsystems can be achieved by using quantum noncommutative holonomies

  19. Quantum game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohler, Michael Lehman

    2002-01-01

    Non-cooperative quantum games have received much attention recently. This thesis defines and divides current works into two major categories of gaming techniques with close attention paid to Nash equilibria, form and possibilities for the payoff functions, and the benefits of using a quantum strategy. In addition to comparing and contrasting these techniques, new applications and calculations are discussed. Finally, the techniques are expanded into 3 x 3 games which allows the study of non-transitive strategies in quantum games.

  20. Quantum dense key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Castelletto, S.

    2004-03-01

    This paper proposes a protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than the Bennet-Brassard 1984 protocol. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  1. Leukocyte adhesion: High-speed cells with ABS.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, P A

    1999-06-03

    In order to decide where to exit blood vessels and enter tissues, leukocytes roll along endothelial surfaces. Recent studies suggest that an 'automatic braking system' (ABS), involving selectin cell-adhesion molecules, enables leukocytes to roll at a fairly constant velocity despite large variations in blood flow rate.

  2. AB Toxins: A Paradigm Switch from Deadly to Desirable

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Yano, Hiroshi; Langridge, William

    2010-01-01

    To ensure their survival, a number of bacterial and plant species have evolved a common strategy to capture energy from other biological systems. Being imperfect pathogens, organisms synthesizing multi-subunit AB toxins are responsible for the mortality of millions of people and animals annually. Vaccination against these organisms and their toxins has proved rather ineffective in providing long-term protection from disease. In response to the debilitating effects of AB toxins on epithelial cells of the digestive mucosa, mechanisms underlying toxin immunomodulation of immune responses have become the focus of increasing experimentation. The results of these studies reveal that AB toxins may have a beneficial application as adjuvants for the enhancement of immune protection against infection and autoimmunity. Here, we examine similarities and differences in the structure and function of bacterial and plant AB toxins that underlie their toxicity and their exceptional properties as immunomodulators for stimulating immune responses against infectious disease and for immune suppression of organ-specific autoimmunity. PMID:22069653

  3. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Luehr, Nathan; Markland, Thomas E; Martínez, Todd J

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  4. Ab initio interatomic potentials and the thermodynamic properties of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Sadus, Richard J.

    2017-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations with accurate ab initio interatomic potentials are used to investigate the key thermodynamic properties of argon and krypton in both vapor and liquid phases. Data are reported for the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, the Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound calculated using various two-body interatomic potentials and different combinations of two-body plus three-body terms. The results are compared to either experimental or reference data at state points between the triple and critical points. Using accurate two-body ab initio potentials, combined with three-body interaction terms such as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto and Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potentials, yields systematic improvements to the accuracy of thermodynamic predictions. The effect of three-body interactions is to lower the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities and increase both the Joule-Thomson coefficient and speed of sound. The Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potential is a computationally inexpensive way to utilize accurate two-body ab initio potentials for the prediction of thermodynamic properties. In particular, it provides a very effective way of extending two-body ab initio potentials to liquid phase properties.

  5. A-B Distinction in a Sample of Prominent Psychotherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Jesse D.; Berzins, Juris I.

    1976-01-01

    A sample of prominent psychotherapists were asked to fill out the A-B therapist "type" scale and comment on their possible differential effectiveness in treating schizoid/schizophrenic versus neurotic patients. The data suggest that B therapists desire and seek more complex and exciting sensory-cognitive inputs during therapy hours than A…

  6. Ab initio calculations of the lattice dynamics of silver halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. B.; Kravchenko, N. G.; Sedelnikov, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    Based on ab initio pseudopotential calculations, the results of investigations of the lattice dynamics of silver halides AgHal (Hal = Cl, Br, I) are presented. Equilibrium lattice parameters, phonon spectra, frequency densities and effective atomic-charge values are obtained for all types of crystals under study.

  7. Information Manual: Procedures, Planning Concepts, Subsystems. ABS Publication No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley.

    This report, the third in a series which presents the results of a systems analysis of the problem of providing science and engineering buildings at the university level, is a technical manual for using the Academic Building Systems (ABS) approach in programing, designing, and constructing such facilities. The document presents (1) planning…

  8. Food for Thought on the "ABS Academic Journal Quality Guide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses issues relating to the use of the Association of Business Schools' (ABS) "Academic Journal Quality Guide" within UK business schools. It also looks at several specific issues raised by the Chair of the British Accounting Association/British Accounting and Finance Association regarding the ratings for top…

  9. The application of ab initio calculations to molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in ab initio molecular structure calculations is reviewed with an emphasis on recent developments, such as full configuration-interaction benchmark calculations and atomic natural orbital basis sets. It is found that new developments in methodology, combined with improvements in computer hardware, are leading to unprecedented accuracy in solving problems in spectroscopy.

  10. The application of ab initio calculations to molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in ab initio molecular structure calculations is reviewed, with an emphasis on recent developments such as full configuration-interaction benchmark calculations and atomic natural orbital basis sets. It is shown that new developments in methodology combined with improvements in computer hardware are leading to unprecedented accuracy in solving problems in spectroscopy.

  11. Pseudosymmetric features of non-centrosymmetric AB type crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gazhulina, A.P., E-mail: asyagazhulina@yandex.ru; Marychev, M.O.

    2016-07-15

    This work is supplement to our previous investigation (Gazhulina and Marychev, 2015) [1]. We have considered pseudosymmetric features with respect to the operation of inversion (pseudoinversion) for 340 non-centrosymmetric AB type crystals. Analysis of the features of particular structure types allowed us to determine the positions of pseudoinversion centers, subdivide them into separate types, and classify the entire set of crystals studied with respect to the types of pseudoinversion centers and peculiarities of the behavior of the degree of pseudoinversion depending on the ratio of atomic numbers of A and B components. For each group of crystals, average values andmore » lower boundaries of the maximum pseudoinversion are determined and distribution with respect to the degree of pseudoinversion is constructed. - Graphical abstract: A group of 340 non-centrosymmetric AB type crystals have been considered for their pseudosymmetry features with respect to the operation of inversion. Positions of pseudoinversion centers, subdivision of them into separate types, classification of the entire set of crystals studied with respect to the types of pseudoinversion centers and peculiarities of the behavior of the degree of pseudoinversion are established and discussed. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We consider pseudoinversion of 340 non-centrosymmetric AB type crystals. • AB type crystals are divided into three groups with respect to pseudoinversion. • Positions and types of pseudoinversion centers are determined. • Lower boundaries of the maximum pseudoinversion are determined.« less

  12. Further Food for Thought on the "ABS Guide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper replies to points raised by the editors of the "ABS Guide", Huw Morris, Charles Harvey, Aidan Kelly and Michael Rowlinson (2011) "Accounting Education: an international journal", 20(6), pp. 561-573) in response to a paper published in a previous issue of "Accounting Education" (Hussain, S. (2011)…

  13. Bicanonical ab Initio Molecular Dynamics for Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Johannes; Meyer, Bernd; Marx, Dominik

    2017-08-08

    Performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of open systems, where the chemical potential rather than the number of both nuclei and electrons is fixed, still is a challenge. Here, drawing on bicanonical sampling ideas introduced two decades ago by Swope and Andersen [ J. Chem. Phys. 1995 , 102 , 2851 - 2863 ] to calculate chemical potentials of liquids and solids, an ab initio simulation technique is devised, which introduces a fictitious dynamics of two superimposed but otherwise independent periodic systems including full electronic structure, such that either the chemical potential or the average fractional particle number of a specific chemical species can be kept constant. As proof of concept, we demonstrate that solvation free energies can be computed from these bicanonical ab initio simulations upon directly superimposing pure bulk water and the respective aqueous solution being the two limiting systems. The method is useful in many circumstances, for instance for studying heterogeneous catalytic processes taking place on surfaces where the chemical potential of reactants rather than their number is controlled and opens a pathway toward ab initio simulations at constant electrochemical potential.

  14. Ab initio interatomic potentials and the thermodynamic properties of fluids.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Sadus, Richard J

    2017-07-14

    Monte Carlo simulations with accurate ab initio interatomic potentials are used to investigate the key thermodynamic properties of argon and krypton in both vapor and liquid phases. Data are reported for the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, the Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound calculated using various two-body interatomic potentials and different combinations of two-body plus three-body terms. The results are compared to either experimental or reference data at state points between the triple and critical points. Using accurate two-body ab initio potentials, combined with three-body interaction terms such as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto and Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potentials, yields systematic improvements to the accuracy of thermodynamic predictions. The effect of three-body interactions is to lower the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities and increase both the Joule-Thomson coefficient and speed of sound. The Marcelli-Wang-Sadus potential is a computationally inexpensive way to utilize accurate two-body ab initio potentials for the prediction of thermodynamic properties. In particular, it provides a very effective way of extending two-body ab initio potentials to liquid phase properties.

  15. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen-bond network of an enzyme active site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2014-12-30

    Enzymes use protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here, we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen-bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active-site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen-bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  16. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen-bond network of an enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Fried, Stephen D.; Boxer, Steven G.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes use protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here, we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen-bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active-site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen-bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen-bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds. PMID:25503367

  17. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    . These nodes are spaced far enough from each other to minimized the electronic repulsion of the electrons, while still providing adequate enough attraction so as to bind the excess elections into orbitals. We have found that even with relativistic considerations these species are stably bound within the field. It was also found that performing the dimensional scaling calculations for systems within the confines of laser fields to be a much simpler and more cost-effective method than the supporting D=3 SCF method. The dimensional scaling method is general and can be extended to include relativistic corrections to describe the stability of simple molecular systems in super-intense laser fields. Chapter 3, we delineate the model, and aspects therein, of inelastic electron tunneling and map this model to the protein environment. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptors that sense molecules outside of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways inside the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is important for understanding a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by an encapsulated agonist. In this note we apply this notion to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using ab initio quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a singular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak that scales in intensity with the known agonist activities. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its isotopologues in which hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and better in silico prediction of

  18. Quantum simulator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednar, Earl; Drager, Steven L.

    2007-04-01

    Quantum information processing's objective is to utilize revolutionary computing capability based on harnessing the paradigm shift offered by quantum computing to solve classically hard and computationally challenging problems. Some of our computationally challenging problems of interest include: the capability for rapid image processing, rapid optimization of logistics, protecting information, secure distributed simulation, and massively parallel computation. Currently, one important problem with quantum information processing is that the implementation of quantum computers is difficult to realize due to poor scalability and great presence of errors. Therefore, we have supported the development of Quantum eXpress and QuIDD Pro, two quantum computer simulators running on classical computers for the development and testing of new quantum algorithms and processes. This paper examines the different methods used by these two quantum computing simulators. It reviews both simulators, highlighting each simulators background, interface, and special features. It also demonstrates the implementation of current quantum algorithms on each simulator. It concludes with summary comments on both simulators.

  19. Quantum random access memory.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2008-04-25

    A random access memory (RAM) uses n bits to randomly address N=2(n) distinct memory cells. A quantum random access memory (QRAM) uses n qubits to address any quantum superposition of N memory cells. We present an architecture that exponentially reduces the requirements for a memory call: O(logN) switches need be thrown instead of the N used in conventional (classical or quantum) RAM designs. This yields a more robust QRAM algorithm, as it in general requires entanglement among exponentially less gates, and leads to an exponential decrease in the power needed for addressing. A quantum optical implementation is presented.

  20. Energy efficient quantum machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abah, Obinna; Lutz, Eric

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the performance of a quantum thermal machine operating in finite time based on shortcut-to-adiabaticity techniques. We compute efficiency and power for a paradigmatic harmonic quantum Otto engine by taking the energetic cost of the shortcut driving explicitly into account. We demonstrate that shortcut-to-adiabaticity machines outperform conventional ones for fast cycles. We further derive generic upper bounds on both quantities, valid for any heat engine cycle, using the notion of quantum speed limit for driven systems. We establish that these quantum bounds are tighter than those stemming from the second law of thermodynamics.

  1. Partial quantum information.

    PubMed

    Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Winter, Andreas

    2005-08-04

    Information--be it classical or quantum--is measured by the amount of communication needed to convey it. In the classical case, if the receiver has some prior information about the messages being conveyed, less communication is needed. Here we explore the concept of prior quantum information: given an unknown quantum state distributed over two systems, we determine how much quantum communication is needed to transfer the full state to one system. This communication measures the partial information one system needs, conditioned on its prior information. We find that it is given by the conditional entropy--a quantity that was known previously, but lacked an operational meaning. In the classical case, partial information must always be positive, but we find that in the quantum world this physical quantity can be negative. If the partial information is positive, its sender needs to communicate this number of quantum bits to the receiver; if it is negative, then sender and receiver instead gain the corresponding potential for future quantum communication. We introduce a protocol that we term 'quantum state merging' which optimally transfers partial information. We show how it enables a systematic understanding of quantum network theory, and discuss several important applications including distributed compression, noiseless coding with side information, multiple access channels and assisted entanglement distillation.

  2. Quantum Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak

    2018-01-01

    Quantum computing promises an unprecedented ability to solve intractable problems by harnessing quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling, superposition, and entanglement. The Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) at NASA Ames Research Center is the space agency's primary facility for conducting research and development in quantum information sciences. QuAIL conducts fundamental research in quantum physics but also explores how best to exploit and apply this disruptive technology to enable NASA missions in aeronautics, Earth and space sciences, and space exploration. At the same time, machine learning has become a major focus in computer science and captured the imagination of the public as a panacea to myriad big data problems. In this talk, we will discuss how classical machine learning can take advantage of quantum computing to significantly improve its effectiveness. Although we illustrate this concept on a quantum annealer, other quantum platforms could be used as well. If explored fully and implemented efficiently, quantum machine learning could greatly accelerate a wide range of tasks leading to new technologies and discoveries that will significantly change the way we solve real-world problems.

  3. Resolution of quantum singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkowski, Deborah; Helliwell, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A review of quantum singularities in static and conformally static spacetimes is given. A spacetime is said to be quantum mechanically non-singular if a quantum wave packet does not feel, in some sense, the presence of a singularity; mathematically, this means that the wave operator is essentially self-adjoint on the space of square integrable functions. Spacetimes with classical mild singularities (quasiregular ones) to spacetimes with classical strong curvature singularities have been tested. Here we discuss the similarities and differences between classical singularities that are healed quantum mechanically and those that are not. Possible extensions of the mathematical technique to more physically realistic spacetimes are discussed.

  4. Threshold quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  5. Quantum Physics in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, I.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses a teaching strategy for introducing quantum ideas into the school classroom using modern devices. Develops the concepts of quantization, wave-particle duality, nonlocality, and tunneling. (JRH)

  6. Tomographic quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yeong Cherng; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2003-08-01

    We present a protocol for quantum cryptography in which the data obtained for mismatched bases are used in full for the purpose of quantum state tomography. Eavesdropping on the quantum channel is seriously impeded by requiring that the outcome of the tomography is consistent with unbiased noise in the channel. We study the incoherent eavesdropping attacks that are still permissible and establish under which conditions a secure cryptographic key can be generated. The whole analysis is carried out for channels that transmit quantum systems of any finite dimension.

  7. Quantum entanglement in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Marcin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present a concept of quantum entanglement in time in a context of entangled consistent histories. These considerations are supported by presentation of necessary tools closely related to those acting on a space of spatial multipartite quantum states. We show that in similarity to monogamy of quantum entanglement in space, quantum entanglement in time is also endowed with this property for a particular history. Basing on these observations, we discuss further bounding of temporal correlations and derive analytically the Tsirelson bound implied by entangled histories for the Leggett-Garg inequalities.

  8. Quantum Game of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Aaron; Carr, Lincoln; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate the emergence of complexity in quantum systems, we present a quantum game of life, inspired by Conway's classic game of life. Through Matrix Product State (MPS) calculations, we simulate the evolution of quantum systems, dictated by a Hamiltonian that defines the rules of our quantum game. We analyze the system through a number of measures which elicit the emergence of complexity in terms of spatial organization, system dynamics, and non-local mutual information within the network. Funded by NSF

  9. Towards a global quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    The creation of a global quantum network is now a realistic proposition thanks to developments in satellite and fibre links and quantum memory. Applications will range from secure communication and fundamental physics experiments to a future quantum internet.

  10. An optimum A-B scale of psychotherapist effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Stephens, J H; Shaffer, J W; Zlotowitz, H I

    1975-04-01

    On the basis of the original Whitehorn-Betz data collected over a 16-year period, it is shown that all previously derived A-B scales of psychotherapist effectiveness using Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) items are deficient in terms of correlation with the original criterion and, frequently, in terms of reliability as well. The reasons for these deficiencies are discussed, and a new experimental A-B scale is formulated and tested for adequacy. This scale is shown to possess substantial internal consistency reliability and to have a high degree of correlation with the criterion even after the removal of possible contaminating factors such as use ofancillary teatments, differences in patient prognosis, and changing practices and interest over time. It is further shown that none of the A-B scales has any validity with respect to female therapists in the original data pool. Exploration of the factor-analytic structure of this new scale and two other widely used A-B measures in terms of the occupationa scales of the SVIB reveals differential loadings on four dimensions labeled verbal/comceptual vs. manual/practical, scientific vs. sales, social concern, and artistic vs. business-oriented. It is concluded that although male therapists' scores on the best of the A-B scales may , under certain circumstances,be related to short term judged improvement in patients treated, there is little evidence that high scoring therapists are more likey than low scoring ones to have a favorable, long range impact on diagnosed schizophrenics.

  11. S/G-1: an ab initio force-field blending frozen Hermite Gaussian densities and distributed multipoles. Proof of concept and first applications to metal cations.

    PubMed

    Chaudret, Robin; Gresh, Nohad; Narth, Christophe; Lagardère, Louis; Darden, Thomas A; Cisneros, G Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2014-09-04

    We demonstrate as a proof of principle the capabilities of a novel hybrid MM'/MM polarizable force field to integrate short-range quantum effects in molecular mechanics (MM) through the use of Gaussian electrostatics. This lead to a further gain in accuracy in the representation of the first coordination shell of metal ions. It uses advanced electrostatics and couples two point dipole polarizable force fields, namely, the Gaussian electrostatic model (GEM), a model based on density fitting, which uses fitted electronic densities to evaluate nonbonded interactions, and SIBFA (sum of interactions between fragments ab initio computed), which resorts to distributed multipoles. To understand the benefits of the use of Gaussian electrostatics, we evaluate first the accuracy of GEM, which is a pure density-based Gaussian electrostatics model on a test Ca(II)-H2O complex. GEM is shown to further improve the agreement of MM polarization with ab initio reference results. Indeed, GEM introduces nonclassical effects by modeling the short-range quantum behavior of electric fields and therefore enables a straightforward (and selective) inclusion of the sole overlap-dependent exchange-polarization repulsive contribution by means of a Gaussian damping function acting on the GEM fields. The S/G-1 scheme is then introduced. Upon limiting the use of Gaussian electrostatics to metal centers only, it is shown to be able to capture the dominant quantum effects at play on the metal coordination sphere. S/G-1 is able to accurately reproduce ab initio total interaction energies within closed-shell metal complexes regarding each individual contribution including the separate contributions of induction, polarization, and charge-transfer. Applications of the method are provided for various systems including the HIV-1 NCp7-Zn(II) metalloprotein. S/G-1 is then extended to heavy metal complexes. Tested on Hg(II) water complexes, S/G-1 is shown to accurately model polarization up to quadrupolar

  12. Effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to class I and class II HLA antigens on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Y; Zicht, R; Ferrone, S; Bonnard, G D; Herberman, R B

    1985-04-01

    We have examined the effect of several monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to monomorphic determinants of class II HLA antigens, and MoAb to monomorphic determinants of class I HLA antigens and to beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2-mu) on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and cultured T cells (CTC). Some, but not all, anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of PBMNC to MoAb OKT3 and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The degree of inhibitory effect varied considerably. This effect was not limited to anti-class II HLA MoAb since anti-class I HLA MoAb and anti-beta 2-mu MoAb also inhibited MoAb OKT3- or PWM-induced proliferative responses. In contrast, the response of PBMNC to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) was not blocked by any anti-class II HLA MoAb. However, some anti-class II HLA MoAb also inhibited the proliferative response of CTC plus allogeneic peripheral blood adherent accessory cells (AC) to PHA or Con A as well as to MoAb OKT3 or PWM. This may be attributable to the substantially greater class II HLA antigen expression by CTC than by fresh lymphocytes. Pretreatment of either CTC or AC with anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited OKT3-induced proliferation. In contrast, pretreatment of CTC, but not AC, with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of CTC to OKT3. Pretreatment of CTC with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited PHA-, Con A and PWM-induced proliferation, to a greater degree than the anti-class II HLA MoAb. It appears as if lymphocyte activation by different mitogens exhibits variable requirements for the presence of cells expressing major histocompatibility determinants. Binding of Ab to membrane markers may interfere with lymphocyte-AC cooperation, perhaps by inhibiting binding of mitogens to their receptors or by interfering with lymphocyte and AC function. We also have examined the role of class II HLA antigens on CTC by depleting class II HLA-positive cells

  13. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl. A New State of the Water Molecule

    DOE PAGES

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani; ...

    2016-04-22

    When using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new “quantum tunneling state” of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. Additionally, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  14. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl. A New State of the Water Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani

    When using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new “quantum tunneling state” of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. Additionally, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  15. Nuclear quantum effects on adsorption of H2 and isotopologues on metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Gu, Bing; Heine, Thomas; Jakowski, Jacek; Garashchuk, Sophya

    2017-02-01

    The nuclear quantum effects on the zero-point energy (ZPE), influencing adsorption of H2 and isotopologues on metal ions, are examined using normal mode analysis of ab initio electronic structure results for complexes with 17 metal cations. The lightest metallic nuclei, Li and Be, are found to be the most 'quantum'. The largest selectivity in adsorption is predicted for Cu, Ni and Co ions. Analysis of the nuclear wavepacket dynamics on the ground state electronic potential energy surfaces (PES) performed for complexes of Li+ and Cu+2 with H2/D2/HD shows that the PES anharmonicity changes the ZPE by up to 9%.

  16. Protective mAbs and Cross-Reactive mAbs Raised by Immunization with Engineered Marburg Virus GPs.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Cassan, Robyn; Biggins, Julia E; Murin, Charles D; Warfield, Kelly L; Li, Sheng; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Olinger, Gene G; Kim, Do H; Whaley, Kevin J; Zeitlin, Larry; Ward, Andrew B; Nykiforuk, Cory; Aman, M Javad; Berry, Jody D; Berry, Jody; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-06-01

    The filoviruses, which include the marburg- and ebolaviruses, have caused multiple outbreaks among humans this decade. Antibodies against the filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) have been shown to provide life-saving therapy in nonhuman primates, but such antibodies are generally virus-specific. Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described against Ebola virus. In contrast, relatively few have been described against Marburg virus. Here we present ten mAbs elicited by immunization of mice using recombinant mucin-deleted GPs from different Marburg virus (MARV) strains. Surprisingly, two of the mAbs raised against MARV GP also cross-react with the mucin-deleted GP cores of all tested ebolaviruses (Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, Reston), but these epitopes are masked differently by the mucin-like domains themselves. The most efficacious mAbs in this panel were found to recognize a novel "wing" feature on the GP2 subunit that is unique to Marburg and does not exist in Ebola. Two of these anti-wing antibodies confer 90 and 100% protection, respectively, one hour post-exposure in mice challenged with MARV.

  17. Relativistic quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. B.; Ralph, T. C.

    2012-11-01

    Over the past few years, a new field of high research intensity has emerged that blends together concepts from gravitational physics and quantum computing. Known as relativistic quantum information, or RQI, the field aims to understand the relationship between special and general relativity and quantum information. Since the original discoveries of Hawking radiation and the Unruh effect, it has been known that incorporating the concepts of quantum theory into relativistic settings can produce new and surprising effects. However it is only in recent years that it has become appreciated that the basic concepts involved in quantum information science undergo significant revision in relativistic settings, and that new phenomena arise when quantum entanglement is combined with relativity. A number of examples illustrate that point. Quantum teleportation fidelity is affected between observers in uniform relative acceleration. Entanglement is an observer-dependent property that is degraded from the perspective of accelerated observers moving in flat spacetime. Entanglement can also be extracted from the vacuum of relativistic quantum field theories, and used to distinguish peculiar motion from cosmological expansion. The new quantum information-theoretic framework of quantum channels in terms of completely positive maps and operator algebras now provides powerful tools for studying matters of causality and information flow in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. This focus issue provides a sample of the state of the art in research in RQI. Some of the articles in this issue review the subject while others provide interesting new results that will stimulate further research. What makes the subject all the more exciting is that it is beginning to enter the stage at which actual experiments can be contemplated, and some of the articles appearing in this issue discuss some of these exciting new developments. The subject of RQI pulls together concepts and ideas from

  18. Some foundational aspects of quantum computers and quantum robots.

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Physics

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses foundational issues related to quantum computing. The need for a universally valid theory such as quantum mechanics to describe to some extent its own validation is noted. This includes quantum mechanical descriptions of systems that do theoretical calculations (i.e. quantum computers) and systems that perform experiments. Quantum robots interacting with an environment are a small first step in this direction. Quantum robots are described here as mobile quantum systems with on-board quantum computers that interact with environments. Included are discussions on the carrying out of tasks and the division of tasks into computation and action phases. Specificmore » models based on quantum Turing machines are described. Differences and similarities between quantum robots plus environments and quantum computers are discussed.« less

  19. Quantum steganography and quantum error-correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Bilal A.

    Quantum error-correcting codes have been the cornerstone of research in quantum information science (QIS) for more than a decade. Without their conception, quantum computers would be a footnote in the history of science. When researchers embraced the idea that we live in a world where the effects of a noisy environment cannot completely be stripped away from the operations of a quantum computer, the natural way forward was to think about importing classical coding theory into the quantum arena to give birth to quantum error-correcting codes which could help in mitigating the debilitating effects of decoherence on quantum data. We first talk about the six-qubit quantum error-correcting code and show its connections to entanglement-assisted error-correcting coding theory and then to subsystem codes. This code bridges the gap between the five-qubit (perfect) and Steane codes. We discuss two methods to encode one qubit into six physical qubits. Each of the two examples corrects an arbitrary single-qubit error. The first example is a degenerate six-qubit quantum error-correcting code. We explicitly provide the stabilizer generators, encoding circuits, codewords, logical Pauli operators, and logical CNOT operator for this code. We also show how to convert this code into a non-trivial subsystem code that saturates the subsystem Singleton bound. We then prove that a six-qubit code without entanglement assistance cannot simultaneously possess a Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) stabilizer and correct an arbitrary single-qubit error. A corollary of this result is that the Steane seven-qubit code is the smallest single-error correcting CSS code. Our second example is the construction of a non-degenerate six-qubit CSS entanglement-assisted code. This code uses one bit of entanglement (an ebit) shared between the sender (Alice) and the receiver (Bob) and corrects an arbitrary single-qubit error. The code we obtain is globally equivalent to the Steane seven-qubit code and thus

  20. Quantum dot properties in the multiband envelope-function approximation using boundary conditions based upon first-principles quantum calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flory, Curt A.; Musgrave, Charles B.; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2008-05-01

    A number of physical processes involving quantum dots depend critically upon the “evanescent” electron eigenstate wave function that extends outside of the material surface into the surrounding region. These processes include electron tunneling through quantum dots, as well as interactions between multiple quantum dot structures. In order to unambiguously determine these evanescent fields, appropriate boundary conditions have been developed to connect the electronic solutions interior to the semiconductor quantum dot to exterior vacuum solutions. In standard envelope function theory, the interior wave function consists of products of band edge and envelope functions, and both must be considered when matching to the external solution. While the envelope functions satisfy tractable equations, the band edge functions are generally not known. In this work, symmetry arguments in the spherically symmetric approximation are used in conjunction with the known qualitative behavior of bonding and antibonding orbitals to catalog the behavior of the band edge functions at the unit cell boundary. This physical approximation allows consolidation of the influence of the band edge functions to two simple surface parameters that are incorporated into the boundary conditions and are straightforwardly computed by using numerical first-principles quantum techniques. These new boundary conditions are employed to analyze an isolated spherically symmetric semiconductor quantum dot in vacuum within the analytical model of Sercel and Vahala [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 239 (1990); Phys. Rev. B 42, 3690 (1990)]. Results are obtained for quantum dots made of GaAs and InP, which are compared with ab initio calculations that have appeared in the literature.