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Sample records for ab inito quantum

  1. Ab-inito calculation of energy level alignment and vacuum level shift at CuPc/C60 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Na; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Chelikowsky, James; Leung, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    The alignment of the donor and acceptor enegy levels is of crucial importance for organic photovotaic performance. We investigate the interfaical electronic structure and energy level alignment of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60) using ab-inito density functional theory calculations including van der Waals interactions and hybrid density functionals. We show that energy level alignment critically depends on the standing-up and lying-down orientation of the CuPc molecules relative to C60 at the interface. We calculate the magnitude of the interface dipole at different molecular orientations and compare them to the vacuum level shift observed in photoemission spectroscopy. The validity of existing theoretical models which invoke charge transfer on this organic interface will be discussed in light of our predictions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Deparment of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Quantum phases of AB 2 fermionic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia-Correa, L. S.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-02-01

    A fermionic chain is a one-dimensional system with fermions that interact locally and can jump between sites in the lattice, in particular an AB n chain type, where A and B are sites that exhibit a difference in energy level of Δ and site B is repeated n-times, such that the unit cell has n +1 sites. A limit case of this model, called the ionic Hubbard model (n = 1), has been widely studied due to its interesting physics and applications. In this paper, we study the ground state of an AB 2 chain, which describes the material R 4[Pt 2(P 2O5H2)4X] · nH 2 O. Specifically, we consider a filling with two electrons per unit cell, and using the density matrix renormalization group method we found that the system exhibits the band insulator and Mott correlated insulator phases, as well as an intermediate phase between them. For couplings of Δ = 2,10 and 20, we estimate the critical points that separate these phases through the structure factor and the energy gap in the sector of charge and spin, finding that the position of the critical point rises as a function of Δ.

  3. Ab Initio Computation of the Energies of Circular Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lohne, M. Pedersen; Hagen, Gaute; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Kvaal, S.; Pederiva, F.

    2011-01-01

    We perform coupled-cluster and diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the energies of circular quantum dots up to 20 electrons. The coupled-cluster calculations include triples corrections and a renormalized Coulomb interaction defined for a given number of low-lying oscillator shells. Using such a renormalized Coulomb interaction brings the coupled-cluster calculations with triples correlations in excellent agreement with the diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. This opens up perspectives for doing ab initio calculations for much larger systems of electrons.

  4. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  5. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as “cloning,” in analogy to the “spawning” procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, “trains,” as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  6. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makhov, Dmitry V; Glover, William J; Martinez, Todd J; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2014-08-01

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions. PMID:25106573

  7. Surface Segregation Energies of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy method. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameterization. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. The ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation for the most part, but predicted relaxations from quantum approximate calculations are used in selected cases to compute approximate relaxed ab initio segregation energies. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with other quantum approximate and ab initio theoretical work, and available experimental results.

  8. Quantum plasmonics: from jellium models to ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varas, Alejandro; García-González, Pablo; Feist, Johannes; García-Vidal, F. J.; Rubio, Angel

    2016-08-01

    Light-matter interaction in plasmonic nanostructures is often treated within the realm of classical optics. However, recent experimental findings show the need to go beyond the classical models to explain and predict the plasmonic response at the nanoscale. A prototypical system is a nanoparticle dimer, extensively studied using both classical and quantum prescriptions. However, only very recently, fully ab initio time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of the optical response of these dimers have been carried out. Here, we review the recent work on the impact of the atomic structure on the optical properties of such systems. We show that TDDFT can be an invaluable tool to simulate the time evolution of plasmonic modes, providing fundamental understanding into the underlying microscopical mechanisms.

  9. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2004-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit heats of segregation for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent LMTO-based parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation, while the ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of a segregation model driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  10. Microsolvation of methyl hydrogen peroxide: Ab initio quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Anant D.; Rai, Dhurba; Bartolotti, Libero J.; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2009-08-01

    Methyl hydrogen peroxide (MHP), one of the simplest organic hydroperoxides, is a strong oxidant, with enhanced activity in aqueous ambience. The present study investigates, at the molecular level, the role of hydrogen bonding that is conducive to cluster formation of MHP with water molecules from its peroxide end, with the methyl group remaining hydrophobic for up to five water molecules. Ab initio quantum chemical computations on MHP⋯(H2O)n, [n =1-5] are performed at second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory employing the basis sets 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) to study the cluster formation of MHP with water molecules from its peroxide end and hydrophobic hydration due to the methyl group. Successive addition of water molecules alters the hydrogen bonding pattern, which leads to changes in overall cluster geometry and in turn to IR vibrational frequency shifts. Molecular co-operativity in these clusters is gauged directly through a detailed many-body interaction energy analysis. Molecular electrostatic potential maps are shown to have a bearing on predicting further growth of these clusters, which is duly corroborated through sample calculations for MHP⋯(H2O)8. Further, a continuum solvation model calculation for energetically stable clusters suggests that this study should serve as a precursor for pathways to aqueous solvation of MHP.

  11. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2003-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit segregation energies for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of segregation models driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  12. Ab inito study of Ag-related defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qixin; Xiong, Zhihua; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Guodong

    2008-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the structure and electronic properties of Ag-related defects in ZnO. The calculation results indicate that AgZn behaves as acceptor. Simultaneously, by comparing the formation energy and electronic structure of Ag-related defects in ZnO, Oi-AgZn behaves as acceptor in Ag-doped ZnO and it is better to gain p-type ZnO. However, Hi-AgZn complex has the lowest formation energy. Thus, the formation of the other point defects is greatly suppressed by the formation of Hi in Ag-doped ZnO. Moreover, the H atoms can be easily dissociated from hydrogen-passivated complexes by post-annealing at moderate temperatures, thus, codoping Ag with H may be a good method to achieve p-type in Ag-doped ZnO.

  13. Ab inito study on triplet excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2011-04-28

    We have studied the triplet energy transfer (TET) for photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, the bacterial light-harvesting complex II (LH2) of Rhodospirillum molischianum and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, and the peridinin-chlorophyll a protein (PCP) from Amphidinium carterae. The electronic coupling factor was calculated with the recently developed fragment spin difference scheme (You and Hsu, J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 133, 074105), which is a general computational scheme that yields the overall coupling under the Hamiltonian employed. The TET rates were estimated based on the couplings obtained. For all light-harvesting complexes studied, there exist nanosecond triplet energy transfer from the chlorophylls to the carotenoids. This result supports a direct triplet quenching mechanism for the photoprotection function of carotenoids. The TET rates are similar for a broad range of carotenoid triplet state energy, which implies a general and robust TET quenching role for carotenoids in photosynthesis. This result is also consistent with the weak dependence of TET kinetics on the type or the number of π conjugation lengths in the carotenoids and their analogues reported in the literature. We have also explored the possibility of forming triplet excitons in these complexes. In B850 of LH2 or the peridinin cluster in PCP, it is unlikely to have triplet exciton since the energy differences of any two neighboring molecules are likely to be much larger than their TET couplings. Our results provide theoretical limits to the possible photophysics in the light-harvesting complexes.

  14. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  15. Ab initio centroid molecular dynamics: a fully quantum method for condensed-phase dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavese, Marc; Berard, Daniel R.; Voth, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    A fully quantum molecular dynamics method is presented which combines ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with centroid molecular dynamics. The first technique allows the forces on the atoms to be obtained from ab initio electronic structure. The second technique, given the forces on the atoms, allows one to calculate an approximate quantum time evolution for the nuclei. The combination of the two, therefore, represents the first feasible approach to simulating the fully quantum dynamics of a many-body system. An application to excess proton translocation along a model water wire will be presented.

  16. Ab initio quantum chemical and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for studying enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Friesner, Richard A; Guallar, Victor

    2005-01-01

    We describe large scale ab initio quantum chemical and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for studying enzymatic reactions. First, technical aspects of the methodology are reviewed, including the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods that are typically employed for the QM aspect of the calculations, and various approaches to defining the interface between the QM and MM regions in QM/MM approaches. The modeling of the enzymatic catalytic cycle for three examples--methane monooxygenase, cytochrome P450, and triose phosphate isomerase--are discussed in some depth, followed by a brief summary of other systems that have been investigated by ab initio methods over the past several years. Finally, a discussion of the qualitative and quantitative conclusions concerning enzymatic catalysis that are available from modern ab initio approaches is presented, followed by a conclusion briefly summarizing future prospects.

  17. Ab initio quantum chemical study of electron transfer in carboranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Ranjit; Pineda, Andrew C.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2005-05-01

    The electron transfer (ET) properties of 10- and 12-vertex carboranes are investigated by the ab initio Hartree-Fock method within the Marcus-Hush (MH) two-state model and the Koopman theorem (KT) approach. The calculated value of the ET coupling matrix element, VAB, is consistently higher in the KT approach than in the MH two-state model. For the carborane molecules functionalized by -CH 2 groups at C-vertices, VAB strongly depends on the relative orientation of the planes containing the terminal -CH 2 groups. The predicted conformation dependence of VAB offers a molecular mechanism to control ET between two active centers in molecular systems.

  18. Quantum fluctuations and isotope effects in ab initio descriptions of water

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E.; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-09-14

    Isotope substitution is extensively used to investigate the microscopic behavior of hydrogen bonded systems such as liquid water. The changes in structure and stability of these systems upon isotope substitution arise entirely from the quantum mechanical nature of the nuclei. Here, we provide a fully ab initio determination of the isotope exchange free energy and fractionation ratio of hydrogen and deuterium in water treating exactly nuclear quantum effects and explicitly modeling the quantum nature of the electrons. This allows us to assess how quantum effects in water manifest as isotope effects, and unravel how the interplay between electronic exchange and correlation and nuclear quantum fluctuations determine the structure of the hydrogen bond in water.

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye Mazzola, Guglielmo Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-04-14

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article, we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous density functional theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Guidoni, Leonardo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-04-14

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article, we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous density functional theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab initio simulations of complex chemical systems. PMID:25877566

  1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Guidoni, Leonardo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article, we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous density functional theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Guidoni, Leonardo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-04-14

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article, we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous density functional theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  3. Ab initio no core calculations of light nuclei and preludes to Hamiltonian quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Honkanen, H.; li, J.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; Teramond, G.F.de; /Costa Rica U.

    2009-08-03

    Recent advances in ab initio quantum many-body methods and growth in computer power now enable highly precise calculations of nuclear structure. The precision has attained a level sufficient to make clear statements on the nature of 3-body forces in nuclear physics. Total binding energies, spin-dependent structure effects, and electroweak properties of light nuclei play major roles in pinpointing properties of the underlying strong interaction. Eventually,we anticipate a theory bridge with immense predictive power from QCD through nuclear forces to nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. Light front Hamiltonian quantum field theory offers an attractive pathway and we outline key elements.

  4. Conformational properties of molecules by ab initio quantum mechanical energy minimization.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, L

    1985-01-01

    The recent literature on the determination of minimum energy conformations by ab initio quantum mechanical techniques is reviewed. The availability of computer-coded analytical first and second derivatives of the Hartree-Fock energy makes possible calculations that will be of significant assistance in structure determination of molecules. A short review of recent progress in empirical energy minimization and molecular dynamics is provided. PMID:3905373

  5. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems. PMID:27176426

  6. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  7. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground-state properties of manganese's oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vinit; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, P. R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    One of the critical scientific challenges of contemporary research is to obtain an accurate theoretical description of the electronic properties of strongly correlated systems such as transition metal oxides and rare-earth compounds, since state-of-art ab-initio methods based on approximate density functionals are not always sufficiently accurate. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods, which use statistical sampling to evaluate many-body wave functions, have the potential to answer this challenge. Owing to the few fundamental approximations made and the direct treatment of electron correlation, QMC methods are among the most accurate electronic structure methods available to date. We assess the accuracy of the diffusion Monte Carlo method in the case of rocksalt manganese oxide (MnO). We study the electronic properties of this strongly-correlated oxide, which has been identified as a suitable candidate for many applications ranging from catalysts to electronic devices. ``This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.'' Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground-state properties of manganese's oxides.

  8. Quantum supercharger library: hyper-parallel integral derivatives algorithms for ab initio QM/MM dynamics.

    PubMed

    Renison, C Alicia; Fernandes, Kyle D; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2015-07-01

    This article describes an extension of the quantum supercharger library (QSL) to perform quantum mechanical (QM) gradient and optimization calculations as well as hybrid QM and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. The integral derivatives are, after the two-electron integrals, the most computationally expensive part of the aforementioned calculations/simulations. Algorithms are presented for accelerating the one- and two-electron integral derivatives on a graphical processing unit (GPU). It is shown that a Hartree-Fock ab initio gradient calculation is up to 9.3X faster on a single GPU compared with a single central processing unit running an optimized serial version of GAMESS-UK, which uses the efficient Schlegel method for s- and l-orbitals. Benchmark QM and QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations are performed on cellobiose in vacuo and in a 39 Å water sphere (45 QM atoms and 24843 point charges, respectively) using the 6-31G basis set. The QSL can perform 9.7 ps/day of ab initio QM dynamics and 6.4 ps/day of QM/MM dynamics on a single GPU in full double precision. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Quantum supercharger library: hyper-parallel integral derivatives algorithms for ab initio QM/MM dynamics.

    PubMed

    Renison, C Alicia; Fernandes, Kyle D; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2015-07-01

    This article describes an extension of the quantum supercharger library (QSL) to perform quantum mechanical (QM) gradient and optimization calculations as well as hybrid QM and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. The integral derivatives are, after the two-electron integrals, the most computationally expensive part of the aforementioned calculations/simulations. Algorithms are presented for accelerating the one- and two-electron integral derivatives on a graphical processing unit (GPU). It is shown that a Hartree-Fock ab initio gradient calculation is up to 9.3X faster on a single GPU compared with a single central processing unit running an optimized serial version of GAMESS-UK, which uses the efficient Schlegel method for s- and l-orbitals. Benchmark QM and QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations are performed on cellobiose in vacuo and in a 39 Å water sphere (45 QM atoms and 24843 point charges, respectively) using the 6-31G basis set. The QSL can perform 9.7 ps/day of ab initio QM dynamics and 6.4 ps/day of QM/MM dynamics on a single GPU in full double precision. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25975864

  10. Free Energies of Chemical Reactions in Solution and in Enzymes with Ab Initio Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2008-05-01

    Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods provide an accurate and efficient energetic description of complex chemical and biological systems, leading to significant advances in the understanding of chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. Here we review progress in QM/MM methodology and applications, focusing on ab initio QM-based approaches. Ab initio QM/MM methods capitalize on the accuracy and reliability of the associated quantum-mechanical approaches, however, at a much higher computational cost compared with semiempirical quantum-mechanical approaches. Thus reaction-path and activation free-energy calculations based on ab initio QM/MM methods encounter unique challenges in simulation timescales and phase-space sampling. This review features recent developments overcoming these challenges and enabling accurate free-energy determination for reaction processes in solution and in enzymes, along with applications.

  11. Free energies of chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes with ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2008-01-01

    Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods provide an accurate and efficient energetic description of complex chemical and biological systems, leading to significant advances in the understanding of chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. Here we review progress in QM/MM methodology and applications, focusing on ab initio QM-based approaches. Ab initio QM/MM methods capitalize on the accuracy and reliability of the associated quantum-mechanical approaches, however, at a much higher computational cost compared with semiempirical quantum-mechanical approaches. Thus reaction-path and activation free-energy calculations based on ab initio QM/MM methods encounter unique challenges in simulation timescales and phase-space sampling. This review features recent developments overcoming these challenges and enabling accurate free-energy determination for reaction processes in solution and in enzymes, along with applications.

  12. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N =1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy Fxc of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of |Δ V |/|V |,|Δ Fxc|/|F |xc˜10-3 . A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of Fxc by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.

  13. Ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics and the quantum nature of hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yexin, Feng; Ji, Chen; Xin-Zheng, Li; Enge, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen bond (HB) is an important type of intermolecular interaction, which is generally weak, ubiquitous, and essential to life on earth. The small mass of hydrogen means that many properties of HBs are quantum mechanical in nature. In recent years, because of the development of computer simulation methods and computational power, the influence of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) on the structural and energetic properties of some hydrogen bonded systems has been intensively studied. Here, we present a review of these studies by focussing on the explanation of the principles underlying the simulation methods, i.e., the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics. Its extension in combination with the thermodynamic integration method for the calculation of free energies will also be introduced. We use two examples to show how this influence of NQEs in realistic systems is simulated in practice. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275008, 91021007, and 10974012) and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M550005).

  14. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: Fractional electron approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xiancheng; Hu Hao; Hu Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J.; Yang Weitao

    2008-03-28

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+/3+} and Ru(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+/3+}. The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  15. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-01

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-01

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost. PMID:26851913

  17. Multiple excitons and the electron phonon bottleneck in semiconductor quantum dots: An ab initio perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2008-07-01

    The article presents the current perspective on the nature of photoexcited states in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The focus is on multiple excitons and photo-induced electron-phonon dynamics in PbSe and CdSe QDs, and the advocated view is rooted in the results of ab initio studies in both energy and time domains. As a new type of material, semiconductor QDs represent the borderline between chemistry and physics, exhibiting both molecular and bulk-like properties. Similar to atoms and molecules, the electronic spectra of QD show discrete bands. Just as bulk semiconductors, QDs comprise multiple copies of the elementary unit cell, and are characterized by valence and conduction bands. The electron-phonon coupling in QDs is weaker than in molecules, but stronger than in bulk semiconductors. Unlike either material, the QD properties can be tuned continuously by changing QD size and shape. The molecular and bulk points of view often lead to contradicting conclusions. For example, the molecular view suggests that the excitations in QDs should exhibit strong electron-correlation (excitonic) effects, and that the electron-phonon relaxation should be slow due to the discrete nature of the optical bands and the mismatch of the electronic energy gaps with vibrational frequencies. In contrast, a finite-size limit of bulk properties indicates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement should be significantly greater than excitonic effects and that the electron-phonon relaxation inside the quasi-continuous bands should be efficient. Such qualitative differences have generated heated discussions in the literature. The great potential of QDs for a variety of applications, including photovoltaics, spintronics, lasers, light-emitting diodes, and field-effect transistors makes it crutual to settle the debates. By synthesizing different viewpoints and presenting a unified atomistic picture of the excited state processes, our ab initio analysis clarifies the controversies

  18. Reproducing Deep Tunneling Splittings, Resonances, and Quantum Frequencies in Vibrational Spectra From a Handful of Direct Ab Initio Semiclassical Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Conte, Riccardo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Ceotto, Michele

    2013-10-17

    A time-dependent semiclassical approach for vibrational spectra calculations is shown to describe deep tunneling splittings, resonances, and quantum frequencies in multidimensional multiwell systems, by propagating a very limited number of classical trajectories. The approach is tested on ammonia by evolving eight trajectories on a full-dimensional PES. Quantum effects are reproduced, and results are in good agreement with time-independent quantum calculations. All the features are maintained when ab initio "on-the-fly" dynamics is adopted, thus demonstrating that precomputation of the PES can be avoided. The approach overcomes the typical scaling issues of quantum mechanical techniques without introducing any simplifications nor reductions of dimensionality of the problem. The proposed methodology is promising for further applications to systems of major complexity. PMID:26705583

  19. Communication: Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Kananenka, Alexei A.; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-12-01

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET, the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green's function method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to n-electron valence state second-order perturbation theory with the same active space, and furthermore, the full active space can be split into smaller active spaces without further implementation. Moreover, SEET avoids intruder states and does not require any high-order reduced density matrices. These advantages show that SEET is a promising method to describe physical and chemical properties of challenging molecules requiring large active spaces.

  20. Communication: Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Kananenka, Alexei A.; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-12-28

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET, the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green’s function method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to n-electron valence state second-order perturbation theory with the same active space, and furthermore, the full active space can be split into smaller active spaces without further implementation. Moreover, SEET avoids intruder states and does not require any high-order reduced density matrices. These advantages show that SEET is a promising method to describe physical and chemical properties of challenging molecules requiring large active spaces.

  1. Communication: Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Kananenka, Alexei A; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-12-28

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET, the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green's function method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to n-electron valence state second-order perturbation theory with the same active space, and furthermore, the full active space can be split into smaller active spaces without further implementation. Moreover, SEET avoids intruder states and does not require any high-order reduced density matrices. These advantages show that SEET is a promising method to describe physical and chemical properties of challenging molecules requiring large active spaces.

  2. The vibration properties of the (n,0) boron nitride nanotubes from ab initio quantum chemical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, A.; Ferrabone, M.; Baima, J.; Orlando, R.; Rérat, M.; Dovesi, R.

    2013-02-01

    The vibration spectrum of single-walled zigzag boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is simulated with an ab initio periodic quantum chemical method. The trend towards the hexagonal monolayer (h-BN) in the limit of large tube radius R is explored for a variety of properties related to the vibrational spectrum: vibration frequencies, infrared intensities, oscillator strengths, and vibration contributions to the polarizability tensor. The (n,0) family is investigated in the range from n = 6 (24 atoms in the unit cell and tube radius R = 2.5 Å) to n = 60 (240 atoms in the cell and R = 24.0 Å). Simulations are performed using the CRYSTAL program which fully exploits the rich symmetry of this class of one-dimensional periodic systems: 4n symmetry operators for the general (n,0) tube. Three sets of infrared active phonon bands are found in the spectrum. The first one lies in the 0-600 cm-1 range and goes regularly to zero when R increases; the connection between these normal modes and the elastic and piezoelectric constants of h-BN is discussed. The second (600-800 cm-1) and third (1300-1600 cm-1) sets tend regularly, but with quite different speed, to the optical modes of the h-BN layer. The vibrational contribution of these modes to the two components (parallel and perpendicular) of the polarizability tensor is also discussed.

  3. Raman spectroscopic features of the neutral vacancy in diamond from ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Baima, Jacopo; Zelferino, Alessandro; Olivero, Paolo; Erba, Alessandro; Dovesi, Roberto

    2016-01-21

    Quantum-mechanical ab initio calculations are performed to elucidate the vibrational spectroscopic features of a common irradiation-induced defect in diamond, i.e. the neutral vacancy. Raman spectra are computed analytically through a Coupled-Perturbed-Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham approach as a function of both different defect spin states and defect concentration. The experimental Raman features of defective diamond located in the 400-1300 cm(-1) spectral range, i.e. below the first-order line of pristine diamond at 1332 cm(-1), are well reproduced, thus corroborating the picture according to which, at low damage densities, this spectral region is mostly affected by non-graphitic sp(3) defects. No peaks above 1332 cm(-1) are found, thus ruling out previous tentative assignments of different spectral features (at 1450 and 1490 cm(-1)) to the neutral vacancy. The perturbation introduced by the vacancy to the thermal nuclear motion of carbon atoms in the defective lattice is discussed in terms of atomic anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs), computed from converged lattice dynamics calculations. PMID:26686374

  4. Communication: Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Kananenka, Alexei A; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-12-28

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET, the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green's function method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to n-electron valence state second-order perturbation theory with the same active space, and furthermore, the full active space can be split into smaller active spaces without further implementation. Moreover, SEET avoids intruder states and does not require any high-order reduced density matrices. These advantages show that SEET is a promising method to describe physical and chemical properties of challenging molecules requiring large active spaces. PMID:26723581

  5. Mixed ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods using frozen orbitals with applications to peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Dean Michael

    Methodology is discussed for mixed ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of systems where the quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM) regions are within the same molecule. The ab initio QM calculations are at the restricted Hartree-Fock level using the pseudospectral method of the Jaguar program while the MM part is treated with the OPLS force fields implemented in the IMPACT program. The interface between the QM and MM regions, in particular, is elaborated upon, as it is dealt with by ``breaking'' bonds at the boundaries and using Boys-localized orbitals found from model molecules in place of the bonds. These orbitals are kept frozen during QM calculations. The mixed modeling presented here can be used for single point energy calculations and geometry optimizations. Results from tests of the method to find relative conformational energies and geometries of alanine tetrapeptides are presented along with comparisons to pure QM and pure MM calculations.

  6. Conformations of 1,2-dimethoxypropane and 5-methoxy-1,3-dioxane: are ab initio quantum chemistry predictions accurate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Grant D.; Jaffe, Richard L.; Yoon, Do. Y.

    1998-06-01

    High-level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are shown to predict conformer populations of 1,2-dimethoxypropane and 5-methoxy-1,3-dioxane that are consistent with gas-phase NMR vicinal coupling constant measurements. The conformational energies of the cyclic ether 5-methoxy-1,3-dioxane are found to be consistent with those predicted by a rotational isomeric state (RIS) model based upon the acyclic analog 1,2-dimethoxypropane. The quantum chemistry and RIS calculations indicate the presence of strong attractive 1,5 C(H 3)⋯O electrostatic interactions in these molecules, similar to those found in 1,2-dimethoxyethane.

  7. The many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method for time-dependent ab-initio quantum simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M. Dimov, I.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of ab-initio approaches is the simulation of many-body quantum systems from the first principles of quantum mechanics. These methods are traditionally based on the many-body Schrödinger equation which represents an incredible mathematical challenge. In this paper, we introduce the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method in the context of distinguishable particles and in the absence of spin-dependent effects. Despite these restrictions, the method has several advantages. First of all, the Wigner formalism is intuitive, as it is based on the concept of a quasi-distribution function. Secondly, the Monte Carlo numerical approach allows scalability on parallel machines that is practically unachievable by means of other techniques based on finite difference or finite element methods. Finally, this method allows time-dependent ab-initio simulations of strongly correlated quantum systems. In order to validate our many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method, as a case study we simulate a relatively simple system consisting of two particles in several different situations. We first start from two non-interacting free Gaussian wave packets. We, then, proceed with the inclusion of an external potential barrier, and we conclude by simulating two entangled (i.e. correlated) particles. The results show how, in the case of negligible spin-dependent effects, the many-body Wigner Monte Carlo method provides an efficient and reliable tool to study the time-dependent evolution of quantum systems composed of distinguishable particles.

  8. Treatment of dilute clusters of methanol and water by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Shulgin, Ivan L; Tilson, Jeffrey L

    2005-02-10

    Large molecular clusters can be considered as intermediate states between gas and condensed phases, and information about them can help us understand condensed phases. In this paper, ab initio quantum mechanical methods have been used to examine clusters formed of methanol and water molecules. The main goal was to obtain information about the intermolecular interactions and the structure of methanol/water clusters at the molecular level. The large clusters (CH(4)O...(H(2)O)(12) and H(2)O...(CH(4)O)(10)) containing one molecule of one component (methanol or water) and many (12, 10) molecules of the other component were considered. Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) was used in the calculations. Several representative cluster geometries were optimized, and nearest-neighbor interaction energies were calculated for the geometries obtained in the first step. The results of the calculations were compared to the available experimental information regarding the liquid methanol/water mixtures and to the molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement was found. For the CH(4)O...(H(2)O)(12) cluster, it was shown that the molecules of water can be subdivided into two classes: (i) H bonded to the central methanol molecule and (ii) not H bonded to the central methanol molecule. As expected, these two classes exhibited striking energy differences. Although they are located almost the same distance from the carbon atom of the central methanol molecule, they possess very different intermolecular interaction energies with the central molecule. The H bonding constitutes a dominant factor in the hydration of methanol in dilute aqueous solutions. For the H(2)O...(CH(4)O)(10) cluster, it was shown that the central molecule of water has almost three H bonds with the methanol molecules; this result differs from those in the literature that concluded that the average number of H bonds between a central water molecule and methanol molecules in dilute solutions of

  9. Ab initio optimization principle for the ground states of translationally invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and fundamental numeric scheme dubbed as ab initio optimization principle (AOP) is proposed for the ground states of translational invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models. The idea is to transform a nondeterministic-polynomial-hard ground-state simulation with infinite degrees of freedom into a single optimization problem of a local function with finite number of physical and ancillary degrees of freedom. This work contributes mainly in the following aspects: (1) AOP provides a simple and efficient scheme to simulate the ground state by solving a local optimization problem. Its solution contains two kinds of boundary states, one of which play the role of the entanglement bath that mimics the interactions between a supercell and the infinite environment, and the other gives the ground state in a tensor network (TN) form. (2) In the sense of TN, a novel decomposition named as tensor ring decomposition (TRD) is proposed to implement AOP. Instead of following the contraction-truncation scheme used by many existing TN-based algorithms, TRD solves the contraction of a uniform TN in an opposite way by encoding the contraction in a set of self-consistent equations that automatically reconstruct the whole TN, making the simulation simple and unified; (3) AOP inherits and develops the ideas of different well-established methods, including the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD), network contractor dynamics, density matrix embedding theory, etc., providing a unified perspective that is previously missing in this fields. (4) AOP as well as TRD give novel implications to existing TN-based algorithms: A modified iTEBD is suggested and the two-dimensional (2D) AOP is argued to be an intrinsic 2D extension of DMRG that is based on infinite projected entangled pair state. This paper is focused on one-dimensional quantum models to present AOP. The benchmark is given on a transverse Ising

  10. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2015-05-01

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H2O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previous spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 0-4000 cm-1 is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.

  11. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2015-05-21

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H{sub 2}O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previous spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 0–4000 cm{sup −1} is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.

  12. Ab initio quantum mechanical models of peptide helices and their vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Bour, Petr; Kubelka, Jan; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2002-10-01

    Structural parameters for standard peptide helices (alpha, 3(10), 3(1) left-handed) were fully ab initio optimized for Ac-(L-Ala)(9)-NHMe and for Ac-(L-Pro)(9)-NHMe (poly-L-proline-PLP I and PLP II-forms), in order to better understand the relative stability and minimum energy geometries of these conformers and the dependence of the ir absorption and vibrational CD (VCD) spectra on detailed variation in these conformations. Only the 3(10)-helical Ala-based conformation was stable in vacuum for this decaamide structure, but both Pro-based conformers minimized successfully. Inclusion of solvent effects, by use of the conductor-like screening solvent model (COSMO), enabled ab initio optimizations [at the DFT/B3LYP/SV(P) level] without any constraints for the alpha- and 3(10)-helical Ala-based peptides as well as the two Pro-based peptides. The geometries obtained compare well with peptide chain torsion angles and hydrogen-bond distances found for these secondary structure types in x-ray structures of peptides and proteins. For the simulation of VCD spectra, force field and intensity response tensors were obtained ab initio for the complete Ala-based peptides in vacuum, but constrained to the COSMO optimized torsional angles, due to limitations of the solvent model. Resultant spectral patterns reproduce well many aspects of the experimental spectra and capture the differences observed for these various helical types.

  13. Formation and dissociation of protonated cytosine—cytosine base pairs in i-motifs by ab initio quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Li, Ming; Wang, Yan-Ting; Ouyang, Zhong-Can

    2014-02-01

    Formation and dissociation mechanisms of C—C+ base pairs in acidic and alkaline environments are investigated, employing ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Our calculations suggest that, in an acidic environment, a cytosine monomer is first protonated and then dimerized with an unprotonated cytosine monomer to form a C—C+ base pair; in an alkaline environment, a protonated cytosine dimer is first unprotonated and then dissociated into two cytosine monomers. In addition, the force for detaching a C—C+ base pair was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the two cytosine monomers. These results provide a microscopic mechanism to qualitatively explain the experimentally observed reversible formation and dissociation of i-motifs.

  14. Ab initio energetics, kinetics, and quantum transport characteristics of graphene nanoribbons as nanosensors for detecting nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulla, Kirti K.; Hassan, Ahmed J.; Knick, Cory R.; Farajian, Amir A.

    2014-03-01

    Molecules adsorption on graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) can be used to engineer and make use of their properties for applications such as energy storage and sensors. We investigate adsorption characteristics by considering nitrogen dioxide as a sample molecule for assessing nanosensor functionality of GNRs. Using ab initio modeling, energetics of various adsorption possibilities are determined and their rate constants are calculated and compared. Nonbonding and weak sp3 adsorptions at the hydrogen-terminated edges are shown to be more feasible than center adsorptions. This shows increased reactivity compared to graphene. Calculated quantum transport responses upon molecules adsorption indicate possibility of sensing extremely low nitrogen dioxide concentrations. Possible approaches for improving gas nanosensor functionality of GNRs are discussed. Reference: RSC Advances, 2013, DOI: 10.1039/c3ra46372a. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Grant ECCS-0925939.

  15. Communication: Novel quantum states of electron spins in polycarbenes from ab initio density matrix renormalization group calculations.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Wataru; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    An investigation into spin structures of poly(m-phenylenecarbene), a prototype of magnetic organic molecules, is presented using the ab initio density matrix renormalization group method. It is revealed by achieving large-scale multireference calculations that the energy differences between high-spin and low-spin states (spin-gaps) of polycarbenes decrease with increasing the number of carbene sites. This size-dependency of the spin-gaps strikingly contradicts the predictions with single-reference methods including density functional theory. The wave function analysis shows that the low-spin states are beyond the classical spin picture, namely, much of multireference character, and thus are manifested as strongly correlated quantum states. The size dependence of the spin-gaps involves an odd-even oscillation, which cannot be explained by the integer-spin Heisenberg model with a single magnetic-coupling constant.

  16. Development of a Polarizable Force Field For Proteins via Ab Initio Quantum Chemistry: First Generation Model and Gas Phase Tests

    PubMed Central

    KAMINSKI, GEORGE A.; STERN, HARRY A.; BERNE, B. J.; FRIESNER, RICHARD A.; CAO, YIXIANG X.; MURPHY, ROBERT B.; ZHOU, RUHONG; HALGREN, THOMAS A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results of developing a methodology suitable for producing molecular mechanics force fields with explicit treatment of electrostatic polarization for proteins and other molecular system of biological interest. The technique allows simulation of realistic-size systems. Employing high-level ab initio data as a target for fitting allows us to avoid the problem of the lack of detailed experimental data. Using the fast and reliable quantum mechanical methods supplies robust fitting data for the resulting parameter sets. As a result, gas-phase many-body effects for dipeptides are captured within the average RMSD of 0.22 kcal/mol from their ab initio values, and conformational energies for the di- and tetrapeptides are reproduced within the average RMSD of 0.43 kcal/mol from their quantum mechanical counterparts. The latter is achieved in part because of application of a novel torsional fitting technique recently developed in our group, which has already been used to greatly improve accuracy of the peptide conformational equilibrium prediction with the OPLS-AA force field.1 Finally, we have employed the newly developed first-generation model in computing gas-phase conformations of real proteins, as well as in molecular dynamics studies of the systems. The results show that, although the overall accuracy is no better than what can be achieved with a fixed-charges model, the methodology produces robust results, permits reasonably low computational cost, and avoids other computational problems typical for polarizable force fields. It can be considered as a solid basis for building a more accurate and complete second-generation model. PMID:12395421

  17. Quantum molecular mechanics-a noniterative procedure for the fast ab Initio calculation of closed shell systems.

    PubMed

    Moura, Gustavo L C; Simas, Alfredo M

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we advance the foundations of a strategy to develop a molecular mechanics method based not on classical mechanics and force fields but entirely on quantum mechanics and localized electron-pair orbitals, which we call quantum molecular mechanics (QMM). Accordingly, we introduce a new manner of calculating Hartree-Fock ab initio wavefunctions of closed shell systems based on variationally preoptimized nonorthogonal electron pair orbitals constructed by linear combinations of basis functions centered on the atoms. QMM is noniterative and requires only one extremely fast inversion of a single sparse matrix to arrive to the one-particle density matrix, to the electron density, and consequently, to the ab initio electrostatic potential around the molecular system, or cluster of molecules. Although QMM neglects the smaller polarization effects due to intermolecular interactions, it fully takes into consideration polarization effects due to the much stronger intramolecular geometry distortions. For the case of methane, we show that QMM was able to reproduce satisfactorily the energetics and polarization effects of all distortions of the molecule along the nine normal modes of vibration, well beyond the harmonic region. We present the first practical applications of the QMM method by examining, in detail, the cases of clusters of helium atoms, hydrogen molecules, methane molecules, as well as one molecule of HeH(+) surrounded by several methane molecules. We finally advance and discuss the potentialities of an exact formula to compute the QMM total energy, in which only two center integrals are involved, provided that the fully optimized electron-pair orbitals are known.

  18. Ab initio quantum chemistry in parallel-portable tools and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.J.; Shepard, R. ); Kendall, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In common with many of the computational sciences, ab initio chemistry faces computational constraints to which a partial solution is offered by the prospect of highly parallel computers. Ab initio codes are large and complex (O(10{sup 5}) lines of FORTRAN), representing a significant investment of communal effort. The often conflicting requirements of portability and efficiency have been successfully resolved on vector computers by reliance on matrix oriented kernels. This proves inadequate even upon closely-coupled shared-memory parallel machines. We examine the algorithms employed during a typical sequence of calculations. Then we investigate how efficient portable parallel implementations may be derived, including the complex multi-reference singles and doubles configuration interaction algorithm. A portable toolkit, modeled after the Intel iPSC and the ANL-ACRF PARMACS, is developed, using shared memory and TCP/IP sockets. The toolkit is used as an initial platform for programs portable between LANS, Crays and true distributed-memory MIMD machines. Timings are presented. 53 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Ab initio multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculations of the excited states of a Mn impurity in CaF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, A. C.; Wilson, T. M.

    1994-08-01

    We analyze Mn absorption in CaF2:Mn by the employment of ab inito quantum-mechanical cluster calculations and ligand-field methods. The [MnF8]6- Oh cluster is chosen to represent the isolated Mn2+ substitutional impurity in an otherwise perfect crystal. The methods of unrestricted open-shell Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (SCF), Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory to second- and fourth-order, and singles and doubles configuration interaction are used to calculate the spin sextet and quartet ground states. With the active space consisting of the Mn 3d molecular orbitals, the spin quartet excited states are calculated by the method of multiconfiguration SCF. It was found that the presence of an external field designed to reproduce the Madelung potential difference within the cluster did not significantly affect the Mn d-to-d transitions. The crystal-field term splitting diagrams for the eight-coordinated Mn2+ impurity in Oh symmetry are calculated. The results showed a narrowing of the multiplet terms in energy with respect to the six-coordinated Oh result. This increases the crystal-field parameter Dq from the previously published value of 420-570 cm-1.

  20. The Role of Anharmonicity and Nuclear Quantum Effects in the Pyridine Molecular Crystal: An ab initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hsin-Yu; Distasio, Robert A., Jr.; Santra, Biswajit; Car, Roberto

    Molecular crystal structure prediction has posed a substantial challenge to first-principles methods and requires sophisticated electronic structure methods to determine the stabilities of nearly degenerate polymorphs. In this work, we demonstrate that the anharmonicity from van der Waals interactions is relevant to the finite-temperature structures of pyridine and pyridine-like molecular crystals. Using such an approach, we find that the equilibrium structures are well captured with classical ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), despite the presence of light atoms such as hydrogen. Employing path integral AIMD simulations, we demonstrate that the success of classical AIMD results from a separation of nuclear quantum effects between the intermolecular and intramolecular degrees of freedom. In this separation, the quasiclassical and anharmonic intermolecular degrees of freedom determine the equilibrium structure, while the quantum and harmonic intramolecular degrees of freedom are averaging to the correct intramolecular structure. This work has been supported by the Department of Energy under Grants No. DE-FG02-05ER46201 and DE-SC0008626.

  1. Quantum wave packet method for state-to-state reactive scattering calculations on AB + CD --> ABC + D reactions.

    PubMed

    Cvitas, Marko T; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2009-04-23

    We describe a quantum wave packet method for computing the state-to-state quantum dynamics of 4-atom AB + CD --> ABC + D reactions. The approach is an extension to 4-atom reactions of a version of the reactant-product decoupling (RPD) approach, applied previously to 3-atom reactions ( J. Chem. Phys. 2001, 114 , 1601 ). The approach partitions the coordinate space of the reaction into separate reagent, strong-interaction, and product regions, using a system of artificial absorbing and reflecting potentials. It employs a partitioned version of the split-operator propagator, which is more efficient than partitioning the (exact) time-dependent Schrodinger equation. The wave packet bounces off a reflecting potential in the entrance channel, which generates a source term; this is transformed efficiently from reagent to product Jacobi coordinates by exploiting some simple angular momentum properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the method is demonstrated by numerical tests on the benchmark OH + H(2) --> H(2)O + H reaction.

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics with noisy forces: Validating the quantum Monte Carlo approach with benchmark calculations of molecular vibrational properties

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Ye Sorella, Sandro; Zen, Andrea

    2014-11-21

    We present a systematic study of a recently developed ab initio simulation scheme based on molecular dynamics and quantum Monte Carlo. In this approach, a damped Langevin molecular dynamics is employed by using a statistical evaluation of the forces acting on each atom by means of quantum Monte Carlo. This allows the use of an highly correlated wave function parametrized by several variational parameters and describing quite accurately the Born-Oppenheimer energy surface, as long as these parameters are determined at the minimum energy condition. However, in a statistical method both the minimization method and the evaluation of the atomic forces are affected by the statistical noise. In this work, we study systematically the accuracy and reliability of this scheme by targeting the vibrational frequencies of simple molecules such as the water monomer, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and phosphine. We show that all sources of systematic errors can be controlled and reliable frequencies can be obtained with a reasonable computational effort. This work provides convincing evidence that this molecular dynamics scheme can be safely applied also to realistic systems containing several atoms.

  3. Iodine-polyphenylacetylene charge-transfer complex: an ab initio quantum-chemical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreocci, M. V.; Bossa, M.; Furlani, A.; Polzonetti, G.; Russo, M. V.

    1991-07-01

    The ab initio MO-LCAO-HF method has been used to calculate the electronic structure of the iodine-polyphenylacetylene charge-transfer complex (PPAI 2). Two models have been considered for the PPA molecule: a simple one containing two phenyl groups and a more realistic one containing six phenyl groups. The calculations give automatically the charge separation between I 5 and the polymer, and show that the total charge separation can be less than 1 e at short distances. The computed charges at the energy minimum have been succesfully introduced into the curve fitting of the I-3d 5/2 core level spectrum of PPAI 2 films, giving good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  4. Ab Initio Simulation of Charge Transfer at the Semiconductor Quantum Dot/TiO 2 Interface in Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Xin, Xukai; Li, Bo; Jung, Jaehan; Yoon, Young Jun; Biswas, Rana; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-07-24

    Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have emerged as a promising solar architecture for next-generation solar cells. The QDSSCs exhibit a remarkably fast electron transfer from the quantum dot (QD) donor to the TiO2 acceptor with size quantization properties of QDs that allows for the modulation of band energies to control photoresponse and photoconversion efficiency of solar cells. In order to understand the mechanisms that underpin this rapid charge transfer, the electronic properties of CdSe and PbSe QDs with different sizes on the TiO2 substrate are simulated using a rigorous ab initio density functional method. Our method capitalizes on localized orbitalmore » basis set, which is computationally less intensive. Quite intriguingly, a remarkable set of electron bridging states between QDs and TiO2 occurring via the strong bonding between the conduction bands of QDs and TiO2 is revealed. Such bridging states account for the fast adiabatic charge transfer from the QD donor to the TiO2 acceptor, and may be a general feature for strongly coupled donor/acceptor systems. All the QDs/TiO2 systems exhibit type II band alignments, with conduction band offsets that increase with the decrease in QD size. This facilitates the charge transfer from QDs donors to TiO2 acceptors and explains the dependence of the increased charge transfer rate with the decreased QD size.« less

  5. Grid-based methods for biochemical ab initio quantum chemical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, M.E.; Nelson, J.S.; Mori, E.

    1997-01-01

    A initio quantum chemical methods are seeing increased application in a large variety of real-world problems including biomedical applications ranging from drug design to the understanding of environmental mutagens. The vast majority of these quantum chemical methods are {open_quotes}spectral{close_quotes}, that is they describe the charge distribution around the nuclear framework in terms of a fixed analytic basis set. Despite the additional complexity they bring, methods involving grid representations of the electron or solvent charge can provide more efficient schemes for evaluating spectral operators, inexpensive methods for calculating electron correlation, and methods for treating the electrostatic energy of salvation in polar solvents. The advantage of mixed or {open_quotes}pseudospectral{close_quotes} methods is that they allow individual non-linear operators in the partial differential equations, such as coulomb operators, to be calculated in the most appropriate regime. Moreover, these molecular grids can be used to integrate empirical functionals of the electron density. These so-called density functional methods (DFT) are an extremely promising alternative to conventional post-Hartree Fock quantum chemical methods. The introduction of a grid at the molecular solvent-accessible surface allows a very sophisticated treatment of a polarizable continuum solvent model (PCM). Where most PCM approaches use a truncated expansion of the solute`s electric multipole expansion, e.g. net charge (Born model) or dipole moment (Onsager model), such a grid-based boundary-element method (BEM) yields a nearly exact treatment of the solute`s electric field. This report describes the use of both DFT and BEM methods in several biomedical chemical applications.

  6. Quantum free energy landscapes from ab initio path integral metadynamics: Double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer is concerted but not correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergei D. Grant, Ian M.; Marx, Dominik

    2015-09-28

    With the goal of computing quantum free energy landscapes of reactive (bio)chemical systems in multi-dimensional space, we combine the metadynamics technique for sampling potential energy surfaces with the ab initio path integral approach to treating nuclear quantum motion. This unified method is applied to the double proton transfer process in the formic acid dimer (FAD), in order to study the nuclear quantum effects at finite temperatures without imposing a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or reducing the dimensionality. Importantly, the ab initio path integral metadynamics technique allows one to treat the hydrogen bonds and concomitant proton transfers in FAD strictly independently and thus provides direct access to the much discussed issue of whether the double proton transfer proceeds via a stepwise or concerted mechanism. The quantum free energy landscape we compute for this H-bonded molecular complex reveals that the two protons move in a concerted fashion from initial to product state, yet world-line analysis of the quantum correlations demonstrates that the protons are as quantum-uncorrelated at the transition state as they are when close to the equilibrium structure.

  7. Ab inito based model for subsurface flow and wett-ability alterations at reservoir condition for variation in ionic composition for carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara Chakravarty, Krishna; Thomsan, Kaj

    2013-04-01

    Through both field and laboratory studies it has been well established that wett-ability and flow rate in carbonate and sandstone reservoirs during water flooding is dictated by the sub-surface chemistry connected to stability of the water film amidst the oil phase and the rock surface, but there is no mathematical model to explain the flow rate and wett-ability mechanism on insertion of a low saline water in the rock system and its interaction with the hydrocarbons. Here, a model for calculating the feasible surface reactions has been developed based on free energy profiles of the different combinations of water, metal (Calcium, strontium and Magnesium) ions and hydrocarbons over a temperature regime of 273 K to 373 K .The approach uses Density Functional Theory based Local Density Approximation on molecular dynamic simulation using standard plane wave pseudopotential scheme. Herein we observe a two shell model during the interaction of water molecule with free energy of -2.8 and -2.5 kJ/mol at 2.4 and 4.2 Å heights from the calcite surface. Mg2+-water complex also retains a two layer model, while Ca2+ and Sr2+ metal ion-water complex show one major layer model of the free energy profile. The metal ion-water cluster adsorbs as an inner sphere complex directly above a surface carbonate group at a height of 3.9, 4.1, and 4.2 Å for calcium, strontium and magnesium respectively at a temperature of 273 K ,which is almost at the same height of the outer shell(4.2 Å) of bulk water profile and thus provides a local energy well for interaction among the complexes. Moreover at this height Mg2+ shows significantly more stability than water or other metal ion complex and it retains a similar pattern of energy profile at temperatures upto 373 K while outer shells loose their structure at higher temperatures in other metal ion complexes. A series of calculation were conducted to achieve the most stable polar hydrocarbon-metal ion-water complex for each metal individually .A free energy profile was also developed for polar hydrocarbon-Metal ion-water complex (CH3COO(-)-M2+-[H2O]n).Herein the two layer model was observed with Ca2+ and Sr2+ while the inner shell was still inconsistent with the 4.2 ( i.e. 3.9 to 4.4 ) Å local energy well model, the outer shell was observed near 6 Å. While with Mg2+ one major shell free energy model was obtained with several minor variations with changing temperature. Here the Ca2+ complex was significantly more stable being the only complex with a negative energy profile around 4.2 Å. Further these observations were together investigated to propose a wett-ability and flow rate model at on the surface described as: Mg2+ + Calcite +(5-6)H2O - -> Mg2+[H2O]5-6- Calcite + eV Calcite- [H2O]4 -Ca2+-CH3COO(-) + eV + SO42-+ (Ca2+,Sr2+) -> Calcite- [H2O] + Calcite- Ca2+- SO42-+ (Ca2+,Sr2+)-(-)OOCCH3 A large part of the work also includes the categorical rejection of many other possible structures, complexes and clusters formations. The model abides to all the experimentally observed points both in field and lab in wett ability alteration, and enhanced oil recovery, and through these energy variation the model categorically explains the effect of temperature on the flow behavior. This model provides a new view to the activity of Mg2+ in surface chemistry for carbonate rock structures in general and can have application in study of erosion, corrosion and other fields as well. This is the first comprehensive mathematical model to extensively explain the low salinity behaviors observed in enhanced oil recovery from a microscopic level to the best of our knowledge.

  8. Ab-Initio Hamiltonian Approach to Light Nuclei And to Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, Jun; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; de Teramond, G.F.; Ng, E.G.; Yang, C.; Sosonkina, M.; /Ames Lab

    2012-06-22

    Nuclear structure physics is on the threshold of confronting several long-standing problems such as the origin of shell structure from basic nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions. At the same time those interactions are being developed with increasing contact to QCD, the underlying theory of the strong interactions, using effective field theory. The motivation is clear - QCD offers the promise of great predictive power spanning phenomena on multiple scales from quarks and gluons to nuclear structure. However, new tools that involve non-perturbative methods are required to build bridges from one scale to the next. We present an overview of recent theoretical and computational progress with a Hamiltonian approach to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for the nuclear structure of light nuclei and quantum field theory.

  9. Structure-function studies of DNA damage using AB INITIO quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.; Miaskiewicz, K.; Osman, R.

    1993-12-01

    Studies of ring-saturated pyrimidine base lesions are used to illustrate an integrated modeling approach that combines quantum-chemical calculations with molecular dynamics simulation. Electronic-structure calculations on the lesions in Isolation reveal strong conformational preferences due to interactions between equatorial substituents to the pyrimidine ring. Large distortions of DNA should result when these interactions force the methyl group of thymine to assume an axial orientation, as is the case for thymine glycol but not for dihydrothymine. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dodecamer d(CGCGAATTCGCG){sub 2} with and without a ring-saturated thymine lesion at position T7 support this conclusion. Implications of these studies for recognition of thymine lesions by endonuclease III are also discussed.

  10. Magnon Hall effect in AB-stacked bilayer honeycomb quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that many bilayer quantum magnets occur in nature, we generalize the study of thermal Hall transports of spin excitations to bilayer magnetic systems. It is shown that bilayer magnetic systems can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically. We study both scenarios on the honeycomb lattice and show that the system realizes topologically nontrivial magnon bands induced by alternating next-nearest-neighbor Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. As a result, the bilayer system realizes both magnon Hall effect and magnon spin Nernst effect. We show that antiferromagnetically coupled layers differ from ferromagnetically coupled layers by a sign change in the conductivities as the magnetic field is reversed. Furthermore, Chern number protected magnon edge states are observed and propagate in the same direction on the top and bottom layers in ferromagnetically coupled layers, whereas the magnon edge states propagate in opposite directions for antiferromagnetically coupled layers.

  11. Single-layered chrysotile nanotubes: A quantum mechanical ab initio simulation.

    PubMed

    D'Arco, Philippe; Noel, Yves; Demichelis, Raffaella; Dovesi, Roberto

    2009-11-28

    Chrysotile single-layered nanotubes, obtained by wrapping the Mg(3)Si(2)O(5)(OH)(4) lizardite monolayer along the (n,-n) hexagonal lattice vector, are simulated at the ab initio level by using an all electron 6-31G( *) basis set and the B3LYP functional for n varying from 14 to 24 (the nanotube radius R referred to the oxygen connecting the Mg and Si layers increases from 20 to 35 A). Because of the full exploitation of the helical symmetry, recently implemented in the CRYSTAL code, the computational cost for the full self-consistent field (SCF) and gradient calculation increases only by a factor of 2 and 1.2, respectively, when passing from the lizardite monolayer [18 atoms and 236 AOs (atomic orbitals) in the unit cell] to the (24, -24) tube (864 atoms and 11,328 AOs). The total energy of the tubes is always larger than that of the lizardite monolayer; the difference DeltaE decreases very rapidly with n; for the largest tube here considered (n=24) DeltaE is as small as 2.7 kJ/mol per formula unit (f.u.); extrapolating to larger n values, at about R=50 A, DeltaE becomes smaller than 1 kJ mol f.u. Very large energy gains are observed for small n values during optimization after rolling, mainly due to the rotation of the SiO(4) tetrahedra that are in the inner part of the cylinder ("normal rolling"); such a rigid rotation accounts for about 85% of the overall relaxation energy. "Inverse rolling" tubes (SiO(4) on the external wall of the tube) are shown to be less stable than the corresponding "normal" tubes.

  12. [Structural and Dipole Structure Peculiarities of Hoogsteen Base Pairs Formed in Complementary Nucleobases according to ab initio Quantum Mechanics Studies].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Y M

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanics studies for the detection of structure and dipole structure peculiarities of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson-Crick base pairs, were performed during our work. These base pairs are formed as a result of complementary interactions. It was revealed, that adenine-thymine Hoogsteen base pair and adenine-thymine Watson-Crick base pairs can be formed depending on initial configuration. Cytosine-guanine Hoogsteen pairs are formed only when cytosine was originally protonated. Both types of Hoogsteen pairs have noticeable difference in the bond distances and angles. These differences appeared in purine as well as in pyrimidine parts of the pairs. Hoogsteen pairs have mostly shorter hydrogen bond lengths and significantly larger angles of hydrogen bonds and larger angles between the hydrogen bonds than Watson-Crick base pairs. Notable differences are also observed with respect to charge distribution and dipole moment. Quantitative data on these differences are shown in our work. It is also reported that the values of local parameters (according to Cambridge classification of the parameters which determine DNA properties) in Hoogsteen base pairs, are greatly different from Watson-Crick ones.

  13. On the use of symmetry in the ab initio quantum mechanical simulation of nanotubes and related materials.

    PubMed

    Noel, Yves; D'arco, Philippe; Demichelis, Raffaella; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M; Dovesi, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Nanotubes can be characterized by a very high point symmetry, comparable or even larger than the one of the most symmetric crystalline systems (cubic, 48 point symmetry operators). For example, N = 2n rototranslation symmetry operators connect the atoms of the (n,0) nanotubes. This symmetry is fully exploited in the CRYSTAL code. As a result, ab initio quantum mechanical large basis set calculations of carbon nanotubes containing more than 150 atoms in the unit cell become very cheap, because the irreducible part of the unit cell reduces to two atoms only. The nanotube symmetry is exploited at three levels in the present implementation. First, for the automatic generation of the nanotube structure (and then of the input file for the SCF calculation) starting from a two-dimensional structure (in the specific case, graphene). Second, the nanotube symmetry is used for the calculation of the mono- and bi-electronic integrals that enter into the Fock (Kohn-Sham) matrix definition. Only the irreducible wedge of the Fock matrix is computed, with a saving factor close to N. Finally, the symmetry is exploited for the diagonalization, where each irreducible representation is separately treated. When M atomic orbitals per carbon atom are used, the diagonalization computing time is close to Nt, where t is the time required for the diagonalization of each 2M x 2M matrix. The efficiency and accuracy of the computational scheme is documented.

  14. On the use of symmetry in the ab initio quantum mechanical simulation of nanotubes and related materials.

    PubMed

    Noel, Yves; D'arco, Philippe; Demichelis, Raffaella; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M; Dovesi, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Nanotubes can be characterized by a very high point symmetry, comparable or even larger than the one of the most symmetric crystalline systems (cubic, 48 point symmetry operators). For example, N = 2n rototranslation symmetry operators connect the atoms of the (n,0) nanotubes. This symmetry is fully exploited in the CRYSTAL code. As a result, ab initio quantum mechanical large basis set calculations of carbon nanotubes containing more than 150 atoms in the unit cell become very cheap, because the irreducible part of the unit cell reduces to two atoms only. The nanotube symmetry is exploited at three levels in the present implementation. First, for the automatic generation of the nanotube structure (and then of the input file for the SCF calculation) starting from a two-dimensional structure (in the specific case, graphene). Second, the nanotube symmetry is used for the calculation of the mono- and bi-electronic integrals that enter into the Fock (Kohn-Sham) matrix definition. Only the irreducible wedge of the Fock matrix is computed, with a saving factor close to N. Finally, the symmetry is exploited for the diagonalization, where each irreducible representation is separately treated. When M atomic orbitals per carbon atom are used, the diagonalization computing time is close to Nt, where t is the time required for the diagonalization of each 2M x 2M matrix. The efficiency and accuracy of the computational scheme is documented. PMID:19603502

  15. Dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces: Tests of dynamical assumptions using quantum models and ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bret; Nattino, Francesco; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2014-08-01

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces is of great practical and fundamental importance. Not only is it the rate-limiting step in the steam reforming of natural gas, the reaction exhibits interesting mode-selective behavior and a strong dependence on the temperature of the metal. We present a quantum model for this reaction on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces based on the reaction path Hamiltonian. The dissociative sticking probabilities computed using this model agree well with available experimental data with regard to variation with incident energy, substrate temperature, and the vibrational state of the incident molecule. We significantly expand the vibrational basis set relative to earlier studies, which allows reaction probabilities to be calculated for doubly excited initial vibrational states, though it does not lead to appreciable changes in the reaction probabilities for singly excited initial states. Sudden models used to treat the center of mass motion parallel to the surface are compared with results from ab initio molecular dynamics and found to be reasonable. Similar comparisons for molecular rotation suggest that our rotationally adiabatic model is incorrect, and that sudden behavior is closer to reality. Such a model is proposed and tested. A model for predicting mode-selective behavior is tested, with mixed results, though we find it is consistent with experimental studies of normal vs. total (kinetic) energy scaling. Models for energy transfer into lattice vibrations are also examined.

  16. Dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces: Tests of dynamical assumptions using quantum models and ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Bret; Nattino, Francesco; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2014-08-07

    The dissociative chemisorption of methane on metal surfaces is of great practical and fundamental importance. Not only is it the rate-limiting step in the steam reforming of natural gas, the reaction exhibits interesting mode-selective behavior and a strong dependence on the temperature of the metal. We present a quantum model for this reaction on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces based on the reaction path Hamiltonian. The dissociative sticking probabilities computed using this model agree well with available experimental data with regard to variation with incident energy, substrate temperature, and the vibrational state of the incident molecule. We significantly expand the vibrational basis set relative to earlier studies, which allows reaction probabilities to be calculated for doubly excited initial vibrational states, though it does not lead to appreciable changes in the reaction probabilities for singly excited initial states. Sudden models used to treat the center of mass motion parallel to the surface are compared with results from ab initio molecular dynamics and found to be reasonable. Similar comparisons for molecular rotation suggest that our rotationally adiabatic model is incorrect, and that sudden behavior is closer to reality. Such a model is proposed and tested. A model for predicting mode-selective behavior is tested, with mixed results, though we find it is consistent with experimental studies of normal vs. total (kinetic) energy scaling. Models for energy transfer into lattice vibrations are also examined.

  17. Ab Initio Quantum Mechanical Description of Noncovalent Interactions at Its Limits: Approaching the Experimental Dissociation Energy of the HF Dimer.

    PubMed

    Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2014-08-12

    Hydrogen fluoride dimer is a perfect model system for studying hydrogen bonding. Its size makes it possible to apply the most advanced theoretical methods available, yet it is a full-featured complex of molecules with nontrivial electronic structure and dynamic properties. Moreover, the dissociation energy of the HF dimer has been measured experimentally with an unparalleled accuracy of ±1 cm(-1)(Bohac et al. J. Chem. Phys. 1992, 9, 6681). In this work, we attempt to reproduce it by purely ab initio means, using advanced quantum-mechanical computational methods free of any empiricism. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities of today's computational chemistry and to point out its limitations by identifying the contributions that introduce the largest uncertainty into the result. The dissociation energy is calculated using a composite scheme including large basis set CCSD(T) calculations, contributions of higher excitations up to CCSDTQ, relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections and anharmonic vibrational calculations. The error of the calculated dissociation energy is 0.07 kcal/mol (25 cm(-1), 2.5%) when compared to the experiment. The major part of this error can be attributed to the inaccuracy of the calculations of the zero-point vibrational energy. PMID:26588277

  18. Heats of Segregation of BCC Metals Using Ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian; Chaka, Anne; Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    Many multicomponent alloys exhibit surface segregation, in which the composition at or near a surface may be substantially different from that of the bulk. A number of phenomenological explanations for this tendency have been suggested, involving, among other things, differences among the components' surface energies, molar volumes, and heats of solution. From a theoretical standpoint, the complexity of the problem has precluded a simple, unified explanation, thus preventing the development of computational tools that would enable the identification of the driving mechanisms for segregation. In that context, we investigate the problem of surface segregation in a variety of bcc metal alloys by computing dilute-limit heats of segregation using both the quantum-approximate energy method of Bozzolo, Ferrante and Smith (BFS), and all-electron density functional theory. In addition, the composition dependence of the heats of segregation is investigated using a BFS-based Monte Carlo procedure, and, for selected cases of interest, density functional calculations. Results are discussed in the context of a simple picture that describes segregation behavior as the result of a competition between size mismatch and alloying effects

  19. Ab Initio Simulation of Charge Transfer at the Semiconductor Quantum Dot/TiO 2 Interface in Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Xukai; Li, Bo; Jung, Jaehan; Yoon, Young Jun; Biswas, Rana; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-07-24

    Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have emerged as a promising solar architecture for next-generation solar cells. The QDSSCs exhibit a remarkably fast electron transfer from the quantum dot (QD) donor to the TiO2 acceptor with size quantization properties of QDs that allows for the modulation of band energies to control photoresponse and photoconversion efficiency of solar cells. In order to understand the mechanisms that underpin this rapid charge transfer, the electronic properties of CdSe and PbSe QDs with different sizes on the TiO2 substrate are simulated using a rigorous ab initio density functional method. Our method capitalizes on localized orbital basis set, which is computationally less intensive. Quite intriguingly, a remarkable set of electron bridging states between QDs and TiO2 occurring via the strong bonding between the conduction bands of QDs and TiO2 is revealed. Such bridging states account for the fast adiabatic charge transfer from the QD donor to the TiO2 acceptor, and may be a general feature for strongly coupled donor/acceptor systems. All the QDs/TiO2 systems exhibit type II band alignments, with conduction band offsets that increase with the decrease in QD size. This facilitates the charge transfer from QDs donors to TiO2 acceptors and explains the dependence of the increased charge transfer rate with the decreased QD size.

  20. Atomic Spectral Methods for Ab Initio Molecular Electronic Energy Surfaces: Transitioning From Small-Molecule to Biomolecular-Suitable Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jeffrey D; Ben-Nun, Michal; Rollin, Kyle; Bromley, Michael W J; Li, Jiabo; Hinde, Robert J; Winstead, Carl L; Sheehy, Jeffrey A; Boatz, Jerry A; Langhoff, Peter W

    2016-08-25

    Continuing attention has addressed incorportation of the electronically dynamical attributes of biomolecules in the largely static first-generation molecular-mechanical force fields commonly employed in molecular-dynamics simulations. We describe here a universal quantum-mechanical approach to calculations of the electronic energy surfaces of both small molecules and large aggregates on a common basis which can include such electronic attributes, and which also seems well-suited to adaptation in ab initio molecular-dynamics applications. In contrast to the more familiar orbital-product-based methodologies employed in traditional small-molecule computational quantum chemistry, the present approach is based on an "ex-post-facto" method in which Hamiltonian matrices are evaluated prior to wave function antisymmetrization, implemented here in the support of a Hilbert space of orthonormal products of many-electron atomic spectral eigenstates familiar from the van der Waals theory of long-range interactions. The general theory in its various forms incorporates the early semiempirical atoms- and diatomics-in-molecules approaches of Moffitt, Ellison, Tully, Kuntz, and others in a comprehensive mathematical setting, and generalizes the developments of Eisenschitz, London, Claverie, and others addressing electron permutation symmetry adaptation issues, completing these early attempts to treat van der Waals and chemical forces on a common basis. Exact expressions are obtained for molecular Hamiltonian matrices and for associated energy eigenvalues as sums of separate atomic and interaction-energy terms, similar in this respect to the forms of classical force fields. The latter representation is seen to also provide a long-missing general definition of the energies of individual atoms and of their interactions within molecules and matter free from subjective additional constraints. A computer code suite is described for calculations of the many-electron atomic eigenspectra and

  1. Atomic Spectral Methods for Ab Initio Molecular Electronic Energy Surfaces: Transitioning From Small-Molecule to Biomolecular-Suitable Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jeffrey D; Ben-Nun, Michal; Rollin, Kyle; Bromley, Michael W J; Li, Jiabo; Hinde, Robert J; Winstead, Carl L; Sheehy, Jeffrey A; Boatz, Jerry A; Langhoff, Peter W

    2016-08-25

    Continuing attention has addressed incorportation of the electronically dynamical attributes of biomolecules in the largely static first-generation molecular-mechanical force fields commonly employed in molecular-dynamics simulations. We describe here a universal quantum-mechanical approach to calculations of the electronic energy surfaces of both small molecules and large aggregates on a common basis which can include such electronic attributes, and which also seems well-suited to adaptation in ab initio molecular-dynamics applications. In contrast to the more familiar orbital-product-based methodologies employed in traditional small-molecule computational quantum chemistry, the present approach is based on an "ex-post-facto" method in which Hamiltonian matrices are evaluated prior to wave function antisymmetrization, implemented here in the support of a Hilbert space of orthonormal products of many-electron atomic spectral eigenstates familiar from the van der Waals theory of long-range interactions. The general theory in its various forms incorporates the early semiempirical atoms- and diatomics-in-molecules approaches of Moffitt, Ellison, Tully, Kuntz, and others in a comprehensive mathematical setting, and generalizes the developments of Eisenschitz, London, Claverie, and others addressing electron permutation symmetry adaptation issues, completing these early attempts to treat van der Waals and chemical forces on a common basis. Exact expressions are obtained for molecular Hamiltonian matrices and for associated energy eigenvalues as sums of separate atomic and interaction-energy terms, similar in this respect to the forms of classical force fields. The latter representation is seen to also provide a long-missing general definition of the energies of individual atoms and of their interactions within molecules and matter free from subjective additional constraints. A computer code suite is described for calculations of the many-electron atomic eigenspectra and

  2. Developing ab initio quality force fields from condensed phase quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics calculations through the adaptive force matching method.

    PubMed

    Akin-Ojo, Omololu; Song, Yang; Wang, Feng

    2008-08-14

    A new method called adaptive force matching (AFM) has been developed that is capable of producing high quality force fields for condensed phase simulations. This procedure involves the parametrization of force fields to reproduce ab initio forces obtained from condensed phase quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. During the procedure, the MM part of the QM/MM is iteratively improved so as to approach ab initio quality. In this work, the AFM method has been tested to parametrize force fields for liquid water so that the resulting force fields reproduce forces calculated using the ab initio MP2 and the Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) and Becke three-parameter LYP (B3LYP) exchange correlation functionals. The AFM force fields generated in this work are very simple to evaluate and are supported by most molecular dynamics (MD) codes. At the same time, the quality of the forces predicted by the AFM force fields rivals that of very expensive ab initio calculations and are found to successfully reproduce many experimental properties. The site-site radial distribution functions (RDFs) obtained from MD simulations using the force field generated from the BLYP functional through AFM compare favorably with the previously published RDFs from Car-Parrinello MD simulations with the same functional. Technical aspects of AFM such as the optimal QM cluster size, optimal basis set, and optimal QM method to be used with the AFM procedure are discussed in this paper.

  3. Externally predictive quantitative modeling of supercooled liquid vapor pressure of polychlorinated-naphthalenes through electron-correlation based quantum-mechanical descriptors.

    PubMed

    Vikas; Chayawan

    2014-01-01

    For predicting physico-chemical properties related to environmental fate of molecules, quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs) are valuable tools in environmental chemistry. For developing a QSPR, molecular descriptors computed through quantum-mechanical methods are generally employed. The accuracy of a quantum-mechanical method, however, rests on the amount of electron-correlation estimated by the method. In this work, single-descriptor QSPRs for supercooled liquid vapor pressure of chloronaphthalenes and polychlorinated-naphthalenes are developed using molecular descriptors based on the electron-correlation contribution of the quantum-mechanical descriptor. The quantum-mechanical descriptors for which the electron-correlation contribution is analyzed include total-energy, mean polarizability, dipole moment, frontier orbital (HOMO/LUMO) energy, and density-functional theory (DFT) based descriptors, namely, absolute electronegativity, chemical hardness, and electrophilicity index. A total of 40 single-descriptor QSPRs were developed using molecular descriptors computed with advanced semi-empirical (SE) methods, namely, RM1, PM7, and ab intio methods, namely, Hartree-Fock and DFT. The developed QSPRs are validated using state-of-the-art external validation procedures employing an external prediction set. From the comparison of external predictivity of the models, it is observed that the single-descriptor QSPRs developed using total energy and correlation energy are found to be far more robust and predictive than those developed using commonly employed descriptors such as HOMO/LUMO energy and dipole moment. The work proposes that if real external predictivity of a QSPR model is desired to be explored, particularly, in terms of intra-molecular interactions, correlation-energy serves as a more appropriate descriptor than the polarizability. However, for developing QSPRs, computationally inexpensive advanced SE methods such as PM7 can be more reliable than

  4. Quantum Dynamics Scattering Study of AB+CDE Reactions: A Seven Dimensional Treatment for the H2+C2H Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou

    2003-01-01

    A time-dependent wave-packet approach is presented for the quantum dynamics study of the AB+CDE reaction system for zero total angular momentum. A seven-degree-of-freedom calculation is employed to study the chemical reaction of H2+C2H yields H + C2H2 by treating C2H as a linear molecule. Initial state selected reaction probabilities are presented for various initial ro-vibrational states. This study shows that vibrational excitation of H2 enhances the reaction probability, whereas the excitation of C2H has only a small effect on the reactivity. An integral cross section is also reported for the initial ground states of H2 and C2H. The theoretical and experimental results agree with each other very well when the calculated seven dimensional results are adjusted to account for the lower transition state barrier heights found in recent ab initio calculations.

  5. Vibrational Properties of Hydrogen-Bonded Systems Using the Multireference Generalization to the "On-the-Fly" Electronic Structure within Quantum Wavepacket ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (QWAIMD).

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Li, Xiaohu; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2014-06-10

    We discuss a multiconfigurational treatment of the "on-the-fly" electronic structure within the quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics (QWAIMD) method for coupled treatment of quantum nuclear effects with electronic structural effects. Here, multiple single-particle electronic density matrices are simultaneously propagated with a quantum nuclear wavepacket and other classical nuclear degrees of freedom. The multiple density matrices are coupled through a nonorthogonal configuration interaction (NOCI) procedure to construct the instantaneous potential surface. An adaptive-mesh-guided set of basis functions composed of Gaussian primitives are used to simplify the electronic structure calculations. Specifically, with the replacement of the atom-centered basis functions positioned on the centers of the quantum-mechanically treated nuclei by a mesh-guided band of basis functions, the two-electron integrals used to compute the electronic structure potential surface become independent of the quantum nuclear variable and hence reusable along the entire Cartesian grid representing the quantum nuclear coordinates. This reduces the computational complexity involved in obtaining a potential surface and facilitates the interpretation of the individual density matrices as representative diabatic states. The parametric nuclear position dependence of the diabatic states is evaluated at the initial time-step using a Shannon-entropy-based sampling function that depends on an approximation to the quantum nuclear wavepacket and the potential surface. This development is meant as a precursor to an on-the-fly fully multireference electronic structure procedure embedded, on-the-fly, within a quantum nuclear dynamics formalism. We benchmark the current development by computing structural, dynamic, and spectroscopic features for a series of bihalide hydrogen-bonded systems: FHF(-), ClHCl(-), BrHBr(-), and BrHCl(-). We find that the donor-acceptor structural features are in good

  6. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational levels of NH4+ and isotopomers on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface

    DOE PAGES

    Hua -Gen Yu; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-29

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH4+) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH4+ and ND4+ exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v1 + v3) + v2 + v4. As a result, the low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data is better than 1 cm–1.

  7. Full-Dimensional Quantum Calculations of Vibrational Levels of NH4(+) and Isotopomers on An Accurate Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua-Gen; Han, Huixian; Guo, Hua

    2016-04-14

    Vibrational energy levels of the ammonium cation (NH4(+)) and its deuterated isotopomers are calculated using a numerically exact kinetic energy operator on a recently developed nine-dimensional permutation invariant semiglobal potential energy surface fitted to a large number of high-level ab initio points. Like CH4, the vibrational levels of NH4(+) and ND4(+) exhibit a polyad structure, characterized by a collective quantum number P = 2(v1 + v3) + v2 + v4. The low-lying vibrational levels of all isotopomers are assigned and the agreement with available experimental data is better than 1 cm(-1).

  8. Condensed-matter ab initio approach for strongly correlated electrons: Application to a quantum spin liquid candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, Youhei

    2015-12-31

    Recently, condensed-matter ab initio approaches to strongly correlated electrons confined in crystalline solids have been developed and applied to transition-metal oxides and molecular conductors. In this paper, an ab initio scheme based on constrained random phase approximations and localized Wannier orbitals is applied to a spin liquid candidate Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} and is shown to reproduce experimentally observed specific heat.

  9. Computational Improvements to Quantum Wave Packet ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Using a Potential-Adapted, Time-Dependent Deterministic Sampling Technique.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2006-09-01

    In a recent publication, we introduced a computational approach to treat the simultaneous dynamics of electrons and nuclei. The method is based on a synergy between quantum wave packet dynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics. Atom-centered density-matrix propagation or Born-Oppenheimer dynamics can be used to perform ab initio dynamics. In this paper, wave packet dynamics is conducted using a three-dimensional direct product implementation of the distributed approximating functional free-propagator. A fundamental computational difficulty in this approach is that the interaction potential between the two components of the methodology needs to be calculated frequently. Here, we overcome this problem through the use of a time-dependent deterministic sampling measure that predicts, at every step of the dynamics, regions of the potential which are important. The algorithm, when combined with an on-the-fly interpolation scheme, allows us to determine the quantum dynamical interaction potential and gradients at every dynamics step in an extremely efficient manner. Numerical demonstrations of our sampling algorithm are provided through several examples arranged in a cascading level of complexity. Starting from a simple one-dimensional quantum dynamical treatment of the shared proton in [Cl-H-Cl](-) and [CH3-H-Cl](-) along with simultaneous dynamical treatment of the electrons and classical nuclei, through a complete three-dimensional treatment of the shared proton in [Cl-H-Cl](-) as well as treatment of a hydrogen atom undergoing donor-acceptor transitions in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1), we benchmark the algorithm thoroughly. Apart from computing various error estimates, we also compare vibrational density of states, inclusive of full quantum effects from the shared proton, using a novel unified velocity-velocity, flux-flux autocorrelation function. In all cases, the potential-adapted, time-dependent sampling procedure is seen to improve the

  10. Ab initio implementation of quantum trajectory mean-field approach and dynamical simulation of the N{sub 2}CO photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Binbin; Liu, Lihong; Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Wei-Hai; Cao, Jun; Feng, Wei; Li, Xin-qi

    2015-11-21

    In this work, the recently introduced quantum trajectory mean-field (QTMF) approach is implemented and employed to explore photodissociation dynamics of diazirinone (N{sub 2}CO), which are based on the high-level ab initio calculation. For comparison, the photodissociation process has been simulated as well with the fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) and the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) methods. Overall, the dynamical behavior predicted by the three methods is consistent. The N{sub 2}CO photodissociation at λ > 335 nm is an ultrafast process and the two C—N bonds are broken in a stepwise way, giving birth to CO and N{sub 2} as the final products in the ground state. Meanwhile, some noticeable differences were found in the QTMF, FSSH, and AIMS simulated time constants for fission of the C—N bonds, excited-state lifetime, and nonadiabatic transition ratios in different intersection regions. These have been discussed in detail. The present study provides a clear evidence that direct ab initio QTMF approach is one of the reliable tools for simulating nonadiabatic dynamics processes.

  11. Local minima conformations of the Sc3N @C80 endohedral complex: Ab initio quantum chemical study and suggestions for experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanov, Ilya; Kholod, Yana; Simeon, Tomekia; Kaczmarek, Anna; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    The results of an ab initio quantum chemical study of the Sc3N@C80 endohedral complex are reported. The Hartree-Fock (HF) and B3LYP levels of theory were employed in conjunction with STO-3G and 6-31G(d) basis sets to determine the geometry and properties of the local minima conformations of Sc3N cluster inside the C80 cage. Weak bonding between the Sc3N and C80 molecule and a number of very close geometry and nearly identical by energy local minima structures can explain the large mobility of the endohedral cluster, but complicate determination of the global minimum structure. The effect of the endohedral cluster on the vibrational spectrum of Sc3N@C80 is revealed. Based on the theoretical infrared (IR) spectra, the experimental method to distinguish local minima structures of Sc3N@C80 is proposed.

  12. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations of spin superexchange in cuprates: the benchmarking case of Ca2CuO3

    SciTech Connect

    Foyevtsova, Kateryna; Krogel, Jaron T; Kim, Jeongnim; Kent, Paul R; Dagotto, Elbio R; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2014-01-01

    In view of the continuous theoretical efforts aimed at an accurate microscopic description of the strongly correlated transition metal oxides and related materials, we show that with continuum quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations it is possible to obtain the value of the spin superexchange coupling constant of a copper oxide in a quantitatively excellent agreement with experiment. The variational nature of the QMC total energy allows us to identify the best trial wave function out of the available pool of wave functions, which makes the approach essentially free from adjustable parameters and thus truly ab initio. The present results on magnetic interactions suggest that QMC is capable of accurately describing ground state properties of strongly correlated materials.

  13. Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric π-conjugated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Ryohei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Minami, Takuya; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we apply the ab initio molecular orbital - configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the calculation and analysis of the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities (β) of asymmetric π-conjugated molecules. In this approach, we construct the excited state models by the ab initio configuration interaction singles method. Then, time evolutions of system reduced density matrix ρ(t) and system polarization p(t) are calculated by the QME approach. Dynamic β in the second harmonic generation is calculated based on the nonperturbative definition of nonlinear optical susceptibility, using the frequency domain system polarization p(ω). Spatial contributions of electrons to β are analyzed based on the dynamic hyperpolarizability density map, which visualizes the second-order response of charge density oscillating with a frequency of 2ω. We apply the present method to the calculation of the dynamic β of a series of donor/acceptor substituted polyene oligomers, and then discuss the applicability of the MOQME method to the calculation and analysis of dynamic NLO properties of molecular systems.

  14. From Model Hamiltonians to ab Initio Hamiltonians and Back Again: Using Single Excitation Quantum Chemistry Methods To Find Multiexciton States in Singlet Fission Materials.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, Nicholas J

    2016-09-13

    Due to the promise of significantly enhanced photovoltaic efficiencies, significant effort has been directed toward understanding and controlling the singlet fission mechanism. Although accurate quantum chemical calculations would provide a detail-rich view of the singlet fission mechanism, this is complicated by the multiexcitonic nature of one of the key intermediates, the (1)(TT) state. Being described as two simultaneous and singlet-coupled triplet excitations on a pair of nearest neighbor monomers, the (1)(TT) state is inherently a multielectronic excitation. This fact renders most single-reference ab initio quantum chemical methods incapable of providing accurate results. This paper serves two purposes: (1) to demonstrate that the multiexciton states in singlet fission materials can be described using a spin-only Hamiltonian and with each monomer treated as a biradical and (2) to propose a very simple procedure for extracting the values for this Hamiltonian from single-reference calculations. Numerical examples are included for a number of different systems, including dimers, trimers, tetramers, and a cluster comprised of seven chromophores. PMID:27472260

  15. Effects of quantum confinement on excited state properties of SrTiO3 from ab initio many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Lillo, Sebastian E.; Rangel, Tonatiuh; Bruneval, Fabien; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2016-07-01

    The Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) homologous series Srn +1TinO3 n +1 provides a useful template for the study and control of the effects of dimensionality and quantum confinement on the excited state properties of the complex oxide SrTiO3. We use ab initio many-body perturbation theory within the G W approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to calculate quasiparticle energies and absorption spectra of Srn +1TinO3 n +1 for n =1 -5 and ∞ . Our computed direct and indirect optical gaps are in excellent agreement with spectroscopic measurements. The calculated optical spectra reproduce the main experimental features and reveal excitonic structure near the gap edge. We find that electron-hole interactions are important across the series, leading to significant exciton binding energies that increase for small n and reach a value of 330 meV for n =1 , a trend attributed to increased quantum confinement. We find that the lowest-energy singlet exciton of Sr2TiO4 (n =1 ) localizes in the two-dimensional plane defined by the TiO2 layer, and we explain the origin of its localization.

  16. Benchmark Quantum Mechanical Calculations of Vibrationally Resolved Cross Sections and Rate Constants on ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces for the F + HD Reaction: Comparisons with Experiments.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2016-07-14

    Quantum scattering calculations within the time-independent approach in an extended interval of energies were performed for the title reaction on four ab initio potential energy surfaces. The calculated integral cross sections, vibrational branching ratios, and rate constants are compared with scattering experiments as well as with chemical kinetics rate data available for this system for both the HF and DF channels. The calculations on the CSZ (J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 024303) and LWAL (J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 127, 174302) surfaces are in close agreement between them and reproduce satisfactorily the experimental measurements. The agreement with the experiments is improved with respect to calculations on the earlier SW (J. Chem. Phys. 1996, 104, 6515) and FXZ (J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 011103) surfaces. The results presented here witness the remarkable progress made by quantum chemistry calculations in describing the interatomic interactions governing the dynamics and kinetics of this reaction. They also suggest that comparison with translationally and rotationally averaged experimental observables is not sufficient to assess the relative accuracy of highly accurate potential energy surfaces. The dynamics and kinetics calculations show that temperatures lower than 50 K or molecular beam energy spread below 1 meV must be reached to discriminate the accuracy of the LWAL and the CSZ surfaces.

  17. Ab initio rate constants from hyperspherical quantum scattering: application to H+C2H6 and H+CH3OH.

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Clary, David C

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics and kinetics of the abstraction reactions of H atoms with ethane and methanol have been studied using a quantum mechanical procedure. Bonds being broken and formed are treated with explicit hyperspherical quantum dynamics. The ab initio potential energy surfaces for these reactions have been developed from a minimal number of grid points (average of 48 points) and are given by analytical functionals. All the degrees of freedom except the breaking and forming bonds are optimized using the second order perturbation theory method with a correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta basis set. Single point energies are calculated on the optimized geometries with the coupled cluster theory and the same basis set. The reaction of H with C2H6 is endothermic by 1.5 kcal/mol and has a vibrationally adiabatic barrier of 12 kcal/mol. The reaction of H with CH3OH presents two reactive channels: the methoxy and the hydroxymethyl channels. The former is endothermic by 0.24 kcal/mol and has a vibrationally adiabatic barrier of 13.29 kcal/mol, the latter reaction is exothermic by 7.87 kcal/mol and has a vibrationally adiabatic barrier of 8.56 kcal/mol. We report state-to-state and state-selected cross sections together with state-to-state rate constants for the title reactions. Thermal rate constants for these reactions exhibit large quantum tunneling effects when compared to conventional transition state theory results. For H+CH3OH, it is found that the CH2OH product is the dominant channel, and that the CH3O channel contributes just 2% at 500 K. For both reactions, rate constants are in good agreement with some measurements. PMID:15473738

  18. Ab initio quantum-chemical study of the lower-lying electronic states of o-benzyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich Suter, Hans; Ha, Tae-Kyu

    1992-10-01

    The lower-lying singlet and triplet states of o-benzyne (C 6H 4) have been calculated by ab initio methods such as CASSCF, CASPT2, MR-CISD and MR-ACPF schemes employing an ANO basis set as well as the CIS method. The calculated results are compared with a recent electronic absorption spectrum of transient o-benzyne in an Ar matrix and with negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. It is shown that the dipole-allowed lowest singlet excitation is the 1B 1 (πσ*) ← 1A 1 and the lowest triplet state is the 3B 2(σσ*) state with calculated vertical energies of 4.0 and 2.0 eV, respectively. The calculated dipole moments are also reported.

  19. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of ground-state tunneling splitting of malonaldehyde using an accurate ab initio potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J; Bowman, Joel M; Carter, Stuart; Tew, David P

    2008-06-14

    Quantum calculations of the ground vibrational state tunneling splitting of H-atom and D-atom transfer in malonaldehyde are performed on a full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The PES is a fit to 11 147 near basis-set-limit frozen-core CCSD(T) electronic energies. This surface properly describes the invariance of the potential with respect to all permutations of identical atoms. The saddle-point barrier for the H-atom transfer on the PES is 4.1 kcalmol, in excellent agreement with the reported ab initio value. Model one-dimensional and "exact" full-dimensional calculations of the splitting for H- and D-atom transfer are done using this PES. The tunneling splittings in full dimensionality are calculated using the unbiased "fixed-node" diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method in Cartesian and saddle-point normal coordinates. The ground-state tunneling splitting is found to be 21.6 cm(-1) in Cartesian coordinates and 22.6 cm(-1) in normal coordinates, with an uncertainty of 2-3 cm(-1). This splitting is also calculated based on a model which makes use of the exact single-well zero-point energy (ZPE) obtained with the MULTIMODE code and DMC ZPE and this calculation gives a tunneling splitting of 21-22 cm(-1). The corresponding computed splittings for the D-atom transfer are 3.0, 3.1, and 2-3 cm(-1). These calculated tunneling splittings agree with each other to within less than the standard uncertainties obtained with the DMC method used, which are between 2 and 3 cm(-1), and agree well with the experimental values of 21.6 and 2.9 cm(-1) for the H and D transfer, respectively.

  20. Towards Understanding the Decomposition/Isomerism Channels of Stratospheric Bromine Species: Ab Initio and Quantum Topology Study

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Saadullah G.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.; Elroby, Shaaban A.; Osman, Osman I.; Hilal, Rifaat H.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims at a fundamental understanding of bonding characteristics of the C–Br and O–Br bonds. The target molecular systems are the isomeric CH3OBr/BrCH2OH system and their decomposition products. Calculations of geometries and frequencies at different density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree–Fock/Møller–Plesset (HF/MP2) levels have been performed. Results have been assessed and evaluated against those obtained at the coupled cluster single-double (Triplet) (CCSD(T)) level of theory. The characteristics of the C–Br and O–Br bonds have been identified via analysis of the electrostatic potential, natural bond orbital (NBO), and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Analysis of the electrostatic potential (ESP) maps enabled the quantitative characterization of the Br σ-holes. Its magnitude seems very sensitive to the environment and the charge accumulated in the adjacent centers. Some quantum topological parameters, namely ∇2ρ, ellipticity at bond critical points and the Laplacian bond order, were computed and discussed. The potential energy function for internal rotation has been computed and Fourier transformed to characterize the conformational preferences and origin of the barriers. NBO energetic components for rotation about the C–Br and O–Br bonds as a function of torsion angle have been computed and displayed. PMID:25815595

  1. Towards understanding the decomposition/isomerism channels of stratospheric bromine species: ab initio and quantum topology study.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Saadullah G; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O; Elroby, Shaaban A; Osman, Osman I; Hilal, Rifaat H

    2015-03-25

    The present study aims at a fundamental understanding of bonding characteristics of the C-Br and O-Br bonds. The target molecular systems are the isomeric CH3OBr/BrCH2OH system and their decomposition products. Calculations of geometries and frequencies at different density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock/Møller-Plesset (HF/MP2) levels have been performed. Results have been assessed and evaluated against those obtained at the coupled cluster single-double (Triplet) (CCSD(T)) level of theory. The characteristics of the C-Br and O-Br bonds have been identified via analysis of the electrostatic potential, natural bond orbital (NBO), and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Analysis of the electrostatic potential (ESP) maps enabled the quantitative characterization of the Br σ-holes. Its magnitude seems very sensitive to the environment and the charge accumulated in the adjacent centers. Some quantum topological parameters, namely Ñ2ρ, ellipticity at bond critical points and the Laplacian bond order, were computed and discussed. The potential energy function for internal rotation has been computed and Fourier transformed to characterize the conformational preferences and origin of the barriers. NBO energetic components for rotation about the C-Br and O-Br bonds as a function of torsion angle have been computed and displayed.

  2. Revisiting structure and dynamics of Ag+ in 18.6% aqueous ammonia: An ab initio quantum mechanical charge field simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Niko; Armunanto, Ria

    2016-05-01

    Structures and dynamics of Ag+ in 18.6% aqueous ammonia have been studied using Quantum Mechanical Charge Field Molecular Dynamics (QMCF-MD) simulation at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level theory employing LANL2DZ ECP basis set for Ag+ and Dunning DZP for solvent molecules. Structural properties are in excellent agreement with previous QM/MM and experiments studies. [Ag(NH3)2(H2O)3]+ was found as dominant species during simulation time. For 20 ps of simulation time, a labile first solvation shell was observed with both fast ammonia and water ligands exchanges. QMCF-MD framework describes first solvation shell more labile than conventional QM/MM MD simulation.

  3. Theoretical study on exciton recurrence motion in anthracene dimer using the Ab initio MO-CI based quantum master equation approach.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ryohei; Nakano, Masayoshi; Minami, Takuya; Fukui, Hitoshi; Nagai, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Kyohei; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2009-05-01

    We apply the ab initio molecular orbital (MO)-configuration interaction (CI) based quantum master equation (MOQME) method to the investigation of ultrafast exciton dynamics in an anthracene dimer modeled after anthracenophane, which is experimentally found to exhibit an oscillatory signal of fluorescence anisotropy decay. Two low-lying near-degenerate one-photon allowed excited states with a slight energy difference (42 cm(-1)) are obtained at the CIS/6-31G** level of approximation using full valence pi-orbitals. The time evolution of reduced exciton density matrices is performed by numerically solving the quantum master equation. After the creation of a superposition state of these near-degenerate states by irradiating a near-resonant laser field, we observe two kinds of oscillatory behaviors of polarizations: field-induced polarizations with faster periods, and amplitude oscillations of x- and z-polarizations, P(x) and P(z), with a slower period, in which the amplitudes of P(x) and P(z) attain maximum alternately. The latter behavior turns out to be associated with an oscillatory exciton motion between the two monomers, i.e., exciton recurrence motion, using the dynamic exciton expression based on the polarization density. From the analysis of contribution to the exciton distributions, such exciton recurrence motion is found to be characterized by both the difference in eigenfrequencies between the two near-degenerate states excited by the laser field and the relative phases among the frontier MOs primarily contributing to the near-degenerate states.

  4. CheMPS2: A free open-source spin-adapted implementation of the density matrix renormalization group for ab initio quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Sebastian; Poelmans, Ward; Ayers, Paul W.; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2014-06-01

    The density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) has become an indispensable numerical tool to find exact eigenstates of finite-size quantum systems with strong correlation. In the fields of condensed matter, nuclear structure and molecular electronic structure, it has significantly extended the system sizes that can be handled compared to full configuration interaction, without losing numerical accuracy. For quantum chemistry (QC), the most efficient implementations of DMRG require the incorporation of particle number, spin and point group symmetries in the underlying matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, as well as the use of so-called complementary operators. The symmetries introduce a sparse block structure in the MPS ansatz and in the intermediary contracted tensors. If a symmetry is non-abelian, the Wigner-Eckart theorem allows to factorize a tensor into a Clebsch-Gordan coefficient and a reduced tensor. In addition, the fermion signs have to be carefully tracked. Because of these challenges, implementing DMRG efficiently for QC is not straightforward. Efficient and freely available implementations are therefore highly desired. In this work we present CheMPS2, our free open-source spin-adapted implementation of DMRG for ab initio QC. Around CheMPS2, we have implemented the augmented Hessian Newton-Raphson complete active space self-consistent field method, with exact Hessian. The bond dissociation curves of the 12 lowest states of the carbon dimer were obtained at the DMRG(28 orbitals, 12 electrons, DSU(2) = 2500)/cc-pVDZ level of theory. The contribution of 1 s core correlation to the X1Σg+ bond dissociation curve of the carbon dimer was estimated by comparing energies at the DMRG(36o, 12e, DSU(2) = 2500)/cc-pCVDZ and DMRG-SCF(34o, 8e, DSU(2) = 2500)/cc-pCVDZ levels of theory.

  5. On the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 pyrochlore solid solution: Quantum ab initio and classic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Mora, Pablo; Cosio-Castañeda, Carlos; Martinez-Anaya, Oliver; Morales, Francisco; Tavizon, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a theoretical study of the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 (Bi2-ySryIr2O16O2) α-pyrochlore-type solid solution is presented. Quantum ab initio DFT(WIEN2k) calculations were performed in order to understand the electrical resistivity changes associated to the Bi substitution by Sr in this system. The main crystallographic modification associated to this substitution is the x position of the 48f oxygen (x, 1/8, 1/8) (O1); this substitution substantially modifies the Bi/Sr-O1 and Ir-O1 atomic distances, increasing the former and diminishing the latter. Experimentally, the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 samples are metallic and the electrical resistivity increases with the Sr content. Electronic structure calculations for Bi2Ir2O7 and BiSrIr2O7 show that, regardless of structural changes, there is only a small change of electrical conductivity with the Sr substitution, and the experimentally observed increase of the resistivity can be explained in terms of a larger impact on the electronic structure of both; the Sr 'impurities' as well as of the thermal Sr oscillations.

  6. Mechanistic Insights into Radical-Mediated Oxidation of Tryptophan from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations and QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Geoffrey P F; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Moore, Jamie M; Wang, John; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2016-05-12

    An assessment of the mechanisms of (•)OH and (•)OOH radical-mediated oxidation of tryptophan was performed using density functional theory calculations and ab initio plane-wave Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored site with a barrierless reaction in the gas phase. The subsequent degradation of this adduct through a H atom transfer to water was intermittently observed in aqueous-phase molecular dynamics simulations. For the (•)OOH reactions, addition to the pyrrole ring at position 2 is the most favored pathway, in contrast to the situation in the model system ethylene, where concerted addition to the double bond is preferred. From the (•)OOH position 2 adduct QM/MM simulations show that formation of oxy-3-indolanaline occurs readily in an aqueous environment. The observed transformation starts from an initial rupture of the O-O bond followed by a H atom transfer with the accompanying loss of an (•)OH radical to solution. Finally, classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to equate observed differential oxidation rates of various tryptophan residues in monoclonal antibody fragments. It was found that simple parameters derived from simulation correlate well with the experimental data. PMID:27082439

  7. Full-dimensional quantum dynamics study of the H2 + C2H → H + C2H2 reaction on an ab initio potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liuyang; Shao, Kejie; Chen, Jun; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Dong H

    2016-05-21

    This work performs a time-dependent wavepacket study of the H2 + C2H → H + C2H2 reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The PES is constructed using neural network method based on 68 478 geometries with energies calculated at UCCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVTZ level and covers H2 + C2H↔H + C2H2, H + C2H2 → HCCH2, and HCCH2 radial isomerization reaction regions. The reaction dynamics of H2 + C2H → H + C2H2 are investigated using full-dimensional quantum dynamics method. The initial-state selected reaction probabilities are calculated for reactants in eight vibrational states. The calculated results showed that the H2 vibrational excitation predominantly enhances the reactivity while the excitation of bending mode of C2H slightly inhibits the reaction. The excitations of two stretching modes of C2H molecule have negligible effect on the reactivity. The integral cross section is calculated with J-shift approximation and the mode selectivity in this reaction is discussed. The rate constants over 200-2000 K are calculated and agree well with the experimental measured values.

  8. Minimizing Electron-Hole Recombination on TiO2 Sensitized with PbSe Quantum Dots: Time-Domain Ab Initio Analysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Run; English, Niall J; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2014-09-01

    TiO2 sensitized with quantum dots (QDs) gives efficient photovoltaic and photocatalytic systems due to high stability and large absorption cross sections of QDs and rapid photoinduced charge separation at the interface. The yields of the light-induced processes are limited by electron-hole recombination that also occurs at the interface. We combine ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics with analytic theory to investigate the experimentally studied charge recombination at the PbSe QD-TiO2 interface. The time-domain atomistic simulation directly mimics the laser experiment and generates important details of the recombination mechanism. The process occurs due to coupling of the electronic subsystem to polar optical modes of the TiO2 surface. The inelastic electron-phonon scattering happens on a picosecond time scale, while the elastic scattering takes 40 fs. Counter to expectations, the donor-acceptor bonding strengthens at an elevated temperature. An analytic theory extends the simulation results to larger QDs and longer QD-TiO2 bridges. It shows that the electron-hole recombination rate decreases significantly for longer bridges and larger dots and that the main effect arises due to reduced donor-acceptor coupling rather than changes in the donor-acceptor energy gap. The study indicates that by varying QD size or ligands one can reduce charge losses while still maintaining efficient charge separation, providing design principles for optimizing solar cell design and increasing photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies.

  9. On the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 pyrochlore solid solution: Quantum ab initio and classic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Mora, Pablo; Cosio-Castañeda, Carlos; Martinez-Anaya, Oliver; Morales, Francisco; Tavizon, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a theoretical study of the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 (Bi2-ySryIr2O16O2) α-pyrochlore-type solid solution is presented. Quantum ab initio DFT(WIEN2k) calculations were performed in order to understand the electrical resistivity changes associated to the Bi substitution by Sr in this system. The main crystallographic modification associated to this substitution is the x position of the 48f oxygen (x, 1/8 , 1/8 ) (O1); this substitution substantially modifies the Bi/Sr-O1 and Ir-O1 atomic distances, increasing the former and diminishing the latter. Experimentally, the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 samples are metallic and the electrical resistivity increases with the Sr content. Electronic structure calculations for Bi2Ir2O7 and BiSrIr2O7 show that, regardless of structural changes, there is only a small change of electrical conductivity with the Sr substitution, and the experimentally observed increase of the resistivity can be explained in terms of a larger impact on the electronic structure of both; the Sr 'impurities' as well as of the thermal Sr oscillations.

  10. State-to-state quantum wave packet dynamics of the LiH + H reaction on two AB initio potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Carrasco, S.; González-Sánchez, L.; Roncero, O.

    2014-03-20

    The dynamics and kinetics of the LiH + H reaction have been studied by using an accurate quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet method on the ab initio ground electronic state potential energy surfaces (PES) developed earlier. Reaction probabilities for the two possible reaction channels, the LiH + H→ H{sub 2} + Li depletion process and the LiH + H→H + LiH hydrogen exchange reaction, have been calculated from 1 meV up to 1.0 eV collision energies for total angular momenta J from 0 to 80. State-to-state and total integral cross sections for the LiH-depletion and H-exchange channels of the reaction have been calculated over this collision energy range. It is found that the LiH-depletion channel is dominant in the whole range of collision energies for both PESs. Accurate total rate coefficients have been calculated on both surfaces from 100 K to 2000 K and are significantly larger than previous empirical estimates and previous J-shifting results. In addition, the present accurate calculations present noticeable differences with previous calculations using the centrifugal sudden approximation.

  11. Mode specificity in the OH + CHD3 reaction: Reduced-dimensional quantum and quasi-classical studies on an ab initio based full-dimensional potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongwei; Lu, Yunpeng; Li, Jun; Yang, Minghui; Guo, Hua

    2016-04-28

    An initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method is applied to study the dynamics of the OH + CHD3 reaction with a six-dimensional model on a newly developed full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES). This quantum dynamical (QD) study is complemented by full-dimensional quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations on the same PES. The QD results indicate that both translational energy and the excitation of the CH stretching mode significantly promote the reaction while the excitation of the umbrella mode has a negligible effect on the reactivity. For this early barrier reaction, interestingly, the CH stretching mode is more effective than translational energy in promoting the reaction except at very low collision energies. These QD observations are supported by QCT results. The higher efficacy of the CH stretching model in promoting this early barrier reaction is inconsistent with the prediction of the naively extended Polanyi's rules, but can be rationalized by the recently proposed sudden vector projection model.

  12. Quantum-chemical ab initio investigation of the two-step charge transfer process of hydrogen reaction: approach of reaction pathways via hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, An. M.; Lorenz, W.

    1994-08-01

    Local reaction events in the course of the electrochemical two-step hydrogen evolution reaction have been investigated by means of quantum-chemical all-electron ab initio calculations on interfacial supermolecular cluster models including a hydrated hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100). Expanding on preceding study to larger hydration clusters, an approach to relevant reaction path characteristics has been pursued for two processes: (i) the transfer of hydrated hydronium ion into a chemisorbed hydrogen intermediate: (ii) the reaction of hydronium ion with the intermediate to molecular hydrogen. Computations were carried out on RHF level, using contracted (12,8,4)/[8,6,2,] and/or 6-31G * or G ** pol-O bases for the metal and adsorbate part, respectively. Destruction of the hydronium configuration in process (i) has been confirmed. Electronic partial charge transfer dut to chemical bond conversions in both steps (i) and (ii) has been displayed along relevant cuts of adiabatic potential surfaces, proving significantly different amounts of charge transfer in both steps, λ 1 > 1, λ 2≡(2-λ 1) < 1. In advance of consideration of macroscopic double layer effects, first insight has been gained into coupled nuclear motions and into the origin of reaction barriers

  13. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    DOE PAGES

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To studymore » defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. Lastly, these results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.« less

  14. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To study defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. These results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy.

  15. Calculating solution redox free energies with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao

    2009-04-01

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method was developed to calculate the redox free energies of large systems in solution with greatly enhanced efficiency for conformation sampling. The QM/MM-MFEP method describes the thermodynamics of a system on the potential of mean force surface of the solute degrees of freedom. The molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is only carried out with the QM subsystem fixed. It thus avoids "on-the-fly" QM calculations and thus overcomes the high computational cost in the direct QM/MM MD sampling. In the applications to two metal complexes in aqueous solution, the new QM/MM-MFEP method yielded redox free energies in good agreement with those calculated from the direct QM/MM MD method. Two larger biologically important redox molecules, lumichrome and riboflavin, were further investigated to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. The enhanced efficiency and uncompromised accuracy are especially significant for biochemical systems. The QM/MM-MFEP method thus provides an efficient approach to free energy simulation of complex electron transfer reactions.

  16. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the uniform electron gas without fixed nodes: The unpolarized case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornheim, T.; Groth, S.; Schoof, T.; Hann, C.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-05-01

    In a recent publication [S. Groth et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 085102 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.085102], we have shown that the combination of two complementary quantum Monte Carlo approaches, namely configuration path integral Monte Carlo [T. Schoof et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 130402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.130402] and permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo [T. Dornheim et al., New J. Phys. 17, 073017 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073017], allows for the accurate computation of thermodynamic properties of the spin-polarized uniform electron gas over a wide range of temperatures and densities without the fixed-node approximation. In the present work, we extend this concept to the unpolarized case, which requires nontrivial enhancements that we describe in detail. We compare our simulation results with recent restricted path integral Monte Carlo data [E. W. Brown et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.146405] for different energy contributions and pair distribution functions and find, for the exchange correlation energy, overall better agreement than for the spin-polarized case, while the separate kinetic and potential contributions substantially deviate.

  17. Calculating solution redox free energies with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path method

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xiancheng; Hu Hao; Hu Xiangqian; Yang Weitao

    2009-04-28

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method was developed to calculate the redox free energies of large systems in solution with greatly enhanced efficiency for conformation sampling. The QM/MM-MFEP method describes the thermodynamics of a system on the potential of mean force surface of the solute degrees of freedom. The molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is only carried out with the QM subsystem fixed. It thus avoids 'on-the-fly' QM calculations and thus overcomes the high computational cost in the direct QM/MM MD sampling. In the applications to two metal complexes in aqueous solution, the new QM/MM-MFEP method yielded redox free energies in good agreement with those calculated from the direct QM/MM MD method. Two larger biologically important redox molecules, lumichrome and riboflavin, were further investigated to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. The enhanced efficiency and uncompromised accuracy are especially significant for biochemical systems. The QM/MM-MFEP method thus provides an efficient approach to free energy simulation of complex electron transfer reactions.

  18. Mechanism of Magnetostructural Transitions in Copper-Nitroxide-Based Switchable Molecular Magnets: Insights from ab Initio Quantum Chemistry Calculations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julie; Guennic, Boris Le; Fedin, Matvey V; Ovcharenko, Victor I; Calzado, Carmen J

    2015-07-20

    The gradual magnetostructural transition in breathing crystals based on copper(II) and pyrazolyl-substituted nitronyl nitroxides has been analyzed by means of DDCI quantum chemistry calculations. The magnetic coupling constants (J) within the spin triads of Cu(hfac)2L(Bu)·0.5C8H18 have been evaluated for the X-ray structures reported at different temperatures. The coupling is strongly antiferromagnetic at low temperature and becomes ferromagnetic when the temperature increases. The intercluster magnetic coupling (J') is antiferromagnetic and shows a marked dependence on temperature. The magnetostructural transition can be reproduced using the calculated J values for each structure in the simulation of the magnetic susceptibility. However, the μ(T) curve can be improved nicely by considering the coexistence of two phases in the transition region, whose ratio varies with temperature corresponding to both the weakly and strongly coupled spin states. These results complement a recent VT-FTIR study on the parent Cu(hfac)2L(Pr) compound with a gradual magnetostructural transition.

  19. Pure and N-substituted Small Cyclic Hydrocarbon Cations and Anions Synthesis in The Ionosphere of Titan: An Ab-Initio Quantum Chemical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, P. P.

    2015-12-01

    The instruments on board the CASSINI spacecraft observed large carbonaceous molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. How these large polyatomic molecules are synthesized in such exotic conditions is, thus far, unknown. Molecular ions, including positive and negative ions, especially large anions, are in abundance in the ionosphere of Titan. Barrier-less ion-molecule interactions may play a major role ­- ions provide electrostatic steering force - in guiding molecules towards each other and initiating reactions. We study these condensation pathways to determine whether they are a viable means of forming large pure hydrocarbon molecules, and nitrogen-containing carbonaceous chains, stacks, and even cyclic compounds. We employ accurate quantum chemical methods to investigate the processes of growth, structures, nature of bonding, mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties of the ensuing ionic products after pairing small carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen-containing molecules with major ions observed in the upper atmosphere of Titan, e.g. C2H5+ and HCNH+, apart from a whole host of small hydrocarbons. We also studied the ion-neutral association pathways involving pure-carbon molecules e.g. acetylene, ethylene and other hydrocarbons, and their dissociation fragments in a plasma discharge. We found the molecular building blocks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenyl cations can form very easily by the combination of smaller hydrocarbons followed by hydrogen loss. We have investigated how nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the carbon ring during growth. Specifically, we explored the mechanisms by which the synthesis of pyrimidine will be feasible in the atmosphere of Titan in conjunction with ion-mobility experiments. Futher, we study the formation process of anions, and study their potential energy surfaces. We have used accurate ab initio coupled cluster theory, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, density functional theory (DFT), and coupled cluster theory

  20. Ab initio quantum mechanical study of the structures and energies for the pseudorotation of 5{prime}-dehydroxy analogues of 2{prime}-deoxyribose and ribose sugars

    SciTech Connect

    Brameld, K.A.; Goddard, W.A. III

    1999-02-10

    The authors have used ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) methods to determine the potential energy of pseudorotation for 3,4-dihydroxy-5-methyl-2-(1-pyrollyl)tetrahydrofuran and 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-(1-pyrollyl)-tetrahydrofuran, close analogues of 2{prime}-deoxyribose and ribose sugars. The pyrrole is a substitute for the naturally occurring nucleic acid bases: adenine, thymine, guanine, cytosine, and uracil. At the highest calculation level (LMP2/cc-pVTZ(-f)//HF/6-31G**) for 2{prime}-deoxyribose, they find the C2{prime}-endo conformation is the global minimum. The C3{prime}-endo conformation is a local minimum 0.6 kcal/mol higher in energy, and an eastern barrier of 1.6 kcal/mol separates the two minima. Pseudorotation energies of ribose are quite complex and are strongly affected by local orientations of the 2{prime} and 3{prime} hydroxyl groups. When the hydroxyl groups are allowed to assume any conformation, the global minimum remains the C2{prime}-endo conformation. The eastern barrier increases slightly to 1.8 kcal/mol, and the C3{prime}-endo local minimum lies 0.6 kcal/mol above the global minimum. Constraining the torsion angle of the C3{prime} hydroxyl group to {minus}146{degree}, as is found in RNA polymers, results in the C3{prime}-endo conformation becoming the only energy minimum with a C2{prime}-endo conformation 1.9 kcal/mol higher in energy. Bond angles within the pentofuranose ring are correlated to the pseudorotational phase, as is observed by X-ray crystallography and is predicted by pseudorotation theory. Finally, a force field for use in molecular mechanics and dynamics simulations is presented which reproduces the QM potential energies for the 2{prime}-deoxyribose and ribose sugars.

  1. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-28

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water.

  2. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water.

  3. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: a theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations.

    PubMed

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-28

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water.

  4. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical immunoassay for CA19-9 detection based on CdSe@ZnS quantum dots sensitized TiO2NWs/Au hybrid structure amplified by quenching effect of Ab2@V(2+) conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Fan, Gao-Chao; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-03-15

    A novel, enhanced photoelectrochemical immunoassay was established for sensitive and specific detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9, Ag). In this protocol, TiO2 nanowires (TiO2NWs) were first decorated with Au nanoparticles to form TiO2NWs/Au hybrid structure, and then coated with CdSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) via the layer-by-layer method, producing TiO2NWs/Au/CdSe@ZnS sensitized structure, which was employed as the photoelectrochemical matrix to immobilize capture CA19-9 antibodies (Ab1); whereas, bipyridinium (V(2+)) molecules were labeled on signal CA19-9 antibodies (Ab2) to form Ab2@V(2+) conjugates, which were used as signal amplification elements. The TiO2NWs/Au/CdSe@ZnS sensitized structure could adequately absorb light energy and dramatically depress electron-hole recombination, resulting in evidently enhanced photocurrent intensity of the immunosensing electrode. While target Ag were detected, the Ab2@V(2+) conjugates could significantly decrease the photocurrent detection signal because of strong electron-withdrawing property of V(2+) coupled with evident steric hindrance of Ab2. Thanks to synergy effect of TiO2NWs/Au/CdSe@ZnS sensitized structure and quenching effect of Ab2@V(2+) conjugates, the well-established photoelectrochemical immunoassay exhibited a low detection limit of 0.0039 U/mL with a wide linear range from 0.01 U/mL to 200 U/mL for target Ag detection. This proposed photoelectrochemical protocol also showed good reproducibility, specificity and stability, and might be applied to detect other important biomarkers. PMID:26433066

  5. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical immunoassay for CA19-9 detection based on CdSe@ZnS quantum dots sensitized TiO2NWs/Au hybrid structure amplified by quenching effect of Ab2@V(2+) conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Fan, Gao-Chao; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-03-15

    A novel, enhanced photoelectrochemical immunoassay was established for sensitive and specific detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9, Ag). In this protocol, TiO2 nanowires (TiO2NWs) were first decorated with Au nanoparticles to form TiO2NWs/Au hybrid structure, and then coated with CdSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) via the layer-by-layer method, producing TiO2NWs/Au/CdSe@ZnS sensitized structure, which was employed as the photoelectrochemical matrix to immobilize capture CA19-9 antibodies (Ab1); whereas, bipyridinium (V(2+)) molecules were labeled on signal CA19-9 antibodies (Ab2) to form Ab2@V(2+) conjugates, which were used as signal amplification elements. The TiO2NWs/Au/CdSe@ZnS sensitized structure could adequately absorb light energy and dramatically depress electron-hole recombination, resulting in evidently enhanced photocurrent intensity of the immunosensing electrode. While target Ag were detected, the Ab2@V(2+) conjugates could significantly decrease the photocurrent detection signal because of strong electron-withdrawing property of V(2+) coupled with evident steric hindrance of Ab2. Thanks to synergy effect of TiO2NWs/Au/CdSe@ZnS sensitized structure and quenching effect of Ab2@V(2+) conjugates, the well-established photoelectrochemical immunoassay exhibited a low detection limit of 0.0039 U/mL with a wide linear range from 0.01 U/mL to 200 U/mL for target Ag detection. This proposed photoelectrochemical protocol also showed good reproducibility, specificity and stability, and might be applied to detect other important biomarkers.

  6. Combining ab initio quantum mechanics with a dipole-field model to describe acid dissociation reactions in water: first-principles free energy and entropy calculations.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-02-21

    We introduce a novel approach to compute dissociation free energy and entropy values in simulations that employ a density functional theory description of the acidic moiety and of the solvent. The approach consists of utilizing an alchemical transformation of a weak acid A-COOH into the strong acid B-COOH, which makes it practical to employ alchemical free energy perturbation methods in the context of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The present alchemical transformation circumvents the need to tackle changes in the total number of electrons and atoms by replacing the chemical residue responsible for the change in acidity with an easily tunable external effective potential. Our investigation demonstrates that (1) a simple but effective class of external potentials that control acidity changes in the acetic/trifluoroacetic acid series can be achieved by replacing the methyl and trifluoromethyl substituents by screened dipoles. Using this dipole-field/quantum-mechanics (DF/QM) approach one can predict gas-phase geometries, proton dissociation energies, total dipole moments, and water binding energies in good agreement with full-QM values. (2) The resulting alchemical perturbation calculations are stable and well converged and allow one to compute absolute pK(a) values whose accuracy is limited primarily by the exchange-correlation functional employed: H-COOH=2.5+/-0.6 (full-QM calculation), 3.7 (exp); F(3)C-COOH=0.4+/-0.6 (DF/QM calculation), 0.5 (exp); H(3)C-COOH=3.1+/-0.7 (DF/QM calculation), 4.7 (exp); 3) Our DF/QM model predicts that the difference in acidity between H-COOH and H(3)C-COOH is dominated by solvent entropy effects, in excellent agreement with experimental observations. The calculated difference between the dissociation energies of these acids is DeltaDelta(d)U=0.0+/-0.26 kcal/mol while the experimental value is 0.0+/-0.1 kcal/mol.

  7. The He + H2+ --> HeH+ + H reaction: Ab initio studies of the potential energy surface, benchmark time-independent quantum dynamics in an extended energy range and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Fazio, Dario; de Castro-Vitores, Miguel; Aguado, Alfredo; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Cavalli, Simonetta

    2012-12-01

    In this work we critically revise several aspects of previous ab initio quantum chemistry studies [P. Palmieri et al., Mol. Phys. 98, 1835 (2000);, 10.1080/00268970009483387 C. N. Ramachandran et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 469, 26 (2009)], 10.1016/j.cplett.2008.12.035 of the HeH_2^+ system. New diatomic curves for the H_2^+ and HeH+ molecular ions, which provide vibrational frequencies at a near spectroscopic level of accuracy, have been generated to test the quality of the diatomic terms employed in the previous analytical fittings. The reliability of the global potential energy surfaces has also been tested performing benchmark quantum scattering calculations within the time-independent approach in an extended interval of energies. In particular, the total integral cross sections have been calculated in the total collision energy range 0.955-2.400 eV for the scattering of the He atom by the ortho- and para-hydrogen molecular ion. The energy profiles of the total integral cross sections for selected vibro-rotational states of H_2^+ (v = 0, …,5 and j = 1, …,7) show a strong rotational enhancement for the lower vibrational states which becomes weaker as the vibrational quantum number increases. Comparison with several available experimental data is presented and discussed.

  8. Ab initio quantum chemical studies of fullerene molecules with substitutes C59X [XSi, Ge, Sn], C59X- [XB, Al, Ga, In], and C59X [XN, P, As, Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeon, Tomekia M.; Yanov, Ilya; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    This article presents the results of systematic ab initio quantum chemical study of charged and neutral analogues of fullerene molecules: C59X[XSi, Ge, Sn], C59X- [XB, Al, Ga, In], and C59X+ [XN, P, As, Sb]. Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory with Stuttgart-Dresden basis set were used to investigate the structure and properties of substituted fullerene molecules. A replacement of fullerene carbon atom with a heteroatom results in a unique chemical site on the fullerene surface, which may be used as a reactive center or to modify the electronic properties. We show the possibility of utilization of substituted fullerenes as atom-like building units. Heteroatom substitution allows the tuning of the physical and chemical properties of original molecule for different material science and nanotechnology applications.

  9. Time-dependent quantum wave packet study of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime )

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Mei; Liu Xinguo; Tan Ruishan; Li Hongzheng; Xu Wenwu

    2013-05-07

    A new global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime ) of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction has been constructed by multi-reference configuration interaction method with Davidson correction and a basis set of aug-cc-pVQZ. Using 6080 ab initio single-point energies of all the regions for the dynamics, a many-body expansion function form has been used to fit these points. The quantum reactive scattering dynamics calculations taking into account the Coriolis coupling (CC) were carried out on the new potential energy surface over a range of collision energies (0.03-1.0 eV). The reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the title reaction were calculated. The significance of including the CC quantum scattering calculation has been revealed by the comparison between the CC and the centrifugal sudden approximation calculation. The calculated cross section is in agreement with the experimental result at collision energy 1.0 eV.

  10. Unexpectedly strong energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of small protein rubredoxin mediated by aromatic residues: correlated ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vondrásek, Jirí; Bendová, Lada; Klusák, Vojtech; Hobza, Pavel

    2005-03-01

    The formation of a hydrophobic core of globular proteins is believed to be the consequence of exterior hydrophobic forces of entropic nature. This, together with the low occurrence of hydrogen bonds in the protein core, leads to the opinion that the energy contribution of core formation to protein folding and stability is negligible. We show that stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of a small protein, rubredoxin, determined by means of high-level correlated ab initio calculations (complete basis set limit of MP2 stabilization energy + CCSD(T) correction term), amounted to approximately 50 kcal/mol. These results clearly demonstrate strong attraction inside a hydrophobic core. This finding may lead to substantial changes in the current view of protein folding. We also point out the inability of the DFT/B3LYP method to describe a strong attraction between studied amino acids.

  11. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    PubMed Central

    van Genderen, E.; Clabbers, M. T. B.; Das, P. P.; Stewart, A.; Nederlof, I.; Barentsen, K. C.; Portillo, Q.; Pannu, N. S.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Gruene, T.; Abrahams, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e− Å−2 s−1) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014). PMID:26919375

  12. Bulk-phase thermodynamic properties and dielectric constant of ethanol: an ab initio quantum mechanical approach combined with a statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Prasenjit; Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2013-10-01

    Ab initio theory at the HF/6-311G(d,p) level has been used to compute the hydrogen bonding thermodynamics in bulk liquid ethanol. Inter-cluster hydrogen bonding is assumed to mimic the H-bonding in bulk ethanol. Rotation of the clusters has been neglected, but translational and vibrational motions are taken into account for calculating bulk thermodynamic parameters. Results are well in agreement with an earlier report [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4212 (2002)]. For a more accurate dipole moment of monomer, MP2/6-311++G(d,p) calculation was done. Use of the computed thermodynamic data in a statistical model yields the Kirkwood-Frohlich correlation factor and the dielectric constant of ethanol (21.0) close to the experimental value, 24.3 at 298 K.

  13. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector.

    PubMed

    van Genderen, E; Clabbers, M T B; Das, P P; Stewart, A; Nederlof, I; Barentsen, K C; Portillo, Q; Pannu, N S; Nicolopoulos, S; Gruene, T; Abrahams, J P

    2016-03-01

    Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼ 0.013 e(-) Å(-2) s(-1)) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014). PMID:26919375

  14. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To study defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. Lastly, these results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  15. Temperature- and gaseous phase-mediated reorganization and paramagnetic doping of solid aluminum fluorides: ESR and ab initio quantum chemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, G.

    1998-08-01

    Based on cw-X-band ESR spectroscopic measurements of Mn{sup 2+} doped AlF{sub 3} powder samples and DFT (B3LYP)/6-31+G{sup *} quantum chemical calculations it is shown that structural reorganization of AlF{sub 3} (AlF{sub 3} (amorphous) {yields} AlF{sub 3} (crystalline)) are necessarily assisted by chemical reactions with the precipitation of water. It could be unambiguously demonstrated that Mn{sup 2+} ions are suitable spin probes for reorganization processes from amorphous to local crystalline regions in fluoride matrices. The resolution of the {sup 55}Mn-{sup 19}F- superhyperfine structure (both the formation of regular MnF{sub 6}{sup 4{minus}}-species as well as the reduction of strain effects by transformation of the amorphous parts) is a sensitive indicator of the formation of local crystalline regions. DFT(B3LYP)/6-31+G{sup *} calculations of (AlF{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} complexes (n: 1,2; m: 1--3) resulted in first and acceptable ideas of structures, energetical stabilities, and vibrational frequencies of hydrated AlF{sub 3}. The calculated strength of the Al-O bond, resulting in the stable {l_brace}AlF{sub 3}-OH{sub 2}{r_brace} subunit, and the favored splitting of Al-F-Al bonds by H{sub 2}O molecules, are the main reasons for the immediate and spontaneous hydration of freshly prepared amorphous AlF{sub 3}. Independent of the size of the model complexes, stable substructures like {l_brace}AlF{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O{r_brace} and {l_brace}F{sub 3}AlFAlF{sub 2}-OH{sub 2}{r_brace} can be recognized in all optimized structure models.

  16. Memories of AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    I had the good fortune to be a student of A. B. Migdal - AB, as we called him in person or in his absence - and to work in the sector he headed at the Kurchatov Institute, along with his other students and my friends, including Vitya Galitsky, Spartak Belyayev and Tolya Larkin. I was especially close with AB in the second half of the 1950s, the years most important for my formation, and AB's contribution to this formation was very great. To this day, I've often quoted AB on various occasions, as it's hard to put things better or more precisely than he did; I tell friends stories heard from AB, because these stories enhance life as AB himself enhanced it; my daughter is named Tanya after AB's wife Tatyana Lvovna, and so on. In what follows, I'll recount a few episodes in my life in which AB played an important or decisive role, and then will share some other memories of AB...

  17. Electronic couplings for molecular charge transfer: Benchmarking CDFT, FODFT, and FODFTB against high-level ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, Adam; Blumberger, Jochen; Hoffmann, Felix; Heck, Alexander; Elstner, Marcus; Oberhofer, Harald

    2014-03-14

    We introduce a database (HAB11) of electronic coupling matrix elements (H{sub ab}) for electron transfer in 11 π-conjugated organic homo-dimer cations. High-level ab inito calculations at the multireference configuration interaction MRCI+Q level of theory, n-electron valence state perturbation theory NEVPT2, and (spin-component scaled) approximate coupled cluster model (SCS)-CC2 are reported for this database to assess the performance of three DFT methods of decreasing computational cost, including constrained density functional theory (CDFT), fragment-orbital DFT (FODFT), and self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding (FODFTB). We find that the CDFT approach in combination with a modified PBE functional containing 50% Hartree-Fock exchange gives best results for absolute H{sub ab} values (mean relative unsigned error = 5.3%) and exponential distance decay constants β (4.3%). CDFT in combination with pure PBE overestimates couplings by 38.7% due to a too diffuse excess charge distribution, whereas the economic FODFT and highly cost-effective FODFTB methods underestimate couplings by 37.6% and 42.4%, respectively, due to neglect of interaction between donor and acceptor. The errors are systematic, however, and can be significantly reduced by applying a uniform scaling factor for each method. Applications to dimers outside the database, specifically rotated thiophene dimers and larger acenes up to pentacene, suggests that the same scaling procedure significantly improves the FODFT and FODFTB results for larger π-conjugated systems relevant to organic semiconductors and DNA.

  18. Quantum mutual information and the one-time pad

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Benjamin; Westmoreland, Michael D.

    2006-10-15

    Alice and Bob share a correlated composite quantum system AB. If AB is used as the key for a one-time pad cryptographic system, we show that the maximum amount of information that Alice can send securely to Bob is the quantum mutual information of AB.

  19. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  20. Omega-AB

    SciTech Connect

    Siirola, John D.; Slepoy, Alexander; Sprigg, Jr., James A.; Jorgensen, Craig R.; Selzler, Gene; Pryor, Richard J.

    2007-05-01

    A hierarchical, modular modeling environment for hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms Omega-AB models contain a hierarchically-defined module tree that specifies the execution logic for the simulation, and a multi-network graph that defines the environment within which the simulation occurs. Modules are the fundamental buildinig blocks of an Omega-AB model and can define anything from a basic mathematical operation to a complex behavioral response model. Modules rely on the "plug-in" concept which allows developers to build independent module libraries that are gathered, linked, and instantiated by the Omega-AB engine at run time. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. The simulation environment is an abstract graph of nodes and links. Agents (module sub-trees headed up by an Agent module) reside at nodes and relate to their neighbors through typed links. To facilitate the construction and visualization of complex, interacting networks with dramatically different structure, Omega-AB provides a system for organizing the nodes into hierarchica trees that describe "slices" of the overall network.

  1. Omega-AB

    2007-05-01

    A hierarchical, modular modeling environment for hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms Omega-AB models contain a hierarchically-defined module tree that specifies the execution logic for the simulation, and a multi-network graph that defines the environment within which the simulation occurs. Modules are the fundamental buildinig blocks of an Omega-AB model and can define anything from a basic mathematical operation to a complex behavioral response model. Modules rely on the "plug-in" conceptmore » which allows developers to build independent module libraries that are gathered, linked, and instantiated by the Omega-AB engine at run time. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. The simulation environment is an abstract graph of nodes and links. Agents (module sub-trees headed up by an Agent module) reside at nodes and relate to their neighbors through typed links. To facilitate the construction and visualization of complex, interacting networks with dramatically different structure, Omega-AB provides a system for organizing the nodes into hierarchica trees that describe "slices" of the overall network.« less

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, an introduction to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been given. Many of the basic concepts, like the Hellman-Feynman forces, the difference between the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and AIMD, have been explained. Also a very versatile AIMD code, the CP2K, has been introduced. On the application, the emphasis was on the aqueous systems and chemical reactions. The biochemical applications have not been discussed in depth.

  3. Ab Initio Studies of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the current understanding of ozone depletion chemistry, particularly with regards the formation of the so-called Antarctic ozone hole, will be presented together with an outline as to how ab initio quantum chemistry can be used to further our understanding of stratospheric chemistry. The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results will be shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  4. Nuclear binding near a quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dean

    2016-03-01

    I review recent ab initio results by the Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory Collaboration showing that nature lies close to a quantum phase transition between an alpha-particle gas and nuclear liquid. I discuss the control parameter of this transition and the implications for clustering in nuclei and improving ab initio nuclear structure calculations.

  5. Quantum gates with topological phases

    SciTech Connect

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2003-09-01

    We investigate two models for performing topological quantum gates with the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) effects. Topological one- and two-qubit Abelian phases can be enacted with the AB effect using charge qubits, whereas the AC effect can be used to perform all single-qubit gates (Abelian and non-Abelian) for spin qubits. Possible experimental setups suitable for a solid-state implementation are briefly discussed.

  6. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  7. Ab initio melting curve of osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakovsky, L.; Burakovsky, N.; Preston, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    The melting curve of osmium up to a pressure P of 500 GPa is obtained from an extensive suite of ab initio quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations using the Z method. The ab initio P =0 melting point of Os is 3370 ±75 K; this range encompasses all of the available data in the literature and corroborates the conclusion of J. W. Arblaster [Platinum Metals Rev. 49, 166 (2005)], 10.1595/147106705X70264 that the melting temperature of pure Os is 3400 ±50 K and that the 3300 K typically quoted in the literature is the melting point of impure Os. The T =0 equation of state (EOS) of Os and the P dependence of the optimized c /a ratio for the hexagonal unit cell, both to pressures ˜900 GPa, are obtained in the ab initio approach as validation of its use. Although excellent agreement with the available experimental data (P ≲80 GPa) is found, it is the third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS with B0'=5 rather than the more widely accepted B0'=4 that describes the QMD data to higher pressures, in agreement with the more recent experimental EOS by Godwal et al. The theoretical melting curve of Os obtained earlier by Joshi et al. is shown to be inconsistent with our QMD results, and the possible reason for this discrepancy is suggested. Regularities in the melting curves of Os and five other third-row transition metals (Ta, W, Re, Pt, Au) could be used to estimate the currently unknown melting curves of Hf and Ir.

  8. THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS: FROM AB INITIO TO PHENOMENOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A

    2004-09-24

    Quantum mechanical-based (or ab initio) methods are used to predict the stability properties of materials although their application is limited to relatively simple systems in terms of structures and number of alloy components. However thermodynamics of complex multi-component alloys requires a more versatile approach afforded within the CALPHAD formalism. Despite its success, the lack of experimental data very often prevents the design of robust thermodynamic databases. After a brief survey of ab initio methodologies and CALPHAD, it will be shown how ab initio electronic structure methods can supplement in two ways CALPHAD for subsequent applications. The first one is rather immediate and concerns the direct input of ab initio energetics in CALPHAD databases. The other way, more involved, is the assessment of ab initio thermodynamics '{acute a} la CALPHAD'. It will be shown how these results can be used within CALPHAD to predict the equilibrium properties of multi-component alloys. Finally, comments will be made on challenges and future prospects.

  9. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of the dissociation energy, zero-point, and 10 K properties of H7+/D7+ clusters using an ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Patricia; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Qu, Chen; Prosmiti, Rita; Bowman, Joel M.

    2013-07-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and path-integral Monte Carlo computations of the vibrational ground state and 10 K equilibrium state properties of the H_7^+/D_7^+ cations are presented, using an ab initio full-dimensional potential energy surface. The DMC zero-point energies of dissociated fragments H_5^+(D_5^+)+H2(D2) are also calculated and from these results and the electronic dissociation energy, dissociation energies, D0, of 752 ± 15 and 980 ± 14 cm-1 are reported for H_7^+ and D_7^+, respectively. Due to the known error in the electronic dissociation energy of the potential surface, these quantities are underestimated by roughly 65 cm-1. These values are rigorously determined for first time, and compared with previous theoretical estimates from electronic structure calculations using standard harmonic analysis, and available experimental measurements. Probability density distributions are also computed for the ground vibrational and 10 K state of H_7^+ and D_7^+. These are qualitatively described as a central H_3^+/D_3^+ core surrounded by "solvent" H2/D2 molecules that nearly freely rotate.

  10. Ab interno trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Pantcheva, Mina B; Kahook, Malik Y

    2010-10-01

    Anterior chamber drainage angle surgery, namely trabeculotomy and goniotomy, has been commonly utilized in children for many years. Its' reported success has ranged between 68% and 100% in infants and young children with congenital glaucoma. However, the long-term success of these procedures has been limited in adults presumably due to the formation of anterior synechiae (AS) in the postoperative phase. Recently, ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome™ has emerged as a novel surgical approach to effectively and selectively remove and ablate the trabecular meshwork and the inner wall of the Schlemm's canal in an attempt to avoid AS formation or other forms of wound healing with resultant closure of the cleft. This procedure seems to have an appealing safety profile with respect to early hypotony or infection if compared to trabeculectomy or glaucoma drainage device implantation. This might be advantageous in some of the impoverish regions of the Middle East and Africa where patients experience difficulties keeping up with their postoperative visits. It is important to note that no randomized trial comparing the Trabectome to other glaucoma procedures appears to have been published to date. Trabectome surgery is not a panacea, however, and it is associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may require additional glaucoma surgery as well as a high incidence of hyphema. Reported results show that postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) remains, at best, in the mid-teen range making it undesirable in patients with low-target IOP goals. A major advantage of Trabectome surgery is that it does not preclude further glaucoma surgery involving the conjunctiva, such as a trabeculectomy or drainage device implantation. As prospective randomized long-term clinical data become available, we will be better positioned to elucidate the exact role of this technique in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium. PMID:21180426

  11. Autonomous Biological System (ABS) experiments.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, T K; Anderson, G A; Poynter, J E; Stodieck, L S; Klaus, D M

    1998-12-01

    Three space flight experiments have been conducted to test and demonstrate the use of a passively controlled, materially closed, bioregenerative life support system in space. The Autonomous Biological System (ABS) provides an experimental environment for long term growth and breeding of aquatic plants and animals. The ABS is completely materially closed, isolated from human life support systems and cabin atmosphere contaminants, and requires little need for astronaut intervention. Testing of the ABS marked several firsts: the first aquatic angiosperms to be grown in space; the first higher organisms (aquatic invertebrate animals) to complete their life cycles in space; the first completely bioregenerative life support system in space; and, among the first gravitational ecology experiments. As an introduction this paper describes the ABS, its flight performance, advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Quantum dynamics on a three-sheeted six-dimensional ab initio potential-energy surface of the phosphine cation: Simulation of the photoelectron spectrum and the ultrafast radiationless decay dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Swarnendu Domcke, Wolfgang; Dai, Zuyang

    2015-11-21

    A diabatic three-sheeted six-dimensional potential-energy surface has been constructed for the ground state and the lowest excited state of the PH{sub 3}{sup +} cation. Coupling terms of Jahn-Teller and pseudo-Jahn-Teller origin up to eighth order had to be included to describe the pronounced anharmonicity of the surface due to multiple conical intersections. The parameters of the diabatic Hamiltonian have been optimized by fitting the eigenvalues of the potential-energy matrix to ab initio data calculated at the CASSCF/MRCI level employing the correlation-consistent triple-ζ basis. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of phosphine and the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics of the phosphine cation have been computed by propagating nuclear wave packets with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. The theoretical photoelectron bands obtained by Fourier transformation of the autocorrelation function agree well with the experimental results. It is shown that the ultrafast non-radiative decay dynamics of the first excited state of PH{sub 3}{sup +} is dominated by the exceptionally strong Jahn-Teller coupling of the asymmetric bending vibrational mode together with a hyperline of conical intersections with the electronic ground state induced by the umbrella mode. Time-dependent population probabilities have been computed for the three adiabatic electronic states. The non-adiabatic Jahn-Teller dynamics within the excited state takes place within ≈5 fs. Almost 80% of the excited-state population decay to the ground state within about 10 fs. The wave packets become highly complex and delocalized after 20 fs and no further significant transfer of electronic population seems to occur up to 100 fs propagation time.

  13. Ab initio studies of the interaction potential for the Xe-NO(X2Π) van der Waals complex: bound states and fully quantum and quasi-classical scattering.

    PubMed

    Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Menéndez, M; Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Eyles, C J

    2012-07-01

    Adiabatic potential energy surfaces for the ground electronic state of the Xe⋅⋅⋅NO(X(2)Π) van der Waals complex have been calculated using the spin-restricted coupled cluster method with single, double, and non-iterative triple excitations (RCCSD(T)). The scalar relativistic effects present in the Xe atom were included by an effective core potential and we extended the basis with bond functions to improve the description of the dispersion interaction. It has been found that the global minimum on the A(') adiabatic surface occurs at a T-shaped geometry with γ(e) = 94° and R(e) = 7.46 a(0), and with well depth of D(e) = 148.68 cm(-1). There is also an additional local minimum for the collinear geometry Xe-NO with a well depth of 104.5 cm(-1). The adiabat of A('') symmetry exhibits a single minimum at a distance R(e) = 7.68 a(0) and has a skewed geometry with γ(e) = 64° and a well depth of 148.23 cm(-1). Several C(nl) van der Waals dispersion coefficients are also estimated, of which C(6, 0) and C(6, 2) are in a reasonable agreement with previous theoretical results obtained by Nielson et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 64, 2055 (1976)]. The new potential energy surfaces were used to calculate bound states of the complex for total angular momentum quantum numbers up to J = 7/2. The ground state energy of Xe⋅⋅⋅NO(X(2)Π) is D(0) = 117 cm(-1), which matches the experimental value very accurately (within 3.3%). Scattering calculations of integral and differential cross sections have also been performed using fully quantum close coupling calculations and quasi-classical trajectory method at a collision energy of 63 meV. These calculations reveal the important role played by L-type rainbows in the scattering dynamics of the heavier Rg-NO(X) systems.

  14. Ab initio studies of the interaction potential for the Xe-NO(X2Π) van der Waals complex: bound states and fully quantum and quasi-classical scattering.

    PubMed

    Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Menéndez, M; Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Eyles, C J

    2012-07-01

    Adiabatic potential energy surfaces for the ground electronic state of the Xe⋅⋅⋅NO(X(2)Π) van der Waals complex have been calculated using the spin-restricted coupled cluster method with single, double, and non-iterative triple excitations (RCCSD(T)). The scalar relativistic effects present in the Xe atom were included by an effective core potential and we extended the basis with bond functions to improve the description of the dispersion interaction. It has been found that the global minimum on the A(') adiabatic surface occurs at a T-shaped geometry with γ(e) = 94° and R(e) = 7.46 a(0), and with well depth of D(e) = 148.68 cm(-1). There is also an additional local minimum for the collinear geometry Xe-NO with a well depth of 104.5 cm(-1). The adiabat of A('') symmetry exhibits a single minimum at a distance R(e) = 7.68 a(0) and has a skewed geometry with γ(e) = 64° and a well depth of 148.23 cm(-1). Several C(nl) van der Waals dispersion coefficients are also estimated, of which C(6, 0) and C(6, 2) are in a reasonable agreement with previous theoretical results obtained by Nielson et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 64, 2055 (1976)]. The new potential energy surfaces were used to calculate bound states of the complex for total angular momentum quantum numbers up to J = 7/2. The ground state energy of Xe⋅⋅⋅NO(X(2)Π) is D(0) = 117 cm(-1), which matches the experimental value very accurately (within 3.3%). Scattering calculations of integral and differential cross sections have also been performed using fully quantum close coupling calculations and quasi-classical trajectory method at a collision energy of 63 meV. These calculations reveal the important role played by L-type rainbows in the scattering dynamics of the heavier Rg-NO(X) systems. PMID:22779653

  15. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  16. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  17. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  18. Ab Initio Calculations Of Light-Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Roth, R; Horiuchi, W

    2012-03-12

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of nuclear forces, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. In this contribution, we present one of such promising techniques capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. By combining the resonating-group method (RGM) with the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM), we complement a microscopic cluster approach with the use of realistic interactions and a microscopic and consistent description of the clusters. We discuss applications to light nuclei scattering, radiative capture and fusion reactions.

  19. Finite Elements in Ab Initio Electronic-Structure Calulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pask, J. E.; Sterne, P. A.

    Over the course of the past two decades, the density functional theory (DFT) (see e.g., [1]) of Hohenberg, Kohn, and Sham has proven to be an accurate and reliable basis for the understanding and prediction of a wide range of materials properties from first principles (ab initio), with no experimental input or empirical parameters. However, the solution of the Kohn-Sham equations of DFT is a formidable task and this has limited the range of physical systems which can be investigated by such rigorous, quantum mechanical means. In order to extend the interpretive and predictive power of such quantum mechanical theories further into the domain of "real materials", involving nonstoichiometric deviations, defects, grain boundaries, surfaces, interfaces, and the like; robust and efficient methods for the solution of the associated quantum mechanical equations are critical. The finite-element (FE) method (see e.g., [2]) is a general method for the solution of partial differential and integral equations which has found wide application in diverse fields ranging from particle physics to civil engineering. Here, we discuss its application to large-scale ab initio electronic-structure calculations.

  20. AB 1725: A Comprehensive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Board of Governors.

    A summary and analysis is provided of California Assembly Bill (AB) 1725, a reform bill that provides new direction and support for the state's community colleges. The analysis addresses each of the eight sections of the bill: (1) mission, highlighting reforms related to mission statements, transfer core curriculum, remedial limits, articulation…

  1. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  2. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  3. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-25

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  4. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    PubMed Central

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  5. Dispersion Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms: Testing the London Equation Using ab Initio Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.

    2011-01-01

    A computational chemistry experiment is described in which students can use advanced ab initio quantum mechanical methods to test the ability of the London equation to account quantitatively for the attractive (dispersion) interactions between rare gas atoms. Using readily available electronic structure applications, students can calculate the…

  6. Exploring Transition Metal Catalyzed Reactions via AB Initio Reaction Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hratchian, Hrant P.

    2011-06-01

    The study and prediction of chemical reactivity is one of the most influential contributions of quantum chemistry. A central concept in the theoretical treatment of chemical reactions is the reaction pathway, which can be quite difficult to integrate accurately and efficiently. This talk will outline our developments in the integration of these pathways on ab initio potential energy surfaces. We will also describe results from recent studies on the kinetics of transition metal catalyzed reactions, including the importance of vibrational coupling to the reaction coordinate and the role of this coupling in catalytic rate enhancement.

  7. Ab Initio Studies of Halogen and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  8. Ab initio two-component Ehrenfest dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Liu, Hongbin; Lingerfelt, David B.; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-09-21

    We present an ab initio two-component Ehrenfest-based mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method to describe the effect of nuclear motion on the electron spin dynamics (and vice versa) in molecular systems. The two-component time-dependent non-collinear density functional theory is used for the propagation of spin-polarized electrons while the nuclei are treated classically. We use a three-time-step algorithm for the numerical integration of the coupled equations of motion, namely, the velocity Verlet for nuclear motion, the nuclear-position-dependent midpoint Fock update, and the modified midpoint and unitary transformation method for electronic propagation. As a test case, the method is applied to the dissociation of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In contrast to conventional Ehrenfest dynamics, this two-component approach provides a first principles description of the dynamics of non-collinear (e.g., spin-frustrated) magnetic materials, as well as the proper description of spin-state crossover, spin-rotation, and spin-flip dynamics by relaxing the constraint on spin configuration. This method also holds potential for applications to spin transport in molecular or even nanoscale magnetic devices.

  9. Ab initio two-component Ehrenfest dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Liu, Hongbin; Lingerfelt, David B.; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-09-01

    We present an ab initio two-component Ehrenfest-based mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method to describe the effect of nuclear motion on the electron spin dynamics (and vice versa) in molecular systems. The two-component time-dependent non-collinear density functional theory is used for the propagation of spin-polarized electrons while the nuclei are treated classically. We use a three-time-step algorithm for the numerical integration of the coupled equations of motion, namely, the velocity Verlet for nuclear motion, the nuclear-position-dependent midpoint Fock update, and the modified midpoint and unitary transformation method for electronic propagation. As a test case, the method is applied to the dissociation of H2 and O2. In contrast to conventional Ehrenfest dynamics, this two-component approach provides a first principles description of the dynamics of non-collinear (e.g., spin-frustrated) magnetic materials, as well as the proper description of spin-state crossover, spin-rotation, and spin-flip dynamics by relaxing the constraint on spin configuration. This method also holds potential for applications to spin transport in molecular or even nanoscale magnetic devices.

  10. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  11. Effective pair potentials using an ab initio variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe; Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2010-01-01

    We used a variational approach adapted to a quantum molecular-dynamics code to determine the best reference potential for warm dense aluminum. This ab initio variational approach was based on the Gibbs-Bogolyubov inequality. We used many-body reference systems interacting through inverse-power-law potentials, among which the Coulomb potential was a particular case defining the classical one-component plasma model. By comparisons with full quantum molecular-dynamics simulations, we found that the Coulomb potential was not always the best reference potential. We calculated the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity and discussed the results obtained using the Chisolm-Wallace relation in the warm dense matter regime.

  12. The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group in practice

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Hu, Weifeng; Sharma, Sandeep; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Nakatani, Naoki

    2015-01-21

    The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) is a tool that can be applied to a wide variety of interesting problems in quantum chemistry. Here, we examine the density matrix renormalization group from the vantage point of the quantum chemistry user. What kinds of problems is the DMRG well-suited to? What are the largest systems that can be treated at practical cost? What sort of accuracies can be obtained, and how do we reason about the computational difficulty in different molecules? By examining a diverse benchmark set of molecules: π-electron systems, benchmark main-group and transition metal dimers, and the Mn-oxo-salen and Fe-porphine organometallic compounds, we provide some answers to these questions, and show how the density matrix renormalization group is used in practice.

  13. The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group in practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Hu, Weifeng; Nakatani, Naoki; Sharma, Sandeep; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2015-01-01

    The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) is a tool that can be applied to a wide variety of interesting problems in quantum chemistry. Here, we examine the density matrix renormalization group from the vantage point of the quantum chemistry user. What kinds of problems is the DMRG well-suited to? What are the largest systems that can be treated at practical cost? What sort of accuracies can be obtained, and how do we reason about the computational difficulty in different molecules? By examining a diverse benchmark set of molecules: π-electron systems, benchmark main-group and transition metal dimers, and the Mn-oxo-salen and Fe-porphine organometallic compounds, we provide some answers to these questions, and show how the density matrix renormalization group is used in practice.

  14. Acceleration of the Convergence in ab initio Atomic Relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Wang, Lin-Wang; Meza, Juan

    2006-03-01

    Atomic relaxations is often required to accurately describe the properties of nanosystems. In ab initio calculations, a common practice is to use a standard search algorithm, such as BFGS (Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno) or CG (conjugate gradient) method, which starts the atomic relaxations without any knowledge of the Hessian matrix of the system. For example, the initial Hessian in BFGS method is often set to identity, and there is no preconditioning to CG method. One way to accelerate the convergence of the atomic relaxations is to estimate an approximate Hessian matrix of the system and then use it as the initial Hessian in BFGS method or a preconditioner in CG method. Previous attempts to obtain the approximated Hessian were focused on the use of classical force field models which rely on the existence of good parameters. Here, we present an alternative method to estimate the Hessian matrix of a nanosystem. First, we decompose the system into motifs which consist of a few atoms, then calculate the Hessian matrix elements on different motif types from ab initio calculations for small prototype systems. Then we generate the Hessian Matrix of the whole system by putting together these motif Hessians. We have applied our motif-based Hessian matrix in ab initio atomic relaxations in several bulk (with/without impurity) and quantum dot systems, and have found a speed up factor of 2 to 4 depending on the system size.

  15. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gennaro; Fortunato, Mauro; Parisi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction; Part I. Basic Features of Quantum Mechanics: 1. From classical mechanics to quantum mechanics; 2. Quantum observable and states; 3. Quantum dynamics; 4. Examples of quantum dynamics; 5. Density matrix; Part II. More Advanced Topics: 6. Angular momentum and spin; 7. Identical particles; 8. Symmetries and conservation laws; 9. The measurement problem; Part III. Matter and Light: 10. Perturbations and approximation methods; 11. Hydrogen and helium atoms; 12. Hydrogen molecular ion; 13. Quantum optics; Part IV. Quantum Information: State and Correlations: 14. Quantum theory of open systems; 15. State measurement in quantum mechanics; 16. Entanglement: non-separability; 17. Entanglement: quantum information; References; Index.

  16. First Principle Quantum Description of the Energetics Associated with LaBr3, LaC13, and Ce Doped Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. McIlwain; Nick Thompson; Da Gao

    2008-03-01

    Considerable interest is given to the excellent scintillation properties of cerium doped lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) and lanthanum bromide (LaBr3). The scintillation efficiencies are much greater than other materials, even those containing cerium. This high efficiency is attributed to the high mobility of electrons and holes, unique placement of the cerium 5d states within the band gap, and energy of the band gap. To better understand the scintillation process and better define the nature of the Self Trapped Exciton (STE) within these unique scintillation materials, density functional theory (DFT), and Ab-inito (HF-MP2) calculations are reported. DFT calculations have yielded a qualitative description of the orbital composition and energy distribution of the band structure in the crystalline material. MP2 and single configuration interaction calculations have provided quantitative values for the band gap and provided energies for the possible range of excited states created following hole and electron creation. Based on this theoretical treatment, one possible description of the STE is the combination of Vk center (Br2-1) and LaBr+1 species that recombine to form a distorted geometry LaBr3* (triplet state). Depending on the distance between the LaBr and Br2, the STE emission band can be reproduced.

  17. Probing the A-B interface of superfluid helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Richard

    2015-03-01

    At temperatures around 1 mK helium-3 forms a BCS spin triplet condensate. The order parameter is sufficiently complex that more than one superfluid phase exists, each exhibiting a different broken symmetry, and there is a model first order transition between the two most stable phases, labeled A and B. The Lancaster Ultra-Low Temperature Group has developed techniques to probe the properties of the A-B interface in the deep sub-mK regime where the superfluid is in the pure condensate limit. Shaped and controllable magnetic fields are used to induce the transition, and to stabilize and move the A-B phase boundary inside the experimental volume. The latent heat of the transition has been measured, and the nucleation behavior shown to be incompatible with conventional thermodynamic models. Since superfluid helium-3 is inherently pure, and the order parameter transforms continuously across the A-B interface, it is the most coherent two-dimensional structure to which we have experimental access. It has been proposed that this 2D surface in the surrounding 3D bulk volume is a good analog of a cosmological brane separating two distinct quantum vacuum states; experiments that simulate brane annihilation and the creation of topological defects have been carried out at Lancaster. Other investigations have included measurements of the surface tension and wetting behavior of the interface. During these studies it was discovered that a large, unpredicted frictional force was acting on the interface even though it is moving through a pure superfluid. Recent breakthrough work on the dynamics of the A-B interface has finally solved this puzzle. Current experiments include a setup where the interface region is probed directly using quartz tuning fork resonators that couple to the local density of broken Cooper pair quasiparticle excitations and thus give insight into the order parameter energy gap structure as A transforms to B.

  18. AB INITIO AND CALPHAD THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A

    2004-04-14

    Ab initio electronic structure methods can supplement CALPHAD in two major ways for subsequent applications to stability in complex alloys. The first one is rather immediate and concerns the direct input of ab initio energetics in CALPHAD databases. The other way, more involved, is the assessment of ab initio thermodynamics {acute a} la CALPHAD. It will be shown how these results can be used within CALPHAD to predict the equilibrium properties of multi-component alloys.

  19. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  20. Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinfurter, Harald; Zeilinger, Anton

    Quantum entanglement lies at the heart of the new field of quantum communication and computation. For a long time, entanglement was seen just as one of those fancy features which make quantum mechanics so counterintuitive. But recently, quantum information theory has shown the tremendous importance of quantum correlations for the formulation of new methods of information transfer and for algorithms exploiting the capabilities of quantum computers.This chapter describes the first experimental realizations of quantum communication schemes using entangled photon pairs. We show how to make communication secure against eavesdropping using entanglement-based quantum cryptography, how to increase the information capacity of a quantum channel by quantum dense coding and, finally, how to communicate quantum information itself in the process of quantum teleportation.

  1. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma; Gomes, Rachel L R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno.

  2. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno. PMID:27293878

  3. Quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, I. M.; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Simulating quantum mechanics is known to be a difficult computational problem, especially when dealing with large systems. However, this difficulty may be overcome by using some controllable quantum system to study another less controllable or accessible quantum system, i.e., quantum simulation. Quantum simulation promises to have applications in the study of many problems in, e.g., condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, atomic physics, quantum chemistry, and cosmology. Quantum simulation could be implemented using quantum computers, but also with simpler, analog devices that would require less control, and therefore, would be easier to construct. A number of quantum systems such as neutral atoms, ions, polar molecules, electrons in semiconductors, superconducting circuits, nuclear spins, and photons have been proposed as quantum simulators. This review outlines the main theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum simulation and emphasizes some of the challenges and promises of this fast-growing field.

  4. Ab initio calculations of free energy barriers for chemical reactions in solution: proton transfer in [FHF]-.

    PubMed

    Muller, R P; Warshel, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method for calculating activation free energies of chemical reactions in solution, using molecular mechanics force fields for the solvent and an ab initio technique that incorporates the potential from the solvent in its Hamiltonian for the solute. The empirical valence bond (EVB) method is used as a reference potential for the ab initio free energy calculation, and drives the reaction along the proper coordinate, thus overcoming problems encountered by direct attempts to use molecular orbital methods in calculations of activation free energies. The utility of our method is illustrated by calculating the activation free energy for proton transfer between fluoride ions in the [FHF]-system, in both polar and nonpolar solution.

  5. The Use of Ab Initio Wavefunctions in Line-Shape Calculations for Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Lamouroux, Julien; Schwenke, David W.

    2014-06-01

    In semi-classical line-shape calculations, the internal motions of the colliding pair are treated via quantum mechanics and the collision trajectory is determined by classical dynamics. The quantum mechanical component, i.e. the determination of reduced matrix elements (RME) for the colliding pair, requires the wavefunctions of the radiating and the perturbing molecules be known. Here the reduced matrix elements for collisions in the ground vibrational state of water vapor are calculated by two methods and compared. First, wavefunctions determined by diagonalizing an effective (Watson) Hamiltonian are used to calculate the RMEs and, second, the ab initio wavefunctions of Partridge and Schwenke are used. While the ground vibrational state will yield the best approximation of the wavefunctions from the effective Hamiltonian approach, this study clearly identifies problems for states not included in the fit of the Hamiltonian and for extrapolated states. RMEs determined using ab initio wavefunctions use ˜100000 times more computational time; however, all ro-vibrational interactions are included. Hence, the ab initio approach will yield better RMEs as the number of vibrational quanta exchanged in the optical transition increases, resulting in improvements in calculated half-widths and line shifts. It is important to note that even for pure rotational transitions the use of ab initio wavefunctions will yield improved results.

  6. An efficient and accurate molecular alignment and docking technique using ab initio quality scoring

    PubMed Central

    Füsti-Molnár, László; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    An accurate and efficient molecular alignment technique is presented based on first principle electronic structure calculations. This new scheme maximizes quantum similarity matrices in the relative orientation of the molecules and uses Fourier transform techniques for two purposes. First, building up the numerical representation of true ab initio electronic densities and their Coulomb potentials is accelerated by the previously described Fourier transform Coulomb method. Second, the Fourier convolution technique is applied for accelerating optimizations in the translational coordinates. In order to avoid any interpolation error, the necessary analytical formulas are derived for the transformation of the ab initio wavefunctions in rotational coordinates. The results of our first implementation for a small test set are analyzed in detail and compared with published results of the literature. A new way of refinement of existing shape based alignments is also proposed by using Fourier convolutions of ab initio or other approximate electron densities. This new alignment technique is generally applicable for overlap, Coulomb, kinetic energy, etc., quantum similarity measures and can be extended to a genuine docking solution with ab initio scoring. PMID:18624561

  7. Ab initio study of the chemical states of water on Cr 2O 3(0 0 0 1): From the isolated molecule to saturation coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Dominique; Sharkas, Kamal; Islam, Mazharul M.; Marcus, Philippe

    2009-08-01

    The reactivity of the (0 0 0 1)-Cr-Cr 2O 3 surface towards water was studied by means of periodic DFT + U. Several water coverages were studied, from 1.2H 2O/nm 2 to 14.1H 2O/nm 2, corresponding to ¼, 1, 2 and 3 water/Cr at the (0 0 0 1)-Cr 2O 3 surface, respectively. With increasing coverage, water gradually completes the coordination sphere of the surface Cr atoms from 3 (dry surface) to 4 (1.2 and 4.7H 2O/nm 2), 5 (9.4H 2O/nm 2) and 6 (14.1H 2O/nm 2). For all studied coverages, water replaces an O atom from the missing above plane. At coverages 1.2 and 4.7H 2O/nm 2, the Cr-O s (surface oxygen) acid-base character and bond directionality govern the water adsorption. The adsorption is molecular at the lowest coverage. At 4.7H 2O/nm 2, molecular and dissociative states are isoenergetic. The activation energy barrier between the two states being as low as 12 kJ/mol, allowing protons exchanges between the OH groups, as evidenced by ab inito molecular dynamics at room temperature. At coverages of 9.4 and 14.1H 2O/nm 2, 1D- (respectively, 2D-) water networks are formed. The resulting surface terminations are -Cr(OH) 2 and -Cr(OH) 3- like, respectively. The increased stability of those terminations as compared to the previous ones are due to the stabilization of the adsorbed phase through a H-bond network and to the increase in the Cr coordination number, stabilizing the Cr ( t2g) orbitals in the valence band. An atomistic thermodynamic approach allows us to specify the temperature and water pressure domains of prevalence for each surface termination. It is found that the -Cr(OH) 3-like, -Cr(OH) 2 and anhydrous surfaces may be stabilized depending on ( T, P) conditions. Calculated energies of adsorption and OH frequencies are in good agreement with published experimental data and support the full hydroxylation model, where the Cr achieves a 6-fold coordination, at saturation.

  8. Ab initio calculations in a uniform magnetic field using periodic supercells

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W; Galli, G

    2003-10-21

    We present a formulation of ab initio electronic structure calculations in a finite magnetic field, which retains the simplicity and efficiency of techniques widely used in first principles molecular dynamics simulations, based on plane-wave basis sets and Fourier transforms. In addition we discuss results obtained with this method for the energy spectrum of interacting electrons in quantum wells, and for the electronic properties of dense fluid deuterium in a uniform magnetic field.

  9. Ab initio phonon limited transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, Matthieu

    We revisit the thermoelectric (TE) transport properties of two champion materials, PbTe and SnSe, using fully first principles methods. In both cases the performance of the material is due to subtle combinations of structural effects, scattering, and phase space reduction. In PbTe anharmonic effects are completely opposite to the predicted quasiharmonic evolution of phonon frequencies and to frequently (and incorrectly) cited extrapolations of experiments. This stabilizes the material at high T, but also tends to enhance its thermal conductivity, in a non linear manner, above 600 Kelvin. This explains why PbTe is in practice limited to room temperature applications. SnSe has recently been shown to be the most efficient TE material in bulk form. This is mainly due to a strongly enhanced carrier concentration and electrical conductivity, after going through a phase transition from 600 to 800 K. We calculate the transport coefficients as well as the defect concentrations ab initio, showing excellent agreement with experiment, and elucidating the origin of the double phase transition as well as the new charge carriers. AH Romero, EKU Gross, MJ Verstraete, and O Hellman PRB 91, 214310 (2015) O. Hellman, IA Abrikosov, and SI Simak, PRB 84 180301 (2011)

  10. Ab initio water pair potential with flexible monomers.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Piotr; Murdachaew, Garold; Bukowski, Robert; Akin-Ojo, Omololu; Leforestier, Claude; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2015-03-26

    A potential energy surface for the water dimer with explicit dependence on monomer coordinates is presented. The surface was fitted to a set of previously published interaction energies computed on a grid of over a quarter million points in the 12-dimensional configurational space using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and coupled-cluster methods. The present fit removes small errors in published fits, and its accuracy is critically evaluated. The minimum and saddle-point structures of the potential surface were found to be very close to predictions from direct ab initio optimizations. The computed second virial coefficients agreed well with experimental values. At low temperatures, the effects of monomer flexibility in the virial coefficients were found to be much smaller than the quantum effects.

  11. Ab Initio Study of KCl and NaCl Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownrigg, Clifton; Hira, Ajit; Pacheco, Jose; Salazar, Justin

    2013-03-01

    We continue our interest in the theoretical study of molecular clusters to examine the chemical properties of small KnCln and NanCln clusters (n = 2 - 15). The potentially important role of these molecular species in biochemical and medicinal processes is well known. This work applies the hybrid ab initio methods of quantum chemistry to derive the different alkali-halide (MnHn) geometries. Of particular interest is the competition between hexagonal ring geometries and rock salt structures. Electronic energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies for these geometries are calculated. Magic numbers for cluster stability are identified and are related to the property of cluster compactness. Mapping of the singlet, triplet, and quintet, potential energy surfaces is performed. Calculations have been performed to examine the interactions of these clusters with some atoms and molecules of biological interest, including O, O2, and Fe. The potential for design of new medicinal drugs is explored.

  12. Ab initio water pair potential with flexible monomers.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Piotr; Murdachaew, Garold; Bukowski, Robert; Akin-Ojo, Omololu; Leforestier, Claude; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2015-03-26

    A potential energy surface for the water dimer with explicit dependence on monomer coordinates is presented. The surface was fitted to a set of previously published interaction energies computed on a grid of over a quarter million points in the 12-dimensional configurational space using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and coupled-cluster methods. The present fit removes small errors in published fits, and its accuracy is critically evaluated. The minimum and saddle-point structures of the potential surface were found to be very close to predictions from direct ab initio optimizations. The computed second virial coefficients agreed well with experimental values. At low temperatures, the effects of monomer flexibility in the virial coefficients were found to be much smaller than the quantum effects. PMID:25687650

  13. Quantum ontologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs.

  14. Ab initio molecular simulations with numeric atom-centered orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Gehrke, Ralf; Hanke, Felix; Havu, Paula; Havu, Ville; Ren, Xinguo; Reuter, Karsten; Scheffler, Matthias

    2009-11-01

    We describe a complete set of algorithms for ab initio molecular simulations based on numerically tabulated atom-centered orbitals (NAOs) to capture a wide range of molecular and materials properties from quantum-mechanical first principles. The full algorithmic framework described here is embodied in the Fritz Haber Institute "ab initio molecular simulations" (FHI-aims) computer program package. Its comprehensive description should be relevant to any other first-principles implementation based on NAOs. The focus here is on density-functional theory (DFT) in the local and semilocal (generalized gradient) approximations, but an extension to hybrid functionals, Hartree-Fock theory, and MP2/GW electron self-energies for total energies and excited states is possible within the same underlying algorithms. An all-electron/full-potential treatment that is both computationally efficient and accurate is achieved for periodic and cluster geometries on equal footing, including relaxation and ab initio molecular dynamics. We demonstrate the construction of transferable, hierarchical basis sets, allowing the calculation to range from qualitative tight-binding like accuracy to meV-level total energy convergence with the basis set. Since all basis functions are strictly localized, the otherwise computationally dominant grid-based operations scale as O(N) with system size N. Together with a scalar-relativistic treatment, the basis sets provide access to all elements from light to heavy. Both low-communication parallelization of all real-space grid based algorithms and a ScaLapack-based, customized handling of the linear algebra for all matrix operations are possible, guaranteeing efficient scaling (CPU time and memory) up to massively parallel computer systems with thousands of CPUs.

  15. Ab initio dynamics of the cytochrome P450 hydroxylation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elenewski, Justin E.; Hackett, John C

    2015-02-14

    The iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin π-cation radical known as Compound I is the primary oxidant within the cytochromes P450, allowing these enzymes to affect the substrate hydroxylation. In the course of this reaction, a hydrogen atom is abstracted from the substrate to generate hydroxyiron(IV) porphyrin and a substrate-centered radical. The hydroxy radical then rebounds from the iron to the substrate, yielding the hydroxylated product. While Compound I has succumbed to theoretical and spectroscopic characterization, the associated hydroxyiron species is elusive as a consequence of its very short lifetime, for which there are no quantitative estimates. To ascertain the physical mechanism underlying substrate hydroxylation and probe this timescale, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations are performed for a model of Compound I catalysis. Semiclassical estimates based on these calculations reveal the hydrogen atom abstraction step to be extremely fast, kinetically comparable to enzymes such as carbonic anhydrase. Using an ensemble of ab initio simulations, the resultant hydroxyiron species is found to have a similarly short lifetime, ranging between 300 fs and 3600 fs, putatively depending on the enzyme active site architecture. The addition of tunneling corrections to these rates suggests a strong contribution from nuclear quantum effects, which should accelerate every step of substrate hydroxylation by an order of magnitude. These observations have strong implications for the detection of individual hydroxylation intermediates during P450 catalysis.

  16. Unified ab initio approaches to nuclear structure and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrátil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume; Romero-Redondo, Carolina; Calci, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    The description of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. In addition to the complex nature of the nuclear forces, with two-, three- and possibly higher many-nucleon components, one faces the quantum-mechanical many-nucleon problem governed by an interplay between bound and continuum states. In recent years, significant progress has been made in ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations based on input from QCD-employing Hamiltonians constructed within chiral effective field theory. After a brief overview of the field, we focus on ab initio many-body approaches—built upon the no-core shell model—that are capable of simultaneously describing both bound and scattering nuclear states, and present results for resonances in light nuclei, reactions important for astrophysics and fusion research. In particular, we review recent calculations of resonances in the 6He halo nucleus, of five- and six-nucleon scattering, and an investigation of the role of chiral three-nucleon interactions in the structure of 9Be. Further, we discuss applications to the 7Be {({{p}},γ )}8{{B}} radiative capture. Finally, we highlight our efforts to describe transfer reactions including the 3H{({{d}},{{n}})}4He fusion.

  17. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  18. Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, B R; Navratil, P; Vary, J P

    2011-04-11

    A long-standing goal of nuclear theory is to determine the properties of atomic nuclei based on the fundamental interactions among the protons and neutrons (i.e., nucleons). By adopting nucleon-nucleon (NN), three-nucleon (NNN) and higher-nucleon interactions determined from either meson-exchange theory or QCD, with couplings fixed by few-body systems, we preserve the predictive power of nuclear theory. This foundation enables tests of nature's fundamental symmetries and offers new vistas for the full range of complex nuclear phenomena. Basic questions that drive our quest for a microscopic predictive theory of nuclear phenomena include: (1) What controls nuclear saturation; (2) How the nuclear shell model emerges from the underlying theory; (3) What are the properties of nuclei with extreme neutron/proton ratios; (4) Can we predict useful cross sections that cannot be measured; (5) Can nuclei provide precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature; and (6) Under what conditions do we need QCD to describe nuclear structure, among others. Along with other ab initio nuclear theory groups, we have pursued these questions with meson-theoretical NN interactions, such as CD-Bonn and Argonne V18, that were tuned to provide high-quality descriptions of the NN scattering phase shifts and deuteron properties. We then add meson-theoretic NNN interactions such as the Tucson-Melbourne or Urbana IX interactions. More recently, we have adopted realistic NN and NNN interactions with ties to QCD. Chiral perturbation theory within effective field theory ({chi}EFT) provides us with a promising bridge between QCD and hadronic systems. In this approach one works consistently with systems of increasing nucleon number and makes use of the explicit and spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry to expand the strong interaction in terms of a dimensionless constant, the ratio of a generic small momentum divided by the chiral symmetry breaking scale taken to be about 1 GeV/c. The resulting NN

  19. Ab Initio Study of Polonium

    SciTech Connect

    Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2008-05-20

    Polonium is the only element with a simple cubic (sc) crystal structure. Atoms in solid polonium sit at the corners of a simple cubic unit cell and no where else. Polonium has a valence electron configuration 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 4} (Z = 84). The low temperature {alpha}-phase transforms into the rhombohedral (trigonal) {beta} structure at {approx}348 K. The sc {alpha}-Po unit cell constant is a = 3.345 A. The beta form of polonium ({beta}-Po) has the lattice parameters, a{sub R} = 3.359 A and a rhombohedral angle 98 deg. 13'. We have performed an ab initio electronic structure calculation by using the density functional theory. We have performed the calculation with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling by using both the LDA and the GGA for the exchange-correlations. The k-points in a simple cubic BZ are determined by R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5), {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), M (0.5, 0.5, 0) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). Other directions of k-points are {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). The SO splittings of p states at the {gamma} point in the GGA+SO scheme for {alpha}-Po are 0.04 eV and 0.02 eV while for the {beta}-Po these are 0.03 eV and 0.97 eV. We have also calculated the vibrational spectra for the unit cells in both the structures. We find that exchanging of a Po atom by Pb atom produces several more bands and destabilizes the {beta} phase.

  20. Quantum memristors

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  1. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  2. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  3. Quantum memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  4. Modeling study of the ABS relay valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai; Xu, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    The ABS (anti-lock braking system) relay valve is the key component of anti-lock braking system in most commercial vehicles such as trucks, tractor-trailers, etc. In this paper, structure of ABS relay valve and its work theory were analyzed. Then a mathematical model of ABS relay valve, which was investigated by dividing into electronic part, magnetic part, pneumatic part and mechanical part, was set up. The displacement of spools and the response of pressure increasing, holding, releasing of ABS relay valve were simulated and analyzed under conditions of control pressure 500 KPa, braking pressure 600 KPa, atmospheric pressure 100 KPa and air temperature 310 K. Thisarticle provides reliable theory for improving the performance and efficiency of anti-lock braking system of vehicles.

  5. Modeling study of the ABS relay valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai; Xu, Weidong

    2010-12-01

    The ABS (anti-lock braking system) relay valve is the key component of anti-lock braking system in most commercial vehicles such as trucks, tractor-trailers, etc. In this paper, structure of ABS relay valve and its work theory were analyzed. Then a mathematical model of ABS relay valve, which was investigated by dividing into electronic part, magnetic part, pneumatic part and mechanical part, was set up. The displacement of spools and the response of pressure increasing, holding, releasing of ABS relay valve were simulated and analyzed under conditions of control pressure 500 KPa, braking pressure 600 KPa, atmospheric pressure 100 KPa and air temperature 310 K. Thisarticle provides reliable theory for improving the performance and efficiency of anti-lock braking system of vehicles.

  6. Free Quantum Field Theory from Quantum Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    After leading to a new axiomatic derivation of quantum theory (see D'Ariano et al. in Found Phys, 2015), the new informational paradigm is entering the domain of quantum field theory, suggesting a quantum automata framework that can be regarded as an extension of quantum field theory to including an hypothetical Planck scale, and with the usual quantum field theory recovered in the relativistic limit of small wave-vectors. Being derived from simple principles (linearity, unitarity, locality, homogeneity, isotropy, and minimality of dimension), the automata theory is quantum ab-initio, and does not assume Lorentz covariance and mechanical notions. Being discrete it can describe localized states and measurements (unmanageable by quantum field theory), solving all the issues plaguing field theory originated from the continuum. These features make the theory an ideal framework for quantum gravity, with relativistic covariance and space-time emergent solely from the interactions, and not assumed a priori. The paper presents a synthetic derivation of the automata theory, showing how the principles lead to a description in terms of a quantum automaton over a Cayley graph of a group. Restricting to Abelian groups we show how the automata recover the Weyl, Dirac and Maxwell dynamics in the relativistic limit. We conclude with some new routes about the more general scenario of non-Abelian Cayley graphs. The phenomenology arising from the automata theory in the ultra-relativistic domain and the analysis of corresponding distorted Lorentz covariance is reviewed in Bisio et al. (Found Phys 2015, in this same issue).

  7. Experimental entanglement activation from discord in a programmable quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Adesso, Gerardo; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Nagali, Eleonora; Piani, Marco; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2014-04-11

    In quantum mechanics, observing is not a passive act. Consider a system of two quantum particles A and B: if a measurement apparatus M is used to make an observation on B, the overall state of the system AB will typically be altered. When this happens, no matter which local measurement is performed, the two objects A and B are revealed to possess peculiar correlations known as quantum discord. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that the very act of local observation gives rise to an activation protocol which converts discord into distillable entanglement, a stronger and more useful form of quantum correlations, between the apparatus M and the composite system AB. We adopt a flexible two-photon setup to realize a three-qubit system (A, B, M) with programmable degrees of initial correlations, measurement interaction, and characterization processes. Our experiment demonstrates the fundamental mechanism underpinning the ubiquitous act of observing the quantum world and establishes the potential of discord in entanglement generation.

  8. On the Origin of Quantum Diffusion Coefficient and Quantum Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Aseem

    2016-03-01

    Synchronizability of space and time experiences between different inhabitants of a spacetime is abstracted as a fundamental premise of Classical physics. Absence thereof i.e. desynchronization between space and time experiences of a system under study and the observer is then studied for a single dimension single particle system. Desynchronization fundamentally makes probability concepts enter physics ab-initio and not as secondary tools to deal with situations wherein incomplete information in situation following perfectly deterministic dynamics demands its introduction. Desynchronization model based on Poisson distribution of events vis-à-vis an observer, leads to expectation of particle's motion as a Brownian motion deriving Nelson's quantum diffusion coefficient naturally, without needing to postulate it. This model also incorporates physical effects akin to those of Bohm's Quantum Potential, again without needing any sub-quantum medium. Schrodinger's equation is shown to be derivable incorporating desynchronization only of space while Quantum Field Theory is shown to model desynchronization of time as well. Fundamental suggestion of the study is that it is desynchronization that is at the root of quantum phenomena rather than sub-micro scales of spacetime. Absence of possibility of synchronization between system's space and time and those of observer is studied. Mathematical modeling of desynchronized evolution explains some intriguing aspects of Quantum Mechanical theory.

  9. Quantum oblivion: A master key for many quantum riddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Avshalom C.; Cohen, Eliahu

    2014-02-01

    A simple quantum interaction is analyzed, where the paths of two superposed particles asymmetrically cross, while a detector set to detect an interaction between them remains silent. Despite this negative result, the particles' states leave no doubt that a peculiar interaction has occurred: One particle's momentum is changed while the other's remains unaffected, in apparent violation of momentum conservation. Revisiting the foundations of the standard quantum measurement process offers the resolution. Prior to the macroscopic recording of no interaction, a brief critical interval (CI) prevails, during which the particles and the detector's pointer form a subtle entanglement which immediately dissolves. It is this self-cancellation, henceforth "quantum oblivion (QO)," that lies at the basis of some well-known intriguing quantum effects. Such is interaction-free measurement (IFM)1 and its more paradoxical variants like Hardy's Paradox2 and the quantum liar paradox.3 Even the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect4 and weak measurement (WM)5 turn out to belong to this group. We next study interventions within the CI that produce some other peculiar effects. Finally, we discuss some of the conceptual issues involved. Under a greater time-resolution of the CI, some non-local phenomena turn out to be local. Momentum is conserved due to the quantum uncertainties inflicted by the particle-pointer interaction, which sets the experiment's final boundary condition.

  10. An ab initio MO study of butalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Katsuhisa; Shima, Toru

    1994-01-01

    Butalene as a structural isomer of p-benzyne has been studied by using an ab initio GVB wavefunction. The geometry of butalene, which is shown to be almost rectangular, is first optimized as a local minimum on the energy surface at the ab initio level. However, the energy barrier of conversion to p-benzyne is as small as 1.6 kcal/mol, and experimental isolation of butalene is predicted to be difficult from a force-constant analysis.

  11. Exact quantum cross sections for a three dimensional angle dependent model for three body reactions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, M.; Kouri, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Exact quantum mechanical reactive cross sections are reported for a three dimensional angle dependent model surface. The surface simulates an atom-heteronuclear diatom system A + BC leading to AB + C where atom B is much heavier than A or C. The molecules BC and AB are taken to be rotating vibrators which can dissociate. Results for two angle dependent potentials are given.

  12. Quantum Teardrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; Fairfax, Simon A.

    2012-11-01

    Algebras of functions on quantum weighted projective spaces are introduced, and the structure of quantum weighted projective lines or quantum teardrops is described in detail. In particular the presentation of the coordinate algebra of the quantum teardrop in terms of generators and relations and classification of irreducible *-representations are derived. The algebras are then analysed from the point of view of Hopf-Galois theory or the theory of quantum principal bundles. Fredholm modules and associated traces are constructed. C*-algebras of continuous functions on quantum weighted projective lines are described and their K-groups computed.

  13. Feet on the potential energy surface, head in the pi clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Quentin

    2011-01-01

    This work presents explorations of the potential energy surface of clusters of atoms and of the interactions between molecules. First, structures of small aluminum clusters are examined and classified as ground states, transition states, or higher-order saddle points. Subsequently, the focus shifts to dispersion-dominated π-π interactions when the potential energy surfaces of benzene, substituted benzene, and pyridine dimers are explored. Because DNA nucleotide bases can be thought of as substituted heterocycles, a natural extension of the substituted benzene and pyridine investigations is to model paired nucleotide bases. Finally, the success of the dispersion studies inspires the development of an extension to the computational method used, which will enable the dispersion energy to be modeled – and the potential energy surface explored – in additional chemical systems. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is described, as well as various quantum mechanical methods. An ab inito quantum mechanical study of 13-atom aluminum clusters is described. EFP studies of aromatic dimers are reported in which dispersion energy makes a significant contribution to the attraction between monomers. Theory and code development toward a means of computing dispersion energy in mixed ab inito-EFP systems are described.

  14. Relaxation of AB Spin Systems in Stimulated-Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straubinger, Klaus; Schick, Fritz; Lutz, Otto

    1995-12-01

    The behavior of the strongly coupled AB spin system during the STEAM (stimulated echo acquisition mode) sequence was calculated analytically. Relaxation during the TM interval, in which longitudinal magnetization and zero-quantum coherences (ZQCs) occur, was accounted for by following the course of the different density-matrix terms. The result allows one to determine sequence timings to provide high signal intensities or signals resulting from certain coherences. Theoretically calculated spectra can be generated, using an analytical function. Series of proton spectra were recorded from a 0.1maqueous solution of citrate on a 1.5 T whole-body imager at 22°C. Spectra series with constant echo time TE were used to evaluate the longitudinal relaxation timeT1as well as the zero-quantum relaxation timeTZQby fitting the theoretically predicted curve to the experimental data. The evaluated proton relaxation timesT1andTZQin citrate differ strongly:T1= 770 ms,TZQ= 1300 ms.

  15. Quantum Darwinism

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  16. Quantum memristors

    DOE PAGES

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantummore » regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.« less

  17. Oriented conjugates of monoclonal and single-domain antibodies with quantum dots for flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Millot, Jean-Marc; Chames, Patrick; Baty, Daniel; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Nabiev, Igor

    2012-03-01

    Ideal diagnostic nanoprobes should not exceed 15 nm in size and should contain high-affinity homogeneously oriented capture molecules on their surface. An advanced procedure for antibody (Ab) reduction was used to cleave each Ab into two functional half-Abs, 75-kDa heavy-light chain fragments, each containing an intact antigen-binding site. Affinity purification of half-Abs followed by their linkage to quantum dots (QDs) yielded oriented QD-Ab conjugates whose functionality was considerably improved compared to those obtained using the standard protocols. Ultrasmall diagnostic nanoprobes were engineered through oriented conjugation of QDs with 13-kDa single-domain Abs (sdAbs) derived from llama IgG. sdAbs were tagged with QDs via an additional cysteine residue specifically integrated into the C-terminal region of sdAb using genetic engineering. This approach made it possible to obtain sdAb-QD nanoprobes <12 nm in diameter comprising four copies of sdAbs linked to the same QD in an oriented manner. sdAb-QD conjugates against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and HER2 exhibited an extremely high specificity in flow cytometry; the quality of immunohistochemical labeling of biopsy samples was found to be superior to that of labeling according to the current "gold standard" protocols of anatomo-pathological practice. The nano-bioengineering approaches developed can be extended to oriented conjugation of Abs and sdAbs with different semiconductor, noble metal, or magnetic nanoparticles.

  18. Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2005-10-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two parties to communicate in absolute security based on the fundamental laws of physics. Up till now, it is widely believed that unconditionally secure QKD based on standard Bennett-Brassard (BB84) protocol is limited in both key generation rate and distance because of imperfect devices. Here, we solve these two problems directly by presenting new protocols that are feasible with only current technology. Surprisingly, our new protocols can make fiber-based QKD unconditionally secure at distances over 100km (for some experiments, such as GYS) and increase the key generation rate from O(η2) in prior art to O(η) where η is the overall transmittance. Our method is to develop the decoy state idea (first proposed by W.-Y. Hwang in "Quantum Key Distribution with High Loss: Toward Global Secure Communication", Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 057901 (2003)) and consider simple extensions of the BB84 protocol. This part of work is published in "Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution", abs/quant-ph/0411004">. We present a general theory of the decoy state protocol and propose a decoy method based on only one signal state and two decoy states. We perform optimization on the choice of intensities of the signal state and the two decoy states. Our result shows that a decoy state protocol with only two types of decoy states--a vacuum and a weak decoy state--asymptotically approaches the theoretical limit of the most general type of decoy state protocols (with an infinite number of decoy states). We also present a one-decoy-state protocol as a special case of Vacuum+Weak decoy method. Moreover, we provide estimations on the effects of statistical fluctuations and suggest that, even for long distance (larger than 100km) QKD, our two-decoy-state protocol can be implemented with only a few hours of experimental data. In conclusion, decoy state quantum key distribution is highly practical. This part of work is

  19. Quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary - that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures.

  20. Magnetic edge states in Aharonov-Bohm graphene quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Farghadan, R. Heidari Semiromi, E.; Saffarzadeh, A.

    2013-12-07

    The effect of electron-electron interaction on the electronic structure of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) graphene quantum rings (GQRs) is explored theoretically using the single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian and the mean-field Hubbard model. The electronic states and magnetic properties of hexagonal, triangular, and circular GQRs with different sizes and zigzag edge terminations are studied. The results show that, although the AB oscillations in the all types of nanoring are affected by the interaction, the spin splitting in the AB oscillations strongly depends on the geometry and the size of graphene nanorings. We found that the total spin of hexagonal and circular rings is zero and therefore, no spin splitting can be observed in the AB oscillations. However, the non-zero magnetization of the triangular rings breaks the degeneracy between spin-up and spin-down electrons, which produces spin-polarized AB oscillations.

  1. Serum PDGF-AB in pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Filiberti, Rosa; Marroni, Paola; Neri, Monica; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Cafferata, Mara A; Canessa, Pier Aldo; Puntoni, Riccardo; Ivaldi, Giovanni Paolo; Paganuzzi, Michela

    2005-01-01

    Overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has been observed in lung and pleural tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic role of serum PDGF in pleural mesothelioma (PM). Four groups of subjects were studied: 93 malignant PM patients, 33 primary non small cell lung cancer patients, 51 subjects exposed to asbestos, defined as high-risk controls, and 24 healthy controls. PDGF-AB mean concentration was higher in PM patients (45.8 ng/ml) than in high-risk controls (33.1 ng/ml) and healthy controls (26.8 ng/ml). Using the cut-off level of 49.8 ng/ml, corresponding to the mean+2SD of PDGF-AB in healthy controls, 43% of PM patients showed positive PDGF-AB levels. Survival was evaluated in 82 PM patients. At the end of the follow-up (median 9.8 months) 80.5% of patients had died. Median survival was 13.1 and 7.9 months for patients with PDGF-AB lower and higher than the cut-off, respectively. Adjusting for age, sex, histology and platelet count, positive PDGF-AB levels were associated with lower survival (OR=1.2, 95%CI: 0.9-1.6), even if not significantly so. In conclusion, serum PDGF may represent a useful additional parameter to prognostic factors already available for PM.

  2. Quantum frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  3. Quantum cheques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose the idea of a quantum cheque scheme, a cryptographic protocol in which any legitimate client of a trusted bank can issue a cheque, that cannot be counterfeited or altered in anyway, and can be verified by a bank or any of its branches. We formally define a quantum cheque and present the first unconditionally secure quantum cheque scheme and show it to be secure against any no-signalling adversary. The proposed quantum cheque scheme can been perceived as the quantum analog of Electronic Data Interchange, as an alternate for current e-Payment Gateways.

  4. Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  5. Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, Serge

    2010-05-01

    Quantum cryptography makes use of the quantum-mechanical behavior of nature for the design and analysis of cryptographic schemes. Optimally (but not always), quantum cryptography allows for the design of cryptographic schemes whose security is guaranteed solely by the laws of nature. This is in sharp contrast to standard cryptographic schemes, which can be broken in principle, i.e., when given sufficient computing power. From a theory point of view, quantum cryptography offers a beautiful interplay between the mathematics of adversarial behavior and quantum information theory. In this review article, we discuss the traditional application of quantum cryptography, quantum key distribution (QKD), from a modern perspective, and we discuss some recent developments in the context of quantum two-party cooperation (2PC). QKD allows two distant parties to communicate in a provably-secure way in the presence of an outside eavesdropper, whereas 2PC is concerned with protecting information against possibly malicious insiders. We show the basic idea of constructing quantum cryptographic schemes, but we also show some connections to quantum information theory as needed for the rigorous security analyses, and we discuss some of the relevant quantum-information-theoretic results.

  6. Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvil Scully, Marlan; Zubairy, Muhammad Suhail

    1997-09-01

    Quantum optics has witnessed significant theoretical and experimental developments in recent years. This book provides an in-depth and wide-ranging introduction to the subject, emphasizing throughout the basic principles and their applications. The book begins by developing the basic tools of quantum optics, and goes on to show the application of these tools in a variety of quantum optical systems, including lasing without inversion, squeezed states, and atom optics. The final four chapters discuss quantum optical tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics, and particular aspects of measurement theory. Assuming only a background of standard quantum mechanics and electromagnetic theory, and containing many problems and references, this book will be invaluable to graduate students of quantum optics, as well as to researchers in this field.

  7. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm's canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  8. Ab Initio Studies of Chlorine Oxide and Nitrogen Oxide Species of Interest in Stratospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of chlorine oxide and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. In particular the geometrical structures, vibrational spectra, and heats of formation Of ClNO2, CisClONO, and trans-ClONO are shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the ab initio results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve the experimental controversy. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of ClONO2, HONO2, ClOOC17 ClOOH, and HOOH will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of the experimental studies.

  9. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-10-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  10. Quantum entanglement, quantum communication and the limits of quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambainis, Andris

    Quantum entanglement is a term describing the quantum correlations between different parts of a quantum system. Quantum information theory has developed sophisticated techniques to quantify and study quantum entanglement. In this thesis, we show how to apply those techniques to problems in quantum algorithms, complexity theory, communication and cryptography. The main results are: (1) quantum communication protocols that are exponentially more efficient that conventional (classical) communication protocols, (2) unconditionally secure quantum protocols for cryptographic problems, (3) a new "quantum adversary" method for proving lower bounds on quantum algorithms, (4) a study of "one clean qubit computation", a model related to the experimental implementation of quantum computers using NMR (nucleo-magnetic resonance) technology.

  11. Quantum volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  12. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  13. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  14. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    PubMed Central

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  15. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    PubMed

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  16. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    -- 4. Mesoscopic superconductivity with unconventional superconductor or ferromagnet. Ultraefficient microrefrigerators realized with ferromagnet-superconductor junctions / F. Giazotto et al. Anomalous charge transport in triplet superconductor junctions by the synergy effect of the proximity effect and the mid gap Andreev resonant states / Y. Tanaka and S. Kashiwaya. Paramagnetic and glass states in superconductive YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] ceramics of sub-micron scale grains / H. Deguchi et al. Quantum properties of single-domain triplet superconductors / A. M. Gulian and K. S. Wood. A numerical study of Josephson current in p wave superconducting junctions / Y. Asano et al. Tilted bi-crystal sapphire substrates improve properties of grain boundary YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] junctions and extend their Josephson response to THZ frequencies / E. Stepantsov et al. Circuit theory analysis of AB-plane tunnel junctions of unconventional superconductor Bi[symbol]Sr[symbol]Ca[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] / I. Shigeta et al. Transport properties of normal metal/anisotropic superconductor junctions in the eutectic system Sr[symbol]RuO[symbol]Ru / M. Kawamura et al. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in d-wave superconductor Josephson / S. Kawabata et al. Quasiparticle states of high-T[symbol] oxides observed by a Zeeman magnetic field response / S. Kashiwaya et al. Experimentally realizable devices for controlling the motion of magnetic flux quanta in anisotropic superconductors: vortex lenses, vortex diodes and vortex pumps / S. Savel'ev and F. Nori. Stability of vortex-antivortex "molecules" in mesoscopic superconducting triangles / V. R. Misko et al. Superconducting network with magnetic decoration - Hofstadter butterfly in spatially modulated magnetic field / Y. Iye et al. Observation of paramagnetic supercurrent in mesoscopic superconducting rings and disks using multiple-small-tunnel-junction method / A. Kanda et al. Guidance of vortices in high

  17. Quantum flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Amikam; Diósi, Lajos; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the concept of a quantum flywheel coupled to a quantum heat engine. The flywheel stores useful work in its energy levels, while additional power is extracted continuously from the device. Generally, the energy exchange between a quantum engine and a quantized work repository is accompanied by heat, which degrades the charging efficiency. Specifically when the quantum harmonic oscillator acts as a work repository, quantum and thermal fluctuations dominate the dynamics. Quantum monitoring and feedback control are applied to the flywheel in order to reach steady state and regulate its operation. To maximize the charging efficiency one needs a balance between the information gained by measuring the system and the information fed back to the system. The dynamics of the flywheel are described by a stochastic master equation that accounts for the engine, the external driving, the measurement, and the feedback operations.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo Methods for First Principles Simulation of Liquid Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergely, John Robert

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate microscopic description of water structure and dynamics is of great interest to molecular biology researchers and in the physics and quantum chemistry simulation communities. This dissertation describes efforts to apply quantum Monte Carlo methods to this problem with the goal of making progress toward a fully "ab initio"…

  19. Conformational space of clindamycin studied by ab initio and full-atom molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kulczycka-Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Trylska, Joanna; Sadlej, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations allow determining internal flexibility of molecules at atomic level. Using ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), one can simulate in a reasonable time frame small systems with hundreds of atoms, usually in vacuum. With quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) or full-atom molecular dynamics (FAMD), the influence of the environment can also be simulated. Here, we compare three types of MD calculations: ab initio BOMD, hybrid QM/MM, and classical FAMD. As a model system, we use a small antibiotic molecule, clindamycin, which is one of the lincosamide antibiotics. Clindamycin acquires two energetically stable forms and we investigated the transition between these two experimentally known conformers. We performed 60-ps BOMD simulations in vacuum, 50-ps QM/MM, and 100-ns FAMD in explicit water. The transition between two antibiotic conformers was observed using both BOMD and FAMD methods but was not noted in the QM/MM simulations. PMID:26733483

  20. Ab initio calculation of valley splitting in monolayer δ-doped phosphorus in silicon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The differences in energy between electronic bands due to valley splitting are of paramount importance in interpreting transport spectroscopy experiments on state-of-the-art quantum devices defined by scanning tunnelling microscope lithography. Using vasp, we develop a plane-wave density functional theory description of systems which is size limited due to computational tractability. Nonetheless, we provide valuable data for the benchmarking of empirical modelling techniques more capable of extending this discussion to confined disordered systems or actual devices. We then develop a less resource-intensive alternative via localised basis functions in siesta, retaining the physics of the plane-wave description, and extend this model beyond the capability of plane-wave methods to determine the ab initio valley splitting of well-isolated δ-layers. In obtaining an agreement between plane-wave and localised methods, we show that valley splitting has been overestimated in previous ab initio calculations by more than 50%. PMID:23445785

  1. Ab initio calculation of valley splitting in monolayer δ-doped phosphorus in silicon.

    PubMed

    Drumm, Daniel W; Budi, Akin; Per, Manolo C; Russo, Salvy P; L Hollenberg, Lloyd C

    2013-02-27

    : The differences in energy between electronic bands due to valley splitting are of paramount importance in interpreting transport spectroscopy experiments on state-of-the-art quantum devices defined by scanning tunnelling microscope lithography. Using vasp, we develop a plane-wave density functional theory description of systems which is size limited due to computational tractability. Nonetheless, we provide valuable data for the benchmarking of empirical modelling techniques more capable of extending this discussion to confined disordered systems or actual devices. We then develop a less resource-intensive alternative via localised basis functions in siesta, retaining the physics of the plane-wave description, and extend this model beyond the capability of plane-wave methods to determine the ab initio valley splitting of well-isolated δ-layers. In obtaining an agreement between plane-wave and localised methods, we show that valley splitting has been overestimated in previous ab initio calculations by more than 50%.

  2. Quantum criticality.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J

    2005-01-20

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary--that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures. PMID:15662409

  3. Protons in polar media: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rosenvinge, Tycho

    1998-10-01

    The hydrates of hydrogen chloride are ionic crystals that contain hydronium (H3O+). The hydronium in the monohydrate has been reported to be statistically disordered between two possible sites related by inversion symmetry. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are presented for the monohydrate, as well as the di-, and tri-hydrates, of hydrogen chloride using the density functional based Car-Parrinello technique. The simulations were carried out with the goal of investigating proton disorder in these crystals. The possible role of nuclear quantum effects has been explored via path integral molecular dynamic simulations. The present results suggest that the proposed disordered sites in the monohydrate are dynamically unstable and therefore unlikely to be responsible for the reported disorder. No useful information was obtained for the dihydrate because the large unit cell leads to difficulties in carrying out the simulations. Nuclear quantum effects are shown to be important for characterizing the proton distributions in the trihydrate. The structure and dynamical behavior of liquid HF with dissolved KF have been investigated using the Car- Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics scheme. Specifically, a system with stoichiometry KFċ2HF was studied at temperatures of 400K and 1000K. This system, which was started from a phase separated mixture, rapidly formed into solvated potassium ions and HnFn+1/sp- polyfluoride anions with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The resulting polyfluoride anions were classified, and their structures and dynamical behavior were compared with the known structures and spectra of crystalline compounds KF/cdot xHF and with theoretical predictions of isolated gas phase species. The present study reveals dramatic frequency shifts in the H atom vibrational modes with variation in the HF coordination number of the polyfluoride anion. In particular the FH wagging motion red shifts while the FH stretch blue shifts as n increases. The present calculations

  4. Quantum seismography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    A major scientific thrust from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to increase the performance of a wide variety of information processing devices. In particular, quantum radar has emerged as an intriguing theoretical concept that could revolutionize electromagnetic standoff sensing. In this paper we will discuss how the techniques developed for quantum radar could also be used towards the design of novel seismographs able to detect small ground vibrations., We use a hypothetical earthquake warning system in order to compare quantum seismography with traditional seismographic techniques.

  5. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  6. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  7. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  8. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  9. Ab initio calculation of anisotropic magnetic properties of complexes. I. Unique definition of pseudospin Hamiltonians and their derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibotaru, L. F.; Ungur, L.

    2012-08-01

    A methodology for the rigorous nonperturbative derivation of magnetic pseudospin Hamiltonians of mononuclear complexes and fragments based on ab initio calculations of their electronic structure is described. It is supposed that the spin-orbit coupling and other relativistic effects are already taken fully into account at the stage of quantum chemistry calculations of complexes. The methodology is based on the establishment of the correspondence between the ab initio wave functions of the chosen manifold of multielectronic states and the pseudospin eigenfunctions, which allows to define the pseudospin Hamiltonians in the unique way. Working expressions are derived for the pseudospin Zeeman and zero-field splitting Hamiltonian corresponding to arbitrary pseudospins. The proposed calculation methodology, already implemented in the SINGLE_ANISO module of the MOLCAS-7.6 quantum chemistry package, is applied for a first-principles evaluation of pseudospin Hamiltonians of several complexes exhibiting weak, moderate, and very strong spin-orbit coupling effects.

  10. Exploring the Nature of the H[subscript 2] Bond. 2. Using Ab Initio Molecular Orbital Calculations to Obtain the Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Glendening, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    A project for students in an upper-level course in quantum or computational chemistry is described in which they are introduced to the concepts and applications of a high quality, ab initio treatment of the ground-state potential energy curve (PEC) for H[subscript 2] and D[subscript 2]. Using a commercial computational chemistry application and a…

  11. Ab initio potential energy surfaces describing the interaction of CH(X2Π) with H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2016-09-01

    We have determined four-dimensional ab initio quasi-diabatic potential energy surfaces describing the interaction of CH(X2Π) with H2, under the assumption of fixed CH and H2 internuclear separations. These calculations employed the multi-reference configuration interaction method [MRCISD+Q(Davidson)]. The computed points were fit to an analytical form suitable for time-independent quantum scattering calculations of rotationally inelastic cross sections and rate constants.

  12. Masses and activity of AB Doradus B a/b. The age of the AB Dor quadruple system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, U.; Czesla, S.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Robrade, J.; Engels, D.; Wieringa, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the close binary AB Dor Ba/b (Rst137B). Our study comprises astrometric orbit measurements, optical spectroscopy, X-ray and radio observations. Using all available adaptive optics images of AB Dor B taken with VLT/NACO from 2004 to 2009, we tightly constrain its orbital period to 360.6 ± 1.5 days. We present the first orbital solution of Rst 137B and estimate the combined mass of AB Dor Ba+b as 0.69+0.02-0.24 M⊙, slightly exceeding previous estimates based on IR photometry. Our determined orbital inclination of Rst 137B is close to the axial inclination of AB Dor A inferred from Doppler imaging. Our VLT/UVES spectra yield high rotational velocities of ≥30 km s-1 for both components Ba and Bb, in accord with previous measurements, which corresponds to rotation periods significantly shorter than one day. Our combined spectral model, using PHOENIX spectra, yields an effective temperature of 3310 ± 50 K for the primary and approximately 60 K less for the secondary. The optical spectra presumably cover a chromospheric flare and show that at least one component of Rst 137B is significantly active. Activity and weak variations are also found in our simultaneous XMM-Newton observations, while our ATCA radio data yield constant fluxes at the level of previous measurements. Using evolutionary models, our newly determined stellar parameters confirm that the age of Rst 137B is between 50 and 100 Myr. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 383.D-1002(A) and the ESO Science Archive Facility. Using data obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and NASA. Using data obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) operated by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

  13. Quantum metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.; Kok, P.; Dowling, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the formal equivalence between the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the Ramsey spectroscope, and a specific quantum logical gate. Based on this equivalence we introduce the quantum Rosetta Stone, and we describe a projective measurement scheme for generating the desired correlations between the interferometric input states in order to achieve Heisenberg-limited sensitivity.

  14. Quantum microbiology.

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T; Masson, L

    2011-01-01

    During his famous 1943 lecture series at Trinity College Dublin, the reknown physicist Erwin Schrodinger discussed the failure and challenges of interpreting life by classical physics alone and that a new approach, rooted in Quantum principles, must be involved. Quantum events are simply a level of organization below the molecular level. This includes the atomic and subatomic makeup of matter in microbial metabolism and structures, as well as the organic, genetic information code of DNA and RNA. Quantum events at this time do not elucidate, for example, how specific genetic instructions were first encoded in an organic genetic code in microbial cells capable of growth and division, and its subsequent evolution over 3.6 to 4 billion years. However, due to recent technological advances, biologists and physicists are starting to demonstrate linkages between various quantum principles like quantum tunneling, entanglement and coherence in biological processes illustrating that nature has exerted some level quantum control to optimize various processes in living organisms. In this article we explore the role of quantum events in microbial processes and endeavor to show that after nearly 67 years, Schrödinger was prophetic and visionary in his view of quantum theory and its connection with some of the fundamental mechanisms of life. PMID:21368338

  15. Investigation of polarization effects in the gramicidin A channel from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timko, Jeff; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2012-11-01

    Polarization is an important component of molecular interactions and is expected to play a particularly significant role in inhomogeneous environments such as pores and interfaces. Here we investigate the effects of polarization in the gramicidin A ion channel by performing quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and comparing the results with those obtained from classical MD simulations with non-polarizable force fields. We consider the dipole moments of backbone carbonyl groups and channel water molecules as well as a number of structural quantities of interest. The ab initio results show that the dipole moments of the carbonyl groups and water molecules are highly sensitive to the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) they participate in. In the absence of a K+ ion, water molecules in the channel are quite mobile, making the H-bond network highly dynamic. A central K+ ion acts as an anchor for the channel waters, stabilizing the H-bond network and thereby increasing their average dipole moments. In contrast, the K+ ion has little effect on the dipole moments of the neighboring carbonyl groups. The weakness of the ion-peptide interactions helps to explain the near diffusion-rate conductance of K+ ions through the channel. We also address the sampling issue in relatively short ab initio MD simulations. Results obtained from a continuous 20 ps ab initio MD simulation are compared with those generated by sampling ten windows from a much longer classical MD simulation and running each window for 2 ps with ab initio MD. Both methods yield similar results for a number of quantities of interest, indicating that fluctuations are fast enough to justify the short ab initio MD simulations.

  16. Investigation of polarization effects in the gramicidin A channel from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Timko, Jeff; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2012-11-28

    Polarization is an important component of molecular interactions and is expected to play a particularly significant role in inhomogeneous environments such as pores and interfaces. Here we investigate the effects of polarization in the gramicidin A ion channel by performing quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and comparing the results with those obtained from classical MD simulations with non-polarizable force fields. We consider the dipole moments of backbone carbonyl groups and channel water molecules as well as a number of structural quantities of interest. The ab initio results show that the dipole moments of the carbonyl groups and water molecules are highly sensitive to the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) they participate in. In the absence of a K(+) ion, water molecules in the channel are quite mobile, making the H-bond network highly dynamic. A central K(+) ion acts as an anchor for the channel waters, stabilizing the H-bond network and thereby increasing their average dipole moments. In contrast, the K(+) ion has little effect on the dipole moments of the neighboring carbonyl groups. The weakness of the ion-peptide interactions helps to explain the near diffusion-rate conductance of K(+) ions through the channel. We also address the sampling issue in relatively short ab initio MD simulations. Results obtained from a continuous 20 ps ab initio MD simulation are compared with those generated by sampling ten windows from a much longer classical MD simulation and running each window for 2 ps with ab initio MD. Both methods yield similar results for a number of quantities of interest, indicating that fluctuations are fast enough to justify the short ab initio MD simulations.

  17. Real wavepacket code for ABC + D {r_arrow} AB + CD reactive scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayneris, J.; Gonzalez, M.; Gray, S. K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. de Barcelona

    2008-09-01

    We discuss a six-dimensional, time-dependent real wavepacket (RWP) code designed to obtain reaction probabilities for ABC(v{sub I}) + D {yields} AB + CD four-atom reactions, where v{sub I} is a collective index for the initial quantum state of the triatomic molecule. The code provides exact results for total angular momentum J = 0, and invokes the helicity decoupling (or centrifugal sudden) approximation for J > 0. Our new RWP code has been extensively checked by considering the benchmark H + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + OH abstraction reaction.

  18. Quantum picturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Why did it take us 50 years since the birth of the quantum mechanical formalism to discover that unknown quantum states cannot be cloned? Yet, the proof of the 'no-cloning theorem' is easy, and its consequences and potential for applications are immense. Similarly, why did it take us 60 years to discover the conceptually intriguing and easily derivable physical phenomenon of 'quantum teleportation'? We claim that the quantum mechanical formalism doesn't support our intuition, nor does it elucidate the key concepts that govern the behaviour of the entities that are subject to the laws of quantum physics. The arrays of complex numbers are kin to the arrays of 0s and 1s of the early days of computer programming practice. Using a technical term from computer science, the quantum mechanical formalism is 'low-level'. In this review we present steps towards a diagrammatic 'high-level' alternative for the Hilbert space formalism, one which appeals to our intuition. The diagrammatic language as it currently stands allows for intuitive reasoning about interacting quantum systems, and trivialises many otherwise involved and tedious computations. It clearly exposes limitations such as the no-cloning theorem, and phenomena such as quantum teleportation. As a logic, it supports 'automation': it enables a (classical) computer to reason about interacting quantum systems, prove theorems, and design protocols. It allows for a wider variety of underlying theories, and can be easily modified, having the potential to provide the required step-stone towards a deeper conceptual understanding of quantum theory, as well as its unification with other physical theories. Specific applications discussed here are purely diagrammatic proofs of several quantum computational schemes, as well as an analysis of the structural origin of quantum non-locality. The underlying mathematical foundation of this high-level diagrammatic formalism relies on so-called monoidal categories, a product of a fairly

  19. Numerical canonical transformation approach to quantum many-body problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Steven R.

    2002-10-01

    We present a new approach for numerical solutions of ab initio quantum chemistry systems. The main idea of the approach, which we call canonical diagonalization, is to diagonalize directly the second-quantized Hamiltonian by a sequence of numerical canonical transformations.

  20. Ab initio studies of phosphorene island single electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S. J.; Venkata Kamalakar, M.; Chowdhury, R.

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorene is a newly unveiled two-dimensional crystal with immense potential for nanoelectronic and optoelectronic applications. Its unique electronic structure and two dimensionality also present opportunities for single electron devices. Here we report the behaviour of a single electron transistor (SET) made of a phosphorene island, explored for the first time using ab initio calculations. We find that the band gap and the charging energy decrease monotonically with increasing layer numbers due to weak quantum confinement. When compared to two other novel 2D crystals such as graphene and MoS2, our investigation reveals larger adsorption energies of gas molecules on phosphorene, which indicates better a sensing ability. The calculated charge stability diagrams show distinct changes in the presence of an individual molecule which can be applied to detect the presence of different molecules with sensitivity at a single molecular level. The higher charging energies of the molecules within the SET display operational viability at room temperature, which is promising for possible ultra sensitive detection applications.

  1. Ab initio calculation of infrared intensities for hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Results of an ab initio SCF quantum mechanical study are used to derive estimates for the infrared intensities of the fundamental vibrations of hydrogen peroxide. Atomic polar tensors (APTs) were calculated on the basis of a 4-31G basis set, and used to derive absolute intensities for the vibrational transitions. Comparison of the APTs calculated for H2O2 with those previously obtained for H2O and CH3OH, and of the absolute intensities derived from the H2O2 APTs with those derived from APTs transferred from H2O and CH3OH, reveals the sets of values to differ by no more than a factor of two, supporting the validity of the theoretical calculation. Values of the infrared intensities obtained correspond to A1 = 14.5 km/mol, A2 = 0.91 km/mol, A3 = 0.058 km/mol, A4 = 123 km/mol, A5 = 46.2 km/mol, and A6 = 101 km/mol. Charge, charge flux and overlap contributions to the dipole moment derivatives are also computed.

  2. Ab initio simulations of pseudomorphic silicene and germanene bidimensional heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debernardi, Alberto; Marchetti, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Among the novel two-dimensional (2D) materials, silicene and germanene, which are two honeycomb crystal structures composed of a monolayer of Si and Ge, respectively, have attracted the attention of material scientists because they combine the advantages of the new 2D ultimate-scaled electronics with their compatibility with industrial processes presently based on Si and Ge. We envisage pseudomorphic lateral heterostructures based on ribbons of silicene and germanene, which are the 2D analogs of conventional 3D Si/Ge superlattices and quantum wells. In spite of the considerable lattice mismatch (˜4 % ) between free-standing silicene and germanene, our ab initio simulations predict that, considering striped 2D lateral heterostructures made by alternating silicene and germanene ribbons of constant width, the silicene/germanene junction remains pseudomorphic—i.e., it maintains lattice-matched edges—up to critical ribbon widths that can reach some tens of nanometers. Such critical widths are one order of magnitude larger than the critical thickness measured in 3D pseudomorphic Si/Ge heterostructures and the resolution of state-of-the-art lithography, thus enabling the possibility of lithography patterned silicene/germanene junctions. We computed how the strain produced by the pseudomorphic growth modifies the crystal structure and electronic bands of the ribbons, providing a mechanism for band-structure engineering. Our results pave the way for lithography patterned lateral heterostructures that can serve as the building blocks of novel 2D electronics.

  3. Rational design of electrolyte components by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Patrik; Jacobsson, Per

    This paper is a small review of the use of computer simulations and especially the use of standard quantum-mechanical ab initio electronic structure calculations to rationally design and investigate different choices of chemicals/systems for lithium battery electrolytes. Covered systems and strategies to enhance the performance of electrolytes will range from assisting the interpretation of vibrational spectroscopy experiments over development of potentials for molecular dynamics simulations, to the design of new lithium salts and the lithium ion coordination in liquid, polymer, and gel polymer electrolytes. Examples of studied properties include the vibrational spectra of anions and ion pairs to characterize the nature and extent of the interactions present, the lithium ion affinities of anions, important for the salt solvation and the ability to provide a high concentration of charge carriers, the HOMO energies of the anions to estimate the stability versus oxidation, the anion volumes that correlate to the anion mobility, the lithium ion coordination and dynamics to reveal the limiting steps of lithium ion transport, etc.

  4. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  5. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    1995-04-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  6. Quantum strategies of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Huang, Yun-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2001-03-01

    In the classical Monty Hall problem, one player can always win with probability 2/3. We generalize the problem to the quantum domain and show that a fair two-party zero-sum game can be carried out if the other player is permitted to adopt quantum measurement strategy.

  7. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm’s canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  8. Quantum physics without quantum philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Detlef; Goldstein, Sheldon; Zanghì, Nino

    Quantum philosophy, a peculiar twentieth-century malady, is responsible for most of the conceptual muddle plaguing the foundations of quantum physics. When this philosophy is eschewed, one naturally arrives at Bohmian mechanics, which is what emerges from Schrödinger's equation for a nonrelativistic system of particles when we merely insist that 'particles' means particles. While distinctly non-Newtonian, Bohmian mechanics is a fully deterministic theory of particles in motion, a motion choreographed by the wave function. The quantum formalism emerges when measurement situations are analyzed according to this theory. When the quantum formalism is regarded as arising in this way, the paradoxes and perplexities so often associated with quantum theory simply evaporate.

  9. Quantum Spin-Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulators and Topological Transitions in Functionalized Sb(111) Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Huisheng; Yang, Zhongqin

    2015-08-12

    Electronic and topological behaviors of Sb(111) monolayers decorated with H and certain magnetic atoms are investigated by using ab initio methods. The drastic exchange field induced by the magnetic atoms, together with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of Sb atoms, generates one new category of valley polarized topological insulators, called quantum spin-quantum anomalous Hall (QSQAH) insulators in the monolayer, with a band gap up to 53 meV. The strong SOC is closely related to Sb px and py orbitals, instead of pz orbitals in usual two-dimensional (2D) materials. Topological transitions from quantum anomalous Hall states to QSQAH states and then to time-reversal-symmetry-broken quantum spin Hall states are achieved by tuning the SOC strength. The behind mechanism is revealed. Our work is helpful for future valleytronic and spintronic applications in 2D materials.

  10. Quantum Baseball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Ivars

    1989-01-01

    An analogy from the game of baseball can be used to examine the philosophy involved in statistics surrounding quantum mechanical events. The "Strong Baseball Principle" is proposed and discussed. (CW)

  11. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a `consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are not entailed by the precepts of quantum mechanics. Thus whatever is proved is not a feature of quantum mechanics, but is a property of a theory that tries to combine quantum theory with quasi-classical features that go beyond what is entailed by quantum theory itself. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by establishing, instead, properties of a system modified by adding properties alien to the original system. Hence Griffiths' rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his `consistent quantum theory' shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive version of quantum theory. An added section responds to Griffiths' reply, which cites general possibilities of ambiguities that might make what is to be proved ill-defined, and hence render the pertinent `consistent framework' ill defined. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question, which, both by its physical formulation and by explicit identification, specify the framework to be used. Griffiths confirms the validity of the proof insofar as that pertinent framework is used. The section also shows

  12. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-07-15

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  13. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Changlani, Hitesh J.; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U{sup ∗}/t to be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models.

  14. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Changlani, Hitesh J; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U(∗)/t to be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models. PMID:26374007

  15. Electric field geometries dominate quantum transport coupling in silicon nanoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tsung-Han E-mail: sfhu.hu@gmail.com; Hu, Shu-Fen E-mail: sfhu.hu@gmail.com

    2014-03-28

    Investigations on the relation between the geometries of silicon nanodevices and the quantum phenomenon they exhibit, such as the Aharonov–Bohm (AB) effect and the Coulomb blockade, were conducted. An arsenic doped silicon nanoring coupled with a nanowire by electron beam lithography was fabricated. At 1.47 K, Coulomb blockade oscillations were observed under modulation from the top gate voltage, and a periodic AB oscillation of ΔB = 0.178 T was estimated for a ring radius of 86 nm under a high sweeping magnetic field. Modulating the flat top gate and the pointed side gate was performed to cluster and separate the many electron quantum dots, which demonstrated that quantum confinement and interference effects coexisted in the doped silicon nanoring.

  16. Undoing Gender Through Legislation and Schooling: the Case of AB 537 and AB 394 IN California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-11-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools have an unconscious acceptance of heteronormativity and gendered norms, which undermines both the spirit and language of these laws. This paper examines how California schools can both change standard practices and realise the transformative social change that laws like AB 537 and AB 394 can instigate. I assert that the systemic implementation of these laws, through the adoption, enforcement and evaluation of existing AB 537 Task Force Recommendations, is necessary for their success. My second assertion is that AB 537 and AB 394 have the potential to change and reconstitute gender-based and heteronormative standards at school sites.

  17. Nonadiabatic theory of strong-field atomic effects under elliptical polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xu; Eberly, J. H.

    2012-12-14

    Elliptically polarized laser fields provide a new channel for access to strong-field processes that are either suppressed or not present under linear polarization. Quantum theory is mostly unavailable for their analysis, and we report here results of a systematic study based on a classical ensemble theory with solution of the relevant ab inito time-dependent Newton equations for selected model atoms. The study's approach is necessarily nonadiabatic, as it follows individual electron trajectories leading to single, double, and triple ionizations. Of particular interest are new results bearing on open questions concerning experimental reports of unexplained species dependences as well as double-electron release times that are badly matched by a conventional adiabatic quantum tunneling theory. We also report the first analysis of electron trajectories for sequential and non-sequential triple ionization.

  18. Ab initio calculation of the ro-vibrational spectrum of H2F+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.

    2015-10-01

    An ab initio study of the rotation-vibrational spectrum of the electronic ground state of the (gas-phase) fluoronium ion H2F+ is presented. A new potential energy surface (PES) and a new dipole moment surface (DMS) were produced and used to compute rotation-vibrational energy levels, line positions and line intensities. Our computations achieve an accuracy of 0.15 cm-1 for the fundamental vibrational frequencies, which is about 50 times more accurate than previous ab initio results. The computed room-temperature line list should facilitate the experimental observations of new H2F+ lines, in particular of yet unobserved overtone transitions. The H2F+ molecular ion, which is isoelectronic to water, has a non-linear equilibrium geometry but a low-energy barrier to linearity at about 6000 cm-1. As a result the effects of so-called quantum monodromy become apparent already at low bending excitations. An analysis of excited bends in terms of quantum monodromy is presented.

  19. Towards an ab initio description of correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Chuck-Hou

    Strongly-correlated materials are a rich playground for physical phenomena, exhibiting complex phase diagrams with many competing orders. Ab initio insights into materials combined with physical ideas provide the ability to identify the organizing principles driving the correlated electronic behavior and pursue first-principles design of new compounds. Realistic modeling of correlated materials is an active area of research, especially with the recent merger of density functional theory (DFT) with dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). This thesis is structured in two parts. The first describes the methods and algorithmic developments which drive advances in DFT+DMFT. In Ch. 2 and 3, we provide an overview of the two foundational theories, DMFT and DFT. In the second half of Ch. 3, we describe some of the principles guiding the combination of the two theories to form DFT+DMFT. In Ch. 4, we describe the algorithm lying at the heart of modern DFT+DMFT implementations, the hybridization expansion formulation of continuous-time quantum monte carlo (CTQMC) for the general Anderson impurity problem, as well as a fast rejection algorithm for speeding-up the local trace evaluation. The final chapter in the methods section describes an algorithm for direct sampling of the partition function, and thus the free energy and entropy, of simple Anderson impurity models within CTQMC. The second part of the thesis is a collection of applications of our ab initio approach to key correlated materials. We first apply our method to plutonium binary alloys (Ch. 6), which when supplemented with slave-boson mean-field theory, allows us to understand the observed photoemission spectra. Ch. 7 describes the computation of spectra and optical conductivity for rare-earth nickelates grown as epitaxial thin films. In the final two chapters, we turn our attention to the high-temperature superconductors. In the first, we show that the charge-transfer energy is a key chemical variable which controls

  20. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  1. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  2. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  3. Ab-initio phasing in protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plas, J. L.; Millane, Rick P.

    2000-11-01

    The central problem in the determination of protein structures form x-ray diffraction dada (x-ray crystallography) corresponds to a phase retrieval problem with undersampled amplitude data. Algorithms for this problem that have an increased radius of convergence have the potential for reducing the amount of experimental work, and cost, involved in determining protein structures. We describe such an algorithm. Application of the algorithm to a simulated crystallographic problem shows that it converges to the correct solution, with no initial phase information, where currently used algorithms fail. The results lend support to the possibility of ab initio phasing in protein crystallography.

  4. Testing Distributed ABS System with Fault Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawczyński, Dawid; Sosnowski, Janusz; Gawkowski, Piotr

    The paper deals with the problem of adapting software implemented fault injection technique (SWIFI) to evaluate dependability of reactive microcontroller systems. We present an original methodology of disturbing controller operation and analyzing fault effects taking into account reactions of the controlled object and the impact of the system environment. Faults can be injected randomly (in space and time) or targeted at the most sensitive elements of the controller to check it at high stresses. This approach allows identifying rarely encountered problems, usually missed in classical approaches. The developed methodology has been used successfully to verify dependability of ABS system. Experimental results are commented in the paper.

  5. New challenges to medicare beneficiary access to mAbs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Precision binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to biological targets, their relative clinical success, and expansion of indications following initial approval, are distinctive clinical features. The relatively high cost of mAbs, together with the absence of a regulatory pathway to generics, stand out as distinctive economic features. Based on both literature review and primary data collection we enumerated mAb original approvals, supplemental indications and off-label uses, assessed payer formulary management of mAbs, and determined new challenges to Medicare beneficiary access to mAbs. We found that the FDA has approved 22 mAbs and 30 supplemental indications pertaining to the originally approved mAbs. In addition, there are 46 off-label use citations in officially recognized pharmaceutical compendia. Across Part B carriers and Part D plans, we found considerable variation in terms of coverage and conditions of reimbursement related to on- and off-label uses of mAbs. Our results point to four major challenges facing mAb developers, health care providers, Medicare beneficiaries, payers and policymakers. These include administrative price controls, coverage variation, projected shift from physician- to self-administered mAbs, and comparative effectiveness. We suggest more systematic use of “coverage with evidence development” as a means of optimally addressing these challenges. PMID:20046575

  6. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, F.

    1992-07-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scientists R. J. Barlow and A. R. Barnett Quantum Mechanics aims to teach those parts of the subject which every physicist should know. The object is to display the inherent structure of quantum mechanics, concentrating on general principles and on methods of wide applicability without taking them to their full generality. This book will equip students to follow quantum-mechanical arguments in books and scientific papers, and to cope with simple cases. To bring the subject to life, the theory is applied to the all-important field of atomic physics. No prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is assumed. However, it would help most readers to have met some elementary wave mechanics before. Primarily written for students, it should also be of interest to experimental research workers who require a good grasp of quantum mechanics without the full formalism needed by the professional theorist. Quantum Mechanics features: A flow diagram allowing topics to be studied in different orders or omitted altogether. Optional "starred" and highlighted sections containing more advanced and specialized material for the more ambitious reader. Sets of problems at the end of each chapter to help student understanding. Hints and solutions to the problems are given at the end of the book.

  7. Introduction to Quantum Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses the problem of efficiently simulating the evolution of a quantum system. The contents include: 1) Quantum Simulation; 2) Extracting Answers from Quantum Simulations; 3) Quantum Fourier Transform; 4) Eigenvalue Estimation; 5) Fermionic Simulations.

  8. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  9. Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bellac, Michel

    2006-03-01

    Quantum physics allows us to understand the nature of the physical phenomena which govern the behavior of solids, semi-conductors, lasers, atoms, nuclei, subnuclear particles and light. In Quantum Physics, Le Bellac provides a thoroughly modern approach to this fundamental theory. Throughout the book, Le Bellac teaches the fundamentals of quantum physics using an original approach which relies primarily on an algebraic treatment and on the systematic use of symmetry principles. In addition to the standard topics such as one-dimensional potentials, angular momentum and scattering theory, the reader is introduced to more recent developments at an early stage. These include a detailed account of entangled states and their applications, the optical Bloch equations, the theory of laser cooling and of magneto-optical traps, vacuum Rabi oscillations, and an introduction to open quantum systems. This is a textbook for a modern course on quantum physics, written for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Completely original and contemporary approach, using algebra and symmetry principles Introduces recent developments at an early stage, including many topics that cannot be found in standard textbooks. Contains 130 physically relevant exercises

  10. Ab initio Study of HZnF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Léonard, C.; Chambaud, G.

    2009-11-01

    On the basis of highly correlated ab initio calculations, an accurate determination of the electronic structure and of the rovibrational spectroscopy has been performed for the electronic ground state of the HZnF system. Using effective core pseudopotentials for the Zn and F atoms and associated aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, we have calculated, at the multireference configuration interaction level including the Davidson correction, the three-dimensional potential energy surface of the X1Σ+ ground state. The rovibrational energy levels have been obtained variationally, and the results have been discussed and compared with existing experimental data on the ground state of the close system HZnCl, which exhibits a complicated vibration-rotation spectrum. Our analysis shows that the nature of the H-ZnF bond is quite similar to that of the H-ZnCl bond, according to their bond lengths, harmonic frequencies of the H-Zn stretching mode, and dissociation energies into H and ZnF/ZnCl. The ab initio study of the electronic ground and excited states of ZnH and ZnH+ are also presented using similar level of calculations. Characteristic constants are given for the first bounded electronic states correlating to the first two dissociation asymptotes of the neutral and ionic diatomics.

  11. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  12. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-12-07

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li{sub 3} molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  13. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Frisch, Michael J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li3 molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  14. Biosorption of Acid Blue 290 (AB 290) and Acid Blue 324 (AB 324) dyes on Spirogyra rhizopus.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ayla; Akkaya, Gönül; Turabik, Meral

    2006-07-31

    In this study, the biosorption of Acid Blue 290 and Acid Blue 324 on Spirogyra rhizopus, a green algae growing on fresh water, was studied with respect to initial pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and biosorbent concentration. The optimum initial pH and temperature values for AB 290 and AB 324 biosorption were found to be 2.0, 30 degrees C and 3.0, 25 degrees C, respectively. It was observed that the adsorbed AB 290 and AB 324 amounts increased with increasing the initial dye concentration up to 1500 and 750 mg/L, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were applied to the experimental equilibrium data and the isotherm constants were determined by using Polymath 4.1 software. The monolayer coverage capacities of S. rhizopus for AB 290 and AB 324 dyes were found as 1356.6 mg/g and 367.0 mg/g, respectively. The intraparticle diffusion model and the pseudo-second order kinetic model were applied to the experimental data in order to describe the removal mechanism of these acidic dyes by S. rhizopus. The pseudo-second order kinetic model described very well the biosorption kinetics of AB 290 and AB 324 dyes. Thermodynamic studies showed that the biosorption of AB 290 and AB 324 on S. rhizopus was exothermic in nature.

  15. In/ITO whisker and optoelectronic properties of ITO films deposited by ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jung-Hsiung; Yeh, Sung-Wei; Teoh, Lay Gaik

    2012-07-15

    ITO films were deposited on a glass substrate using ion beam sputtering, with oxygen flow rates from 0.5 to 2 sccm. The films consisted of randomly oriented ITO nanoparticles and metallic indium (In) with {l_brace}101{r_brace} facets, following the specific crystallographic relationship of [010]{sub In}//[110]{sub ITO}; (001){sub In}//(001){sub ITO} with habit planes (100){sub In}//(011){sub ITO}, when fabricated using a low oxygen flow rate. Oxygen flow rate in excess of 2.0 sccm results in the growth of amorphous films. The epitaxial In nanoparticles probably act as seeds for the development of curved ITO whiskers as small as 10 nm and extend up to 100 nm in length along the [100] direction, with poorly defined shape, possibly due to the tapering and bending of the whisker to form a tilt boundary about the [011] zone axis of the ITO. The ITO whisker growth was facilitated by the In globular tips in the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. The films prepared using a series of oxygen flow rates showed different chemical-bonding states, electric resistivity and optical transparency; as a result of phase and microstructural changes.

  16. Structure, Biological Functions and Applications of the AB5 Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Beddoe, Travis; Paton, Adrienne W.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Rossjohn, Jamie; Paton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    AB5 toxins are important virulence factors for several major bacterial pathogens, including Bordetella pertussis, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella dysenteriae and at least two distinct pathotypes of Escherichia coli. The AB5 toxins are so termed because they comprise a catalytic A-subunit, which is responsible for disruption of essential host functions, and a pentameric B-subunit that binds to specific glycan receptors on the target cell surface. The molecular mechanisms by which these AB5 toxins cause disease have been largely unraveled, including recent insights into a novel AB5 toxin family, subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB). Furthermore, AB5 toxins have become a valuable tool for studying fundamental cellular functions, and are now being investigated for potential applications in the clinical treatment of human diseases. PMID:20202851

  17. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  18. Ab initio cluster study of crystalline NaF

    SciTech Connect

    Temple, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    A highly-accurate ab initio cluster model of crystalline NaF has been constructed to explore the limits of cluster methods in the treatment of ionic solids. The focus of this model was the characterization of the lattice environment and its influence on the easily-polarizable fluorine anion. The model consisted of a central all-electron fluorine anion coordinated by pseudopotentials, to represent the nearest-neighbor sodium cations, and a finite array of point charges chosen to generate the correct crystal field from the surrounding infinite ionic lattice. The wavefunction and properties of the anion were calculated using the restricted Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction techniques from quantum chemistry. An extensive analysis of basis set incompleteness errors in the anion wavefunction was performed. Important features were identified in the embedded anion, such as its distortion under the influence of the lattice compressions, its stabilization from the Madelung potential, and its changes in size due to electron correlations. Bulk properties of the rocksalt-structure (B1) NaF crystal were derived from the total mode energies, calculated as a function of the crystal volume. The properties included the zero-pressure lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, and the pressure-volume equation-of-state. A series of test calculations explored the relationships, and their underlying physical mechanisms, between the features of the embedded anion and the bulk properties of the crystal. These features often produced opposing changes in the properties, demonstrating the importance of a thorough and systematic treatment of the embedded anion. The most thorough test calculation gave bulk properties that were within 1% of experiment. Using an embedded anion model for the high-pressure cesium-chloride (B2) phase of NaF, the B1-to-B2 structural transition was correctly predicted at 25 GPa, in excellent agreement with the experimental values of 23 to 27 GPa.

  19. Ab initio kinetics of gas phase decomposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2010-12-01

    The thermal and kinetic aspects of gas phase decomposition reactions can be extremely complex due to a large number of parameters, a variety of possible intermediates, and an overlap in thermal decomposition traces. The experimental determination of the activation energies is particularly difficult when several possible reaction pathways coexist in the thermal decomposition. Ab initio calculations intended to provide an interpretation of the experiment are often of little help if they produce only the activation barriers and ignore the kinetics of the decomposition process. To overcome this ambiguity, a theoretical study of a complete picture of gas phase thermo-decomposition, including reaction energies, activation barriers, and reaction rates, is illustrated with the example of the β-octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) molecule by means of quantum-chemical calculations. We study three types of major decomposition reactions characteristic of nitramines: the HONO elimination, the NONO rearrangement, and the N-NO(2) homolysis. The reaction rates were determined using the conventional transition state theory for the HONO and NONO decompositions and the variational transition state theory for the N-NO(2) homolysis. Our calculations show that the HMX decomposition process is more complex than it was previously believed to be and is defined by a combination of reactions at any given temperature. At all temperatures, the direct N-NO(2) homolysis prevails with the activation barrier at 38.1 kcal/mol. The nitro-nitrite isomerization and the HONO elimination, with the activation barriers at 46.3 and 39.4 kcal/mol, respectively, are slow reactions at all temperatures. The obtained conclusions provide a consistent interpretation for the reported experimental data. PMID:21077597

  20. Quantal Study of the Exchange Reaction for N + N2 using an ab initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The N + N2 exchange rate is calculated using a time-dependent quantum dynamics method on a newly determined ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground A" state. This ab initio PES shows a double barrier feature in the interaction region with the barrier height at 47.2 kcal/mol, and a shallow well between these two barriers, with the minimum at 43.7 kcal/mol. A quantum dynamics wave packet calculation has been carried out using the fitted PES to compute the cumulative reaction probability for the exchange reaction of N + N2(J=O). The J - K shift method is then employed to obtain the rate constant for this reaction. The calculated rate constant is compared with experimental data and a recent quasi-classical calculation using a LEPS PES. Significant differences are found between the present and quasiclassical results. The present rate calculation is the first accurate 3D quantal dynamics study for N + N2 reaction system and the ab initio PES reported here is the first such surface for N3.

  1. Quantum Uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Denis; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Classical physics allows for the existence of pairs of absolutely identical systems. Pairwise application of identical measurements to each of those systems always leads to exactly alike results irrespectively of the choice of measurements. Here we ask a question how the picture looks like in the quantum domain. Surprisingly, we get a counterintuitive outcome. Pairwise application of identical (but a priori unknown) measurements cannot always lead to exactly alike results. We interpret this as quantum uniqueness—a feature that has no classical analog.

  2. Quantum Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-10-24

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  3. Quantum control limited by quantum decoherence

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Fei; Sun, C. P.; Yu, S. X.

    2006-01-15

    We describe quantum controllability under the influences of the quantum decoherence induced by the quantum control itself. It is shown that, when the controller is considered as a quantum system, it will entangle with its controlled system and then cause quantum decoherence in the controlled system. In competition with this induced decoherence, the controllability will be limited by some uncertainty relation in a well-armed quantum control process. In association with the phase uncertainty and the standard quantum limit, a general model is studied to demonstrate the possibility of realizing a decoherence-free quantum control with a finite energy within a finite time. It is also shown that if the operations of quantum control are to be determined by the initial state of the controller, then due to the decoherence which results from the quantum control itself, there exists a low bound for quantum controllability.

  4. Quantum mechanical study and spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C, 1H, UV) study, first order hyperpolarizability, NBO analysis, HOMO and LUMO analysis of 4-[(4-aminobenzene) sulfonyl] aniline by ab initio HF and density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu, S.; Uma Maheswari, J.

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman of 4-[(4-aminobenzene) sulfonyl] aniline have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies have been investigated with the help of HF and DFT methods with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by GIAO method. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using DFT quantum mechanical calculations. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded and electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were also performed. Finally the calculations results were applied to simulated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which show good agreement with observed spectra.

  5. Anti-GD2 mAbs and next-generation mAb-based agents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Horta, Zulmarie Perez; Goldberg, Jacob L; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated efficacy in the clinic, becoming an important approach for cancer immunotherapy. Due to its limited expression on normal tissue, the GD2 disialogangloside expressed on neuroblastoma cells is an excellent candidate for mAb therapy. In 2015, dinutuximab (an anti-GD2 mAb) was approved by the US FDA and is currently used in a combination immunotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Here, we review the extensive preclinical and clinical development of anti-GD2 mAbs and the different mechanisms by which they mediate tumor cell killing. In addition, we discuss different mAb-based strategies that capitalize on the targeting ability of anti-GD2 mAbs to potentially deliver, as monotherapy, or in combination with other treatments, improved antitumor efficacy.

  6. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings. PMID:25411881

  7. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.

  8. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis frommore » primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.« less

  9. Dissecting the A-B personality type.

    PubMed

    Ray, J J; Bozek, R

    1980-06-01

    It is suggested that 'freneticism' might be an appropriate name for the type of personality said by Rosenman, Friedman and Jenkins to be at risk from coronary heart disease. In study 1 the measure of this personality type (the JAS) was given a uniform answer format and, as such, was found to give improved reliability. It was administered to a random postal sample of Australians. A short form of 24 items was also produced. In study 2 a similar sample received the 24-item form and scales to measure achievement motivation, dominance and extraversion. 'A' types were found to be very much achievement motivated and dominant. A factor analysis showed these two traits as the main components of the A-B concept with only a third factor of 'freneticism'. This factor was measured in a third study which showed that the factor could be used as a scale in its own right.

  10. Ab Initio Calculation of the Hoyle State

    SciTech Connect

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2011-05-13

    The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the helium burning of stars heavier than our Sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this Letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy.

  11. Quantum dice

    SciTech Connect

    Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano

    2013-09-15

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote [42]: “Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the ‘old one.’ I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.” In this paper we take seriously Einstein’s famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how to perform measurements on a single die, to create typical quantum interference effects, and how to connect (entangle) two identical dice, to maximally violate Bell’s inequality. -- Highlights: •Rolling a die is a quantum process admitting a Hilbert space representation. •Rolling experiments with a single die can produce interference effects. •Two connected dice can violate Bell’s inequality. •Correlations need to be created by the measurement, to violate Bell’s inequality.

  12. Quantum wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M. )

    1991-01-15

    This paper presents an application of quantum-mechanical principles to a microscopic variant of the traversable wormholes recently introduced by Morris and Thorne. The analysis, based on the surgical grafting of two Reissner-Nordstroem spacetimes, proceeds by using a minisuperspace model to approximate the geometry of these wormholes. The thin shell'' formalism is applied to this minisuperspace model to extract the effective Lagrangian appropriate to this one-degree-of-freedom system. This effective Lagrangian is then quantized and the wave function for the wormhole is explicitly exhibited. A slightly more general class of wormholes---corresponding to the addition of some dust'' to the wormhole throat---is analyzed by recourse to WKB techniques. In all cases discussed in this paper, the expectation value of the wormhole radius is calculated to be of the order of the Planck length. Accordingly, though these quantum wormholes are of considerable theoretical interest they do not appear to be useful as a means for interstellar travel. The results of this paper may also have a bearing on the question of topological fluctuations in quantum gravity. These calculations serve to suggest that topology-changing effects might in fact be {ital suppressed} by quantum-gravity effects.

  13. Quantum abacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Taksu; Tsutsui, Izumi; Fülöp, Tamás

    2004-09-01

    We show that the point interactions on a line can be utilized to provide U(2) family of qubit operations for quantum information processing. Qubits are realized as states localized in either side of the point interaction which represents a controllable gate. The qubit manipulation proceeds in a manner analogous to the operation of an abacus.

  14. Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2009-11-01

    The continuing search for quantum gravity and never ending attempts to unify gravity with other forces of nature represent tremendous waste of public and private funds directing students' energy towards non-creative manipulative work instead of learning from the scientific creativity in Einstein's 1919 paper that unifies gravity with nuclear force. It reflects Einstein's 1919 jump beyond his own 1915 theory of gravity, including that of Newton as implicitly demanded by Newton in 1686. Einstein corrected and retracted his 1917 introduction of cosmological constant in 1919. Dislike of the fact that Einstein did not use quantum mechanics to prove his point has no real value now, because we will use key ingredients (Planck scale and probabilistic aspect) of quantum mechanics and show that they reach the same conclusion. Newton explained the solar system known after Kepler. Likewise, our quantum mechanical approach explains the strong coupling as well the solar system and shows new horizons, otherwise unexplained. Explanation of unexplained observations need no prediction per Hawking, and obviously otherwise.

  15. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  16. Quantum transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, A.E.; Matone, M.

    1998-01-09

    We show that the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation can be written in the classical form with the spatial derivative {partial_derivative}{sub q} replaced by {partial_derivative}{sub q} with dq = dq/{radical}1{minus}{beta}{sup 2}(q), where {beta}{sup 2}(q) is strictly related to the quantum potential. This can be seen as the opposite of the problem of finding the wave function representation of classical mechanics as formulated by Schiller and Rosen. The structure of the above {open_quotes}quantum transformation{close_quotes}, related to the recently formulated equivalence principle, indicates that the potential deforms space geometry. In particular, a result by Flanders implies that both W(q) = V(q) {minus} E and the quantum potential Q are proportional to the curvatures {kappa}{sub W} and {kappa}{sub Q} which arise as natural invariants in an equivalence problem for curves in the projective line. In this formulation the Schroedinger equation takes the geometrical form ({partial_derivative}{sub q}{sup 2} + {kappa}{sub W}){psi} = 0.

  17. Quantum rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  18. Polarization and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in quantum-ring magnetoexcitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dias da Silva, Luis G.G.V.; Ulloa, Sergio E.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2005-09-15

    We study interaction and radial polarization effects on the absorption spectrum of neutral bound magnetoexcitons confined in quantum-ring structures. We show that the size and orientation of the exciton's dipole moment, as well as the interaction screening, play important roles in the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations. In particular, the excitonic absorption peaks display AB oscillations both in position and amplitude for weak electron-hole interaction and large radial polarization. The presence of impurity scattering induces anticrossings in the exciton spectrum, leading to a modulation in the absorption strength. These properties could be used in experimental investigations of the effect in semiconductor quantum-ring structures.

  19. Quantum roulette: an extended quantum strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Bin; Kwek, L. C.; Oh, C. H.

    2000-12-01

    In a recent paper, Meyer demonstrated that with a quantum computer, an analogous zero-sum classically strategic game played with quantum strategy essentially become a bias game under a mixture of quantum and classical strategy. To illustrate his point, Meyer used a quantum coin tossing event. In this Letter, we generalize Meyer's argument to an N-state game.

  20. Quantum state and quantum entanglement protection using quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuchao; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiangbin; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Yu, Zongwen; Zou, Wenjie

    2015-03-01

    The time evolution of some quantum states can be slowed down or even stopped under frequent measurements. This is the usual quantum Zeno effect. Here we report an operator quantum Zeno effect, in which the evolution of some physical observables is slowed down through measurements even though thequantum state changes randomly with time. Based on the operator quantum Zeno effect, we show how we can protect quantum information from decoherence with two-qubit measurements, realizable with noisy two-qubit interactions. Besides, we report the quantum entanglement protection using weak measurement and measurement reversal scheme. Exposed in the nonzero temperature environment, a quantum system can both lose and gain excitations by interacting with the environment. In this work, we show how to optimally protect quantum states and quantum entanglement in such a situation based on measurement reversal from weak measurement. In particular, we present explicit formulas of protection. We find that this scheme can circumvent the entanglement sudden death in certain conditions.

  1. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  2. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  3. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  4. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  5. Quantum error correction for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terhal, Barbara M.

    2015-04-01

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory are considered. The theory of fault tolerance and quantum error correction is reviewed, and examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error-correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates, and the route toward fault-tolerant universal quantum computation are discussed. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular, the surface code architecture. The complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories are discussed. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  6. AB1402: Design-Build Project Guidelines. 2002 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Div. of School Facilities Planning.

    Assembly Bill (AB) 1402 authorized California's school districts to enter into design-build contracts for projects with design and construction costs exceeding $10 million. These guidelines are intended to accomplish the following purposes: (1) inform school districts of the design-build process under AB 1402; (2) help school districts to…

  7. History of California's AB 1725 and Its Major Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Tab

    This paper addresses the history of California's Assembly Bill 1725 (AB 1725) legislation and describes its major provisions. Signed in 1988 by Governor George Deukmejian, AB 1725's focus is to emphasize the new role of California community colleges as postsecondary institutions committed to transferring students, offering remedial courses, and…

  8. Towards Accurate Ab Initio Predictions of the Spectrum of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have carried out extensive ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of methane, and these results are used to compute vibrational energy levels. We include basis set extrapolations, core-valence correlation, relativistic effects, and Born- Oppenheimer breakdown terms in our calculations. Our ab initio predictions of the lowest lying levels are superb.

  9. Quantum random walks using quantum accelerator modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Z.-Y.; Burnett, K.; D'Arcy, M. B.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2006-01-15

    We discuss the use of high-order quantum accelerator modes to achieve an atom optical realization of a biased quantum random walk. We first discuss how one can create coexistent quantum accelerator modes, and hence how momentum transfer that depends on the atoms' internal state can be achieved. When combined with microwave driving of the transition between the states, a different type of atomic beam splitter results. This permits the realization of a biased quantum random walk through quantum accelerator modes.

  10. i-PI: A Python interface for ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; More, Joshua; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2014-03-01

    Recent developments in path integral methodology have significantly reduced the computational expense of including quantum mechanical effects in the nuclear motion in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. However, the implementation of these developments requires a considerable programming effort, which has hindered their adoption. Here we describe i-PI, an interface written in Python that has been designed to minimise the effort required to bring state-of-the-art path integral techniques to an electronic structure program. While it is best suited to first principles calculations and path integral molecular dynamics, i-PI can also be used to perform classical molecular dynamics simulations, and can just as easily be interfaced with an empirical forcefield code. To give just one example of the many potential applications of the interface, we use it in conjunction with the CP2K electronic structure package to showcase the importance of nuclear quantum effects in high-pressure water. Catalogue identifier: AERN_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 138626 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3128618 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: Multiple architectures. Operating system: Linux, Mac OSX, Windows. RAM: Less than 256 Mb Classification: 7.7. External routines: NumPy Nature of problem: Bringing the latest developments in the modelling of nuclear quantum effects with path integral molecular dynamics to ab initio electronic structure programs with minimal implementational effort. Solution method: State-of-the-art path integral molecular dynamics techniques are implemented in a Python interface. Any electronic structure code can be patched to receive the atomic

  11. Quantum Size Effects in Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ching-Ming

    2006-03-01

    Quantum size effects in metal thin films and metallic clusters are studied using first-principles density functional theory. For metal thin films, Pb(111), Pb(100), Al(110), and Al(111) films up to 30 monolayers are calculated. Significant oscillatory quantum size effects are found on surface energy, work function, and surface relaxations. These oscillations are correlated with the thickness dependence of the energies of confined electrons, which can be properly modelled by an energy-dependent phase shift of the electronic wave function upon reflection at the interface. It is found that a quantitative description of these quantum size effects requires full consideration of the crystal band structure. For metallic clusters, the highly symmetric particles of sizes up 4 nm (Al923, Pb923, and Au309) in the icosahedral (ico), decahedral, and cubotohedral (fcc) structures are calculated. We propose a simple scheme to compare their relative stability and to identify the quantum size effect. In addition, the famous Mackay (fcc-to-ico) transition for metallic clusters is investigated by ab-initio elastic-band method. The transition path can in general be described by an angular variable s. The barriers of the Mackay transition for large Al, Pb, and Au clusters are found to be smaller than the thermal energy at room temperature. Finally CO oxidation on metallic clusters will be presented. A catalytic reaction path for CO oxidation on Au55, Ag55, and Au25Ag30 ico clusters is found with activation energies of less than 0.5 eV. The reaction consists of a peroxolike transition intermediate involving the OOCO configuration. A crucial factor to determine the reaction rate on these clusters is identified as the co-adsorption energy of CO and O2 on these clusters.

  12. Single Ion Quantum Lock-In Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Keselman, Anna; Ozeri, Roee

    2011-05-01

    Invented by Dicke, the lock-in measurement is a phase-sensitive detection scheme that can extract a signal with a known carrier frequency from an extremely noisy environment. Here we report on the implementation of a quantum analog to the classical lock- in amplifier. All the lock-in operations: modulation, detection and mixing, are performed via the application of non-commuting quantum operators on the electronic spin state of a single trapped Sr+ ion. We increase its sensitivity to external fields while extending phase coherence by three orders of magnitude, to more than one second. With this technique we measure magnetic fields with sensitivity of 25 pT /√{ Hz } , and light shifts with an uncertainty below 140 mHz after 1320 seconds of averaging. These sensitivities are limited by quantum projection noise and, to our knowledge, are more than two orders of magnitude better than with other single-spin probe technologies. As a first application we perform light shift spectroscopy of a narrow optical quadruple transition. We remark that the quantum lock-in technique is generic and can potentially enhance the sensitivity of any quantum sensor. (http://arxiv.org/abs/1101.4885)

  13. Coping with noise in programmable quantum annealers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    Solving real-world applications with quantum annealing algorithms requires overcoming several challenges, ranging from translating the computational problem at hand to the quantum-machine language, to tuning several other parameters of the quantum algorithm that have a significant impact on performance of the device. In this talk, we discuss these challenges, strategies developed to enhance performance, and also a more efficient implementation of several applications. For example, in http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.05679 we proposed an method to measure residual systematic biases in the programmable parameters of large-scale quantum annealers. Although the method described there works from a practical point of view, a few questions were left unanswered. One of these puzzles was the observation of a broad distribution in the estimated effective qubit temperatures throughout the device . In this talk, we will present our progress in understanding these puzzles and how these new insights allow for a more effective bias correction protocol. We will present the impact of these new parameter setting and bias correction protocols in the performance of hard discrete optimization problems and in the successful implementation of quantum-assisted machine-learning algorithms.

  14. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-09-25

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric. PMID:26451583

  15. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-09-25

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects of nonlocal response and a finite work function with TDDFT-level accuracy. Applying the theory to dimers, we find quantum corrections to the hybridization even in mesoscopic dimers, as long as the gap itself is subnanometric.

  16. Ab initio studies of equations of state and chemical reactions of reactive structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava

    subject of studies of the shock or thermally induced chemical reactions of the two solids comprising these reactive materials, from first principles, is a relatively new field of study. The published literature on ab initio techniques or quantum mechanics based approaches consists of the ab initio or ab initio-molecular dynamics studies in related fields that contain a solid and a gas. One such study in the literature involves a gas and a solid. This is an investigation of the adsorption of gasses such as carbon monoxide (CO) on Tungsten. The motivation for these studies is to synthesize alternate or synthetic fuel technology by Fischer-Tropsch process. In this thesis these studies are first to establish the procedure for solid-solid reaction and then to extend that to consider the effects of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energy and chemisorptions of CO on tungsten. Then in this thesis, similar studies are also conducted on the effect of mechanical strain and temperature on the binding energies of Titanium and hydrogen. The motivations are again to understand the method and extend the method to such solid-solid reactions. A second motivation is to seek strained conditions that favor hydrogen storage and strain conditions that release hydrogen easily when needed. Following the establishment of ab initio and ab initio studies of chemical reactions between a solid and a gas, the next step of research is to study thermally induced chemical reaction between two solids (Ni+Al). Thus, specific new studies of the thesis are as follows: (1) Ab initio Studies of Binding energies associated with chemisorption of (a) CO on W surfaces (111, and 100) at elevated temperatures and strains and (b) adsorption of hydrogen in titanium base. (2) Equations of state of mixtures of reactive material structures from ab initio methods. (3) Ab initio studies of the reaction initiation, transition states and reaction products of intermetallic mixtures of (Ni+Al) at elevated

  17. A permutationally invariant full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface for the abstraction and exchange channels of the H + CH{sub 4} system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dong H. E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-28

    We report a permutationally invariant global potential energy surface (PES) for the H + CH{sub 4} system based on ∼63 000 data points calculated at a high ab initio level (UCCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ) using the recently proposed permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method. The small fitting error (5.1 meV) indicates a faithful representation of the ab initio points over a large configuration space. The rate coefficients calculated on the PES using tunneling corrected transition-state theory and quasi-classical trajectory are found to agree well with the available experimental and previous quantum dynamical results. The calculated total reaction probabilities (J{sub tot} = 0) including the abstraction and exchange channels using the new potential by a reduced dimensional quantum dynamic method are essentially the same as those on the Xu-Chen-Zhang PES [Chin. J. Chem. Phys. 27, 373 (2014)].

  18. Ab Initio Simulations of Dense Helium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Cong; He Xiantu; Zhang Ping

    2011-04-08

    We study the thermophysical properties of dense helium plasmas by using quantum molecular dynamics and orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations, where densities are considered from 400 to 800 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures up to 800 eV. Results are presented for the equation of state. From the Kubo-Greenwood formula, we derive the electrical conductivity and electronic thermal conductivity. In particular, with the increase in temperature, we discuss the change in the Lorenz number, which indicates a transition from strong coupling and degenerate state to moderate coupling and partial degeneracy regime for dense helium.

  19. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  20. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  1. Quantum Foam

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  2. Quantum nonlocality

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-04-01

    It is argued that the validity of the predictions of quantum theory in certain spin-correlation experiments entails a violation of Einstein's locality idea that no causal influence can act outside the forward light cone. First, two preliminary arguments suggesting such a violation are reviewed. They both depend, in intermediate stages, on the idea that the results of certain unperformed experiments are physically determinate. The second argument is entangled also with the problem of the meaning of physical reality. A new argument having neither of these characteristics is constructed. It is based strictly on the orthodox ideas of Bohr and Heisenberg, and has no realistic elements, or other ingredients, that are alien to orthodox quantum thinking.

  3. Undoing Gender through Legislation and Schooling: The Case of AB 537 and AB 394 in California, USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools…

  4. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A development of quantum theory that was initiated in the 1920s by Werner Heisenberg (1901-76) and Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961). The theory drew on a proposal made in 1925 Prince Louis de Broglie (1892-1987), that particles have wavelike properties (the wave-particle duality) and that an electron, for example, could in some respects be regarded as a wave with a wavelength that depended on its mo...

  5. Collective Modes in a Quantum Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Snir; Podolsky, Daniel; Nonne, Heloise; Auerbach, Assa; Arovas, Daniel P.

    2016-08-01

    We provide a theoretical explanation for the optical modes observed in inelastic neutron scattering on the bcc solid phase of helium 4 [T. Markovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 195301 (2002)]. We argue that these excitations are amplitude (Higgs) modes associated with fluctuations of the crystal order parameter within the unit cell. We present an analysis of the modes based on an effective Ginzburg-Landau model, classify them according to their symmetry properties, and compute their signature in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. In addition, we calculate the dynamical structure factor by means of an ab intio quantum Monte Carlo simulation and find a finite frequency excitation at zero relative momentum.

  6. Efficient Quantum Information Processing via Quantum Compressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Luo, M. X.; Ma, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to improve the quantum transmission efficiency and reduce the resource cost by quantum compressions. The lossless quantum compression is accomplished using invertible quantum transformations and applied to the quantum teleportation and the simultaneous transmission over quantum butterfly networks. New schemes can greatly reduce the entanglement cost, and partially solve transmission conflictions over common links. Moreover, the local compression scheme is useful for approximate entanglement creations from pre-shared entanglements. This special task has not been addressed because of the quantum no-cloning theorem. Our scheme depends on the local quantum compression and the bipartite entanglement transfer. Simulations show the success probability is greatly dependent of the minimal entanglement coefficient. These results may be useful in general quantum network communication.

  7. Proximity of iron pnictide superconductors to a quantum tricritical point

    PubMed Central

    Giovannetti, Gianluca; Ortix, Carmine; Marsman, Martijn; Capone, Massimo; van den Brink, Jeroen; Lorenzana, José

    2011-01-01

    In several materials, unconventional superconductivity appears nearby a quantum phase transition where long-range magnetic order vanishes as a function of a control parameter like charge doping, pressure or magnetic field. The nature of the quantum phase transition is of key relevance, because continuous transitions are expected to favour superconductivity, due to strong fluctuations. Discontinuous transitions, on the other hand, are not expected to have a similar role. Here we determine the nature of the magnetic quantum phase transition, which occurs as a function of doping, in the iron-based superconductor LaFeAsO1–xFx. We use constrained density functional calculations that provide ab initio coefficients for a Landau order parameter analysis. The outcome is intriguing, as this material turns out to be remarkably close to a quantum tricritical point, where the transition changes from continuous to discontinuous, and several susceptibilities diverge simultaneously. We discuss the consequences for superconductivity and the phase diagram. PMID:21772269

  8. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  9. Structural and Biophysical Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1

    PubMed Central

    Kelker, Matthew S.; Berry, Colin; Evans, Steven L.; Pai, Reetal; McCaskill, David G.; Wang, Nick X.; Russell, Joshua C.; Baker, Matthew D.; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, J. W.; Wade, Matthew; Wess, Tim J.; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains are well known for the production of insecticidal proteins upon sporulation and these proteins are deposited in parasporal crystalline inclusions. The majority of these insect-specific toxins exhibit three domains in the mature toxin sequence. However, other Cry toxins are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated to this three-domain family and little is known of their three dimensional structures, limiting our understanding of their mechanisms of action and our ability to engineer the proteins to enhance their function. Among the non-three domain Cry toxins, the Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins from B. thuringiensis strain PS149B1 are required to act together to produce toxicity to the western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte via a pore forming mechanism of action. Cry34Ab1 is a protein of ∼14 kDa with features of the aegerolysin family (Pfam06355) of proteins that have known membrane disrupting activity, while Cry35Ab1 is a ∼44 kDa member of the toxin_10 family (Pfam05431) that includes other insecticidal proteins such as the binary toxin BinA/BinB. The Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins represent an important seed trait technology having been developed as insect resistance traits in commercialized corn hybrids for control of WCR. The structures of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 have been elucidated to 2.15 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The solution structures of the toxins were further studied by small angle X-ray scattering and native electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. We present here the first published structure from the aegerolysin protein domain family and the structural comparisons of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 with other pore forming toxins. PMID:25390338

  10. Structural and biophysical characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1.

    PubMed

    Kelker, Matthew S; Berry, Colin; Evans, Steven L; Pai, Reetal; McCaskill, David G; Wang, Nick X; Russell, Joshua C; Baker, Matthew D; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, J W; Wade, Matthew; Wess, Tim J; Narva, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains are well known for the production of insecticidal proteins upon sporulation and these proteins are deposited in parasporal crystalline inclusions. The majority of these insect-specific toxins exhibit three domains in the mature toxin sequence. However, other Cry toxins are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated to this three-domain family and little is known of their three dimensional structures, limiting our understanding of their mechanisms of action and our ability to engineer the proteins to enhance their function. Among the non-three domain Cry toxins, the Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins from B. thuringiensis strain PS149B1 are required to act together to produce toxicity to the western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte via a pore forming mechanism of action. Cry34Ab1 is a protein of ∼14 kDa with features of the aegerolysin family (Pfam06355) of proteins that have known membrane disrupting activity, while Cry35Ab1 is a ∼44 kDa member of the toxin_10 family (Pfam05431) that includes other insecticidal proteins such as the binary toxin BinA/BinB. The Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins represent an important seed trait technology having been developed as insect resistance traits in commercialized corn hybrids for control of WCR. The structures of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 have been elucidated to 2.15 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The solution structures of the toxins were further studied by small angle X-ray scattering and native electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. We present here the first published structure from the aegerolysin protein domain family and the structural comparisons of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 with other pore forming toxins.

  11. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the

  12. High-level ab-initio calculation of gas-phase NMR chemical shifts and secondary isotope effects of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution high-level ab-initio calculations of the chemical shifts of methanol including zero-point vibrational and temperature corrections are presented. For the first time, secondary isotope effects have been calculated via second order vibrational perturbation theory. In comparison with recent experimental gas-phase data and in contrast to other quantum-chemical methods the results are consistent and in very good agreement with the experimental 13C, 17O and 1H chemical shifts reported by Makulski [W. Makulski, J. Mol. Struct. 872 (2008) 81]. Secondary isotope effects can be calculated with remarkable accuracy of a few hundredths of a ppm in comparison to experiment.

  13. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provides a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  14. Ab initio calculations of nitramine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh-Fallet, Sharon; Schweigert, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Elevated temperatures and pressures are typically thought to have opposing effects on the reaction channels of nitramine decomposition. These high temperatures promote reactions with loose transition structures (positive activation entropies and volumes), such as N-N bond homolysis. Elevated pressures promote reactions with tight transition structures (negative activation entropies and volumes), such as intramolecular and intermolecular H transfer. However, no quantitative data exists regarding the range of temperatures and pressures at which these effects become pronounced. We are pursuing ab initio calculations of the corresponding unimolecular and bimolecular transition structures with the objective of estimating the relevant thermochemical parameters and quantifying the effects of elevated temperature and pressures on the corresponding rate constants. Here, we present density functional theory and complete active space calculations of gas-phase molecular dimers of nitramines as an intermediate step toward modeling transition structures directly in the condensed phase. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory via the American Society for Engineering and Education and by the Office of Naval Research, both directly and through the Naval Research Laboratory.

  15. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  16. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  17. ABS_PDv14.0 beta

    2008-07-30

    ABS_PD stands for Adaptive Background Suppression and Peak Detection algorithm. This algorithm uses an iterative process to simultaneously estimate the background and identify peaks in signals where the bakground is slowly varying relative to the peaks to be detected. This is sone on an automated manner. The algorithm can be applied to many physical processes where the desired signal is superimposed on a background. The main advantage of this algorithm is that the background canmore » be variable and doesn't have to be known. All that is required is that a set of basis function,s capa ble of representing the background, needs to be defined. Depending on the signals to be processed, the basis functions can be as simple as low order polynomials. The current algorithm has polynomials built-in and allows for additional basis functions to be defined by the user. An additional advantage is that the algorithm does not use any derivatives in detection of peaks and thus allows for analysis of noisy data. The noise level in the data is automatically taken into account when setting thresholds for peak detection.« less

  18. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance.

  19. Phonocatalysis. An ab initio simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangnam; Kaviany, Massoud

    2016-06-01

    Using simulations, we postulate and show that heterocatalysis on large-bandgap semiconductors can be controlled by substrate phonons, i.e., phonocatalysis. With ab initio calculations, including molecular dynamic simulations, the chemisorbed dissociation of XeF6 on h-BN surface leads to formation of XeF4 and two surface F/h-BN bonds. The reaction pathway and energies are evaluated, and the sorption and reaction emitted/absorbed phonons are identified through spectral analysis of the surface atomic motion. Due to large bandgap, the atomic vibration (phonon) energy transfer channels dominate and among them is the match between the F/h-BN covalent bond stretching and the optical phonons. We show that the chemisorbed dissociation (the pathway activation ascent) requires absorption of large-energy optical phonons. Then using progressively heavier isotopes of B and N atoms, we show that limiting these high-energy optical phonons inhibits the chemisorbed dissociation, i.e., controllable phonocatalysis.

  20. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl: A New State of the Water Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R.; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G.; Wesolowski, David J.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-01

    Using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new "quantum tunneling state" of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. In addition, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  1. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  2. Quantum Russian roulette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; da Silva, Ladário

    2013-01-01

    We quantize the gamble known as Russian roulette and we study it in two versions for two- and three-persons when: (i) players use a fully loaded quantum gun; (ii) the quantum gun has only one quantum bullet.

  3. Interpreting quantum discord through quantum state merging

    SciTech Connect

    Madhok, Vaibhav; Datta, Animesh

    2011-03-15

    We present an operational interpretation of quantum discord based on the quantum state merging protocol. Quantum discord is the markup in the cost of quantum communication in the process of quantum state merging, if one discards relevant prior information. Our interpretation has an intuitive explanation based on the strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy. We use our result to provide operational interpretations of other quantities like the local purity and quantum deficit. Finally, we discuss in brief some instances where our interpretation is valid in the single-copy scenario.

  4. Quantum probability and quantum decision-making.

    PubMed

    Yukalov, V I; Sornette, D

    2016-01-13

    A rigorous general definition of quantum probability is given, which is valid not only for elementary events but also for composite events, for operationally testable measurements as well as for inconclusive measurements, and also for non-commuting observables in addition to commutative observables. Our proposed definition of quantum probability makes it possible to describe quantum measurements and quantum decision-making on the same common mathematical footing. Conditions are formulated for the case when quantum decision theory reduces to its classical counterpart and for the situation where the use of quantum decision theory is necessary.

  5. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-09-24

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients' graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  6. Boiling treatment of ABS and PS plastics for flotation separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Wu, Bao-xin; Liu, Qun

    2014-07-01

    A new physical method, namely boiling treatment, was developed to aid flotation separation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and polystyrene (PS) plastics. Boiling treatment was shown to be effective in producing a hydrophilic surface on ABS plastic. Fourier Transform Infrared analysis was conducted to investigate the mechanism of boiling treatment of ABS. Surface rearrangement of polymer may be responsible for surface change of boiling treated ABS, and the selective influence of boiling treatment on the floatability of boiling treated plastics may be attributed to the difference in the molecular mobility of polymer chains. The effects of flotation time, frother concentration and particle size on flotation behavior of simple plastic were investigated. Based on flotation behavior of simple plastic, flotation separation of boiling treatment ABS and PS with different particle sizes was achieved efficiently. The purity of ABS and PS was up to 99.78% and 95.80%, respectively; the recovery of ABS and PS was up to 95.81% and 99.82%, respectively. Boiling treatment promotes the industrial application of plastics flotation and facilitates plastic recycling.

  7. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  8. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications.

  9. Safety assessment of Cry1Ab/Ac fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cao, Sishuo; He, Xiaoyun; Luo, Yunbo; Guo, Xing; Yuan, Yanfang; Huang, Kunlun

    2009-07-01

    Cry1ab/ac gene was fused by both the cry1ab gene (GenBank Accession No. X54939) and the cry1ac gene (GenBank Accession No. Y09787), which was widely used in genetically modified (GM) rice, cotton, maize and so on. In order to support the safety assessment of GM food or feed products containing Cry1Ab/Ac protein, sufficient quantities of Cry1Ab/Ac protein were produced in Escherichia coli for in vitro evaluation and animal studies. The Cry1Ab/Ac protein does not possess the characteristics associated with food toxins or allergens, i.e., it has no sequence homology with any known allergens or toxins, and no N-glycosylation sites, can be rapidly degraded in gastric and intestinal fluids, and is devoid of adverse effects in mice by gavage at a high dose level of 5g (Cry1Ab/Ac protein)/kg body weight. In conclusion, there is a reasonable certainty of no harm resulting from the inclusion of the Cry1Ab/Ac protein in human food or animal feed.

  10. Kinetics of reaction with water vapor and ab initio study of titanium beryllide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchida, M.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium is one of the candidate materials of the neutron multiplier in the tritium-breeding blanket. Titanium beryllides such as Be 12Ti are known to have advantages over beryllium from the perspectives of higher melting point, lower chemical reactivity, lower swelling and so forth. The reaction of titanium beryllides with water vapor was investigated. The sample disks of Be 12Ti were exposed to an argon gas with 10 000 ppm of water vapor, and the sample temperature was raised to 1000 °C. However, the chaotic breakaway reaction was not observed. The kinetics of oxidation on the surface of Be 12Ti by water vapor was investigated using a model differential equation, and the reaction constant was quantified. Furthermore, to know the electron state in Be 12Ti, ab initio calculations of quantum chemistry were performed using CRYSTAL 98. The structure optimization of Be 12Ti crystal was attempted, and an electron density map was generated.

  11. Pressure effect on elastic anisotropy of crystals from ab initio simulations: The case of silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, A.; Erba, A. Dovesi, R.; Doll, K.

    2014-06-21

    A general methodology has been devised and implemented into the solid-state ab initio quantum-mechanical CRYSTAL program for studying the evolution under geophysical pressure of the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. This scheme, which fully exploits both translational and point symmetry of the crystal, is developed within the formal frame of one-electron Hamiltonians and atom-centered basis functions. Six silicate garnet end-members, among the most important rock-forming minerals of the Earth's mantle, are considered, whose elastic anisotropy is fully characterized under high hydrostatic compressions, up to 60 GPa. The pressure dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and shear-wave birefringence of seismic wave velocities for these minerals are accurately simulated and compared with available single-crystal measurements.

  12. Experimental and ab initio investigations of microscopic properties of laser-shocked Ge-doped ablator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huser, G.; Recoules, V.; Ozaki, N.; Sano, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Salin, G.; Albertazzi, B.; Miyanishi, K.; Kodama, R.

    2015-12-01

    Plastic materials (CH) doped with mid-Z elements are used as ablators in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules and in their surrogates. Hugoniot equation of state (EOS) and electronic properties of CH doped with germanium (at 2.5% and 13% dopant fractions) are investigated experimentally up to 7 Mbar using velocity and reflectivity measurements of shock fronts on the GEKKO laser at Osaka University. Reflectivity and temperature measurements were updated using a quartz standard. Shocked quartz reflectivity was measured at 532 and 1064 nm. Theoretical investigation of shock pressure and reflectivity was then carried out by ab initio simulations using the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) code abinit and compared with tabulated average atom EOS models. We find that shock states calculated by QMD are in better agreement with experimental data than EOS models because of a more accurate description of ionic structure. We finally discuss electronic properties by comparing reflectivity data to a semiconductor gap closure model and to QMD simulations.

  13. Ab Initio Vibrational Levels For HO2 and Vibrational Splittings for Hydrogen Atom Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, V. J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Hamilton, I. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate vibrational levels and wave functions for HO2 using the recently reported ab initio potential energy surface of Walch and Duchovic. There is intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer when the hydrogen atom tunnels through a T-shaped saddle point separating two equivalent equilibrium geometries, and correspondingly, the energy levels are split. We focus on vibrational levels and wave functions with significant splitting. The first three vibrational levels with splitting greater than 2/cm are (15 0), (0 7 1) and (0 8 0) where V(sub 2) is the O-O-H bend quantum number. We discuss the dynamics of hydrogen atom transfer; in particular, the O-O distances at which hydrogen atom transfer is most probable for these vibrational levels. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  14. Ab Initio Investigation of the Structures of Fe-Doped Carbon Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovato, Christella; Brownrigg, Clifton; Hira, Ajit

    2012-02-01

    We continue our interest in the theoretical study of carbon clusters to examine the effects of the doping of small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2 - 15) with iron atoms. This work applies the hybrid ab initio methods of quantum chemistry to derive the different FemCn (m = 1-3) geometries. Of particular interest are linear, fan, and cyclic geometries. Electronic energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies for these geometries are calculated. Exploration of the singlet, triplet, quintet, and septet potential energy surfaces is performed. The type of bonding in terms of competition between sp^2 and sp^3 hybridization is examined, with a view to addressing the possibility of the stabilization of the doped carbon nano-particles in a diamond type structure. The potential for the existence of new pathways to the fabrication of nanotubes is explored.

  15. Equation of state and phase diagram of ammonia at high pressures from ab initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethkenhagen, Mandy; French, Martin; Redmer, Ronald

    2013-06-01

    We present an equation of state as well as a phase diagram of ammonia at high pressures and high temperatures derived from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The predicted phases of ammonia are characterized by analyzing diffusion coefficients and structural properties. Both the phase diagram and the subsequently computed Hugoniot curves are compared to experimental results. Furthermore, we discuss two methods that allow us to take into account nuclear quantum effects, which are of considerable importance in molecular fluids. Our data cover pressures up to 330 GPa and a temperature range from 500 K to 10 000 K. This regime is of great interest for interior models of the giant planets Uranus and Neptune, which contain, besides water and methane, significant amounts of ammonia.

  16. Ab initio atomic recombination reaction energetics on model heat shield surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senese, Fredrick; Ake, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations on small hydration complexes involving the nitrate anion are reported. The self-consistent field method with accurate basis sets has been applied to compute completely optimized equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, thermochemical parameters, and stable site labilities of complexes involving 1, 2, and 3 waters. The most stable geometries in the first hydration shell involve in-plane waters bridging pairs of nitrate oxygens with two equal and bent hydrogen bonds. A second extremely labile local minimum involves out-of-plane waters with a single hydrogen bond and lies about 2 kcal/mol higher. The potential in the region of the second minimum is extremely flat and qualitatively sensitive to changes in the basis set; it does not correspond to a true equilibrium structure.

  17. Experimental and ab initio study of the photofragmentation of DNA and RNA sugars

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, D. T.; Huels, M. A.; Huttula, M.; Urpelainen, S.; Kukk, E.

    2011-09-15

    The photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence method is used to measure the photodissociation of doubly charged D-ribose (C{sub 5}H{sub 10}O{sub 5}), the RNA sugar molecules, and 2-deoxy-D-ribose (C{sub 5}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), the DNA sugar molecules, following normal Auger decay after initial C 1s and O 1s core ionizations. The fragment identification is facilitated by measuring isotopically labeled D-ribose, such as D-ribose deuterated at C(1), and with {sup 13}C at the C(5) position. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are used to gain further insight into the abundant appearance of the CHO{sup +} fragment.

  18. Ab initio molecular dynamics: Relationship between structural phases and the sound velocity in dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Perlado, Jose M.

    2014-10-01

    The phase diagram and the possible stable structures of molecular solid hydrogen are intriguing physical phenomena that still remain to be fully unveiled. Particularly, its transition to metallic hydrogen at high pressures is currently a hot topic of discussion. This letter reports a simulation method that links the ab initio, quantum molecular dynamic and mechanical properties calculations to study the relation between the structural phase transitions and sound velocity in solid molecular hydrogen. The pressure range studied is from 0.1 GPa to 180 GPa, at 15 K temperature, thereby our aim is to simulate the conditions of manufacture, handling and early stages of compression of the target fuel used in confinement inertial fusion. Phase I degeneration below 1 GPa is discussed.

  19. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A new N2-N2 rigid-rotor surface has been determined using extensive Ab Initio quantum chemistry calculations together with recent experimental data for the second virial coefficient. Rotational energy transfer is studied using the new potential energy surface (PES) employing the close coupling method below 200 cm(exp -1) and coupled state approximation above that. Comparing with a previous calculation based on the PES of van der Avoird et al.,3 it is found that the new PES generally gives larger cross sections for large (delta)J transitions, but for small (delta)J transitions the cross sections are either comparable or smaller. Correlation between the differences in the cross sections and the two PES will be attempted. The computed cross sections will also be compared with available experimental data.

  20. Equation of state and phase diagram of ammonia at high pressures from ab initio simulations.

    PubMed

    Bethkenhagen, Mandy; French, Martin; Redmer, Ronald

    2013-06-21

    We present an equation of state as well as a phase diagram of ammonia at high pressures and high temperatures derived from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The predicted phases of ammonia are characterized by analyzing diffusion coefficients and structural properties. Both the phase diagram and the subsequently computed Hugoniot curves are compared to experimental results. Furthermore, we discuss two methods that allow us to take into account nuclear quantum effects, which are of considerable importance in molecular fluids. Our data cover pressures up to 330 GPa and a temperature range from 500 K to 10,000 K. This regime is of great interest for interior models of the giant planets Uranus and Neptune, which contain, besides water and methane, significant amounts of ammonia. PMID:23802968

  1. Theoretical Study of FH2– Electron Photodetachment Spectra on New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dequan; Chen, Jun; Cong, Shulin; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-12-17

    The FH2– anion has a stable structure that resembles a configuration in the vicinity of the transition state for neutral reaction F + H2 → HF + H. Electron photodetachment spectra of the FH2– anion reveal the neutral reaction dynamics in the critical transition-state region. Accurate quantum dynamics simulations of the photodetachment spectra using highly accurate new ab initio potential energy surfaces for both anionic and neutral FH2 are performed and compared with all available experimental results. The results provide reliable interpretations for the experimental observations of FH2– photoelectron detachment and reveal a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics around the transition state of the F + H2 reaction. The latest high-resolution photoelectron detachment spectra [Kim et al. Science, 2015, 349, 510-513] confirm the high accuracy of our new potential energy surface for describing the resonance-enhanced reactivity of the neutral F + H2 reaction.

  2. Equation of state and phase diagram of ammonia at high pressures from ab initio simulations.

    PubMed

    Bethkenhagen, Mandy; French, Martin; Redmer, Ronald

    2013-06-21

    We present an equation of state as well as a phase diagram of ammonia at high pressures and high temperatures derived from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The predicted phases of ammonia are characterized by analyzing diffusion coefficients and structural properties. Both the phase diagram and the subsequently computed Hugoniot curves are compared to experimental results. Furthermore, we discuss two methods that allow us to take into account nuclear quantum effects, which are of considerable importance in molecular fluids. Our data cover pressures up to 330 GPa and a temperature range from 500 K to 10,000 K. This regime is of great interest for interior models of the giant planets Uranus and Neptune, which contain, besides water and methane, significant amounts of ammonia.

  3. Ab initio/DFT calculations of butyl ammonium salt of O,O'-dibornyl dithiophosphate.

    PubMed

    Kart, H H; Ozdemir Kart, S; Karakuş, M; Kurt, M

    2014-08-14

    O,O'-dibornyl dithiophosphete has been synthesized by the reaction of P2S5 and borneol in toluene. Fourier Transform Infrared spectra (FT-IR) of the title compound are measured. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and NMR spectrum of the title compound in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) methods with the basis set of 6-31G(d). The computed bond lengths and bond angles show the good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the vibrational frequencies are calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR spectra. Assignments of the vibrational modes are made on the basis of total energy distribution (TED) calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The observed and calculated FT-IR and NMR spectra are in good agreement with each other. PMID:24747929

  4. Ab initio/DFT calculations of butyl ammonium salt of O,O‧-dibornyl dithiophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kart, H. H.; Özdemir Kart, S.; Karakuş, M.; Kurt, M.

    2014-08-01

    O,O‧-dibornyl dithiophosphete has been synthesized by the reaction of P2S5 and borneol in toluene. Fourier Transform Infrared spectra (FT-IR) of the title compound are measured. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and NMR spectrum of the title compound in the ground state have been calculated by using the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) methods with the basis set of 6-31G(d). The computed bond lengths and bond angles show the good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the vibrational frequencies are calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR spectra. Assignments of the vibrational modes are made on the basis of total energy distribution (TED) calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The observed and calculated FT-IR and NMR spectra are in good agreement with each other.

  5. Ab initio perspective on the Mollwo-Ivey relation for F centers in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwald, Paul; Karsai, Ferenc; Laskowski, Robert; Gräfe, Stefanie; Blaha, Peter; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Wirtz, Ludger

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the well-known Mollwo-Ivey relation that describes the "universal" dependence of the absorption energies of F-type color centers on the lattice constant a of alkali-halide crystals, Eabs∝a-n. We perform both state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemistry and post-DFT calculations of F-center absorption spectra. By "tuning" independently the lattice constant and the atomic species we show that the scaling with the lattice constant alone (keeping the elements fixed) would yield n =2 in agreement with the "particle-in-the-box" model. Keeping the lattice constant fixed and changing the atomic species enables us to quantify the ion-size effects which are shown to be responsible for the exponent n ≈1.8 .

  6. Ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp Hassel, Egon; Hellmann, Robert Bich, Eckard

    2015-06-28

    We present an analytical intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) for two rigid nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) molecules derived from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Interaction energies for 2018 N{sub 2}O–N{sub 2}O configurations were computed utilizing the counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the CCSD(T) level of theory using basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ supplemented with bond functions. A site-site potential function with seven sites per N{sub 2}O molecule was fitted to the pair interaction energies. We validated our PES by computing the second virial coefficient as well as shear viscosity and thermal conductivity in the dilute-gas limit. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data.

  7. Ab initio simulations for the ion-ion structure factor of warm dense aluminum.

    PubMed

    Rüter, Hannes R; Redmer, Ronald

    2014-04-11

    We perform ab initio simulations based on finite-temperature density functional theory in order to determine the static and dynamic ion-ion structure factor in aluminum. We calculate the dynamic structure factor via the intermediate scattering function and extract the dispersion relation for the collective excitations. The results are compared with available experimental x-ray scattering data. Very good agreement is obtained for the liquid metal domain. In addition we perform simulations for warm dense aluminum in order to obtain the ion dynamics in this strongly correlated quantum regime. We determine the sound velocity for both liquid and warm dense aluminum which can be checked experimentally using narrow-bandwidth free electron laser radiation. PMID:24765982

  8. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of photoisomerization in azobenzene in the n{pi}* state

    SciTech Connect

    Ootani, Yusuke; Satoh, Kiminori; Nakayama, Akira; Noro, Takeshi; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2009-11-21

    Photoisomerization mechanism of azobenzene in the lowest excited state S{sub 1}(n{pi}*) is investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation with the RATTLE algorithm, based on the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field method. AIMD simulations show that cis to trans isomerization occurs via two-step rotation mechanism, accompanying rotations of the central NN part and two phenyl rings, and this process can be classified into two types, namely, clockwise and counterclockwise rotation pathways. On the other hand, trans to cis isomerization occurs via conventional rotation pathway where two phenyl rings rotate around the NN bond. The quantum yields are calculated to be 0.45 and 0.28{+-}0.14 for cis to trans and trans to cis photoisomerizations, respectively, which are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental results.

  9. Quantum chemical modeling of rhodopsin mutants displaying switchable colors.

    PubMed

    Melaccio, Federico; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-09-28

    We look at the possibility to compute and understand the color change occurring upon mutation of a photochromic protein. Accordingly, ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemical methods are used to construct basic quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) models for a small mutant library of the sensory rhodopsin of Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. PCC7120 cyanobacterium. Together with the wild-type forms, a set of 26 absorption maxima spanning a ca. 80 nm range is obtained. We show that these models can be used to capture the electrostatic change controlling the computed color variation and the change in the ionization of specific side chains. PMID:22699180

  10. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  11. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  12. Structural Basis of Subtilase Cytotoxin SubAB Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Le Nours, Jérôme; Paton, Adrienne W.; Byres, Emma; Troy, Sally; Herdman, Brock P.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Paton, James C.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli produce a number of toxins that belong to the AB5 toxin family, which comprise a catalytic A-subunit that induces cellular dysfunction and a B-pentamer that recognizes host glycans. Although the molecular actions of many of the individual subunits of AB5 toxins are well understood, how they self-associate and the effect of this association on cytotoxicity are poorly understood. Here we have solved the structure of the holo-SubAB toxin that, in contrast to other AB5 toxins whose molecular targets are located in the cytosol, cleaves the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP. SubA interacts with SubB in a similar manner to other AB5 toxins via the A2 helix and a conserved disulfide bond that joins the A1 domain with the A2 helix. The structure revealed that the active site of SubA is not occluded by the B-pentamer, and the B-pentamer does not enhance or inhibit the activity of SubA. Structure-based sequence comparisons with other AB5 toxin family members, combined with extensive mutagenesis studies on SubB, show how the hydrophobic patch on top of the B-pentamer plays a dominant role in binding the A-subunit. The structure of SubAB and the accompanying functional characterization of various mutants of SubAB provide a framework for understanding the important role of the B-pentamer in the assembly and the intracellular trafficking of this AB5 toxin. PMID:23921389

  13. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2011-03-15

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  14. Ab Initio Calculation of Accurate Vibrational Frequencies for Molecules of Interest in Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Due to advances in quantum mechanical methods over the last few years, it is now possible to determine ab initio potential energy surfaces in which fundamental vibrational frequencies are accurate to within +/- 8 cm(sup -1) on average, and molecular bond distances are accurate to within +/- 0.001-0.003 A, depending on the nature of the bond. That is, the potential energy surfaces have not been scaled or empirically adjusted in any way, showing that theoretical methods have progressed to the point of being useful in analyzing spectra that are not from a tightly controlled laboratory environment, such as rovibrational spectra from the interstellar medium. Some recent examples demonstrating this accuracy win be presented and discussed. These include the HNO, CH4, C2H4, and ClCN molecules. The HNO molecule is interesting due to the very large H-N anharmonicity, while ClCN has a very large Fermi resonance. The ab initio studies for the CH4 and C2H4 molecules present the first accurate full quartic force fields of any kind (i.e., whether theoretical or empirical) for a five-atom and six-atom system, respectively.

  15. Towards an ab-initio treatment of nonlocal electronic correlations with dynamical vertex approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Anna; Gunacker, Patrik; Tomczak, Jan; Thunström, Patrik; Held, Karsten

    Recently, approaches such as the dynamical vertex approximation (D ΓA) or the dual-fermion method have been developed. These diagrammatic approaches are going beyond dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) by including nonlocal electronic correlations on all length scales as well as the local DMFT correlations. Here we present our efforts to extend the D ΓA methodology to ab-initio materials calculations (ab-initio D ΓA). Our approach is a unifying framework which includes both GW and DMFT-type of diagrams, but also important nonlocal correlations beyond, e.g. nonlocal spin fluctuations. In our multi-band implementation we are using a worm sampling technique within continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo in the hybridization expansion to obtain the DMFT vertex, from which we construct the reducible vertex function using the two particle-hole ladders. As a first application we show results for transition metal oxides. Support by the ERC project AbinitioDGA (306447) is acknowledged.

  16. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces and the Calculation of Accurate Vibrational Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Due to advances in quantum mechanical methods over the last few years, it is now possible to determine ab initio potential energy surfaces in which fundamental vibrational frequencies are accurate to within plus or minus 8 cm(exp -1) on average, and molecular bond distances are accurate to within plus or minus 0.001-0.003 Angstroms, depending on the nature of the bond. That is, the potential energy surfaces have not been scaled or empirically adjusted in any way, showing that theoretical methods have progressed to the point of being useful in analyzing spectra that are not from a tightly controlled laboratory environment, such as vibrational spectra from the interstellar medium. Some recent examples demonstrating this accuracy will be presented and discussed. These include the HNO, CH4, C2H4, and ClCN molecules. The HNO molecule is interesting due to the very large H-N anharmonicity, while ClCN has a very large Fermi resonance. The ab initio studies for the CH4 and C2H4 molecules present the first accurate full quartic force fields of any kind (i.e., whether theoretical or empirical) for a five-atom and six-atom system, respectively.

  17. Ab initio derivation of model energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    I propose a simple and manageable method that allows for deriving coupling constants of model energy density functionals (EDFs) directly from ab initio calculations performed for finite fermion systems. A proof-of-principle application allows for linking properties of finite nuclei, determined by using the nuclear nonlocal Gogny functional, to the coupling constants of the quasilocal Skyrme functional. The method does not rely on properties of infinite fermion systems but on the ab initio calculations in finite systems. It also allows for quantifying merits of different model EDFs in describing the ab initio results.

  18. On the hierarchical parallelization of ab initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Barragan, Sergi; Ishimura, Kazuya; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2016-02-01

    A hierarchical parallelization has been implemented in a new unified code PIMD-SMASH for ab initio simulation where the replicas and the Born-Oppenheimer forces are parallelized. It is demonstrated that ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations can be carried out very efficiently for systems up to a few tens of water molecules. The code was then used to study a Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and butenone by ab initio string method. A reduction in the reaction energy barrier is found in the presence of hydrogen-bonded water, in accordance with experiment.

  19. Ab initio Calculations of Solvation Processes in Volcanic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, K.; Seward, T.

    2006-12-01

    The structures and thermochemical properties of hydrated ions and neutral molecules play an important role in our understanding of solvent clustering and hydrogen bonding in the gas phase. Considerable effort therefore has been devoted to both the experimental and theoretical determination of stepwise hydration energies of geochemically important ions and neutral molecules with solvents, for instance H2O or H2S, over a broad range of temperatures typical of those encountered in volcanic gases. Because volcanic gases contain mutiple solute and solvent components which are subject to proton transfer, competive solvation and solvent switching, characterizing individual clusters has been a fundamental challenge to a molecular-level understanding of high temperature gas-phase solvation. However, recent advances in computational chemistry methods, especially Pople´s Gaussian (G-n) and complete basis set limit (CBS-x) model chemistries, now allow characterization of the dominant cluster structures and thermochemical properties of solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions in high temperature volcanic gases. Building on reported measurements of volcanic gases at Vesuvio, Italy, and Showa-Shinzan, Japan, as well as our recent investigations of ion-hydration we have re-examined the high temperature clustering equilibria of the small hydronium (H3O+) and ammonium (NH4+) ions as well as neutral ammonia and sulphur species with H2O and/or H2S using ab initio quantum chemical methods. From our study, we find that most of the gas phase ions tend to associate with a small number of H2O and H2S molecules to yield a hydrated ion cluster even at low humidities. Furthermore, inspection of van´t Hoff data demonstrate that (1) hydration energies of ions are shifted to less exergonic values as the solvent shell grows and the composition shifts from water-rich to hydrogen sulphide rich, (2) ion-cluster size increases with decreasing temperature at constant humidity, (3) attachment

  20. Quantum information does exist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duwell, Armond

    2008-01-01

    This paper advocates a concept of quantum information whose origins can be traced to Schumacher [1995. Quantum coding. Physical Review A 51, 2738-2747]. The concept of quantum information advocated is elaborated using an analogy to Shannon's theory provided by Schumacher coding. In particular, this paper extends Timpson's [2004. Quantum information theory and the foundations of quantum mechanics. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Oxford. Preprint, quant-ph/0412063] framework for interpreting Shannon information theory to the quantum context. Entanglement fidelity is advocated as the appropriate success criterion for the reproduction of quantum information. The relationship between the Shannon theory and quantum information theory is discussed.

  1. Interference of quantum market strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan; Syska, Jacek

    2003-02-01

    Recent development in quantum computation and quantum information theory allows to extend the scope of game theory for the quantum world. The paper is devoted to the analysis of interference of quantum strategies in quantum market games.

  2. Quantum Mechanics of Palladium Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; McKeough, James; Ortiz, Bridget; Diaz, Juan

    We continue our interest in the chemisorption of different atomic and molecular species on small clusters of metallic elements, by examining the interactions of H, H2, Li and O adsorbates with Pdn clusters (n = 2 thru 20). The study of clusters can reveal the effects of substrate geometry on the behavior of adsorbates. Transition-metal clusters are especially suited for the study of quantum size effects and for formation of metallic states, and are ideal candidates for catalytic processes. Hybrid ab initio methods of quantum chemistry (particularly the DFT-B3LYP model) are used to derive optimal geometries for the clusters of interest. We compare calculated binding energies, bond-lengths, ionization potentials, electron affinities and HOMO-LUMO gaps for the clusters. Of particular interest are the comparisons of binding strengths at the three important types of sites: edge (E), hollow (H), on-top (T), threefold sites and fourfold sites. Effects of crystal symmetries corresponding to the bulk structures are investigated. The capacity of Pd clusters to adsorb H atoms will be compared to Ni clusters. Admixture with Pt atoms will also be considered.

  3. Communication: ab initio simulations of hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics: collective tunneling and the origin of geometrical isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Wikfeldt, K T; Michaelides, A

    2014-01-28

    Ab initio simulations that account for nuclear quantum effects have been used to examine the order-disorder transition in squaric acid, a prototypical H-bonded antiferroelectric crystal. Our simulations reproduce the >100 K difference in transition temperature observed upon deuteration as well as the strong geometrical isotope effect observed on intermolecular separations within the crystal. We find that collective transfer of protons along the H-bonding chains - facilitated by quantum mechanical tunneling - is critical to the order-disorder transition and the geometrical isotope effect. This sheds light on the origin of isotope effects and the importance of tunneling in squaric acid which likely extends to other H-bonded ferroelectrics.

  4. Communication: Ab initio simulations of hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics: Collective tunneling and the origin of geometrical isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wikfeldt, K. T.; Michaelides, A.

    2014-01-28

    Ab initio simulations that account for nuclear quantum effects have been used to examine the order-disorder transition in squaric acid, a prototypical H-bonded antiferroelectric crystal. Our simulations reproduce the >100 K difference in transition temperature observed upon deuteration as well as the strong geometrical isotope effect observed on intermolecular separations within the crystal. We find that collective transfer of protons along the H-bonding chains – facilitated by quantum mechanical tunneling – is critical to the order-disorder transition and the geometrical isotope effect. This sheds light on the origin of isotope effects and the importance of tunneling in squaric acid which likely extends to other H-bonded ferroelectrics.

  5. Skutterudites under pressure: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Swetarekha; Kanchana, V.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-03-07

    Ab initio results on the band structure, density of states, and Fermi surface (FS) properties of LaRu{sub 4}X{sub 12} (X = P, As, Sb) are presented at ambient pressure as well as under compression. The analysis of density of states reveals the major contribution at the Fermi level to be mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. We have a complicated Fermi surface with both electron and hole characters for all the three compounds which is derived mainly from the Ru-d and X-p states. There is also a simpler FS with hole character derived from the P-p{sub z} orbital for LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12} and Ru-d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital in the case of As and Sb containing compounds. More interestingly, Fermi surface nesting feature is observed only in the case of the LaRu{sub 4}P{sub 12}. Under compression, we observe the topology of the complicated FS sheet of LaRu{sub 4}As{sub 12} to change around V/V{sub 0} = 0.85, leading to a behaviour similar to that of a multiband superconductor, and in addition, we have two more hole pockets centered around Γ at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 for the same compound. Apart from this, we find the hole pocket to vanish at V/V{sub 0} = 0.8 in the case of LaRu{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and the opening of the complicated FS sheet gets reduced. The de Haas van Alphen calculation shows the number of extremal orbits in the complicated sheet to change in As and Sb containing compounds under compression, where we also observe the FS topology to change.

  6. Ab Initio Calculations of Water Line Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry

    1998-01-01

    We report on the determination of a high quality ab initiu potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function for water. This PES is empirically adjusted to improve the agreement between the computed line positions and those from the HITRAN 92 data base with J less than 6 for H2O. The changes in the PES are small, nonetheless including an estimate of core (oxygen 1s) electron correlation greatly improves the agreement with experiment. Using this adjusted PES, we can match 30,092 of the 30,117 transitions in the HITRAN 96 data base for H2O with theoretical lines. The 10,25,50,75, and 90 percentiles of the difference between the calculated and tabulated line positions are -0.11, -0.04, -0.01, 0.02, and 0.07 l/cm. Non-adiabatic effects are not explicitly included. About 3% of the tabulated line positions appear to be incorrect. Similar agreement using this adjusted PES is obtained for the oxygen 17 and oxygen 18 isotopes. For HDO, the agreement is not as good, with root-mean-square error of 0.25 l/cm for lines with J less than 6. This error is reduced to 0.02 l/cm by including a small asymmetric correction to the PES, which is parameterized by simultaneously fitting to HDO md D2O data. Scaling this correction by mass factors yields good results for T2O and HTO. The intensities summed over vibrational bands are usually in good agreement between the calculations and the tabulated results, but individual lines strengths can differ greatly. A high temperature list consisting of 307,721,352 lines is generated for H2O using our PES and dipole moment function.

  7. Quantum spin Hall effect in α -Sn /CdTe(001 ) quantum-well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küfner, Sebastian; Matthes, Lars; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and topological properties of heterovalent and heterocrystalline α -Sn/CdTe(001) quantum wells (QWs) are studied in dependence on the thickness of α -Sn by means of ab initio calculations. We calculate the topological Z2 invariants of the respective bulk crystals, which identify α -Sn as strong three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs), whereas CdTe is a trivial insulator. We predict the existence of two-dimensional (2D) topological interface states between both materials and show that a topological phase transition from a trivial insulating phase into the quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase in the QW structures occurs at much higher thicknesses than in the HgTe case. The QSH effect is characterized by the localization, dispersion, and spin polarization of the topological interface states. We address the distinction of the 3D and 2D TI characters of the studied QW structures, which is inevitable for an understanding of the underlying quantum state of matter. The 3D TI nature is characterized by two-dimensional topological interface states, while the 2D phase exhibits one-dimensional edge states. The two different state characteristics are often intermixed in the discussion of the topology of 2D QW structures, especially, the comparison of ab initio calculations and experimental transport studies.

  8. Quantum recurrences: probe to study quantum chaos

    PubMed

    Saif

    2000-11-01

    We study the phase space of periodically modulated gravitational cavity by means of quantum recurrence phenomena. We report that the quantum recurrences serve as a tool to connect phase space of the driven system with a spectrum in the quantum domain. With the help of quantum recurrences we investigate the quasienergy spectrum of the system for a certain fixed modulation strength. In addition, we study transition of spectrum from discrete to continuum as a function of modulation strength. PMID:11101963

  9. Quantum teleportation of optical quantum gates.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Munro, William J

    2003-03-21

    We show that a universal set of gates for quantum computation with optics can be quantum teleported through the use of EPR entangled states, homodyne detection, and linear optics and squeezing operations conditioned on measurement outcomes. This scheme may be used for fault-tolerant quantum computation in any optical scheme (qubit or continuous-variable). The teleportation of nondeterministic nonlinear gates employed in linear optics quantum computation is discussed.

  10. Ab Initio: And a New Era of Airline Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesell, Laurence E.

    1995-01-01

    Expansion of air transportation and decreasing numbers seeking pilot training point to a shortage of qualified pilots. Ab initio training, in which candidates with no flight time are trained to air transport proficiency, could resolve the problem. (SK)

  11. Tensile deformation mechanisms of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. H.; Gao, J.; Lin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Huang, J.; Xu, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    The tensile deformation mechanisms of acrylonitrile - butadiene - styrene (ABS) / polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blends toughened by ethylene methacrylate (EMA) copolymer was investigated by analysing the fracture morphology. ABS/PMMA was blended with EMA copolymer by melt mixing technique using co-rotating twin extruder. Tensile tests show that the elongation at break of ABS/PMMA blends can be efficiently improved with the increase in EMA content. Fracture morphology of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends reveals that the material yield induced by hollowing-out of EMA particles and its propagation into yield zone is the main toughening mechanism. Moreover, the appearance that EMA particles in the central area are given priority to hollowing-out may be related to the skin-core structure of the injection moulded parts caused by the different cooling rate between surface and inside in the process of injection moulding.

  12. Quantum Steganography and Quantum Error-Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Bilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum error-correcting codes have been the cornerstone of research in quantum information science (QIS) for more than a decade. Without their conception, quantum computers would be a footnote in the history of science. When researchers embraced the idea that we live in a world where the effects of a noisy environment cannot completely be…

  13. Quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Penin, Alexander A.

    2009-03-15

    We consider the quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics and find a deviation from the quantum-mechanical prediction for the Hall conductivity due to radiative antiscreening of electric charge in an external magnetic field. A weak dependence of the universal von Klitzing constant on the magnetic field strength, which can possibly be observed in a dedicated experiment, is predicted.

  14. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  15. Quantum Walk Schemes for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael S.

    Random walks are a powerful tool for the efficient implementation of algorithms in classical computation. Their quantum-mechanical analogues, called quantum walks, hold similar promise. Quantum walks provide a model of quantum computation that has recently been shown to be equivalent in power to the standard circuit model. As in the classical case, quantum walks take place on graphs and can undergo discrete or continuous evolution, though quantum evolution is unitary and therefore deterministic until a measurement is made. This thesis considers the usefulness of continuous-time quantum walks to quantum computation from the perspectives of both their fundamental power under various formulations, and their applicability in practical experiments. In one extant scheme, logical gates are effected by scattering processes. The results of an exhaustive search for single-qubit operations in this model are presented. It is shown that the number of distinct operations increases exponentially with the number of vertices in the scattering graph. A catalogue of all graphs on up to nine vertices that implement single-qubit unitaries at a specific set of momenta is included in an appendix. I develop a novel scheme for universal quantum computation called the discontinuous quantum walk, in which a continuous-time quantum walker takes discrete steps of evolution via perfect quantum state transfer through small 'widget' graphs. The discontinuous quantum-walk scheme requires an exponentially sized graph, as do prior discrete and continuous schemes. To eliminate the inefficient vertex resource requirement, a computation scheme based on multiple discontinuous walkers is presented. In this model, n interacting walkers inhabiting a graph with 2n vertices can implement an arbitrary quantum computation on an input of length n, an exponential savings over previous universal quantum walk schemes. This is the first quantum walk scheme that allows for the application of quantum error correction

  16. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  17. Quantum Confinement Effects in Silicon Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogut, Serdar

    1998-03-01

    Quasiparticle gaps, self-energy corrections, exciton Coulomb energies, and optical gaps in Si quantum dots are calculated from first principles.(S. Öğ)üt, J. R. Chelikowsky, and S. G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1770 (1997). The calculations are performed on hydrogen-passivated spherical Si clusters with diameters up to 32 Å ( ~ 1200 Si and H atoms). Such a large ab initio quantum mechanical modeling can be accomplished efficiently using a real space higher-order finite difference pseudopotential method(J. R. Chelikowsky, N. Troullier, and Y. Saad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72), 1240 (1994) on a massively parallel computational platform (T3E).(A. Stathopoulos, S. Öğ)üt, Y. Saad, J. R. Chelikowsky, and H. Kim, (submitted to IEEE Comput. Sci. Eng.) It is shown that (i) the size-dependent self-energy correction in quantum dots is enhanced substantially compared to bulk, and (ii) quantum confinement and reduced electronic screening result in appreciable excitonic Coulomb energies. Calculated optical gaps are in very good agreement with absorption data from Si nanocrystallites.

  18. Quantum reactive scattering of H + hydrocarbon reactions.

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Clary, David C

    2006-02-28

    A practical quantum-dynamical method is described for predicting accurate rate constants for general chemical reactions. The ab initio potential energy surfaces for these reactions can be built from a minimal number of grid points (average of 50 points) and expressed in terms of analytical functionals. All the degrees of freedom except the breaking and forming bonds are optimised using the MP2 method with a cc-pVTZ basis set. Single point energies are calculated on the optimised geometries at the CCSD(T) level of theory with the same basis set. The dynamics of these reactions occur on effective reduced dimensionality hyper-surfaces accounting for the zero-point energy of the optimised degrees of freedom. Bonds being broken and formed are treated with explicit hyperspherical time independent quantum dynamics. Application of the method to the H + CH(4)--> H(2)+ CH(3), H + C(2)H(6)--> H(2)+ C(2)H(5), H + C(3)H(8)--> H(2)+n-C(3)H(7)/H(2)+i-C(3)H(7) and H + CH(3)OH --> H(2)+ CH(3)O/H(2)+ CH(2)OH reactions illustrate the potential of the approach in predicting rate constants, kinetic isotope effects and branching ratios. All studied reactions exhibit large quantum tunneling in the rate constants at lower temperatures. These quantum calculations compare well with the experimental results. PMID:16482334

  19. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo; Mireles, Francisco

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  20. Nuclear Binding Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Li, Ning; Rokash, Alexander; Alarcón, Jose Manuel; Du, Dechuan; Klein, Nico; Lu, Bing-nan; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam

    2016-09-01

    How do protons and neutrons bind to form nuclei? This is the central question of ab initio nuclear structure theory. While the answer may seem as simple as the fact that nuclear forces are attractive, the full story is more complex and interesting. In this work we present numerical evidence from ab initio lattice simulations showing that nature is near a quantum phase transition, a zero-temperature transition driven by quantum fluctuations. Using lattice effective field theory, we perform Monte Carlo simulations for systems with up to twenty nucleons. For even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons, we discover a first-order transition at zero temperature from a Bose-condensed gas of alpha particles (4He nuclei) to a nuclear liquid. Whether one has an alpha-particle gas or nuclear liquid is determined by the strength of the alpha-alpha interactions, and we show that the alpha-alpha interactions depend on the strength and locality of the nucleon-nucleon interactions. This insight should be useful in improving calculations of nuclear structure and important astrophysical reactions involving alpha capture on nuclei. Our findings also provide a tool to probe the structure of alpha cluster states such as the Hoyle state responsible for the production of carbon in red giant stars and point to a connection between nuclear states and the universal physics of bosons at large scattering length.

  1. Ab-initio calculation of electronic structure and optical properties of AB-stacked bilayer α-graphyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2016-09-01

    Monolayer α-graphyne is a new two-dimensional carbon allotrope with many special features. In this work the electronic properties of AA- and AB-stacked bilayers of this material and then the optical properties are studied, using first principle plane wave method. The electronic spectrum has two Dirac cones for AA stacked bilayer α-graphyne. For AB-stacked bilayer, the interlayer interaction changes the linear bands into parabolic bands. The optical spectra of the most stable AB-stacked bilayer closely resemble to that of the monolayer, except for small shifts of peak positions and increasing of their intensity. For AB-stacked bilayer, a pronounced peak has been found at low energies under the perpendicular polarization. This peak can be clearly ascribed to the transitions at the Dirac point as a result of the small degeneracy lift in the band structure.

  2. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stephen P; Lee, Keith S M; Preskill, John

    2012-06-01

    Quantum field theory reconciles quantum mechanics and special relativity, and plays a central role in many areas of physics. We developed a quantum algorithm to compute relativistic scattering probabilities in a massive quantum field theory with quartic self-interactions (φ(4) theory) in spacetime of four and fewer dimensions. Its run time is polynomial in the number of particles, their energy, and the desired precision, and applies at both weak and strong coupling. In the strong-coupling and high-precision regimes, our quantum algorithm achieves exponential speedup over the fastest known classical algorithm. PMID:22654052

  3. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stephen P; Lee, Keith S M; Preskill, John

    2012-06-01

    Quantum field theory reconciles quantum mechanics and special relativity, and plays a central role in many areas of physics. We developed a quantum algorithm to compute relativistic scattering probabilities in a massive quantum field theory with quartic self-interactions (φ(4) theory) in spacetime of four and fewer dimensions. Its run time is polynomial in the number of particles, their energy, and the desired precision, and applies at both weak and strong coupling. In the strong-coupling and high-precision regimes, our quantum algorithm achieves exponential speedup over the fastest known classical algorithm.

  4. Tunneling spectroscopy of a single quantum dot coupled to a superconductor: From Kondo ridge to Andreev bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillet, J.-D.; Joyez, P.; Žitko, Rok; Goffman, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    We performed tunneling spectroscopy of a carbon nanotube quantum dot (QD) coupled to a metallic reservoir either in the normal or in the superconducting state. We explore how the Kondo resonance, observed when the QD's occupancy is odd and the reservoir is normal, evolves towards Andreev bound states (ABS) in the superconducting state. Within this regime, the ABS spectrum observed is consistent with a quantum phase transition from a singlet to a degenerate magnetic doublet ground state, in quantitative agreement with a single-level Anderson model with superconducting leads.

  5. Spins and photons: connecting quantum registers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Lily

    2012-06-01

    Long-lived electronic and nuclear spin states have made the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond a leading candidate for quantum information processing in the solid state. Multi-qubit quantum registers formed by single defects and nearby nuclear spins can currently be controlled and detected with high fidelity. Nevertheless, development of coherent connections between distant NVs remains an outstanding challenge. One advantage to working with solid-state defects is the opportunity to integrate them with microfabricated mechanical, electronic, or optical devices; in principle, such devices could mediate interactions between registers, turning them into nodes within a larger quantum network. In the last few months, several experiments have made key steps toward realizing a coherent quantum interface between individual NV centers using a mechanical quantum bus [1] or optical channels [2,3]. This talk will explore the current state of the art, and report on recent observation of two photon quantum interference between different gate-tunable defect centers [2]. These results pave the way towards measurement-based entanglement between remote NV centers and the realization of quantum networks with solid-state spins.[4pt] [1] Kolkowitz et al., Science 335, 1603 (2012)[2] Bernien et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 043604 (2012)[3] Sipahigil et al., http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/1112.3975

  6. Aqueous solutions: state of the art in ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hassanali, Ali A; Cuny, Jérôme; Verdolino, Vincenzo; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-03-13

    The simulation of liquids by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been a subject of intense activity over the last two decades. The significant increase in computational resources as well as the development of new and efficient algorithms has elevated this method to the status of a standard quantum mechanical tool that is used by both experimentalists and theoreticians. As AIMD computes the electronic structure from first principles, it is free of ad hoc parametrizations and has thus been applied to a large variety of physical and chemical problems. In particular, AIMD has provided microscopic insight into the structural and dynamical properties of aqueous solutions which are often challenging to probe experimentally. In this review, after a brief theoretical description of the Born-Oppenheimer and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics formalisms, we show how AIMD has enhanced our understanding of the properties of liquid water and its constituent ions: the proton and the hydroxide ion. Thereafter, a broad overview of the application of AIMD to other aqueous systems, such as solvated organic molecules and inorganic ions, is presented. We also briefly describe the latest theoretical developments made in AIMD, such as methods for enhanced sampling and the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects. PMID:24516179

  7. An ab initio study of the polytypism in InP

    PubMed Central

    Dacal, Luis C. O.; Cantarero, A.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of polytypism in semiconductor nanostructures gives rise to the appearance of stacking faults which many times can be treated as quantum wells. In some cases, despite of a careful growth, the polytypism can be hardly avoided. In this work, we perform an ab initio study of zincblende stacking faults in a wurtzite InP system, using the supercell approach and taking the limit of low density of narrow stacking faults regions. Our results confirm the type II band alignment between the phases, producing a reliable qualitative description of the band gap evolution along the growth axis. These results show an spacial asymmetry in the zincblende quantum wells, that is expected due to the fact that the wurtzite stacking sequence (ABAB) is part of the zincblende one (ABCABC), but with an unexpected asymmetry between the valence and the conduction bands. We also present results for the complex dielectric function, clearly showing the influence of the stacking on the homostructure values and surprisingly proving that the correspondent bulk results can be used to reproduce the polytypism even in the limit we considered. PMID:27666092

  8. Reaction dynamics of methane with F, O, Cl, and Br on ab initio potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Czakó, Gábor; Bowman, Joel M

    2014-04-24

    The bimolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions of methane with atoms have become benchmark systems to test and extend our knowledge of polyatomic chemical reactivity. We review the state-of-the-art methodologies for reaction dynamics computations of X + methane [X = F, O((3)P), Cl, Br] reactions, which consist of two key steps: (1) potential energy surface (PES) developments and (2) reaction dynamics computations on the PES using either classical or quantum methods. We briefly describe the permutationally invariant polynomial approach for step 1 and the quasiclassical trajectory method, focusing on the mode-specific polyatomic product analysis and the Gaussian binning (1GB) techniques, and reduced-dimensional quantum models for step 2. High-quality full-dimensional ab initio PESs and dynamical studies of the X + CH4 and CHD3 reactions are reviewed. The computed integral cross-sections, angular, vibrational, and rotational product distributions are compared with available experiments. Both experimental and theoretical findings shed light on the rules of mode-selective polyatomic reactivity.

  9. Quantum Matching Pennies Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Azhar; Abbott, Derek

    2009-01-01

    A quantum version of the matching pennies (MP) game is proposed that is played using an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm (EPR-Bohm) setting. We construct the quantum game without using state vectors, while considering only the quantum mechanical joint probabilities relevant to the EPR-Bohm setting. We embed the classical game within the quantum game such that the classical MP game results when the quantum mechanical joint probabilities become factorizable. We report new Nash equilibria in the quantum MP game that emerge when the quantum mechanical joint probabilities maximally violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt form of Bell’s inequality.

  10. Universal quantum computation by discontinuous quantum walk

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Michael S.; Feder, David L.

    2010-10-15

    Quantum walks are the quantum-mechanical analog of random walks, in which a quantum ''walker'' evolves between initial and final states by traversing the edges of a graph, either in discrete steps from node to node or via continuous evolution under the Hamiltonian furnished by the adjacency matrix of the graph. We present a hybrid scheme for universal quantum computation in which a quantum walker takes discrete steps of continuous evolution. This ''discontinuous'' quantum walk employs perfect quantum-state transfer between two nodes of specific subgraphs chosen to implement a universal gate set, thereby ensuring unitary evolution without requiring the introduction of an ancillary coin space. The run time is linear in the number of simulated qubits and gates. The scheme allows multiple runs of the algorithm to be executed almost simultaneously by starting walkers one time step apart.

  11. Secure quantum signatures using insecure quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Kent, Adrian; Andersson, Erika

    2016-03-01

    Digital signatures are widely used in modern communication to guarantee authenticity and transferability of messages. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. We present a quantum signature scheme that does not require trusted quantum channels. We prove that it is unconditionally secure against the most general coherent attacks, and show that it requires the transmission of significantly fewer quantum states than previous schemes. We also show that the quantum channel noise threshold for our scheme is less strict than for distilling a secure key using quantum key distribution. This shows that "direct" quantum signature schemes can be preferable to signature schemes relying on secret shared keys generated using quantum key distribution.

  12. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  13. quantum mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    -symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on -symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a -symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathe- matics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter–antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of -synthetic materials are being developed, and the phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of -symmetric quantum mechanics. PMID:23509390

  14. Quantum computing classical physics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David A

    2002-03-15

    In the past decade, quantum algorithms have been found which outperform the best classical solutions known for certain classical problems as well as the best classical methods known for simulation of certain quantum systems. This suggests that they may also speed up the simulation of some classical systems. I describe one class of discrete quantum algorithms which do so--quantum lattice-gas automata--and show how to implement them efficiently on standard quantum computers.

  15. What are Quantum Jumps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper answers the title question by giving an operational definition of quantum jumps based on measurement theory. This definition forms the basis of a theory of quantum jumps which leads to a number of testable predictions. Experiments are proposed to test the theory. The suggested experiments also test the quantum Zeno paradox, i.e., they test the proposition that frequent observation of a quantum system inhibits quantum jumps in that system.

  16. Diagrammatic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Louis H.; Lomonaco, Samuel J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores how diagrams of quantum processes can be used for modeling and for quantum epistemology. The paper is a continuation of the discussion where we began this formulation. Here we give examples of quantum networks that represent unitary transformations by dint of coherence conditions that constitute a new form of non-locality. Local quantum devices interconnected in space can form a global quantum system when appropriate coherence conditions are maintained.

  17. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Feng-Li; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning. In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  18. Biochemical characterization of the feline AB blood group system.

    PubMed

    Griot-Wenk, M; Pahlsson, P; Chisholm-Chait, A; Spitalnik, P F; Spitalnik, S L; Giger, U

    1993-12-01

    The biochemical nature of the feline AB blood group system was characterized by analysing red blood cells from homozygous (genotype A/A) and heterozygous (A/B) type A, type B (B/B), and type AB cats. High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) of red cell glycolipids revealed that specific neuraminic acids (NA) on gangliosides, containing ceramide dihexoside (CDH) as a backbone, correlated with the feline AB blood group antigens. Although disialogangliosides predominated, mono- and trisialogangliosides were also isolated. B cats expressed solely N-acetyl-NA (NeuNAc) on these gangliosides. In addition to expressing N-glycolyl-NA (NeuNGc) containing gangliosides, A red cells have gangliosides with only NeuNAc or mixtures of both NA. HPTLC profiles of disialogangliosides from homozygous and heterozygous A cats differed slightly in the quantity of disialogangliosides. Equal amounts of NeuNAc and NeuNGc containing disialogangliosides, as well as two intermediary forms, were recovered from AB erythrocytes. Analysing disialogangliosides from red cells belonging to 17 genetically related cats, we consistently obtained the expected disialoganglioside profile, based on blood typing and pedigree information. SDS-PAGE of red cell membrane proteins and blotting with Triticum vulgaris, a lectin recognizing NeuNAc, revealed glycoproteins of approximately 51, 53, and 80 kD in B and AB cats but only a faint band of approximately 53 kD in A cats. By haemagglutination, Triticum vulgaris could also distinguish different blood types by specifically binding to B and AB cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8273913

  19. Quantum dynamics of the abstraction reaction of H with cyclopropane.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2014-10-30

    The dynamics of the abstraction reaction of H atoms with the cyclopropane molecule is studied using quantum mechanical scattering theory. The quantum scattering calculations are performed in hyperspherical coordinates with a two-dimensional (2D) potential energy surface. The ab initio energy calculations are carried out with CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 level of theory with the geometry and frequency calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level. The contribution to the potential energy surface from the spectator modes is included as the projected zero-point energy correction to the ab initio energy. The 2D surface is fitted with a 29-parameter double Morse potential. An R-matrix propagation scheme is carried out to solve the close-coupled equations. The adiabatic energy barrier and reaction enthalpy are compared with high level computational calculations as well as experimental data. The calculated reaction rate constants shows very good agreement when compared with the experimental data, especially at lower temperature highlighting the importance of quantum tunnelling. The reaction probabilities are also presented and discussed. The special features of performing quantum dynamics calculation on the chemical reaction of a cyclic molecule are discussed.

  20. Dynamical mean-field theory from a quantum chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Zgid, Dominika; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) from a quantum chemical perspective. Dynamical mean-field theory offers a formalism to extend quantum chemical methods for finite systems to infinite periodic problems within a local correlation approximation. In addition, quantum chemical techniques can be used to construct new ab initio Hamiltonians and impurity solvers for DMFT. Here, we explore some ways in which these things may be achieved. First, we present an informal overview of dynamical mean-field theory to connect to quantum chemical language. Next, we describe an implementation of dynamical mean-field theory where we start from an ab initio Hartree-Fock Hamiltonian that avoids double counting issues present in many applications of DMFT. We then explore the use of the configuration interaction hierarchy in DMFT as an approximate solver for the impurity problem. We also investigate some numerical issues of convergence within DMFT. Our studies are carried out in the context of the cubic hydrogen model, a simple but challenging test for correlation methods. Finally, we finish with some conclusions for future directions.

  1. Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    The universe, ultimately, is to be described by quantum theory. Quantum aspects of all there is, including space and time, may not be significant for many purposes, but are crucial for some. And so a quantum description of cosmology is required for a complete and consistent worldview. At any rate, even if we were not directly interested in regimes where quantum cosmology plays a role, a complete physical description could not stop at a stage before the whole universe is reached. Quantum theory is essential in the microphysics of particles, atoms, molecules, solids, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Why should one expect this ladder of scales to end at a certain size? If regimes are sufficiently violent and energetic, quantum effects are non-negligible even on scales of the whole cosmos; this is realized at least once in the history of the universe: at the big bang where the classical theory of general relativity would make energy densities diverge. 1.Lachieze-Rey, M., Luminet, J.P.: Phys. Rept. 254,135 (1995), gr-qc/9605010 2.BSDeWitt1967Phys. Rev.160511131967PhRv..160.1113D0158.4650410.1103/PhysRev.160.1113DeWitt, B.S.: Phys. Rev. 160(5), 1113 (1967) 3.Wiltshire, D.L.: In: Robson B., Visvanathan N., Woolcock W.S. (eds.) Cosmology: The Physics of the Universe, pp. 473-531. World Scientific, Singapore (1996

  2. Nonadiabatic ab initio dynamics of a model protonated Schiff base of 9-cis retinal.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wilfredo Credo; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Ishida, Toshimasa

    2010-08-19

    The dynamics of the photoisomerization of a model protonated Schiff base of 9-cis retinal in isorhodopsin is investigated using nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation combined with ab initio quantum chemical calculations on-the-fly. The quantum chemical part is treated at the complete-active space self-consistent field level for six electrons in six active pi orbitals with the 6-31G basis set (CASSCF(6,6)/6-31G). The probabilities of nonadiabatic transitions between the S(1) ((1)pipi*) and S(0) states are estimated in light of the Zhu-Nakamura theory. The photoinduced cis-trans isomerization of 9-cis retinal proceeds slower than that of its 11-cis analogue and at a lower quantum yield, confirming experimental observations. An energetic barrier in the excited state impedes the elongation and twist of the C(9)=C(10) stretch and torsion coordinates, respectively, resulting in the trapping of trajectories before transition. Consequently, the isomerization takes longer time and the transition more often occurs at smaller twist angle of =C(8)-C(9)=C(10)-C(11)=, which leads to regeneration of the 9-cis reactant. Thus, neither the smaller twist observed in the X-ray crystal nor the slower movement of nuclei in the transition region would be the main reason for the longer reaction time and lower yield. A well-known space-saving asynchronous bicycle pedal or crankshaft photoisomerization mechanism is found to be operational in 9-cis retinal. The simulation in vacuo suggests that the excited-state barrier and the photoisomerization itself are intrinsic properties of the visual chromophore and not triggered mainly by the protein environment that surrounds the chromophore. PMID:20666503

  3. Quantum optics, cavity QED, and quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Quantum optomechanics provides a universal tool to achieve the quantum control of mechanical motion. It does that in devices spanning a vast range of parameters, with mechanical frequencies from a few Hertz to GHz, and with masses from 10-20 g to several kilos. Its underlying ideas can be traced back to the study of gravitational wave antennas, quantum optics, cavity QED and laser cooling which, when combined with the recent availability of advanced micromechanical and nanomechanical devices, opens a path to the realization of macroscopic mechanical systems that operate deep in the quantum regime. At the fundamental level this development paves the way to experiments that will lead to a more profound understanding of quantum mechanics; and from the point of view of applications, quantum optomechanical techniques will provide motion and force sensing near the fundamental limit imposed by quantum mechanics (quantum metrology) and significantly expand the toolbox of quantum information science. After a brief summary of key historical developments, the talk will give a broad overview of the current state of the art of quantum optomechanics, and comment on future prospects both in applied and in fundamental science. Work supported by NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuASAR and ORCHID programs.

  4. Quantum vibrational analysis and infrared spectra of microhydrated sodium ions using an ab initio potential.

    PubMed

    Kamarchik, Eugene; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M

    2011-03-21

    We present a full-dimensional potential energy surface and a dipole moment surface (DMS) for hydrated sodium ion. These surfaces are based on an n-body expansion for both the potential energy and the dipole moment, truncated at the two-body level for the H(2)O-Na(+) interaction and also for the DMS. The water-water interaction is truncated at the three-body level. The new full-dimensional two-body H(2)O-Na(+) potential is a fit to roughly 20,000 coupled-cluster single double (triple)/aug-cc-pVTZ energies. Properties of this two-body potential and the potential describing (H(2)O)(n)Na(+) clusters, with n up to 4 are given. We then report anharmonic, coupled vibrational calculations with the "local-monomer model" to obtain infrared spectra and also 0 K radial distribution functions for these clusters. Some comparisons are made with the recent infrared predissociation spectroscopy experiments of Miller and Lisy [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 15381 (2008).]. PMID:21428623

  5. Mechanisms of branching reactions in melanin formation - Ab initio quantum engineering approach -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Ryo; Menez Aspera, Susan; Kasai, Hideaki

    Melanin, a pigment found in animals, consists of two types of oligomeric unit: eumelanin and pheomelanin. The color of the skin, the hair, and the eyes is controlled by the ratio of eumelanin/pheomelanin production. Especially, dopachrome and dopaquinone are the precursor molecules of melanin which directly affect the composition of melanin through their branching reactions. Dopachrome is converted into two possible monomers of eumelanin. Dopaquinone can undergo both eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis. To understand the mechanisms and controlling factors that govern the conversions, reactions of the two molecules are investigated using density functional theory-based first-principles calculations. Our results deepen mechanistic understanding of the reactions and open possibilities to design properties and functions of melanin. In this talk, we will discuss about the competitions of the branching reactions.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS BY AB INITIO QUANTUM MECHANICAL COMPUTATION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational chemistry, in conjunction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (GC/MS/FT-IR), was used to tentatively identify seven tetrachlorobutadiene (TCBD) isomers detected in an environmental sample. Computation of the TCBD infrare...

  7. Nitrosyl Iodide, Ino: Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy Guided by AB Initio Quantum Chemical Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, Stephane; Duflot, Denis; Aiba, Shohei; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    In the series of the nitrosyl halides, XNO (where X = {F, Cl, Br, I}), the millimeter-wave spectrum of INO remains so far unknown. We report our investigation on the first high-resolution rotational spectroscopy of nitrosyl iodide, INO. One of the motivation for this work comes from the growing need in developing a more complete understanding of atmospheric chemistry, especially halogen and nitrogen oxides chemistry that adversely impacts ozone levels. In the family of the nitrogen oxyhalides such as nitrosyl (XNO), nitryl (XNO), nitrite (XONO), and nitrate (XON0_2) halides, those with X = {F, Cl, Br} have been well studied, both theoretically and experimentally. However, relatively little is known about the iodine-containing analogues, although they also are of potential importance in tropospheric chemistry. In 1991, the Fourier-transform IR spectroscopic detection of INO, INO_2 and IONO_2 in the gas phase has been reported The INO molecule was generated by in situ mixing continuously I_2 and NO in a 50-cm long reaction glass tube whose outlet was connected to the absorption cell using a teflon tube. At the time of writing this abstract, 68 μ_a-type transitions (K_a = 0-10), all weak, have been successfully assigned. The hyperfine structures due to both I and N nuclei will also be presented. S.B. and D.D. acknowledge support from the Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-005 of the Programme d'Investissement d'Avenir. I. Barnes, K. H. Becker and J. Starcke, J. Phys. Chem. 1991, 95, 9736-9740.

  8. The Forbidden Quantum Adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum information provides fundamentally different computational resources than classical information. We prove that there is no unitary protocol able to add unknown quantum states belonging to different Hilbert spaces. This is an inherent restriction of quantum physics that is related to the impossibility of copying an arbitrary quantum state, i.e., the no-cloning theorem. Moreover, we demonstrate that a quantum adder, in absence of an ancillary system, is also forbidden for a known orthonormal basis. This allows us to propose an approximate quantum adder that could be implemented in the lab. Finally, we discuss the distinct character of the forbidden quantum adder for quantum states and the allowed quantum adder for density matrices.

  9. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks.

  10. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks. PMID:26173556

  11. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks. PMID:26173556

  12. Reliable quantum communication over a quantum relay channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2014-12-04

    We show that reliable quantum communication over an unreliable quantum relay channels is possible. The coding scheme combines the results on the superadditivity of quantum channels and the efficient quantum coding approaches.

  13. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes.

    PubMed

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics. PMID:25871066

  14. Molecular nanomagnets with switchable coupling for quantum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiesa, Alessandro; Whitehead, George F. S.; Carretta, Stefano; Carthy, Laura; Timco, Grigore A.; Teat, Simon J.; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Pavarini, Eva; Winpenny, Richard E. P.; Santini, Paolo

    2014-12-11

    Molecular nanomagnets are attractive candidate qubits because of their wide inter- and intra-molecular tunability. Uniform magnetic pulses could be exploited to implement one- and two-qubit gates in presence of a properly engineered pattern of interactions, but the synthesis of suitable and potentially scalable supramolecular complexes has proven a very hard task. Indeed, no quantum algorithms have ever been implemented, not even a proof-of-principle two-qubit gate. In this paper we show that the magnetic couplings in two supramolecular {Cr7Ni}-Ni-{Cr7Ni} assemblies can be chemically engineered to fit the above requisites for conditional gates with no need of local control. Microscopic parameters are determined by a recently developed many-body ab-initio approach and used to simulate quantum gates. We find that these systems are optimal for proof-of-principle two-qubit experiments and can be exploited as building blocks of scalable architectures for quantum simulation.

  15. Molecular nanomagnets with switchable coupling for quantum simulation

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Alessandro; Whitehead, George F. S.; Carretta, Stefano; Carthy, Laura; Timco, Grigore A.; Teat, Simon J.; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Pavarini, Eva; Winpenny, Richard E. P.; Santini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Molecular nanomagnets are attractive candidate qubits because of their wide inter- and intra-molecular tunability. Uniform magnetic pulses could be exploited to implement one- and two-qubit gates in presence of a properly engineered pattern of interactions, but the synthesis of suitable and potentially scalable supramolecular complexes has proven a very hard task. Indeed, no quantum algorithms have ever been implemented, not even a proof-of-principle two-qubit gate. Here we show that the magnetic couplings in two supramolecular {Cr7Ni}-Ni-{Cr7Ni} assemblies can be chemically engineered to fit the above requisites for conditional gates with no need of local control. Microscopic parameters are determined by a recently developed many-body ab-initio approach and used to simulate quantum gates. We find that these systems are optimal for proof-of-principle two-qubit experiments and can be exploited as building blocks of scalable architectures for quantum simulation. PMID:25502419

  16. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and... Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of a... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.506...

  17. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and... Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of a... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.506...

  18. Quantum Dimension and Quantum Projective Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matassa, Marco

    2014-09-01

    We show that the family of spectral triples for quantum projective spaces introduced by D'Andrea and Dąbrowski, which have spectral dimension equal to zero, can be reconsidered as modular spectral triples by taking into account the action of the element K_{2rho} or its inverse. The spectral dimension computed in this sense coincides with the dimension of the classical projective spaces. The connection with the well known notion of quantum dimension of quantum group theory is pointed out.

  19. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-01

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle.

  20. Quantum chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, David; Aubourg, Lucile

    2016-02-01

    We study a theoretical model of closed quasi-hermitian chain of spins which exhibits quantum analogues of chimera states, i.e. long life classical states for which a part of an oscillator chain presents an ordered dynamics whereas another part presents a disordered dynamics. For the quantum analogue, the chimera behaviour deals with the entanglement between the spins of the chain. We discuss the entanglement properties, quantum chaos, quantum disorder and semi-classical similarity of our quantum chimera system. The quantum chimera concept is novel and induces new perspectives concerning the entanglement of multipartite systems.

  1. Counterfactual quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae-Gon

    2009-12-01

    Quantum cryptography allows one to distribute a secret key between two remote parties using the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. The well-known established paradigm for the quantum key distribution relies on the actual transmission of signal particle through a quantum channel. In this Letter, we show that the task of a secret key distribution can be accomplished even though a particle carrying secret information is not in fact transmitted through the quantum channel. The proposed protocols can be implemented with current technologies and provide practical security advantages by eliminating the possibility that an eavesdropper can directly access the entire quantum system of each signal particle. PMID:20366133

  2. Quantum information causality.

    PubMed

    Pitalúa-García, Damián

    2013-05-24

    How much information can a transmitted physical system fundamentally communicate? We introduce the principle of quantum information causality, which states the maximum amount of quantum information that a quantum system can communicate as a function of its dimension, independently of any previously shared quantum physical resources. We present a new quantum information task, whose success probability is upper bounded by the new principle, and show that an optimal strategy to perform it combines the quantum teleportation and superdense coding protocols with a task that has classical inputs. PMID:23745844

  3. Multiscale quantum optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2007-04-01

    Quantum experiments are described in terms of time-dependent networks of quantum bits, each qubit representing an elementary information gateway. The emphasis is on the signal properties of apparatus rather than on systems under observation (SUOs), with the quantum states of the theory (the labstates) representing the observer's information about the state of their apparatus, rather than of any SUO. The formalism gives an efficient quantum register description related to the formalism of quantum computation. Experiments conventionally described by the PVM and POVM formalisms are treated in identical terms, the formalism providing an efficient modular approach to quantum optics experiments of arbitrary complexity.

  4. A multiplexed quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Lan, S-Y; Radnaev, A G; Collins, O A; Matsukevich, D N; Kennedy, T A; Kuzmich, A

    2009-08-01

    A quantum repeater is a system for long-distance quantum communication that employs quantum memory elements to mitigate optical fiber transmission losses. The multiplexed quantum memory (O. A. Collins, S. D. Jenkins, A. Kuzmich, and T. A. B. Kennedy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 060502 (2007)) has been shown theoretically to reduce quantum memory time requirements. We present an initial implementation of a multiplexed quantum memory element in a cold rubidium gas. We show that it is possible to create atomic excitations in arbitrary memory element pairs and demonstrate the violation of Bell's inequality for light fields generated during the write and read processes.

  5. Double-membraned Liposomes Sculpted by Poliovirus 3AB Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Ptacek, Jennifer B.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Infection with many positive-strand RNA viruses dramatically remodels cellular membranes, resulting in the accumulation of double-membraned vesicles that resemble cellular autophagosomes. In this study, a single protein encoded by poliovirus, 3AB, is shown to be sufficient to induce the formation of double-membraned liposomes via the invagination of single-membraned liposomes. Poliovirus 3AB is a 109-amino acid protein with a natively unstructured N-terminal domain. HeLa cells transduced with 3AB protein displayed intracellular membrane disruption; specifically, the formation of cytoplasmic invaginations. The ability of a single viral protein to produce structures of similar topology to cellular autophagosomes should facilitate the understanding of both cellular and viral mechanisms for membrane remodeling. PMID:23908350

  6. Wheel slip control of ABS using ER valve pressure modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Cho, Myung-Soo; Kim, Yong-Il; Choi, Young-Tai; Wereley, Norman M.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a wheel slip control via sliding mode controller for a new anti-lock brake system (ABS) of a passenger vehicle using electrorheological (ER) valve pressure modulator. The principal design parameters of the ER valves and hydraulic booster are appropriately determined by considering braking pressure variation during ABS operation. An electrically controllable pressure modulator using the ER valves is then constructed and its governing equations are derived. Subsequently, the pressure control performance of the new pressure modulator is experimentally evaluated. The governing equations of motion for a quarter car wheel model are derived and the sliding mode controller is formulated for wheel slip control. Hardware in the loop simulation (HILS) for braking performance evaluation is undertaken in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed ABS associated with the ER valve pressure modulator.

  7. Control Performance of Vehicle Abs Featuring ER Valve Pressure Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. S.; Choi, S. B.; Wereley, N. M.

    In this work, an electrically controllable anti-lock brake system (ABS) for passenger vehicle is developed by utilizing electrorheological (ER) fluid. A pressure modulator which consists of a cylindrical ER valve and the hydraulic booster is constructed in order to achieve sufficient brake pressure variation during ABS operation. The principal design parameters of the modulator are determined by considering ER properties as well as required braking pressure. After investigating pressure controllability of the modulator, a vehicle model which is integrated with the proposed pressure modulator is formulated to design yaw rate controller. A sliding mode controller is designed to obtain desired yaw rate, and the friction forces between roads and wheels are estimated via the estimator. Braking performances of the proposed ABS under various roads are evaluated through the hardware-in-the-loop-simulation (HILS) and the steering stability during braking operation is demonstrated by undertaking split-μ test.

  8. Quantum capacity of quantum black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Chris; Bradler, Kamil

    2014-03-01

    The fate of quantum entanglement interacting with a black hole has been an enduring mystery, not the least because standard curved space field theory does not address the interaction of black holes with matter. We discuss an effective Hamiltonian of matter interacting with a black hole that has a precise analogue in quantum optics and correctly reproduces both spontaneous and stimulated Hawking radiation with grey-body factors. We calculate the quantum capacity of this channel in the limit of perfect absorption, as well as in the limit of a perfectly reflecting black hole (a white hole). We find that the white hole is an optimal quantum cloner, and is isomorphic to the Unruh channel with positive quantum capacity. The complementary channel (across the horizon) is entanglement-breaking with zero capacity, avoiding a violation of the quantum no-cloning theorem. The black hole channel on the contrary has vanishing capacity, while its complement has positive capacity instead. Thus, quantum states can be reconstructed faithfully behind the black hole horizon, but not outside. This work sheds new light on black hole complementarity because it shows that black holes can both reflect and absorb quantum states without violating the no-cloning theorem, and makes quantum firewalls obsolete.

  9. Quantum optics. Gravity meets quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.

    2015-02-27

    Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity is a classical formulation but a quantum mechanical description of gravitational forces is needed, not only to investigate the coupling of classical and quantum systems but simply to give a more complete description of our physical surroundings. In this issue of Nature Photonics, Wen-Te Liao and Sven Ahrens reveal a link between quantum and gravitational physics. They propose that in the quantum-optical effect of superradiance, the world line of electromagnetic radiation is changed by the presence of a gravitational field.

  10. Work and quantum phase transitions: quantum latency.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, E; Bragança, H; Dorner, R; França Santos, M; Vedral, V; Modi, K; Goold, J

    2014-06-01

    We study the physics of quantum phase transitions from the perspective of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. For first-order quantum phase transitions, we find that the average work done per quench in crossing the critical point is discontinuous. This leads us to introduce the quantum latent work in analogy with the classical latent heat of first order classical phase transitions. For second order quantum phase transitions the irreversible work is closely related to the fidelity susceptibility for weak sudden quenches of the system Hamiltonian. We demonstrate our ideas with numerical simulations of first, second, and infinite order phase transitions in various spin chain models.

  11. Quantum Darwinism in Quantum Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2008-12-01

    Quantum Darwinism—the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment—was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state—a macroscopic superposition—the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  12. Quantum Darwinism in quantum Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-12-12

    Quantum Darwinism--the redundant encoding of information about a decohering system in its environment--was proposed to reconcile the quantum nature of our Universe with apparent classicality. We report the first study of the dynamics of quantum Darwinism in a realistic model of decoherence, quantum Brownian motion. Prepared in a highly squeezed state--a macroscopic superposition--the system leaves records whose redundancy increases rapidly with initial delocalization. Redundancy appears rapidly (on the decoherence time scale) and persists for a long time.

  13. Quantum Kolmogorov complexity and bounded quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2011-04-15

    The effect of bounded quantum memory in a primitive information protocol has been examined using the quantum Kolmogorov complexity as a measure of information. We employed a toy two-party protocol in which Bob, by using a bounded quantum memory and an unbounded classical memory, estimates a message that was encoded in qubits by Alice in one of the bases X or Z. Our theorem gave a nontrivial effect of the memory boundedness. In addition, a generalization of the uncertainty principle in the presence of quantum memory has been obtained.

  14. Thomson backscattering diagnostics of nanosecond electron bunches in high space charge regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachinda, Pavel

    The trend over the last 50 years of down-scaling the silicon transistor to achieve faster computations has led to doubling of the number of transistors and computation speed over about every two years. However, this trend cannot be maintained due to the fundamental limitations of silicon as the main material for the semiconducting industry. Therefore, there is an active search for exploration of alternate materials. Among the possible candidates that can may be able to replace silicon is graphene which has recently gained the most attention. Unique properties of graphene include exceedingly high carrier mobility, tunable band gap, huge optical density of a monolayer, anomalous quantum Hall effect, and many others. To be suitable for microelectronic applications the material should be semiconductive, i.e. have a non-zero band gap. Pristine graphene is a semimetal, but by the virtue of doping the graphene surface with different molecules and radicals a band gap can be opened. Because the electronic properties of all materials are intimately related to their atomic structure, characterization of molecular and electronic structure of functionalizing groups is of high interest. The ab-inito (from the first principles) calculations provide a unique opportunity to study the influence of the dopants and thus allow exploration of the physical phenomena in functionalized graphene structures. This ability paves the road to probe the properties based on the intuitive structural information only. A great advantage of this approach lies in the opportunity for quick screening of various atomic structures. We conducted a series of ab-inito investigations of graphene functionalized with covalently and hapticly bound groups, and demonstrated possible practical usage of functionalized graphene for microelectronic and optical applications. This investigation showed that it is possible produce band gaps in graphene (i.e., produce semiconducting graphene) of about 1 eV, without

  15. Stimulation of UvrD helicase by UvrAB.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, John; Guy, Colin P; Cadman, Chris J; Moolenaar, Geri F; Goosen, Nora; McGlynn, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Helicases play critical roles in all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism by catalyzing the remodeling of DNA and RNA structures. UvrD is an abundant helicase in Escherichia coli with well characterized functions in mismatch and nucleotide excision repair and a possible role in displacement of proteins such as RecA from single-stranded DNA. The mismatch repair protein MutL is known to stimulate UvrD. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair proteins UvrA and UvrB can together stimulate UvrD-catalyzed unwinding of a range of DNA substrates containing strand discontinuities, including forked DNA substrates. The stimulation is specific for UvrD, as UvrAB failed to stimulate Rep helicase, a UvrD homologue. Moreover, although UvrAB can promote limited strand displacement, stimulation of UvrD did not require the strand displacement function of UvrAB. We conclude that UvrAB, like MutL, modulate UvrD helicase activity. This stimulation likely plays a role in DNA strand and protein displacement by UvrD in nucleotide excision repair. Promotion of UvrD-catalyzed unwinding of nicked duplexes by UvrAB may also explain the need for UvrAB and UvrD in Okazaki fragment processing in cells lacking DNA polymerase I. More generally, these data support the idea that helicase activity is regulated in vivo, with helicases acting as part of multisubunit complexes rather than in isolation. PMID:19208629

  16. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-01

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit.

  17. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-22

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit.

  18. 1984 AB - A unique Mars-crossing asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helin, E. F.; Dunbar, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Asteroid 1984 AB, discovered in January 1984, proved to be a unique object with a close dynamical relationship to Mars. A brief history of the discovery and subsequent 'evolution' of the orbit as it was refined is presented. The preliminary orbit of 1984 AB indicated that it might be a Mars Trojan, and an extended discussion of this interesting possibility is presented, but this hypothesis had to be dismissed after further observations had refined the orbit. The semimajor axis and orbital eccentricity are very similar to that of Mars. No other known Mars-crossing asteroid exists with an orbit as closely associated to Mars.

  19. An ABS control logic based on wheel force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, D.; Galvagno, E.; Ondrak, V.; van Leeuwen, B.; Vigliani, A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents an anti-lock braking system (ABS) control logic based on the measurement of the longitudinal forces at the hub bearings. The availability of force information allows to design a logic that does not rely on the estimation of the tyre-road friction coefficient, since it continuously tries to exploit the maximum longitudinal tyre force. The logic is designed by means of computer simulation and then tested on a specific hardware in the loop test bench: the experimental results confirm that measured wheel force can lead to a significant improvement of the ABS performances in terms of stopping distance also in the presence of road with variable friction coefficient.

  20. Ab initio computations of photodissociation products of CFC alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, S.; Illinger, K.H.; Kenny, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Ab initio computations, have already been used to examine the energetics of the photodissociation of stratospheric chlorofluorocarbons. Our awn research has investigated the ab initio computation of vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F, CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}H, and CF{sub 3}CH{sub 3}; continuing research will attempt to expand these computations to the energetics of the photodissociation of these molecules, since sane of the most common types of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes are hydrofluoroethanes.

  1. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  2. On the room-temperature phase diagram of high pressure hydrogen: An ab initio molecular dynamics perspective and a diffusion Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji; Ren, Xinguo; Li, Xin-Zheng; Alfè, Dario; Wang, Enge

    2014-07-14

    The finite-temperature phase diagram of hydrogen in the region of phase IV and its neighborhood was studied using the ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) and the ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD). The electronic structures were analyzed using the density-functional theory (DFT), the random-phase approximation, and the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. Taking the state-of-the-art DMC results as benchmark, comparisons of the energy differences between structures generated from the MD and PIMD simulations, with molecular and dissociated hydrogens, respectively, in the weak molecular layers of phase IV, indicate that standard functionals in DFT tend to underestimate the dissociation barrier of the weak molecular layers in this mixed phase. Because of this underestimation, inclusion of the quantum nuclear effects (QNEs) in PIMD using electronic structures generated with these functionals leads to artificially dissociated hydrogen layers in phase IV and an error compensation between the neglect of QNEs and the deficiencies of these functionals in standard ab initio MD simulations exists. This analysis partly rationalizes why earlier ab initio MD simulations complement so well the experimental observations. The temperature and pressure dependencies for the stability of phase IV were also studied in the end and compared with earlier results.

  3. Ab-initio simulations of materials using VASP: Density-functional theory and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jürgen

    2008-10-01

    During the past decade, computer simulations based on a quantum-mechanical description of the interactions between electrons and between electrons and atomic nuclei have developed an increasingly important impact on solid-state physics and chemistry and on materials science-promoting not only a deeper understanding, but also the possibility to contribute significantly to materials design for future technologies. This development is based on two important columns: (i) The improved description of electronic many-body effects within density-functional theory (DFT) and the upcoming post-DFT methods. (ii) The implementation of the new functionals and many-body techniques within highly efficient, stable, and versatile computer codes, which allow to exploit the potential of modern computer architectures. In this review, I discuss the implementation of various DFT functionals [local-density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA), meta-GGA, hybrid functional mixing DFT, and exact (Hartree-Fock) exchange] and post-DFT approaches [DFT + U for strong electronic correlations in narrow bands, many-body perturbation theory (GW) for quasiparticle spectra, dynamical correlation effects via the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (AC-FDT)] in the Vienna ab initio simulation package VASP. VASP is a plane-wave all-electron code using the projector-augmented wave method to describe the electron-core interaction. The code uses fast iterative techniques for the diagonalization of the DFT Hamiltonian and allows to perform total-energy calculations and structural optimizations for systems with thousands of atoms and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for ensembles with a few hundred atoms extending over several tens of ps. Applications in many different areas (structure and phase stability, mechanical and dynamical properties, liquids, glasses and quasicrystals, magnetism and magnetic nanostructures, semiconductors and insulators, surfaces

  4. Microwave and ab initio studies of rare gas-methane van der Waals complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaqian; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    Rotational spectra of the weakly bound Kr-methane van der Waals complex were recorded using a pulsed molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer in the range from 3.5 to 18 GHz. Spectra of 25 isotopomers of Kr-methane were assigned and analyzed. For isotopomers containing CH4, 13CH4, and CD4, two sets of transitions with K=0 and one with K=1 were recorded, correlating to the j=0, 1, and 2 rotational levels of free methane, respectively (j is the rotational angular momentum quantum number of the methane monomer). For isotopomers containing CH3D and CHD3, two K=0 components were recorded, correlating to the jk=00 and 11 rotational levels of free methane (k corresponds to the projection of j onto the C3 axis of CH3D and CHD3). The obtained spectroscopic results were used to derive van der Waals bond distance R, van der Waals stretching frequency νs, and the corresponding stretching force constant ks. Nuclear spin statistical weights of individual states were obtained from molecular symmetry group analyses and were compared with the observed relative transition intensities. The tentatively assigned j=2 transitions were more intense than predicted from symmetry considerations. This is attributed to a relatively large effective dipole moment of this state, supported by ab initio dipole moment calculations. Ab initio potential energy calculations of Kr-CH4 and Ar-CH4 were done at the coupled cluster level of theory, with single and double excitations and perturbative inclusion of triple excitations, using the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set supplemented with bond functions. The theoretical results show that the angular dynamics of the dimer does not change significantly when the binding partner of methane changes from Ar to Kr. The dipole moment of Ar-CH4 was calculated at various configurations, providing a qualitative explanation for the unsuccessful spectral searches for rotational transitions of Ar-CH4.

  5. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Harrow, Aram W.; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-01

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  6. Pulsed Quantum Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanner, Michael R.; Pikovski, Igor; Cole, Garrett D.; Kim, Myungshik; Brukner, Caslav; Hammerer, Klemens; Milburn, Gerard J.; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    By combining quantum optics with mechanical resonators an avenue is opened to extend investigations of quantum behavior into unprecendented mass regimes. The field resulting from this combination - ``cavity quantum optomechanics'' -- is receiving a surge of interest for its potential to contribute to quantum measurement and control, studies of decoherence and non-classical state preparation of macroscopic objects. However, quantum state preparation and especially quantum state reconstruction of mechanical oscillators is currently a significant challenge. We are pursuing a scheme that employs short optical pulses to realize quantum state tomography, squeezing via measurement and state purifcation of a mechanical resonator. The pulsed scheme has considerable resilience to initial thermal occupation, provides a promising means to explore the quantum nature of massive oscillators and can be applied to other systems such as trapped ions. Our theoretical proposal and experimental results will be discussed.

  7. Quantum Stochastic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, William Joseph

    2009-04-13

    We consider quantum analogues of n-parameter stochastic processes, associated integrals and martingale properties extending classical results obtained in [1, 2, 3], and quantum results in [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10].

  8. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-29

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics. PMID:27176509

  9. The quantum space race

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, Thomas; Higgins, Brendon

    2013-03-01

    Sending satellites equipped with quantum technologies into space will be the first step towards a global quantum-communication network. As Thomas Jennewein and Brendon Higgins explain, these systems will also enable physicists to test fundamental physics in new regimes.

  10. Quantum information and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.H.

    1995-10-01

    A new quantum theory of communication and computation is emerging, in which the stuff transmitted or processed is not classical information, but arbitrary superpositions of quantum states. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Efficient Quantum Pseudorandomness.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-04-29

    Randomness is both a useful way to model natural systems and a useful tool for engineered systems, e.g., in computation, communication, and control. Fully random transformations require exponential time for either classical or quantum systems, but in many cases pseudorandom operations can emulate certain properties of truly random ones. Indeed, in the classical realm there is by now a well-developed theory regarding such pseudorandom operations. However, the construction of such objects turns out to be much harder in the quantum case. Here, we show that random quantum unitary time evolutions ("circuits") are a powerful source of quantum pseudorandomness. This gives for the first time a polynomial-time construction of quantum unitary designs, which can replace fully random operations in most applications, and shows that generic quantum dynamics cannot be distinguished from truly random processes. We discuss applications of our result to quantum information science, cryptography, and understanding the self-equilibration of closed quantum dynamics.

  12. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  13. Quantum Feynman Ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Ketan; Kawai, Ryoichi

    As nanotechnology advances, understanding of the thermodynamic properties of small systems becomes increasingly important. Such systems are found throughout physics, biology, and chemistry manifesting striking properties that are a direct result of their small dimensions where fluctuations become predominant. The standard theory of thermodynamics for macroscopic systems is powerless for such ever fluctuating systems. Furthermore, as small systems are inherently quantum mechanical, influence of quantum effects such as discreteness and quantum entanglement on their thermodynamic properties is of great interest. In particular, the quantum fluctuations due to quantum uncertainty principles may play a significant role. In this talk, we investigate thermodynamic properties of an autonomous quantum heat engine, resembling a quantum version of the Feynman Ratchet, in non-equilibrium condition based on the theory of open quantum systems. The heat engine consists of multiple subsystems individually contacted to different thermal environments.

  14. GJ 282 AB (WDS 07400-0336 AB = BGH 3 AB) and GICLAS 112-29: A Very Wide System in Process of Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rica, F. M.; Benavides, R.

    2016-04-01

    Very wide binaries are interesting objects that shed light on the binary formation process and their dynamical evolution. Poveda et al. (2009) studied the possible physical relation of the near (14.2 pc) and wide (~58") binary star GJ 282 AB and the extremely wide (1.09º; ~55,000 AU) companion, NLTT 18149, and they concluded that this very wide system is in the process of dynamical disintegration. In this work, we confirm the same conclusion but using a different method. We first study dynamically GJ 282 AB, confirmed that it is a bound system and then we determine possible orbital solutions. Later, we calculate the relative velocity of NLTT 18149 with respect to the GJ 282 AB's center mass using their (U, V, W) galactocentric velocity. The relative velocity, Vrel = 1.98 ± 0.16 km s-1, is much larger than the escape velocity (0.25 ± 0.01 km s-1). Therefore, with a significance level of 11s, we also conclude that this very wide system is in a process of dynamical disintegration.

  15. Harnessing Quantum Interference in Molecular Dielectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Bergfield, Justin P; Heitzer, Henry M; Van Dyck, Colin; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2015-06-23

    We investigate the relationship between dielectric response and charge transport in molecule-based materials operating in the quantum coherent regime. We find that quantum interference affects these observables differently, for instance, allowing current passing through certain materials to be reduced by orders of magnitude without affecting dielectric behavior (or band gap). As an example, we utilize ab initio electronic structure theory to calculate conductance and dielectric constants of cross-conjugated anthraquinone (AQ)-based and linearly conjugated anthracene (AC)-based materials. In spite of having nearly equal fundamental gaps, electrode bonding configurations, and molecular dimensions, we find a ∼1.7 order of magnitude (∼50-fold) reduction in the conductance of the AQ-based material relative to the AC-based material, a value in close agreement with recent measurements, while the calculated dielectric constants of both materials are nearly identical. From these findings, we propose two molecular materials in which quantum interference is used to reduce leakage currents across a ∼25 Å monolayer gap with dielectric constants larger than 4.5.

  16. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  17. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2007-12-01

    Preface; 1. Convexity, colours and statistics; 2. Geometry of probability distributions; 3. Much ado about spheres; 4. Complex projective spaces; 5. Outline of quantum mechanics; 6. Coherent states and group actions; 7. The stellar representation; 8. The space of density matrices; 9. Purification of mixed quantum states; 10. Quantum operations; 11. Duality: maps versus states; 12. Density matrices and entropies; 13. Distinguishability measures; 14. Monotone metrics and measures; 15. Quantum entanglement; Epilogue; Appendices; References; Index.

  18. Relativistic Quantum Scars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K.; Goodnick, Stephen M.; Akis, Richard

    2009-07-31

    The concentrations of wave functions about classical periodic orbits, or quantum scars, are a fundamental phenomenon in physics. An open question is whether scarring can occur in relativistic quantum systems. To address this question, we investigate confinements made of graphene whose classical dynamics are chaotic and find unequivocal evidence of relativistic quantum scars. The scarred states can lead to strong conductance fluctuations in the corresponding open quantum dots via the mechanism of resonant transmission.

  19. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  20. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.