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Sample records for ab neurovascular remodeling

  1. Outcomes of Stent-assisted Coil Embolization of Wide-necked Intracranial Aneurysms Using the Solitaire™ AB Neurovascular Remodeling Device

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study presents our experience with respect to the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients treated with stent-assisted coil embolization using Solitaire™ AB stents. Materials and Methods From March 2011 to December 2014, 50 patients with 55 wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms were evaluated. Four patients presented with an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Stent deployment was performed with a standard coiling procedure in 49 aneurysms. Three patients underwent bailout stenting, 2 patients were treated by temporary stenting and one patient was treated only by stenting without coiling for dissecting aneurysm. Results Successful placement of the Solitaire AB stent was achieved in all the cases. Based on the postprocedural angiographic results, a Raymond 1 was obtained in 32 (59%) of 54 aneurysms, excluded by one case of dissecting aneurysm, and a Raymond 2 in 13 (24%), and a Raymond 3 in 9 (17%). There was one thromboembolic (2%) and three hemorrhagic complications (6%). However, procedure-related morbidity or mortality was not found. Annual follow-up angiographic results from the embolization were obtained in 40 (74.1%) of 54 cases. These results were represented as Raymond 1 in 27 (67.5%), class 2 in 9 (22.5%), and class 3 in 4 (10%) cases. Angiographic improvement associated with progressive thrombosis of the aneurysm was obtained in 10 aneurysms. Four aneurysms were recanalized without requiring additional treatment. In-stent stenosis was found in one aneurysm, but stent migration was not seen on follow-up angiography. Conclusion Stent-assisted coil embolization using the Solitaire AB stent for treating wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms was found to be safe and effective immediately post-embolization and after follow-up. Long-term follow-up will be required to identify the effect of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rates. PMID:27066440

  2. Strong Impact of Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion on Neurovascular Unit, Cerebrovascular Remodeling, and Neurovascular Trophic Coupling in Alzheimer's Disease Model Mouse.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingwei; Yamashita, Toru; Zhai, Yun; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Abe, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Although chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) may affect Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, the mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the role of CCH on an AD mouse model in neurovascular unit, cerebrovascular remodeling, and neurovascular trophic coupling. Moreover, examined protective effect of galantamine. Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice (APP23) were subjected to bilateral common carotid arteries stenosis with ameroid constrictors for slowly progressive cerebral hypoperfusion. CCH exacerbated neuronal loss and decrease of α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs) expression in hippocampus and thalamus at 12 months. Meanwhile, CCH greatly induced advanced glycation end products expression, and blood-brain barrier leakage through observing IgG and MMP9 expressions. Furthermore, a significant number of dramatic enlarged cerebral vessels with remodeling, BDNF/TrkB decreased in neurovascular trophic coupling. The present study demonstrated that CCH strongly enhanced primary AD pathology including neurodegeneration, neurovascular unit disruption, cerebrovascular remodeling and neurovascular trophic coupling damage in AD mice, and that galantamine treatment greatly ameliorated such neuropathologic abnormalities. PMID:27060955

  3. miR-7a/b attenuates post-myocardial infarction remodeling and protects H9c2 cardiomyoblast against hypoxia-induced apoptosis involving Sp1 and PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Geng, Hai-hua; Xiao, Jie; Qin, Xiao-teng; Wang, Fu; Xing, Jun-hui; Xia, Yan-fei; Mao, Yang; Liang, Jing-wen; Ji, Xiao-ping

    2016-01-01

    miRs (microRNAs, miRNAs) intricately regulate physiological and pathological processes. Although miR-7a/b protects against cardiomyocyte injury in ischemia/reperfusion injury, the function of miR-7a/b in myocardial infarction (MI)-induced cardiac remodeling remains unclear. Here, we sought to investigate the function of miR-7a/b in post-MI remodeling in a mouse model and to determine the underlying mechanisms involved. miR-7a/b overexpression improved cardiac function, attenuated cardiac remodeling and reduced fibrosis and apoptosis, whereas miR-7a/b silencing caused the opposite effects. Furthermore, miR-7a/b overexpression suppressed specific protein 1 (Sp1) and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) expression both in vivo and in vitro, and a luciferase reporter activity assay showed that miR-7a/b could directly bind to Sp1. Mithramycin, an inhibitor of the DNA binding activity of Sp1, effectively repressed PARP-1 and caspase-3, whereas knocking down miR-7a/b partially counteracted these beneficial effects. Additionally, an immunoprecipitation assay indicated that hypoxia triggered activation of the binding activity of Sp1 to the promoters of PARP-1 and caspase-3, which is abrogated by miR-7a/b. In summary, these findings identified miR-7a/b as protectors of cardiac remodeling and hypoxia-induced injury in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts involving Sp1 and PARP-1. PMID:27384152

  4. Protection after stroke: cellular effectors of neurovascular unit integrity

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Duque, Rafael Andres; Barreto, George E.; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders are prevalent worldwide. Cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 55% of all neurological diseases, are the leading cause of permanent disability, cognitive and motor disorders and dementia. Stroke affects the function and structure of blood-brain barrier, the loss of cerebral blood flow regulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and the loss of neural connections. Currently, no gold standard treatments are available outside the acute therapeutic window to improve outcome in stroke patients. Some promising candidate targets have been identified for the improvement of long-term recovery after stroke, such as Rho GTPases, cell adhesion proteins, kinases, and phosphatases. Previous studies by our lab indicated that Rho GTPases (Rac and RhoA) are involved in both tissue damage and survival, as these proteins are essential for the morphology and movement of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells, thus playing a critical role in the balance between cell survival and death. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of RhoA/ROCK blocks the activation of the neurodegeneration cascade. In addition, Rac and synaptic adhesion proteins (p120 catenin and N-catenin) play critical roles in protection against cerebral infarction and in recovery by supporting the neurovascular unit and cytoskeletal remodeling activity to maintain the integrity of the brain parenchyma. Interestingly, neuroprotective agents, such as atorvastatin, and CDK5 silencing after cerebral ischemia and in a glutamate-induced excitotoxicity model may act on the same cellular effectors to recover neurovascular unit integrity. Therefore, future efforts must focus on individually targeting the structural and functional roles of each effector of neurovascular unit and the interactions in neural and non-neural cells in the post-ischemic brain and address how to promote the recovery or prevent the loss of homeostasis in the short, medium and long term. PMID:25177270

  5. Protection after stroke: cellular effectors of neurovascular unit integrity.

    PubMed

    Posada-Duque, Rafael Andres; Barreto, George E; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders are prevalent worldwide. Cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs), which account for 55% of all neurological diseases, are the leading cause of permanent disability, cognitive and motor disorders and dementia. Stroke affects the function and structure of blood-brain barrier, the loss of cerebral blood flow regulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and the loss of neural connections. Currently, no gold standard treatments are available outside the acute therapeutic window to improve outcome in stroke patients. Some promising candidate targets have been identified for the improvement of long-term recovery after stroke, such as Rho GTPases, cell adhesion proteins, kinases, and phosphatases. Previous studies by our lab indicated that Rho GTPases (Rac and RhoA) are involved in both tissue damage and survival, as these proteins are essential for the morphology and movement of neurons, astrocytes and endothelial cells, thus playing a critical role in the balance between cell survival and death. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of RhoA/ROCK blocks the activation of the neurodegeneration cascade. In addition, Rac and synaptic adhesion proteins (p120 catenin and N-catenin) play critical roles in protection against cerebral infarction and in recovery by supporting the neurovascular unit and cytoskeletal remodeling activity to maintain the integrity of the brain parenchyma. Interestingly, neuroprotective agents, such as atorvastatin, and CDK5 silencing after cerebral ischemia and in a glutamate-induced excitotoxicity model may act on the same cellular effectors to recover neurovascular unit integrity. Therefore, future efforts must focus on individually targeting the structural and functional roles of each effector of neurovascular unit and the interactions in neural and non-neural cells in the post-ischemic brain and address how to promote the recovery or prevent the loss of homeostasis in the short, medium and long term.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG protein but not RuvAB or RecA protein is efficient at remodeling the stalled replication forks: implications for multiple mechanisms of replication restart in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Khanduja, Jasbeer Singh; Muniyappa, K; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant DNA replication, defects in the protection, and restart of stalled replication forks are major causes of genome instability in all organisms. Replication fork reversal is emerging as an evolutionarily conserved physiological response for restart of stalled forks. Escherichia coli RecG, RuvAB, and RecA proteins have been shown to reverse the model replication fork structures in vitro. However, the pathways and the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a slow growing human pathogen, responds to different types of replication stress and DNA damage are unclear. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis RecG rescues E. coli ΔrecG cells from replicative stress. The purified M. tuberculosis RecG (MtRecG) and RuvAB (MtRuvAB) proteins catalyze fork reversal of model replication fork structures with and without a leading strand single-stranded DNA gap. Interestingly, single-stranded DNA-binding protein suppresses the MtRecG- and MtRuvAB-mediated fork reversal with substrates that contain lagging strand gap. Notably, our comparative studies with fork structures containing template damage and template switching mechanism of lesion bypass reveal that MtRecG but not MtRuvAB or MtRecA is proficient in driving the fork reversal. Finally, unlike MtRuvAB, we find that MtRecG drives efficient reversal of forks when fork structures are tightly bound by protein. These results provide direct evidence and valuable insights into the underlying mechanism of MtRecG-catalyzed replication fork remodeling and restart pathways in vivo.

  7. Susceptibility-weighted Imaging in Neurovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Chris; Alcaide-Leon, Paula; Bharatha, Aditya; Sussman, Marshall S; Kucharczyk, Walter; Mandell, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has become an important imaging sequence in the evaluation of patients with neurovascular disease. In this review, we provide a general overview of the physics of SWI and describe how image contrast is produced with this technique. We provide a general approach and differential diagnosis for 2 commonly encountered radiographic patterns seen with SWI in neurovascular disease. Finally, we discuss specific neurovascular applications of SWI, including its application in acute stroke, vascular malformations, venous thrombosis, and evaluation of cerebral microbleeds.

  8. Neurovascular coupling: a parallel implementation

    PubMed Central

    Dormanns, Katharina; Brown, Richard G.; David, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) is presented based on neuronal activity coupled to vasodilation/contraction models via the astrocytic mediated perivascular K+ and the smooth muscle cell (SMC) Ca2+ pathway termed a neurovascular unit (NVU). Luminal agonists acting on P2Y receptors on the endothelial cell (EC) surface provide a flux of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) into the endothelial cytosol. This concentration of IP3 is transported via gap junctions between EC and SMC providing a source of sarcoplasmic derived Ca2+ in the SMC. The model is able to relate a neuronal input signal to the corresponding vessel reaction (contraction or dilation). A tissue slice consisting of blocks, each of which contain an NVU is connected to a space filling H-tree, simulating a perfusing arterial tree (vasculature) The model couples the NVUs to the vascular tree via a stretch mediated Ca2+ channel on both the EC and SMC. The SMC is induced to oscillate by increasing an agonist flux in the EC and hence increased IP3 induced Ca2+ from the SMC stores with the resulting calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) oscillation inhibiting NVC thereby relating blood flow to vessel contraction and dilation following neuronal activation. The coupling between the vasculature and the set of NVUs is relatively weak for the case with agonist induced where only the Ca2+ in cells inside the activated area becomes oscillatory however, the radii of vessels both inside and outside the activated area oscillate (albeit small for those outside). In addition the oscillation profile differs between coupled and decoupled states with the time required to refill the cytosol with decreasing Ca2+ and increasing frequency with coupling. The solution algorithm is shown to have excellent weak and strong scaling. Results have been generated for tissue slices containing up to 4096 blocks. PMID:26441619

  9. 21 CFR 882.5950 - Neurovascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurovascular embolization device. 882.5950... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5950 Neurovascular embolization device. (a) Identification. A neurovascular embolization device is an intravascular...

  10. Drug abuse and the neurovascular unit.

    PubMed

    Egleton, Richard D; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse continues to create a major international epidemic affecting society. A great majority of past drug abuse research has focused mostly on the mechanisms of addiction and the specific effects of substance use disorders on brain circuits and pathways that modulate reward, motivation, craving, and decision making. Few studies have focused on the neurobiology of acute and chronic substance abuse as it relates to the neurovascular unit (brain endothelial cell, neuron, astrocyte, microglia, and pericyte). Increasing research indicates that all cellular components of the neurovascular unit play a pivotal role in both the process of addiction and how drug abuse affects the brain response to diseases. This review will focus on the specific effects of opioids, amphetamines, alcohol, and nicotine on the neurovascular unit and its role in addiction and adaption to brain diseases. Elucidation of the role of the neurovascular unit on the neurobiology associated with drug addiction will help to facilitate the development of better therapeutic approaches for drug-dependent individuals.

  11. Investigating the Limits of Neurovascular Coupling.

    PubMed

    Denfield, George H; Fahey, Paul G; Reimer, Jacob; Tolias, Andreas S

    2016-09-01

    O'Herron et al. (2016) perform two-photon imaging of vascular and neural responses in cat and rodent primary visual cortex to investigate the limits of neurovascular coupling. Their results suggest important constraints on making inferences about neuronal responses from hemodynamic activity. PMID:27608758

  12. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction induced by intracerebral-administered homocysteine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamat, P K; Kalani, A; Givvimani, S; Sathnur, P B; Tyagi, S C; Tyagi, N

    2013-11-12

    High levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia are associated with neurovascular diseases. H2S, a metabolite of Hcy, has potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities; however, the effect of H2S has not been explored in Hcy (IC)-induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction in mice. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the neuroprotective role of H2S on Hcy-induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction. To test this hypothesis we employed wild-type (WT) males ages 8-10 weeks, WT+artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), WT+Hcy (0.5 μmol/μl) intracerebral injection (IC, one time only prior to NaHS treatment), WT+Hcy+NaHS (sodium hydrogen sulfide, precursor of H2S, 30 μmol/kg, body weight). NaHS was injected i.p. once daily for the period of 7 days after the Hcy (IC) injection. Hcy treatment significantly increased malondialdehyde, nitrite level, acetylcholinestrase activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, glial fibrillary acidic protein, inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and decreased glutathione level indicating oxidative-nitrosative stress and neuroinflammation as compared to control and aCSF-treated groups. Further, increased expression of neuron-specific enolase, S100B and decreased expression of (post-synaptic density-95, synaptosome-associated protein-97) synaptic protein indicated neurodegeneration. Brain sections of Hcy-treated mice showed damage in the cortical area and periventricular cells. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated, dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells and Fluro Jade-C staining indicated apoptosis and neurodegeneration. The increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP9, MMP2 and decreased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) TIMP-1, TIMP-2, tight junction proteins (zonula occulden 1) in Hcy-treated group indicate neurovascular remodeling. Interestingly, NaHS treatment significantly

  13. Involvement of astrocytes in neurovascular communication.

    PubMed

    Nuriya, M; Hirase, H

    2016-01-01

    The vascular interface of the brain is distinct from that of the peripheral tissue in that astrocytes, the most numerous glial cell type in the gray matter, cover the vasculature with their endfeet. This morphological feature of the gliovascular junction has prompted neuroscientists to suggest possible functional roles of astrocytes including astrocytic modulation of the vasculature. Additionally, astrocytes develop an intricate morphology that intimately apposes neuronal synapses, making them an ideal cellular mediator of neurovascular coupling. In this article, we first introduce the classical anatomical and physiological findings that led to the proposal of various gliovascular interaction models. Next, we touch on the technological advances in the past few decades that enabled investigations and evaluations of neuro-glio-vascular interactions in situ. We then review recent experimental findings on the roles of astrocytes in neurovascular coupling from the viewpoints of intra- and intercellular signalings in astrocytes. PMID:27130410

  14. Neurovascular Compression After the Latarjet Procedure.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Joseph W; Romanowski, James R; Boykin, Robert E; Eichinger, Josef K; Lafosse, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure is an established and effective option for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Symptomatic compression of the vasculature around the shoulder and adjacent brachial plexus is uncommon and may be difficult to diagnose and treat. The purpose of this report is to describe a patient with neurovascular compression of the axillary artery and brachial plexus after an open Latarjet procedure. This is the first known report of documented combined vascular and neurologic thoracic outlet syndrome after a Latarjet procedure. Evaluation of this suspected problem requires a detailed clinical examination and a dynamic angiogram to verify which neurovascular structures are compressed. Treatment includes decompression of the brachial plexus and axillary vasculature by releasing tethering scar tissue or the remaining pectoralis minor that is creating a constricting sling effect. An arthroscopic approach provides for a careful and specific decompression. Additionally, the authors provide a review of the literature for neurologic complications and management for these complications.

  15. Neurovascular and neurometabolic derailment in aging and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Cátia F.; Ledo, Ana; Dias, Cândida; Barbosa, Rui M.; Laranjinha, João

    2015-01-01

    The functional and structural integrity of the brain requires local adjustment of blood flow and regulated delivery of metabolic substrates to meet the metabolic demands imposed by neuronal activation. This process—neurovascular coupling—and ensued alterations of glucose and oxygen metabolism—neurometabolic coupling—are accomplished by concerted communication between neural and vascular cells. Evidence suggests that neuronal-derived nitric oxide (•NO) is a key player in both phenomena. Alterations in the mechanisms underlying the intimate communication between neural cells and vessels ultimately lead to neuronal dysfunction. Both neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling are perturbed during brain aging and in age-related neuropathologies in close association with cognitive decline. However, despite decades of intense investigation, many aspects remain poorly understood, such as the impact of these alterations. In this review, we address neurovascular and neurometabolic derailment in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), discussing its significance in connection with •NO-related pathways. PMID:26074816

  16. [Trigeminalgia caused by neurovascular compression in 12 years old girl].

    PubMed

    Steczkowska, Małgorzata; Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Gleń, Agnieszka; Gergont, Aleksandra; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Trigeminalgia is one of the most frequent clinical problems, common in adults but also found in children. In this paper we described a case of 12 years old girl with symptomatic trigeminalgia caused by neurovascular compression, hospitalized in the Department of Pediatric Neurology Jagiellonian University in Kraków. It creates a very difficult diagnostic problem. The girl was first unsuccessfully treated with carbamazepine and afterwards the surgery of neurovascular decompression was performed. We emphasis the crucial role of MR and MRA in cases refractory to classic pharmacotherapy.

  17. Houshiheisan compound prescription protects neurovascular units after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haizheng; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2014-01-01

    Houshiheisan is composed of wind-dispelling (chrysanthemun flower, divaricate saposhnikovia root, Manchurian wild ginger, cassia twig, Szechwan lovage rhizome, and platycodon root) and deficiency-nourishing (ginseng, Chinese angelica, large-head atractylodes rhizome, Indian bread, and zingiber) drugs. In this study, we assumed these drugs have protective effects against cerebral ischemia, on neurovascular units. Houshiheisan was intragastrically administered in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Hematoxylin-eosin staining, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence staining, and western blot assays showed that Houshiheisan reduced pathological injury to the ischemic penumbra, protected neurovascular units, visibly up-regulated neuronal nuclear antigen expression, and down-regulated amyloid precursor protein and amyloid-β 42 expression. Wind-dispelling and deficiency-nourishing drugs maintained NeuN expression to varying degrees, but did not affect amyloid precursor protein or amyloid-β 42 expression in the ischemic penumbra. Our results suggest that the compound prescription Houshiheisan effectively suppresses abnormal amyloid precursor protein accumulation, reduces amyloid substance deposition, maintains stabilization of the internal environment of neurovascular units, and minimizes injury to neurovascular units in the ischemic penumbra. PMID:25206882

  18. Neurovascular injuries in the wrists and hands of athletes.

    PubMed

    Rettig, A C

    1990-04-01

    Neurovascular syndromes in the wrist and hand are uncommon occurrences in the athlete. They are usually related to repetitive use of the wrist such as in racquet sports or sports with repetitive impact to the hands such as handball and catching. Common syndromes are discussed with regard to anatomy, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and return to sport.

  19. Treatment of complex neurovascular lesions: an interdisciplinary angio suite approach

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Tobias; Wrede, Karsten H.; Stein, Klaus-Peter; Wanke, Isabel; Grams, Astrid E.; Gizewski, Elke R.; Schlamann, Marc; Forsting, Michael; Sandalcioglu, I. Erol; Sure, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse our initial experience using an interdisciplinary angio suite approach to neurosurgical treatment of complex neurovascular lesions and expound technical feasibility and possible applications. Subjects: Six out of 451 patients with cranial or spinal neurovascular lesions were surgically treated in the angio suite (biplane angiographic system) during a 28-month observation period. Clinical baseline data, radiological and intraoperative findings as well as clinical and radiological outcome were assessed. Results: A ventral spinal perimedullary arteriovenous malformation, a ventral spinal perimedullary fistula, two diffuse frontal dural arteriovenous fistulas, a multifocal temporal arteriovenous malformation and a partially embolized fronto-temporo-basal dural arteriovenous fistula were successfully treated with angiographically confirmed complete occlusion and unimpaired neurological condition of the patients at the 12-month follow up. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this approach and points out possible indications, namely ventrally located spinal lesions and diffuse, deep seated cranial lesions. PMID:24409203

  20. Calcium dynamics in astrocyte processes during neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Yo; Couchman, Kiri; Lyons, Declan G; Collot, Mayeul; Agarwal, Amit; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Pfrieger, Frank W; Bergles, Dwight E; Charpak, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced neuronal activity in the brain triggers a local increase in blood flow, termed functional hyperemia, via several mechanisms, including calcium (Ca2+) signaling in astrocytes. However, recent in vivo studies have questioned the role of astrocytes in functional hyperemia because of the slow and sparse dynamics of their somatic Ca2+ signals and the absence of glutamate metabotropic receptor 5 in adults. Here, we reexamined their role in neurovascular coupling by selectively expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in astrocytes of the olfactory bulb. We show that in anesthetized mice, the physiological activation of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) terminals reliably triggers Ca2+ increases in astrocyte processes but not in somata. These Ca2+ increases systematically precede the onset of functional hyperemia by 1–2 s, reestablishing astrocytes as potential regulators of neurovascular coupling. PMID:25531572

  1. Analysis and Visualization of Nerve Vessel Contacts for Neurovascular Decompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süßmuth, Jochen; Piazza, Alexander; Enders, Frank; Naraghi, Ramin; Greiner, Günther; Hastreiter, Peter

    Neurovascular compression syndromes are caused by a pathological contact between cranial nerves and vascular structures at the surface of the brainstem. Aiming at improved pre-operative analysis of the target structures, we propose calculating distance fields to provide quantitative information of the important nerve-vessel contacts. Furthermore, we suggest reconstructing polygonal models for the nerves and vessels. Color-coding with the respective distance information is used for enhanced visualization. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved clinical understanding.

  2. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:23631798

  3. Supra and infralevator neurovascular pathways to the penile corpora cavernosa

    PubMed Central

    BENOIT, G.; DROUPY, S.; QUILLARD, J.; PARADIS, V.; GIULIANO, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of both penile innervation and vascularisation. Eighty-five male cadavers were examined through gross and microscopic anatomical analysis. The pelvic nerve plexus had both parasympathetic and sympathetic roots. It was distributed to the external urethral sphincter giving rise to cavernous nerves which anastomosed in 70% of the cases with the pudendal nerve in the penile root. Accessory pudendal arteries were present in the pelvis in 70% of the cases, anastomosing in 70% of the cases with the cavernous arteries that originated from the pudendal arteries. Transalbugineal anastomoses were always seen between the cavernous artery and the spongiosal arterial network. There were 2 venous pathways, 1 in the pelvis and 1 in the perineum with a common origin from the deep dorsal penile vein. It is concluded that there are 2 neurovascular pathways destined for the penis that are topographically distinct. One is located in the pelvis and the other in the perineum. We were unable to determine the functional balance between these 2 anastomosing pathways but experimental data have shown that they are both involved in penile erection. These 2 neurovascular pathways, above and below the levator ani, together with their anastomoses, form a neurovascular loop around the levator ani. PMID:10634698

  4. Neurovascular coupling: in vivo optical techniques for functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lun-De; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Li, Meng-Lin; Erzurumlu, Reha; Vipin, Ashwati; Orellana, Josue; Lin, Yan-Ren; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-04-30

    Optical imaging techniques reflect different biochemical processes in the brain, which is closely related with neural activity. Scientists and clinicians employ a variety of optical imaging technologies to visualize and study the relationship between neurons, glial cells and blood vessels. In this paper, we present an overview of the current optical approaches used for the in vivo imaging of neurovascular coupling events in small animal models. These techniques include 2-photon microscopy, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi), functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM), functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging (fNIRS) and multimodal imaging techniques. The basic principles of each technique are described in detail, followed by examples of current applications from cutting-edge studies of cerebral neurovascular coupling functions and metabolic. Moreover, we provide a glimpse of the possible ways in which these techniques might be translated to human studies for clinical investigations of pathophysiology and disease. In vivo optical imaging techniques continue to expand and evolve, allowing us to discover fundamental basis of neurovascular coupling roles in cerebral physiology and pathophysiology.

  5. Complex rostral neurovascular system in a giant pliosaur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffa, Davide; Sassoon, Judyth; Cuff, Andrew R.; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Benton, Michael J.

    2014-05-01

    Pliosaurs were a long-lived, ubiquitous group of Mesozoic marine predators attaining large body sizes (up to 12 m). Despite much being known about their ecology and behaviour, the mechanisms they adopted for prey detection have been poorly investigated and represent a mystery to date. Complex neurovascular systems in many vertebrate rostra have evolved for prey detection. However, information on the occurrence of such systems in fossil taxa is extremely limited because of poor preservation potential. The neurovascular complex from the snout of an exceptionally well-preserved pliosaur from the Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic, c. 170 Myr ago) of Weymouth Bay (Dorset, UK) is described here for the first time. Using computed tomography (CT) scans, the extensive bifurcating neurovascular channels could be traced through the rostrum to both the teeth and the foramina on the dorsal and lateral surface of the snout. The structures on the surface of the skull and the high concentrations of peripheral rami suggest that this could be a sensory system, perhaps similar to crocodile pressure receptors or shark electroreceptors.

  6. Digital tomosynthesis: technique modifications and clinical applications for neurovascular anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Maravilla, K.R.; Murry, R.C. Jr.; Diehl, J.; Suss, R.; Allen, L.; Chang, K.; Crawford, J.; McCoy, R.

    1984-09-01

    Digital tomosynthesis studies (DTS) using a linear tomographic motion can provide good quality clinical images when combined with subtraction angiotomography. By modifying their hardware system and the computer software algorithms, the authors were able to reconstruct tomosynthesis images using an isocentric rotation (IR) motion. Applying a combination of linear tomographic and IR techniques in clinical cases, they performed DTS studies in six patients, five with aneurysms and one with a hypervascular tumor. The results showed detailed definitions of the pathologic entities and the regional neurovascular anatomy. Based on this early experience, DTS would seem to be a useful technique for the preoperative surgical planning of vascular abnormalities.

  7. Endothelial Dysfunction and Amyloid-β-Induced Neurovascular Alterations.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kenzo; Wang, Gang; Park, Laibaik

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular diseases share common vascular risk factors that have disastrous effects on cerebrovascular regulation. Endothelial cells, lining inner walls of cerebral blood vessels, form a dynamic interface between the blood and the brain and are critical for the maintenance of neurovascular homeostasis. Accordingly, injury in endothelial cells is regarded as one of the earliest symptoms of impaired vasoregulatory mechanisms. Extracellular buildup of amyloid-β (Aβ) is a central pathogenic factor in AD. Aβ exerts potent detrimental effects on cerebral blood vessels and impairs endothelial structure and function. Recent evidence implicates vascular oxidative stress and activation of the non-selective cationic channel transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM)-2 on endothelial cells in the mechanisms of Aβ-induced neurovascular dysfunction. Thus, Aβ triggers opening of TRPM2 channels in endothelial cells leading to intracellular Ca(2+) overload and vasomotor dysfunction. The cerebrovascular dysfunction may contribute to AD pathogenesis by reducing the cerebral blood supply, leading to increased susceptibility to vascular insufficiency, and by promoting Aβ accumulation. The recent realization that vascular factors contribute to AD pathobiology suggests new targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:26328781

  8. Neurovascular coupling, cerebral white matter integrity, and response to cocoa in older people

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Shelley; Salat, David H.; Greve, Douglas N.; Fisher, Naomi D.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between neurovascular coupling and cognitive function in elderly individuals with vascular risk factors and to determine whether neurovascular coupling could be modified by cocoa consumption. Methods: Sixty older people (aged 72.9 ± 5.4 years) were studied in a parallel-arm, double-blind clinical trial of neurovascular coupling and cognition in response to 24 hours and 30 days of cocoa consumption. Cognitive measures included Mini-Mental State Examination and Trail Making Test A and B. Neurovascular coupling was measured from the beat-to-beat blood flow velocity responses in the middle cerebral arteries to the N-Back Task. In a subset of MRI-eligible participants, cerebral white matter structural integrity was also measured. Results: Neurovascular coupling was associated with Trails B scores (p = 0.002) and performance on the 2-Back Task. Higher neurovascular coupling was also associated with significantly higher fractional anisotropy in cerebral white matter hyperintensities (p = 0.02). Finally, 30 days of cocoa consumption was associated with increased neurovascular coupling (5.6% ± 7.2% vs −2.4% ± 4.8%; p = 0.001) and improved Trails B times (116 ± 78 seconds vs 167 ± 110 seconds; p = 0.007) in those with impaired neurovascular coupling at baseline. Conclusion: There is a strong correlation between neurovascular coupling and cognitive function, and both can be improved by regular cocoa consumption in individuals with baseline impairments. Better neurovascular coupling is also associated with greater white matter structural integrity. PMID:23925758

  9. APOE Stabilization by Exercise Prevents Aging Neurovascular Dysfunction and Complement Induction

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana; Graham, Leah C.; Richter, Hannah J.; Simeone, Stephen N.; Radell, Jake E.; Grabowska, Weronika; Funkhouser, W. Keith; Howell, Megan C.; Howell, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the processes that lead to age-related decline of brain structures and function. Here we use RNA-seq in combination with high resolution histological analyses to show that aging leads to a significant deterioration of neurovascular structures including basement membrane reduction, pericyte loss, and astrocyte dysfunction. Neurovascular decline was sufficient to cause vascular leakage and correlated strongly with an increase in neuroinflammation including up-regulation of complement component C1QA in microglia/monocytes. Importantly, long-term aerobic exercise from midlife to old age prevented this age-related neurovascular decline, reduced C1QA+ microglia/monocytes, and increased synaptic plasticity and overall behavioral capabilities of aged mice. Concomitant with age-related neurovascular decline and complement activation, astrocytic Apoe dramatically decreased in aged mice, a decrease that was prevented by exercise. Given the role of APOE in maintaining the neurovascular unit and as an anti-inflammatory molecule, this suggests a possible link between astrocytic Apoe, age-related neurovascular dysfunction and microglia/monocyte activation. To test this, Apoe-deficient mice were exercised from midlife to old age and in contrast to wild-type (Apoe-sufficient) mice, exercise had little to no effect on age-related neurovascular decline or microglia/monocyte activation in the absence of APOE. Collectively, our data shows that neurovascular structures decline with age, a process that we propose to be intimately linked to complement activation in microglia/monocytes. Exercise prevents these changes, but not in the absence of APOE, opening up new avenues for understanding the complex interactions between neurovascular and neuroinflammatory responses in aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26512759

  10. [The neurovascular unit in health and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Ago, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    The neurovascular unit (NVU), a minimal unit to exert neurological functions, is composed of neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, and extracellular matrix proteins forming basal membranes. The cell components interact with one another and function cooperatively under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pericytes and astrocytes participate crucially in the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the tight junction formed by endothelial cells, and regulate cerebral blood flow in response to neurological activities. The BBB actively regulate molecular import and export. The concept of the NVU is also useful for understanding pathogenesis and exploring therapeutic targets in various CNS disorders. In this review, recent research advances regarding the NVU and its components in health and ischemic stroke are summarized. PMID:27333744

  11. Assessment of endothelial and neurovascular function in human skin microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral microvascular dysfunction has been described in many physiological and pathological conditions. Owing to its accessibility, the cutaneous microcirculation provides a unique index of microvascular function. Skin microvascular function has therefore been proposed as a prognostic marker or for evaluating the effect of drugs on the microcirculation. Various reactivity tests, coupled with techniques measuring skin blood flux, are used to non-invasively explore both endothelial and neurovascular microvascular functioning in humans. We review the advantages and limitations of the main reactivity tests, including post-occlusive reactive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, pressure-induced vasodilation, and iontophoresis of vasodilators, combined with measurement techniques such as laser Doppler and laser speckle contrast imaging. Recent advances in our comprehension of the physiological pathways underlying these reactivity tests, as well as technological developments in microcirculation imaging, have provided reliable and reproducible tools for studying the microcirculation.

  12. A neurovascular blood-brain barrier in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; White, Robin; Hedrich, Jana; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature possesses certain cellular features that constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (Abbott et al., Neurobiol Dis 37:13-25, 2010). This dynamic barrier separates the brain parenchyma from peripheral blood flow and is of tremendous clinical importance: for example, BBB breakdown as in stroke is associated with the development of brain edema (Rosenberg and Yang, Neurosurg Focus 22:E4, 2007), inflammation (Kuhlmann et al., Neurosci Lett 449:168-172, 2009; Coisne and Engelhardt, Antioxid Redox Signal 15:1285-1303, 2011), and increased mortality. In vivo, the BBB consists of brain endothelial cells (BEC) that are embedded within a precisely regulated environment containing astrocytes, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. These cells experience modulation by various pathways of intercellular communication and by pathophysiological processes, e.g., through neurovascular coupling (Attwell et al., Nature 468:232-243, 2010), cortical spreading depression (Gursoy-Ozdemir et al., J Clin Invest 113:1447-1455, 2004), or formation of oxidative stress (Yemisci et al., Nat Med 15:1031-1037, 2009). Hence, this interdependent assembly of cells is referred to as the neurovascular unit (NVU) (Zlokovic, Nat Med 16:1370-1371, 2010; Zlokovic, Neuron 57:178-201, 2008). Experimental approaches to investigate the BBB in vitro are highly desirable to study the cerebral endothelium in health and disease. However, due to the complex interactions taking place within the NVU in vivo, it is difficult to mimic this interplay in vitro.Here, we describe a murine blood-brain barrier coculture model consisting of cortical organotypic slice cultures and brain endothelial cells that includes most of the cellular components of the NVU including neurons, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. This model allows the experimental analysis of several crucial BBB parameters such as transendothelial electrical resistance or tight junction protein localization by

  13. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  14. Neurovascular unit on a chip: implications for translational applications.

    PubMed

    Alcendor, Donald J; Block, Frank E; Cliffel, David E; Daniels, John Scott; Ellacott, Kate L J; Goodwin, Cody R; Hofmeister, Lucas H; Li, Deyu; Markov, Dmitry A; May, Jody C; McCawley, Lisa J; McLaughlin, BethAnn; McLean, John A; Niswender, Kevin D; Pensabene, Virginia; Seale, Kevin T; Sherrod, Stacy D; Sung, Hak-Joon; Tabb, David L; Webb, Donna J; Wikswo, John P

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) dynamically controls exchange between the brain and the body, but this interaction cannot be studied directly in the intact human brain or sufficiently represented by animal models. Most existing in vitro BBB models do not include neurons and glia with other BBB elements and do not adequately predict drug efficacy and toxicity. Under the National Institutes of Health Microtissue Initiative, we are developing a three-dimensional, multicompartment, organotypic microphysiological system representative of a neurovascular unit of the brain. The neurovascular unit system will serve as a model to study interactions between the central nervous system neurons and the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) compartment, all coupled to a realistic blood-surrogate supply and venous return system that also incorporates circulating immune cells and the choroid plexus. Hence all three critical brain barriers will be recapitulated: blood-brain, brain-CSF, and blood-CSF. Primary and stem cell-derived human cells will interact with a variety of agents to produce critical chemical communications across the BBB and between brain regions. Cytomegalovirus, a common herpesvirus, will be used as an initial model of infections regulated by the BBB. This novel technological platform, which combines innovative microfluidics, cell culture, analytical instruments, bioinformatics, control theory, neuroscience, and drug discovery, will replicate chemical communication, molecular trafficking, and inflammation in the brain. The platform will enable targeted and clinically relevant nutritional and pharmacologic interventions for or prevention of such chronic diseases as obesity and acute injury such as stroke, and will uncover potential adverse effects of drugs. If successful, this project will produce clinically useful technologies and reveal new insights into how the brain receives, modifies, and is affected by drugs, other neurotropic agents, and diseases. PMID:24564885

  15. Effect of exosomes derived from multipluripotent mesenchymal stromal cells on functional recovery and neurovascular plasticity in rats after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanlu; Chopp, Michael; Meng, Yuling; Katakowski, Mark; Xin, Hongqi; Mahmood, Asim; Xiong, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Object Transplanted multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) improve functional recovery in rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we test a novel hypothesis that systemic administration of cell-free exosomes generated from MSCs promotes functional recovery and neurovascular remodeling in rats after TBI. Methods Wistar rats were subjected to TBI followed by tail vein injection of 100 μg protein of exosomes derived from MSCs or an equal volume of vehicle phosphate-buffered saline (n = 8/group) 24 hours later. To evaluate cognitive and sensorimotor functional recovery, the modified Morris water maze, neurological severity score and footfault tests were performed. Animals were sacrificed at 35 days after TBI. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed for measurements of lesion volume, neurovascular remodeling (angiogenesis and neurogenesis), and neuroinflammation. Results Compared with saline-treated controls, exosome-treated TBI rats showed significant improvement in spatial learning at 34-35 days measured by the Morris water maze test (p < 0.05), and sensorimotor functional recovery, i.e., reduced neurological deficits and footfault frequency, observed at 14-35 days post injury (p < 0.05). Exosome treatment significantly increased the number of newborn endothelial cells in the lesion boundary zone and dentate gyrus, and significantly increased the number of newborn immature and mature neurons in the dentate gyrus as well as reduced neuroinflammation. Conclusions We, for the first time, demonstrate that MSC-generated exosomes effectively improve functional recovery, at least in part, by promoting endogenous angiogenesis and neurogenesis and reducing inflammation in rats after TBI. Thus, MSC-generated exosomes may provide a novel cell-free therapy for TBI and possibly other neurological diseases. PMID:25594326

  16. Neurovascular unit impairment in early Alzheimer's disease measured with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    van de Haar, Harm J; Jansen, Jacobus F A; van Osch, Matthias J P; van Buchem, Mark A; Muller, Majon; Wong, Sau May; Hofman, Paul A M; Burgmans, Saartje; Verhey, Frans R J; Backes, Walter H

    2016-09-01

    The neurovascular unit, which protects neuronal cells and supplies them with essential molecules, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The aim of this study was to noninvasively investigate 2 linked functional elements of the neurovascular unit, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow (CBF), in patients with early AD and healthy controls. Therefore, both dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging were applied to measure BBB permeability and CBF, respectively. The patients with early AD showed significantly lower CBF and local blood volume in the gray matter, compared with controls. In the patients, we also found that a reduction in CBF is correlated with an increase in leakage rate. This finding supports the hypothesis that neurovascular damage, and in particular impairment of the neurovascular unit constitutes the pathophysiological link between CBF reduction and BBB impairment in AD. PMID:27459939

  17. Neurovascular Coupling is Impaired in Slow Walkers: The MOBILIZE Boston Study

    PubMed Central

    Sorond, Farzaneh A.; Kiely, Dan K.; Galica, Andrew; Moscufo, Nicola; Serrador, Jorge M.; Iloputaife, Ike; Egorova, Svetlana; Dell'Oglio, Elisa; Meier, Dominik; Newton, Elizabeth; Milberg, William P.; Guttmann, Charles; Lipsitz, Lewis A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neurovascular coupling may be involved in compensatory mechanisms responsible for preservation of gait speed in elderly people with cerebrovascular disease. Our study examines the association between neurovascular coupling in the middle cerebral artery and gait speed in elderly individuals with impaired cerebral vasoreactivity. Methods Twenty-two fast and 20 slow walkers in the lowest quartile of cerebral vasoreactivity were recruited from the MOBILIZE Boston Study. Neurovascular coupling was assessed in bilateral middle cerebral arteries by measuring cerebral blood flow during the N-Back Task. Cerebral white matter hyperintensities were measured for each group using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Neurovascular coupling was attenuated in slow compared to fast walkers (2.8% [CI95%: −0.9–6.6] vs. 8.2% [CI95%: 4.7–11.8]; p=0.02). The odds of being a slow walker were 6.4 (CI95%: 1.7–24.9, p=0.007) if there was a high burden of white matter hyperintensity, however, this risk increased to 14.5 (CI95%: 2.3–91.1, p=0.004) if neurovascular coupling was also attenuated. Interpretation Our results suggest that intact neurovascular coupling may help preserve mobility in elderly people with cerebral microvascular disease. PMID:21674588

  18. Age-related alterations in retinal neurovascular and inflammatory transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Van Kirk, Colleen A.; VanGuilder, Heather D.; Young, Megan; Farley, Julie A.; Sonntag, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Vision loss is one of the most common complications of aging, even in individuals with no diagnosed ocular disease. Increasing age induces structural alterations and functional impairments in retinal neurons and microvasculature linked to the activation of proinflammatory signaling pathways. Commonalities between the effects of aging and those observed with diabetes, including visual impairment, vascular dysfunction, and increased inflammatory response, have led to the hypothesis that diabetes-associated pathologies reflect an “advanced aging” phenotype. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of aging on retinal mRNA expression of neurovascular and inflammatory transcripts previously demonstrated to be regulated with diabetes. Methods The relative expression of 36 genes of interest previously identified as consistently regulated with diabetes was assessed in retinas of Young (3 month), Adult (12 month), and Aged (26 month) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway (F1) hybrid rats using quantitative PCR. Serum samples obtained at sacrifice were assayed to determine serum glucose levels. Results Eleven inflammation- and microvascular-related genes previously demonstrated to be upregulated in young diabetic rats (complement component 1 s subcomponent [C1s], chitinase 3-like 1 [Chi3L1], endothelin 2 [Edn2], guanylate nucleotide binding protein 2 [Gbp2], glial fibrillary acidic protein [Gfap], intracellular adhesion molecule 1 [Icam1], janus kinase 3 [Jak3], lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF factor [Litaf], complement 1-inhibitor [Serping1], signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 [Stat3], tumor necrosis factor receptor subfamily member 12a [Tnfrsf12a]) demonstrated progressively increasing retinal expression in aged normoglycemic rats. Additionally, two neuronal function–related genes (glutamate receptor ionotropic NMDA 2A [Grin2a] and polycomb group ring finger 1 [Pcgf1]) and one inflammation-related gene (pigment epithelium-derived growth

  19. Neurovascular Bundle Decompression without Excessive Dissection for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Kyongsong; ISU, Toyohiko; MORIMOTO, Daijiro; SASAMORI, Toru; SUGAWARA, Atsushi; CHIBA, Yasuhiro; ISOBE, Masahiro; KOBAYASHI, Shiro; MORITA, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve and its branches in the tarsal tunnel. We present our less invasive surgical treatment of TTS in 69 patients (116 feet) and their clinical outcomes. The mean follow-up period was 64.6 months. With the patient under local anesthesia we use a microscope to perform sharp dissection of the flexor retinaculum and remove the connective tissues surrounding the posterior tibial nerve and vessels. To prevent postoperative adhesion and delayed neuropathy, decompression is performed to achieve symptom improvement without excessive dissection. Decompression is considered complete when the patient reports intraoperative symptom abatement and arterial pulsation is sufficient. The sensation of numbness and/or pain and of foreign substance adhesion was reduced in 92% and 95% of our patients, respectively. In self-assessments, 47 patients (68%) reported the treatment outcome as satisfactory, 15 (22%) as acceptable, and 7 (10%) were dissatisfied. Of 116 feet, 4 (3%) required re-operation, initial decompression was insufficient in 2 feet and further decompression was performed; in the other 2 feet improvement was achieved by decompression of the distal tarsal tunnel. Our surgical method involves neurovascular bundle decompression to obtain sufficient arterial pulsation. As we use local anesthesia, we can confirm symptom improvement intraoperatively, thereby avoiding unnecessary excessive dissection. Our method is simple, safe, and without detailed nerve dissection and it prevents postoperative adhesion. PMID:25367582

  20. Neuro-vascular link: from genetic insights to therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) and nerves (neurogenesis) is of great medical relevance. It is well known that dysregulation of angiogenesis leads to tissue ischemia, cancer, inflammation and other disorders, while a dysfunction of the nerve system contributes to motorneuron disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALs) and other neurodegenerative diseases. The observations of Andreas Vesalius--Belgian anatomist of the 16th century--that patterning ofvessels and nerves show more than remarkable similarities, are currently revisited in exciting studies. Indeed, often, vessels and nerves even track alongside each other. Recent genetic studies revealed that vessels and nerves share many more common principles and signals for navigation, proliferation and survival than previously suspected. For instance, gene inactivation studies in mice and zebrafish showed that axon guidance signals regulate vessel navigation. Conversely, prototypic angiogenic factors such as VEGF control neurogenesis and regulate axon and neuron guidance, independently of their angiogenic activity. The next coming years promise to become an exciting journey to further unravel the molecular basis and explore the therapeutic potential of the neurovascular link. PMID:20120252

  1. Gaining Surgical Access for Repositioning the Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Al-Siweedi, Saif Yousif Abdullah; Nambiar, P.; Shanmuhasuntharam, P.; Ngeow, W. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining anatomical landmarks that can be used to gain access to the inferior alveolar neurovascular (IAN) bundle. Scanned CBCT (i-CAT machine) data of sixty patients and reconstructions performed using the SimPlant dental implant software were reviewed. Outcome variables were the linear distances of the mandibular canal to the inferior border and the buccal cortex of the mandible, measured immediately at the mental foramen (D1) and at 10, 20, 30, and 40 mm (D2–D5) distal to it. Predictor variables were age, ethnicity, and gender of subjects. Apicobasal assessment of the canal reveals that it is curving downward towards the inferior mandibular border until 20 mm (D3) distal to the mental foramen where it then curves upwards, making an elliptic-arc curve. The mandibular canal also forms a buccolingually oriented elliptic arc in relation to the buccal cortex. Variations due to age, ethnicity, and gender were evident and this study provides an accurate anatomic zone for gaining surgical access to the IAN bundle. The findings indicate that the buccal cortex-IAN distance was greatest at D3. Therefore, sites between D2 and D5 can be used as favorable landmarks to access the IAN bundle with the least complications to the patient. PMID:24892077

  2. Neurovascular factors in resting-state functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) for the assessment of disease and treatment, and a number of studies have reported significant diseaserelated changes in resting-state blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal amplitude and functional connectivity. rsfMRI is particularly suitable for clinical applications because the approach does not require the patient to perform a task and scans can be obtained in a relatively short amount of time. However, the mechanisms underlying resting-state BOLD activity are not well understood and thus the interpretation of changes in resting state activity is not always straightforward. The BOLD signal represents the hemodynamic response to neural activity, and changes in resting-state activity can reflect a complex combination of neural, vascular, and metabolic factors. This paper examines the role of neurovascular factors in rsfMRI and reviews approaches for the interpretation and analysis of resting state measures in the presence of confounding factors. PMID:23644003

  3. Advanced and standardized evaluation of neurovascular compression syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastreiter, Peter; Vega Higuera, Fernando; Tomandl, Bernd; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Naraghi, Ramin

    2004-05-01

    Caused by a contact between vascular structures and the root entry or exit zone of cranial nerves neurovascular compression syndromes are combined with different neurological diseases (trigeminal neurolagia, hemifacial spasm, vertigo, glossopharyngeal neuralgia) and show a relation with essential arterial hypertension. As presented previously, the semi-automatic segmentation and 3D visualization of strongly T2 weighted MR volumes has proven to be an effective strategy for a better spatial understanding prior to operative microvascular decompression. After explicit segmentation of coarse structures, the tiny target nerves and vessels contained in the area of cerebrospinal fluid are segmented implicitly using direct volume rendering. However, based on this strategy the delineation of vessels in the vicinity of the brainstem and those at the border of the segmented CSF subvolume are critical. Therefore, we suggest registration with MR angiography and introduce consecutive fusion after semi-automatic labeling of the vascular information. Additionally, we present an approach of automatic 3D visualization and video generation based on predefined flight paths. Thereby, a standardized evaluation of the fused image data is supported and the visualization results are optimally prepared for intraoperative application. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved 3D representation and evaluation of vascular compression syndromes. Its value for diagnosis and surgery is demonstrated with various clinical examples.

  4. Microstructured Thin Film Nitinol for a Neurovascular Flow-Diverter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanfei; Howe, Connor; Lee, Yongkuk; Cheon, Seongsik; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    A cerebral aneurysm occurs as a result of a weakened blood vessel, which allows blood to flow into a sac or a ballooned section. Recent advancement shows that a new device, 'flow-diverter', can divert blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. People found that a flow-diverter based on thin film nitinol (TFN), works very effectively, however there are no studies proving the mechanical safety in irregular, curved blood vessels. Here, we study the mechanical behaviors and structural safety of a novel microstructured TFN membrane through the computational and experimental studies, which establish the fundamental aspects of stretching and bending mechanics of the structure. The result shows a hyper-elastic behavior of the TFN with a negligible strain change up to 180° in bending and over 500% in radial stretching, which is ideal in the use in neurovascular curved arteries. The simulation determines the optimal joint locations between the TFN and stent frame. In vitro experimental test qualitatively demonstrates the mechanical flexibility of the flow-diverter with multi-modal bending. In vivo micro X-ray and histopathology study demonstrate that the TFN can be conformally deployed in the curved blood vessel of a swine model without any significant complications or abnormalities. PMID:27009500

  5. Microstructured Thin Film Nitinol for a Neurovascular Flow-Diverter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanfei; Howe, Connor; Lee, Yongkuk; Cheon, Seongsik; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-01-01

    A cerebral aneurysm occurs as a result of a weakened blood vessel, which allows blood to flow into a sac or a ballooned section. Recent advancement shows that a new device, ‘flow-diverter’, can divert blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. People found that a flow-diverter based on thin film nitinol (TFN), works very effectively, however there are no studies proving the mechanical safety in irregular, curved blood vessels. Here, we study the mechanical behaviors and structural safety of a novel microstructured TFN membrane through the computational and experimental studies, which establish the fundamental aspects of stretching and bending mechanics of the structure. The result shows a hyper-elastic behavior of the TFN with a negligible strain change up to 180° in bending and over 500% in radial stretching, which is ideal in the use in neurovascular curved arteries. The simulation determines the optimal joint locations between the TFN and stent frame. In vitro experimental test qualitatively demonstrates the mechanical flexibility of the flow-diverter with multi-modal bending. In vivo micro X-ray and histopathology study demonstrate that the TFN can be conformally deployed in the curved blood vessel of a swine model without any significant complications or abnormalities. PMID:27009500

  6. Microstructured Thin Film Nitinol for a Neurovascular Flow-Diverter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanfei; Howe, Connor; Lee, Yongkuk; Cheon, Seongsik; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-03-24

    A cerebral aneurysm occurs as a result of a weakened blood vessel, which allows blood to flow into a sac or a ballooned section. Recent advancement shows that a new device, 'flow-diverter', can divert blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. People found that a flow-diverter based on thin film nitinol (TFN), works very effectively, however there are no studies proving the mechanical safety in irregular, curved blood vessels. Here, we study the mechanical behaviors and structural safety of a novel microstructured TFN membrane through the computational and experimental studies, which establish the fundamental aspects of stretching and bending mechanics of the structure. The result shows a hyper-elastic behavior of the TFN with a negligible strain change up to 180° in bending and over 500% in radial stretching, which is ideal in the use in neurovascular curved arteries. The simulation determines the optimal joint locations between the TFN and stent frame. In vitro experimental test qualitatively demonstrates the mechanical flexibility of the flow-diverter with multi-modal bending. In vivo micro X-ray and histopathology study demonstrate that the TFN can be conformally deployed in the curved blood vessel of a swine model without any significant complications or abnormalities.

  7. Microstructured Thin Film Nitinol for a Neurovascular Flow-Diverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanfei; Howe, Connor; Lee, Yongkuk; Cheon, Seongsik; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Chun, Youngjae

    2016-03-01

    A cerebral aneurysm occurs as a result of a weakened blood vessel, which allows blood to flow into a sac or a ballooned section. Recent advancement shows that a new device, ‘flow-diverter’, can divert blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. People found that a flow-diverter based on thin film nitinol (TFN), works very effectively, however there are no studies proving the mechanical safety in irregular, curved blood vessels. Here, we study the mechanical behaviors and structural safety of a novel microstructured TFN membrane through the computational and experimental studies, which establish the fundamental aspects of stretching and bending mechanics of the structure. The result shows a hyper-elastic behavior of the TFN with a negligible strain change up to 180° in bending and over 500% in radial stretching, which is ideal in the use in neurovascular curved arteries. The simulation determines the optimal joint locations between the TFN and stent frame. In vitro experimental test qualitatively demonstrates the mechanical flexibility of the flow-diverter with multi-modal bending. In vivo micro X-ray and histopathology study demonstrate that the TFN can be conformally deployed in the curved blood vessel of a swine model without any significant complications or abnormalities.

  8. Breaking boundaries—coagulation and fibrinolysis at the neurovascular interface

    PubMed Central

    Bardehle, Sophia; Rafalski, Victoria A.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Blood proteins at the neurovascular unit (NVU) are emerging as important molecular determinants of communication between the brain and the immune system. Over the past two decades, roles for the plasminogen activation (PA)/plasmin system in fibrinolysis have been extended from peripheral dissolution of blood clots to the regulation of central nervous system (CNS) functions in physiology and disease. In this review, we discuss how fibrin and its proteolytic degradation affect neuroinflammatory, degenerative and repair processes. In particular, we focus on novel functions of fibrin—the final product of the coagulation cascade and the main substrate of plasmin—in the activation of immune responses and trafficking of immune cells into the brain. We also comment on the suitability of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems as potential biomarkers and drug targets in diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and stroke. Studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as major molecular pathways that regulate cellular functions at the NVU has the potential to lead to the development of novel strategies for the detection and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:26441525

  9. Nucleosome Remodeling and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Peter B.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is kept flexible and dynamic to respond to environmental, metabolic, and developmental cues through the action of a family of so-called “nucleosome remodeling” ATPases. Consistent with their helicase ancestry, these enzymes experience conformation changes as they bind and hydrolyze ATP. At the same time they interact with DNA and histones, which alters histone–DNA interactions in target nucleosomes. Their action may lead to complete or partial disassembly of nucleosomes, the exchange of histones for variants, the assembly of nucleosomes, or the movement of histone octamers on DNA. “Remodeling” may render DNA sequences accessible to interacting proteins or, conversely, promote packing into tightly folded structures. Remodeling processes participate in every aspect of genome function. Remodeling activities are commonly integrated with other mechanisms such as histone modifications or RNA metabolism to assemble stable, epigenetic states. PMID:24003213

  10. Remodeling and Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigueza, Wendi V.; Williams, Kevin Jon; Rothblat, George H.; Phillips, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    In normal physiology, cells are exposed to cholesterol acceptors of different sizes simultaneously. The current study examined the possible interactions between two different classes of acceptors, one large (large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles, LUVs) and one small (HDL or other small acceptors), added separately or in combination to Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells. During a 24-hour incubation, LUVs of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine at 1 mg phospholipid (PL) per milliliter extracted ≈20% of cellular unesterified cholesterol (UC) label and mass in a slow, continuous fashion (half-time [t½] for UC efflux was ≈50 hours) and human HDL3 at 25 μg PL per milliliter extracted ≈15% cellular UC label with no change in cellular cholesterol mass (t½ of ≈8 hours). In contrast, the combination of LUVs and HDL3 extracted over 90% of UC label (t½ of ≈4 hours) and ≈50% of the UC mass, indicating synergy. To explain this synergy, specific particle interactions were examined, namely, remodeling, in which the two acceptors alter each other’s composition and thus the ability to mobilize cellular cholesterol, and shuttling, in which the small acceptor ferries cholesterol from cells to the large acceptor. To examine remodeling, LUVs and HDL were coincubated and reisolated before application to cells. This HDL became UC depleted, PL enriched, and lost a small amount of apolipoprotein A-I. Compared with equivalent numbers of control HDL particles, remodeled HDL caused faster efflux (t½ ≈4 hours) and exhibited a greater capacity to sequester cellular cholesterol over 24 hours (≈38% versus ≈15% for control HDL), consistent with their enrichment in PL. Remodeled LUVs still extracted ≈20% of cellular UC. Thus, remodeling accounted for some but not all of the synergy between LUVs and HDL. To examine shuttling, several approaches were used. First, reisolation of particles after an 8-hour exposure to cells revealed that HDL contained very little of the cellular UC

  11. [Surgical management of trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, paroxysmal tinnitus and nystagmus by neurovascular decompression].

    PubMed

    Isu, T; Abe, H; Nakagawa, Y; Aida, T; Tsuru, M; Ito, T; Murai, H

    1983-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia, facial spasm, tinnitus, vertigo, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia are believed to be the symptoms complex of hyperactive dysfunction of the cranial nerve caused by vascular cross compression at the root entry (exit) zone of the appropriate nerve. Posterior cranial fossa approach for the neurovascular decompression was enhanced by Jannetta et al (1975). From their experiences of surgery, they emphasized that these symptoms were relieved by surgery. In this report, we will discuss the etiology of the disease, the neurotological examination, the angiographic findings, the operative findings and results in a series of 10 patients who have undergone neurovascular decompression. The series consisted of 4 cases with trigeminal neuralgia, 5 cases with facial spasm, and 1 case with paroxysmal tinnitus accompanied by facial spasm. The postoperative progress in these all patients was excellent and relieved of the symptoms. There was neither mortality nor any significant complication. We stress that the neurovascular decompression surgery is now well justified as the definite treatment for the trigeminal neuralgia and facial spasm, because the surgery can be performed easily and safely by the neurosurgeons. The indication of the neurovascular decompression for the acoustic nerve and glossopharyngeal nerve is still controversial. In our own case, tinnitus was paroxysmal and complicated with facial spasm, not synchronous with facial spasm, but with nystagmus. This selective synchronism between tinnitus and nystagmus is a particular feature of our clinical instance. This particular clinical experience may provide some highly significant suggestions in considering the applicability of neurovascular decompression to the acoustic nerve. PMID:6671636

  12. IGF-1 deficiency impairs neurovascular coupling in mice: implications for cerebromicrovascular aging.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Ashpole, Nicole M; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Milne, Ginger L; Valcarcel-Ares, Noa M; Menyhart, Akos; Farkas, Eszter; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    Aging is associated with marked deficiency in circulating IGF-1, which has been shown to contribute to age-related cognitive decline. Impairment of moment-to-moment adjustment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) via neurovascular coupling is thought to play a critical role in the genesis of age-related cognitive impairment. To establish the link between IGF-1 deficiency and cerebromicrovascular impairment, neurovascular coupling mechanisms were studied in a novel mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency (Igf1(f/f) -TBG-Cre-AAV8) and accelerated vascular aging. We found that IGF-1-deficient mice exhibit neurovascular uncoupling and show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory test, mimicking the aging phenotype. IGF-1 deficiency significantly impaired cerebromicrovascular endothelial function decreasing NO mediation of neurovascular coupling. IGF-1 deficiency also impaired glutamate-mediated CBF responses, likely due to dysregulation of astrocytic expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors and impairing mediation of CBF responses by eicosanoid gliotransmitters. Collectively, we demonstrate that IGF-1 deficiency promotes cerebromicrovascular dysfunction and neurovascular uncoupling mimicking the aging phenotype, which are likely to contribute to cognitive impairment.

  13. Double-membraned Liposomes Sculpted by Poliovirus 3AB Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Ptacek, Jennifer B.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Infection with many positive-strand RNA viruses dramatically remodels cellular membranes, resulting in the accumulation of double-membraned vesicles that resemble cellular autophagosomes. In this study, a single protein encoded by poliovirus, 3AB, is shown to be sufficient to induce the formation of double-membraned liposomes via the invagination of single-membraned liposomes. Poliovirus 3AB is a 109-amino acid protein with a natively unstructured N-terminal domain. HeLa cells transduced with 3AB protein displayed intracellular membrane disruption; specifically, the formation of cytoplasmic invaginations. The ability of a single viral protein to produce structures of similar topology to cellular autophagosomes should facilitate the understanding of both cellular and viral mechanisms for membrane remodeling. PMID:23908350

  14. [Surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia--neurovascular decompression established by Jannetta].

    PubMed

    Isu, T; Abe, H; Nakagawa, Y; Mitsumori, K; Nakagawa, T; Sakuragi, M; Tsuru, M; Ito, T

    1985-01-01

    The etiology of trigeminal neuralgia has been unknown. However, recently, trigeminal neuralgia is believed to be caused by vascular cross compression at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve. Posterior cranial fossa approach for the neurovascular decompression was enhanced by Jannetta et al. They emphasized that the pain was relieved by surgery. In this report, we will discuss the operative findings and results in a series of 8 patients who have undergone neurovascular decompression. The postoperative progress in all of these patients was excellent and relieved of the pain. There was neither mortality nor any significant complication. We stress that the neurovascular decompression surgery is now well justified as the definite treatment for the trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:3988235

  15. Neurovascular defects and faulty amyloid-β vascular clearance in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sagare, Abhay P.; Bell, Robert D.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence that neurovascular dysfunction is an integral part of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis has continued to emerge in the last decade. Changes in the brain vasculature have been shown to contribute to the onset and progression of the pathological processes associated with AD, such as microvascular reductions, blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and faulty clearance of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) from the brain. Herein, we review the role of the neurovascular unit and molecular mechanisms in cerebral vascular cells behind the pathogenesis of AD. In particular, we focus on molecular pathways within cerebral vascular cells and the systemic circulation that contribute to BBB dysfunction, brain hypoperfusion and impaired clearance of Aβ from the brain. We aim to provide a summary of recent research findings implicated in neurovascular defects and faulty amyloid-β vasular clearance contributing to AD pathogenesis. PMID:22751174

  16. Functional hyperemia and mechanisms of neurovascular coupling in the retinal vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Eric A

    2013-01-01

    The retinal vasculature supplies cells of the inner and middle layers of the retina with oxygen and nutrients. Photic stimulation dilates retinal arterioles producing blood flow increases, a response termed functional hyperemia. Despite recent advances, the neurovascular coupling mechanisms mediating the functional hyperemia response in the retina remain unclear. In this review, the retinal functional hyperemia response is described, and the cellular mechanisms that may mediate the response are assessed. These neurovascular coupling mechanisms include neuronal stimulation of glial cells, leading to the release of vasoactive arachidonic acid metabolites onto blood vessels, release of potassium from glial cells onto vessels, and production and release of nitric oxide (NO), lactate, and adenosine from neurons and glia. The modulation of neurovascular coupling by oxygen and NO are described, and changes in functional hyperemia that occur with aging and in diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and other pathologies, are reviewed. Finally, outstanding questions concerning retinal blood flow in health and disease are discussed. PMID:23963372

  17. [Current concepts of perinatal ischemic injury in the brain neurovascular unit: molecular targets for neuroprotection].

    PubMed

    Morgun, A V; Kuvacheva, N V; Taranushenko, T E; Khilazheva, E D; Malinovskaia, N A; Gorina, Ia V; Pozhilenkova, E A; Frolova, O V; Salmina, A B

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is a relevant medical and social problem. Among many pathological processes in the neonatal period perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury is a major cause of further hemorrhage, necrotic and atrophic changes in the brain. This review presents recent data on the basic mechanisms of the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury along the concept of neurovascular unit (neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes) with the focus on alterations in cell-to-cell communication. Pathological changes caused by ischemia-hypoxia are considered within two phases of injury (ischemic phase and reperfusion phase). The review highlights changes in each individual component of the neurovascular unit and their interactions. Molecular targets for pharmacological improvement of intercellular communication within neurovascular unit as a therapeutic strategy in perinatal brain injury are discussed.

  18. Remodeling with the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Bodzin, S.

    1997-05-01

    Remodeling is the perfect time to improve daylighting, direct gain heating and shading with passive solar techniques. It can also provide the best opportunity to add solar water heating or even photoboltaics to a home. This article describes addition of such energy efficient plans to a home in terms of what is needed and what the benefits are: adding windows, North glass, east and west glass, south glass, daylighting, the roof, shingles and roofing tiles, walls and floors, solar hot water, photovoltaics. Two side bars discuss the sunplace: a passive solar room and angles and overhangs.

  19. Technetium 99m-methylene diphosphonate bone scans in children with reflex neurovascular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Laxer, R.M.; Allen, R.C.; Malleson, P.N.; Morrison, R.T.; Petty, R.E.

    1985-03-01

    Eleven children with reflex neurovascular dystrophy were investigated by technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate bone scanning. Eight of 12 scans demonstrated abnormal findings, four showing diffusely decreased uptake and four diffusely increased uptake of the radionuclide in the affected site. Three scans showed normal findings initially, as did one previously abnormal scan when repeated in the asymptomatic patient 6 months later. Diffusely abnormal findings can be helpful in the diagnosis of childhood reflex neurovascular dystrophy, but a normal scan does not exclude the diagnosis.

  20. A neurovascular transmission model for acupuncture-induced nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sheng-Hsiung; Tsai, Li-Jen

    2008-09-01

    Acupuncture is the practice of inserting needles into the body to reduce pain or induce anesthesia. More broadly, acupuncture is a family of procedures involving the stimulation of anatomical locations on or in the skin by a variety of techniques. Employing acupuncture to treat human disease or maintain bodily condition has been practiced for thousands of years. However, the mechanism(s) of action of acupuncture at the various meridians are poorly understood. Most studies have indicated that acupuncture is able to increase blood flow. The acupuncture points have high electrical conductance and a relationship of the acupuncture points and meridians with the connective tissue planes and the perivascular space has also been suggested. Several studies employing the human and animal models have shown that acupuncture enhances the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and increases local circulation. Specifically, electroacupuncture (EA) seems to prevent the reduction in NO production from endothelial NO synthetase (eNOS) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) that is associated with hypertension and this process involves a stomach-meridian organ but not a non-stomach-meridian organ such as the liver. How can we explain the phenomena of EA and meridian effect? Here, we proposed a neurovascular transmission model for acupuncture induced NO. In this proposed model, the acupuncture stimulus is able to influence connective tissue via mechanical force transfer to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Through the ECM, the mechanotransduction stimulus can be translated or travel from the acupuncture points, which involve local tissue and cells. Cells in the local tissue that have received mechanotransduction induce different types of NO production that can induce changes in blood flow and local circulation. The local mechanical stress produced is coupled to a cyclic strain of the blood vessels and this could then change the frequency of resonance. According to the resonance theory, an oscillatory

  1. To Remodel or To Build?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The question of remodeling an existing house to make it wheelchair accessible or building a new barrier-free house is a difficult decision. This article presents some initial questions and considerations followed by a list of pros and cons for remodeling an existing house vs. building a new house.

  2. No-Regrets Remodeling, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    No-Regrets Remodeling, sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is an informative publication that walks homeowners and/or remodelers through various home remodeling projects. In addition to remodeling information, the publication provides instruction on how to incorporate energy efficiency into the remodeling process. The goal of the publication is to improve homeowner satisfaction after completing a remodeling project and to provide the homeowner with a home that saves energy and is comfortable and healthy.

  3. Preliminary methods for wearable neuro-vascular assessment with non-invasive, active sensing.

    PubMed

    Carek, Andrew M; Töreyin, Hakan; Hersek, Sinan; Inan, Omer T

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a non-invasive and active sensing scheme that is ultimately aimed to be integrated in a wearable system for neuro-vascular health assessment is presented with preliminary results. With this system, vascular tone is modulated by local heating and cooling of the palm, and the resulting changes in local hemodynamics are monitored via impedance plethysmography (IPG) and photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors interfaced with custom analog electronics. Proof-of-concept measurements were conducted on three subjects using hot packs/ice bags to modulate the palmar skin temperature. From ensemble averaged and smoothed versions of pulsatile IPG and PPG signals, the effects of local changes in skin temperature on a series of parameters associated with neuro-vascular mechanisms (heart rate, blood volume, blood flow rate, blood volume pulse inflection point area ratio, and local pulse transit time) have been observed. The promising experimental results suggest that, with different active temperature modulation schemes (consisting of heating/cooling cycles covering different temperature ranges at different rates), it would be possible to enhance the depth and specificity of the information associated with neuro-vascular health by using biosensors that can fit inside a wearable device (such as a sleeve). This study sets the foundation for future studies on designing and testing such a wearable neuro-vascular health assessment system employing active sensing. PMID:26736951

  4. Towards a bimodal proximity sensor for in situ neurovascular bundle detection during dental implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jessie R.; Baribeau, François; Grenier, Paul; Émond, Frédéric; Dubois, Sylvain; Duchesne, François; Girard, Marc; Pope, Timothy; Gallant, Pascal; Mermut, Ozzy; Moghadam, Hassan Ghaderi

    2013-01-01

    Proof of concept results are presented towards an in situ bimodal proximity sensor for neurovascular bundle detection during dental implant surgery using combined near infrared absorption (NIR) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques. These modalities are shown to have different sensitivity to the proximity of optical contrast from neurovascular bundles. NIR AC and DC signals from the pulsing of an artery enable qualitative ranging of the bundle in the millimeter range, with best sensitivity around 0.5-3mm distance in a custom phantom setup. OCT provides structural mapping of the neurovascular bundle at sub-millimeter distances in an ex vivo human jaw bone. Combining the two techniques suggests a novel ranging system for the surgeon that could be implemented in a “smart drill.” The proximity to the neurovascular bundle can be tracked in real time in the range of a few millimeters with NIR signals, after which higher resolution imaging OCT to provide finer ranging in the sub-millimeter distances. PMID:24466473

  5. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia caused by a complex neurovascular conflict: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alafaci, Concetta; Granata, Francesca; Cutugno, Mariano; Marino, Daniele; Conti, Alfredo; Tomasello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) is a rare condition characterized by severe, paroxysmal episodes of pain mainly localized to the external ear canal, pharynx, and tongue, usually caused by a neurovascular conflict between postero-inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and IX cranial nerve. Sometimes there is also a compression of X c.n. Case Description: We present a case of a 71-year-old female with a 3-year history of intense pain localized in the pharynx and posterior portion of the tongue. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) documented a neurovascular conflict between a loop of PICA and IX left c.n. Surgery was performed through a retrosigmoid craniectomy. The intraoperative findings documented a loop of PICA compressing IX, X, and XI c.n. Microvascular decompression (MVD) of IX c.n. was performed using the interposing technique. No rhizotomy and MVD of the X c.n. was performed. Postoperative course showed the regression of all symptoms. Conclusions: The surgical treatment of patients with GN caused by complex neurovascular conflicts can be safely performed with the classical MVD of IX c.n. A double MVD of both IX and X c.n. has a role only in patients presenting symptoms from both nerves. Rhizotomy, in our opinion, has to be avoided in all cases. The authors review the literature concerning GN caused by complex neurovascular conflicts. PMID:25709856

  6. Neurovascular cross talk in diabetic retinopathy: Pathophysiological roles and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Moran, Elizabeth P; Wang, Zhongxiao; Chen, Jing; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Smith, Lois E H; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the working-age population in developed countries, and its prevalence will increase as the global incidence of diabetes grows exponentially. DR begins with an early nonproliferative stage in which retinal blood vessels and neurons degenerate as a consequence of chronic hyperglycemia, resulting in vasoregression and persistent retinal ischemia, metabolic disequilibrium, and inflammation. This is conducive to overcompensatory pathological neovascularization associated with advanced proliferative DR. Although DR is considered a microvascular complication, the retinal microvasculature is intimately associated with and governed by neurons and glia; neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, and dysregulation of neurovascular cross talk are responsible in part for vascular abnormalities in both early nonproliferative DR and advanced proliferative DR. Neuronal activity directly regulates microvascular dilation and blood flow in the process of neurovascular coupling. Retinal neurons also secrete guidance cues in response to injury, ischemia, or metabolic stress that may either promote or suppress vascular outgrowth, either alleviating or exacerbating DR, contingent on the stage of disease and retinal microenvironment. Neurodegeneration, impaired neurovascular coupling, and dysregulation of neuronal guidance cues are key events in the pathogenesis of DR, and correcting these events may prevent or delay development of advanced DR. The review discusses the mechanisms of neurovascular cross talk and its dysregulation in DR, and their potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27473938

  7. Synaptic activity and connective tissue remodeling in denervated frog muscle

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Denervation of skeletal muscle results in dramatic remodeling of the cellular and molecular composition of the muscle connective tissue. This remodeling is concentrated in muscle near neuromuscular junctions and involves the accumulation of interstitial cells and several extracellular matrix molecules. Given the role of extracellular matrix in neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, we predict that this remodeling of the junctional connective tissue directly influences the regeneration of the neuromuscular junction. As one step toward understanding the role of this denervation-induced remodeling in synapse formation, we have begun to look for the signals that are involved in initiating the junctional accumulations of interstitial cells and matrix molecules. Here, the role of muscle inactivity as a signal was examined. The distributions of interstitial cells, fibronectin, and tenascin were determined in muscles inactivated by presynaptic blockade of muscle activity with tetrodotoxin. We found that blockade of muscle activity for up to 4 wk produced neither the junctional accumulation of interstitial cells nor the junctional concentrations of tenascin and fibronectin normally present in denervated frog muscle. In contrast, the muscle inactivity induced the extrajunctional appearance of two synapse-specific molecules, the acetylcholine receptor and a muscle fiber antigen, mAb 3B6. These results demonstrate that the remodeling of the junctional connective tissue in response to nerve injury is a unique response of muscle to denervation in that it is initiated by a mechanism that is independent of muscle activity. Thus connective tissue remodeling in denervated skeletal muscle may be induced by signals released from or associated with the nerve other than the evoked release of neurotransmitter. PMID:7525607

  8. Control of the neurovascular coupling by nitric oxide-dependent regulation of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel F.; Puebla, Mariela; Figueroa, Xavier F.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity must be tightly coordinated with blood flow to keep proper brain function, which is achieved by a mechanism known as neurovascular coupling. Then, an increase in synaptic activity leads to a dilation of local parenchymal arterioles that matches the enhanced metabolic demand. Neurovascular coupling is orchestrated by astrocytes. These glial cells are located between neurons and the microvasculature, with the astrocytic endfeet ensheathing the vessels, which allows fine intercellular communication. The neurotransmitters released during neuronal activity reach astrocytic receptors and trigger a Ca2+ signaling that propagates to the endfeet, activating the release of vasoactive factors and arteriolar dilation. The astrocyte Ca2+ signaling is coordinated by gap junction channels and hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx43 and Cx30) and channels formed by pannexins (Panx-1). The neuronal activity-initiated Ca2+ waves are propagated among neighboring astrocytes directly via gap junctions or through ATP release via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels. In addition, Ca2+ entry via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels may participate in the regulation of the astrocyte signaling-mediated neurovascular coupling. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO) can activate connexin hemichannel by S-nitrosylation and the Ca2+-dependent NO-synthesizing enzymes endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) are expressed in astrocytes. Therefore, the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling triggered in neurovascular coupling may activate NO production, which, in turn, may lead to Ca2+ influx through hemichannel activation. Furthermore, NO release from the hemichannels located at astrocytic endfeet may contribute to the vasodilation of parenchymal arterioles. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling that mediates neurovascular coupling, with a special emphasis in the possible participation of NO in this process

  9. Oleanolic acid alleviated pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hai-Han; Zhang, Nan; Feng, Hong; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Zhen-Guo; Yang, Zheng; Yuan, Yuan; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Previous study has demonstrated that oleanolic acid (OA) possessing the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties blunted high-glucose-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy and ameliorated experimental autoimmune myocarditis in mice. However, little is known about its effects on pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling. Herein, we investigated the effect of OA on cardiac remodeling and underlying mechanism. Mice, subjected to aortic banding (AB), were randomly assigned into control group and experimental group. OA premixed in diets was administered to mice after 3 days of AB. Echocardiography and catheter-based measurements of hemodynamic parameters were performed after 8 weeks' treatment of OA. Histologic examination and molecular analyses were used to assess cardiac hypertrophy and tissue fibrosis. In addition, the inhibitory effects of OA on H9c2 cardiomyocytes and cardiac primary fibroblast responded to the stimulation of AngII were also investigated. OA ameliorated the systolic and diastolic dysfunction induced by pressure overload evidenced by echocardiography and catheter-based measurements. OA also decreased the mRNA expression of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis markers evidenced by RT-PCR. It has been shown in our study that pressure overload activated the phosphorylations of Akt, mTOR, p70s6k, S6, GSK3β, and FoxO3a, and treatment of OA attenuated the phosphorylation of these proteins. In addition, hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and fibrosis markers induced by AngII was inhibited by OA in vitro. Our findings uncover that OA suppressed AB-induced cardiac hypertrophy, partly by inhibiting the activity of Akt/mTOR pathway, and suggest that treatment of OA may have a benefit on retarding the progress of cardiac remodeling under long terms of pressure overload. PMID:26215454

  10. Memories of AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    I had the good fortune to be a student of A. B. Migdal - AB, as we called him in person or in his absence - and to work in the sector he headed at the Kurchatov Institute, along with his other students and my friends, including Vitya Galitsky, Spartak Belyayev and Tolya Larkin. I was especially close with AB in the second half of the 1950s, the years most important for my formation, and AB's contribution to this formation was very great. To this day, I've often quoted AB on various occasions, as it's hard to put things better or more precisely than he did; I tell friends stories heard from AB, because these stories enhance life as AB himself enhanced it; my daughter is named Tanya after AB's wife Tatyana Lvovna, and so on. In what follows, I'll recount a few episodes in my life in which AB played an important or decisive role, and then will share some other memories of AB...

  11. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Vincis, Roberto; Lagier, Samuel; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging. PMID:26146075

  12. EMCCD-Based High Resolution Dynamic X-Ray Detector for Neurovascular Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Jain, A.; Panse, A.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic detector for neurovascular interventions. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2, bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.3:1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 cycles/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, both independent of gain applied to EMCCD, as needed for region-of-interest (ROI) image guidance during neurovascular interventions. PMID:22256144

  13. Cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal: neurovascular anatomy on gas CT cisternograms

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, C.R.; Hasso, A.N.; Drayer, B.P.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.; Thompson, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The authors reviewed 103 normal gas CT cisternograms to delineate the appearance of normal neurovascular structures in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC). Cranial nerves VII and VIII were identified in the CPA in 97% of cases, either separately (53%) or as a bundle (44%). Intracanalicular branches of the VIIIth cranial nerve were identified in 20% of cases, and cranial nerve V was visualized in the CPA in 14%. The characteristic vascular loop, usually the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, was visible in 35% of cases, and, in 22% of visualized cases, was in an intracanalicular location. In 10% of cases, greater than 66% of the IAC was occupied by the neurovascular bundle. Familiarity with the normal anatomy and variations seen on gas CT cisternograms is necessary to prevent false-positive interpretations.

  14. Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging: From Mechanisms to Therapies. Proceedings of the Inaugural Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Akassoglou, Katerina; Agalliu, Dritan; Chang, Christopher J.; Davalos, Dimitrios; Grutzendler, Jaime; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Khakh, Baljit S.; Kleinfeld, David; McGavern, Dorian B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough advances in intravital imaging have launched a new era for the study of dynamic interactions at the neurovascular interface in health and disease. The first Neurovascular and Immuno-Imaging Symposium was held at the Gladstone Institutes, University of California, San Francisco in March, 2015. This highly interactive symposium brought together a group of leading researchers who discussed how recent studies have unraveled fundamental biological mechanisms in diverse scientific fields such as neuroscience, immunology, and vascular biology, both under physiological and pathological conditions. These Proceedings highlight how advances in imaging technologies and their applications revolutionized our understanding of the communication between brain, immune, and vascular systems and identified novel targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological diseases. PMID:26941593

  15. microRNAs and Cardiovascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ono, Koh

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality attributable largely to structural changes in the heart and with associated cardiac dysfunction. Remodeling is defined as alteration of the mass, dimensions, or shape of the heart (termed cardiac or ventricular remodeling) and vessels (vascular remodeling) in response to hemodynamic load and/or cardiovascular injury in association with neurohormonal activation. Remodeling may be described as physiologic or pathologic; alternatively, remodeling may be classified as adaptive or maladaptive. The importance of remodeling as a pathogenic mechanism has been controversial because factors leading to remodeling as well as the remodeling itself may be major determinants of patients' prognosis. The basic mechanisms of cardiovascular remodeling, and especially the roles of microRNAs in HF progression and vascular diseases, will be reviewed here.

  16. Early effects of high-fat diet on neurovascular function and focal ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiguo; Prakash, Roshini; Chawla, Dhruv; Du, Wenting; Didion, Sean P; Filosa, Jessica A; Zhang, Quanguang; Brann, Darrell W; Lima, Victor V; Tostes, Rita C; Ergul, Adviye

    2013-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the early effects of high-fat diet (HFD) on neurovascular function and ischemic stroke outcomes remain unclear. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that HFD beginning early in life 1) impairs neurovascular coupling, 2) causes cerebrovascular dysfunction, and 3) worsens short-term outcomes after cerebral ischemia. Functional hyperemia and parenchymal arteriole (PA) reactivity were measured in rats after 8 wk of HFD. The effect of HFD on basilar artery function after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and associated O-GlcNAcylation were assessed. Neuronal cell death, infarct size, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) frequency/severity, and neurological deficit were evaluated after global ischemia and transient MCAO. HFD caused a 10% increase in body weight and doubled adiposity without a change in lipid profile, blood glucose, and blood pressure. Functional hyperemia and PA relaxation were decreased with HFD. Basilar arteries from stroked HFD rats were more sensitive to contractile factors, and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was impaired. Vascular O-GlcNAcylated protein content was increased with HFD. This group also showed greater mortality rate, infarct volume, HT occurrence rate, and HT severity and poor functional outcome compared with the control diet group. These results indicate that HFD negatively affects neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular function even in the absence of dyslipidemia. These early cerebrovascular changes may be the cause of greater cerebral injury and poor outcomes of stroke in these animals. PMID:23576615

  17. Special Report: The Rush to Remodel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools, 1973

    1973-01-01

    As more and more districts scurry to remodel outdated buildings and individual rooms, the detailed how-to-do-it sometimes gets lost in the overall planning. This article furnishes specific help in ways to remodel economically. (Author/JN)

  18. Aerobic exercise training promotes physiological cardiac remodeling involving a set of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago; Baraúna, Valério G.; Negrão, Carlos E.; Phillips, M. Ian

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is an important physiological compensatory mechanism in response to chronic increase in hemodynamic overload. There are two different forms of LV hypertrophy, one physiological and another pathological. Aerobic exercise induces beneficial physiological LV remodeling. The molecular/cellular mechanisms for this effect are not totally known, and here we review various mechanisms including the role of microRNA (miRNA). Studies in the heart, have identified antihypertrophic miRNA-1, -133, -26, -9, -98, -29, -378, and -145 and prohypertrophic miRNA-143, -103, -130a, -146a, -21, -210, -221, -222, -27a/b, -199a/b, -208, -195, -499, -34a/b/c, -497, -23a, and -15a/b. Four miRNAs are recognized as cardiac-specific: miRNA-1, -133a/b, -208a/b, and -499 and called myomiRs. In our studies we have shown that miRNAs respond to swimming aerobic exercise by 1) decreasing cardiac fibrosis through miRNA-29 increasing and inhibiting collagen, 2) increasing angiogenesis through miRNA-126 by inhibiting negative regulators of the VEGF pathway, and 3) modulating the renin-angiotensin system through the miRNAs-27a/b and -143. Exercise training also increases cardiomyocyte growth and survival by swimming-regulated miRNA-1, -21, -27a/b, -29a/c, -30e, -99b, -100, -124, -126, -133a/b, -143, -144, -145, -208a, and -222 and running-regulated miRNA-1, -26, -27a, -133, -143, -150, and -222, which influence genes associated with the heart remodeling and angiogenesis. We conclude that there is a potential role of these miRNAs in promoting cardioprotective effects on physiological growth. PMID:26071549

  19. Acute Resveratrol Consumption Improves Neurovascular Coupling Capacity in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rachel H.X.; Raederstorff, Daniel; Howe, Peter R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor cerebral perfusion may contribute to cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that resveratrol can enhance cerebral vasodilator function and thereby alleviate the cognitive deficits in T2DM. We have already reported that acute resveratrol consumption improved cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR) to hypercapnia. We now report the effects of resveratrol on neurovascular coupling capacity (CVR to cognitive stimuli), cognitive performance and correlations with plasma resveratrol concentrations. Methods: Thirty-six T2DM adults aged 40–80 years were randomized to consume single doses of resveratrol (0, 75, 150 and 300 mg) at weekly intervals. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to monitor changes in blood flow velocity (BFV) during a cognitive test battery. The battery consisted of dual-tasking (finger tapping with both Trail Making task and Serial Subtraction 3 task) and a computerized multi-tasking test that required attending to four tasks simultaneously. CVR to cognitive tasks was calculated as the per cent increase in BFV from pre-test basal to peak mean blood flow velocity and also as the area under the curve for BFV. Results: Compared to placebo, 75 mg resveratrol significantly improved neurovascular coupling capacity, which correlated with plasma total resveratrol levels. Enhanced performance on the multi-tasking test battery was also evident following 75 mg and 300 mg of resveratrol. Conclusion: a single 75 mg dose of resveratrol was able to improve neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in T2DM. Evaluation of benefits of chronic resveratrol supplementation is now warranted. PMID:27420093

  20. Neurovascular and neuroimaging effects of the hallucinogenic serotonin receptor agonist psilocin in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spain, Aisling; Howarth, Clare; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Sharp, Trevor; Sibson, Nicola R; Martin, Chris

    2015-12-01

    The development of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) has presented the opportunity for investigation of the neurophysiological effects of drugs in vivo. Psilocin, a hallucinogen metabolised from psilocybin, was recently reported to evoke brain region-specific, phMRI signal changes in humans. The present study investigated the effects of psilocin in a rat model using phMRI and then probed the relationship between neuronal and haemodynamic responses using a multimodal measurement preparation. Psilocin (2 mg/kg or 0.03 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle was administered to rats (N=6/group) during either phMRI scanning or concurrent imaging of cortical blood flow and recording of local field potentials. Compared to vehicle controls psilocin (2 mg/kg) evoked phMRI signal increases in a number of regions including olfactory and limbic areas and elements of the visual system. PhMRI signal decreases were seen in other regions including somatosensory and motor cortices. Investigation of neurovascular coupling revealed that whilst neuronal responses (local field potentials) to sensory stimuli were decreased in amplitude by psilocin administration, concurrently measured haemodynamic responses (cerebral blood flow) were enhanced. The present findings show that psilocin evoked region-specific changes in phMRI signals in the rat, confirming recent human data. However, the results also suggest that the haemodynamic signal changes underlying phMRI responses reflect changes in both neuronal activity and neurovascular coupling. This highlights the importance of understanding the neurovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations for interpreting haemodynamic neuroimaging data. PMID:26192543

  1. Impaired neurovascular coupling in the APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rancillac, Armelle; Geoffroy, Helene; Rossier, Jean

    2012-12-01

    The tight coupling between neuronal activity and the local increase of blood flow termed neurovascular coupling is essential for normal brain function. This mechanism of regulation is compromised in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In order to determine whether a purely vascular dysfunction or a neuronal alteration of blood vessels diameter control could be responsible for the impaired neurovascular coupling observed in AD, blood vessels reactivity in response to different pharmacological stimulations was examined in double transgenic APPxPS1 mice model of AD. Blood vessels movements were monitored using infrared videomicroscopy ex vivo, in cortical slices of 8 month-old APPxPS1 and wild type (WT) mice. We quantified vasomotor responses induced either by direct blood vessel stimulation with a thromboxane A2 analogue, the U46619 (9,11-dideoxy-11a,9a-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α) or via the stimulation of interneurons with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) agonist DMPP (1,1-Dimethyl-4- phenylpiperazinium iodide). Using both types of stimulation, no significant differences were detected for the amplitude of blood vessel diameter changes between the transgenic APPxPS1 mice model of AD and WT mice, although the kinetics of recovery were slower in APPxPS1 mice. We find that activation of neocortical interneurons with DMPP induced both vasodilation via Nitric Oxide (NO) release and constriction via Neuropeptide Y (NPY) release. However, we observed a smaller proportion of reactive blood vessels following a neuronal activation in transgenic mice compared with WT mice. Altogether, these results suggest that in this mouse model of AD, deficiency in the cortical neurovascular coupling essentially results from a neuronal rather than a vascular dysfunction.

  2. A Critical Role for the Vascular Endothelium in Functional Neurovascular Coupling in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brenda R.; Kozberg, Mariel G.; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The functional modulation of blood flow in the brain is critical for brain health and is the basis of contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging. There is evident coupling between increases in neuronal activity and increases in local blood flow; however, many aspects of this neurovascular coupling remain unexplained by current models. Based on the rapid dilation of distant pial arteries during cortical functional hyperemia, we hypothesized that endothelial signaling may play a key role in the long‐range propagation of vasodilation during functional hyperemia in the brain. Although well characterized in the peripheral vasculature, endothelial involvement in functional neurovascular coupling has not been demonstrated. Methods and Results We combined in vivo exposed‐cortex multispectral optical intrinsic signal imaging (MS‐OISI) with a novel in vivo implementation of the light‐dye technique to record the cortical hemodynamic response to somatosensory stimulus in rats before and after spatially selective endothelial disruption. We demonstrate that discrete interruption of endothelial signaling halts propagation of stimulus‐evoked vasodilation in pial arteries, and that wide‐field endothelial disruption in pial arteries significantly attenuates the hemodynamic response to stimulus, particularly the early, rapid increase and peak in hyperemia. Conclusions Involvement of endothelial pathways in functional neurovascular coupling provides new explanations for the spatial and temporal features of the hemodynamic response to stimulus and could explain previous results that were interpreted as evidence for astrocyte‐mediated control of functional hyperemia. Our results unify many aspects of blood flow regulation in the brain and body and prompt new investigation of direct links between systemic cardiovascular disease and neural deficits. PMID:24926076

  3. The Brain’s Heart – Therapeutic Opportunities for Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) and Neurovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ning, MingMing; Lo, Eng H.; Ning, Pei-Chen; Xu, Su-Yu; McMullin, David; Demirjian, Zareh; Inglessis, Ignacio; Dec, G William; Palacios, Igor; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.

    2013-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO), a common congenital cardiac abnormality, is a connection between the right and left atria in the heart. As a “back door to the brain”, PFO can serve as a conduit for paradoxical embolism, allowing venous thrombi to enter the arterial circulation, avoiding filtration by the lungs, and causing ischemic stroke. PFO-related strokes affect more than 150,000 people per year in the US, and PFO is present in up to 60% of migraine patients with aura, and in one out of four normal individuals. So, in such a highly prevalent condition, what are the best treatment and prevention strategies? Emerging studies show PFO-related neurovascular disease to be a multi-organ condition with varying individual risk factors that may require individualized therapeutic approaches – opening the field for new pharmacologic and therapeutic targets. The anatomy of PFO suggests that, in addition to thrombi, it can also allow harmful circulatory factors to travel directly from the venous to the arterial circulation, a concept important in finding novel therapeutic targets for PFO-related neurovascular injury. Here, we: 1) review emerging data on PFO-related injuries and clinical trials; 2) discuss potential mechanisms of PFO-related neurovascular disease in the context of multi-organ interaction and heart-brain signaling; and 3) discuss novel therapeutic targets and research frontiers. Clinical studies and molecular mapping of the circulatory landscape of this multi-organ disease will both be necessary in order to better individualize clinical treatment for a condition affecting more than a quarter of the world’s population. PMID:23528225

  4. The brain's heart - therapeutic opportunities for patent foramen ovale (PFO) and neurovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ning, Mingming; Lo, Eng H; Ning, Pei-Chen; Xu, Su-Yu; McMullin, David; Demirjian, Zareh; Inglessis, Ignacio; Dec, G William; Palacios, Igor; Buonanno, Ferdinando S

    2013-08-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO), a common congenital cardiac abnormality, is a connection between the right and left atria in the heart. As a "back door to the brain", PFO can serve as a conduit for paradoxical embolism, allowing venous thrombi to enter the arterial circulation, avoiding filtration by the lungs, and causing ischemic stroke. PFO-related strokes affect more than 150,000 people per year in the US, and PFO is present in up to 60% of migraine patients with aura, and in one out of four normal individuals. So, in such a highly prevalent condition, what are the best treatment and prevention strategies? Emerging studies show PFO-related neurovascular disease to be a multi-organ condition with varying individual risk factors that may require individualized therapeutic approaches - opening the field for new pharmacologic and therapeutic targets. The anatomy of PFO suggests that, in addition to thrombi, it can also allow harmful circulatory factors to travel directly from the venous to the arterial circulation, a concept important in finding novel therapeutic targets for PFO-related neurovascular injury. Here, we: 1) review emerging data on PFO-related injuries and clinical trials; 2) discuss potential mechanisms of PFO-related neurovascular disease in the context of multi-organ interaction and heart-brain signaling; and 3) discuss novel therapeutic targets and research frontiers. Clinical studies and molecular mapping of the circulatory landscape of this multi-organ disease will both be necessary in order to better individualize clinical treatment for a condition affecting more than a quarter of the world's population.

  5. Volumetric BOLD fMRI simulation: from neurovascular coupling to multivoxel imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) modality has been numerically simulated by calculating single voxel signals. However, the observation on single voxel signals cannot provide information regarding the spatial distribution of the signals. Specifically, a single BOLD voxel signal simulation cannot answer the fundamental question: is the magnetic resonance (MR) image a replica of its underling magnetic susceptibility source? In this paper, we address this problem by proposing a multivoxel volumetric BOLD fMRI simulation model and a susceptibility expression formula for linear neurovascular coupling process, that allow us to examine the BOLD fMRI procedure from neurovascular coupling to MR image formation. Methods Since MRI technology only senses the magnetism property, we represent a linear neurovascular-coupled BOLD state by a magnetic susceptibility expression formula, which accounts for the parameters of cortical vasculature, intravascular blood oxygenation level, and local neuroactivity. Upon the susceptibility expression of a BOLD state, we carry out volumetric BOLD fMRI simulation by calculating the fieldmap (established by susceptibility magnetization) and the complex multivoxel MR image (by intravoxel dephasing). Given the predefined susceptibility source and the calculated complex MR image, we compare the MR magnitude (phase, respectively) image with the predefined susceptibility source (the calculated fieldmap) by spatial correlation. Results The spatial correlation between the MR magnitude image and the magnetic susceptibility source is about 0.90 for the settings of TE = 30 ms, B0 = 3 T, voxel size = 100 micron, vessel radius = 3 micron, and blood volume fraction = 2%. Using these parameters value, the spatial correlation between the MR phase image and the susceptibility-induced fieldmap is close to 1.00. Conclusion Our simulation results show that the MR magnitude image is not an exact

  6. Neurovascular and neuroimaging effects of the hallucinogenic serotonin receptor agonist psilocin in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spain, Aisling; Howarth, Clare; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Sharp, Trevor; Sibson, Nicola R; Martin, Chris

    2015-12-01

    The development of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) has presented the opportunity for investigation of the neurophysiological effects of drugs in vivo. Psilocin, a hallucinogen metabolised from psilocybin, was recently reported to evoke brain region-specific, phMRI signal changes in humans. The present study investigated the effects of psilocin in a rat model using phMRI and then probed the relationship between neuronal and haemodynamic responses using a multimodal measurement preparation. Psilocin (2 mg/kg or 0.03 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle was administered to rats (N=6/group) during either phMRI scanning or concurrent imaging of cortical blood flow and recording of local field potentials. Compared to vehicle controls psilocin (2 mg/kg) evoked phMRI signal increases in a number of regions including olfactory and limbic areas and elements of the visual system. PhMRI signal decreases were seen in other regions including somatosensory and motor cortices. Investigation of neurovascular coupling revealed that whilst neuronal responses (local field potentials) to sensory stimuli were decreased in amplitude by psilocin administration, concurrently measured haemodynamic responses (cerebral blood flow) were enhanced. The present findings show that psilocin evoked region-specific changes in phMRI signals in the rat, confirming recent human data. However, the results also suggest that the haemodynamic signal changes underlying phMRI responses reflect changes in both neuronal activity and neurovascular coupling. This highlights the importance of understanding the neurovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations for interpreting haemodynamic neuroimaging data.

  7. Neurovascular and neuroimaging effects of the hallucinogenic serotonin receptor agonist psilocin in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Spain, Aisling; Howarth, Clare; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A.; Sharp, Trevor; Sibson, Nicola R.; Martin, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The development of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) has presented the opportunity for investigation of the neurophysiological effects of drugs in vivo. Psilocin, a hallucinogen metabolised from psilocybin, was recently reported to evoke brain region-specific, phMRI signal changes in humans. The present study investigated the effects of psilocin in a rat model using phMRI and then probed the relationship between neuronal and haemodynamic responses using a multimodal measurement preparation. Psilocin (2 mg/kg or 0.03 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle was administered to rats (N = 6/group) during either phMRI scanning or concurrent imaging of cortical blood flow and recording of local field potentials. Compared to vehicle controls psilocin (2 mg/kg) evoked phMRI signal increases in a number of regions including olfactory and limbic areas and elements of the visual system. PhMRI signal decreases were seen in other regions including somatosensory and motor cortices. Investigation of neurovascular coupling revealed that whilst neuronal responses (local field potentials) to sensory stimuli were decreased in amplitude by psilocin administration, concurrently measured haemodynamic responses (cerebral blood flow) were enhanced. The present findings show that psilocin evoked region-specific changes in phMRI signals in the rat, confirming recent human data. However, the results also suggest that the haemodynamic signal changes underlying phMRI responses reflect changes in both neuronal activity and neurovascular coupling. This highlights the importance of understanding the neurovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations for interpreting haemodynamic neuroimaging data. PMID:26192543

  8. Neurovascular embolization: in vitro evaluation of a mechanical detachable platinum coil system.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K J; Mandai, S; Gailloud, P; Clint, H; Szopinski, K; Quie, H; Martin, J B; Rüfenacht, D A

    2000-12-01

    The authors evaluated a mechanically detachable platinum coil system intended for neurovascular use. The introduction characteristics, ease of delivery, ease of retrieval, and detachability were studied with fluoroscopic guidance with in vitro silicone models. All the coils passed easily through the microcatheter. The detachment maneuver occurred within 20 seconds with 20 or fewer rotations of the pusher wire. One of 229 coils detached prematurely but only after deliberate and extreme manipulation. The detachment system is safe, reliable, and consistent and will be useful for interventional neuroradiologists.

  9. Towards spatial frequency domain optical imaging of neurovascular coupling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alexander J.; Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler B.; Green, Kim N.; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-02-01

    Early neurovascular coupling (NVC) changes in Alzheimer's disease can potentially provide imaging biomarkers to assist with diagnosis and treatment. Previous efforts to quantify NVC with intrinsic signal imaging have required assumptions of baseline optical pathlength to calculate changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations during evoked stimuli. In this work, we present an economical spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) platform utilizing a commercially available LED projector, camera, and off-the-shelf optical components suitable for imaging dynamic optical properties. The fast acquisition platform described in this work is validated on silicone phantoms and demonstrated in neuroimaging of a mouse model.

  10. Neural remodeling in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Strettoi, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Mammalian retinal degenerations initiated by gene defects in rods, cones or the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) often trigger loss of the sensory retina, effectively leaving the neural retina deafferented. The neural retina responds to this challenge by remodeling, first by subtle changes in neuronal structure and later by large-scale reorganization. Retinal degenerations in the mammalian retina generally progress through three phases. Phase 1 initiates with expression of a primary insult, followed by phase 2 photoreceptor death that ablates the sensory retina via initial photoreceptor stress, phenotype deconstruction, irreversible stress and cell death, including bystander effects or loss of trophic support. The loss of cones heralds phase 3: a protracted period of global remodeling of the remnant neural retina. Remodeling resembles the responses of many CNS assemblies to deafferentation or trauma, and includes neuronal cell death, neuronal and glial migration, elaboration of new neurites and synapses, rewiring of retinal circuits, glial hypertrophy and the evolution of a fibrotic glial seal that isolates the remnant neural retina from the surviving RPE and choroid. In early phase 2, stressed photoreceptors sprout anomalous neurites that often reach the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. As death of rods and cones progresses, bipolar and horizontal cells are deafferented and retract most of their dendrites. Horizontal cells develop anomalous axonal processes and dendritic stalks that enter the inner plexiform layer. Dendrite truncation in rod bipolar cells is accompanied by revision of their macromolecular phenotype, including the loss of functioning mGluR6 transduction. After ablation of the sensory retina, Müller cells increase intermediate filament synthesis, forming a dense fibrotic layer in the remnant subretinal space. This layer invests the remnant retina and seals it from access via the choroidal route. Evidence of bipolar cell death begins in

  11. Cocaine attenuates blood flow but not neuronal responses to stimulation while preserving neurovascular coupling for resting brain activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Liu, P; Volkow, N D; Pan, Y; Du, C

    2016-10-01

    Cocaine affects neuronal activity and constricts cerebral blood vessels, making it difficult to determine whether cocaine-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) reflect neuronal activation or its vasoactive effects. Here we assessed the effects of acute cocaine on both resting-state and stimulation responses to investigate cocaine's effects on neurovascular coupling and to differentiate its effects on neuronal activity from its vasoactive actions. We concurrently measured cortical field potentials via thinned-skull electroencephalography recordings and CBF with laser Doppler flowmetry in the rat's somatosensory cortex for both resting state and forepaw stimulation before and following cocaine administration (1 mg kg(-1), intravenously). Results show both resting-state field potentials and CBF were depressed after cocaine administration (19.8±4.7% and 52.1±13.4%, respectively) and these changes were strongly correlated with each other (r=0.81, P<0.001), indicating that cocaine did not affect neurovascular coupling at rest and that the reduction in resting CBF reflected reduction in synchronized spontaneous neuronal activity rather than vasoconstriction. In contrast, the forepaw stimulation-evoked neuronal activity was not changed by cocaine (P=0.244), whereas the CBF to the stimulation was reduced 49.9±2.6% (P=0.028) gradually recovering ∼20 min after cocaine injection, indicating that neurovascular coupling during stimulation was temporarily disrupted by cocaine. Neurovascular uncoupling by cocaine during stimulation but not during rest indicates that distinct processes might underlie neurovascular regulation for both stimulation and spontaneous activity. The greater reductions by cocaine to the stimulation-induced CBF increases than to the background CBF should be considered when interpreting functional MRI studies comparing activation responses between controls and cocaine abusers. Neurovascular uncoupling could contribute to cocaine

  12. Cocaine attenuates blood flow but not neuronal responses to stimulation while preserving neurovascular coupling for resting brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Peng; Volkow, Nora D.; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine affects neuronal activity and constricts cerebral blood vessels, making it difficult to determine whether cocaine-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) reflect neuronal activation or its vasoactive effects. Here we assessed the effects of acute cocaine on both resting-state and stimulation responses to investigate cocaine’s effects on neurovascular coupling and to differentiate its effects on neuronal activity from its vasoactive actions. We concurrently measured cortical field potentials via thinned skull EEG recordings and CBF with laser Doppler flowmetry in the rat’s somatosensory cortex for both resting state and forepaw stimulation prior to and following cocaine administration (1mg/kg, i.v.). Results show both resting-state field potentials and CBF were depressed after cocaine administration (19.8±4.7% and 52.1±13.4%, respectively) and these changes were strongly correlated with each other (r=0.81, p<0.001) indicating that cocaine did not affect neurovascular coupling at rest and that the reduction in resting CBF reflected reduction in synchronized spontaneous neuronal activity rather than vasoconstriction. In contrast, the forepaw-stimulation-evoked neuronal activity was not changed by cocaine (p=0.244) whereas the CBF to the stimulation was reduced 49.9±2.6% (p=0.028) gradually recovering ~20min post cocaine injection, indicating that neurovascular coupling during stimulation was temporarily disrupted by cocaine. Neurovascular uncoupling by cocaine during stimulation but not during rest indicates that distinct processes might underlie regulation of neurovascular coupling for spontaneous than for stimulation-induced activity. The greater reductions by cocaine to the stimulation-induced CBF increases than to the background CBF should be considered when interpreting fMRI studies comparing activation responses between controls and cocaine abusers. Neurovascular uncoupling could contribute to cocaine’s neurotoxicity particularly for

  13. Frontiers in growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  14. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  15. Frontiers in growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-06-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  16. Chromatin remodeling in plant development.

    PubMed

    Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel; Cubas, Pilar; Martínez-Zapater, José M

    2009-01-01

    Plant development results from specific patterns of gene expression that are tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal manner. Chromatin remodeling plays a central role in establishing these expression patterns and maintaining epigenetic transcriptional states through successive rounds of mitosis that take place within a cell lineage. Plant epigenetic switches occur not only at the embryo stage, but also during postembryonic developmental transitions, suggesting that chromatin remodeling activities in plants can provide a higher degree of regulatory flexibility which probably underlies their developmental plasticity. Here, we highlight recent progress in the understanding of plant chromatin dynamic organization, facilitating the activation or repression of specific sets of genes involved in different developmental programs and integrating them with the response to environmental signals. Chromatin conformation controls gene expression both in actively dividing undifferentiated cells and in those already fate-determined. In this context, we first describe chromatin reorganization activities required to maintain meristem function stable through DNA replication and cell division. Organ initiation at the apex, with emphasis on reproductive development, is next discussed to uncover the chromatin events involved in the establishment and maintenance of expression patterns associated with differentiating cells; this is illustrated with the complex epigenetic regulation of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Finally, we discuss the involvement of chromatin remodeling in plant responses to environmental cues and to different types of stress conditions.

  17. A novel in vitro model to study pericytes in the neurovascular unit of the developing cortex.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Wedler, Hannah E; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Cortical function is impaired in various disorders of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease, autism and schizophrenia. Some of these disorders are speculated to be associated with insults in early brain development. Pericytes have been shown to regulate neurovascular integrity in development, health and disease. Hence, precisely controlled mechanisms must have evolved in evolution to operate pericyte proliferation, repair and cell fate within the neurovascular unit (NVU). It is well established that pericyte deficiency leads to NVU injury resulting in cognitive decline and neuroinflammation in cortical layers. However, little is known about the role of pericytes in pathophysiological processes of the developing cortex. Here we introduce an in vitro model that enables to precisely study pericytes in the immature cortex and show that moderate inflammation and hypoxia result in caspase-3 mediated pericyte loss. Using heterozygous EYFP-NG2 mouse mutants we performed live imaging of pericytes for several days in vitro. In addition we show that pericytes maintain their capacity to proliferate which may allow cell-based therapies like reprogramming of pericytes into induced neuronal cells in the presented approach.

  18. A modular approach to create a neurovascular unit-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Achyuta, Anil Kumar H; Conway, Amy J; Crouse, Richard B; Bannister, Emilee C; Lee, Robin N; Katnik, Christopher P; Behensky, Adam A; Cuevas, Javier; Sundaram, Shivshankar S

    2013-02-21

    In this work, we describe the fabrication and working of a modular microsystem that recapitulates the functions of the "Neurovascular Unit". The microdevice comprised a vertical stack of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) neural parenchymal chamber separated by a vascular channel via a microporous polycarbonate (PC) membrane. The neural chamber housed a mixture of neurons (~4%), astrocytes (~95%), and microglia (~1%). The vascular channel was lined with a layer of rat brain microvascular endothelial cell line (RBE4). Cellular components in the neural chamber and vascular channel showed viability (>90%). The neural cells fired inhibitory as well as excitatory potentials following 10 days of culture. The endothelial cells showed diluted-acetylated low density lipoprotein (dil-a-LDL) uptake, expressed von Willebrand factor (vWF) and zonula occludens (ZO-1) tight junctions, and showed decreased Alexafluor™-conjugated dextran leakage across their barriers significantly compared with controls (p < 0.05). When the vascular layer was stimulated with TNF-α for 6 h, about 75% of resident microglia and astrocytes on the neural side were activated significantly (p < 0.05 compared to controls) recapitulating tissue-mimetic responses resembling neuroinflammation. The impact of this microsystem lies in the fact that this biomimetic neurovascular platform might not only be harnessed for obtaining mechanistic insights for neurodegenerative disorders, but could also serve as a potential screening tool for central nervous system (CNS) therapeutics in toxicology and neuroinfectious diseases. PMID:23108480

  19. Neurophysiological, metabolic and cellular compartments that drive neurovascular coupling and neuroimaging signals

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Andrea; Jego, Pierrick; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Canals, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Complete understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate work and energy supply of the brain, the so called neurovascular coupling, is fundamental to interpreting brain energetics and their influence on neuronal coding strategies, but also to interpreting signals obtained from brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Interactions between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow regulation are largely compartmentalized. First, there exists a functional compartmentalization in which glutamatergic peri-synaptic activity and its electrophysiological events occur in close proximity to vascular responses. Second, the metabolic processes that fuel peri-synaptic activity are partially segregated between glycolytic and oxidative compartments. Finally, there is cellular segregation between astrocytic and neuronal compartments, which has potentially important implications on neurovascular coupling. Experimental data is progressively showing a tight interaction between the products of energy consumption and neurotransmission-driven signaling molecules that regulate blood flow. Here, we review some of these issues in light of recent findings with special attention to the neuron-glia interplay on the generation of neuroimaging signals. PMID:23543907

  20. Neurovascular coupling in normal aging: A combined optical, ERP and fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Fabiani, Monica; Gordon, Brian A.; Maclin, Edward L.; Pearson, Melanie A.; Brumback-Peltz, Carrie R.; Low, Kathy A.; McAuley, Edward; Sutton, Bradley P.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Gratton, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is characterized by changes in both hemodynamic and neuronal responses, which may be influenced by the cardiorespiratory fitness of the individual. To investigate the relationship between neuronal and hemodynamic changes, we studied the brain activity elicited by visual stimulation (checkerboard reversals at different frequencies) in younger adults and in older adults varying in physical fitness. Four functional brain measures were used to compare neuronal and hemodynamic responses obtained from BA17: two reflecting neuronal activity (the event-related optical signal, EROS, and the C1 response of the ERP), and two reflecting functional hemodynamic changes (functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS). The results indicated that both younger and older adults exhibited a quadratic relationship between neuronal and hemodynamic effects, with reduced increases of the hemodynamic response at high levels of neuronal activity. Although older adults showed reduced activation, similar neurovascular coupling functions were observed in the two age groups when fMRI and deoxy-hemoglobin measures were used. However, the coupling between oxy-and deoxy-hemoglobin changes decreased with age and increased with increasing fitness. These data indicate that departures from linearity in neurovascular coupling may be present when using hemodynamic measures to study neuronal function. PMID:23664952

  1. Neurophysiological, metabolic and cellular compartments that drive neurovascular coupling and neuroimaging signals.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Andrea; Jego, Pierrick; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Canals, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Complete understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate work and energy supply of the brain, the so called neurovascular coupling, is fundamental to interpreting brain energetics and their influence on neuronal coding strategies, but also to interpreting signals obtained from brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Interactions between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow regulation are largely compartmentalized. First, there exists a functional compartmentalization in which glutamatergic peri-synaptic activity and its electrophysiological events occur in close proximity to vascular responses. Second, the metabolic processes that fuel peri-synaptic activity are partially segregated between glycolytic and oxidative compartments. Finally, there is cellular segregation between astrocytic and neuronal compartments, which has potentially important implications on neurovascular coupling. Experimental data is progressively showing a tight interaction between the products of energy consumption and neurotransmission-driven signaling molecules that regulate blood flow. Here, we review some of these issues in light of recent findings with special attention to the neuron-glia interplay on the generation of neuroimaging signals. PMID:23543907

  2. The Changing Landscape of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Neurovascular Disorders and in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cataldi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    It is a common belief that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) cannot carry toxic amounts of Ca2+ in neurons. Also, some of them as L-type channels are essential for Ca2+-dependent regulation of prosurvival gene-programs. However, a wealth of data show a beneficial effect of drugs acting on VGCCs in several neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases. In the present review, we explore several mechanisms by which the “harmless” VGCCs may become “toxic” for neurons. These mechanisms could explain how, though usually required for neuronal survival, VGCCs may take part in neurodegeneration. We will present evidence showing that VGCCs can carry toxic Ca2+ when: a) their density or activity increases because of aging, chronic hypoxia or exposure to β-amyloid peptides or b) Ca2+-dependent action potentials carry high Ca2+ loads in pacemaker neurons. Besides, we will examine conditions in which VGCCs promote neuronal cell death without carrying excess Ca2+. This can happen, for instance, when they carry metal ions into the neuronal cytoplasm or when a pathological decrease in their activity weakens Ca2+-dependent prosurvival gene programs. Finally, we will explore the role of VGCCs in the control of nonneuronal cells that take part to neurodegeneration like those of the neurovascular unit or of microglia. PMID:24179464

  3. Modified Bilateral Neurovascular Cheek Flap: Functional Reconstruction of Extensive Lower Lip Defects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of extensive lower lip defects is challenging, and functional outcomes are difficult to achieve. Methods: A modified bilateral neurovascular cheek (MBNC) flap has been described. The data of patients with cancer of the lower lip treated with wide excision and reconstructed with the MBNC flap in the Plastic Surgery Unit, Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University, from 1966 to 2012 were reviewed. Results: Of the total of 143 patients included, 90.91% were women, and their age ranged from 32 to 100 years. All defects involved 70% or greater of the lower lip, which included oral commissure, buccal mucosa, or cheek skin and upper lip. All 20 patients who were followed up demonstrated good outcomes of intercommissural distance, interlabial distance, sulcus depth, and 2-point discrimination compared with normal lip parameters according to age group and satisfaction with treatment. Conclusions: Reconstruction of extensive lower lip defects with the MBNC flap provided good oral competence and functional outcomes. The flap provided adequate lip height and width, with proper position of oral commissure and vermilion reconstruction. The awareness about neurovascular anatomy of the lip and cheek and gentle dissection preserve the lip function. The flap overcomes the drawbacks of Karapandzic technique, which is microstomia, and of Bernard technique, which is a tight adynamic lower lip. It can be used in defects of more than two-thirds of the lip, extending to the cheek, commissural reconstruction, and secondary reconstruction. PMID:27579245

  4. Role of Inflammasome Activation in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Diseases of the Neurovascular Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Islam N.; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation is the standard double-edged defense mechanism that aims at protecting the human physiological homeostasis from devastating threats. Both acute and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the occurrence and progression of vascular diseases. Interference with components of the immune system to improve patient outcome after ischemic injury has been uniformly unsuccessful. There is a need for a deeper understanding of the innate immune response to injury in order to modulate, rather than to block inflammation and improve the outcome for vascular diseases. Recent Advances: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors or NOD-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) can be activated by sterile and microbial inflammation. NLR family plays a major role in activating the inflammasome. Critical Issues: The aim of this work is to review recent findings that provided insights into key inflammatory mechanisms and define the place of the inflammasome, a multi-protein complex involved in instigating inflammation in neurovascular diseases, including retinopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. Future Directions: The significant contribution of NLRP-inflammasome activation to vascular disease of the neurovascular unit in the brain and retina suggests that therapeutic strategies focused on specific targeting of inflammasome components could significantly improve the outcomes of these diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1188–1206. PMID:25275222

  5. Pericytes control key neurovascular functions and neuronal phenotype in the adult brain and during brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Robert D.; Winkler, Ethan A.; Sagare, Abhay P.; Singh, Itender; LaRue, Barb; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Pericytes play a key role in the development of cerebral microcirculation. The exact role of pericytes in the neurovascular unit in the adult brain and during brain aging remains, however, elusive. Using adult viable pericyte-deficient mice, we show that pericyte loss leads to brain vascular damage by two parallel pathways: (1) reduction in brain microcirculation causing diminished brain capillary perfusion, cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood flow responses to brain activation which ultimately mediates chronic perfusion stress and hypoxia, and (2) blood-brain barrier breakdown associated with brain accumulation of serum proteins and several vasculotoxic and/or neurotoxic macromolecules ultimately leading to secondary neuronal degenerative changes. We show that age-dependent vascular damage in pericyte-deficient mice precedes neuronal degenerative changes, learning and memory impairment and the neuroinflammatory response. Thus, pericytes control key neurovascular functions that are necessary for proper neuronal structure and function, and pericytes loss results in a progressive age-dependent vascular-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:21040844

  6. Omega-AB

    SciTech Connect

    Siirola, John D.; Slepoy, Alexander; Sprigg, Jr., James A.; Jorgensen, Craig R.; Selzler, Gene; Pryor, Richard J.

    2007-05-01

    A hierarchical, modular modeling environment for hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms Omega-AB models contain a hierarchically-defined module tree that specifies the execution logic for the simulation, and a multi-network graph that defines the environment within which the simulation occurs. Modules are the fundamental buildinig blocks of an Omega-AB model and can define anything from a basic mathematical operation to a complex behavioral response model. Modules rely on the "plug-in" concept which allows developers to build independent module libraries that are gathered, linked, and instantiated by the Omega-AB engine at run time. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. The simulation environment is an abstract graph of nodes and links. Agents (module sub-trees headed up by an Agent module) reside at nodes and relate to their neighbors through typed links. To facilitate the construction and visualization of complex, interacting networks with dramatically different structure, Omega-AB provides a system for organizing the nodes into hierarchica trees that describe "slices" of the overall network.

  7. Omega-AB

    2007-05-01

    A hierarchical, modular modeling environment for hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms Omega-AB models contain a hierarchically-defined module tree that specifies the execution logic for the simulation, and a multi-network graph that defines the environment within which the simulation occurs. Modules are the fundamental buildinig blocks of an Omega-AB model and can define anything from a basic mathematical operation to a complex behavioral response model. Modules rely on the "plug-in" conceptmore » which allows developers to build independent module libraries that are gathered, linked, and instantiated by the Omega-AB engine at run time. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. The simulation environment is an abstract graph of nodes and links. Agents (module sub-trees headed up by an Agent module) reside at nodes and relate to their neighbors through typed links. To facilitate the construction and visualization of complex, interacting networks with dramatically different structure, Omega-AB provides a system for organizing the nodes into hierarchica trees that describe "slices" of the overall network.« less

  8. Gender differences in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Patrizio, Mario; Marano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is a complex process that occurs in response to different types of cardiac injury such as ischemia and hypertension, and that involves cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells. The end result is cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, inflammation, vascular, and electrophysiological remodeling. This paper reviews a large number of studies on the influence of gender on pathological cardiac remodeling and shows how sex differences result in different clinical outcomes and therapeutic responses, with males which generally develop greater cardiac remodeling responses than females. Although estrogens appear to have an important role in attenuating adverse cardiac remodeling, the mechanisms through which gender modulates myocardial remodeling remain to be identified. PMID:27364397

  9. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  10. Role of CXCR2/CXCR2 ligands in vascular remodeling during bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Belperio, John A.; Keane, Michael P.; Burdick, Marie D.; Gomperts, Brigitte; Xue, Ying Ying; Hong, Kurt; Mestas, Javier; Ardehali, Abbas; Mehrad, Borna; Saggar, Rajan; Lynch, Joseph P.; Ross, David J.; Strieter, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling support fibroproliferative processes; however, no study has addressed the importance of angiogenesis during fibro-obliteration of the allograft airway during bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) that occurs after lung transplantation. The ELR+ CXC chemokines both mediate neutrophil recruitment and promote angiogenesis. Their shared endothelial cell receptor is the G-coupled protein receptor CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2). We found that elevated levels of multiple ELR+ CXC chemokines correlated with the presence of BOS. Proof-of-concept studies using a murine model of BOS not only demonstrated an early neutrophil infiltration but also marked vascular remodeling in the tracheal allografts. In addition, tracheal allograft ELR+ CXC chemokines were persistently expressed even in the absence of significant neutrophil infiltration and were temporally associated with vascular remodeling during fibro-obliteration of the tracheal allograft. Furthermore, in neutralizing studies, treatment with anti-CXCR2 Abs inhibited early neutrophil infiltration and later vascular remodeling, which resulted in the attenuation of murine BOS. A more profound attenuation of fibro-obliteration was seen when CXCR2–/– mice received cyclosporin A. This supports the notion that the CXCR2/CXCR2 ligand biological axis has a bimodal function during the course of BOS: early, it is important for neutrophil recruitment and later, during fibro-obliteration, it is important for vascular remodeling independent of neutrophil recruitment. PMID:15864347

  11. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part I: Mandibular Canal and Inferior Alveolar Neurovascular Bundle in Relation with Dental Implantology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives It is critical to determine the location and configuration of the mandibular canal and related vital structures during the implant treatment. The purpose of the present study was to review the literature concerning the mandibular canal and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle anatomical variations related to the implant surgery. Material and Methods Literature was selected through the search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular canal, inferior alveolar nerve, and inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1973 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, prosthetic and periodontal journals and books were performed. Results In total, 46 literature sources were obtained and morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to implant treatment in posterior mandible were presented as two entities: intraosseous mandibular canal and associated inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle. Conclusions A review of morphological aspects and variations of the anatomy related to mandibular canal and mandibular vital structures are very important especially in implant therapy since inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle exists in different locations and possesses many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that osteotomies in implant dentistry should not be developed in the posterior mandible until the position of the mandibular canal is established. PMID:24421958

  12. Athermal early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle during nerve-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Geoffrey; Dangle, Pankaj P; Palmer, Kenneth J; Samevedi, Srinivas; Patel, Vipul R

    2009-03-01

    While cancer control is the primary objective of radical prostatectomy, maintenance of sexual function is a priority for the majority of men presenting with prostate cancer. Preservation of the neurovascular bundles is the challenging and critical step of radical prostatectomy with regards to maintenance of potency. The objective of this study is to describe the surgical steps of our hybrid technique: athermal early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle during nerve-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. This technique involves releasing the neurovascular bundle in a retrograde direction from the apex toward the base of the prostate, during an antegrade prostatectomy. It is a hybrid of the traditional open and the laparoscopic approaches to nerve sparing. With this approach we are able to clearly delineate the path of the bundle and avoid inadvertently injuring it when controlling the prostatic pedicle. Our hybrid nerve-sparing technique combines aspects of the traditional open anatomical approach with those of the laparoscopic antegrade approach. The benefits of robotic technology allow a retrograde neurovascular bundle dissection to be performed during an antegrade radical prostatectomy. PMID:27628447

  13. The establishment of endovascular aneurysm coiling at a neurovascular unit: report of experience during early years.

    PubMed

    Norbäck, O; Gál, G; Johansson, M; Solander, S; Tovi, M; Persson, L; Ronne-Engström, E; Enblad, P

    2005-02-01

    The treatment of cerebral aneurysms is changing from surgical clipping to endovascular coiling (EVC) in many neurovascular centres. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical results and clinical outcome at 6 months in a consecutive series of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients treated with EVC, in a situation when the EVC had been established very rapidly as the first line of treatment at a neurovascular centre. The patient material comprised 239 SAH patients (155 women and 84 men, mean age 55 years, age range 16-81) allocated to EVC as the first line of treatment in the acute stage (within 3 weeks of rupture) between September 1996 and December 2000. Clinical grade on admission was Hunt & Hess (H&H) I and II in 42%, H&H III in 25% and H&H grade IV and V in 33% of the patients. The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 82% of the cases. EVC was performed on days 0-3 in 77% of the cases. EVC of the target aneurysm was able to be completed in 222 patients (93%). Complete occlusion was achieved in 126 patients (53%). Procedural complications occurred in 39 patients (16%). Favourable clinical outcome was observed in 57%, severe disability in 28% and poor outcome in 14% of the patients. Favourable outcome was achieved in 77% of H&H I and II patients and in 43% of H&H III-V patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that younger age, good neurological grade on admission, absence of intracerebral hematoma and intraventricular hematoma respectively, ICA-PcomA aneurysm location, later treatment and absence of complications were significant predictors of favourable outcome. After interventional training and installation of the X-ray system, the introduction and establishment of EVC at a neurovascular unit can be done in a short period of time and with favourable results. Future studies must concentrate on identifying factors of importance for the choice of interventional or surgical therapy. The results of this study indicate

  14. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  15. Adrenocortical Zonation, Renewal, and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pihlajoki, Marjut; Dörner, Julia; Cochran, Rebecca S.; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal cortex is divided into concentric zones. In humans the major cortical zones are the zona glomerulosa, zona fasciculata, and zona reticularis. The adrenal cortex is a dynamic organ in which senescent cells are replaced by newly differentiated ones. This constant renewal facilitates organ remodeling in response to physiological demand for steroids. Cortical zones can reversibly expand, contract, or alter their biochemical profiles to accommodate needs. Pools of stem/progenitor cells in the adrenal capsule, subcapsular region, and juxtamedullary region can differentiate to repopulate or expand zones. Some of these pools appear to be activated only during specific developmental windows or in response to extreme physiological demand. Senescent cells can also be replenished through direct lineage conversion; for example, cells in the zona glomerulosa can transform into cells of the zona fasciculata. Adrenocortical cell differentiation, renewal, and function are regulated by a variety of endocrine/paracrine factors including adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin II, insulin-related growth hormones, luteinizing hormone, activin, and inhibin. Additionally, zonation and regeneration of the adrenal cortex are controlled by developmental signaling pathways, such as the sonic hedgehog, delta-like homolog 1, fibroblast growth factor, and WNT/β-catenin pathways. The mechanisms involved in adrenocortical remodeling are complex and redundant so as to fulfill the offsetting goals of organ homeostasis and stress adaptation. PMID:25798129

  16. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, an introduction to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been given. Many of the basic concepts, like the Hellman-Feynman forces, the difference between the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and AIMD, have been explained. Also a very versatile AIMD code, the CP2K, has been introduced. On the application, the emphasis was on the aqueous systems and chemical reactions. The biochemical applications have not been discussed in depth.

  18. Development and pathological changes of neurovascular unit regulated by hypoxia response in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, T

    2016-01-01

    Retina is a highly vascularized tissue with a high oxygen and metabolic demand receiving light located in the back of the eye. The development and the maintenance of the retinal vasculature are important to regulate the homeostasis in the tissue. α Subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) are key molecules in hypoxia response inducing genes required for cell survival such as vascular endothelial growth factor under hypoxia. Neurons, glia, and vascular endothelium cells interdependently form neurovascular unit in the retina tightly regulated by hypoxia response via HIF expression. A corruption of the precise hypoxia response in the developmental or matured retinal tissue may lead congenital vascular anomalies or adult neovascular ocular diseases. To regulate hypoxia response through HIF activity would be an ideal therapeutic target for these vision-threatening eye diseases. PMID:27130417

  19. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  20. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway promotes neurovascular repair after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Qi-shan; Yu, Yun-hu; Fu, Xiao-hong; Wen, Yuan-chao

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a key role in angiogenesis and endothelial cell formation, but it remains unclear whether it is involved in vascular repair by endothelial progenitor cells after traumatic brain injury. Therefore, in the present study, we controlled the Notch signaling pathway using overexpression and knockdown constructs. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway by Notch1 or Jagged1 overexpression enhanced the migration, invasiveness and angiogenic ability of endothelial progenitor cells. Suppression of the Notch signaling pathway with Notch1 or Jagged1 siRNAs reduced the migratory capacity, invasiveness and angiogenic ability of endothelial progenitor cells. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway in vivo in a rat model of mild traumatic brain injury promoted neurovascular repair. These findings suggest that the activation of the Notch signaling pathway promotes blood vessel formation and tissue repair after brain trauma. PMID:26487853

  1. [Clinical thinking about treating acute ischemic stroke by targeting the neurovascular unit of Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Lei, Ya-Ling; Liu, Qing; Luo, Yi

    2013-09-01

    Neurovascular unit (NVU) concept proposed for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) provides a new target, i.e., we should target as an integrity including neurons, glia, and microcirculation, thus supplementing limitations of previous treatment targeting neurons or blood vessels alone. Meanwhile, many clinical trials have failed after NVU protection against AIS drug research has developed at home and abroad. Chinese medicine has multi-component, multi-target, and overall regulation advantages, and is in line with clinical requirement for overall treatment targeting multiple targets of NVU. Currently clinical studies of Chinese medicine treatment of AIS targeting NVU are few. Standardized and systematic clinical efficacy evaluation is lack. Clinical studies for improving AIS-NVU injured blood markers by Chinese medicine are rarer. We hope to pave the way for performing clinical studies on Chinese medicine treatment of AIS targeting NVU.

  2. Investigating Human Neurovascular Coupling Using Functional Neuroimaging: A Critical Review of Dynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Huneau, Clément; Benali, Habib; Chabriat, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that link a transient neural activity to the corresponding increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) are termed neurovascular coupling (NVC). They are possibly impaired at early stages of small vessel or neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of NVC in humans has been made possible with the development of various neuroimaging techniques based on variations of local hemodynamics during neural activity. Specific dynamic models are currently used for interpreting these data that can include biophysical parameters related to NVC. After a brief review of the current knowledge about possible mechanisms acting in NVC we selected seven models with explicit integration of NVC found in the literature. All these models were described using the same procedure. We compared their physiological assumptions, mathematical formalism, and validation. In particular, we pointed out their strong differences in terms of complexity. Finally, we discussed their validity and their potential applications. These models may provide key information to investigate various aspects of NVC in human pathology. PMID:26733782

  3. Development and pathological changes of neurovascular unit regulated by hypoxia response in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, T

    2016-01-01

    Retina is a highly vascularized tissue with a high oxygen and metabolic demand receiving light located in the back of the eye. The development and the maintenance of the retinal vasculature are important to regulate the homeostasis in the tissue. α Subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) are key molecules in hypoxia response inducing genes required for cell survival such as vascular endothelial growth factor under hypoxia. Neurons, glia, and vascular endothelium cells interdependently form neurovascular unit in the retina tightly regulated by hypoxia response via HIF expression. A corruption of the precise hypoxia response in the developmental or matured retinal tissue may lead congenital vascular anomalies or adult neovascular ocular diseases. To regulate hypoxia response through HIF activity would be an ideal therapeutic target for these vision-threatening eye diseases.

  4. Hemostatic hydrodissection of the neurovascular bundles during robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: safety and efficacy trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekattil, Sijo J.; Dahm, Philipp; Vieweg, Johannes W.

    2009-02-01

    Preservation of continence and potency after Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (RALP) are two key outcome measures that patients consider when comparing different treatment options for localized prostate cancer. Ensuring that positive surgical margins are as low as possible provides oncologic control. Various techniques to optimize these outcomes have been employed. This study presents the early outcomes for Hemostatic Hydrodissection of the Neurovascular Bundles during 86 consecutive RALPs. Positive margin rates were 12.5% overall (9% for pT2 and 28.6% for pT3); continence at 6 months was 100%, at 3 months 90% and at 1 month 66%. In patients with no preoperative erectile dysfunction (preoperative SHIM of 25), 79% had return of erections sufficient for intercourse by 6 months. 2 of these patients were able to have intercourse 2 weeks after surgery. These preliminary findings appear promising.

  5. Imaging the Perivascular Space as a Potential Biomarker of Neurovascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Joel; Berezuk, Courtney; McNeely, Alicia A; Gao, Fuqiang; McLaurin, JoAnne; Black, Sandra E

    2016-03-01

    Although the brain lacks conventional lymphatic vessels found in peripheral tissue, evidence suggests that the space surrounding the vasculature serves a similar role in the clearance of fluid and metabolic waste from the brain. With aging, neurodegeneration, and cerebrovascular disease, these microscopic perivascular spaces can become enlarged, allowing for visualization and quantification on structural MRI. The purpose of this review is to: (i) describe some of the recent pre-clinical findings from basic science that shed light on the potential neurophysiological mechanisms driving glymphatic and perivascular waste clearance, (ii) review some of the pathobiological etiologies that may lead to MRI-visible enlarged perivascular spaces (ePVS), (iii) describe the possible clinical implications of ePVS, (iv) evaluate existing qualitative and quantitative techniques used for measuring ePVS burden, and (v) propose future avenues of research that may improve our understanding of this potential clinical neuroimaging biomarker for fluid and metabolic waste clearance dysfunction in neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases.

  6. Sensitivity evaluation of DSA-based parametric imaging using Doppler ultrasound in neurovascular phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramoniam, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2016-03-01

    An evaluation of the relation between parametric imaging results obtained from Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) images and blood-flow velocity measured using Doppler ultrasound in patient-specific neurovascular phantoms is provided. A silicone neurovascular phantom containing internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery was embedded in a tissue equivalent gel. The gel prevented movement of the vessels when blood mimicking fluid was pumped through it to obtain Colour Doppler images. The phantom was connected to a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. To obtain the parametric images, water was pumped through the phantom at various flow rates (100, 120 and 160 ml/min) and 10 ml contrast boluses were injected. DSA images were obtained at 10 frames/sec from the Toshiba C-arm and DSA image sequences were input into LabVIEW software to get parametric maps from time-density curves. The parametric maps were compared with velocities determined by Doppler ultrasound at the internal carotid artery. The velocities measured by the Doppler ultrasound were 38, 48 and 65 cm/s for flow rates of 100, 120 and 160 ml/min, respectively. For the 20% increase in flow rate, the percentage change of blood velocity measured by Doppler ultrasound was 26.3%. Correspondingly, there was a 20% decrease of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT) and 14.3% decrease of Mean Transit Time (MTT), showing strong inverse correlation with Doppler measured velocity. The parametric imaging parameters are quite sensitive to velocity changes and are well correlated to the velocities measured by Doppler ultrasound.

  7. Neurovascular compression in the thoracic outlet: changing management over 50 years.

    PubMed Central

    Urschel, H C; Razzuk, M A

    1998-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the past five decades, significant improvements have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) secondary to sports activities, breast implants, or median sternotomy. METHODS, RESULTS, AND CONCLUSIONS: Of more than 15,000 patients evaluated for TOS, 3914 underwent primary neurovascular decompression procedures and 1221 underwent second surgical procedures for recurrent symptoms. Of 2210 consecutive patients, 250 had symptoms of upper plexus compression only (median nerve), 1508 had symptoms of lower plexus compression only (ulnar nerve), and 452 patients had symptoms of both. Ulnar and median nerve conduction velocities confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Transaxillary first rib removal alone for neurovascular decompression relieved both upper and lower plexus symptoms (without a combined transaxillary and supraclavicular approach). There are two reasons for this: most upper compression mechanisms attach to the first rib, and the median nerve is also supplied by C8 and T1 as well as C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots. Axillary subclavian artery aneurysm or occlusion was treated successfully in 240 patients. Dorsal sympathectomy was performed concomitantly in 71 patients for occlusion or embolectomy. It was combined with first rib resection in 1974 patients for sympathetic maintained pain syndrome and causalgia that did not improve with conservative therapy. Of 264 patients with effort thrombosis (Paget-Schroetter syndrome), 211 were treated by urokinase thrombolysis and prompt first rib resection with excellent long-term results. Recurrent TOS symptoms required a second procedure using the posterior approach in 1221 patients with brachial plexus neurolysis and dorsal sympathectomy. The use of hyaluronic acid significantly reduced recurrent scarring. PMID:9790350

  8. Acute two-photon imaging of the neurovascular unit in the cortex of active mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Gordon, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon scanning fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique to observe physiological processes from the millimeter to the micron scale in the intact animal. In neuroscience research, a common approach is to install an acute cranial window and head bar to explore neocortical function under anesthesia before inflammation peaks from the surgery. However, there are few detailed acute protocols for head-restrained and fully awake animal imaging of the neurovascular unit during activity. This is because acutely performed awake experiments are typically untenable when the animal is naïve to the imaging apparatus. Here we detail a method that achieves acute, deep-tissue two-photon imaging of neocortical astrocytes and microvasculature in behaving mice. A week prior to experimentation, implantation of the head bar alone allows mice to train for head-immobilization on an easy-to-learn air-supported ball treadmill. Following just two brief familiarization sessions to the treadmill on separate days, an acute cranial window can subsequently be installed for immediate imaging. We demonstrate how running and whisking data can be captured simultaneously with two-photon fluorescence signals with acceptable movement artifacts during active motion. We also show possible applications of this technique by (1) monitoring dynamic changes to microvascular diameter and red blood cells in response to vibrissa sensory stimulation, (2) examining responses of the cerebral microcirculation to the systemic delivery of pharmacological agents using a tail artery cannula during awake imaging, and (3) measuring Ca2+ signals from synthetic and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators in astrocytes. This method will facilitate acute two-photon fluorescence imaging in awake, active mice and help link cellular events within the neurovascular unit to behavior. PMID:25698926

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of ischemia viability thresholds and the neurovascular unit.

    PubMed

    Barber, Philip A

    2013-05-27

    Neuroimaging has improved our understanding of the evolution of stroke at discreet time points helping to identify irreversibly damaged and potentially reversible ischemic brain. Neuroimaging has also contributed considerably to the basic premise of acute stroke therapy which is to salvage some portion of the ischemic region from evolving into infarction, and by doing so, maintaining brain function and improving outcome. The term neurovascular unit (NVU) broadens the concept of the ischemic penumbra by linking the microcirculation with neuronal-glial interactions during ischemia reperfusion. Strategies that attempt to preserve the individual components (endothelium, glia and neurons) of the NVU are unlikely to be helpful if blood flow is not fully restored to the microcirculation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the foremost imaging technology able to bridge both basic science and the clinic via non-invasive real time high-resolution anatomical delineation of disease manifestations at the molecular and ionic level. Current MRI based technologies have focused on the mismatch between perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) signals to estimate the tissue that could be saved if reperfusion was achieved. Future directions of MRI may focus on the discordance of recanalization and reperfusion, providing complimentary pathophysiological information to current compartmental paradigms of infarct core (DWI) and penumbra (PWI) with imaging information related to cerebral blood flow, BBB permeability, inflammation, and oedema formation in the early acute phase. In this review we outline advances in our understanding of stroke pathophysiology with imaging, transcending animal stroke models to human stroke, and describing the potential translation of MRI to image important interactions relevant to acute stroke at the interface of the neurovascular unit.

  10. Modeling neuro-vascular coupling in rat cerebellum: characterization of deviations from linearity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Tina; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Lauritzen, Martin

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the quantitative relation between neuronal activity and blood flow by means of a general parametric mathematical model which described the neuro-vascular system as being dynamic, linear, time-invariant, and subjected to additive noise. The model was constructed from measurements by means of system identification methods and validated across experiments. We sought to cover the system response to multiple stimulation frequencies and durations by a single model. We used the model to investigate the transport delay, the linear order, the deviations from linearity, and conditions for linearizability. We exercised the model on data from rat cerebellar cortex. In anesthetized rats, stimulation of the inferior olive caused climbing fiber activity and blood flow changes. Field potential amplitudes were used as an indicator of neuronal activity and blood flow was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry. In one set of experiments, stimulation frequencies were in the range 2-20 Hz and the stimulation durations were 60 s and 600 s. The transport delay was estimated to be nearly zero, the linear order to be two. The deviations from linearity were consistently characterized as frequency saturation and dips in blood flow responses to stimulation for 60 s, and overgrowth of blood flow responses to stimulation for 600 s. In another set of experiments, stimulation frequencies were in the range 0.5-10 Hz and the stimulation duration was 15 s. The neuro-vascular system could be approximated by the linear model when the stimulation frequencies were restricted to the range 0.5-7 Hz. In conclusion, our model could predict blood flow responses to stimuli of low frequency and short duration. PMID:19027074

  11. Mechanistic Mathematical Modeling Tests Hypotheses of the Neurovascular Coupling in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Lundengård, Karin; Cedersund, Gunnar; Sten, Sebastian; Leong, Felix; Smedberg, Alexander; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response to neural activity. The BOLD response depends on the neurovascular coupling, which connects cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and deoxyhemoglobin level to neuronal activity. The exact mechanisms behind this neurovascular coupling are not yet fully investigated. There are at least three different ways in which these mechanisms are being discussed. Firstly, mathematical models involving the so-called Balloon model describes the relation between oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood volume, and cerebral blood flow. However, the Balloon model does not describe cellular and biochemical mechanisms. Secondly, the metabolic feedback hypothesis, which is based on experimental findings on metabolism associated with brain activation, and thirdly, the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypothesis which describes intracellular pathways leading to vasoactive substance release. Both the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses have been extensively studied, but only experimentally. These two hypotheses have never been implemented as mathematical models. Here we investigate these two hypotheses by mechanistic mathematical modeling using a systems biology approach; these methods have been used in biological research for many years but never been applied to the BOLD response in fMRI. In the current work, model structures describing the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses were applied to measured BOLD responses in the visual cortex of 12 healthy volunteers. Evaluating each hypothesis separately shows that neither hypothesis alone can describe the data in a biologically plausible way. However, by adding metabolism to the neurotransmitter feed-forward model structure, we obtained a new model structure which is able to fit the estimation data and successfully predict new, independent validation data

  12. Mechanistic Mathematical Modeling Tests Hypotheses of the Neurovascular Coupling in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lundengård, Karin; Cedersund, Gunnar; Sten, Sebastian; Leong, Felix; Smedberg, Alexander; Elinder, Fredrik; Engström, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response to neural activity. The BOLD response depends on the neurovascular coupling, which connects cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and deoxyhemoglobin level to neuronal activity. The exact mechanisms behind this neurovascular coupling are not yet fully investigated. There are at least three different ways in which these mechanisms are being discussed. Firstly, mathematical models involving the so-called Balloon model describes the relation between oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood volume, and cerebral blood flow. However, the Balloon model does not describe cellular and biochemical mechanisms. Secondly, the metabolic feedback hypothesis, which is based on experimental findings on metabolism associated with brain activation, and thirdly, the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypothesis which describes intracellular pathways leading to vasoactive substance release. Both the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses have been extensively studied, but only experimentally. These two hypotheses have never been implemented as mathematical models. Here we investigate these two hypotheses by mechanistic mathematical modeling using a systems biology approach; these methods have been used in biological research for many years but never been applied to the BOLD response in fMRI. In the current work, model structures describing the metabolic feedback and the neurotransmitter feed-forward hypotheses were applied to measured BOLD responses in the visual cortex of 12 healthy volunteers. Evaluating each hypothesis separately shows that neither hypothesis alone can describe the data in a biologically plausible way. However, by adding metabolism to the neurotransmitter feed-forward model structure, we obtained a new model structure which is able to fit the estimation data and successfully predict new, independent validation data

  13. Neurovascular study of the trigeminal nerve at 3 t MRI.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Jorge; Gonzalez, Nadia; Muñoz, Alexandra; Bravo, Fernando; Sarroca, Daniel; Morales, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to show a novel visualization method to investigate neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve (TN) using a volume-rendering fusion imaging technique of 3D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) and coregistered 3D time of flight MR angiography (3D TOF MRA) sequences, which we called "neurovascular study of the trigeminal nerve". We prospectively studied 30 patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and 50 subjects without symptoms of TN (control group), on a 3 Tesla scanner. All patients were assessed using 3D FIESTA and 3D TOF MRA sequences centered on the pons, as well as a standard brain protocol including axial T1, T2, FLAIR and GRE sequences to exclude other pathologies that could cause TN. Post-contrast T1-weighted sequences were also performed. All cases showing arterial imprinting on the trigeminal nerve (n = 11) were identified on the ipsilateral side of the pain. No significant relationship was found between the presence of an artery in contact with the trigeminal nerve and TN. Eight cases were found showing arterial contact on the ipsilateral side of the pain and five cases of arterial contact on the contralateral side. The fusion imaging technique of 3D FIESTA and 3D TOF MRA sequences, combining the high anatomical detail provided by the 3D FIESTA sequence with the 3D TOF MRA sequence and its capacity to depict arterial structures, results in a tool that enables quick and efficient visualization and assessment of the relationship between the trigeminal nerve and the neighboring vascular structures.

  14. Bone remodeling and silicon deficiency in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alveolar bone undergoes continuous remodeling to meet physiologic and functional demands. The aim of the present work was to evaluate histologically and histomorphometrically the effect of silicon deficiency on bone modeling and remodeling in the periodontal cortical plate. Two groups of weaning mal...

  15. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Längst, Gernot; Manelyte, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development. PMID:26075616

  16. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  17. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  18. Chromatin remodeling in nuclear cloning.

    PubMed

    Wade, Paul A; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear cloning is a procedure to create new animals by injecting somatic nuclei into unfertilized oocytes. Recent successes in mammalian cloning with differentiated adult nuclei strongly indicate that oocyte cytoplasm contains unidentified remarkable reprogramming activities with the capacity to erase the previous memory of cell differentiation. At the heart of this nuclear reprogramming lies chromatin remodeling as chromatin structure and function define cell differentiation through regulation of the transcriptional activities of the cells. Studies involving the modification of chromatin elements such as selective uptake or release of binding proteins, covalent histone modifications including acetylation and methylation, and DNA methylation should provide significant insight into the molecular mechanisms of nuclear dedifferentiation and redifferentiation in oocyte cytoplasm.

  19. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  20. Stimulation of UvrD helicase by UvrAB.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, John; Guy, Colin P; Cadman, Chris J; Moolenaar, Geri F; Goosen, Nora; McGlynn, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Helicases play critical roles in all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism by catalyzing the remodeling of DNA and RNA structures. UvrD is an abundant helicase in Escherichia coli with well characterized functions in mismatch and nucleotide excision repair and a possible role in displacement of proteins such as RecA from single-stranded DNA. The mismatch repair protein MutL is known to stimulate UvrD. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair proteins UvrA and UvrB can together stimulate UvrD-catalyzed unwinding of a range of DNA substrates containing strand discontinuities, including forked DNA substrates. The stimulation is specific for UvrD, as UvrAB failed to stimulate Rep helicase, a UvrD homologue. Moreover, although UvrAB can promote limited strand displacement, stimulation of UvrD did not require the strand displacement function of UvrAB. We conclude that UvrAB, like MutL, modulate UvrD helicase activity. This stimulation likely plays a role in DNA strand and protein displacement by UvrD in nucleotide excision repair. Promotion of UvrD-catalyzed unwinding of nicked duplexes by UvrAB may also explain the need for UvrAB and UvrD in Okazaki fragment processing in cells lacking DNA polymerase I. More generally, these data support the idea that helicase activity is regulated in vivo, with helicases acting as part of multisubunit complexes rather than in isolation. PMID:19208629

  1. Maternal uterine vascular remodeling during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Osol, George; Mandala, Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    Sufficient uteroplacental blood flow is essential for normal pregnancy outcome and is accomplished by the coordinated growth and remodeling of the entire uterine circulation, as well as the creation of a new fetal vascular organ: the placenta. The process of remodeling involves a number of cellular processes, including hyperplasia and hypertrophy, rearrangement of existing elements, and changes in extracellular matrix. In this review, we provide information on uterine blood flow increases during pregnancy, the influence of placentation type on the distribution of uterine vascular resistance, consideration of the patterns, nature, and extent of maternal uterine vascular remodeling during pregnancy, and what is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms.

  2. Effects of removing inferior alveolar neurovascular structures on mandibular growth and the eruption of permanent dentition in puppies.

    PubMed

    Harputluoğlu, S

    1990-08-01

    Investigation was performed on the effects of removing the inferior alveolar neurovascular structures on the permanent dentition and mandibular growth. Five puppies with erupted deciduous teeth had the inferior alveolar neurovascular structures removed unilaterally. When the test animals were 28 weeks old, examination revealed that the deciduous teeth on the side operated had exfoliated but permanent teeth did not replace them. On the other hand, the permanent teeth on the side not operated on replaced the exfoliated deciduous teeth. After a second period of 28 weeks, the germs of the permanent teeth on the side operated on were still buried in the mandibular bone, and the permanent teeth on the side not operated on erupted normally. Mandibular measurements demonstrated that translative and transformative growth and developmental processes were normal in both the sides operated on and the sides not operated on. PMID:2290639

  3. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  4. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

    PubMed

    Neetu, Soni; Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia.

  5. Visually evoked hemodynamical response and assessment of neurovascular coupling in the optic nerve and retina.

    PubMed

    Riva, Charles E; Logean, Eric; Falsini, Benedetto

    2005-03-01

    The retina and optic nerve are both optically accessible parts of the central nervous system. They represent, therefore, highly valuable tissues for studies of the intrinsic physiological mechanism postulated more than 100 years ago by Roy and Sherrington, by which neural activity is coupled to blood flow and metabolism. This article describes a series of animal and human studies that explored the changes in hemodynamics and oxygenation in the retina and optic nerve in response to increased neural activity, as well as the mechanisms underlying these changes. It starts with a brief review of techniques used to assess changes in neural activity, hemodynamics, metabolism and tissue concentration of various potential mediators and modulators of the coupling. We then review: (a) the characteristics of the flicker-induced hemodynamical response in different regions of the eye, starting with the optic nerve, the region predominantly studied; (b) the effect of varying the stimulus parameters, such as modulation depth, frequency, luminance, color ratio, area of stimulation, site of measurement and others, on this response; (c) data on activity-induced intrinsic reflectance and functional magnetic resonance imaging signals from the optic nerve and retina. The data undeniably demonstrate that visual stimulation is a powerful modulator of retinal and optic nerve blood flow. Exploring the relationship between vasoactivity and metabolic changes on one side and corresponding neural activity changes on the other confirms the existence of a neurovascular/neurometabolic coupling in the neural tissue of the eye fundus and reveals that the mechanism underlying this coupling is complex and multi-factorial. The importance of fully exploiting the potential of the activity-induced vascular changes in the assessment of the pathophysiology of ocular diseases motivated studies aimed at identifying potential mediators and modulators of the functional hyperemia, as well as conditions

  6. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-09-30

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K(+)) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2+) events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca(2+) signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca(2+) signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca(2+) and elevation of extracellular K(+)). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) release events leading to inversion of NVC. Significance statement: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)--strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the

  7. The absolute CBF response to activation is preserved during elevated perfusion: Implications for neurovascular coupling measures.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joseph R; Driver, Ian D; Bright, Molly G; Murphy, Kevin

    2016-01-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques in which the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to a neural stimulus are measured, can be used to estimate the fractional increase in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) that accompanies evoked neural activity. A measure of neurovascular coupling is obtained from the ratio of fractional CBF and CMRO2 responses, defined as n, with the implicit assumption that relative rather than absolute changes in CBF and CMRO2 adequately characterise the flow-metabolism response to neural activity. The coupling parameter n is important in terms of its effect on the BOLD response, and as potential insight into the flow-metabolism relationship in both normal and pathological brain function. In 10 healthy human subjects, BOLD and CBF responses were measured to test the effect of baseline perfusion (modulated by a hypercapnia challenge) on the coupling parameter n during graded visual stimulation. A dual-echo pulsed arterial spin labelling (PASL) sequence provided absolute quantification of CBF in baseline and active states as well as relative BOLD signal changes, which were used to estimate CMRO2 responses to the graded visual stimulus. The absolute CBF response to the visual stimuli were constant across different baseline CBF levels, meaning the fractional CBF responses were reduced at the hyperperfused baseline state. For the graded visual stimuli, values of n were significantly reduced during hypercapnia induced hyperperfusion. Assuming the evoked neural responses to the visual stimuli are the same for both baseline CBF states, this result has implications for fMRI studies that aim to measure neurovascular coupling using relative changes in CBF. The coupling parameter n is sensitive to baseline CBF, which would confound its interpretation in fMRI studies where there may be significant differences in baseline perfusion between groups. The absolute change in

  8. Neurovascular protection of cilostazol in stroke-prone spontaneous hypertensive rats associated with angiogenesis and pericyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Omote, Yoshio; Deguchi, Kentaro; Kono, Syoichiro; Liu, Ning; Liu, Wentao; Kurata, Tomoko; Yamashita, Toru; Ikeda, Yoshio; Abe, Koji

    2014-03-01

    Stroke is the major cause of death and decrease in the activities of daily living. This study sought to evaluate the effects of commonly used antiplatelet drugs on spontaneous cerebral infarction in relation to neurovascular protection associated with angiogenesis and pericyte proliferation. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) were treated with vehicle, aspirin, clopidogrel, or cilostazol from 8 to 10 weeks of age. The interaction of neurovascular components among endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytic endfeet were immunohistochemically examined in brain sections. Angiogenesis associated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and pericyte proliferation were also examined immunohistochemically. The expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were assessed immunohistochemically and by gelatin zymography. Among the antiplatelet drugs, cilostazol preserved the neurovascular unit (NVU) by preventing astrocytic endfeet or pericytes from pathological detachment found in the vehicle and aspirin treatment. Cilostazol also inhibited the expression and activity of MMP-9, which led to protection of the NVU. Furthermore, in the periinfarct area, cilostazol increased VEGFR2 expression, promoting angiogenesis through proliferation of pericytes. The present study showed a strong protection of NVU integrity by cilostazol and the promotion of angiogenesis by stimulating both endothelial VEGFR2 expression and pericyte proliferation. In addition to the antioxidative effect, these pleiotropic effects of cilostazol contribute to reduce spontaneous infarct volume and preserve motor and cognitive function in SHR-SP.

  9. Investigation of the neurovascular coupling in positive and negative BOLD responses in human brain at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Huber, Laurentius; Goense, Jozien; Kennerley, Aneurin J; Ivanov, Dimo; Krieger, Steffen N; Lepsien, Jöran; Trampel, Robert; Turner, Robert; Möller, Harald E

    2014-08-15

    Decreases in stimulus-dependent blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal and their underlying neurovascular origins have recently gained considerable interest. In this study a multi-echo, BOLD-corrected vascular space occupancy (VASO) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique was used to investigate neurovascular responses during stimuli that elicit positive and negative BOLD responses in human brain at 7 T. Stimulus-induced BOLD, cerebral blood volume (CBV), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes were measured and analyzed in 'arterial' and 'venous' blood compartments in macro- and microvasculature. We found that the overall interplay of mean CBV, CBF and BOLD responses is similar for tasks inducing positive and negative BOLD responses. Some aspects of the neurovascular coupling however, such as the temporal response, cortical depth dependence, and the weighting between 'arterial' and 'venous' contributions, are significantly different for the different task conditions. Namely, while for excitatory tasks the BOLD response peaks at the cortical surface, and the CBV change is similar in cortex and pial vasculature, inhibitory tasks are associated with a maximum negative BOLD response in deeper layers, with CBV showing strong constriction of surface arteries and a faster return to baseline. The different interplays of CBV, CBF and BOLD during excitatory and inhibitory responses suggests different underlying hemodynamic mechanisms.

  10. Simultaneous real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography and EEG for neurovascular coupling study in an animal model of epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Xiao, Jiaying; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Neurovascular coupling in epilepsy is poorly understood; its study requires simultaneous monitoring of hemodynamic changes and neural activity in the brain. Approach. Here for the first time we present a combined real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and electrophysiology/electroencephalography (EEG) system for the study of neurovascular coupling in epilepsy, whose ability was demonstrated with a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced generalized seizure model in rats. Two groups of experiments were carried out with different wavelengths to detect the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) signals in the rat brain. We extracted the average PAT signals of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), and compared them with the EEG signal. Main results. Results showed that the seizure process can be divided into three stages. A ‘dip’ lasting for 1-2 min in the first stage and the following hyperfusion in the second stage were observed. The HbO2 signal and the HbR signal were generally negatively correlated. The change of blood flow was also estimated. All the acquired results here were in accordance with other published results. Significance. Compared to other existing functional neuroimaging tools, the method proposed here enables reliable tracking of hemodynamic signal with both high spatial and high temporal resolution in 3D, so it is more suitable for neurovascular coupling study of epilepsy.

  11. Raise the Floor When Remodeling Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools, 1972

    1972-01-01

    A new remodeling idea adopts the concept of raised floor covering gas, water, electrical, and drain lines. The accessible floor has removable panels set into an adjustable support frame 24 inches above a concrete subfloor. (Author)

  12. Lead Poisoning in Remodeling of Old Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bart

    1973-01-01

    An article based on Dr. Muriel D. Wolf's study of elevated blood lead levels in children and adults present during the remodeling of old homes. Lead poisoning examples, symptoms, and precautions are given. (ST)

  13. Bone Remodeling Under Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Li, Shuai; Pacios, Sandra; Wang, Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    Bone is masterfully programmed to repair itself through the coupling of bone formation following bone resorption, a process referred to as coupling. In inflammatory or other conditions, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation shifts so that a net bone loss results. This review focuses on four pathologic conditions in which remodeling leads to net loss of bone, postmenopausal osteoporosis, arthritis, periodontal disease, and disuse bone loss, which is similar to bone loss associated with microgravity. In most of these there is an acceleration of the resorptive process due to increased formation of bone metabolic units. This initially leads to a net bone loss since the time period of resorption is much faster than the time needed for bone formation that follows. In addition, each of these processes is characterized by an uncoupling that leads to net bone loss. Mechanisms responsible for increased rates of bone resorption, i.e. the formation of more bone metabolic units, involve enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of RANKL. Moreover, the reasons for uncoupling are discussed which range from a decrease in expression of growth factors and bone morphogenetic proteins to increased expression of factors that inhibit Wnt signaling. PMID:26599114

  14. Remodeling kitchens: A smorgasbord of energy savings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, B.

    1995-09-01

    The kitchen is often the busiest room in the house and is most likely to remodeled repeatedly over the life of a house. The kitchen also represents a concentration of household energy use. Remodeling a kitchen can mean introducing a host of new energy-saving features or making major energy blunders. This article discusses ways to utilized the best features: layout and design; appliances; lighting; windows and skylights; ventilation; insulation and air sealing; water; household recycling; green building materials.

  15. [Bone remodelling using the boundary element method].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gabriela; Cerrolaza, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm for the mathematical representation of external bone remodeling is proposed. The Boundary element method is used for the numerical analysis of trabecular bone, together with the remodeling algorithm presented by Fridez. The versatility and power of the algorithm discussed herein are shown by some numerical examples. As well, the method converges very fast to the solution, which is one of the main advantages of the proposed numerical scheme.

  16. Biomechanics of vascular mechanosensation and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing blood exerts a frictional force, fluid shear stress (FSS), on the endothelial cells that line the blood and lymphatic vessels. The magnitude, pulsatility, and directional characteristics of FSS are constantly sensed by the endothelium. Sustained increases or decreases in FSS induce vessel remodeling to maintain proper perfusion of tissue. In this review, we discuss these mechanisms and their relevance to physiology and disease, and propose a model for how information from different mechanosensors might be integrated to govern remodeling. PMID:26715421

  17. Mitochondria, myocardial remodeling, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Hugo E; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Gutierrez, Tomás; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Pedrozo, Zully; Munoz, Juan Pablo; Garcia, Lorena; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    The process of muscle remodeling lies at the core of most cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac adaptation to pressure or volume overload is associated with a complex molecular change in cardiomyocytes which leads to anatomic remodeling of the heart muscle. Although adaptive at its beginnings, the sustained cardiac hypertrophic remodeling almost unavoidably ends in progressive muscle dysfunction, heart failure and ultimately death. One of the features of cardiac remodeling is a progressive impairment in mitochondrial function. The heart has the highest oxygen uptake in the human body and accordingly it has a large number of mitochondria, which form a complex network under constant remodeling in order to sustain the high metabolic rate of cardiac cells and serve as Ca(2+) buffers acting together with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, this high dependence on mitochondrial metabolism has its costs: when oxygen supply is threatened, high leak of electrons from the electron transport chain leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. These three aspects of mitochondrial function (Reactive oxygen species signaling, Ca(2+) handling and mitochondrial dynamics) are critical for normal muscle homeostasis. In this article, we will review the latest evidence linking mitochondrial morphology and function with the process of myocardial remodeling and cardiovascular disease.

  18. Physiology and pathophysiology of bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Raisz, L G

    1999-08-01

    The skeleton is a metabolically active organ that undergoes continuous remodeling throughout life. This remodeling is necessary both to maintain the structural integrity of the skeleton and to subserve its metabolic functions as a storehouse of calcium and phosphorus. These dual functions often come into conflict under conditions of changing mechanical forces or metabolic and nutritional stress. The bone remodeling cycle involves a complex series of sequential steps that are highly regulated. The "activation" phase of remodeling is dependent on the effects of local and systemic factors on mesenchymal cells of the osteoblast lineage. These cells interact with hematopoietic precursors to form osteoclasts in the "resorption" phase. Subsequently, there is a "reversal" phase during which mononuclear cells are present on the bone surface. They may complete the resorption process and produce the signals that initiate formation. Finally, successive waves of mesenchymal cells differentiate into functional osteoblasts, which lay down matrix in the "formation" phase. The effects of calcium-regulating hormones on this remodeling cycle subserve the metabolic functions of the skeleton. Other systemic hormones control overall skeletal growth. The responses to changes in mechanical force and repair of microfractures, as well as the maintenance of the remodeling cycle, are determined locally by cytokines, prostaglandins, and growth factors. Interactions between systemic and local factors are important in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis as well as the skeletal changes in hyperparathyroidism and hyperthyroidism. Local factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of the skeletal changes associated with immobilization, inflammation, and Paget disease of bone. PMID:10430818

  19. Epigenomic regulation of oncogenesis by chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Li, D-Q; Müller, S; Knapp, S

    2016-08-25

    Disruption of the intricate gene expression program represents one of major driving factors for the development, progression and maintenance of human cancer, and is often associated with acquired therapeutic resistance. At the molecular level, cancerous phenotypes are the outcome of cellular functions of critical genes, regulatory interactions of histones and chromatin remodeling complexes in response to dynamic and persistent upstream signals. A large body of genetic and biochemical evidence suggests that the chromatin remodelers integrate the extracellular and cytoplasmic signals to control gene activity. Consequently, widespread dysregulation of chromatin remodelers and the resulting inappropriate expression of regulatory genes, together, lead to oncogenesis. We summarize the recent developments and current state of the dysregulation of the chromatin remodeling components as the driving mechanism underlying the growth and progression of human tumors. Because chromatin remodelers, modifying enzymes and protein-protein interactions participate in interpreting the epigenetic code, selective chromatin remodelers and bromodomains have emerged as new frontiers for pharmacological intervention to develop future anti-cancer strategies to be used either as single-agent or in combination therapies with chemotherapeutics or radiotherapy. PMID:26804164

  20. Mitochondria, myocardial remodeling, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Hugo E; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Gutierrez, Tomás; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Pedrozo, Zully; Munoz, Juan Pablo; Garcia, Lorena; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    The process of muscle remodeling lies at the core of most cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac adaptation to pressure or volume overload is associated with a complex molecular change in cardiomyocytes which leads to anatomic remodeling of the heart muscle. Although adaptive at its beginnings, the sustained cardiac hypertrophic remodeling almost unavoidably ends in progressive muscle dysfunction, heart failure and ultimately death. One of the features of cardiac remodeling is a progressive impairment in mitochondrial function. The heart has the highest oxygen uptake in the human body and accordingly it has a large number of mitochondria, which form a complex network under constant remodeling in order to sustain the high metabolic rate of cardiac cells and serve as Ca(2+) buffers acting together with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, this high dependence on mitochondrial metabolism has its costs: when oxygen supply is threatened, high leak of electrons from the electron transport chain leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. These three aspects of mitochondrial function (Reactive oxygen species signaling, Ca(2+) handling and mitochondrial dynamics) are critical for normal muscle homeostasis. In this article, we will review the latest evidence linking mitochondrial morphology and function with the process of myocardial remodeling and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22972531

  1. Three-Dimensional Blood-Brain Barrier Model for in vitro Studies of Neurovascular Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hansang; Seo, Ji Hae; Wong, Keith H. K.; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Park, Joseph; Bong, Kiwan; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology leads to neurovascular disorders and is an important target for therapies. However, the study of BBB pathology is difficult in the absence of models that are simple and relevant. In vivo animal models are highly relevant, however they are hampered by complex, multi-cellular interactions that are difficult to decouple. In vitro models of BBB are simpler, however they have limited functionality and relevance to disease processes. To address these limitations, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model of BBB on a microfluidic platform. We verified the tightness of the BBB by showing its ability to reduce the leakage of dyes and to block the transmigration of immune cells towards chemoattractants. Moreover, we verified the localization at endothelial cell boundaries of ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin, two components of tight and adherens junctions. To validate the functionality of the BBB model, we probed its disruption by neuro-inflammation mediators and ischemic conditions and measured the protective function of antioxidant and ROCK-inhibitor treatments. Overall, our 3D BBB model provides a robust platform, adequate for detailed functional studies of BBB and for the screening of BBB-targeting drugs in neurological diseases.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction in mild dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementias. In addition to genetics, environment, and lifestyle, growing evidence supports vascular contributions to dementias including dementia because of AD. Alzheimer's disease affects multiple cell types within the neurovascular unit (NVU), including brain vascular cells (endothelial cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells), glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), and neurons. Thus, identifying and integrating biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury with established AD biomarkers, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, has a potential to contribute to better understanding of the disease process in dementias including AD. Here, we discuss the existing literature on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses during early stages of dementia and AD. We suggest that the clinical usefulness of established AD biomarkers, Aβ and tau, could be further improved by developing an algorithm that will incorporate biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury. Such biomarker algorithm could aid in early detection and intervention as well as identify novel treatment targets to delay disease onset, slow progression, and/or prevent AD.

  3. Upregulation of neurovascular communication through filamin abrogation promotes ectopic periventricular neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Houlihan, Shauna L; Lanctot, Alison A; Guo, Yan; Feng, Yuanyi

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal fate-restricted intermediate progenitors (IPs) are derived from the multipotent radial glia (RGs) and serve as the direct precursors for cerebral cortical neurons, but factors that control their neurogenic plasticity remain elusive. Here we report that IPs’ neuron production is enhanced by abrogating filamin function, leading to the generation of periventricular neurons independent of normal neocortical neurogenesis and neuronal migration. Loss of Flna in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) led RGs to undergo changes resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) along with exuberant angiogenesis that together changed the microenvironment and increased neurogenesis of IPs. We show that by collaborating with β-arrestin, Flna maintains the homeostatic signaling between the vasculature and NPCs, and loss of this function results in escalated Vegfa and Igf2 signaling, which exacerbates both EMT and angiogenesis to further potentiate IPs’ neurogenesis. These results suggest that the neurogenic potential of IPs may be boosted in vivo by manipulating Flna-mediated neurovascular communication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17823.001 PMID:27664421

  4. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  5. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier; Development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: 1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and 2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25355056

  6. Three-Dimensional Blood-Brain Barrier Model for in vitro Studies of Neurovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hansang; Seo, Ji Hae; Wong, Keith H. K.; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Park, Joseph; Bong, Kiwan; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) pathology leads to neurovascular disorders and is an important target for therapies. However, the study of BBB pathology is difficult in the absence of models that are simple and relevant. In vivo animal models are highly relevant, however they are hampered by complex, multi-cellular interactions that are difficult to decouple. In vitro models of BBB are simpler, however they have limited functionality and relevance to disease processes. To address these limitations, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model of BBB on a microfluidic platform. We verified the tightness of the BBB by showing its ability to reduce the leakage of dyes and to block the transmigration of immune cells towards chemoattractants. Moreover, we verified the localization at endothelial cell boundaries of ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin, two components of tight and adherens junctions. To validate the functionality of the BBB model, we probed its disruption by neuro-inflammation mediators and ischemic conditions and measured the protective function of antioxidant and ROCK-inhibitor treatments. Overall, our 3D BBB model provides a robust platform, adequate for detailed functional studies of BBB and for the screening of BBB-targeting drugs in neurological diseases. PMID:26503597

  7. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-01

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574304

  8. A 3D neurovascular bundles segmentation method based on MR-TRUS deformable registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Ogunleye, Tomi; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D neurovascular bundles (NVB) segmentation method for ultrasound (US) image by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS deformable registration. First, 3D NVB was contoured by a physician in MR images, and the 3D MRdefined NVB was then transformed into US images using a MR-TRUS registration method, which models the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimates the boundary deformation and the volumetric deformations under the elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 6 patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was less than 2 mm, and the average NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was over 89%. This NVB segmentation technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NVB response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  9. Neurovascular complications due to the Hippocrates method for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Markus; Polzer, Hans; Mutschler, Wolf

    2014-01-18

    In spite of the fact that the Hippocrates method hardly has been evaluated in a scientific manner and numerous associated iatrogenic complications have been reported, this method remains to be one of the most common techniques for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations. We report the case of a 69-year-old farmer under coumarin anticoagulant therapy who sustained acute first time anterior dislocation of his dominant right shoulder. By using the Hippocrates method with the patient under general anaesthesia, the brachial vein was injured and an increasing hematoma subsequently caused brachial plexus paresis by pressure. After surgery for decompression and vascular suturing, symptoms declined rapidly, but brachial plexus paresis still was not fully reversible after 3 mo of follow-up. The hazardousness of using the Hippocrates method can be explained by traction on the outstretched arm with force of the operator's body weight, direct trauma to the axillary region by the physician's heel, and the topographic relations of neurovascular structures and the dislocated humeral head. As there is a variety of alternative reduction techniques which have been evaluated scientifically and proofed to be safe, we strongly caution against the use of the Hippocrates method as a first line technique for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations, especially in elder patients with fragile vessels or under anticoagulant therapy, and recommend the scapular manipulation technique or the Milch technique, for example, as a first choice. PMID:24649415

  10. Imaging the Perivascular Space as a Potential Biomarker of Neurovascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Joel; Berezuk, Courtney; McNeely, Alicia A; Gao, Fuqiang; McLaurin, JoAnne; Black, Sandra E

    2016-03-01

    Although the brain lacks conventional lymphatic vessels found in peripheral tissue, evidence suggests that the space surrounding the vasculature serves a similar role in the clearance of fluid and metabolic waste from the brain. With aging, neurodegeneration, and cerebrovascular disease, these microscopic perivascular spaces can become enlarged, allowing for visualization and quantification on structural MRI. The purpose of this review is to: (i) describe some of the recent pre-clinical findings from basic science that shed light on the potential neurophysiological mechanisms driving glymphatic and perivascular waste clearance, (ii) review some of the pathobiological etiologies that may lead to MRI-visible enlarged perivascular spaces (ePVS), (iii) describe the possible clinical implications of ePVS, (iv) evaluate existing qualitative and quantitative techniques used for measuring ePVS burden, and (v) propose future avenues of research that may improve our understanding of this potential clinical neuroimaging biomarker for fluid and metabolic waste clearance dysfunction in neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases. PMID:26993511

  11. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed.

  12. Iptakalim protects against ischemic injury by improving neurovascular unit function in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ji, Juan; Yan, Hui; Chen, Zheng-Zhen; Zhao, Zhan; Yang, Dan-Dan; Sun, Xiu-Lan; Shi, Yong-Ping

    2015-07-01

    It has been reported that the novel ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener iptakalim (IPT) decreases ischemic neuronal damage in rats. However, the mechanisms underlying neuroprotection are still to be fully elucidated. The results of this study showed that mice with ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion exhibited higher mortality and more neurological deficits, as well as larger infarct volume, compared with sham mice. Moreover, it was found that ischemia activated astrocytes surrounding CA1 neurons with an increased expression of D-serine, induced greater microglial activation accompanied by higher tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, and caused higher expressions of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in the endothelial cells of mice. Pretreatment with IPT significantly attenuated the neurological deficits and decreased the infarct volume in mice. IPT treatment could decrease MMP-9 secretion, inhibit astrocytic activation with decreasing D-serine and elevating connexin43 expression. Microglial activation was also inhibited and TNF-α production was decreased by IPT. Taken together, a K-ATP channel opener may improve the function of neurovascular unit and protect against ischemic injury. These findings suggest that targeting K-ATP channels provides a promising therapeutic approach for stroke. PMID:25998857

  13. Molecular contributions to neurovascular unit dysfunctions after brain injuries: lessons for target-specific drug development

    PubMed Central

    Jullienne, Amandine; Badaut, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The revised ‘expanded’ neurovascular unit (eNVU) is a physiological and functional unit encompassing endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes and neurons. Ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury are acute brain injuries directly affecting the eNVU with secondary damage, such as blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption, edema formation and hypoperfusion. BBB dysfunctions are observed at an early postinjury time point, and are associated with eNVU activation of proteases, such as tissue plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinases. BBB opening is accompanied by edema formation using astrocytic AQP4 as a key protein regulating water movement. Finally, nitric oxide dysfunction plays a dual role in association with BBB injury and dysregulation of cerebral blood flow. These mechanisms are discussed including all targets of eNVU encompassing endothelium, glial cells and neurons, as well as larger blood vessels with smooth muscle. In fact, the feeding blood vessels should also be considered to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury. This review underlines the importance of the eNVU in drug development aimed at improving clinical outcome after stroke and traumatic brain injury. PMID:24489483

  14. SIV-induced impairment of neurovascular repair: a potential role for VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Ebenezer, Gigi J.; McArthur, Justin C.; Polydefkis, Michael; Dorsey, Jamie L.; O'Donnell, Ryan; Hauer, Peter; Adams, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerves and blood vessels travel together closely during development but little is known about their interactions post-injury. The SIV-infected pigtailed macaque model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) recapitulates peripheral nervous system pathology of HIV infection. In this study, we assessed the effect of SIV infection on neurovascular regrowth using a validated excisional axotomy model. Six uninfected and five SIV-infected macaques were studied 14 and 70 days after axotomy to characterize regenerating vessels and axons. Blood vessel extension preceded the appearance of regenerating nerve fibers suggesting that vessels serve as scaffolding to guide regenerating axons through extracellular matrix. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed along vascular silhouettes by endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular cells. VEGF expression correlated with dermal nerve (r=0.68, p= 0.01) and epidermal nerve fiber regrowth (r=0.63, p=0.02). No difference in blood vessel growth was observed between SIV-infected and control macaques. In contrast, SIV-infected animals demonstrated altered length, pruning and arborization of nerve fibers as well as alteration of VEGF expression. These results reinforce earlier human primate findings that vessel growth precedes and influences axonal regeneration. The consistency of these observations across human and non-human primates validates the use of the pigtailed-macaque as a preclinical model. PMID:22549763

  15. Regulation of Neurovascular Coupling in Autoimmunity to Water and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jukkola, Peter; Gu, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding autoimmune channelopathies, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are not always clear due to broad expression of some channel proteins. Recent studies show that autoimmune conditions that interfere with neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system (CNS) can lead to neurodegeneration. Cerebral blood flow that meets neuronal activity and metabolic demand is tightly regulated by local neural activity. This process of reciprocal regulation involves coordinated actions of a number of cell types, including neurons, glia, and vascular cells. In particular, astrocytic endfeet cover more than 90% of brain capillaries to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and wrap around synapses and nodes of Ranvier to communicate with neuronal activity. In this review, we highlight four types of channel proteins that are expressed in astrocytes, regarding their structures, biophysical properties, expression and distribution patterns, and related diseases including autoimmune disorders. Water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and inwardly-rectifying potassium (Kir4.1) channels are concentrated in astrocytic endfeet, whereas some voltage-gated Ca2+ and two-pore-domain K+ channels are expressed throughout the cell body of reactive astrocytes. More channel proteins are found in astrocytes under normal and abnormal conditions. This research field will contribute to a better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms underlying autoimmune disorders. PMID:25462580

  16. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-01

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  17. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-06-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  18. Chromatin remodelling initiation during human spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    De Vries, Marieke; Ramos, Liliana; Housein, Zjwan; De Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary During the last phase of spermatogenesis, spermiogenesis, haploid round spermatids metamorphose towards spermatozoa. Extensive cytoplasmic reduction and chromatin remodelling together allow a dramatic decrease of cellular, notably nuclear volume. DNA packing by a nucleosome based chromatin structure is largely replaced by a protamine based one. At the cytoplasmic level among others the acrosome and perinuclear theca (PNT) are formed. In this study we describe the onset of chromatin remodelling to occur concomitantly with acrosome and PNT development. In spread human round spermatid nuclei, we show development of a DAPI-intense doughnut-like structure co-localizing with the acrosomal sac and sub acrosomal PNT. At this structure we observe the first gradual decrease of nucleosomes and several histones. Histone post-translational modifications linked to chromatin remodelling such as H4K8ac and H4K16ac also delineate the doughnut, that is furthermore marked by H3K9me2. During the capping phase of acrosome development, the size of the doughnut-like chromatin domain increases, and this area often is marked by uniform nucleosome loss and the first appearance of transition protein 2 and protamine 1. In the acrosome phase at nuclear elongation, chromatin remodelling follows the downward movement of the marginal ring of the acrosome. Our results indicate that acrosome development and chromatin remodelling are interacting processes. In the discussion we relate chromatin remodelling to the available data on the nuclear envelope and the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex of spermatids, suggesting a signalling route for triggering chromatin remodelling. PMID:23213436

  19. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  20. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  1. A fly's view of neuronal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Shiri P; Schuldiner, Oren

    2016-09-01

    Developmental neuronal remodeling is a crucial step in sculpting the final and mature brain connectivity in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Remodeling includes degenerative events, such as neurite pruning, that may be followed by regeneration to form novel connections during normal development. Drosophila provides an excellent model to study both steps of remodeling since its nervous system undergoes massive and stereotypic remodeling during metamorphosis. Although pruning has been widely studied, our knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms is far from complete. Our understanding of the processes underlying regrowth is even more fragmentary. In this review, we discuss recent progress by focusing on three groups of neurons that undergo stereotypic pruning and regrowth during metamorphosis, the mushroom body γ neurons, the dendritic arborization neurons and the crustacean cardioactive peptide peptidergic neurons. By comparing and contrasting the mechanisms involved in remodeling of these three neuronal types, we highlight the common themes and differences as well as raise key questions for future investigation in the field. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:618-635. doi: 10.1002/wdev.241 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27351747

  2. Ab interno trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Pantcheva, Mina B; Kahook, Malik Y

    2010-10-01

    Anterior chamber drainage angle surgery, namely trabeculotomy and goniotomy, has been commonly utilized in children for many years. Its' reported success has ranged between 68% and 100% in infants and young children with congenital glaucoma. However, the long-term success of these procedures has been limited in adults presumably due to the formation of anterior synechiae (AS) in the postoperative phase. Recently, ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome™ has emerged as a novel surgical approach to effectively and selectively remove and ablate the trabecular meshwork and the inner wall of the Schlemm's canal in an attempt to avoid AS formation or other forms of wound healing with resultant closure of the cleft. This procedure seems to have an appealing safety profile with respect to early hypotony or infection if compared to trabeculectomy or glaucoma drainage device implantation. This might be advantageous in some of the impoverish regions of the Middle East and Africa where patients experience difficulties keeping up with their postoperative visits. It is important to note that no randomized trial comparing the Trabectome to other glaucoma procedures appears to have been published to date. Trabectome surgery is not a panacea, however, and it is associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may require additional glaucoma surgery as well as a high incidence of hyphema. Reported results show that postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) remains, at best, in the mid-teen range making it undesirable in patients with low-target IOP goals. A major advantage of Trabectome surgery is that it does not preclude further glaucoma surgery involving the conjunctiva, such as a trabeculectomy or drainage device implantation. As prospective randomized long-term clinical data become available, we will be better positioned to elucidate the exact role of this technique in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium. PMID:21180426

  3. Active, passive, and motor imagery paradigms: component analysis to assess neurovascular coupling.

    PubMed

    Salinet, Angela S M; Robinson, Thompson G; Panerai, Ronney B

    2013-05-15

    The association between neural activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been used to assess neurovascular coupling (NVC) in health and diseases states, but little attention has been given to the contribution of simultaneous changes in peripheral covariates. We used an innovative approach to assess the contributions of arterial blood pressure (BP), PaCO2, and the stimulus itself to changes in CBF velocities (CBFv) during active (MA), passive (MP), and motor imagery (MI) paradigms. Continuous recordings of CBFv, beat-to-beat BP, heart rate, and breath-by-breath end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) were performed in 17 right-handed subjects before, during, and after motor-cognitive paradigms performed with the right arm. A multivariate autoregressive-moving average model was used to calculate the separate contributions of BP, EtCO2, and the neural activation stimulus (represented by a metronome on-off signal) to the CBFv response during paradigms. Differences were found in the bilateral CBFv responses to MI compared with MA and MP, due to the contributions of stimulation (P < 0.05). BP was the dominant contributor to the initial peaked CBFv response in all paradigms with no significant differences between paradigms, while the contribution of the stimulus explained the plateau phase and extended duration of the CBFv responses. Separating the neural activation contribution from the influences of other covariates, it was possible to detect differences between three paradigms often used to assess disease-related NVC. Apparently similar CBFv responses to different motor-cognitive paradigms can be misleading due to the contributions from peripheral covariates and could lead to inaccurate assessment of NVC, particularly during MI.

  4. Neurovascular bundle dissection for Nesbit procedure in congenital penile curvature patients: medial or lateral?

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Akman, Tolga; Salabas, Emre; Dincer, Murat; Ortac, Mazhar; Kadioglu, Ates

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of the modified Nesbit procedure using different techniques for dissecting the neurovascular bundle (NVB) to correct ventral congenital penile curvatures (CPCs). The bundle was mobilized using the medial and lateral dissection technique in 21 (Group 1) and 13 (Group 2) patients, respectively. In the medial technique, Buck's fascia is opened at the dorsal side of the penis, the deep dorsal vein is removed at the most prominent site of the curvature and a diamond-shaped tunica albuginea (TA) is excised from the midline of the penis. In the lateral technique, the bundle is mobilized using a longitudinal lateral incision of the Buck's fascia above the urethra at the 5 and 7 o'clock positions via a bilateral approach. The localization and degree of curvature was evaluated using the combined intracavernous injection stimulation test or from the patients' photographs. The mean patient age and degree of curvature were similar between groups. The mean operation time was longer for Group 2 (P = 0.01). In Group 1, nine patients (42.8%) required one diamond excision, 10 (47.6%) required two diamond excisions and two (9.5%) required more than two excisions; in Group 2, six patients (46.2%) required two diamond excisions and seven patients (53.8%) required more than two diamond excisions (P = 0.019). The differences in penile shortening, penile straightening and numbness of the glans penis were not statistically significant. Medial dissection of the bundle for the modified Nesbit procedure reduces the number of diamond-shaped removals of TA and thus shortens operation time in comparison with its lateral counterpart. PMID:24625879

  5. Effect of acute nitrate supplementation on neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Hughes, William E; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-02-01

    The matching of oxygen supply to neural demand (i.e., neurovascular coupling (NVC)) is an important determinant of cognitive performance. The impact of hypoxia on NVC remains poorly characterized. NVC is partially modulated by nitric oxide (NO), which may initially decrease in hypoxia. This study investigated the effect of acute NO-donor (nitrate) supplementation on NVC and cognitive function in hypoxia. Twenty healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover design study. Following normoxic cognitive/NVC testing, participants consumed either nitrate (NIT) or a NIT-depleted placebo (PLA). Participants then underwent 120 min of hypoxia (11.6% ± 0.1% O2) and all cognitive/NVC testing was repeated. NVC was assessed as change in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow during a cognitive task (incongruent Stroop) using transcranial Doppler. Additional computerized cognitive testing was conducted separately to assess memory, executive function, attention, sensorimotor, and social cognition domains. Salivary nitrite significantly increased following supplementation in hypoxia for NIT (+2.6 ± 1.0 arbitrary units (AU)) compared with PLA (+0.2 ± 0.3 AU; p < 0.05). Memory performance (-6 ± 13 correct) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in hypoxia while all other cognitive domains were unchanged in hypoxia for both PLA and NIT conditions (p > 0.05). MCA flow increased during Stroop similarly in normoxia (PLA +5 ± 6 cm·s(-1), NIT +7 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) and hypoxia (PLA +5 ± 9 cm·s(-1), NIT +6 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) (p < 0.05) and this increase was not altered by PLA or NIT (p > 0.05). In conclusion, acute hypoxia resulted in significant reductions in memory concomitant with preservation of executive function, attention, and sensorimotor function. Hypoxia had no effect on NVC. Acute NIT supplementation had no effect on NVC or cognitive performance in hypoxia. PMID:26751937

  6. Citalopram Enhances Neurovascular Regeneration and Sensorimotor Functional Recovery after Ischemic Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Espinera, Alyssa R.; Ogle, Molly E.; Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) after stroke enhances motor functional recovery; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. We hypothesized that daily administration of the clinical drug citalopram would produce these functional benefits via enhancing neurovascular repair in the ischemic peri-infarct region. To test this hypothesis, focal ischemic stroke was induced in male C57/B6 mice by permanent ligation of distal branches of the middle cerebral artery to the barrel cortex and 7-min occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries. Citalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 24 hrs after stroke and daily thereafter. To label proliferating cells, bromo-deoxyuridine was injected daily beginning 3 days after stroke. Immunohistochemical and functional assays were performed to elucidate citalopram-mediated cellular and sensorimotor changes after stroke. Citalopram treatment had no significant effect on infarct formation or edema 3 days after stroke; however, citalopram-treated mice had better functional recovery than saline-treated controls 3 and 14 days after stroke in the adhesive removal test. Increased expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor was detected in the peri-infarct region 7 days after stroke in citalopram-treated animals. The number of proliferating neural progenitor cells and the distance of neuroblast migration from the sub-ventricular zone towards the ischemic cortex were significantly greater in citalopram-treated mice at 7 days after stroke. Immunohistochemical staining and co-localization analysis showed that citalopram-treated animals generated more new neurons and microvessels in the peri-infarct region 21 and 28 days after stroke. Taken together, these results suggest that citalopram promotes post-stroke sensorimotor recovery likely via enhancing neurogenesis, neural cell migration and the microvessel support in the peri-infarct region of

  7. Recreating blood-brain barrier physiology and structure on chip: A novel neurovascular microfluidic bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Pensabene, Virginia; Markov, Dmitry A.; Allwardt, Vanessa; Neely, M. Diana; Shi, Mingjian; Britt, Clayton M.; Hoilett, Orlando S.; Yang, Qing; Brewer, Bryson M.; Samson, Philip C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; May, James M.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu; Bowman, Aaron B.; Reiserer, Ronald S.; Wikswo, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical structure that serves as the gatekeeper between the central nervous system and the rest of the body. It is the responsibility of the BBB to facilitate the entry of required nutrients into the brain and to exclude potentially harmful compounds; however, this complex structure has remained difficult to model faithfully in vitro. Accurate in vitro models are necessary for understanding how the BBB forms and functions, as well as for evaluating drug and toxin penetration across the barrier. Many previous models have failed to support all the cell types involved in the BBB formation and/or lacked the flow-created shear forces needed for mature tight junction formation. To address these issues and to help establish a more faithful in vitro model of the BBB, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that is comprised of both a vascular chamber and a brain chamber separated by a porous membrane. This design allows for cell-to-cell communication between endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes and independent perfusion of both compartments separated by the membrane. This NeuroVascular Unit (NVU) represents approximately one-millionth of the human brain, and hence, has sufficient cell mass to support a breadth of analytical measurements. The NVU has been validated with both fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran diffusion and transendothelial electrical resistance. The NVU has enabled in vitro modeling of the BBB using all human cell types and sampling effluent from both sides of the barrier. PMID:26576206

  8. Effect of acute nitrate supplementation on neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Hughes, William E; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-02-01

    The matching of oxygen supply to neural demand (i.e., neurovascular coupling (NVC)) is an important determinant of cognitive performance. The impact of hypoxia on NVC remains poorly characterized. NVC is partially modulated by nitric oxide (NO), which may initially decrease in hypoxia. This study investigated the effect of acute NO-donor (nitrate) supplementation on NVC and cognitive function in hypoxia. Twenty healthy men participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover design study. Following normoxic cognitive/NVC testing, participants consumed either nitrate (NIT) or a NIT-depleted placebo (PLA). Participants then underwent 120 min of hypoxia (11.6% ± 0.1% O2) and all cognitive/NVC testing was repeated. NVC was assessed as change in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow during a cognitive task (incongruent Stroop) using transcranial Doppler. Additional computerized cognitive testing was conducted separately to assess memory, executive function, attention, sensorimotor, and social cognition domains. Salivary nitrite significantly increased following supplementation in hypoxia for NIT (+2.6 ± 1.0 arbitrary units (AU)) compared with PLA (+0.2 ± 0.3 AU; p < 0.05). Memory performance (-6 ± 13 correct) significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in hypoxia while all other cognitive domains were unchanged in hypoxia for both PLA and NIT conditions (p > 0.05). MCA flow increased during Stroop similarly in normoxia (PLA +5 ± 6 cm·s(-1), NIT +7 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) and hypoxia (PLA +5 ± 9 cm·s(-1), NIT +6 ± 7 cm·s(-1)) (p < 0.05) and this increase was not altered by PLA or NIT (p > 0.05). In conclusion, acute hypoxia resulted in significant reductions in memory concomitant with preservation of executive function, attention, and sensorimotor function. Hypoxia had no effect on NVC. Acute NIT supplementation had no effect on NVC or cognitive performance in hypoxia.

  9. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  10. Autonomous Biological System (ABS) experiments.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, T K; Anderson, G A; Poynter, J E; Stodieck, L S; Klaus, D M

    1998-12-01

    Three space flight experiments have been conducted to test and demonstrate the use of a passively controlled, materially closed, bioregenerative life support system in space. The Autonomous Biological System (ABS) provides an experimental environment for long term growth and breeding of aquatic plants and animals. The ABS is completely materially closed, isolated from human life support systems and cabin atmosphere contaminants, and requires little need for astronaut intervention. Testing of the ABS marked several firsts: the first aquatic angiosperms to be grown in space; the first higher organisms (aquatic invertebrate animals) to complete their life cycles in space; the first completely bioregenerative life support system in space; and, among the first gravitational ecology experiments. As an introduction this paper describes the ABS, its flight performance, advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52

  12. Low-intensity aerobic interval training attenuates pathological left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction in aortic-banded miniature swine

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy in response to hypertension or myocardial infarction is a pathological indicator associated with heart failure (HF). A central component of the remodeling process is the loss of cardiomyocytes via cell death pathways regulated by the mitochondrion. Recent evidence has indicated that exercise training can attenuate or reverse pathological remodeling, creating a physiological phenotype. The purpose of this study was to examine left ventricular (LV) function, remodeling, and cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function in aortic-banded (AB) sedentary (HFSED; n = 6), AB exercise-trained (HFTR, n = 5), and control sedentary (n = 5) male Yucatan miniature swine. LV hypertrophy was present in both AB groups before the start of training, as indicated by increases in LV end-diastolic volume, LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), and LV end-systolic dimension (LVESD). Exercise training (15 wk) prevented further increases in LVESV and LVESD (P < 0.05). The heart weight-to-body weight ratio, LV + septum-to-body weight ratio, LV + septum-to-right ventricle ratio, and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area were increased in both AB groups postmortem regardless of training status. Preservation of LV function after exercise training, as indicated by the maintenance of fractional shortening, ejection fraction, and mean wall shortening and increased stroke volume, was associated with an attenuation of the increased LV fibrosis (23%) and collagen (36%) observed in HFSED animals. LV mitochondrial dysfunction, as measured by Ca2+-induced mitochondrial permeability transition, was increased in HFSED (P < 0.05) but not HFTR animals. In conclusion, low-intensity interval exercise training preserved LV function as exemplified by an attenuation of fibrosis, maintenance of a positive inotropic state, and inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction, providing further evidence of the therapeutic potential of exercise in a clinical setting. PMID:20817828

  13. Strategies for Energy Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance.

  14. The tissue-type plasminogen activator-plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 complex promotes neurovascular injury in brain trauma: evidence from mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Sashindranath, Maithili; Sales, Eunice; Daglas, Maria; Freeman, Roxann; Samson, Andre L; Cops, Elisa J; Beckham, Simone; Galle, Adam; McLean, Catriona; Morganti-Kossmann, Cristina; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Madani, Rime; Vassalli, Jean-Dominique; Su, Enming J; Lawrence, Daniel A; Medcalf, Robert L

    2012-11-01

    The neurovascular unit provides a dynamic interface between the circulation and central nervous system. Disruption of neurovascular integrity occurs in numerous brain pathologies including neurotrauma and ischaemic stroke. Tissue plasminogen activator is a serine protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin, a protease that dissolves blood clots. Besides its role in fibrinolysis, tissue plasminogen activator is abundantly expressed in the brain where it mediates extracellular proteolysis. However, proteolytically active tissue plasminogen activator also promotes neurovascular disruption after ischaemic stroke; the molecular mechanisms of this process are still unclear. Tissue plasminogen activator is naturally inhibited by serine protease inhibitors (serpins): plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, neuroserpin or protease nexin-1 that results in the formation of serpin:protease complexes. Proteases and serpin:protease complexes are cleared through high-affinity binding to low-density lipoprotein receptors, but their binding to these receptors can also transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane. The matrix metalloproteinases are the second major proteolytic system in the mammalian brain, and like tissue plasminogen activators are pivotal to neurological function but can also degrade structures of the neurovascular unit after injury. Herein, we show that tissue plasminogen activator potentiates neurovascular damage in a dose-dependent manner in a mouse model of neurotrauma. Surprisingly, inhibition of activity following administration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 significantly increased cerebrovascular permeability. This led to our finding that formation of complexes between tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the brain parenchyma facilitates post-traumatic cerebrovascular damage. We demonstrate that following trauma, the complex binds to low-density lipoprotein receptors, triggering the induction of matrix

  15. Epigenetic regulation of aortic remodeling in hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nithya; Pushpakumar, Sathnur Basappa; Givvimani, Srikanth; Kundu, Sourav; Metreveli, Naira; James, Dexter; Bratcher, Adrienne P.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is prevalent in patients with hypertension and is an independent risk factor for aortic pathologies. HHcy is known to cause an imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), leading to the accumulation of collagen in the aorta and resulting in stiffness and development of hypertension. Although the exact mechanism of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is unclear, emerging evidence implicates epigenetic regulation involving DNA methylation. Our purpose was to investigate whether 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Aza), a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) inhibitor, reduces high blood pressure (BP) by regulating aortic ECM remodeling in HHcy. Wild-type and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)+/− HHcy mice were treated with Aza (0.5 mg/kg body weight). In HHcy mice, Aza treatment normalized the plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level and BP. Thoracic and abdominal aorta ultrasound revealed a reduction in the resistive index and wall-to-lumen ratio. Vascular response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside improved after Aza in HHcy mice. Histology showed a marked reduction in collagen deposition in the aorta. Aza treatment decreased the expression of DNMT1, MMP9, TIMP1, and S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) and upregulated methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). We conclude that reduction of DNA methylation by Aza in HHcy reduces adverse aortic remodeling to mitigate hypertension.—Narayanan, N., Pushpakumar, S. B., Givvimani, S., Kundu, S., Metreveli, N., James, D., Bratcher, A. P., Tyagi, S. C. Epigenetic regulation of aortic remodeling in hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:24739303

  16. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. PMID:27020758

  17. Revealing remodeler function: Varied and unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastlund, Allen

    Chromatin remodelers perform a necessary and required function for the successful expression of our genetic code. By modifying, shifting, or ejecting nucleosomes from the chromatin structure they allow access to the underlying DNA to the rest of the cell's machinery. This research has focused on two major remodeler motors from major families of chromatin remodelers: the trimeric motor domain of RSC and the motor domain of the ISWI family, ISWI. Using primarily stopped-flow spectrofluorometry, I have categorized the time-dependent motions of these motor domains along their preferred substrate, double-stranded DNA. Combined with collected ATP utilization data, I present the subsequent analysis and associated conclusions that stem from the underlying assumptions and models. Interestingly, there is little in common between the investigated proteins aside from their favored medium. While RSC exhibits modest translocation characteristics and highly effective motion with the ability for large molecular forces, ISWI is not only structurally different but highly inefficient in its motion leading to difficulties in determining its specific translocation mechanics. While chromatin remodeling is a ubiquitous facet of eukaryotic life, there remains much to be understood about their general mechanisms.

  18. Chromatin remodelers: We are the drivers!!

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Monica; Imam, Nasir; Verma, Kirtika; Patel, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    Chromatin is a highly dynamic structure that imparts structural organization to the genome and regulates the gene expression underneath. The decade long research in deciphering the significance of epigenetics in maintaining cellular integrity has embarked the focus on chromatin remodeling enzymes. These drivers have been categorized as readers, writers and erasers with each having significance of their own. Largely, on the basis of structure, ATP dependent chromatin remodelers have been grouped into 4 families; SWI/SNF, ISWI, IN080 and CHD. It is still unclear to what degree these enzymes are swayed by local DNA sequences when shifting a nucleosome to different positions. The ability of regulating active and repressive transcriptional state via open and close chromatin architecture has been well studied however, the significance of chromatin remodelers in regulating transcription at each step i.e. initiation, elongation and termination require further attention. The authors have highlighted the significance and role of different chromatin remodelers in transcription, DNA repair and histone variant deposition. PMID:27429206

  19. Challenging Modernization: Remodelling the Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Gunter, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This special edition enables an in-depth look at the process of modernization of education in England, in relation to other international developments. In particular we focus on the reform of teachers? work by examining the antecedence of the current policy of remodelling through three articles based on the Evaluation of the Department for…

  20. Arterial Remodeling Associates with CKD Progression

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Cédric; Karras, Alexandre; Laurent, Stéphane; Bozec, Erwan; Jacquot, Christian; Stengel, Bénédicte; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    In CKD, large arteries remodel and become increasingly stiff. The greater pulsatile pressure reaching the glomerulus as a result of increased aortic stiffness could induce renal damage, suggesting that the stiffening and remodeling of large arteries could affect the progression of CKD. We measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, aortic pressure and carotid remodeling and stiffness parameters in 180 patients with CKD (mean measured GFR, 32 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and followed them prospectively for a mean of 3.1 years. During follow-up, carotid stiffness significantly increased (+0.28 ± 0.05 m/s; P < 0.0001) but aortic stiffness did not. Carotid intima-media thickness decreased significantly during follow-up and the internal diameter of the carotid increased, producing increased circumferential wall stress (+2.08 ± 0.43 kPa/yr; P < 0.0001). In a linear mixed model, circumferential wall stress significantly associated with faster GFR decline after adjustment for risk factors of cardiovascular disease and progression of CKD. In a multivariable Cox model, carotid circumferential wall stress and pulse pressure independently associated with higher risk for ESRD. None of the arterial stiffness parameters associated with progression of CKD. In conclusion, maladaptive remodeling of the carotid artery and increased pulse pressure independently associate with faster decline of renal function and progression to ESRD. PMID:21493771

  1. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  2. Positive Outcome After a Small-Caliber Gunshot Fracture of the Upper Cervical Spine without Neurovascular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Thula; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Maurer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Gunshot wounds to the cervical spine most frequently concur with serious injuries to the spinal cord and cervical vessels and often have a fatal outcome. Case Report We describe the case of a 35-year-old male with a complex fracture of the C2 vertebra body and a mandibular fracture after a penetration gunshot to the cervical spine. Computed tomography (CT) at admission revealed the exact extent of the fractures and the small caliber bullet lodged next to the C2 vertebra. In this rare and extremely lucky case no collateral vascular or neurological damage was detected. Eighteen months after surgical bullet removal and posterior C1–C3 fusion complete bone healing of the C2 vertebra was achieved and there were no secondary neurovascular deficits. Conclusions Immediate surgical C1–C3 fixation resulted in an excellent outcome without secondary neurovascular deficits in this rare case of traumatic complex C2 vertebral fracture caused by a gunshot injury. PMID:27081417

  3. The effects of sodium-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate application on the neural and neurovascular tissues: An experimental animal study

    PubMed Central

    Ant, Ayca; Karamert, Recep; Kulduk, Gamze; Ekinci, Özgür; Tutar, Hakan; Göksu, Nebil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sodium-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MESNA) is a protective agent that is also used as “a chemical dissector” in various surgical fields. The aim of this study is to evaluate the toxic effects of MESNA on neural and neurovascular structures based on a morphological analysis and examine its safety in neurotological applications. Methods: Three groups of guinea pigs were used as subjects. MESNA solution (50 and 100%) and saline solution were applied to the subarachnoid space over the brain tissue via a middle fossa approach of study and control groups, respectively. Effects of MESNA were assessed by means of light microscope. McNemar Chi-square test was used to evaluate the histopathological findings. Statistical significance of P < 0.05 was taken as criterion. Results: No morphological changes were observed on vascular and neural structures in the study groups in both concentrations, compared to the control group. Conclusions: On a morphological basis, a single application of MESNA does not cause any morphological changes that indicate a toxicity in neural and neurovascular structures. PMID:26487975

  4. Remodeling and vascular spaces in bone.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Erik Fink; Eghbali-Fatourechi, Guiti Z; Khosla, Sundeep

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, we have come to appreciate that the close association between bone and vasculature plays a pivotal role in the regulation of bone remodeling and fracture repair. In 2001, Hauge et al. characterized a specialized vascular structure, the bone remodeling compartment (BRC), and showed that the outer lining of this compartment was made up of flattened cells, displaying all the characteristics of lining cells in bone. A decrease in bone turnover leads to a decrease in surfaces covered with remodeling compartments, whereas increased turnover causes an increase. Immunoreactivity for all major osteotropic growth factors and cytokines including osteoprotegerin (OPG) and RANKL has been shown in the cells lining the BRC, which makes the BRC the structure of choice for coupling between resorption and formation. The secretion of these factors inside a confined space separated from the bone marrow would facilitate local regulation of the remodeling process without interference from growth factors secreted by blood cells in the marrow space. The BRC creates an environment where cells inside the structure are exposed to denuded bone, which may enable direct cellular interactions with integrins and other matrix factors known to regulate osteoclast/osteoblast activity. However, the denuded bone surface inside the BRC also constitutes an ideal environment for the seeding of bone metastases, known to have high affinity for bone matrix. Reduction in BRC space brought about by antiresorptive therapies such as bisphosphonates reduce the number of skeletal events in advanced cancer, whereas an increase in BRC space induced by remodeling activators like PTH may increase the bone metastatic burden. The BRC has only been characterized in detail in trabecular bone; there is, however, evidence that a similar structure may exist in cortical bone, but further characterization is needed.

  5. The RSC chromatin remodeling complex has a crucial role in the complete remodeler set for yeast PHO5 promoter opening.

    PubMed

    Musladin, Sanja; Krietenstein, Nils; Korber, Philipp; Barbaric, Slobodan

    2014-04-01

    Although yeast PHO5 promoter chromatin opening is a founding model for chromatin remodeling, the complete set of involved remodelers remained unknown for a long time. The SWI/SNF and INO80 remodelers cooperate here, but nonessentially, and none of the many tested single or combined remodeler gene mutations could prevent PHO5 promoter opening. RSC, the most abundant and only remodeler essential for viability, was a controversial candidate for the unrecognized remodeling activity but unassessed in vivo. Now we show that remodels the structure of chromatin (RSC) is crucially involved in PHO5 promoter opening. Further, the isw1 chd1 double deletion also delayed chromatin remodeling. Strikingly, combined absence of RSC and Isw1/Chd1 or Snf2 abolished for the first time promoter opening on otherwise sufficient induction in vivo. Together with previous findings, we recognize now a surprisingly complex network of five remodelers (RSC, SWI/SNF, INO80, Isw1 and Chd1) from four subfamilies (SWI/SNF, INO80, ISWI and CHD) as involved in PHO5 promoter chromatin remodeling. This is likely the first described complete remodeler set for a physiological chromatin transition. RSC was hardly involved at the coregulated PHO8 or PHO84 promoters despite cofactor recruitment by the same transactivator and RSC's presence at all three promoters. Therefore, promoter-specific chromatin rather than transactivators determine remodeler requirements.

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling.

  7. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:17386182

  8. AB 1725: A Comprehensive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Board of Governors.

    A summary and analysis is provided of California Assembly Bill (AB) 1725, a reform bill that provides new direction and support for the state's community colleges. The analysis addresses each of the eight sections of the bill: (1) mission, highlighting reforms related to mission statements, transfer core curriculum, remedial limits, articulation…

  9. [Remodeling of Cardiovascular System: Causes and Consequences].

    PubMed

    Lopatina, E V; Kipenko, A V; Penniyaynen, V A; Pasatetckaia, N A; Tsyrline, V A

    2016-01-01

    Literature and our data suggest the regulatory action of a number of biologically active substances (catecholamines, cardiac glycosides, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor) on the growth and proliferation of heart cells. By using of organotypic tissue culture has proved that the basis of this regulation is the ability of test substances, receptor- or transducer-mediated signaling to modulate the function of Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase. There is a delay in the development of vascular smooth muscle in the late postnatal period in rats with the blockade of the sympathetic nervous system in the prenatal period. The relationship between vascular remodeling and contractile activity is described. It seems that one of the causes of high blood pressure is a remodeling of the cardiovascular system, which precedes the development of hypertension. PMID:27530043

  10. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  11. Metabolic remodeling in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Guo, Tao

    2013-08-01

    Although the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) has made enormous progress over the past decades, CHF is still a tremendous medical and societal burden. Metabolic remodeling might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CHF. The characteristics and mechanisms of metabolic remodeling remained unclear, and the main hypothesis might include the changes in the availability of metabolic substrate and the decline of metabolic capability. In the early phases of the disease, metabolism shifts toward carbohydrate utilization from fatty acids (FAs) oxidation. Along with the progress of the disease, the increasing level of the hyperadrenergic state and insulin resistance cause the changes that shift back to a greater FA uptake and oxidation. In addition, a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence suggests that the improvement in the metabolic capability is likely to be more significant than the selection of the substrate.

  12. [Remodeling of Cardiovascular System: Causes and Consequences].

    PubMed

    Lopatina, E V; Kipenko, A V; Penniyaynen, V A; Pasatetckaia, N A; Tsyrline, V A

    2016-01-01

    Literature and our data suggest the regulatory action of a number of biologically active substances (catecholamines, cardiac glycosides, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor) on the growth and proliferation of heart cells. By using of organotypic tissue culture has proved that the basis of this regulation is the ability of test substances, receptor- or transducer-mediated signaling to modulate the function of Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase. There is a delay in the development of vascular smooth muscle in the late postnatal period in rats with the blockade of the sympathetic nervous system in the prenatal period. The relationship between vascular remodeling and contractile activity is described. It seems that one of the causes of high blood pressure is a remodeling of the cardiovascular system, which precedes the development of hypertension.

  13. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed.

  14. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed. PMID:27161240

  15. Peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst prevents matrix metalloproteinase-9 activation and neurovascular injury after hemoglobin injection into the caudate nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, R; Feng, L; He, L; Chen, Y; Wen, P; Fu, Z; Lin, C; Yang, S; Deng, X; Zeng, J; Sun, G

    2015-06-25

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is a major constituent of blood and a potent mediator of oxidative or nitrative stress after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our previous study demonstrated that Hb could induce abundant peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation in vivo, which may be involved in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, however, the drug intervention is absent and also the underlying mechanism. Using an experimental stroke model by injecting Hb into the caudate nucleus of male Sprague-Dawley rats, we assessed the role of ONOO(-) decomposition catalyst, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato iron(III) [FeTPPS] in the activation of MMP-9 and Hb-induced neurovascular injuries. 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT, as an index of ONOO(-) formation) and NF-κB expression was measured by western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC)/immunofluorescence (IF). Activity of MMP was evaluated by in situ zymography. Neurovascular injury was assessed using zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) by WB and IF, fibronectin (FN) and neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) IHC. Perihematomal cell death was determined by TUNEL assay. Behavioral outcome was measured by modified neurological severity score (mNSS) test. At the injured striata, profuse 3-NT was produced and mainly expressed in neutrophils and microglia/macrophages. 3-NT formation significantly colocalized with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression. In situ zymography showed that gelatinase activity was mostly co-localized with neurons and blood vessel walls and partly with neutrophils and microglia/macrophages. Enhanced 3-NT production, NF-κB induction and MMP-9 activation were obviously reduced after FeTPPS treatment. Hb-induced injury to tight junction protein (ZO-1), basal lamina of FN-immunopositive microvasculature and neural cells was evidently ameliorated by FeTPPS. In addition, apoptotic cell numbers as well as behavioral deficits were also improved. The present study shows that the administration of the ONOO(-) decomposition

  16. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  17. Perspectives on biological growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, D.; Ateshian, G. A.; Arruda, E. M.; Cowin, S. C.; Dumais, J.; Goriely, A.; Holzapfel, G. A.; Humphrey, J. D.; Kemkemer, R.; Kuhl, E.; Olberding, J. E.; Taber, L. A.; Garikipati, K.

    2011-01-01

    The continuum mechanical treatment of biological growth and remodeling has attracted considerable attention over the past fifteen years. Many aspects of these problems are now well-understood, yet there remain areas in need of significant development from the standpoint of experiments, theory, and computation. In this perspective paper we review the state of the field and highlight open questions, challenges, and avenues for further development. PMID:21532929

  18. Application of Petri Nets in Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingxi; Yokota, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Understanding a mechanism of bone remodeling is a challenging task for both life scientists and model builders, since this highly interactive and nonlinear process can seldom be grasped by simple intuition. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) have been built for simulating bone formation as well as bone resorption. Although solving ODEs numerically can provide useful predictions for dynamical behaviors in a continuous time frame, an actual bone remodeling process in living tissues is driven by discrete events of molecular and cellular interactions. Thus, an event-driven tool such as Petri nets (PNs), which may dynamically and graphically mimic individual molecular collisions or cellular interactions, seems to augment the existing ODE-based systems analysis. Here, we applied PNs to expand the ODE-based approach and examined discrete, dynamical behaviors of key regulatory molecules and bone cells. PNs have been used in many engineering areas, but their application to biological systems needs to be explored. Our PN model was based on 8 ODEs that described an osteoprotegerin linked molecular pathway consisting of 4 types of bone cells. The models allowed us to conduct both qualitative and quantitative evaluations and evaluate homeostatic equilibrium states. The results support that application of PN models assists understanding of an event-driven bone remodeling mechanism using PN-specific procedures such as places, transitions, and firings. PMID:19838338

  19. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  20. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-19

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome.

  1. Two-photon microscopy as a tool to study blood flow and neurovascular coupling in the rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Andy Y; Driscoll, Jonathan D; Drew, Patrick J; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Kleinfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral vascular system services the constant demand for energy during neuronal activity in the brain. Attempts to delineate the logic of neurovascular coupling have been greatly aided by the advent of two-photon laser scanning microscopy to image both blood flow and the activity of individual cells below the surface of the brain. Here we provide a technical guide to imaging cerebral blood flow in rodents. We describe in detail the surgical procedures required to generate cranial windows for optical access to the cortex of both rats and mice and the use of two-photon microscopy to accurately measure blood flow in individual cortical vessels concurrent with local cellular activity. We further provide examples on how these techniques can be applied to the study of local blood flow regulation and vascular pathologies such as small-scale stroke. PMID:22293983

  2. Secretion of Shh by a neurovascular bundle niche supports mesenchymal stem cell homeostasis in the adult mouse incisor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hu; Feng, Jifan; Seidel, Kerstin; Shi, Songtao; Klein, Ophir; Sharpe, Paul; Chai, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are typically defined by their in vitro characteristics, and as a consequence the in vivo identity of MSCs and their niches are poorly understood. To address this issue, we used lineage tracing in a mouse incisor model and identified the neurovascular bundle (NVB) as an MSC niche. We found that NVB sensory nerves secrete Shh protein, which activates Gli1 expression in periarterial cells that contribute to all mesenchymal derivatives. These periarterial cells do not express classical MSC markers used to define MSCs in vitro. In contrast, NG2+ pericytes represent an MSC subpopulation derived from Gli1+ cells; they express classical MSC markers and contribute little to homeostasis but are actively involved in injury repair. Likewise, incisor Gli1+ cells but not NG2+ cells exhibit typical MSC characteristics in vitro. Collectively, we demonstrate that MSCs originate from periarterial cells and are regulated by Shh secretion from a NVB. PMID:24506883

  3. Helium preconditioning protects the brain against hypoxia/ischemia injury via improving the neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Peixi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wenwu; Yin, Na

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether helium preconditioning (He-PC) is able to exert neuroprotective effects via improving focal neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat hypoxia/ischemia (HI) brain injury model. Seven day old rat pups were divided into control group, HI group and He-PC group. HI was induced by exposure to 8% oxygen for 90min one day after preconditioning with 70% helium-30% oxygen for three 5-min periods. At 3 and 7 days, the brain was collected for the detection of inflammation related factors (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-10) and growth/neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] and nerve growth factor [NGF]); at 7 days, neurobehaviors were evaluated, and the brain was collected for the detection of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) by PCR, protein expression of angiogenesis related molecules (VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1) by Western blotting and microvessel density (MCD) by immunohistochemistry for vWF. Results showed He-PC was able to reduce TNF-α and IL-1β, further increase IL-10, BDNF, bFGF and NGF, elevate the mRNA expression of VEGF and Ang-1, increase the protein expression of VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1, promote angiogenesis and improve neurobehaviors as compared to HI group. These findings suggest that He-PC may improve the post-stroke neurovascular niche to exert neuroprotective effects on neonatal HI brain injury. PMID:27515290

  4. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids robustly promotes neurovascular restorative dynamics and improves neurological functions after stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Hailian; Zhang, Hui; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; Hu, Xiaoming; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is a devastating neurological disease with no satisfactory therapies to preserve long-term neurological function, perhaps due to the sole emphasis on neuronal survival in most preclinical studies. Recent studies have revealed the importance of protecting multiple cell types in the injured brain, such as oligodendrocytes and components of the neurovascular unit, before long-lasting recovery of function can be achieved. For example, revascularization in the ischemic penumbra is critical to provide various neurotrophic factors that enhance the survival and activity of neurons and other progenitor cells, such as oligodendrocyte precursor cells. In the present study, we hypothesized that chronic dietary supplementation with fish oil promotes post-stroke angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and oligodendrogenesis, thereby leading to long-term functional improvements. Mice received dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFA-enriched fish oil for three months before and up to one month after stroke. As expected, dietary n-3 PUFAs significantly increased levels of n-3 PUFAs in the brain and improved long-term behavioral outcomes after cerebral ischemia. n-3 PUFAs also robustly improved revascularization and angiogenesis and boosted the survival of NeuN/BrdU labeled newborn neurons up to 35days after stroke injury. Furthermore, these pro-neurogenic effects were accompanied by robust oligodendrogenesis. Thus, this is the first study to demonstrate that chronic dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs is an effective prophylactic measure not only to protect against ischemic injury for the long term but also to actively promote neurovascular restorative dynamics and brain repair. PMID:25771800

  5. Helium preconditioning protects the brain against hypoxia/ischemia injury via improving the neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Peixi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wenwu; Yin, Na

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether helium preconditioning (He-PC) is able to exert neuroprotective effects via improving focal neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat hypoxia/ischemia (HI) brain injury model. Seven day old rat pups were divided into control group, HI group and He-PC group. HI was induced by exposure to 8% oxygen for 90min one day after preconditioning with 70% helium-30% oxygen for three 5-min periods. At 3 and 7 days, the brain was collected for the detection of inflammation related factors (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-10) and growth/neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] and nerve growth factor [NGF]); at 7 days, neurobehaviors were evaluated, and the brain was collected for the detection of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) by PCR, protein expression of angiogenesis related molecules (VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1) by Western blotting and microvessel density (MCD) by immunohistochemistry for vWF. Results showed He-PC was able to reduce TNF-α and IL-1β, further increase IL-10, BDNF, bFGF and NGF, elevate the mRNA expression of VEGF and Ang-1, increase the protein expression of VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1, promote angiogenesis and improve neurobehaviors as compared to HI group. These findings suggest that He-PC may improve the post-stroke neurovascular niche to exert neuroprotective effects on neonatal HI brain injury.

  6. Reduction of lipoxidative load by secretory phospholipase A2 inhibition protects against neurovascular injury following experimental stroke in rat

    PubMed Central

    Hoda, Md Nasrul; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar K; Khan, Mushfiquddin

    2009-01-01

    Background In animal models, ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury triggers membrane lipid degradation and accumulation of lipoxidative exacerbations in neurovascular unit, leading to blood brain barrier (BBB) damage and neurologic deficits. In this study, we investigated whether impeding membrane lipid breakdown by inhibiting secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity reduces BBB leakage, leading to neuroprotection and functional recovery. Methods Focal cerebral IR injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in adult male rats. A sPLA2 inhibitor, 7,7-dimethyleicosadienoic acid (DEDA), was administered following IR injury. DEDA-treated animals were compared with vehicle-treated in terms of BBB leakage, edema, infarct volume, and neurological deficit. Membrane lipid degradation and the expression/activity of sPLA2 were also assessed. The role of one of the sPLA2 products, arachidonic acid (AA), on the morphology of the differentiated neuronal cell PC12 was examined by light microscopy. Results Treatment with DEDA after IR injury not only reduced BBB leakage but also decreased infarct volume and improved neurologic function. The treatment attenuated both the activity of sPLA2 and the levels of sPLA2-derived oxidized products. The metabolites of lipid oxidation/peroxidation, including the protein carbonyl, were reduced as well. The treatment also restored the levels of glutathione, indicating attenuation of oxidative stress. In vitro treatment of PC12 cells with DEDA did not restore the AA-mediated inhibition of neurite formation and the levels of glutathione, indicating that effect of DEDA is up stream to AA release. Conclusion sPLA2-derived oxidative products contribute to significant neurovascular damage, and treatment with sPLA2 inhibitor DEDA ameliorates secondary injury by reducing exacerbations from lipoxidative stress. PMID:19678934

  7. Functional MRI during Hyperbaric Oxygen: Effects of Oxygen on Neurovascular Coupling and BOLD fMRI signals

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Damon P.; Muir, Eric R.; Huang, Shiliang; Boley, Angela; Lodge, Daniel; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is used to treat a number of ailments. Improved understanding of how HBO affects neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) changes could shed light on the role of oxygen in neurovascular coupling and help guide HBO treatments. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses: i) activation-induced CBF fMRI response is not dependent on hemoglobin deoxygenation, and ii) activation-induced BOLD fMRI is markedly attenuated under HBO. CBF and BOLD fMRI of forepaw stimulation in anesthetized rats under HBO at 3 atmospheres absolute (ATA) was compared with normobaric air. Robust BOLD and CBF fMRI were detected under HBO. Inflow effects and spin-density changes did not contribute significantly to the BOLD fMRI signal under HBO. Analysis of the T2*-weighted signal at normobaric air and 1, 2 and 3ATA oxygen in the tissue and the superior sagittal sinus showed a strong dependence on increasing inhaled [O2]. Spontaneous electrophysiological activity and evoked local-field potentials were reduced under HBO. The differences between normobaric air and HBO in basal and evoked electrical activity could not fully account for the strong BOLD responses under HBO. We concluded that activation-induced CBF regulation in the brain does not operate through an oxygen-sensing mechanism and that stimulus-evoked BOLD responses and the venous T2*-weighted signals still have room to increase under 3ATA HBO. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study under HBO, providing insights into the effects of HBO on neural activity, neurovascular coupling, tissue oxygenation, and the BOLD signal. PMID:26143203

  8. Intranasal delivery of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells improved neurovascular regeneration and rescued neuropsychiatric deficits after neonatal stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zheng Zachory; Gu, Xiaohuan; Ferdinand, Anwar; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Ji, Xun Ming; Yu, Shan Ping; Wei, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal stroke is a major cause of mortality and long-term morbidity in infants and children. Currently, very limited therapeutic strategies are available to protect the developing brain against ischemic damage and promote brain repairs for pediatric patients. Moreover, children who experienced neonatal stroke often have developmental social behavior problems. Cellular therapy using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has emerged as a regenerative therapy after stroke. In the present investigation, neonatal stroke of postnatal day 7 (P7) rat pups was treated with noninvasive and brain-specific intranasal delivery of BMSCs at 6 h and 3 days after stroke (1 × 10(6)cells/animal). Prior to transplantation, BMSCs were subjected to hypoxic preconditioning to enhance their tolerance and regenerative properties. The effects on regenerative activities and stroke-induced sensorimotor and social behavioral deficits were specifically examined at P24 of juvenile age. The BMSC treatment significantly reduced infarct size and blood-brain barrier disruption, promoted angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurovascular repair, and improved local cerebral blood flow in the ischemic cortex. BMSC-treated rats showed better sensorimotor and olfactory functional recovery than saline-treated animals, measured by the adhesive removal test and buried food finding test. In social behavioral tests, we observed functional and social behavioral deficits in P24 rats subjected to stroke at P7, while the BMSC treatment significantly improved the performance of stroke animals. Overall, intranasal BMSC transplantation after neonatal stroke shows neuroprotection and great potential as a regenerative therapy to enhance neurovascular regeneration and improve functional recovery observed at the juvenile stage of development. PMID:25647744

  9. Functional MRI during hyperbaric oxygen: Effects of oxygen on neurovascular coupling and BOLD fMRI signals.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Damon P; Muir, Eric R; Huang, Shiliang; Boley, Angela; Lodge, Daniel; Duong, Timothy Q

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is used to treat a number of ailments. Improved understanding of how HBO affects neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) changes could shed light on the role of oxygen in neurovascular coupling and help guide HBO treatments. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses: i) activation-induced CBF fMRI response is not dependent on hemoglobin deoxygenation, and ii) activation-induced BOLD fMRI is markedly attenuated under HBO. CBF and BOLD fMRI of forepaw stimulation in anesthetized rats under HBO at 3 atmospheres absolute (ATA) were compared with normobaric air. Robust BOLD and CBF fMRI were detected under HBO. Inflow effects and spin-density changes did not contribute significantly to the BOLD fMRI signal under HBO. Analysis of the T2(⁎)-weighted signal at normobaric air and 1, 2 and 3ATA oxygen in the tissue and the superior sagittal sinus showed a strong dependence on increasing inhaled [O2]. Spontaneous electrophysiological activity and evoked local-field potentials were reduced under HBO. The differences between normobaric air and HBO in basal and evoked electrical activity could not fully account for the strong BOLD responses under HBO. We concluded that activation-induced CBF regulation in the brain does not operate through an oxygen-sensing mechanism and that stimulus-evoked BOLD responses and the venous T2(⁎)-weighted signals still have room to increase under 3ATA HBO. To our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study under HBO, providing insights into the effects of HBO on neural activity, neurovascular coupling, tissue oxygenation, and the BOLD signal.

  10. Connective tissue growth factor inhibition attenuates left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in pressure overload-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zoltán; Magga, Johanna; Alakoski, Tarja; Ulvila, Johanna; Piuhola, Jarkko; Vainio, Laura; Kivirikko, Kari I; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Lipson, Kenneth E; Signore, Pierre; Kerkelä, Risto

    2014-06-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is involved in the pathogenesis of various fibrotic disorders. However, its role in the heart is not clear. To investigate the role of CTGF in regulating the development of cardiac fibrosis and heart failure, we subjected mice to thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) or angiotensin II infusion, and antagonized the function of CTGF with CTGF monoclonal antibody (mAb). After 8 weeks of TAC, mice treated with CTGF mAb had significantly better preserved left ventricular (LV) systolic function and reduced LV dilatation compared with mice treated with control immunoglobulin G. CTGF mAb-treated mice exhibited significantly smaller cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and reduced expression of hypertrophic marker genes. CTGF mAb treatment reduced the TAC-induced production of collagen 1 but did not significantly attenuate TAC-induced accumulation of interstitial fibrosis. Analysis of genes regulating extracellular matrix proteolysis showed decreased expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in mice treated with CTGF mAb. In contrast to TAC, antagonizing the function of CTGF had no effect on LV dysfunction or LV hypertrophy in mice subjected to 4-week angiotensin II infusion. Further analysis showed that angiotensin II-induced expression of hypertrophic marker genes or collagens was not affected by treatment with CTGF mAb. In conclusion, CTGF mAb protects from adverse LV remodeling and LV dysfunction in hearts subjected to pressure overload by TAC. Antagonizing the function of CTGF may offer protection from cardiac end-organ damage in patients with hypertension.

  11. Control of bone remodelling by applied dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The data showing the relationship between bone mass and peak strain magnitude prepared and submitted for publication. The data from experiments relating remodelling activity with static or dynamic loads were prepared and submitted for publication. Development of programs to relate the location of remodelling activity with he natural and artificial dynamic strain distributions continued. Experiments on the effect of different strain rates on the remodelling response continued.

  12. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of heart valves.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Moeller, Andrew D; Lee, J Michael; Wells, Sarah M

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated remodeling of aortic and mitral valves leaflets under the volume loading and cardiac expansion of pregnancy. Those valves' leaflets enlarge with altered collagen fiber architecture, content, and cross-linking and biphasic changes (decreases, then increases) in extensibility during gestation. This study extends our analyses to right-sided valves, with additional compositional measurements for all valves. Valve leaflets were harvested from nonpregnant heifers and pregnant cows. Leaflet structure was characterized by leaflet dimensions, and ECM composition was determined using standard biochemical assays. Histological studies assessed changes in cellular and ECM components. Leaflet mechanical properties were assessed using equibiaxial mechanical testing. Collagen thermal stability and cross-linking were assessed using denaturation and hydrothermal isometric tension tests. Pulmonary and tricuspid leaflet areas increased during pregnancy by 35 and 55%, respectively. Leaflet thickness increased by 20% only in the pulmonary valve and largely in the fibrosa (30% thickening). Collagen crimp length was reduced in both the tricuspid (61%) and pulmonary (42%) valves, with loss of crimped area in the pulmonary valve. Thermomechanics showed decreased collagen thermal stability with surprisingly maintained cross-link maturity. The pulmonary leaflet exhibited the biphasic change in extensibility seen in left side valves, whereas the tricuspid leaflet mechanics remained largely unchanged throughout pregnancy. The tricuspid valve exhibits a remodeling response during pregnancy that is significantly diminished from the other three valves. All valves of the heart remodel in pregnancy in a manner distinct from cardiac pathology, with much similarity valve to valve, but with interesting valve-specific responses in the aortic and tricuspid valves.

  13. Chromatin remodelling: the industrial revolution of DNA around histones.

    PubMed

    Saha, Anjanabha; Wittmeyer, Jacqueline; Cairns, Bradley R

    2006-06-01

    Chromatin remodellers are specialized multi-protein machines that enable access to nucleosomal DNA by altering the structure, composition and positioning of nucleosomes. All remodellers have a catalytic ATPase subunit that is similar to known DNA-translocating motor proteins, suggesting DNA translocation as a unifying aspect of their mechanism. Here, we explore the diversity and specialization of chromatin remodellers, discuss how nucleosome modifications regulate remodeller activity and consider a model for the exposure of nucleosomal DNA that involves the use of directional DNA translocation to pump 'DNA waves' around the nucleosome.

  14. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  15. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500

  16. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  17. ECG manifestations of left ventricular electrical remodeling.

    PubMed

    Estes, E Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Research and thinking about the electrocardiographic manifestations of left ventricular hypertrophy has been constrained by a limited conceptual model of the process: heart disease produces chamber enlargement (increased mass), which in turn produces an altered electrocardiogram. The process is much more complex than can be represented in this simple model. A more robust and intricate model is proposed, in which heart (and vascular) disease causes structural changes, electrical changes, biochemical changes, and others, all of which interact to produce electrical remodeling of ventricular myocardium. This electrical remodeling results in a variety of ECG changes. All of these changes interact, leading to an altered clinical course, and to premature death. It is suggested that research, based on this model, can provide new clues to the processes involved, and improve the prediction of clinical outcomes. New directions in research, in recording equipment, and in organizational activities are suggested to test this new model, and to improve the usefulness of the electrocardiogram as a research and diagnostic tool.

  18. Remodeling of cardiolipin by phospholipid transacylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Kelley, Richard I; Blanck, Thomas J J; Schlame, Michael

    2003-12-19

    Mitochondrial cardiolipin (CL) contains unique fatty acid patterns, but it is not known how the characteristic molecular species of CL are formed. We found a novel reaction that transfers acyl groups from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine to CL in mitochondria of rat liver and human lymphoblasts. Acyl transfer was stimulated by ADP, ATP, and ATP gamma S, but not by other nucleotides. Coenzyme A stimulated the reaction only in the absence of adenine nucleotides. Free fatty acids were not incorporated into CL under the same incubation condition. The transacylation required addition of exogenous CL or monolyso-CL, whereas dilyso-CL was not a substrate. Transacylase activity was decreased in lymphoblasts from patients with Barth syndrome (tafazzin deletion), and this was accompanied by drastic changes in the molecular composition of CL. In rat liver, where linoleic acid was the most abundant residue of CL, only linoleoyl groups were transferred into CL, but not oleoyl or arachidonoyl groups. We demonstrated complete remodeling of tetraoleoyl-CL to tetralinoleoyl-CL in rat liver mitochondria and identified the intermediates linoleoyl-trioleoyl-CL, dilinoleoyl-dioleoyl-CL, and trilinoleoyl-oleoyl-CL by high-performance liquid chromatography. The data suggest that CL is remodeled by acyl specific phospholipid transacylation and that tafazzin is an acyltransferase involved in this mechanism.

  19. PARP inhibition and postinfarction myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Halmosi, Robert; Deres, Laszlo; Gal, Roland; Eros, Krisztian; Sumegi, Balazs; Toth, Kalman

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease accounts for the greatest proportion of cardiovascular diseases therefore it is the major cause of death worldwide. Its therapeutic importance is indicated by still high mortality of myocardial infarction, which is one of the most severe forms of CVDs. Moreover, the risk of developing heart failure is very high among survivors. Heart failure is accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rate, therefore this topic is in the focus of researchers' interest. After a myocardial infarct, at first ventricular hypertrophy develops as a compensatory mechanism to decrease wall stress but finally leads to left ventricular dilation. This phenomenon is termed as myocardial remodeling. The main characteristics of underlying mechanisms involve cardiomyocyte growth, vessel changes and increased collagen production, in all of which several mechanical stress induced neurohumoral agents, oxidative stress and signal transduction pathways are involved. The long term activation of these processes ultimately leads to left ventricular dilation and heart failure with decreased systolic function. Oxidative stress causes DNA breaks producing the activation of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) enzyme that leads to energy depletion and unfavorable modulation of different kinase cascades (Akt-1/GSK-3β, MAPKs, various PKC isoforms) and thus it promotes the development of heart failure. Therefore inhibition of PARP enzyme could offer a promising new therapeutical approach to prevent the onset of heart failure among postinfarction patients. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive summary about the most significant experimental results and mechanisms in postinfarction remodeling. PMID:27392900

  20. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  1. The “Neurovascular Unit approach” to Evaluate Mechanisms of Dysfunctional Autoregulation in Asphyxiated Newborns in the era of Hypothermia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F.; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Despite improvements in obstetrical and neonatal care, and introduction of hypothermia as a neuroprotective therapy, perinatal brain injury remains a frequent cause of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy. The recognition of dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation is essential for a real time measure of efficacy to identify those who are at highest risk for brain injury. This article will focus on the “neurovascular unit” approach to the care of asphyxiated neonates to review 1) potential mechanisms of dysfunctional cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, 2) optimal monitoring methodology such as NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy), and TCD (transcutaneous Doppler), and 3) clinical implications of monitoring in the neonatal intensive care setting in asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia and rewarming. Critical knowledge of the functional regulation of the neurovascular unit may lead to improved ability to predict outcomes in real time during hypothermia, as well as differentiate nonresponders who might benefit from additional therapies. PMID:25062804

  2. Distribution of temperature changes and neurovascular coupling in rat brain following 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") exposure.

    PubMed

    Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Jiang, Lihong; Hyder, Fahmeed; Behar, Kevin L

    2015-10-01

    (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") is an abused psychostimulant that produces strong monoaminergic stimulation and whole-body hyperthermia. MDMA-induced thermogenesis involves activation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), primarily a type specific to skeletal muscle (UCP-3) and absent from the brain, although other UCP types are expressed in the brain (e.g. thalamus) and might contribute to thermogenesis. Since neuroimaging of brain temperature could provide insights into MDMA action, we measured spatial distributions of systemically administered MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in rat cortex and subcortex using a novel magnetic resonance method, Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS), with an exogenous temperature-sensitive probe (thulium ion and macrocyclic chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTMA(4-))). The MDMA-induced temperature rise was greater in the cortex than in the subcortex (1.6 ± 0.4 °C versus 1.3 ± 0.4 °C) and occurred more rapidly (2.0 ± 0.2 °C/h versus 1.5 ± 0.2 °C/h). MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in the cortex and body were correlated, although the body temperature exceeded the cortex temperature before and after MDMA. Temperature, neuronal activity, and blood flow (CBF) were measured simultaneously in the cortex and subcortex (i.e. thalamus) to investigate possible differences of MDMA-induced warming across brain regions. MDMA-induced warming correlated with increases in neuronal activity and blood flow in the cortex, suggesting that the normal neurovascular response to increased neural activity was maintained. In contrast to the cortex, a biphasic relationship was seen in the subcortex (i.e. thalamus), with a decline in CBF as temperature and neural activity rose, transitioning to a rise in CBF for temperature above 37 °C, suggesting that MDMA affected CBF and neurovascular coupling differently in subcortical regions

  3. Distribution of temperature changes and neurovascular coupling in rat brain following 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA,‘ecstasy’) exposure

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Jiang, Lihong; Hyder, Fahmeed; Behar, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    (+/−)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’) is an abused psychostimulant producing strong monoaminergic stimulation and whole-body hyperthermia. MDMA-induced thermogenesis involves activation of uncoupling proteins (UCP), primarily a type specific to skeletal muscle (UCP-3) and which is absent in brain, although other UCP types are expressed in brain (e.g., thalamus) and might contribute to thermogenesis. Since neuroimaging of brain temperature could provide insights of MDMA action, we measured spatial distributions of systemically-administered MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in rat cortex and subcortex using a novel magnetic resonance method, Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation of Shifts (BIRDS), with an exogenous temperature-sensitive probe (thulium ion and macrocyclic chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTMA4−)). The MDMA-induced temperature rise in cortex was greater than in subcortex (1.6±0.4°C vs. 1.3±0.4°C) and occurred more rapidly (2.0±0.2°C/h vs. 1.5±0.2°C/h). MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in cortex and body were correlated, although body temperature exceeded cortex before and after MDMA. Temperature, neuronal activity, and blood flow (CBF) were measured simultaneously in cortex and subcortex (i.e., thalamus) to investigate possible differences of MDMA-induced warming across brain regions. MDMA-induced warming correlated with increases in neuronal activity and blood flow in cortex, suggesting that the normal neurovascular response to increased neural activity was maintained. In contrast to cortex, a biphasic relationship was seen in subcortex (i.e., thalamus), with a decline in CBF as temperature and neural activity rose, transitioning to a rise in CBF for temperature >37°C, suggesting that MDMA affected CBF and neurovascular coupling differently in subcortical regions. Considering that MDMA effects on CBF and heat dissipation (as well as

  4. Distribution of temperature changes and neurovascular coupling in rat brain following 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") exposure.

    PubMed

    Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Jiang, Lihong; Hyder, Fahmeed; Behar, Kevin L

    2015-10-01

    (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") is an abused psychostimulant that produces strong monoaminergic stimulation and whole-body hyperthermia. MDMA-induced thermogenesis involves activation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), primarily a type specific to skeletal muscle (UCP-3) and absent from the brain, although other UCP types are expressed in the brain (e.g. thalamus) and might contribute to thermogenesis. Since neuroimaging of brain temperature could provide insights into MDMA action, we measured spatial distributions of systemically administered MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in rat cortex and subcortex using a novel magnetic resonance method, Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS), with an exogenous temperature-sensitive probe (thulium ion and macrocyclic chelate 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTMA(4-))). The MDMA-induced temperature rise was greater in the cortex than in the subcortex (1.6 ± 0.4 °C versus 1.3 ± 0.4 °C) and occurred more rapidly (2.0 ± 0.2 °C/h versus 1.5 ± 0.2 °C/h). MDMA-induced temperature changes and dynamics in the cortex and body were correlated, although the body temperature exceeded the cortex temperature before and after MDMA. Temperature, neuronal activity, and blood flow (CBF) were measured simultaneously in the cortex and subcortex (i.e. thalamus) to investigate possible differences of MDMA-induced warming across brain regions. MDMA-induced warming correlated with increases in neuronal activity and blood flow in the cortex, suggesting that the normal neurovascular response to increased neural activity was maintained. In contrast to the cortex, a biphasic relationship was seen in the subcortex (i.e. thalamus), with a decline in CBF as temperature and neural activity rose, transitioning to a rise in CBF for temperature above 37 °C, suggesting that MDMA affected CBF and neurovascular coupling differently in subcortical regions

  5. Anatomy of Mandibular Vital Structures. Part II: Mandibular Incisive Canal, Mental Foramen and Associated Neurovascular Bundles in Relation with Dental Implantology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of the present study was to review the literature of how to identify the mental foramen, mandibular incisive canal and associated neurovascular bundles during implant surgery and how to detect and avoid the damage of these vital structures during implant therapy. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen, mental nerve, anterior mental loop. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1979 to November 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, and periodontal journals and books was performed. Results In total, 47 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The morphology and variations of the mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen and associated neurovascular bundles were presented as two entities. It suggested that clinicians should carefully assess these vital structures to avoid nerve/artery damage. Conclusions The mandibular incisive canal, mental foramen and associated neurovascular bundles exist in different locations and possess many variations. Individual, gender, age, race, assessing technique used and degree of edentulous alveolar bone atrophy largely influence these variations. It suggests that the clinicians should carefully identify these anatomical landmarks, by analyzing all influencing factors, prior to their implant surgical operation. PMID:24421959

  6. The effect of stress concentration on bone remodeling: theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Firoozbakhsh, K; Aleyaasin, M

    1989-11-01

    Theoretical predictions of internal bone remodeling around an elliptical hole are studied. The internal remodeling theory due to Cowin and Hegedus is employed. The bone is modeled as an initially homogeneous adaptive elastic plate with an elliptical hole under a superposed steady compressive load. It is shown that there will exist a final inhomogeneous remodeling distribution around the hole that will disappear away from the hole. The remodeling is such that the compressive stress concentration causes the bone structure to evolve to one of greater density and stiffer elastic coefficients. The speed of remodeling around the hole and its variation with respect to distance is investigated and discussed. It is shown that the rate of bone reinforcement in the area of compressive stress concentration is much higher than the rate of bone resorption in the area of existing tensile stress. Special cases of a circular hole and vertical and horizontal slots are studied and discussed.

  7. AB INITIO AND CALPHAD THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A

    2004-04-14

    Ab initio electronic structure methods can supplement CALPHAD in two major ways for subsequent applications to stability in complex alloys. The first one is rather immediate and concerns the direct input of ab initio energetics in CALPHAD databases. The other way, more involved, is the assessment of ab initio thermodynamics {acute a} la CALPHAD. It will be shown how these results can be used within CALPHAD to predict the equilibrium properties of multi-component alloys.

  8. Multimodality Imaging of Myocardial Injury and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Sosnovik, David E.; French, Brent A.; Bengel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular molecular imaging have come at a rapid pace over the last several years. Multiple approaches have been taken to better understand the structural, molecular, and cellular events that underlie the progression from myocardial injury to myocardial infarction (MI) and, ultimately, to congestive heart failure. Multimodality molecular imaging including SPECT, PET, cardiac MRI, and optical approaches is offering new insights into the pathophysiology of MI and left ventricular remodeling in small-animal models. Targets that are being probed include, among others, angiotensin receptors, matrix metalloproteinases, integrins, apoptosis, macrophages, and sympathetic innervation. It is only a matter of time before these advances are applied in the clinical setting to improve post-MI prognostication and identify appropriate therapies in patients to prevent the onset of congestive heart failure. PMID:20395347

  9. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  10. Organelle remodeling at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Henne, W Mike

    2016-10-01

    Cellular organelles must execute sophisticated biological processes to persist, and often communicate with one another to exchange metabolites and information. Recent studies suggest inter-organelle membrane contact sites (MCSs) are hubs for this cellular cross-talk. MCSs also govern membrane remodeling, thus controlling aspects of organelle shape, identity, and function. Here, we summarize three emerging phenomena that MCSs appear to govern: 1) organelle identity via the non-vesicular exchange of lipids, 2) mitochondrial shape and division, and 3) endosomal migration in response to sterol trafficking. We also discuss the role for ER-endolysosomal contact sites in cholesterol metabolism, and the potential biomedical importance this holds. Indeed, the emerging field inter-organellar cross-talk promises substantial advances in the fields of lipid metabolism and cell signaling.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic remodeling in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pandey, Subhash C

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol use and alcohol addiction represent dysfunctional brain circuits resulting from neuroadaptive changes during protracted alcohol exposure and its withdrawal. Alcohol exerts a potent effect on synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine formation in specific brain regions, providing a neuroanatomical substrate for the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Epigenetics has recently emerged as a critical regulator of gene expression and synaptic plasticity-related events in the brain. Alcohol exposure and withdrawal induce changes in crucial epigenetic processes in the emotional brain circuitry (amygdala) that may be relevant to the negative affective state defined as the "dark side" of addiction. Here, we review the literature concerning synaptic plasticity and epigenetics, with a particular focus on molecular events related to dendritic remodeling during alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Targeting epigenetic processes that modulate synaptic plasticity may yield novel treatments for alcoholism.

  12. Myocardial Tissue Remodeling in Adolescent Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravi V.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Neilan, Tomas G.; Hulten, Edward; Coelho‐Filho, Otavio; Hoppin, Alison; Levitsky, Lynne; de Ferranti, Sarah; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Traum, Avram; Goodman, Elizabeth; Feng, Henry; Heydari, Bobak; Harris, William S.; Hoefner, Daniel M.; McConnell, Joseph P.; Seethamraju, Ravi; Rickers, Carsten; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Jerosch‐Herold, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Although ventricular remodeling has been reported in obese youth, early tissue‐level markers within the myocardium that precede organ‐level alterations have not been described. Methods and Results We studied 21 obese adolescents (mean age, 17.7±2.6 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 41.9±9.5 kg/m2, including 11 patients with type 2 diabetes [T2D]) and 12 healthy volunteers (age, 15.1±4.5 years; BMI, 20.1±3.5 kg/m2) using biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to phenotype cardiac structure, function, and interstitial matrix remodeling by standard techniques. Although left ventricular ejection fraction and left atrial volumes were similar in healthy volunteers and obese patients (and within normal body size‐adjusted limits), interstitial matrix expansion by CMR extracellular volume fraction (ECV) was significantly different between healthy volunteers (median, 0.264; interquartile range [IQR], 0.253 to 0.271), obese adolescents without T2D (median, 0.328; IQR, 0.278 to 0.345), and obese adolescents with T2D (median, 0.376; IQR, 0.336 to 0.407; P=0.0001). ECV was associated with BMI for the entire population (r=0.58, P<0.001) and with high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein (r=0.47, P<0.05), serum triglycerides (r=0.51, P<0.05), and hemoglobin A1c (r=0.76, P<0.0001) in the obese stratum. Conclusions Obese adolescents (particularly those with T2D) have subclinical alterations in myocardial tissue architecture associated with inflammation and insulin resistance. These alterations precede significant left ventricular hypertrophy or decreased cardiac function. PMID:23963758

  13. Progenitor cells in pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Michael E; Frid, Maria G; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by cellular and structural changes in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Intimal thickening and fibrosis, medial hypertrophy and fibroproliferative changes in the adventitia are commonly observed, as is the extension of smooth muscle into the previously non-muscularized vessels. A majority of these changes are associated with the enhanced presence of α-SM-actin+ cells and inflammatory cells. Atypical abundances of functionally distinct endothelial cells, particularly in the intima (plexiform lesions), and also in the perivascular regions, are also described. At present, neither the origin(s) of these cells nor the molecular mechanisms responsible for their accumulation, in any of the three compartments of the vessel wall, have been fully elucidated. The possibility that they arise from either resident vascular progenitors or bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is now well established. Resident vascular progenitor cells have been demonstrated to exist within the vessel wall, and in response to certain stimuli, to expand and express myofibroblastic, endothelial or even hematopoietic markers. Bone marrow-derived or circulating progenitor cells have also been shown to be recruited to sites of vascular injury and to assume both endothelial and SM-like phenotypes. Here, we review the data supporting the contributory role of vascular progenitors (including endothelial progenitor cells, smooth muscle progenitor cells, pericytes, and fibrocytes) in vascular remodeling. A more complete understanding of the processes by which progenitor cells modulate pulmonary vascular remodeling will undoubtedly herald a renaissance of therapies extending beyond the control of vascular tonicity and reduction of pulmonary artery pressure. PMID:22034593

  14. Virtual stenting workflow with vessel-specific initialization and adaptive expansion for neurovascular stents and flow diverters.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Nikhil; Yu, Hongyu; Xu, Jinhui; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun; Meng, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Endovascular intervention using traditional neurovascular stents and densely braided flow diverters (FDs) have become the preferred treatment strategies for traditionally challenging intracranial aneurysms. Modeling stent and FD deployment in patient-specific aneurysms and its flow modification results prior to the actual intervention can potentially predict the patient outcome and treatment optimization. We present a clinically focused, streamlined virtual stenting workflow that efficiently simulates stent and FD treatment in patient-specific aneurysms based on expanding a simplex mesh structure. The simplex mesh is generated using an innovative vessel-specific initialization technique, which uses the patient's parent artery diameter to identify the initial position of the simplex mesh inside the artery. A novel adaptive expansion algorithm enables the acceleration of deployment process by adjusting the expansion forces based on the distance of the simplex mesh from the parent vessel. The virtual stenting workflow was tested by modeling the treatment of two patient-specific aneurysms using the Enterprise stent and the Pipeline Embolization Device (commercial FD). Both devices were deployed in the aneurysm models in a few seconds. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of pre- and post-treatment aneurysmal hemodynamics show flow reduction in the aneurysmal sac in treated aneurysms, with the FD diverting more flow than the Enterprise stent. The test results show that this workflow can rapidly simulate clinical deployment of stents and FDs, hence paving the way for its future clinical implementation.

  15. Relation of haemostatic function, neurovascular impairment, and vibration exposure in workers with different stages of vibration induced white finger.

    PubMed Central

    Bovenzi, M; Giansante, C; Fiorito, A; Calabrese, S

    1985-01-01

    Haemostatic function and neurovascular symptoms were investigated in 67 workers exposed to vibration and 46 comparable referents. Of these 65.6% of vibration workers complained of neurological disturbances (stages 0T, 0N of Taylor's classification for vibration induced white finger (VWF) and 20.9% suffered from Raynaud's phenomenon (stages 1-2-3). The severity of the staging symptoms showed a close relation with an index of vibration dose computed on the basis of vibration measurement and individual exposure time. Indices of platelet aggregation, both in vitro and in vivo, antithrombin III, fibrinogen and fibrinopeptide A levels were not different in the exposed workers compared with the referents. No relation was found between haemostatic parameters and the severity of VWF. Exposed workers responded to a cooling procedure with a more pronounced vasoconstriction in the digital vessels than the referents, as indicated by delayed recovery time of finger skin temperature after the cold test. These findings suggest that both in the early stages (0T, 0N) and in more severe stages of VWF (stages 1-2) cold induced hyperreactivity in the digital vessels and Raynaud's syndrome are vascular disorders of functional origin occurring without any prethrombotic alterations. PMID:3978045

  16. Mechanism of Mitochondrial Connexin43′s Protection of the Neurovascular Unit under Acute Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuai; Shen, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Xie, Hong-Yan; Deng, Fang; Feng, Jia-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We observed mitochondrial connexin43 (mtCx43) expression under cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, analyzed its regulation, and explored its protective mechanisms. Wistar rats were divided into groups based on injections received before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Cerebral infarction volume was detected by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolim chloride staining, and cell apoptosis was observed by transferase dUTP nick end labeling. We used transmission electron microscopy to observe mitochondrial morphology and determined superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. MtCx43, p-mtCx43, protein kinase C (PKC), and p-PKC expression were detected by Western blot. Compared with those in the IR group, cerebral infarction volumes in the carbenoxolone (CBX) and diazoxide (DZX) groups were obviously smaller, and the apoptosis indices were down-regulated. Mitochondrial morphology was damaged after I/R, especially in the IR and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD) groups. Similarly, decreased SOD activity and increased MDA were observed after MCAO; CBX, DZX, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) reduced mitochondrial functional injury. Expression of mtCx43 and p-mtCx43 and the p-Cx43/Cx43 ratio were significantly lower in the IR group than in the sham group. These abnormalities were ameliorated by CBX, DZX, and PMA. MtCx43 may protect the neurovascular unit from acute cerebral IR injury via PKC activation induced by mitoKATP channel agonists. PMID:27164087

  17. Virtual Stenting Workflow with Vessel-Specific Initialization and Adaptive Expansion for Neurovascular Stents and Flow Diverters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinhui; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun; Meng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular intervention using traditional neurovascular stents and densely braided flow diverters (FDs) have become the preferred treatment strategies for traditionally challenging intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Modeling stent and FD deployment in patient-specific aneurysms and its flow modification results prior to the actual intervention can potentially predict the patient outcome and treatment optimization. We present a clinically focused, streamlined virtual stenting workflow that efficiently simulates stent and FD treatment in patient-specific aneurysms based on expanding a simplex mesh structure. The simplex mesh is generated using an innovative vessel-specific initialization technique, which uses the patient’s parent artery diameter to identify the initial position of the simplex mesh inside the artery. A novel adaptive expansion algorithm enables the acceleration of deployment process by adjusting the expansion forces based on the distance of the simplex mesh from the parent vessel. The virtual stenting workflow was tested by modeling the treatment of two patient-specific aneurysms using the Enterprise stent and the Pipeline Embolization Device (commercial FD). Both devices were deployed in the aneurysm models in a few seconds. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of pre- and post-treatment aneurysmal hemodynamics show flow reduction in the aneurysmal sac in treated aneurysms, with the FD diverting more flow than the Enterprise stent. The test results show that this workflow can rapidly simulate clinical deployment of stents and FDs, hence paving the way for its future clinical implementation. PMID:26899135

  18. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma; Gomes, Rachel L R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno.

  19. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Comparison of Ab Interno and Ab Externo Intraocular Lens Scleral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Lie; Garcia, Patricia Novita; Malavazzi, Gustavo Ricci; Allemann, Norma

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare ab interno and ab externo scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods. Randomized patients underwent ab externo or ab interno scleral fixation of a PCIOL. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively, to determine PCIOL centration, IOL distance to the iris at 12, 3, 6, and 9 hours, and haptics placement in relation to the ciliary sulcus. Results. Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The ab externo technique was used in 7 eyes (46.6%) and the ab interno in 8 eyes (53.3%). In the ab externo technique, 14 haptics were located: 4 (28.57%) in the ciliary sulcus; 2 (14.28%) anterior to the sulcus; and 8 (57.14%) posterior to the sulcus, 6 in the ciliary body and 2 posterior to the ciliary body. In the ab interno group, 4 haptics (25.0%) were in the ciliary sulcus, 2 (12.50%) anterior to the sulcus, and 10 (75.0%) posterior to the sulcus, 4 in the ciliary body and 6 posterior to the ciliary body. Conclusions. Ab externo and ab interno scleral fixation techniques presented similar results in haptic placement. Ab externo technique presented higher vertical tilt when compared to the ab interno. PMID:27293878

  20. Remodeling of Endogenous Mammary Epithelium by Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A.; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R.; Habte, Frezghi G.; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R.; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L.; Clarke, Michael F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  1. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  2. Pathological Ventricular Remodeling: Mechanisms: Part 1 of 2

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Min; Burchfield, Jana S.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite declines in heart failure morbidity and mortality with current therapies, re-hospitalization rates remain distressingly high, impacting substantially on individuals, society, and the economy. As a result, the need for new therapeutic advances and novel medical devices is urgent. Disease-related left ventricular remodeling is a complex process involving cardiac myocyte growth and death, vascular rarefaction, fibrosis, inflammation, and electrophysiological remodeling. As these events are highly inter-related, targeting one single molecule or process may not be sufficient. Here, we review molecular and cellular mechanisms governing pathological ventricular remodeling. PMID:23877061

  3. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  4. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  5. Cytomembrane ATP-sensitive K+ channels in neurovascular unit targets of ischemic stroke in the recovery period

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Pan, Sipei; Zheng, Xiaolu; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to analyze the mechanism of cytomembrane ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP) in the neurovascular unit treatment of ischemic stroke in the recovery period. A total of 24 healthy adult male Wistar rats of 5–8 weeks age, weighing 160–200 g were randomly divided into the control (sham-operation group), model, KATP blocker and KATP opener groups (n=6 rats per group). Nylon cerebral artery occlusion was conducted using nylon monofilament coated with Poly-L-lysine, which was used to produce a cerebral infarction model. After feeding normally for 3 days, 5-hydroxydecanoate (40 mg/Kg), and diazoxide (40 mg/Kg) were injected to the abdominal cavity in the blocker, and opener groups, respectively. The control received an equivalent normal saline that was injected into the sham-operation and model groups. The animals were mutilated and samples were collected after 3 days. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression levels of the three subunits of KATP, i.e., kir6.1, and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 1 and SUR2 mRNA, as well as to calculate infarct size in tetrazolium chloride staining. The expression level of mRNA in the opener group were significantly higher, followed by the model and blocker groups, with the control group being the lowest (P<0.05). Infarct size in the opener group was markedly smaller than the model and blocker groups, and infarct size in the blocker group was significantly larger (P<0.05). Thus, the target treatment on KATP may improve the prognosis of ischemic stroke during the recovery period. PMID:27446320

  6. Effects of inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition or norepinephrine on the neurovascular coupling in an endotoxic rat shock model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a crucial role in early sepsis-related microcirculatory dysfunction. Compared to a catecholamine therapy we tested effects of a specific iNOS-inhibitor (1400W) on the microcirculatory function in the brain. Methods Seventy SD-rats (280-310 g) were divided into 1 control and 6 sepsis groups. Sepsis groups received 1 or 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravenously to induce a moderate or severe sepsis syndrome. Thirty minutes later rats were further randomized into subgroups receiving moderate volume therapy alone or additionally continuous norepinephrine (NE) or 1400W infusion. Separately, effects of 1400W on neurofunctional parameters were investigated in 3 rats without sepsis induction. Performing electric forepaw-stimulation evoked potentials (N2-P1 amplitude, P1-latency) and local hemodynamic responses were recorded with surface electrodes and laser Doppler over the somatosensory cortex at baseline and repeatedly after LPS administration. Cytokine levels (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL6), interferon-gamma (IFNγ)) and cell destruction markers (neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S-100 calcium binding protein B (S100B)) were obtained at the end of experiments. Results During sepsis progression resting cerebral blood flow increased and functionally activated hemodynamic responses decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas 1400W and NE improved blood pressure, only 1400W stabilized resting flow levels. However, both regimens were ineffective on the functionally coupled flow responses and destruction markers were similar between groups. Conclusions NE and 1400W appeared to be ineffective in mitigating the effects of sepsis on the neurovascular coupling. Other regimens are needed to protect the cerebral microcirculation under septic conditions. PMID:19709421

  7. Neuronal-Derived Nitric Oxide and Somatodendritically Released Vasopressin Regulate Neurovascular Coupling in the Rat Hypothalamic Supraoptic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenting; Stern, Javier E.

    2015-01-01

    The classical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) implies that activity-dependent axonal glutamate release at synapses evokes the production and release of vasoactive signals from both neurons and astrocytes, which dilate arterioles, increasing in turn cerebral blood flow (CBF) to areas with increased metabolic needs. However, whether this model is applicable to brain areas that also use less conventional neurotransmitters, such as neuropeptides, is currently unknown. To this end, we studied NVC in the rat hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system (MNS) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), in which dendritic release of neuropeptides, including vasopressin (VP), constitutes a key signaling modality influencing neuronal and network activity. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we investigated vasopressin-mediated vascular responses in SON arterioles of hypothalamic brain slices of Wistar or VP-eGFP Wistar rats. Bath-applied VP significantly constricted SON arterioles (Δ−41 ± 7%) via activation of the V1a receptor subtype. Vasoconstrictions were also observed in response to single VP neuronal stimulation (Δ−18 ± 2%), an effect prevented by V1a receptor blockade (V2255), supporting local dendritic VP release as the key signal mediating activity-dependent vasoconstrictions. Conversely, osmotically driven magnocellular neurosecretory neuronal population activity leads to a predominant nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation (Δ19 ± 2%). Activity-dependent vasodilations were followed by a VP-mediated vasoconstriction, which acted to limit the magnitude of the vasodilation and served to reset vascular tone following activity-dependent vasodilation. Together, our results unveiled a unique and complex form of NVC in the MNS, supporting a competitive balance between nitric oxide and activity-dependent dendritic released VP, in the generation of proper NVC responses. PMID:25834057

  8. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling in Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are involved in a wide array of cardiovascular diseases, from myocardial ischemia and peripheral arterial disease, to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm. Molecular imaging techniques to detect and quantify key molecular and cellular players in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors, αvβ3 integrin, and matrix metalloproteinases) can advance vascular biology research and serve as clinical tools for early diagnosis, risk stratification, and selection of patients who would benefit most from therapeutic interventions. To target these key mediators, a number of molecular imaging techniques have been developed and evaluated in animal models of angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. This review of the state of the art molecular imaging of angiogenesis and vascular (and valvular) remodeling, will focus mostly on nuclear imaging techniques (positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography) that offer high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27275836

  9. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling shapes the DNA replication landscape

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jack A.; Kwong, Tracey J.; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic DNA replication machinery must traverse every nucleosome in the genome during S phase. As nucleosomes are generally inhibitory to DNA-dependent processes, chromatin structure must undergo extensive reorganization to facilitate DNA synthesis. However, the identity of chromatin-remodeling factors involved in replication and how they affect DNA synthesis is largely unknown. Here we show that two highly conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Isw2 and Ino80, function in parallel to promote replication fork progression. As a result, Isw2 and Ino80 play especially important roles for replication of late-replicating regions during periods of replication stress. Both Isw2 and Ino80 complexes are enriched at sites of replication, suggesting that these complexes act directly to promote fork progression. These findings identify ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes promoting DNA replication, and define a specific stage of replication that requires remodeling for normal function. PMID:18408730

  10. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  11. Tissue remodeling investigation in varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Khodaii, Zohreh

    2012-01-01

    Although the etiology of varicose veins remains unknown, recent studies have focused on endothelial cell integrity and function because the endothelium regulates vessel tone and synthesizes many pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the evidence involving the endothelium in the development of varicose vein disease. In addition, tissue remodeling was investigated in varicose veins to determine the expression of different types of collagen. Tissue specimens of superficial varicose veins and control saphenous vein were used for immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscope (TEM). α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen I, III, IV antibodies were applied for immunohistochemical investigation. Findings of this study showed alterations of the intima, such as focal intimal discontinuity and denudation of endothelium; and the media, such as irregular arrangements of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibres in varicose veins. Our findings showed some changes in terms of distribution of types I, III and IV collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls compared with controls. These alterations to the media suggest that the pathological abnormality in varicose veins may be due to the loss of muscle tone as a result of the breakup of its regular structure by the collagen fibres. These findings only described some changes in terms of distribution of these types of collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls which may result in venous wall dysfunction in varicosis. PMID:24551759

  12. Shape Remodeling Assemblies in Biologically Inspired Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safinya, Cyrus

    2013-03-01

    Much of our research is inspired by, and directed at, understanding the formation of novel structures (both relatively static and highly dynamic) with distinct shapes and morphologies observed in charged biological systems. The structures, in turn, often correlate to specific functions. For example, charged nanoscale tubules and rods and their assemblies are of interest in a range of applications, including as templates for hierarchical nanostructures, encapsulation systems, and biosensors. A series of studies will be described on charged biological assemblies exhibiting ``molecularly-triggered'' dynamical shape changes. In particular, we will focus on protein and lipid based nanotubule formation through small molecule stimuli-induced shape remodeling events. The systems include invertible protein nanotubes from two-state tubulin-protein building blocks and lipid nanotubes and nanorods from curvature stabilizing lipids (mimicking membrane curvature generating proteins). Funded by DOE-BES grant number DOE-DE-FG02-06ER46314 (protein and lipid assembly, lipid synthesis, structure-function) and NSF-DMR-1101900 (phase behavior).

  13. Chromatin modifications remodel cardiac gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mathiyalagan, Prabhu; Keating, Samuel T; Du, Xiao-Jun; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-07-01

    Signalling and transcriptional control involve precise programmes of gene activation and suppression necessary for cardiovascular physiology. Deep sequencing of DNA-bound transcription factors reveals a remarkable complexity of co-activators or co-repressors that serve to alter chromatin modification and regulate gene expression. The regulated complexes characterized by genome-wide mapping implicate the recruitment and exchange of proteins with specific enzymatic activities that include roles for histone acetylation and methylation in key developmental programmes of the heart. As for transcriptional changes in response to pathological stress, co-regulatory complexes are also differentially utilized to regulate genes in cardiac disease. Members of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family catalyse the removal of acetyl groups from proteins whose pharmacological inhibition has profound effects preventing heart failure. HDACs interact with a complex co-regulatory network of transcription factors, chromatin-remodelling complexes, and specific histone modifiers to regulate gene expression in the heart. For example, the histone methyltransferase (HMT), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), is regulated by HDAC inhibition and associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. The challenge now is to target the activity of enzymes involved in protein modification to prevent or reverse the expression of genes implicated with cardiac hypertrophy. In this review, we discuss the role of HDACs and HMTs with a focus on chromatin modification and gene function as well as the clinical treatment of heart failure. PMID:24812277

  14. Ab initio phonon limited transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, Matthieu

    We revisit the thermoelectric (TE) transport properties of two champion materials, PbTe and SnSe, using fully first principles methods. In both cases the performance of the material is due to subtle combinations of structural effects, scattering, and phase space reduction. In PbTe anharmonic effects are completely opposite to the predicted quasiharmonic evolution of phonon frequencies and to frequently (and incorrectly) cited extrapolations of experiments. This stabilizes the material at high T, but also tends to enhance its thermal conductivity, in a non linear manner, above 600 Kelvin. This explains why PbTe is in practice limited to room temperature applications. SnSe has recently been shown to be the most efficient TE material in bulk form. This is mainly due to a strongly enhanced carrier concentration and electrical conductivity, after going through a phase transition from 600 to 800 K. We calculate the transport coefficients as well as the defect concentrations ab initio, showing excellent agreement with experiment, and elucidating the origin of the double phase transition as well as the new charge carriers. AH Romero, EKU Gross, MJ Verstraete, and O Hellman PRB 91, 214310 (2015) O. Hellman, IA Abrikosov, and SI Simak, PRB 84 180301 (2011)

  15. TOWARDS A NEW SPATIAL REPRESENTATION OF BONE REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jason M.; Ayati, Bruce P.; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Martin, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Irregular bone remodeling is associated with a number of bone diseases such as osteoporosis and multiple myeloma. Computational and mathematical modeling can aid in therapy and treatment as well as understanding fundamental biology. Different approaches to modeling give insight into different aspects of a phenomena so it is useful to have an arsenal of various computational and mathematical models. Here we develop a mathematical representation of bone remodeling that can effectively describe many aspects of the complicated geometries and spatial behavior observed. There is a sharp interface between bone and marrow regions. Also the surface of bone moves in and out, i.e. in the normal direction, due to remodeling. Based on these observations we employ the use of a level-set function to represent the spatial behavior of remodeling. We elaborate on a temporal model for osteoclast and osteoblast population dynamics to determine the change in bone mass which influences how the interface between bone and marrow changes. We exhibit simulations based on our computational model that show the motion of the interface between bone and marrow as a consequence of bone remodeling. The simulations show that it is possible to capture spatial behavior of bone remodeling in complicated geometries as they occur in vitro and in vivo. By employing the level set approach it is possible to develop computational and mathematical representations of the spatial behavior of bone remodeling. By including in this formalism further details, such as more complex cytokine interactions and accurate parameter values, it is possible to obtain simulations of phenomena related to bone remodeling with spatial behavior much as in vitro and in vivo. This makes it possible to perform in silica experiments more closely resembling experimental observations. PMID:22901065

  16. Novel concepts in airway inflammation and remodelling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Saglani, Sejal; Lloyd, Clare M

    2015-12-01

    The hallmark pathological features of asthma include airway eosinophilic inflammation and structural changes (remodelling) which are associated with an irreversible loss in lung function that tracks from childhood to adulthood. In parallel with changes in function, pathological abnormalities occur early, during the pre-school years, are established by school age and subsequently remain (even though symptoms may remit for periods during adulthood). Given the equal importance of inflammation and remodelling in asthma pathogenesis, there is a significant disparity in studies undertaken to investigate the contribution of each. The majority focus on the role of inflammation, and although novel therapeutics such as those targeted against T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) mediators have arisen, it is apparent that targeting inflammation alone has not allowed disease modification. Therefore, unless airway remodelling is addressed for future therapeutic strategies, it is unlikely that we will progress towards a cure for asthma. Having acknowledged these limitations, the focus of this review is to highlight the gaps in our current knowledge about the mechanisms underlying airway remodelling, the relationships between remodelling, inflammation and function, remodelling and clinical phenotypes, and the importance of utilising innovative and realistic pre-clinical models to uncover effective, disease-modifying therapeutic strategies. PMID:26541520

  17. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  18. Long-term probucol therapy continues to suppress markers of neurovascular inflammation in a dietary induced model of cerebral capillary dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Probucol has been shown to prevent cerebral capillary disturbances characterized by blood-to-brain extravasation of plasma derived proteins and neurovascular inflammation in mice maintained on western-styled diets for 12 weeks. However the effect of probucol on capillary integrity in aging models with capillary dysfunction is not known. Methods Wild-type C57BL6 mice were randomized to a low-fat (LF); saturated-fat (SFA); or SFA + Probucol diet for up to12 months of intervention. Results Mice fed the LF diet had substantially greater parenchymal abundance of plasma derived IgG and apo B lipoproteins at 12 months, compared to LF mice at 3 months of intervention. Markers of neurovascular inflammation were also greater at 12 months in LF fed mice compared to LF mice at 3 months. The SFA diet exacerbated the aging induced parenchymal abundance of IgG and of apo B lipoproteins and neurovascular inflammation at 12 months. The SFA effects were associated with increased production of intestinal lipoprotein amyloid-β (Aβ). The co-provision of probucol with the SFA completely abolished heightened inflammation at 12 months. Probucol attenuated SFA-induced capillary permeability but had only a modest inhibitory effect on parenchymal retention of apoB lipoproteins. The improvements in markers of inflammation and capillary integrity because of probucol correlated with enterocytic genesis of chylomicron Aβ. Conclusion In this long-term feeding study, probucol profoundly suppressed dietary SFA induced disturbances in capillary integrity but had a more modest effect on age-associated changes. PMID:24890126

  19. Catheter venography for the assessment of internal jugular veins and azygous vein: position statement by expert panel of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Simka, Marian; Hubbard, David; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Dake, Michael D; Sclafani, Salvatore J A; Al-Omari, Mamoon; Eisele, Carlos G; Haskal, Ziv J; Ludyga, Tomasz; Miloševič, Zoran V; Sievert, Horst; Stehling, Michael K; Zapf, Stefan; Zorc, Marjeta

    2013-05-01

    This document by an expert panel of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease is aimed at presenting current technique and interpretation of catheter venography of the internal jugular veins, azygous vein and other veins draining the central nervous system. Although interventionalists agree on general rules, significant differences exist in terms of details of venographic technique and interpretations of angiographic pictures. It is also suggested that debatable findings should be investigated using multimodal diagnostics. Finally, the authors recommend that any publication on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency should include detailed description of venographic technique used, to facilitate a comparison of published results in this area.

  20. Ab Initio Study of Polonium

    SciTech Connect

    Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2008-05-20

    Polonium is the only element with a simple cubic (sc) crystal structure. Atoms in solid polonium sit at the corners of a simple cubic unit cell and no where else. Polonium has a valence electron configuration 6s{sup 2}6p{sup 4} (Z = 84). The low temperature {alpha}-phase transforms into the rhombohedral (trigonal) {beta} structure at {approx}348 K. The sc {alpha}-Po unit cell constant is a = 3.345 A. The beta form of polonium ({beta}-Po) has the lattice parameters, a{sub R} = 3.359 A and a rhombohedral angle 98 deg. 13'. We have performed an ab initio electronic structure calculation by using the density functional theory. We have performed the calculation with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling by using both the LDA and the GGA for the exchange-correlations. The k-points in a simple cubic BZ are determined by R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5), {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), M (0.5, 0.5, 0) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). Other directions of k-points are {gamma} (0, 0, 0), X (0.5, 0, 0), R (0.5, 0.5, 0.5) and {gamma} (0, 0, 0). The SO splittings of p states at the {gamma} point in the GGA+SO scheme for {alpha}-Po are 0.04 eV and 0.02 eV while for the {beta}-Po these are 0.03 eV and 0.97 eV. We have also calculated the vibrational spectra for the unit cells in both the structures. We find that exchanging of a Po atom by Pb atom produces several more bands and destabilizes the {beta} phase.

  1. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than

  2. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula's material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element's remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual

  3. Obstruction-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Zou, Yu; He, Huamei; McGowan, Francis X; Zurakowski, David; Zhang, Yanhang

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary obstruction occurs in many common forms of congenital heart disease. In this study, pulmonary artery (PA) banding is used as a model for pulmonary stenosis. Significant remodeling of the vascular bed occurs as a result of a prolonged narrowing of the PAs, and here we quantify the biophysical and molecular changes proximal and distal to the obstruction. Main and branch PAs are harvested from banded and sham rabbits and their mechanical properties are assessed using a biaxial tensile tester. Measurements defined as initial and stiff slopes are taken, assuming a linear region at the start and end of the J-shaped stress-strain curves, along with a transitional knee point. Collagen, elastin assays, Movat's pentachrome staining, and Doppler protocols are used to quantify biochemical, structural, and physiological differences. The banded main PAs have significantly greater initial slopes while banded branch PAs have lower initial slopes; however, this change in mechanical behavior cannot be explained by the assay results as the elastin content in both main and branch PAs is not significantly different. The stiff slopes of the banded main PAs are higher, which is attributed to the significantly greater amounts of insoluble collagen. Shifting of the knee points reveals a decreased toe region in the main PAs but an opposite trend in the branch PAs. The histology results show a loss of integrity of the media, increase in ground substance, and dispersion of collagen in the banded tissue samples. This indicates other structural changes could have led to the mechanical differences in banded and normal tissue. PMID:22168741

  4. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  5. Modeling study of the ABS relay valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai; Xu, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    The ABS (anti-lock braking system) relay valve is the key component of anti-lock braking system in most commercial vehicles such as trucks, tractor-trailers, etc. In this paper, structure of ABS relay valve and its work theory were analyzed. Then a mathematical model of ABS relay valve, which was investigated by dividing into electronic part, magnetic part, pneumatic part and mechanical part, was set up. The displacement of spools and the response of pressure increasing, holding, releasing of ABS relay valve were simulated and analyzed under conditions of control pressure 500 KPa, braking pressure 600 KPa, atmospheric pressure 100 KPa and air temperature 310 K. Thisarticle provides reliable theory for improving the performance and efficiency of anti-lock braking system of vehicles.

  6. Modeling study of the ABS relay valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai; Xu, Weidong

    2010-12-01

    The ABS (anti-lock braking system) relay valve is the key component of anti-lock braking system in most commercial vehicles such as trucks, tractor-trailers, etc. In this paper, structure of ABS relay valve and its work theory were analyzed. Then a mathematical model of ABS relay valve, which was investigated by dividing into electronic part, magnetic part, pneumatic part and mechanical part, was set up. The displacement of spools and the response of pressure increasing, holding, releasing of ABS relay valve were simulated and analyzed under conditions of control pressure 500 KPa, braking pressure 600 KPa, atmospheric pressure 100 KPa and air temperature 310 K. Thisarticle provides reliable theory for improving the performance and efficiency of anti-lock braking system of vehicles.

  7. An ab initio MO study of butalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Katsuhisa; Shima, Toru

    1994-01-01

    Butalene as a structural isomer of p-benzyne has been studied by using an ab initio GVB wavefunction. The geometry of butalene, which is shown to be almost rectangular, is first optimized as a local minimum on the energy surface at the ab initio level. However, the energy barrier of conversion to p-benzyne is as small as 1.6 kcal/mol, and experimental isolation of butalene is predicted to be difficult from a force-constant analysis.

  8. Biometric study of the relationships between palmar neurovascular structures, the flexor retinaculum and the distal wrist crease

    PubMed Central

    OLAVE, E.; DEL SOL, M.; GABRIELLI, C.; MANDIOLA, E.; RODRIGUES, C. F. S.

    2001-01-01

    During surgical exposure of the carpal tunnel it is possible to injure the neurovascular structures closely related to the flexor retinaculum, such as the superficial palmar arch and the communicating branch between the ulnar and median nerves. Because of the importance of these structures and with the purpose of increasing knowledge of anatomical details concerning to their location, a biometric study was performed on the retinaculum and the communicating branch, and between the communicating branch and the distal wrist crease, as well as between the retinaculum and the superficial palmar arch. We dissected 56 hands from 28 Brazilian formalin-preserved cadavers of both sexes (24 male) at the Federal University of São Paulo–Escola Paulista de Medicina, Brazil. The communicating branch was observed in 96.4% of cases and the superficial palmar arch in 78.6%. The communicating branch was found between the common palmar digital nerve of the 4th interosseous space (from the ulnar nerve) to the homonymous nerve of the 3rd interosseous space (from the median nerve). In males, the distance between the distal wrist crease and the site where the communicating branch originates from the ulnar component had an average of 33.9±5.5 mm on the right side and 30.2±8.2 mm on the left. The distance between the distal wrist crease and the junction of the communicating branch with the common palmar digital nerve of the 3rd interosseous space was 43.6±6.9 mm on the right and 40.2±6.2 mm on the left side. Conversely, in 14.8% of cases (1 female), the communicating branch was observed to emerge from the common palmar digital nerve of the 3rd interosseous space. The distance between the retinaculum and the superficial palmar arch in the axial line of the 4th metacarpal bone was on average 7.3±4.3 mm on the right and 8.3±3.5 mm on the left side. At the same level, the distance between the retinaculum and the communicating branch was 6.2±3.7 mm on the right side and 5.1±2.8 mm on

  9. Demonstration of Brain Tumor-Induced Neurovascular Uncoupling in Resting-State fMRI at Ultrahigh Field.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shruti; Sair, Haris I; Airan, Raag; Hua, Jun; Jones, Craig K; Heo, Hye-Young; Olivi, Alessandro; Lindquist, Martin A; Pekar, James J; Pillai, Jay J

    2016-05-01

    To demonstrate in a small case series for the first time the phenomenon of brain tumor-related neurovascular uncoupling (NVU) in resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at ultrahigh field (7T). Two de novo (i.e., untreated) brain tumor patients underwent both BOLD resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) on a 7T MRI system and motor task-based BOLD fMRI at 3T. Ipsilesional (i.e., ipsilateral to tumor or IL) and contralesional (i.e., contralateral to tumor or CL) region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed on both 3T motor task-related general linear model-derived activation maps and on 7T rsfMRI independent component analysis (ICA)-derived sensorimotor network maps for each case. Asymmetry scores (ASs) were computed based on numbers of suprathreshold voxels in the IL and CL ROIs. In each patient, ASs derived from ROI analysis of suprathreshold voxels in IL and CL ROIs in task-related activation maps and rsfMRI ICA-derived sensorimotor component maps indicate greater number of suprathreshold voxels in contralesional than ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex in both maps. In patient 1, an AS of 0.2 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (voxels with Z-scores >5.0) of the task-based activation map and AS of 1.0 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (Z-scores >5.0) of the ICA-derived sensorimotor component map. Similarly, in patient 2, an AS of 1.0 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (Z-scores >5.0) of the task-based activation map and an AS of 1.0 was obtained from the suprathreshold Z-score spectrum (Z-scores >5.0) of the ICA-derived sensorimotor component map. Overall, decreased BOLD signal was noted in IL compared with CL ROIs on both task-based activation maps and ultrahigh field resting-state maps, indicating the presence of NVU. We have demonstrated evidence of NVU on ultrahigh field 7T rsfMRI comparable with the findings on standard 3T motor task-based fMRI in both cases

  10. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  11. Dexamethasone Rescues Neurovascular Unit Integrity from Cell Damage Caused by Systemic Administration of Shiga Toxin 2 and Lipopolysaccharide in Mice Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Alipio; Jacobsen, Mariana; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Cangelosi, Adriana; Cejudo, María Laura; Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Goldstein, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) that can lead to fatal encephalopathies. Neurological abnormalities may occur before or after the onset of systemic pathological symptoms and motor disorders are frequently observed in affected patients and in studies with animal models. As Stx2 succeeds in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and invading the brain parenchyma, it is highly probable that the observed neurological alterations are based on the possibility that the toxin may trigger the impairment of the neurovascular unit and/or cell damage in the parenchyma. Also, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced and secreted by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) may aggravate the deleterious effects of Stx2 in the brain. Therefore, this study aimed to determine (i) whether Stx2 affects the neurovascular unit and parenchymal cells, (ii) whether the contribution of LPS aggravates these effects, and (iii) whether an inflammatory event underlies the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the observed injury. The administration of a sub-lethal dose of Stx2 was employed to study in detail the motor cortex obtained from a translational murine model of encephalopathy. In the present paper we report that Stx2 damaged microvasculature, caused astrocyte reaction and neuronal degeneration, and that this was aggravated by LPS. Dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory, reversed the pathologic effects and proved to be an important drug in the treatment of acute encephalopathies. PMID:23894578

  12. Assessment of neurovascular dynamics during transient ischemic attack by the novel integration of micro-electrocorticography electrode array with functional photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hang; Liao, Lun-De; Tan, Stacey Sze Hui; Kwon, Ki Yong; Ling, Ji Min; Bandla, Aishwarya; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Tan, Eddie Tung Wee; Li, Wen; Ng, Wai Hoe; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2015-10-01

    This study developed a novel system combining a 16-channel micro-electrocorticography (μECoG) electrode array and functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) to examine changes in neurovascular functions following transient ischemic attack (TIA) in rats. To mimic the pathophysiology of TIA, a modified photothrombotic ischemic model was developed by using 3 min illumination of 5 mW continuous-wave (CW) green laser light focusing on a distal branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Cerebral blood volume (CBV), hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and alpha-to-delta ratio (ADR) were measured pre- and post-ischemia over a focal cortical region (i.e., 1.5×1.5 mm(2)). Unexpectedly, the SO2, peak-to-peak amplitude (PPA) of SSEPs and ADR recovered and achieved levels greater than the baseline values at the 4th hour post-ischemia induction without any intervention, whereas the CBV value only partially recovered. In other words, transient ischemia led to increased neural activity when the relative CBV was reduced, which may further compromise neural integrity or lead to subsequent vascular disease. This novel μECoG-fPAM system complements currently available imaging techniques and represents a promising technology for studying neurovascular coupling in animal models.

  13. P2RX7 sensitizes Mac-1/ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and promotes neurovascular injury during septic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Hong, Ling-Juan; Huang, Ji-Yun; Jiang, Quan; Tao, Rong-Rong; Tan, Chao; Lu, Nan-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Ahmed, Muhammad M; Lu, Ying-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Shi, Wei-Xing; Lai, En-Yin; Wilcox, Christopher S; Han, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy (SE) is a critical factor determining sepsis mortality. Vascular inflammation is known to be involved in SE, but the molecular events that lead to the development of encephalopathy remain unclear. Using time-lapse in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy, we provide the first direct evidence that cecal ligation and puncture in septic mice induces microglial trafficking to sites adjacent to leukocyte adhesion on inflamed cerebral microvessels. Our data further demonstrate that septic injury increased the chemokine CXCL1 level in brain endothelial cells by activating endothelial P2RX7 and eventually enhanced the binding of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-expressing leukocytes to endothelial ICAM-1. In turn, leukocyte adhesion upregulated endothelial CX3CL1, thereby triggering microglia trafficking to the injured site. The sepsis-induced increase in endothelial CX3CL1 was abolished in CD18 hypomorphic mutant mice. Inhibition of the P2RX7 pathway not only decreased endothelial ICAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion but also prevented microglia overactivation, reduced brain injury, and consequently doubled the early survival of septic mice. These results demonstrate the role of the P2RX7 pathway in linking neurovascular inflammation to brain damage in vivo and provide a rationale for targeting endothelial P2RX7 for neurovascular protection during SE. PMID:25998681

  14. Assessment of neurovascular dynamics during transient ischemic attack by the novel integration of micro-electrocorticography electrode array with functional photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hang; Liao, Lun-De; Tan, Stacey Sze Hui; Kwon, Ki Yong; Ling, Ji Min; Bandla, Aishwarya; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Tan, Eddie Tung Wee; Li, Wen; Ng, Wai Hoe; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2015-10-01

    This study developed a novel system combining a 16-channel micro-electrocorticography (μECoG) electrode array and functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) to examine changes in neurovascular functions following transient ischemic attack (TIA) in rats. To mimic the pathophysiology of TIA, a modified photothrombotic ischemic model was developed by using 3 min illumination of 5 mW continuous-wave (CW) green laser light focusing on a distal branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Cerebral blood volume (CBV), hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and alpha-to-delta ratio (ADR) were measured pre- and post-ischemia over a focal cortical region (i.e., 1.5×1.5 mm(2)). Unexpectedly, the SO2, peak-to-peak amplitude (PPA) of SSEPs and ADR recovered and achieved levels greater than the baseline values at the 4th hour post-ischemia induction without any intervention, whereas the CBV value only partially recovered. In other words, transient ischemia led to increased neural activity when the relative CBV was reduced, which may further compromise neural integrity or lead to subsequent vascular disease. This novel μECoG-fPAM system complements currently available imaging techniques and represents a promising technology for studying neurovascular coupling in animal models. PMID:26149348

  15. IL-17A promotes ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Su-Feng; Yuan, Jing; Liao, Meng-Yang; Xia, Ni; Tang, Ting-Ting; Li, Jing-Jing; Jiao, Jiao; Dong, Wen-Yong; Nie, Shao-Fang; Zhu, Zheng-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Cai; Lv, Bing-Jie; Xiao, Hong; Wang, Qing; Tu, Xin; Liao, Yu-Hua; Shi, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Inflammatory responses play an important role in the pathogenesis of adverse ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We previously demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-17A plays a pathogenic role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and viral myocarditis. However, the role of IL-17A in post-MI remodeling and the related mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Acute MI was induced by permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in C57BL/6 mice. Repletion of IL-17A significantly aggravated both early- and late-phase ventricular remodeling, as demonstrated by increased infarct size, deteriorated cardiac function, increased myocardial fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. By contrast, genetic IL-17A deficiency had the opposite effect. Additional studies in vitro indicated that IL-17A induces neonatal cardiomyocyte (from C57BL/6 mice) apoptosis through the activation of p38, p53 phosphorylation, and Bax redistribution. These data demonstrate that IL-17A induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p53-Bax signaling pathway and promotes both early- and late-phase post-MI ventricular remodeling. IL-17A might be an important target in preventing heart failure after MI. Key message: We demonstrated that IL-17A plays a pathogenic role both in the early and late stages of post-MI remodeling. IL-17A induces murine cardiomyocyte apoptosis. IL-17A induces murine cardiomyocyte apoptosis through the p38 MAPK-p53-Bax signaling pathway.

  16. Chromatin remodeling facilitates DNA incision in UV-damaged nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungeun; Kim, Deok Ryong; Ahn, Byungchan

    2004-08-31

    The DNA repair machinery must locate and repair DNA damage all over the genome. As nucleosomes inhibit DNA repair in vitro, it has been suggested that chromatin remodeling might be required for efficient repair in vivo. To investigate a possible contribution of nucleosome dynamics and chromatin remodeling to the repair of UV-photoproducts in nucleosomes, we examined the effect of a chromatin remodeling complex on the repair of UV-lesions by Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease (ML-UV endo) and T4-endonuclease V (T4-endoV) in reconstituted mononucleosomes positioned at one end of a 175-bp long DNA fragment. Repair by ML-UV endo and T4-endoV was inefficient in mononucleosomes compared with naked DNA. However, the human nucleosome remodeling complex, hSWI/SNF, promoted more homogeneous repair by ML-UV endo and T4-endo V in reconstituted nucleosomes. This result suggests that recognition of DNA damage could be facilitated by a fluid state of the chromatin resulting from chromatin remodeling activities. PMID:15359130

  17. Chemistry of bone remodelling preserved in extant and fossil Sirenia.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Wogelius, Roy A; Edwards, Nicholas P; van Veelen, Arjen; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Manning, Phillip L

    2016-05-01

    Bone remodelling is a crucial biological process needed to maintain elemental homeostasis. It is important to understand the trace elemental inventories that govern these processes as malfunctions in bone remodelling can have devastating effects on an organism. In this study, we use a combination of X-ray techniques to map, quantify, and characterise the coordination chemistry of trace elements within the highly remodelled bone tissues of extant and extinct Sirenia (manatees and dugongs). The dense bone structure and unique body chemistry of sirenians represent ideal tissues for studying both high remodelling rates as well as unique fossilisation pathways. Here, elemental maps revealed uncorrelated patterning of Ca and Zn within secondary osteons in both extant and fossil sirenians, as well as elevated Sr within the connecting canals of fossil sirenians. Concentrations of these elements are comparable between extant and fossil material indicating geochemical processing of the fossil bone has been minimal. Zn was found to be bound in the same coordination within the apatite structure in both extant and fossil bone. Accurate quantification of trace elements in extant material was only possible when the organic constituents of the bone were included. The comparable distributions, concentrations, and chemical coordination of these physiologically important trace elements indicate the chemistry of bone remodelling has been preserved for 19 million years. This study signifies the powerful potential of merging histological and chemical techniques in the understanding of physiological processes in both extant and extinct vertebrates. PMID:26923825

  18. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders.

    PubMed

    López, Alberto J; Wood, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF) complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS), schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Together, these human developmental and ID disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and ID disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development. PMID:25954173

  19. Physiological remodelling of the maternal uterine circulation during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mandala, Maurizio; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    Sufficient uteroplacental blood flow is essential for normal pregnancy outcome and is accomplished by the coordinated growth and remodelling of the entire maternal uterine vasculature. The main focus of this MiniReview is to provide information on upstream (pre-placental) maternal uterine vascular remodelling that facilitates gestational increases in uterine blood flow. Consideration of the three-dimensional pattern of remodelling (circumferential enlargement versus axial elongation), changes in vessel biomechanical properties, and underlying mechanisms [shear stress, nitric oxide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/placental growth factor (PlGF), the renin-angiotensin system] and pathways (local versus systemic; venoarterial exchange) are provided using the rat as the principal animal model, although findings from other species are incorporated wherever possible to provide a comparative perspective. The process of maternal gestational uterine vascular remodelling involves a number of cellular processes and mechanisms, including trophoblast invasion, hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and changes in extracellular matrix composition. In addition, changes in cellular function, e.g. the secretory and contractile properties of smooth muscle and an up-regulation of endothelial vasodilatory influences may contribute to uteroplacental blood flow increases through changes in tone as well as in structure. Future studies aimed at better understanding the inter-relationship between changes in vessel structure (remodelling) and function (reactivity) would likely generate new mechanistic insights into the fascinating process of maternal gestational uterine vascular adaptation and provide a more physiological perspective of the underlying cellular processes involved in its regulation.

  20. Auditory cortex directs the input-specific remodeling of thalamus.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sultan L; Kong, Lingzhi; Liu, Xiuping; Yan, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Input-specific remodeling is observed both in the primary auditory cortex (AI) and the ventral division of the medial geniculate body of the thalamus (MGBv) through motivation such as learning. Here, we show the role of AI in the MGBv remodeling induced by the electrical stimulation (ES) of the central division of the inferior colliculus (ICc). For the MGBv neurons with frequency tunings different from those of electrically stimulated ICc neurons, their frequency tunings shifted towards the tunings of the ICc neurons. AI neurons also showed this input-specific remodeling after ES of the ICc (ESICc). Interestingly, the input-specific remodeling of MGBv was eliminated when the AI was inactivated using cortical application of muscimol. For the MGBv neurons tuned to the same frequency as the stimulated ICc neurons, their tunings were kept but their responses were facilitated after the ESICc. In contrast to the input-specific tuning shifts, this facilitation was rarely impacted by the AI inactivation. Thus, we conclude that AI directs the input-specific remodeling of MGBv induced by ESICc. It is suggested that the tuning shift in the MGBv primarily takes place in the AI and is relayed to the MGBv through the corticofugal system while the MGBv mainly highlights the frequency information emphasized in ICc.

  1. Focal myocardial infarction induces global remodeling of cardiac sympathetic innervation: neural remodeling in a spatial context

    PubMed Central

    Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Yagishita, Daigo; Patel, Krishan J.; Vaseghi, Marmar; Zhou, Wei; Yamakawa, Kentaro; So, Eileen; Lux, Robert L.; Mahajan, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) induces neural and electrical remodeling at scar border zones. The impact of focal MI on global functional neural remodeling is not well understood. Sympathetic stimulation was performed in swine with anteroapical infarcts (MI; n = 9) and control swine (n = 9). A 56-electrode sock was placed over both ventricles to record electrograms at baseline and during left, right, and bilateral stellate ganglion stimulation. Activation recovery intervals (ARIs) were measured from electrograms. Global and regional ARI shortening, dispersion of repolarization, and activation propagation were assessed before and during sympathetic stimulation. At baseline, mean ARI was shorter in MI hearts than control hearts (365 ± 8 vs. 436 ± 9 ms, P < 0.0001), dispersion of repolarization was greater in MI versus control hearts (734 ± 123 vs. 362 ± 32 ms2, P = 0.02), and the infarcted region in MI hearts showed longer ARIs than noninfarcted regions (406 ± 14 vs. 365 ± 8 ms, P = 0.027). In control animals, percent ARI shortening was greater on anterior than posterior walls during right stellate ganglion stimulation (P = 0.0001), whereas left stellate ganglion stimulation showed the reverse (P = 0.0003). In infarcted animals, this pattern was completely lost. In 50% of the animals studied, sympathetic stimulation, compared with baseline, significantly altered the direction of activation propagation emanating from the intramyocardial scar during pacing. In conclusion, focal distal anterior MI alters regional and global pattern of sympathetic innervation, resulting in shorter ARIs in infarcted hearts, greater repolarization dispersion, and altered activation propagation. These conditions may underlie the mechanisms by which arrhythmias are initiated when sympathetic tone is enhanced. PMID:23893167

  2. Finite element prediction of endosteal and periosteal bone remodelling in the turkey ulna: effect of remodelling signal and dead-zone definition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W R; Warner, M D; Clift, S E

    2003-01-01

    Bone remodelling is the adaptation of bone mass in response to localized changes in loading conditions. The nature of the mechanical signal governing remodelling, however, remains the subject of continued investigation. The aims of this study were to use an iterative finite element (FE) bone remodelling technique to explore the effect of different remodelling signals in the prediction of bone remodelling behaviour. A finite element model of the turkey ulna, following that of Brown et al., was analysed using the ABAQUS package. The model was validated against the static predictions of the Brown et al. study. A bone remodelling technique, based on swelling algorithms given by Taylor and Clift, was then applied to predict the dramatic change in loading conditions imposed. The resulting changes in FE mid-shaft bone geometry were compared with the remodelling observed experimentally and showed good agreement. The tensile principal stress was found to be the best remodelling signal under the imposed conditions. Localized sensitivities in the remodelling patterns were found, however, and the definition of the dead zone was modified as a result. Remodelling with the new dead-zone definition showed that both the tensile principal stress and the tensile principal strain produced the remodelling patterns that agreed most closely with experiment.

  3. Chromatin Remodeling by Imitation Switch (ISWI) Class ATP-dependent Remodelers Is Stimulated by Histone Variant H2A.Z

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Joseph A.; Garlick, Joseph D.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes rearrange nucleosomes by altering the position of DNA around the histone octamer. Although chromatin remodelers and the histone variant H2A.Z colocalize on transcriptional control regions, whether H2A.Z directly affects remodeler association or activity is unclear. We determined the relative association of remodelers with H2A.Z chromatin and tested whether replacement of H2A.Z in a nucleosome altered the activity of remodeling enzymes. Many families of remodelers showed increased association with H2A.Z chromatin, but only the ISWI family of chromatin remodelers showed stimulated activity in vitro. An acidic patch on the nucleosome surface, extended by inclusion of H2A.Z in nucleosomes and essential for viability, is required for ISWI stimulation. We conclude that H2A.Z incorporation increases nucleosome remodeling activity of the largest class of mammalian remodelers (ISWI) and that it correlates with increased association of other remodelers to chromatin. This reveals two possible modes for regulation of a remodeler by a histone variant. PMID:19940112

  4. Regulation of the Golgi Complex by Phospholipid Remodeling Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kevin D.; Clarke, Benjamin A.; Brown, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian Golgi complex is a highly dynamic organelle consisting of stacks of flattened cisternae with associated coated vesicles and membrane tubules that contribute to cargo import and export, intra-cisternal trafficking, and overall Golgi architecture. At the morphological level, all of these structures are continuously remodeled to carry out these trafficking functions. Recent advances have shown that continual phospholipid remodeling by phospholipase A (PLA) and lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) enzymes, which deacylate and reacylate Golgi phospholipids, respectively, contributes to this morphological remodeling. Here we review the identification and characterization of four cytoplasmic PLA enzymes and one integral membrane LPAT that participate in the dynamic functional organization of the Golgi complex, and how some of these enzymes are integrated to determine the relative abundance of COPI vesicle and membrane tubule formation. PMID:22562055

  5. Remodeling of legacy systems in health care using UML.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra; Herold, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Research projects in the field of Medical Informatics often involve the development of application systems. Usually they are developed over a longer period of time, so that at a certain point of time a systematically planned reimplementation is necessary. The first step of reimplementation should be a systematic and comprehensive remodeling. When using UML for this task a systematic approach for remodeling activities is missing. Therefore, we developed a method for remodeling of legacy systems (Qumquad) and applied it to DOSPO, a documentation and therapy planning system for pediatric oncology. Qumquad helps to systematically carry out three steps: the modeling of the current actual state of the application system, the systematic identification of weak points and the development of a target concept for reimplementation considering the identified weak points. Results show that this approach is valuable and feasible and could be applied to various application systems in health care.

  6. Remodelling the extracellular matrix in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonnans, Caroline; Chou, Jonathan; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a highly dynamic structure that is present in all tissues and continuously undergoes controlled remodelling. This process involves quantitative and qualitative changes in the ECM, mediated by specific enzymes that are responsible for ECM degradation, such as metalloproteinases. The ECM interacts with cells to regulate diverse functions, including proliferation, migration and differentiation. ECM remodelling is crucial for regulating the morphogenesis of the intestine and lungs, as well as of the mammary and submandibular glands. Dysregulation of ECM composition, structure, stiffness and abundance contributes to several pathological conditions, such as fibrosis and invasive cancer. A better understanding of how the ECM regulates organ structure and function and of how ECM remodelling affects disease progression will contribute to the development of new therapeutics. PMID:25415508

  7. Computational Study of Growth and Remodeling in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Taber, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    Opening angles (OAs) are associated with growth and remodeling in arteries. One curiosity has been the relatively large OAs found in the aortic arch of some animals. Here, we use computational models to explore the reasons behind this phenomenon. The artery is assumed to contain a smooth muscle/collagen phase and an elastin phase. In the models, growth and remodeling of smooth muscle/collagen depends on wall stress and fluid shear stress. Remodeling of elastin, which normally turns over very slowly, is neglected. The results indicate that OAs generally increase with longitudinal curvature (torus model), earlier elastin production during development, and decreased wall stiffness. Correlating these results with available experimental data suggests that all of these effects may contribute to the large OAs in the aortic arch. The models also suggest that the slow turnover rate of elastin limits longitudinal growth. These results should promote increased understanding of the causes of residual stress in arteries. PMID:18792831

  8. Remodeling of legacy systems in health care using UML.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra; Herold, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Research projects in the field of Medical Informatics often involve the development of application systems. Usually they are developed over a longer period of time, so that at a certain point of time a systematically planned reimplementation is necessary. The first step of reimplementation should be a systematic and comprehensive remodeling. When using UML for this task a systematic approach for remodeling activities is missing. Therefore, we developed a method for remodeling of legacy systems (Qumquad) and applied it to DOSPO, a documentation and therapy planning system for pediatric oncology. Qumquad helps to systematically carry out three steps: the modeling of the current actual state of the application system, the systematic identification of weak points and the development of a target concept for reimplementation considering the identified weak points. Results show that this approach is valuable and feasible and could be applied to various application systems in health care. PMID:15460740

  9. Iron chelation inhibits the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Preston, Ioana R; Hill, Nicholas S; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2012-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Because iron is an important regulator of ROS biology, this study examined the effects of iron chelation on the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. The administration of an iron chelator, deferoxamine, to rats prevented chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Various iron chelators inhibited the growth of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Protein carbonylation, an important iron-dependent biological event, was promoted in association with pulmonary vascular remodeling and cell growth. A proteomic approach identified that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor (a negative regulator of RhoA) is carbonylated. In human plasma, the protein carbonyl content was significantly higher in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension than in healthy controls. These results suggest that iron plays an important role in the ROS-dependent mechanism underlying the development of pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Iron chelation inhibits the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Preston, Ioana R.; Hill, Nicholas S.; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Since iron is an important regulator of ROS biology, the present study examined the effect of iron chelation on the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. The administration of an iron chelator, deferoxamine, to rats prevented chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Various iron chelators inhibited growth of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Protein carbonylation, an important iron-dependent biological event, was promoted in association with pulmonary vascular remodeling and cell growth. A proteomic approach identified that Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor (a negative regulator of RhoA) is carbonylated. In human plasma, the protein carbonyl content was significantly higher in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension than in healthy controls. These results suggest that iron plays an important role in the ROS-dependent mechanism underlying the development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22974762

  11. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  12. Dynamical DNA accessibility induced by chromatin remodeling and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Castelnovo, M.

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors are enzymes being able to alter locally chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level and they actively participate in the regulation of gene expression. Using simple rules for individual nucleosome motion induced by a remodeling factor, we designed simulations of the remodeling of oligomeric chromatin, in order to address quantitatively collective effects in DNA accessibility upon nucleosome mobilization. Our results suggest that accessibility profiles are inhomogeneous thanks to borders effects like protein binding. Remarkably, we show that the accessibility lifetime of DNA sequence is roughly doubled in the vicinity of borders as compared to its value in bulk regions far from the borders. These results are quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the confined diffusion of a large nucleosome depleted region.

  13. Passive ventricular remodeling in cardiac disease: focus on heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Elise L.; Boulaksil, Mohamed; van Rijen, Harold V. M.; Vos, Marc A.; van Veen, Toon A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Passive ventricular remodeling is defined by the process of molecular ventricular adaptation to different forms of cardiac pathophysiology. It includes changes in tissue architecture, such as hypertrophy, fiber disarray, alterations in cell size and fibrosis. Besides that, it also includes molecular remodeling of gap junctions, especially those composed by Connexin43 proteins (Cx43) in the ventricles that affect cell-to-cell propagation of the electrical impulse, and changes in the sodium channels that modify excitability. All those alterations appear mainly in a heterogeneous manner, creating irregular and inhomogeneous electrical and mechanical coupling throughout the heart. This can predispose to reentry arrhythmias and adds to a further deterioration into heart failure. In this review, passive ventricular remodeling is described in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM), Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (ICM), and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (ACM), with a main focus on the heterogeneity of those alterations mentioned above. PMID:25566084

  14. Anisotropic stress orients remodelling of mammalian limb bud ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kimberly; Tao, Hirotaka; Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Sturgeon, Kendra; Sorfazlian, Natalie; Lazic, Savo; Burrows, Jeffrey T. A.; Wong, Michael D.; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Ciruna, Brian; Scott, Ian; Simmons, Craig; Henkelman, R. Mark; Williams, Trevor; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Sun, Yu; Hopyan, Sevan

    2016-01-01

    The physical forces that drive morphogenesis are not well characterized in vivo, especially among vertebrates. In the early limb bud, dorsal and ventral ectoderm converge to form the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By live imaging mouse embryos, we show that prospective AER progenitors intercalate at the dorsoventral boundary and that ectoderm remodels by concomitant cell division and neighbour exchange. Mesodermal expansion and ectodermal tension together generate a dorsoventrally biased stress pattern that orients ectodermal remodelling. Polarized distribution of cortical actin reflects this stress pattern in a β-catenin- and Fgfr2-dependent manner. Intercalation of AER progenitors generates a tensile gradient that reorients resolution of multicellular rosettes on adjacent surfaces, a process facilitated by β-catenin-dependent attachment of cortex to membrane. Therefore, feedback between tissue stress pattern and cell intercalations remodels mammalian ectoderm. PMID:25893915

  15. [Determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density(BMD)and bone microstructure are regulated mainly by bone remodeling. In contrast, bone collagen enzymatic immature and mature cross-links and advanced glycation end products such as pentosidine and carboxyl methyl lysine are affected by various factors. Aging bone tissue is repaired in the process of bone remodeling. However, deterioration of bone material properties markedly advances due to increases in oxidative stress, glycation stress, reactive oxygen species, carbonyl stress associated with aging and reduced sex hormone levels, and glucocorticoid use. To improve bone material properties in osteoporosis, we should use different drug (Saito M, Calcif Tissue Int, REVIEW, 97;242-261, 2015). In this review, we summarized determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling. PMID:26728528

  16. [Focus on the effect of orthognathic surgery on condylar remodeling].

    PubMed

    Boulétreau, P; Frey, R; Breton, P; Freidel, M

    2004-11-01

    Condylar remodeling is a physiologic process that aims to adapt the structure of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) to meet the functional demands. It is based on an interaction between the mechanical forces sustained by the TMJ and the adaptative capacities of the condyle. Orthognathic surgery can sometimes be responsible for an excessive physical stress to the articular surfaces. In these cases, normal functional condylar remodelling shifts to the process of progressive condylar resorption. Effect of orthognathic surgery on condylar remodeling is a poorly understood and controversial issue. It is however considered as an etiology of postoperative skeletal relapse following orthognathic surgery. Based on two case reports, etiopathogenic hypotheses of this process are discussed as well as predisposing factors to condylar resorption following orthognathic surgery.

  17. Serum PDGF-AB in pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Filiberti, Rosa; Marroni, Paola; Neri, Monica; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Cafferata, Mara A; Canessa, Pier Aldo; Puntoni, Riccardo; Ivaldi, Giovanni Paolo; Paganuzzi, Michela

    2005-01-01

    Overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has been observed in lung and pleural tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic role of serum PDGF in pleural mesothelioma (PM). Four groups of subjects were studied: 93 malignant PM patients, 33 primary non small cell lung cancer patients, 51 subjects exposed to asbestos, defined as high-risk controls, and 24 healthy controls. PDGF-AB mean concentration was higher in PM patients (45.8 ng/ml) than in high-risk controls (33.1 ng/ml) and healthy controls (26.8 ng/ml). Using the cut-off level of 49.8 ng/ml, corresponding to the mean+2SD of PDGF-AB in healthy controls, 43% of PM patients showed positive PDGF-AB levels. Survival was evaluated in 82 PM patients. At the end of the follow-up (median 9.8 months) 80.5% of patients had died. Median survival was 13.1 and 7.9 months for patients with PDGF-AB lower and higher than the cut-off, respectively. Adjusting for age, sex, histology and platelet count, positive PDGF-AB levels were associated with lower survival (OR=1.2, 95%CI: 0.9-1.6), even if not significantly so. In conclusion, serum PDGF may represent a useful additional parameter to prognostic factors already available for PM.

  18. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  19. Mechanisms contributing to myocardial potassium channel diversity, regulation and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2016-04-01

    In the mammalian heart, multiple types of K(+) channels contribute to the control of cardiac electrical and mechanical functioning through the regulation of resting membrane potentials, action potential waveforms and refractoriness. There are similarly vast arrays of K(+) channel pore-forming and accessory subunits that contribute to the generation of functional myocardial K(+) channel diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of K(+) channels associated with cardiac and systemic diseases results in impaired repolarization and increased propensity for arrhythmias. Here, we review the diverse transcriptional, post-transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic mechanisms contributing to regulating the expression, distribution, and remodeling of cardiac K(+) channels under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26391345

  20. Efficient computational simulation of actin stress fiber remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ristori, T; Obbink-Huizer, C; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T; Loerakker, S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding collagen and stress fiber remodeling is essential for the development of engineered tissues with good functionality. These processes are complex, highly interrelated, and occur over different time scales. As a result, excessive computational costs are required to computationally predict the final organization of these fibers in response to dynamic mechanical conditions. In this study, an analytical approximation of a stress fiber remodeling evolution law was derived. A comparison of the developed technique with the direct numerical integration of the evolution law showed relatively small differences in results, and the proposed method is one to two orders of magnitude faster.

  1. Mechanisms of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Motors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Coral Y; Johnson, Stephanie L; Gamarra, Nathan I; Narlikar, Geeta J

    2016-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling motors play essential roles in all DNA-based processes. These motors catalyze diverse outcomes ranging from sliding the smallest units of chromatin, known as nucleosomes, to completely disassembling chromatin. The broad range of actions carried out by these motors on the complex template presented by chromatin raises many stimulating mechanistic questions. Other well-studied nucleic acid motors provide examples of the depth of mechanistic understanding that is achievable from detailed biophysical studies. We use these studies as a guiding framework to discuss the current state of knowledge of chromatin remodeling mechanisms and highlight exciting open questions that would continue to benefit from biophysical analyses. PMID:27391925

  2. Remodeling of Cell-Cell Junctions in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Saffitz, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a primary myocardial disorder characterized by a high incidence of ventricular arrhythmias often preceding the onset of ventricular remodeling and dysfunction. Approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with AC have one or more mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins, although non-desmosomal genes have also been associated with the disease. Increasing evidence implicates remodeling of intercalated disk proteins reflecting abnormal responses to mechanical load and aberrant cell signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of AC. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding disease mechanisms in AC that have come from studies of human myocardium and experimental models. PMID:24460198

  3. [Bone quality and strength relating with bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Mori, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The bone has the functions of mineral reservoir and mechanical support as skeleton. Bone remodeling is the adult mode of bone metabolism, replacing old bone tissue to new one. Bone strength is determined by bone volume, structure and quality such as micro damage, degree of mineralization and collagen cross linkage, which are all controlled by bone remodeling. Bone strength decreases under high turn-over condition by decreasing bone volume and deterioration of bone structure, which also decreases under low turn-over condition by increased micro damage, increasing mineralization and AGE collagen cross linkage.

  4. Efficient computational simulation of actin stress fiber remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ristori, T; Obbink-Huizer, C; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T; Loerakker, S

    2016-09-01

    Understanding collagen and stress fiber remodeling is essential for the development of engineered tissues with good functionality. These processes are complex, highly interrelated, and occur over different time scales. As a result, excessive computational costs are required to computationally predict the final organization of these fibers in response to dynamic mechanical conditions. In this study, an analytical approximation of a stress fiber remodeling evolution law was derived. A comparison of the developed technique with the direct numerical integration of the evolution law showed relatively small differences in results, and the proposed method is one to two orders of magnitude faster. PMID:26823159

  5. Silent Synapse-Based Circuitry Remodeling in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to cocaine, and likely other drugs of abuse, generates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor-silent glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens. These immature synaptic contacts evolve after drug withdrawal to redefine the neurocircuital properties. These results raise at least three critical questions: (1) what are the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced generation of silent synapses; (2) how are neurocircuits remodeled upon generation and evolution of drug-generated silent synapses; and (3) what behavioral consequences are produced by silent synapse-based circuitry remodeling? This short review analyzes related experimental results, and extends them to some speculations. PMID:26721952

  6. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm's canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  7. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-10-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  8. School Buildings: Remodeling; Rehabilitation; Modernization; Repair. Bulletin, 1950, No. 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiles, Nelson E.

    1950-01-01

    Adequate school plants are essential to a modern educational program. The school plant that is not properly maintained soon fails to provide the service for which it was intended. The total program of maintenance, including repairs, renovation, remodeling, rehabilitation, and modernization should be carefully planned. Some tasks will recur at…

  9. Remodelling the School Workforce in England: A Study in Tyranny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Remodelling the school workforce is being rolled out across England with official purposes articulated around work-life balance, improving standards, and the need to efficiently and effectively deploy staffing. This is not new and can be related to ongoing policy thrusts designed to restructure the state as manifest in the haphazard construction…

  10. Regulator of calcineurin 1 mediates pathological vascular wall remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Vanesa; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Jesús Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis; Roqué, Mercè; Novensá, Laura; Belén García-Redondo, Ana; Salaices, Mercedes; Vila, Luis; Arbonés, María L.

    2011-01-01

    Artery wall remodeling, a major feature of diseases such as hypertension, restenosis, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm, involves changes in the tunica media mass that reduce or increase the vessel lumen. The identification of molecules involved in vessel remodeling could aid the development of improved treatments for these pathologies. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a key effector of aortic wall remodeling that contributes to aneurysm formation and restenosis through incompletely defined signaling pathways. We show that AngII induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and vessel remodeling in mouse models of restenosis and aneurysm. These effects were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin (CN) or lentiviral delivery of CN-inhibitory peptides. Whole-genome analysis revealed >1,500 AngII-regulated genes in VSMCs, with just 11 of them requiring CN activation. Of these, the most sensitive to CN activation was regulator of CN 1 (Rcan1). Rcan1 was strongly activated by AngII in vitro and in vivo and was required for AngII-induced VSMC migration. Remarkably, Rcan1−/− mice were resistant to AngII-induced aneurysm and restenosis. Our results indicate that aneurysm formation and restenosis share mechanistic elements and identify Rcan1 as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of aneurysm and restenosis progression. PMID:21930771

  11. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  12. Minor Groove Binder Distamycin Remodels Chromatin but Inhibits Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parijat; Banerjee, Amrita; Shandilya, Jayasha; Senapati, Parijat; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Kundu, Tapas K.; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as “chromatin remodeling”. In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance. PMID:23460895

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  14. The Remodeling Conjecture and the Faber-Pandharipande Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Vincent; Catuneanu, Andrei; Marchal, Olivier; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we prove that the free energies F g constructed from the Eynard-Orantin topological recursion applied to the curve mirror to {{C}^3} reproduce the Faber-Pandharipande formula for genus g Gromov-Witten invariants of {{C}^3} . This completes the proof of the remodeling conjecture for {{C}^3}.

  15. Bone remodeling induced by dental implants of functionally graded materials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Functionally graded material (FGM) had been developed as a potential implant material to replace titanium for its improved capability of initial osseointegration. The idea behind FGM dental implant is that its properties can be tailored in accordance with the biomechanical needs at different regions adapting to its hosting bony tissues, therefore creating an improved overall integration and stability in the entire restoration. However, there have been very few reports available so far on predicting bone remodeling induced by FGM dental implants. This article aims to evaluate bone remodeling when replacing the titanium with a hydroxyapatite/collagen (HAP/Col) FGM model. A finite element model was constructed in the buccal-lingual section of a dental implant-bone structure generated from in vivo CT scan images. The remodeling simulation was performed over a 4 year healing period. Comparisons were made between the titanium implant and various FGM implants of this model. The FGM implants showed an improved bone remodeling outcome. The study is expected to provide a basis for future development of FGM implants.

  16. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Chad C

    2016-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics, but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling.

  17. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of U.S. households compared to piecemeal remodeling efforts. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team examines the improvement of a home’s energy performance in an opportunistic way by examining what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for energy efficiency upgrades to occur at the same time as remodeling proejcts. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home’s energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  18. Energy Efficiency Measures to Incorporate into Remodeling Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    Energy improvements in a home are often approached as one concerted effort, beginning with a simple walk-through assessment or more in-depth energy audit and followed by the installation of recommended energy measures. While this approach allows for systems thinking to guide the efforts, comprehensive energy improvements of this nature are undertaken by a relatively small number of the households in our nation compared to more piecemeal remodeling efforts. Even when programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR are considered, homes that have had a comprehensive energy makeover still represent a small fraction of the 111.1 million households. In this report, the U.S Department of Energy Building America Retrofit Alliance research team looks at the improvement of a home's energy performance in an opportunistic way: it examines what can be done to incorporate energy efficiency measures into general remodeling work and home repair projects. This allows for the possibility for people who would not normally pursue energy efficiency but will remodel their kitchen or re-side their home to improve their home's performance at the same time. There are challenges to this approach, not the least of which being that the work will take place over time in potentially many separate projects. The opportunity to improve a home's energy efficiency at one time expands or contracts with the scope of the remodel. As such, guidance on how to do each piece thoughtfully and with consideration for potential future projects, is critical.

  19. 19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 'Southern Pacific Company, Pacific Lines, Remodeling of Piers For Renewal of Br. 210-C Near Tehama, Sac. Division, Scale 1' = 40' & 1/4' = 1'-0', Sept. 1927, M.W.D., Drawing 5935, Sheet 2.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  20. "New Professionalism," Workforce Remodeling and the Restructuring of Teachers' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Howard; Carter, Bob; Passy, Rowena

    2007-01-01

    Since its election in 1997 the Labour government's policy has sought to promote a "new professionalism" amongst teachers. First mooted at the time when new performance management arrangements were introduced, the discourse of new professionalism has now become closely associated with the "workforce remodeling" agenda in which teachers' work is…

  1. Pentoxifylline Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling Induced by Tobacco Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Minicucci, Marcos; Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Priscila; Polegato, Bertha; Roscani, Meliza; Fernandes, Ana Angelica; Lustosa, Beatriz; Paiva, Sergio; Zornoff, Leonardo; Azevedo, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke exposure is an important risk factor for cardiac remodeling. Under this condition, inflammation, oxidative stress, energy metabolism abnormalities, apoptosis, and hypertrophy are present. Pentoxifylline has anti‑inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic and anti-proliferative properties. Objective The present study tested the hypothesis that pentoxifylline would attenuate cardiac remodeling induced by smoking. Methods Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: Control (C), Pentoxifylline (PX), Tobacco Smoke (TS), and PX-TS. After two months, echocardiography, invasive blood pressure measurement, biochemical, and histological studies were performed. The groups were compared by two-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. Results TS increased left atrium diameter and area, which was attenuated by PX. In the isolated heart study, TS lowered the positive derivate (+dp/dt), and this was attenuated by PX. The antioxidants enzyme superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased in the TS group; PX recovered these activities. TS increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and decreased 3-hydroxyacyl Coenzyme A dehydrogenases (OH-DHA) and citrate synthase (CS). PX attenuated LDH, 3-OH-DHA and CS alterations in TS-PX group. TS increased IL-10, ICAM-1, and caspase-3. PX did not influence these variables. Conclusion TS induced cardiac remodeling, associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and changed energy metabolism. PX attenuated cardiac remodeling by reducing oxidative stress and improving cardiac bioenergetics, but did not act upon cardiac cytokines and apoptosis. PMID:27096523

  2. Remodeling of University of Minnesota President's House and Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul. Program Evaluation Div.

    A report on the remodeling projects at the University of Minnesota president's house and office is presented, noting significant shortcomings in the way the projects were managed and in the reporting relationship that existed between the Board of Regents and the university's administration. Recommendations are offered to the university on how…

  3. 17. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, 1988 (original sepia in plan room of Base Civil Engineer, Scott AFB) First and second floor plans - Scott Air Force Base, General Officer Quarters, 229 Birchard Street, O'Fallon, St. Clair County, IL

  4. 18. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photographic copy of original remodeling drawings dated July 8, 1988 (original sepia in plan room of Base Civil Engineer, Scott AFB) First and second floor demolition and framing plan - Scott Air Force Base, General Officer Quarters, 229 Birchard Street, O'Fallon, St. Clair County, IL

  5. Transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha promotes peroxisomal remodeling and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bagattin, Alessia; Hugendubler, Lynne; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2010-11-23

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes execute some analogous, nonredundant functions including fatty acid oxidation and detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and, in response to select metabolic cues, undergo rapid remodeling and division. Although these organelles share some components of their division machinery, it is not known whether a common regulator coordinates their remodeling and biogenesis. Here we show that in response to thermogenic stimuli, peroxisomes in brown fat tissue (BAT) undergo selective remodeling and expand in number and demonstrate that ectopic expression of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α recapitulates these effects on the peroxisomal compartment, both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, β-adrenergic stimulation of PGC-1α(-/-) cells results in blunted induction of peroxisomal gene expression. Surprisingly, PPARα was not required for the induction of critical biogenesis factors, suggesting that PGC-1α orchestrates peroxisomal remodeling through a PPARα-independent mechanism. Our data suggest that PGC-1α is critical to peroxisomal physiology, establishing a role for this factor as a fundamental orchestrator of cellular adaptation to energy demands.

  6. Effects of Electrical and Structural Remodeling on Atrial Fibrillation Maintenance: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Christini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, a common cardiac arrhythmia, often progresses unfavourably: in patients with long-term atrial fibrillation, fibrillatory episodes are typically of increased duration and frequency of occurrence relative to healthy controls. This is due to electrical, structural, and contractile remodeling processes. We investigated mechanisms of how electrical and structural remodeling contribute to perpetuation of simulated atrial fibrillation, using a mathematical model of the human atrial action potential incorporated into an anatomically realistic three-dimensional structural model of the human atria. Electrical and structural remodeling both shortened the atrial wavelength - electrical remodeling primarily through a decrease in action potential duration, while structural remodeling primarily slowed conduction. The decrease in wavelength correlates with an increase in the average duration of atrial fibrillation/flutter episodes. The dependence of reentry duration on wavelength was the same for electrical vs. structural remodeling. However, the dynamics during atrial reentry varied between electrical, structural, and combined electrical and structural remodeling in several ways, including: (i) with structural remodeling there were more occurrences of fragmented wavefronts and hence more filaments than during electrical remodeling; (ii) dominant waves anchored around different anatomical obstacles in electrical vs. structural remodeling; (iii) dominant waves were often not anchored in combined electrical and structural remodeling. We conclude that, in simulated atrial fibrillation, the wavelength dependence of reentry duration is similar for electrical and structural remodeling, despite major differences in overall dynamics, including maximal number of filaments, wave fragmentation, restitution properties, and whether dominant waves are anchored to anatomical obstacles or spiralling freely. PMID:22383869

  7. The Complexity of Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis: The Role of RAGE as Therapeutic Target to Promote Neuroprotection by Inhibiting Neurovascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Lorena; Sbai, Oualid; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are prominent pathological features of AD. Aging and age-dependent oxidative stress are the major nongenetic risk factors for AD. The beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ), the major component of plaques, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are key activators of plaque-associated cellular dysfunction. Aβ and AGEs bind to the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), which transmits the signal from RAGE via redox-sensitive pathways to nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). RAGE-mediated signaling is an important contributor to neurodegeneration in AD. We will summarize the current knowledge and ongoing studies on RAGE function in AD. We will also present evidence for a novel pathway induced by RAGE in AD, which leads to the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP), providing further evidence that pharmacological inhibition of RAGE will promote neuroprotection by blocking neurovascular dysfunction in AD. PMID:22482078

  8. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 in atrial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Lung-An; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Chen, Wei-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium constitutes the main feature of atrial fibrillation (AF), which is characterized by increased oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potent anti-oxidant system that may provide protection against various oxidative stress-related diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HO-1 has a protective effect on AF-related remodeling. Cultured atrium-derived myocytes (HL-1 cell line) were used to evaluate tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, structural, and electrical remodeling. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was utilized to assess collagen (a main fibrosis-related protein) expression in atrial fibroblasts. Tachypacing in HL-1 myocytes and treatment of atrial fibroblasts with TGF-β enhanced the expression of HO-1, both of which were mediated by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2. Over-expression of HO-1 in HL-1 cells attenuated tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, down-regulation of L-type calcium channel, and shortening of action potential duration. Furthermore, HO-1 over-expression in atrial fibroblasts blocked the up-regulation of collagen by TGF-β, implicating a protective role of HO-1 in structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium. In vivo, HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited a higher degree of oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, and collagen deposit in their atria than wild-type mice. Moreover, burst atrial pacing induced a greater susceptibility to AF in HO-1(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. In conclusion, a negative-feedback regulation of HO-1 in activated atrial myocytes and fibroblasts may provide protection against AF-related remodeling and AF development. PMID:27562817

  9. Prefrontal white matter pathology in air pollution exposed Mexico City young urbanites and their potential impact on neurovascular unit dysfunction and the development of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Vargas-Martínez, Javier; Gómez-Maqueo-Chew, Aline; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Perry, George; Gónzalez-Maciel, Angélica

    2016-04-01

    Millions of urban children are chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants, i.e., fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. Compared with children living with clear air those in Mexico City (MC) exhibit systemic, brain and intrathecal inflammation, low CSF Aβ42, breakdown of the BBB, attention and short-term memory deficits, prefrontal white matter hyperintensities, damage to epithelial and endothelial barriers, tight junction and neural autoantibodies, and Alzheimer and Parkinson's hallmarks. The prefrontal white matter is a target of air pollution. We examined by light and electron microscopy the prefrontal white matter of MC dogs (n: 15, age 3.17±0.74 years), children and teens (n: 34, age: 12.64±4.2 years) versus controls. Major findings in MC residents included leaking capillaries and small arterioles with extravascular lipids and erythrocytes, lipofuscin in pericytes, smooth muscle and endothelial cells (EC), thickening of cerebrovascular basement membranes with small deposits of amyloid, patchy absence of the perivascular glial sheet, enlarged Virchow-Robin spaces and nanosize particles (20-48nm) in EC, basement membranes, axons and dendrites. Tight junctions, a key component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) were abnormal in MC versus control dogs (χ(2)<0.0001), and white matter perivascular damage was significantly worse in MC dogs (p=0.002). The integrity of the NVU, an interactive network of vascular, glial and neuronal cells is compromised in MC young residents. Characterizing the early NVU damage and identifying biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction may provide a fresh insight into Alzheimer pathogenesis and open opportunities for pediatric neuroprotection. PMID:26829765

  10. Prefrontal white matter pathology in air pollution exposed Mexico City young urbanites and their potential impact on neurovascular unit dysfunction and the development of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Vargas-Martínez, Javier; Gómez-Maqueo-Chew, Aline; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Perry, George; Gónzalez-Maciel, Angélica

    2016-04-01

    Millions of urban children are chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants, i.e., fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. Compared with children living with clear air those in Mexico City (MC) exhibit systemic, brain and intrathecal inflammation, low CSF Aβ42, breakdown of the BBB, attention and short-term memory deficits, prefrontal white matter hyperintensities, damage to epithelial and endothelial barriers, tight junction and neural autoantibodies, and Alzheimer and Parkinson's hallmarks. The prefrontal white matter is a target of air pollution. We examined by light and electron microscopy the prefrontal white matter of MC dogs (n: 15, age 3.17±0.74 years), children and teens (n: 34, age: 12.64±4.2 years) versus controls. Major findings in MC residents included leaking capillaries and small arterioles with extravascular lipids and erythrocytes, lipofuscin in pericytes, smooth muscle and endothelial cells (EC), thickening of cerebrovascular basement membranes with small deposits of amyloid, patchy absence of the perivascular glial sheet, enlarged Virchow-Robin spaces and nanosize particles (20-48nm) in EC, basement membranes, axons and dendrites. Tight junctions, a key component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) were abnormal in MC versus control dogs (χ(2)<0.0001), and white matter perivascular damage was significantly worse in MC dogs (p=0.002). The integrity of the NVU, an interactive network of vascular, glial and neuronal cells is compromised in MC young residents. Characterizing the early NVU damage and identifying biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction may provide a fresh insight into Alzheimer pathogenesis and open opportunities for pediatric neuroprotection.

  11. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Possible link to blood–brain barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Maren K. L.; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S.; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I.; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood–brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood

  12. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  13. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  14. Effective chromosome pairing requires chromatin remodeling at the onset of meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Colas, Isabelle; Shaw, Peter; Prieto, Pilar; Wanous, Michael; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang; Mago, Rohit; Moore, Graham

    2008-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes (homologues) recognize each other and then intimately associate. Studies exploiting species with large chromosomes reveal that chromatin is remodeled at the onset of meiosis before this intimate association. However, little is known about the effect the remodeling has on pairing. We show here in wheat that chromatin remodeling of homologues can only occur if they are identical or nearly identical. Moreover, a failure to undergo remodeling results in reduced pairing between the homologues. Thus, chromatin remodeling at the onset of meiosis enables the chromosomes to become competent to pair and recombine efficiently. PMID:18417451

  15. Masses and activity of AB Doradus B a/b. The age of the AB Dor quadruple system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, U.; Czesla, S.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Robrade, J.; Engels, D.; Wieringa, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the close binary AB Dor Ba/b (Rst137B). Our study comprises astrometric orbit measurements, optical spectroscopy, X-ray and radio observations. Using all available adaptive optics images of AB Dor B taken with VLT/NACO from 2004 to 2009, we tightly constrain its orbital period to 360.6 ± 1.5 days. We present the first orbital solution of Rst 137B and estimate the combined mass of AB Dor Ba+b as 0.69+0.02-0.24 M⊙, slightly exceeding previous estimates based on IR photometry. Our determined orbital inclination of Rst 137B is close to the axial inclination of AB Dor A inferred from Doppler imaging. Our VLT/UVES spectra yield high rotational velocities of ≥30 km s-1 for both components Ba and Bb, in accord with previous measurements, which corresponds to rotation periods significantly shorter than one day. Our combined spectral model, using PHOENIX spectra, yields an effective temperature of 3310 ± 50 K for the primary and approximately 60 K less for the secondary. The optical spectra presumably cover a chromospheric flare and show that at least one component of Rst 137B is significantly active. Activity and weak variations are also found in our simultaneous XMM-Newton observations, while our ATCA radio data yield constant fluxes at the level of previous measurements. Using evolutionary models, our newly determined stellar parameters confirm that the age of Rst 137B is between 50 and 100 Myr. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 383.D-1002(A) and the ESO Science Archive Facility. Using data obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and NASA. Using data obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) operated by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

  16. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  17. Dynamics of Lung Defense in Pneumonia: Resistance, Resilience, and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is initiated by microbes in the lung, but physiological processes integrating responses across diverse cell types and organ systems dictate the outcome of respiratory infection. Resistance, or actions of the host to eradicate living microbes, in the lungs involves a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by air-space infection. Resilience, or the ability of the host tissues to withstand the physiologically damaging effects of microbial and immune activities, is equally complex, precisely regulated, and determinative. Both immune resistance and tissue resilience are dynamic and change throughout the lifetime, but we are only beginning to understand such remodeling and how it contributes to the incidence of severe pneumonias, which diminishes as childhood progresses and then increases again among the elderly. Here, we review the concepts of resistance, resilience, and remodeling as they apply to pneumonia, highlighting recent advances and current significant knowledge gaps. PMID:25148693

  18. Perspectives on biomechanical growth and remodeling mechanisms in glaucoma⋆

    PubMed Central

    Grytz, Rafael; Girkin, Christopher A.; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, J. Crawford

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a blinding diseases in which damage to the axons results in loss of retinal ganglion cells. Experimental evidence indicates that chronic intraocular pressure elevation initiates axonal insult at the level of the lamina cribrosa. The lamina cribrosa is a porous collagen structure through which the axons pass on their path from the retina to the brain. Recent experimental studies revealed the extensive structural changes of the lamina cribrosa and its surrounding tissues during the development and progression of glaucoma. In this perspective paper we review the experimental evidence for growth and remodeling mechanisms in glaucoma including adaptation of tissue anisotropy, tissue thickening/thinning, tissue elongation/shortening and tissue migration. We discuss the existing predictive computational approaches that try to elucidate the potential biomechanical basis of theses growth and remodeling mechanisms and highlight open questions, challenges, and avenues for further development. PMID:23109748

  19. Physical principles of membrane remodelling during cell mechanoadaptation

    PubMed Central

    Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Casares, Laura; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Thottacherry, Joseph Jose; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; González-Tarragó, Víctor; del Pozo, Miguel Ángel; Mayor, Satyajit; Arroyo, Marino; Navajas, Daniel; Trepat, Xavier; Gauthier, Nils C.; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes in any physiological environment involve changes in cell shape, which must be accommodated by their physical envelope—the bilayer membrane. However, the fundamental biophysical principles by which the cell membrane allows for and responds to shape changes remain unclear. Here we show that the 3D remodelling of the membrane in response to a broad diversity of physiological perturbations can be explained by a purely mechanical process. This process is passive, local, almost instantaneous, before any active remodelling and generates different types of membrane invaginations that can repeatedly store and release large fractions of the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that the shape of those invaginations is determined by the minimum elastic and adhesive energy required to store both membrane area and liquid volume at the cell–substrate interface. Once formed, cells reabsorb the invaginations through an active process with duration of the order of minutes. PMID:26073653

  20. ATP Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saladi, Srinivas Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells that can self renew or be induced to differentiate into multiple cell lineages, and thus have the potential to be utilized in regenerative medicine. Key pluripotency specific factors (Oct 4/Sox2/Nanog/Klf4) maintain the pluripotent state by activating expression of pluripotency specific genes and by inhibiting the expression of developmental regulators. Pluripotent ES cells are distinguished from differentiated cells by a specialized chromatin state that is required to epigenetically regulate the ES cell phenotype. Recent studies show that in addition to pluripotency specific factors, chromatin remodeling enzymes play an important role in regulating ES cell chromatin and the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate. Here we review recent studies that delineate the role of ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in regulating ES cell chromatin structure. PMID:20148317

  1. The role of microRNAs in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Dian; Hao, Jin; Shen, Yu; Tang, Ge; Li, Mei-Le; Huang, Shi-Hu; Zhao, Zhi-He

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is balanced by bone formation and bone resorption as well as by alterations in the quantities and functions of seed cells, leading to either the maintenance or deterioration of bone status. The existing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs), known as a family of short non-coding RNAs, are the key post-transcriptional repressors of gene expression, and growing numbers of novel miRNAs have been verified to play vital roles in the regulation of osteogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and adipogenesis, revealing how they interact with signaling molecules to control these processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the roles of miRNAs in regulating bone remodeling as well as novel applications for miRNAs in biomaterials for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26208037

  2. Dental implant design--effect on bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pilliar, R M; Deporter, D A; Watson, P A; Valiquette, N

    1991-04-01

    Bone remodeling around three different endosseous dental implant designs placed in dog mandibles was studied using radiography during lengthy periods of function and by histology after animal sacrifice. The three designs investigated were (a) threaded (c.p. titanium), (b) fully porous-coated (titanium alloy), and (c) partially porous-coated (titanium alloy). The implants were kept in function for either 32 weeks (fully porous-coated) or 73 to 77 weeks (partially porous-coated and threaded). The studies indicated that some crestal bone loss occurred for both the threaded and partially porous-coated implants while no significant bone loss was seen with fully porous-coated implants in the absence of plaque-associated infection. It is suggested that these observed differences are a result of the different stress states that develop in bone surrounding the three designs underlying the importance of implant design on bone remodeling.

  3. The solid state environment orchestrates embryonic development and tissue remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damsky, C. H.; Moursi, A.; Zhou, Y.; Fisher, S. J.; Globus, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    Cell interactions with extracellular matrix and with other cells play critical roles in morphogenesis during development and in tissue homeostasis and remodeling throughout life. Extracellular matrix is information-rich, not only because it is comprised of multifunctional structural ligands for cell surface adhesion receptors, but also because it contains peptide signaling factors, and proteinases and their inhibitors. The functions of these groups of molecules are extensively interrelated. In this review, three primary cell culture models are described that focus on adhesion receptors and their roles in complex aspects of morphogenesis and remodeling: the regulation of proteinase expression by fibronectin and integrins in synovial fibroblasts; the regulation of osteoblast differentiation and survival by fibronectin, and the regulation of trophoblast differentiation and invasion by integrins, cadherins and immunoglobulin family adhesion receptors.

  4. Design stars: how small DNA viruses remodel the host nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mengxi; Imperiale, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Numerous host components are encountered by viruses during the infection process. While some of these host structures are left unchanged, others may go through dramatic remodeling processes. In this review, we summarize these host changes that occur during small DNA virus infections, with a focus on host nuclear components and pathways. Although these viruses differ significantly in their genome structures and infectious pathways, there are common nuclear targets that are altered by various viral factors. Accumulating evidence suggests that these nuclear remodeling processes are often essential for productive viral infections and/or viral-induced transformation. Understanding the complex interactions between viruses and these host structures and pathways will help to build a more integrated network of how the virus completes its life cycle and point toward the design of novel therapeutic regimens that either prevent harmful viral infections or employ viruses as nontraditional treatment options or molecular tools.

  5. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  6. Probabilistic Study of Bone Remodeling Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamic bone remodeling process is a computationally challenging research area that struggles to understand the actual mechanisms. It has been observed that a mechanical stimulus in the bone greatly affects the remodeling process. A 3D finite element model of a femur is created and a probabilistic analysis is performed on the model. The probabilistic analysis measures the sensitivities of various parameters related to the material properties, geometric properties, and the three load cases defined as Single Leg Stance, Abduction, and Adduction. The sensitivity of each parameter is based on the calculated maximum mechanical stimulus and analyzed at various values of probabilities ranging from 0.001 to 0.999. The analysis showed that the parameters associated with the Single Leg Stance load case had the highest sensitivity with a probability of 0.99 and the angle of the force applied to the joint of the proximal femur had the overall highest sensitivity

  7. The population model of bone remodelling employed the optimal control.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Adam

    2012-11-01

    Several models have been developed in recent years which apply population dynamics methods to describe the mechanisms of bone remodelling. This study incorporates the population kinetics model of bone turnover (including the osteocyte loop regulation) with the optimal control technique. Model simulations have been performed with a wide range of rate parameters using the Monte Carlo method. The regression method has also been used to investigate the interdependence of the location of equilibrium and the characteristics of the equilibrium/relaxation time on the rate parameters employed. The dynamic optimal control outlook for the regulation of bone remodelling processes, in the context of the osteocyte-control population model, has been discussed. Optimisation criteria have been formulated from the perspective of the energetic and metabolic losses in the tissue, with respect to the performance of the bone multicellular unit.

  8. Remodeling myelination: implications for mechanisms of neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Redmond, Stephanie A; Chan, Jonah R

    2016-02-01

    One of the most significant paradigm shifts in membrane remodeling is the emerging view that membrane transformation is not exclusively controlled by cytoskeletal rearrangement, but also by biophysical constraints, adhesive forces, membrane curvature and compaction. One of the most exquisite examples of membrane remodeling is myelination. The advent of myelin was instrumental in advancing the nervous system during vertebrate evolution. With more rapid and efficient communication between neurons, faster and more complex computations could be performed in a given time and space. Our knowledge of how myelin-forming oligodendrocytes select and wrap axons has been limited by insufficient spatial and temporal resolution. By virtue of recent technological advances, progress has clarified longstanding controversies in the field. Here we review insights into myelination, from target selection to axon wrapping and membrane compaction, and discuss how understanding these processes has unexpectedly opened new avenues of insight into myelination-centered mechanisms of neural plasticity.

  9. Osteocyte Remodeling of the Perilacunar and Pericanalicular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Hai; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2009-01-01

    With additional functions of osteocytes being identified, the concept that osteocytes are just “static lacunar-dwelling cells” is no longer accepted. We reviewed most of the relevant literature on osteocyte's function in the direct remodeling of the perilucunar matrix, discussing the advantages and disadvantages. Special attention was paid to how the negative researchers argue about the “osteocytic osteolysis” principle, and how the positive side addressed the arguments. We also discussed the newly found data of osteocytic remodeling function from our group. With more biotechnology in hand, there is increased excitement in the prospect of now being able to answer the two important questions: do osteocytes have the capability to remove mineral from the perilacunar matrix and if so what are the molecular and cellular mechanisms? do osteocytes have the capability to deposit new mineral on the perilacunar matrix and if so what are the cellular and molecular mechanisms? PMID:20687297

  10. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA. PMID:25486562

  11. SUN4 is essential for nuclear remodeling during mammalian spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Alessandra; Wong, Arnette Shi Wei; Wright, Graham; Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Loo, Tsui Han; Stewart, Colin L; Burke, Brian

    2015-11-15

    One of the more dramatic examples of cellular reorganization occurs during spermiogenesis in which a roughly spherical spermatid is transformed into a mature sperm cell. A highlight of this process involves nuclear remodeling whereby the round spermatid nucleus is sculpted into an elongated and polar structure. This transformation in nuclear architecture features chromatin condensation, changes in the composition and organization of the nuclear lamina and redistribution and elimination of nuclear pore complexes. The manchette, a cytoplasmic microtubule-based structure is thought to play a crucial role in the remodeling process. Here we show that SUN4, a spermatid nuclear membrane protein has an essential function in coupling the manchette to the nuclear periphery. In the absence of SUN4, manchette microtubules appear highly disorganized and the nucleus itself fails to elongate. Consequently, mice deficient in SUN4 display globozoospermia with associated infertility.

  12. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA.

  13. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function.

    PubMed

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-04-28

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo.

  14. Ab interno trabeculectomy: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vinod, Kateki; Gedde, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Ab interno trabeculectomy is one among several recently introduced minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries that avoid a conjunctival incision and full-thickness sclerostomy involved in traditional glaucoma surgery. Ablation of the trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm’s canal is performed in an arcuate fashion via a clear corneal incision, alone or in combination with phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Intraocular pressure reduction following ab interno trabeculectomy is limited by resistance in distal outflow pathways and generally stabilizes in the mid-to-high teens. Relief of medication burden has been demonstrated by some studies. A very low rate of complications, most commonly transient hyphema and intraocular pressure elevations in the immediate postoperative period, have been reported. However, available data are derived from small retrospective and prospective case series. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to better elucidate the potential merits of ab interno trabeculectomy in the combined setting versus phacoemulsification cataract surgery alone and to compare it with other minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries. PMID:27574396

  15. Remodelling the vascular microenvironment of glioblastoma with alpha-particles

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E.M.; Hassan, Iman F.; Veach, Darren R.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tumors escape anti-angiogenic therapy by activation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225Ac-E4G10 as an anti-vascular approach and previously showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here we investigate changes in tumor-vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225Ac-E4G10. Methods We investigated remodeling of tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4 kBq dose of 225Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphological changes in the tumor blood brain barrier microenvironment. Multi-color flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaged functional changes of the tumor vascular network. Results The mechanism of drug action is a combination of glioblastoma vascular microenvironment remodeling, edema relief, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis was lessened and resulted in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacological uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced following α-particle therapy. Conclusion Targeted anti-vascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of Platelet-derived growth factor driven glioblastoma. PMID:27261519

  16. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output.

  17. PDGFRα plays a crucial role in connective tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Shinjiro; Ishii, Yoko; Hamashima, Takeru; Yamamoto, Seiji; Mori, Hisashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Shen, Jie; Inoue, Ran; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Majima, Masataka; Abraham, David; Miyawaki, Toshio; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-12-07

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) plays a pivotal role in the remodeling of connective tissues. Emerging data indicate the distinctive role of PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα) in this process. In the present study, the Pdgfra gene was systemically inactivated in adult mouse (α-KO mouse), and the role of PDGFRα was examined in the subcutaneously implanted sponge matrices. PDGFRα expressed in the fibroblasts of Pdgfra-preserving control mice (Flox mice), was significantly reduced in the sponges in α-KO mice. Neovascularized areas were largely suppressed in the α-KO mice than in the Flox mice, whereas the other parameters related to the blood vessels and endothelial cells were similar. The deposition of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of collagen 1a1 and 3a1 genes were significantly reduced in α-KO mice. There was a significantly decrease in the number and dividing fibroblasts in the α-KO mice, and those of macrophages were similar between the two genotypes. Hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) gene expression was suppressed in Pdgfra-inactivated fibroblasts and connective tissue. The findings implicate the role of PDGFRα-dependent ECM and HGF production in fibroblasts that promotes the remodeling of connective tissue and suggest that PDGFRα may be a relevant target to regulate connective tissue remodeling.

  18. Pulmonary arterial remodeling revealed by microfocal x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Johnson, Roger H.; Dhyani, Anita H.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2001-05-01

    Animal models and micro-CT imaging are useful for understanding the functional consequences of, and identifying the genes involved in, the remodeling of vascular structures that accompanies pulmonary vascular disease. Using a micro-CT scanner to image contrast-enhanced arteries in excised lungs from fawn hooded rats (a strain genetically susceptible to hypoxia induced pulmonary hypertension), we found that portions of the pulmonary arterial tree downstream from a given diameter were morphometrically indistinguishable. This 'self-consistency' property provided a means for summarizing the pulmonary arterial tree architecture and mechanical properties using a parameter vector obtained from measurements of the contiguous set of vessel segments comprising the longest (principal) pathway and its branches over a range of vascular pressures. This parameter vector was used to characterize the pulmonary vascular remodeling that occurred in rats exposed to a hypoxic (11.5% oxygen) environment and provided the input to a hemodynamic model relating structure to function. The major effect of the remodeling was a longitudinally (pulmonary artery to arterioles) uniform decrease in vessel distensibility that resulted in a 90% increase in arterial resistance. Despite the almost uniform change in vessel distensibility, over 50% of the resistance increase was attributable to vessels with unstressed diameters less than 125 microns.

  19. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx (-/-) pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  20. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA–DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx−/− pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  1. A Computational Model for Simulating Spaceflight Induced Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2014-01-01

    An overview of an initial development of a model of bone loss due to skeletal unloading in weight bearing sites is presented. The skeletal site chosen for the initial application of the model is the femoral neck region because hip fractures can be debilitating to the overall performance health of astronauts. The paper begins with the motivation for developing such a model of the time course of change in bone in order to understand the mechanism of bone demineralization experienced by astronauts in microgravity, to quantify the health risk, and to establish countermeasures. Following this, a general description of a mathematical formulation of the process of bone remodeling is discussed. Equations governing the rate of change of mineralized bone volume fraction and active osteoclast and osteoblast are illustrated. Some of the physiology of bone remodeling, the theory of how imbalance in remodeling can cause bone loss, and how the model attempts to capture this is discussed. The results of a preliminary validation analysis that was carried out are presented. The analysis compares a set of simulation results against bone loss data from control subjects who participated in two different bed rest studies. Finally, the paper concludes with outlining the current limitations and caveats of the model, and planned future work to enhance the state of the model.

  2. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome after calvarial remodeling in craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jun-Hee; Yoo, Gyeol

    2005-10-01

    Hyponatremia and increased urine output after calvarial remodeling have been noted in pediatric patients with craniosynostosis. If not treated properly, patients develop hypoosmotic conditions that can lead to cerebral edema, increased intracranial pressure, and collapsed circulation. Postoperative hyponatremia after central nervous system surgery is considered as the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion. Recently, however, cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) instead of SIADH has been reported frequently. CSWS is associated with a decreased serum sodium level, increased urinary sodium level, increased urine output, decreased ECF volume, increased atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) level, and increased brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level. We experienced nine patients with craniosynostosis who underwent calvarial remodeling. By postoperative day 1, the ANP and BNP levels increased by 3-6 folds compared with the preoperative levels. They returned to the normal levels by postoperative day 5. The ADH level was within the normal range even after operation. The urinary sodium level increased in all patients by postoperative day 1 and 3. But the serum sodium level, and serum and urine osmolarity were normal due to appropriate replacement of sodium and fluid. After calvarial remodeling, the potential development of CSWS should be considered and distinguished from SIADH. The patients with CSWS require normal saline resuscitation and should prophylactically receive normal saline.

  3. Age-dependent motor unit remodelling in human limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Mathew; Ireland, Alex; Jones, David A; McPhee, Jamie S

    2016-06-01

    Voluntary control of skeletal muscle enables humans to interact with and manipulate the environment. Lower muscle mass, weakness and poor coordination are common complaints in older age and reduce physical capabilities. Attention has focused on ways of maintaining muscle size and strength by exercise, diet or hormone replacement. Without appropriate neural innervation, however, muscle cannot function. Emerging evidence points to a neural basis of muscle loss. Motor unit number estimates indicate that by age around 71 years, healthy older people have around 40 % fewer motor units. The surviving low- and moderate-threshold motor units recruited for moderate intensity contractions are enlarged by around 50 % and show increased fibre density, presumably due to collateral reinnervation of denervated fibres. Motor unit potentials show increased complexity and the stability of neuromuscular junction transmissions is decreased. The available evidence is limited by a lack of longitudinal studies, relatively small sample sizes, a tendency to examine the small peripheral muscles and relatively few investigations into the consequences of motor unit remodelling for muscle size and control of movements in older age. Loss of motor neurons and remodelling of surviving motor units constitutes the major change in ageing muscles and probably contributes to muscle loss and functional impairments. The deterioration and remodelling of motor units likely imposes constraints on the way in which the central nervous system controls movements. PMID:26667009

  4. Remodeling sensory cortical maps implants specific behavioral memory.

    PubMed

    Bieszczad, K M; Miasnikov, A A; Weinberger, N M

    2013-08-29

    Neural mechanisms underlying the capacity of memory to be rich in sensory detail are largely unknown. A candidate mechanism is learning-induced plasticity that remodels the adult sensory cortex. Here, expansion in the primary auditory cortical (A1) tonotopic map of rats was induced by pairing a 3.66-kHz tone with activation of the nucleus basalis, mimicking the effects of natural associative learning. Remodeling of A1 produced de novo specific behavioral memory, but neither memory nor plasticity was consistently at the frequency of the paired tone, which typically decreased in A1 representation. Rather, there was a specific match between individual subjects' area of expansion and the tone that was strongest in each animal's memory, as determined by post-training frequency generalization gradients. These findings provide the first demonstration of a match between the artificial induction of specific neural representational plasticity and artificial induction of behavioral memory. As such, together with prior and present findings for detection, correlation and mimicry of plasticity with the acquisition of memory, they satisfy a key criterion for neural substrates of memory. This demonstrates that directly remodeling sensory cortical maps is sufficient for the specificity of memory formation.

  5. Mechanisms underlying heterologous skin scaffold-mediated tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Kallyne K. O.; Moraes, Andréia R.; Miranda, Aline C.; Greco, Rebecca; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Greco, Karin V.; Oliani, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility of two newly developed porcine skin scaffolds was assessed after 3, 14, 21 and 90 days of implantation in rats. Both scaffolds showed absence of cells, preservation of ECM and mechanical properties comparable to non-decellularised skin before implantation. Host cell infiltration was much prominent on both scaffolds when compared to Permacol (surgical control). At day 3, the grafts were surrounded by polymorphonuclear cells, which were replaced by a notable number of IL-6-positive cells at day 14. Simultaneously, the number of pro-inflammatory M1-macrophage was enhanced. Interestingly, a predominant pro-remodeling M2 response, with newly formed vessels, myofibroblasts activation and a shift on the type of collagen expression was sequentially delayed (around 21 days). The gene expression of some trophic factors involved in tissue remodeling was congruent with the cellular events. Our findings suggested that the responsiveness of macrophages after non-crosslinked skin scaffolds implantation seemed to intimately affect various cell responses and molecular events; and this range of mutually reinforcing actions was predictive of a positive tissue remodeling that was essential for the long-standing success of the implants. Furthermore, our study indicates that non-crosslinked biologic scaffold implantation is biocompatible to the host tissue and somehow underlying molecular events involved in tissue repair. PMID:27725772

  6. Atrial Electrophysiological Remodeling and Fibrillation in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Sandeep V.; Workman, Antony J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) causes complex, chronic changes in atrial structure and function, which can cause substantial electrophysiological remodeling and predispose the individual to atrial fibrillation (AF). Pharmacological treatments for preventing AF in patients with HF are limited. Improved understanding of the atrial electrical and ionic/molecular mechanisms that promote AF in these patients could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Animal models of HF have identified numerous changes in atrial ion currents, intracellular calcium handling, action potential waveform and conduction, as well as expression and signaling of associated proteins. These studies have shown that the pattern of electrophysiological remodeling likely depends on the duration of HF, the underlying cardiac pathology, and the species studied. In atrial myocytes and tissues obtained from patients with HF or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the data on changes in ion currents and action potentials are largely equivocal, probably owing mainly to difficulties in controlling for the confounding influences of multiple variables, such as patient’s age, sex, disease history, and drug treatments, as well as the technical challenges in obtaining such data. In this review, we provide a summary and comparison of the main animal and human electrophysiological studies to date, with the aim of highlighting the consistencies in some of the remodeling patterns, as well as identifying areas of contention and gaps in the knowledge, which warrant further investigation. PMID:27812293

  7. Ventricular restoration--a surgical approach to reverse ventricular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Buckberg, Gerald D

    2004-10-01

    Congestive heart failure is most often caused by scar from coronary occlusion. The transition from occluded vessel to scar to dilation results in a remodeled ventricle that changes shape from ellipse to sphere. This shape change following an index event is called remodeling and a surgical approach for restoration (bring back to normal) will be described that uses the patient's own tissue, rather than employing heart replacement by mechanical devices or transplantation. The surgical restoration approach was taken by the RESTORE group that comprises an international medical and surgical team that will report (a) the remodeling infrastructure, role of compensatory remote muscle, and factors underlying surgical restoration decisions, (b) structural basis for ventricular geometric changes and surgical background for restoration, (c) individual rebuilding experience in 1150 patients over 20 years from one center, (d) integrated 5 year results from the RESTORE team in 1198 patients, (e) electrical aspects of restoration in 382 patients with only one AICD used, (f) how restoration improves mechanical synchrony without electrical devices, (g) geometric reasons for secondary mitral insufficiency and impact of adding mitral repair during SVR procedures, and (h) importance of defining site specific scar in no ischemic disease to identify a similar trigger lesion in non ischemic cardiomyopathy. The importance of a team approach by the RESTORE group may set the benchmark for collaborative world wide groups, and thereby depart from traditional focal approaches by individual disciplines. PMID:15886970

  8. A microsphere-based remodelling formulation for anisotropic biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas; Waffenschmidt, Tobias

    2009-09-13

    Biological tissues possess the ability to adapt according to the respective local loading conditions, which results in growth and remodelling phenomena. The main goal of this work is the development of a new remodelling approach that, on the one hand, reflects the alignment of fibrous soft biological tissue with respect to representative loading directions. On the other hand, the continuum approach proposed is based on a sound micro-mechanically motivated formulation. To be specific, use of a worm-like chain model is made to describe the behaviour of long-chain molecules as present in, for instance, collageneous tissues. The extension of such a one-dimensional constitutive equation to the three-dimensional macroscopic level is performed by means of a microsphere formulation. Inherent with the algorithmic treatment of this type of modelling approach, a finite number of unit vectors is considered for the numerical integration over the domain of the unit sphere. As a key aspect of this contribution, remodelling is incorporated by setting up evolution equations for the referential orientations of these integration directions. Accordingly, the unit vectors considered now allow interpretation as internal variables, which characterize the material's anisotropic properties. Several numerical studies underline the applicability of the model that, moreover, nicely fits into iterative finite element formulations so that general boundary value problems can be solved. PMID:19657009

  9. Circadian rhythms and memory formation: regulation by chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Sahar, Saurabh; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation or histone modification, can remodel the chromatin and regulate gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin provides an efficient mechanism of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, to regulate gene expression. CLOCK:BMAL1 mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Recent research has demonstrated that chromatin remodeling is at the cross-roads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and aging. It would be of interest to identify if similar pathways exist in the epigenetic regulation of memory formation. PMID:22470318

  10. Remodeling of the Methylation Landscape in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Reyngold, Marsha; Turcan, Sevin; Giri, Dilip; Kannan, Kasthuri; Walsh, Logan A.; Viale, Agnes; Drobnjak, Marija; Vahdat, Linda T.; Lee, William; Chan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of breast cancer metastasis is accompanied by dynamic transcriptome changes and dramatic alterations in nuclear and chromatin structure. The basis of these changes is incompletely understood. The DNA methylome of primary breast cancers contribute to transcriptomic heterogeneity and different metastatic behavior. Therefore we sought to characterize methylome remodeling during regional metastasis. We profiled the DNA methylome and transcriptome of 44 matched primary breast tumors and regional metastases. Striking subtype-specific patterns of metastasis-associated methylome remodeling were observed, which reflected the molecular heterogeneity of breast cancers. These divergent changes occurred primarily in CpG island (CGI)-poor areas. Regions of methylome reorganization shared by the subtypes were also observed, and we were able to identify a metastasis-specific methylation signature that was present across the breast cancer subclasses. These alterations also occurred outside of CGIs and promoters, including sequences flanking CGIs and intergenic sequences. Integrated analysis of methylation and gene expression identified genes whose expression correlated with metastasis-specific methylation. Together, these findings significantly enhance our understanding of the epigenetic reorganization that occurs during regional breast cancer metastasis across the major breast cancer subtypes and reveal the nature of methylome remodeling during this process. PMID:25083786

  11. Endocrine remodelling of the adult intestine sustains reproduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Tobias; Jacobson, Jake; Cognigni, Paola; Antonello, Zeus; Ballesta, Esther; Tan, Kah Junn; Yew, Joanne Y; Dominguez, Maria; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The production of offspring is energetically costly and relies on incompletely understood mechanisms that generate a positive energy balance. In mothers of many species, changes in key energy-associated internal organs are common yet poorly characterised functionally and mechanistically. In this study, we show that, in adult Drosophila females, the midgut is dramatically remodelled to enhance reproductive output. In contrast to extant models, organ remodelling does not occur in response to increased nutrient intake and/or offspring demands, but rather precedes them. With spatially and temporally directed manipulations, we identify juvenile hormone (JH) as an anticipatory endocrine signal released after mating. Acting through intestinal bHLH-PAS domain proteins Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and Germ cell-expressed (Gce), JH signals directly to intestinal progenitors to yield a larger organ, and adjusts gene expression and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activity in enterocytes to support increased lipid metabolism. Our findings identify a metabolically significant paradigm of adult somatic organ remodelling linking hormonal signals, epithelial plasticity, and reproductive output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06930.001 PMID:26216039

  12. Remodeling of bovine endometrium throughout the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Arai, Miki; Yoshioka, Shin; Tasaki, Yukari; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian endometrium changes morphologically and functionally throughout the estrous cycle. In some species, endometrial cells also undergo periodic proliferation and degeneration. However, the remodeling of bovine endometrium throughout the estrous cycle remains unclear. In the present study, we examined how the remodeling of bovine endometrium varied through the estrous cycle by measuring the relative rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cells positive for both KI-67 (a proliferation marker) and cleaved caspase-3 (CCP3: an apoptotic cell marker) were immunohistochemically evaluated throughout the estrous cycle in the luminal and glandular epithelia, and the stroma of bovine endometrium. Percentages of KI-67-positive cells tended to be higher at the early luteal and follicular stages than at the mid and late luteal stages in all cell types. Similarly, percentages of CCP3-positive cells were higher at the early luteal stage than at the mid and late luteal stages in the luminal epithelium and stroma. Furthermore, CCP3 expression levels by Western blot analysis agreed with these immunohistological observations. On the other hand, DNA fragmentation was detected in the bovine endometrium without significant differences during the estrous cycle by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Together, these results show that cell proliferation and apoptosis undergo cyclic patterns in the bovine endometrium, and suggest that the bovine endometrium is remodeled in each estrous cycle. PMID:24051170

  13. Effects of spironolactone towards rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid pacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fa; Gu, Lei; Huang, Meng-Xun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Li, Hua; Zhang, Bang-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the effects of spironolactone towards the rabbit atrial remodeling with rapid atrial pacing (RAP). 30 rabbits were randomly divided into control group, RAP group and spironolactone group, with 10 rabbits in each group. RAP was performed at the speed of 800 beats/min for 8 h, atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was determined before and at the 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) of the pacing, the expressions of atrial muscular calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA were performed the RT-PCR detection, and ultrastructural changes of atrial myocytes were observed. AERP of RAP group shortened, with poor frequency adaptability; the expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA decreased 22% and 26%, respectively, when compared with the control group; ultrastructure of atrial myocytes changed significantly. AERP of spironotlactone group shortened less that RAP group, and the frequency adaptability was maintained, the decreased expressions of calcium channel α1C subunit and β1 subunit mRNA significantly reduced. RAP could cause atrial remodeling, while spironolactone could inhibit RAP-induced atrial remodeling. PMID:26826809

  14. The human tri-peptide GHK and tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Loren

    2008-01-01

    Tissue remodeling follows the initial phase of wound healing and stops inflammatory and scar-forming processes, then restores the normal tissue morphology. The human peptide Gly-(L-His)-(L-Lys) or GHK, has a copper 2+ (Cu(2+)) affinity similar to the copper transport site on albumin and forms GHK-Cu, a complex with Cu(2+). These two molecules activate a plethora of remodeling related processes: (1) chemoattraction of repair cells such as macrophages, mast cells, capillary cells; (2) anti-inflammatory actions (suppression of free radicals, thromboxane formation, release of oxidizing iron, transforming growth factor beta-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha and protein glycation while increasing superoxide dismutase, vessel vasodilation, blocking ultraviolet damage to skin keratinocytes and improving fibroblast recovery after X-ray treatments); (3) increases protein synthesis of collagen, elastin, metalloproteinases, anti-proteases, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, nerve growth factor, neutrotropins 3 and 4, and erythropoietin; (4) increases the proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes; nerve outgrowth, angiogenesis, and hair follicle size. GHK-Cu stimulates wound healing in numerous models and in humans. Controlled studies on aged skin demonstrated that it tightens skin, improves elasticity and firmness, reduces fine lines, wrinkles, photodamage and hyperpigmentation. GHK-Cu also improves hair transplant success, protects hepatic tissue from tetrachloromethane poisoning, blocks stomach ulcer development, and heals intestinal ulcers and bone tissue. These results are beginning to define the complex biochemical processes that regulate tissue remodeling. PMID:18644225

  15. A gene-centric study of common carotid artery remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Seamus C.; Zabaneh, Delilah; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Drenos, Fotios; Jones, Gregory T.; Shah, Sonia; Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Gigante, Bruna; Holewijn, Suzanne; De Graaf, Jacqueline; Vermeulen, Sita; Folkersen, Lasse; van Rij, Andre M.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Talmud, Philippa J.; Deanfield, John E.; Agu, Obi; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Bown, Matthew J.; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Giral, Philippe; Mannarino, Elmo; Silveira, Angela; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; de Borst, Gert J.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Faire, Ulf; Baas, Annette F.; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Fowkes, Gerry; Tzoulaki, Ionna; Price, Jacqueline F.; Tremoli, Elena; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Eriksson, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Expansive remodelling is the process of compensatory arterial enlargement in response to atherosclerotic stimuli. The genetic determinants of this process are poorly characterized. Methods Genetic association analyses of inter-adventitial common carotid artery diameter (ICCAD) in the IMPROVE study (n = 3427) using the Illumina 200k Metabochip was performed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that met array-wide significance were taken forward for analysis in three further studies (n = 5704), and tested for association with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). Results rs3768445 on Chromosome 1q24.3, in a cluster of protein coding genes (DNM3, PIGC, C1orf105) was associated with larger ICCAD in the IMPROVE study. For each copy of the rare allele carried, ICCAD was on average 0.13 mm greater (95% CI 0.08–0.18 mm, P = 8.2 × 10−8). A proxy SNP (rs4916251, R2 = 0.99) did not, however, show association with ICCAD in three follow-up studies (P for replication = 0.29). There was evidence of interaction between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and rs4916251 on ICCAD in two of the cohorts studies suggesting that it plays a role in the remodelling response to atherosclerosis. In meta-analysis of 5 case–control studies pooling data from 5007 cases and 43,630 controls, rs4916251 was associated with presence of AAA 1.10, 95% CI 1.03–1.17, p = 2.8 × 10−3, I2 = 18.8, Q = 0.30). A proxy SNP, rs4916251 was also associated with increased expression of PIGC in aortic tissue, suggesting that this may the mechanism by which this locus affects vascular remodelling. Conclusions Common variation at 1q24.3 is associated with expansive vascular remodelling and risk of AAA. These findings support a hypothesis that pathways involved in systemic vascular remodelling play a role in AAA development. PMID:23246012

  16. Central Role of Cellular Senescence in TSLP-Induced Airway Remodeling in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinxiang; Dong, Fangzheng; Wang, Rui-An; Wang, Junfei; Zhao, Jiping; Yang, Mengmeng; Gong, Wenbin; Cui, Rutao; Dong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Background Airway remodeling is a repair process that occurs after injury resulting in increased airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a vital cytokine, plays a critical role in orchestrating, perpetuating and amplifying the inflammatory response in asthma. TSLP is also a critical factor in airway remodeling in asthma. Objectives To examine the role of TSLP-induced cellular senescence in airway remodeling of asthma in vitro and in vivo. Methods Cellular senescence and airway remodeling were examined in lung specimens from patients with asthma using immunohischemical analysis. Both small molecule and shRNA approaches that target the senescent signaling pathways were used to explore the role of cellular senescence in TSLP-induced airway remodeling in vitro. Senescence-Associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) staining, and BrdU assays were used to detect cellular senescence. In addition, the Stat3-targeted inhibitor, WP1066, was evaluated in an asthma mouse model to determine if inhibiting cellular senescence influences airway remodeling in asthma. Results Activation of cellular senescence as evidenced by checkpoint activation and cell cycle arrest was detected in airway epithelia samples from patients with asthma. Furthermore, TSLP-induced cellular senescence was required for airway remodeling in vitro. In addition, a mouse asthma model indicates that inhibiting cellular senescence blocks airway remodeling and relieves airway resistance. Conclusion TSLP stimulation can induce cellular senescence during airway remodeling in asthma. Inhibiting the signaling pathways of cellular senescence overcomes TSLP-induced airway remodeling. PMID:24167583

  17. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells.

    PubMed

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Bou Dargham, Daria; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2016-02-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for the chromatin remodellers Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites are nevertheless bound by non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and marked by H3K4me3 and H3K27ac modifications. RNA polymerase II therefore navigates hundreds of base pairs of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3' end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis after remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers have either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs.

  18. Incidence and location of positive surgical margins following open, pure laparoscopic, and robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and its relation with neurovascular preservation: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Villamil, W; Billordo Peres, N; Martinez, P; Giudice, C; Liyo, J; García Marchiñena, P; Jurado, A; Damia, O

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate whether robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (dvRP) provides adequate local control of the disease, incidence of positive surgical margins (PSMs) obtained with dvRP was compared with that of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) and with that of open radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) performed in a single institution by the same surgeons. We also studied whether neurovascular bundle preservation modified PSM rates. The records were retrospectively reviewed from electronic medical data, and three groups of 100 patients were organized. Group 1 included 100 patients who underwent RRP prior to the incorporation of minimally invasive techniques. Group 2 included the first 100 patients who underwent LRP, and group 3 was made up of the first 100 patients who underwent dvRP. All surgical specimens were analyzed by the same pathologist. We used the technique described by Patel et al. for dvRP. LRP was performed using a five-trocar extraperitoneal approach as previously published by the authors. RRP was performed using retrograde dissection as described by Walsh et al. The final decision of preserving neurovascular bundles was made during surgery. Using D'Amico's risk classification, the dvRP group had a lower percentage of patients with low risk (dvRP versus LRP p = 0.017; dvRP versus RRP p = 0.0108). No statistically significant differences were found within high- and intermediate-risk groups. A higher percentage of patients with pT3 disease was found in the dvRP group compared with the RRP group (p = 0.0408). There were no statistically significant differences regarding PSMs among groups (RRP: 25, LRP: 14, dvRP: 18), although when we compared the total number of PSMs we found that the dvRP group had 18 PSMs versus 21 and 50 PSMs for LRP and RRP, respectively. All three groups had more PSMs located posterolaterally. There was a higher percentage of nerve-sparing procedures in the dvRP group (dvRP: 91 patients, LRP: 47 patients, RRP: 5

  19. Undoing Gender Through Legislation and Schooling: the Case of AB 537 and AB 394 IN California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-11-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools have an unconscious acceptance of heteronormativity and gendered norms, which undermines both the spirit and language of these laws. This paper examines how California schools can both change standard practices and realise the transformative social change that laws like AB 537 and AB 394 can instigate. I assert that the systemic implementation of these laws, through the adoption, enforcement and evaluation of existing AB 537 Task Force Recommendations, is necessary for their success. My second assertion is that AB 537 and AB 394 have the potential to change and reconstitute gender-based and heteronormative standards at school sites.

  20. Simulated bone remodeling around two types of osseointegrated implants for direct fixation of upper-leg prostheses.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, P K; Verdonschot, N; Bulstra, S K; Rietman, J S; Verkerke, G J

    2012-11-01

    Direct attachment of an upper leg prosthesis to the skeletal system by a percutaneous implant is an alternative solution to the traditional socket fixation. In this study, we investigated long-term periprosthetic bone changes around two types of fixation implants using two different initial conditions, namely immediate post-amputation implantation and the conventional implantation after considerable time of socket prosthesis use. We questioned the difference in bone modeling response the implants provoked and if it could lead to premature bone fracture. Generic CT-based finite element models of an intact femoral bone and amputated bone implanted with models of two existing direct-fixation implants, the OPRA system (Integrum AB) and the ISP Endo/Exo prosthesis (ESKA Implants AG) were created for this study. Adaptive bone-remodeling simulations used the heel-strike and toe-off loads from a normal walking cycle. The bone loss caused by prolonged use of socket prosthesis had more severe effects on the ultimate bone quality than adaptation induced by the direct-fixation implants. Both implants showed considerable bone remodeling; the titanium screw implant (OPRA system) provoked more bone loss than the porous coated CoCrMo stem (ISP implant). The chance of the peri-prosthetic bone fracture remained higher for the post-socket case as compared to the direct amputation cases. In conclusion, both direct-fixation implants lead to considerable bone loss and bone loss is more severe after a prolonged period of post-socket use. Hence, from a biomechanical perspective it is better to limit the post-socket time and to re-design direct fixation devices to reduce bone loss and the probability of peri-prosthetic bone fractures.

  1. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  2. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  3. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  4. Ab initio melting curve of osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakovsky, L.; Burakovsky, N.; Preston, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    The melting curve of osmium up to a pressure P of 500 GPa is obtained from an extensive suite of ab initio quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations using the Z method. The ab initio P =0 melting point of Os is 3370 ±75 K; this range encompasses all of the available data in the literature and corroborates the conclusion of J. W. Arblaster [Platinum Metals Rev. 49, 166 (2005)], 10.1595/147106705X70264 that the melting temperature of pure Os is 3400 ±50 K and that the 3300 K typically quoted in the literature is the melting point of impure Os. The T =0 equation of state (EOS) of Os and the P dependence of the optimized c /a ratio for the hexagonal unit cell, both to pressures ˜900 GPa, are obtained in the ab initio approach as validation of its use. Although excellent agreement with the available experimental data (P ≲80 GPa) is found, it is the third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS with B0'=5 rather than the more widely accepted B0'=4 that describes the QMD data to higher pressures, in agreement with the more recent experimental EOS by Godwal et al. The theoretical melting curve of Os obtained earlier by Joshi et al. is shown to be inconsistent with our QMD results, and the possible reason for this discrepancy is suggested. Regularities in the melting curves of Os and five other third-row transition metals (Ta, W, Re, Pt, Au) could be used to estimate the currently unknown melting curves of Hf and Ir.

  5. Ab-initio phasing in protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plas, J. L.; Millane, Rick P.

    2000-11-01

    The central problem in the determination of protein structures form x-ray diffraction dada (x-ray crystallography) corresponds to a phase retrieval problem with undersampled amplitude data. Algorithms for this problem that have an increased radius of convergence have the potential for reducing the amount of experimental work, and cost, involved in determining protein structures. We describe such an algorithm. Application of the algorithm to a simulated crystallographic problem shows that it converges to the correct solution, with no initial phase information, where currently used algorithms fail. The results lend support to the possibility of ab initio phasing in protein crystallography.

  6. Testing Distributed ABS System with Fault Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawczyński, Dawid; Sosnowski, Janusz; Gawkowski, Piotr

    The paper deals with the problem of adapting software implemented fault injection technique (SWIFI) to evaluate dependability of reactive microcontroller systems. We present an original methodology of disturbing controller operation and analyzing fault effects taking into account reactions of the controlled object and the impact of the system environment. Faults can be injected randomly (in space and time) or targeted at the most sensitive elements of the controller to check it at high stresses. This approach allows identifying rarely encountered problems, usually missed in classical approaches. The developed methodology has been used successfully to verify dependability of ABS system. Experimental results are commented in the paper.

  7. New challenges to medicare beneficiary access to mAbs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Precision binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to biological targets, their relative clinical success, and expansion of indications following initial approval, are distinctive clinical features. The relatively high cost of mAbs, together with the absence of a regulatory pathway to generics, stand out as distinctive economic features. Based on both literature review and primary data collection we enumerated mAb original approvals, supplemental indications and off-label uses, assessed payer formulary management of mAbs, and determined new challenges to Medicare beneficiary access to mAbs. We found that the FDA has approved 22 mAbs and 30 supplemental indications pertaining to the originally approved mAbs. In addition, there are 46 off-label use citations in officially recognized pharmaceutical compendia. Across Part B carriers and Part D plans, we found considerable variation in terms of coverage and conditions of reimbursement related to on- and off-label uses of mAbs. Our results point to four major challenges facing mAb developers, health care providers, Medicare beneficiaries, payers and policymakers. These include administrative price controls, coverage variation, projected shift from physician- to self-administered mAbs, and comparative effectiveness. We suggest more systematic use of “coverage with evidence development” as a means of optimally addressing these challenges. PMID:20046575

  8. Soft skills turned into hard facts: nucleosome remodelling at developmental switches.

    PubMed

    Chioda, M; Becker, P B

    2010-07-01

    Nucleosome remodelling factors are regulators of DNA accessibility in chromatin and lubricators of all major functions of eukaryotic genomes. Their action is transient and reversible, yet can be decisive for irreversible cell-fate decisions during development. In addition to the well-known local actions of nucleosome remodelling factors during transcription initiation, more global and fundamental roles for remodelling complexes in shaping the epigenome during development are emerging.

  9. Soft skills turned into hard facts: nucleosome remodelling at developmental switches.

    PubMed

    Chioda, M; Becker, P B

    2010-07-01

    Nucleosome remodelling factors are regulators of DNA accessibility in chromatin and lubricators of all major functions of eukaryotic genomes. Their action is transient and reversible, yet can be decisive for irreversible cell-fate decisions during development. In addition to the well-known local actions of nucleosome remodelling factors during transcription initiation, more global and fundamental roles for remodelling complexes in shaping the epigenome during development are emerging. PMID:20372184

  10. Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0: a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements with MATLAB(®) graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Vishnu B; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna; Saisan, Payam A

    2014-01-01

    We present a database client software-Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0 (NNE 1.0)-that uses MATLAB(®) based Graphical User Interface (GUI) for interaction with a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements from our previous publication (Tian et al., 2010). These data are of particular interest for modeling the hemodynamic response. NNE 1.0 is downloaded by the user and then runs either as a MATLAB script or as a standalone program on a Windows platform. The GUI allows browsing the database according to parameters specified by the user, simple manipulation and visualization of the retrieved records (such as averaging and peak-normalization), and export of the results. Further, we provide NNE 1.0 source code. With this source code, the user can database their own experimental results, given the appropriate data structure and naming conventions, and thus share their data in a user-friendly format with other investigators. NNE 1.0 provides an example of seamless and low-cost solution for sharing of experimental data by a regular size neuroscience laboratory and may serve as a general template, facilitating dissemination of biological results and accelerating data-driven modeling approaches.

  11. Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0: a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements with MATLAB(®) graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Vishnu B; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna; Saisan, Payam A

    2014-01-01

    We present a database client software-Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0 (NNE 1.0)-that uses MATLAB(®) based Graphical User Interface (GUI) for interaction with a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements from our previous publication (Tian et al., 2010). These data are of particular interest for modeling the hemodynamic response. NNE 1.0 is downloaded by the user and then runs either as a MATLAB script or as a standalone program on a Windows platform. The GUI allows browsing the database according to parameters specified by the user, simple manipulation and visualization of the retrieved records (such as averaging and peak-normalization), and export of the results. Further, we provide NNE 1.0 source code. With this source code, the user can database their own experimental results, given the appropriate data structure and naming conventions, and thus share their data in a user-friendly format with other investigators. NNE 1.0 provides an example of seamless and low-cost solution for sharing of experimental data by a regular size neuroscience laboratory and may serve as a general template, facilitating dissemination of biological results and accelerating data-driven modeling approaches. PMID:24904401

  12. Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0: a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements with MATLAB® graphical user interface

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Vishnu B.; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M.; Devor, Anna; Saisan, Payam A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a database client software—Neurovascular Network Explorer 1.0 (NNE 1.0)—that uses MATLAB® based Graphical User Interface (GUI) for interaction with a database of 2-photon single-vessel diameter measurements from our previous publication (Tian et al., 2010). These data are of particular interest for modeling the hemodynamic response. NNE 1.0 is downloaded by the user and then runs either as a MATLAB script or as a standalone program on a Windows platform. The GUI allows browsing the database according to parameters specified by the user, simple manipulation and visualization of the retrieved records (such as averaging and peak-normalization), and export of the results. Further, we provide NNE 1.0 source code. With this source code, the user can database their own experimental results, given the appropriate data structure and naming conventions, and thus share their data in a user-friendly format with other investigators. NNE 1.0 provides an example of seamless and low-cost solution for sharing of experimental data by a regular size neuroscience laboratory and may serve as a general template, facilitating dissemination of biological results and accelerating data-driven modeling approaches. PMID:24904401

  13. Synergy of endothelial and neural progenitor cells from adipose-derived stem cells to preserve neurovascular structures in rat hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Handayani, Fitri; Chiang, Yi-Lun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Ho, Chien-Jung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, Sheng-Che; Huang, Chao-Ching; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal cerebral hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury damages the architecture of neurovascular units (NVUs) and results in neurological disorders. Here, we differentiated adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) toward the progenitor of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and neural precursor cells (NPCs) via microenvironmental induction and investigated the protective effect by transplanting ASCs, EPCs, NPCs, or a combination of EPCs and NPCs (E+N) into neonatal HI injured rat pups. The E+N combination produced significant reduction in brain damage and cell apoptosis and the most comprehensive restoration in NVUs regarding neuron number, normal astrocytes, and vessel density. Improvements in cognitive and motor functions were also achieved in injured rats with E+N therapy. Synergistic interactions to facilitate transmigration under in vitro hypoxic microenvironment were discovered with involvement of the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) signal in EPCs and the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signals in NPCs. Therefore, ASCs exhibit great potential for cell sources in endothelial and neural lineages to prevent brain from HI damage. PMID:26447335

  14. Wnt/β-catenin coupled with HIF-1α/VEGF signaling pathways involved in galangin neurovascular unit protection from focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuanhong; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Chang; Wang, Wei; Wen, Limei; Gao, Kuo; Chen, Xiuping; Xiong, Sihuai; Zhao, Huihui; Li, Shaojing

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironmental regulation has become a promising strategy for complex disease treatment. The neurovascular unit (NVU), as the key structural basis to maintain an optimal brain microenvironment, has emerged as a new paradigm to understand the pathology of stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of galangin, a natural flavonoid isolated from the rhizome of Alpina officinarum Hance, on NVU microenvironment improvement and associated signal pathways in rats impaired by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Galangin ameliorated neurological scores, cerebral infarct volume and cerebral edema and reduced the concentration of Evans blue (EB) in brain tissue. NVU ultrastructural changes were also improved by galangin. RT-PCR and western blot revealed that galangin protected NVUs through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway coupled with HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF and β-catenin could be the key nodes of these two coupled pathways. In conclusion, Galangin might function as an anti-ischemic stroke drug by improving the microenvironment of NVUs. PMID:26537366

  15. Extracellular Ubiquitin: Role in Myocyte Apoptosis and Myocardial Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Stephanie L C; Amin, Parthiv; Singh, Mahipal; Singh, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB) is a highly conserved low molecular weight (8.5 kDa) protein. It consists of 76 amino acid residues and is found in all eukaryotic cells. The covalent linkage of UB to a variety of cellular proteins (ubiquitination) is one of the most common posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. This modification generally regulates protein turnover and protects the cells from damaged or misfolded proteins. The polyubiquitination of proteins serves as a signal for degradation via the 26S proteasome pathway. UB is present in trace amounts in body fluids. Elevated levels of UB are described in the serum or plasma of patients under a variety of conditions. Extracellular UB is proposed to have pleiotropic roles including regulation of immune response, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective activities. CXCR4 is identified as receptor for extracellular UB in hematopoietic cells. Heart failure represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western society. Cardiac remodeling is a determinant of the clinical course of heart failure. The components involved in myocardial remodeling include-myocytes, fibroblasts, interstitium, and coronary vasculature. Increased sympathetic nerve activity in the form of norepinephrine is a common feature during heart failure. Acting via β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR), norepinephrine is shown to induce myocyte apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. β-AR stimulation increases extracellular levels of UB in myocytes, and UB inhibits β-AR-stimulated increases in myocyte apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. This review summarizes intracellular and extracellular functions of UB with particular emphasis on the role of extracellular UB in cardiac myocyte apoptosis and myocardial remodeling. PMID:26756642

  16. [Effects of aldosterone receptor blocker therapy on cardiac remodeling].

    PubMed

    Boccanelli, A; Battagliese, A

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is a physiologic or pathologic condition that occurs after myocardial infarction, pressure overload, myocardial inflammatory diseases, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy or volume overload. In spite of different etiologies, molecular, biochemical and mechanical processes are the same. The change in left ventricular function brings about a complex neuro-hormonal disorder, and disease progression is due to the combined action of several biological factors with toxic effects on the heart and vessels. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is very important in this process, through the effects on hydro-saline balance or through direct processes on myocardium. A direct effect of aldosterone in myocardial fibrosis after the detection of heart tissue aldosterone production has been demonstrated. In the past, the attention of physicians and researchers was focused on angiotensin II inhibition; and therefore, on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, considering them sufficient to antagonize the effects of aldosterone. Nevertheless, this theory has been confuted in recent studies, with the evidence of elevated plasmatic aldosterone levels in patients treated with ACE-inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers. This phenomenon probably is due to the activation of secondary ACTH mediated pathways of trial aldosterone production. It has been demonstrated that aldosterone receptor inhibition is effective in reducing cardiac remodeling and mortality. AREA-IN CHF is the first multicentric, double blind, randomized, placebo control study to compare canrenone, an aldosterone receptor blocker, with placebo. The primary end point is the echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular remodeling. Secondary end points are left ventricular end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, diastolic filling patterns, NYHA functional class, and mortality and hospitalizations of cardiac origin. In addition, bio-humoral effects of aldosterone receptor blocker

  17. Determinants of cerebrovascular remodeling: Do large brain arteries accommodate stenosis?

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Goldman, James; Honig, Lawrence S; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Morgello, Susan; Marshall, Randolph S

    2014-01-01

    Objective It is hypothesized that outward remodeling in systemic arteries is a compensatory mechanism for lumen area preservation in the face of increasing arterial stenosis. Large brain arteries have also been studied, but it remains unproven if all assumptions about arterial remodeling can be replicated in the cerebral circulation. Methods The sample included 196 autopsied subjects with a mean age of 55 years; 63 % were men, and 74 % non-Hispanic whites. From each of 1,396 dissected cadaveric large arteries of the circle of Willis, the areas of the lumen, intima, media, and adventitia were measured. Internal elastic lamina (IEL) area was defined as the area encircled by this layer. Stenosis was calculated by dividing the plaque area by the IEL area and multiplying by 100. Results Plotting stenosis against lumen area or stratified by arterial size showed no preservation of the lumen in the setting of growing stenosis. We could not find an association between greater IEL proportion and stenosis (B=0.44, P=0.86). Stratifying arteries by their size, we found that smaller arteries have greater lumen reduction at any degree of stenosis (B=−23.65, P=<0.0001), and although larger arteries show a positive association between IEL proportion and stenosis, this was no longer significant after adjusting for covariates (B=6.0, P=0.13). Conclusions We cannot confirm the hypothesis that large brain arteries undergo outward remodeling as an adaptive response to increasing degrees of stenosis. We found that the lumen decreases proportionally to the degree of stenosis. PMID:24929285

  18. Monocyte interaction accelerates HCl-induced lung epithelial remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by overwhelming inflammatory responses and lung remodeling. We hypothesized that leukocyte infiltration during the inflammatory response modulates epithelial remodeling through a mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods Human lung epithelial cells were treated for 30 min with hydrochloric acid (HCl). Human monocytes were then cocultured with the epithelial cells for up to 48 h, in the presence or absence of blocking peptides against lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), or tyrphostin A9, a specific inhibitor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor tyrosine kinase. Results Exposure of lung epithelial cells to HCl resulted in increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and production of interleukin (IL)-8 at 24 h. The expression of the epithelial markers E-cadherin decreased while the mesenchymal markers vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) increased at 24 h and remained high at 48 h. The addition of monocytes augmented the profiles of lower expression of epithelial markers and higher mesenchymal markers accompanied by increased collagen deposition. This EMT profile was associated with an enhanced production of IL-8 and PDGF. Treatment of the lung epithelial cells with the LAF-1 blocking peptides CD11a237–246 or/and CD18112–122 suppressed monocyte adhesion, production of IL-8, PDGF and hydroxyproline as well as EMT markers. Treatment with tyrphostin A9 prevented the EMT profile shift induced by HCl stimulation. Conclusions The interaction between epithelial cells and monocytes enhanced epithelial remodelling after initial injury through EMT signalling that is associated with the release of soluble mediators, including IL-8 and PDGF. PMID:25108547

  19. Galectin-3 Participates in Cardiovascular Remodeling Associated With Obesity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; López-Ándres, Natalia; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rousseau, Elodie; Bartolomé, Mará Visitación; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Rossignol, Patrick; Islas, Fabian; Antequera, Alfonso; Prieto, Santiago; Luaces, María; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2015-11-01

    Remodeling, diastolic dysfunction, and arterial stiffness are some of the alterations through which obesity affects the cardiovascular system. Fibrosis and inflammation are important mechanisms underlying cardiovascular remodeling, although the precise promoters involved in these processes are still unclear. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) induces inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. We have investigated the potential role of Gal-3 in cardiac damage in morbidly obese patients, and we have evaluated the protective effect of the Gal-3 inhibition in the occurrence of cardiovascular fibrosis and inflammation in an experimental model of obesity. Morbid obesity is associated with alterations in cardiac remodeling, mainly left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Obesity and hypertension are the main determinants of left ventricular hypertrophy. Insulin resistance, left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating levels of C-reactive protein and Gal-3 are associated with a worsening of diastolic function in morbidly obese patients. Obesity upregulates Gal-3 production in the cardiovascular system in a normotensive animal model of diet-induced obesity by feeding for 6 weeks a high-fat diet (33.5% fat). Gal-3 inhibition with modified citrus pectin (100 mg/kg per day) reduced cardiovascular levels of Gal-3, total collagen, collagen I, transforming and connective growth factors, osteopontin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the heart and aorta of obese animals without changes in body weight or blood pressure. In morbidly obese patients, Gal-3 levels are associated with diastolic dysfunction. In obese animals, Gal-3 blockade decreases cardiovascular fibrosis and inflammation. These data suggest that Gal-3 could be a novel therapeutic target in cardiac fibrosis and inflammation associated with obesity.

  20. Reversibility of Adverse, Calcineurin-Dependent Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jeff M.; Le, Vien; Rotter, David; Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Grinsfelder, Bennett; Tannous, Paul; Burchfield, Jana S.; Czubryt, Michael; Backs, Johannes; Olson, Eric N.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies to dissect the role of calcineurin in pathological cardiac remodeling have relied heavily on murine models, where genetic gain- and loss-of-function manipulations are initiated at or before birth. However, the great majority of clinical cardiac pathology occurs in adults. Yet, nothing is known about the effects of calcineurin when its activation commences in adulthood. Further, despite the fact that ventricular hypertrophy is a well established risk factor for heart failure, the relative pace and progression of these two major phenotypic features of heart disease are unknown. Methods and Results We engineered mice harboring in cardiomyocytes a constitutively active calcineurin transgene driven by a tetracycline-responsive promoter element. Expression of the mutant calcineurin transgene was initiated for variable lengths of time to determine the natural history of disease pathogenesis, and to determine when, if ever, these events are reversible. Activation of the calcineurin transgene in adult mice triggered rapid and robust cardiac growth with features characteristic of pathological hypertrophy. Concentric hypertrophy preceded the development of systolic dysfunction, fetal gene activation, fibrosis, and clinical heart failure. Further, cardiac hypertrophy reversed spontaneously when calcineurin activity was turned off, and expression of fetal genes reverted to baseline. Fibrosis, a prominent feature of pathological cardiac remodeling, manifested partial reversibility. Conclusions Together, these data establish and define the deleterious effects of calcineurin signaling in adult heart and reveal that calcineurin-dependent hypertrophy with concentric geometry precedes systolic dysfunction and heart failure. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that during much of the disease process, calcineurin-dependent remodeling remains reversible. PMID:21700928

  1. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: age-related tissue-remodeling.

    PubMed

    Untergasser, Gerold; Madersbacher, Stephan; Berger, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Aging and androgens are the two established risk factors for the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE), which can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in elderly men. BPH, consisting of a nodular overgrowth of the epithelium and fibromuscular tissue within transition zone and periurethral areas, is first detectable around the fourth decade of life and affects nearly all men by the ninth decade. The pathogenesis of BPH is still largely unresolved, but multiple partially overlapping and complementary theories have been proposed, all of which seem to be operative at least to some extent. In addition to nerve-, endocrine- and immune system, local para- and luminocrine pleiotrope mechanisms/factors are implicated in the prostatic tissue-remodeling process. Prostate tissue-remodeling in the transition zone is characterized by: (i) hypertrophic basal cells, (ii) altered secretions of luminal cells leading to calcification, clogged ducts and inflammation, (iii) lymphocytic infiltration with production of proinflammatory cytokines, (iv) increased radical oxygen species (ROS) production that damages epithelial and stromal cells, (v) increased basic fibroblast (bFGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1) production leading to stromal proliferation, transdifferentiation and extracellular matrix production, (vi) altered autonomous innervation that decreases relaxation and leads to a high adrenergic tonus, (vii) and altered neuroendocine cell function and release of neuroendocrine peptides (NEP). This review summarizes the multifactorial nature of prostate tissue remodeling in elderly men with symptomatic BPH with a particular focus on changes of cell-cell interactions and cell functions in the human aging prostate.

  2. Systemic and Pulmonary Vascular Remodelling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; López-Sánchez, Marta; Escobar, Ignacio; Huertas, Daniel; Penín, Rosa; Molina-Molina, María; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is associated with subclinical systemic atherosclerosis and pulmonary vascular remodelling characterized by intimal hyperplasia and luminal narrowing. We aimed to determine differences in the intimal thickening of systemic and pulmonary arteries in COPD subjects and smokers. Secondary aims include comparisons with a non-smokers group; determining the clinical variables associated with systemic and pulmonary intimal thickening, and the correlations between systemic and pulmonary remodelling changes. Methods All consecutive subjects undergoing lung resection were included and divided into 3 groups: 1) COPD, 2) smokers, and 3) non-smokers. Sections of the 5th intercostal artery and muscular pulmonary arteries were measured by histo-morphometry. Four parameters of intimal thickening were evaluated: 1) percentage of intimal area (%IA), 2) percentage of luminal narrowing, 3) intimal thickness index, and 4) intima-to-media ratio. Results In the adjusted analysis, the systemic arteries of COPD subjects showed greater intimal thickening (%IA) than those of smokers (15.6±1.5% vs. 14.2±1.6%, p = 0.038). In the pulmonary arteries, significant differences were observed for %IA between the 2 groups (37.3±2.2% vs. 29.3±2.3%, p = 0.016). Among clinical factors, metabolic syndrome, gender and COPD status were associated with the systemic intimal thickening, while only COPD status was associated with pulmonary intimal thickening. A correlation between the %IA of the systemic and pulmonary arteries was observed (Spearman’s rho = 0.46, p = 0.008). Conclusions Greater intimal thickening in systemic and pulmonary arteries is observed in COPD patients than in smokers. There is a correlation between systemic and pulmonary vascular remodelling in the overall population. PMID:27046203

  3. Hypothyroidism and Its Rapid Correction Alter Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Itani, Tarek; Moubarak, Majed; Aftimos, Georges; Farès, Nassim

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of mild and overt thyroid disease include a vast array of pathological changes. As well, thyroid replacement therapy has been suggested for preserving cardiac function. However, the influence of thyroid hormones on cardiac remodeling has not been thoroughly investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of hypothyroidism and thyroid replacement therapy on cardiac alterations. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: a control (n = 10) group and a group treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) (n = 20) to induce hypothyroidism. Ten of the 20 rats in the PTU group were then treated with L-thyroxine to quickly re-establish euthyroidism. The serum levels of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL6) and pro-fibrotic transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), were significantly increased in hypothyroid rats; elevations in cardiac stress markers, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were also noted. The expressions of cardiac remodeling genes were induced in hypothyroid rats in parallel with the development of fibrosis, and a decline in cardiac function with chamber dilation was measured by echocardiography. Rapidly reversing the hypothyroidism and restoring the euthyroid state improved cardiac function with a decrease in the levels of cardiac remodeling markers. However, this change further increased the levels of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in the plasma and heart and led to myocardial cellular infiltration. In conclusion, we showed that hypothyroidism is related to cardiac function decline, fibrosis and inflammation; most importantly, the rapid correction of hypothyroidism led to cardiac injuries. Our results might offer new insights for the management of hypothyroidism-induced heart disease. PMID:25333636

  4. VEGF receptors mediate hypoxic remodeling of adult ovine carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Olayemi O; Bouthors, Vincent; Hubbell, Margaret C; Williams, James M; Pearce, William J

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that VEGF contributes to hypoxic remodeling of arterial smooth muscle, although hypoxia produces only transient increases in VEGF that return to normoxic levels despite sustained changes in arterial structure and function. To explore how VEGF might contribute to long-term hypoxic vascular remodeling, this study explores the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia produces sustained increases in smooth muscle VEGF receptor density that mediate long-term vascular effects of hypoxia. Carotid arteries from adult sheep maintained at sea level or altitude (3,820 m) for 110 days were harvested and denuded of endothelium. VEGF levels were similar in chronically hypoxic and normoxic arteries, as determined by immunoblotting. In contrast, VEGF receptor levels were significantly increased by 107% (VEGF-R1) and 156% (VEGF-R2) in hypoxic compared with normoxic arteries. In arteries that were organ cultured 24 h with 3 nM VEGF, VEGF replicated effects of hypoxia on abundances of smooth muscle α actin (SMαA), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and MLC20 and the effects of hypoxia on colocalization of MLC20 with SMαA, as measured via confocal microscopy. VEGF did not replicate the effects of chronic hypoxia on colocalization of MLCK with SMαA or MLCK with MLC20, suggesting that VEGF's role in hypoxic remodeling is highly protein specific, particularly for contractile protein organization. VEGF effects in organ culture were inhibited by VEGF receptor blockers vatalinib (240 nM) and dasatinib (6.3 nM). These findings support the hypothesis that long-term upregulation of VEGF receptors help mediate sustained effects of hypoxia on the abundance and colocalization of contractile proteins in arterial smooth muscle. PMID:25038104

  5. Maladaptive dendritic spine remodeling contributes to diabetic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Fischer, Tanya Z; Zhao, Peng; Persson, Anna-Karin; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-05-16

    Diabetic neuropathic pain imposes a huge burden on individuals and society, and represents a major public health problem. Despite aggressive efforts, diabetic neuropathic pain is generally refractory to available clinical treatments. A structure-function link between maladaptive dendritic spine plasticity and pain has been demonstrated previously in CNS and PNS injury models of neuropathic pain. Here, we reasoned that if dendritic spine remodeling contributes to diabetic neuropathic pain, then (1) the presence of malformed spines should coincide with the development of pain, and (2) disrupting maladaptive spine structure should reduce chronic pain. To determine whether dendritic spine remodeling contributes to neuropathic pain in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, we analyzed dendritic spine morphology and electrophysiological and behavioral signs of neuropathic pain. Our results show changes in dendritic spine shape, distribution, and shape on wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons within lamina IV-V of the dorsal horn in diabetes. These diabetes-induced changes were accompanied by WDR neuron hyperexcitability and decreased pain thresholds at 4 weeks. Treatment with NSC23766 (N(6)-[2-[[4-(diethylamino)-1-methylbutyl]amino]-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]-2-methyl-4,6-quinolinediamine trihydrochloride), a Rac1-specific inhibitor known to interfere with spine plasticity, decreased the presence of malformed spines in diabetes, attenuated neuronal hyperresponsiveness to peripheral stimuli, reduced spontaneous firing activity from WDR neurons, and improved nociceptive mechanical pain thresholds. At 1 week after STZ injection, animals with hyperglycemia with no evidence of pain had few or no changes in spine morphology. These results demonstrate that diabetes-induced maladaptive dendritic spine remodeling has a mechanistic role in neuropathic pain. Molecular pathways that control spine morphogenesis and plasticity may be promising future targets for treatment.

  6. Ab initio Study of HZnF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Léonard, C.; Chambaud, G.

    2009-11-01

    On the basis of highly correlated ab initio calculations, an accurate determination of the electronic structure and of the rovibrational spectroscopy has been performed for the electronic ground state of the HZnF system. Using effective core pseudopotentials for the Zn and F atoms and associated aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, we have calculated, at the multireference configuration interaction level including the Davidson correction, the three-dimensional potential energy surface of the X1Σ+ ground state. The rovibrational energy levels have been obtained variationally, and the results have been discussed and compared with existing experimental data on the ground state of the close system HZnCl, which exhibits a complicated vibration-rotation spectrum. Our analysis shows that the nature of the H-ZnF bond is quite similar to that of the H-ZnCl bond, according to their bond lengths, harmonic frequencies of the H-Zn stretching mode, and dissociation energies into H and ZnF/ZnCl. The ab initio study of the electronic ground and excited states of ZnH and ZnH+ are also presented using similar level of calculations. Characteristic constants are given for the first bounded electronic states correlating to the first two dissociation asymptotes of the neutral and ionic diatomics.

  7. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  8. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong; Frisch, Michael J.

    2014-12-07

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li{sub 3} molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  9. Ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi; Goings, Joshua J.; Frisch, Michael J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Many magnetic materials do not conform to the (anti-)ferromagnetic paradigm where all electronic spins are aligned to a global magnetization axis. Unfortunately, most electronic structure methods cannot describe such materials with noncollinear electron spin on account of formally requiring spin alignment. To overcome this limitation, it is necessary to generalize electronic structure methods and allow each electron spin to rotate freely. Here, we report the development of an ab initio time-dependent non-relativistic two-component spinor (TDN2C), which is a generalization of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations. Propagating the TDN2C equations in the time domain allows for the first-principles description of spin dynamics. A numerical tool based on the Hirshfeld partitioning scheme is developed to analyze the time-dependent spin magnetization. In this work, we also introduce the coupling between electron spin and a homogenous magnetic field into the TDN2C framework to simulate the response of the electronic spin degrees of freedom to an external magnetic field. This is illustrated for several model systems, including the spin-frustrated Li3 molecule. Exact agreement is found between numerical and analytic results for Larmor precession of hydrogen and lithium atoms. The TDN2C method paves the way for the ab initio description of molecular spin transport and spintronics in the time domain.

  10. Quantum phases of AB 2 fermionic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia-Correa, L. S.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-02-01

    A fermionic chain is a one-dimensional system with fermions that interact locally and can jump between sites in the lattice, in particular an AB n chain type, where A and B are sites that exhibit a difference in energy level of Δ and site B is repeated n-times, such that the unit cell has n +1 sites. A limit case of this model, called the ionic Hubbard model (n = 1), has been widely studied due to its interesting physics and applications. In this paper, we study the ground state of an AB 2 chain, which describes the material R 4[Pt 2(P 2O5H2)4X] · nH 2 O. Specifically, we consider a filling with two electrons per unit cell, and using the density matrix renormalization group method we found that the system exhibits the band insulator and Mott correlated insulator phases, as well as an intermediate phase between them. For couplings of Δ = 2,10 and 20, we estimate the critical points that separate these phases through the structure factor and the energy gap in the sector of charge and spin, finding that the position of the critical point rises as a function of Δ.

  11. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells

    PubMed Central

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Dargham, Daria Bou; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P.; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B. Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers1–3 target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank MNase-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are nevertheless chromatinized with non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac). RNA polymerase (pol) II therefore navigates hundreds of bp of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3′ end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis upon remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers play either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs. PMID:26814966

  12. Integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model of human proximal femur behavior.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Lespessailles, Eric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model allowing for the combined simulation of (i) simulation of a human proximal femur remodeling under a given boundary conditions, (ii) followed by the simulation of its fracture behavior (force-displacement curve and fracture pattern) under quasi-static load. The combination of remodeling and fracture simulation into one unified model consists in considering that the femur properties resulting from the remodeling simulation correspond to the initial state for the fracture prediction. The remodeling model is based on phenomenological one based on a coupled strain and fatigue damage stimulus. The fracture model is based on continuum damage mechanics in order to predict the progressive fracturing process which allows to predict the fracture pattern and the complete force-displacement curve under quasi-static load. To prevent mesh-dependence that generally affects the damage propagation rate, regularization technique was applied in the current work. To investigate the potential of the proposed unified remodeling-to-fracture model, we performed remodeling simulations on a 3D proximal femur model for a duration of 365 days under five different daily loading conditions followed by a side fall fracture simulation reproducing previously published experimental tests (de Bakker et al. (2009), case C, male, 72 years old). We show here that the implementation of an integrated remodeling-to-fracture model provides more realistic prediction strategy to assess the bone remodeling effects on the fracture risk of bone.

  13. Airway and lung remodelling in chronic pulmonary obstructive disease: a role for muscarinic receptor antagonists?

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lung tissue remodelling in chronic inflammatory lung diseases has long been regarded as a follow-up event to inflammation. Recent studies have indicated that, although airway and lung tissue remodelling is often independent of inflammation, it precedes or causes inflammation. None of the available therapies has a significant effect on airway and lung tissue remodelling in asthma, bronchiectasis, fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The goal of stopping or reversing lung tissue remodelling is difficult, as the term summarizes the net effect of independent events, including (1) cell proliferation, (2) cell volume increase, (3) cell migration, (4) modified deposition and metabolism of specific extracellular matrix components, and (5) local action of infiltrated inflammatory cells. The extracellular matrix of the lung has a very high turnover, and thus small changes may accumulate to significant structural pathologies, which seem to be irreversible. The most important question is 'why are pathological changes of the lung structure irreversible and resistant to drugs?' Many drugs have the potential to reduce remodelling mechanisms in vitro but fail in clinical trials. New evidence suggests that muscarinic receptor inhibitors have the potential to improve lung function through modifying tissue remodelling. However, the role of muscarinic receptors in lung remodelling, especially their supportive role for other remodelling driving factors, needs to be further investigated. The focus of this review is the role of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue remodelling as it has been reported in the human lung.

  14. Biosorption of Acid Blue 290 (AB 290) and Acid Blue 324 (AB 324) dyes on Spirogyra rhizopus.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ayla; Akkaya, Gönül; Turabik, Meral

    2006-07-31

    In this study, the biosorption of Acid Blue 290 and Acid Blue 324 on Spirogyra rhizopus, a green algae growing on fresh water, was studied with respect to initial pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and biosorbent concentration. The optimum initial pH and temperature values for AB 290 and AB 324 biosorption were found to be 2.0, 30 degrees C and 3.0, 25 degrees C, respectively. It was observed that the adsorbed AB 290 and AB 324 amounts increased with increasing the initial dye concentration up to 1500 and 750 mg/L, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were applied to the experimental equilibrium data and the isotherm constants were determined by using Polymath 4.1 software. The monolayer coverage capacities of S. rhizopus for AB 290 and AB 324 dyes were found as 1356.6 mg/g and 367.0 mg/g, respectively. The intraparticle diffusion model and the pseudo-second order kinetic model were applied to the experimental data in order to describe the removal mechanism of these acidic dyes by S. rhizopus. The pseudo-second order kinetic model described very well the biosorption kinetics of AB 290 and AB 324 dyes. Thermodynamic studies showed that the biosorption of AB 290 and AB 324 on S. rhizopus was exothermic in nature.

  15. Functional Insights into Chromatin Remodelling from Studies on CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome characterised by a unique combination of multiple organ anomalies. Dominant loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7), which is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller, have been identified as the cause of CHARGE syndrome. Here, we review recent work aimed at understanding the mechanism of CHD7 function in normal and pathological states, highlighting results from biochemical and in vivo studies. The emerging picture from this work suggests that the mechanisms by which CHD7 fine-tunes gene expression are context specific, consistent with the pleiotropic nature of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26411921

  16. Expression of RANKL/OPG during bone remodeling in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Mine, T.; Ogasa, H.; Taguchi, T.; Liang, C.T.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study to determine the relationship between osteogenic differentiation and RANKL/OPG expression during bone remodeling in vivo. {yields} The OPG expression peak occurred during the bone formation phase, whereas the marked elevation of RANKL expression was observed during the bone resorption phase. {yields} Histological analysis showed that RANKL/OPG immunoreactivity was predominantly associated with bone marrow cells in the marrow cavity. {yields} The present study confirmed that RANKL/OPG are key factors linking bone formation to resorption during the bone remodeling process. -- Abstract: The interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a dominant role in osteoclastogenesis. As both proteins are produced by osteoblast lineage cells, they are considered to represent a key link between bone formation and resorption. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL and OPG during bone remodeling in vivo to determine the relationship between osteoclastogenic stimulation and osteoblastic differentiation. Total RNA was prepared from rat femurs after marrow ablation on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. The temporal activation patterns of osteoblast-related genes (procollagen {alpha}1 (I), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) were examined by Northern blot analysis. An appreciable increase in the expression of these osteoblast markers was observed on day 3. The peak increase in gene expression was observed on day 6 followed by a slight reduction by day 9. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the OPG mRNA expression was markedly upregulated on day 6 and slightly decreased on day 9. In contrast, RANKL mRNA expression was increased by more than 20-fold on day 9. The RANKL/OPG ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulation, peaked on day 9. Histological analysis showed that RANKL and OPG immunoreactivity were predominantly associated with bone marrow cells. The

  17. Optimization of a Cemented Femoral Prosthesis Considering Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Corso, Leandro Luis; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Schnaid, Fernando; Zanrosso, Crisley Dossin; Marczak, Rogério José

    2016-01-01

    The study presents a numerical methodology for minimizing the bone loss in human femur submitted to total hip replacement (THR) procedure with focus on cemented femoral stem. Three-dimensional computational models were used to describe the femoral bone behavior. An optimization procedure using the genetic algorithm (GA) method was applied in order to minimize the bone loss, considering the geometry and the material of the prosthesis as well as the design of the stem. Internal and external bone remodeling were analyzed numerically. The numerical method proposed here showed that the bone mass loss could be reduced by 24%, changing the design parameters. PMID:26540616

  18. Mechanoelectrical remodeling and arrhythmias during progression of hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongwei; Chemaly, Elie R.; Lee, Ahyoung; Kho, Changwon; Hadri, Lahouaria; Hajjar, Roger J.; Akar, Fadi G.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a clear association between left ventricular (LV) mechanical dysfunction in end-stage heart failure and the incidence of arrhythmias, the majority of sudden cardiac deaths occur at earlier stages of disease development. The mechanisms by which structural, mechanical, and molecular alterations predispose to arrhythmias at the tissue level before the onset of LV dysfunction remain unclear. In a rat model of pressure overload hypertrophy (PoH) produced by ascending aortic banding, we correlated mechanical and structural changes measured in vivo with key electrophysiological changes measured ex vivo in the same animals. We found that action potential prolongation, a hallmark of electrical remodeling at the tissue level, is highly correlated with changes in LV wall thickness but not mechanical function. In contrast, conduction delays are not predicted by either mechanical or structural changes during disease development. Moreover, disrupted Cx43 phosphorylation at intermediate (increased) and late (decreased) stages of PoH are associated with moderate and severe conduction delays, respectively. Interestingly, the level of interaction between Cx43 and the cytoskeletal protein ZO-1 is exclusively decreased at the late stage of PoH. Closely coupled action potentials consistent with afterdepolarization-mediated triggered beats were readily observed in 6 of 15 PoH hearts but never in controls. Similarly, PoH (8/15) but not control hearts exhibited sustained episodes of ventricular tachycardia after rapid stimulation. The initiation and early maintenance of arrhythmias in PoH were formed by rapid and highly uniform activation wavefronts emanating from sites distal to the former site of stimulation. In conclusion, repolarization but not conduction delays are predicted by structural remodeling in PoH. Cx43 phosphorylation is disrupted at intermediate (increased) and late (decreased) stages, which are associated with conduction delays. Dephosphorylation of Cx43 is

  19. Stochastic lattice model for bone remodeling and aging.

    PubMed

    Weinkamer, Richard; Hartmann, Markus A; Brechet, Yves; Fratzl, Peter

    2004-11-26

    We investigate the remodeling process of trabecular bone inside a human vertebral body using a stochastic lattice model, in which the ability of living bone to adapt to mechanical stimuli is incorporated. Our simulations show the emergence of a networklike structure similar to real trabecular bone. With time, the bone volume fraction reaches a steady state. The microstructure, however, coarsens with a typical length in the system following a power law. The simulation results suggest that a coarsening of the trabecular structure should occur as a natural aging phenomenon, not related to disease.

  20. Functional Insights into Chromatin Remodelling from Studies on CHARGE Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basson, M Albert; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2015-10-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome characterised by a unique combination of multiple organ anomalies. Dominant loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7), which is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller, have been identified as the cause of CHARGE syndrome. Here, we review recent work aimed at understanding the mechanism of CHD7 function in normal and pathological states, highlighting results from biochemical and in vivo studies. The emerging picture from this work suggests that the mechanisms by which CHD7 fine-tunes gene expression are context specific, consistent with the pleiotropic nature of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26411921

  1. Altered thermogenesis and impaired bone remodeling in Misty mice.

    PubMed

    Motyl, Katherine J; Bishop, Kathleen A; DeMambro, Victoria E; Bornstein, Sheila A; Le, Phuong; Kawai, Masanobu; Lotinun, Sutada; Horowitz, Mark C; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L; Rosen, Clifford J

    2013-09-01

    Fat mass may be modulated by the number of brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue (WAT) in humans and rodents. Bone remodeling is dependent on systemic energy metabolism and, with age, bone remodeling becomes uncoupled and brown adipose tissue (BAT) function declines. To test the interaction between BAT and bone, we employed Misty (m/m) mice, which were reported be deficient in BAT. We found that Misty mice have accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and impaired brown fat function (including reduced temperature, lower expression of Pgc1a, and less sympathetic innervation compared to wild-type (+/ +)). Despite reduced BAT function, Misty mice had normal core body temperature, suggesting heat is produced from other sources. Indeed, upon acute cold exposure (4°C for 6 hours), inguinal WAT from Misty mice compensated for BAT dysfunction by increasing expression of Acadl, Pgc1a, Dio2, and other thermogenic genes. Interestingly, acute cold exposure also decreased Runx2 and increased Rankl expression in Misty bone, but only Runx2 was decreased in wild-type. Browning of WAT is under the control of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and, if present at room temperature, could impact bone metabolism. To test whether SNS activity could be responsible for accelerated trabecular bone loss, we treated wild-type and Misty mice with the β-blocker, propranolol. As predicted, propranolol slowed trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) loss in the distal femur of Misty mice without affecting wild-type. Finally, the Misty mutation (a truncation of DOCK7) also has a significant cell-autonomous role. We found DOCK7 expression in whole bone and osteoblasts. Primary osteoblast differentiation from Misty calvaria was impaired, demonstrating a novel role for DOCK7 in bone remodeling. Despite the multifaceted effects of the Misty mutation, we have shown that impaired brown fat function leads to altered SNS activity and bone loss, and for the first time that cold

  2. Development of Bone Remodeling Model for Spaceflight Bone Physiology Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Werner, Christopher R.; Lewandowski, Beth; Thompson, Bill; Sibonga, Jean; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight exercise countermeasures do not eliminate bone loss. Astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1-2% a month (Lang et al. 2004, Buckey 2006, LeBlanc et al. 2007). This may lead to early onset osteoporosis and place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. NASA seeks to improve understanding of the mechanisms of bone remodeling and demineralization in 1g in order to appropriately quantify long term risks to astronauts and improve countermeasures. NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA's bone discipline to develop a validated computational model to augment research efforts aimed at achieving this goal.

  3. Hierarchical Structure and Repair of Bone: Deformation, Remodelling, Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratzl, Peter; Weinkamer, Richard

    The design of natural materials follows a radically different paradigm as compared to engineering materials: organs are growing rather than being fabricated. As a main consequence, adaptation to changing conditions remains possible during the whole lifetime of a biological material. As a typical example of such a biological material, bone is constantly laid down by bone forming cells, osteoblasts, and removed by bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts. With this remodelling cycle of bone resorption and formation, the skeleton is able to adapt to changing needs at all levels of structural hierarchy. The hierarchical structure of bone is summarized in the second part of this chapter.

  4. Structure, Biological Functions and Applications of the AB5 Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Beddoe, Travis; Paton, Adrienne W.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Rossjohn, Jamie; Paton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    AB5 toxins are important virulence factors for several major bacterial pathogens, including Bordetella pertussis, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella dysenteriae and at least two distinct pathotypes of Escherichia coli. The AB5 toxins are so termed because they comprise a catalytic A-subunit, which is responsible for disruption of essential host functions, and a pentameric B-subunit that binds to specific glycan receptors on the target cell surface. The molecular mechanisms by which these AB5 toxins cause disease have been largely unraveled, including recent insights into a novel AB5 toxin family, subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB). Furthermore, AB5 toxins have become a valuable tool for studying fundamental cellular functions, and are now being investigated for potential applications in the clinical treatment of human diseases. PMID:20202851

  5. Remodeling the host environment: modulation of the gastric epithelium by the Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ik-Jung; Blanke, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Virulence mechanisms underlying Helicobacter pylori persistence and disease remain poorly understood, in part, because the factors underlying disease risk are multifactorial and complex. Among the bacterial factors that contribute to the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections, the vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is one of the most important. Analogous to a number of H. pylori genes, the vacA gene exhibits allelic mosaicism, and human epidemiological studies have revealed that several families of toxin alleles are predictive of more severe disease. Animal model studies suggest that VacA may contribute to pathogenesis in several ways. VacA functions as an intracellular-acting protein exotoxin. However, VacA does not fit the current prototype of AB intracellular-acting bacterial toxins, which elaborate modulatory effects through the action of an enzymatic domain translocated inside host cells. Rather, VacA may represent an alternative prototype for AB intracellular acting toxins that modulate cellular homeostasis by forming ion-conducting intracellular membrane channels. Although VacA seems to form channels in several different membranes, one of the most important target sites is the mitochondrial inner membrane. VacA apparently take advantage of an unusual intracellular trafficking pathway to mitochondria, where the toxin is imported and depolarizes the inner membrane to disrupt mitochondrial dynamics and cellular energy homeostasis as a mechanism for engaging the apoptotic machinery within host cells. VacA remodeling of the gastric environment appears to be fine-tuned through the action of the Type IV effector protein CagA which, in part, limits the cytotoxic effects of VacA in cells colonized by H. pylori. PMID:22919629

  6. Anti-GD2 mAbs and next-generation mAb-based agents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Horta, Zulmarie Perez; Goldberg, Jacob L; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated efficacy in the clinic, becoming an important approach for cancer immunotherapy. Due to its limited expression on normal tissue, the GD2 disialogangloside expressed on neuroblastoma cells is an excellent candidate for mAb therapy. In 2015, dinutuximab (an anti-GD2 mAb) was approved by the US FDA and is currently used in a combination immunotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Here, we review the extensive preclinical and clinical development of anti-GD2 mAbs and the different mechanisms by which they mediate tumor cell killing. In addition, we discuss different mAb-based strategies that capitalize on the targeting ability of anti-GD2 mAbs to potentially deliver, as monotherapy, or in combination with other treatments, improved antitumor efficacy.

  7. Signalling from dead cells drives inflammation and vessel remodelling.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin; Yu, Haixiang; Clarke, Murray

    2012-01-01

    Death of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has been demonstrated in vessel development and in disease, most notably in atherosclerosis, but also after injury and remodelling. VSMC death promotes multiple features of vulnerable plaques, but also induces features of normal vessel ageing and cystic medial necrosis, including loss of VSMCs, elastin fragmentation and loss, increased glycosaminoglycans and speckled calcification. VSMC apoptosis in the absence of efficient phagocytosis also produces inflammation due to secondary necrosis; in contrast, VSMC apoptosis in normal vessels can be silent. We have investigated the consequences of VSMC apoptosis in both disease and during vessel remodelling. We find that VSMCs release specific cytokines dependent upon the mode of cell death; IL-1β predominates during apoptosis, whilst IL-1α predominates during necrosis. Both IL-1α and β promote release of further cytokines from adjacent live cells, in particular IL-6 and MCP-1. The balance of cytokines results in pathology with differing compositions, including inflammation or neointima formation/vascular repair, via direct promotion of VSMC proliferation and migration. Thus, VSMC death can promote either pathology or repair, depending upon the context and cytokine signalling.

  8. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M. Florencia; Wine, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:27406567

  9. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  10. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  11. Antenatal Hypoxia and Pulmonary Vascular Function and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G.; Blood, Arlin B.; Kim, Joon H.; Wilson, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression. PMID:24063380

  12. Vascular Remodelling and Mesenchymal Transition in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Tombetti, Enrico; Maugeri, Norma; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis of the skin and of internal organs, autoimmunity, and vascular inflammation are hallmarks of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). The injury and activation of endothelial cells, with hyperplasia of the intima and eventual obliteration of the vascular lumen, are early features of SSc. Reduced capillary blood flow coupled with deficient angiogenesis leads to chronic hypoxia and tissue ischemia, enforcing a positive feed-forward loop sustaining vascular remodelling, further exacerbated by extracellular matrix accumulation due to fibrosis. Despite numerous developments and a growing number of controlled clinical trials no treatment has been shown so far to alter SSc natural history, outlining the need of further investigation in the molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We review some processes potentially involved in SSc vasculopathy, with attention to the possible effect of sustained vascular inflammation on the plasticity of vascular cells. Specifically we focus on mesenchymal transition, a key phenomenon in the cardiac and vascular development as well as in the remodelling of injured vessels. Recent work supports the role of transforming growth factor-beta, Wnt, and Notch signaling in these processes. Importantly, endothelial-mesenchymal transition may be reversible, possibly offering novel cues for treatment. PMID:27069480

  13. Antenatal hypoxia and pulmonary vascular function and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Blood, Arlin B; Kim, Joon H; Wilson, Sean M

    2013-09-01

    This review provides evidence that antenatal hypoxia, which represents a significant and worldwide problem, causes prenatal programming of the lung. A general overview of lung development is provided along with some background regarding transcriptional and signaling systems of the lung. The review illustrates that antenatal hypoxic stress can induce a continuum of responses depending on the species examined. Fetuses and newborns of certain species and specific human populations are well acclimated to antenatal hypoxia. However, antenatal hypoxia causes pulmonary vascular disease in fetuses and newborns of most mammalian species and humans. Disease can range from mild pulmonary hypertension, to severe vascular remodeling and dangerous elevations in pressure. The timing, length, and magnitude of the intrauterine hypoxic stress are important to disease development, however there is also a genetic-environmental relationship that is not yet completely understood. Determining the origins of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension and their associated effects is a challenging task, but is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for pulmonary hypertension in the newborn due to antenatal hypoxia that can both treat the symptoms and curtail or reverse disease progression.

  14. Mechanisms of bone remodeling: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Anne M; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2002-01-01

    The adult skeleton undergoes continuous remodeling. The remodeling cycle involves the interaction of cells of osteoblastic and osteoclastic lineage and is regulated by both systemic hormones and local factors. In addition to the systemic calcium-regulating hormones, parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D and calcitonin, sex hormones play an important role. Estrogen has been identified as the major inhibitor of bone resorption in both men and women. Androgen is important not only as a source of estrogen, through the action of aromatase, but also for its direct effect in stimulating bone formation. The effects of sex hormones may be mediated by their ability to alter the secretion of local cytokines, prostaglandins and growth factors. Sex hormone action is also modulated by the level of sex hormone-binding globulin in the circulation. A more precise analysis of these effects has been made possible by the development of new methods of measuring not only bone mineral density, but also relative rates of bone formation and resorption using biochemical markers. These new approaches have allowed us to define more precisely the specific roles of androgens, estrogens and other regulatory hormones in human skeletal physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:11829079

  15. Circadian Epigenomic Remodeling and Hepatic Lipogenesis: Lessons from HDAC3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Everett, Logan J.; Bugge, Anne; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have evolved to anticipate metabolic needs across the 24-hour light/dark cycle. This is accomplished by circadian expression of metabolic genes orchestrated by transcription factors through chromatin remodeling and histone modifications. Our recent genome-wide study on histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in mouse liver provides novel insights into the molecular link between circadian rhythm and hepatic de novo lipogenesis. We found that liver-specific knockout of HDAC3 in adult mouse display severe hepatic steatosis associated with enhanced de novo lipogenesis and increased expression of lipogenic genes. Genome-wide analysis (ChIP-seq) revealed a pronounced circadian pattern of HDAC3 occupancy on genes involved in lipid metabolism, which is inversely related to histone acetylation and RNA polymerase II recruitment at these sites. The cistromes of HDAC3 and its binding partner, nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR), significantly overlap with that of Rev-erbα, a nuclear receptor directly involved in the core circadian machinery. Knockout of Rev-erbα in mouse also leads to hepatic steatosis and enhanced de novo lipogenesis. Collectively, these data suggest that the circadian epigenomic remodeling controlled by HDAC3, and largely directed by Rev-erbα, is essential for homeostasis of the lipogenic process in liver. PMID:21900149

  16. Early remodeling of the neocortex upon episodic memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Bero, Adam W; Meng, Jia; Cho, Sukhee; Shen, Abra H; Canter, Rebecca G; Ericsson, Maria; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2014-08-12

    Understanding the mechanisms by which long-term memories are formed and stored in the brain represents a central aim of neuroscience. Prevailing theory suggests that long-term memory encoding involves early plasticity within hippocampal circuits, whereas reorganization of the neocortex is thought to occur weeks to months later to subserve remote memory storage. Here we report that long-term memory encoding can elicit early transcriptional, structural, and functional remodeling of the neocortex. Parallel studies using genome-wide RNA sequencing, ultrastructural imaging, and whole-cell recording in wild-type mice suggest that contextual fear conditioning initiates a transcriptional program in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that is accompanied by rapid expansion of the synaptic active zone and postsynaptic density, enhanced dendritic spine plasticity, and increased synaptic efficacy. To address the real-time contribution of the mPFC to long-term memory encoding, we performed temporally precise optogenetic inhibition of excitatory mPFC neurons during contextual fear conditioning. Using this approach, we found that real-time inhibition of the mPFC inhibited activation of the entorhinal-hippocampal circuit and impaired the formation of long-term associative memory. These findings suggest that encoding of long-term episodic memory is associated with early remodeling of neocortical circuits, identify the prefrontal cortex as a critical regulator of encoding-induced hippocampal activation and long-term memory formation, and have important implications for understanding memory processing in healthy and diseased brain states.

  17. Pay attention to cardiac remodeling in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yawen; Chen, Han; Li, Xiaoqing; Sun, Yuping

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex and multifaceted disease state characterized by fatigue, weakness, and loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Recently, the profound negative effects of cancer cachexia on cardiac tissue draw much attention, which is likely to contribute to mortality in tumor-bearing animals. The mechanism of cardiac remodeling is not so clear and involved with a series of molecular alterations. In cancer cachexia model, progressive loss of left ventricular mass and decrease in myocardial function is observed and cardiac autonomic functions are altered. Levels of several emerging cardiovascular neurohormones are found elevating in patients with cancer, but it is still controversial whether the changes could reflect the heart injury accurately. The remedy for cardiac remodeling has been explored. It is showed that exercise can modulate signaling pathways activated by wasting cytokines and impact on the resulting outcomes on heart adaptation. Some drugs, such as bisoprolol, spironolactone, perindopril, tandospirone, and simvastatin, can mitigate adverse effects of the tumor on the heart and prolong survival. PMID:27108265

  18. Fibroblast cytoskeletal remodeling contributes to connective tissue tension.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M; Bouffard, Nicole A; Fox, James R; Palmer, Bradley M; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C; Barnes, William D; Badger, Gary J; Howe, Alan K

    2011-05-01

    The visco-elastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the visco-elastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast's processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the visco-elastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular, and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue.

  19. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L; Merkle, Hans P; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106-212 μm), medium (212-300 μm), and large pore diameter ranges (300-425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter, all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced, and bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  20. Danger Control Programs Cause Tissue Injury and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Jan H.; Haegele, Holger; Müller, Susanna; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Are there common pathways underlying the broad spectrum of tissue pathologies that develop upon injuries and from subsequent tissue remodeling? Here, we explain the pathophysiological impact of a set of evolutionary conserved danger control programs for tissue pathology. These programs date back to the survival benefits of the first multicellular organisms upon traumatic injuries by launching a series of danger control responses, i.e., 1. Haemostasis, or clotting to control bleeding; 2. Host defense, to control pathogen entry and spreading; 3. Re-epithelialisation, to recover barrier functions; and 4. Mesenchymal, to repair to regain tissue stability. Taking kidney pathology as an example, we discuss how clotting, inflammation, epithelial healing, and fibrosis/sclerosis determine the spectrum of kidney pathology, especially when they are insufficiently activated or present in an overshooting and deregulated manner. Understanding the evolutionary benefits of these response programs may refine the search for novel therapeutic targets to limit organ dysfunction in acute injuries and in progressive chronic tissue remodeling. PMID:23759985

  1. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Jean-Claude; Leroux, Christelle; Dardelle, Flavien; Lehner, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed. PMID:27137369

  2. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  3. Energy Excess, Glucose Utilization, and Skeletal Remodeling: New Insights.

    PubMed

    Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Rosen, Clifford J

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal complications have recently been recognized as another of the several comorbidities associated with diabetes. Clinical studies suggest that disordered glucose and lipid metabolism have a profound effect on bone. Diabetes-related changes in skeletal homeostasis result in a significant increased risk of fractures, although the pathophysiology may differ from postmenopausal osteoporosis. Efforts to understand the underlying mechanisms of diabetic bone disease have focused on the direct interaction of adipose tissue with skeletal remodeling and the potential influence of glucose utilization and energy uptake on these processes. One aspect that has emerged recently is the major role of the central nervous system in whole-body metabolism, bone turnover, adipose tissue remodeling, and beta cell secretion of insulin. Importantly, the skeleton contributes to the metabolic balance inherent in physiologic states. New animal models have provided the insights necessary to begin to dissect the effects of obesity and insulin resistance on the acquisition and maintenance of bone mass. In this Perspective, we focus on potential mechanisms that underlie the complex interactions between adipose tissue and skeletal turnover by focusing on the clinical evidence and on preclinical studies indicating that glucose intolerance may have a significant impact on the skeleton. In addition, we raise fundamental questions that need to be addressed in future studies to resolve the conundrum associated with glucose intolerance, obesity, and osteoporosis.

  4. Evidence of structural remodeling in the dyssynchronous failing heart.

    PubMed

    Helm, Patrick A; Younes, Laurent; Beg, Mirza F; Ennis, Daniel B; Leclercq, Christophe; Faris, Owen P; McVeigh, Elliot; Kass, David; Miller, Michael I; Winslow, Raimond L

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular remodeling of both geometry and fiber structure is a prominent feature of several cardiac pathologies. Advances in MRI and analytical methods now make it possible to measure changes of cardiac geometry, fiber, and sheet orientation at high spatial resolution. In this report, we use diffusion tensor imaging to measure the geometry, fiber, and sheet architecture of eight normal and five dyssynchronous failing canine hearts, which were explanted and fixed in an unloaded state. We apply novel computational methods to identify statistically significant changes of cardiac anatomic structure in the failing and control heart populations. The results demonstrate significant regional differences in geometric remodeling in the dyssynchronous failing heart versus control. Ventricular chamber dilatation and reduction in wall thickness in septal and some posterior and anterior regions are observed. Primary fiber orientation showed no significant change. However, this result coupled with the local wall thinning in the septum implies an altered transmural fiber gradient. Further, we observe that orientation of laminar sheets become more vertical in the early-activated septum, with no significant change of sheet orientation in the late-activated lateral wall. Measured changes in both fiber gradient and sheet structure will affect both the heterogeneity of passive myocardial properties as well as electrical activation of the ventricles.

  5. FIBROBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REMODELING CONTRIBUTES TO CONNECTIVE TISSUE TENSION

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M.; Bouffard, Nicole A.; Fox, James R.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C.; Barnes, William D.; Badger, Gary J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the viscoelastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast’s processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the viscoelastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue. PMID:20945345

  6. Remodeling patterns of occipital growth: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kranioti, Elena F; Rosas, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; Estalrrich, Almudena; Bastir, Markus; Peña-Melián, Angel

    2009-11-01

    Occipital growth depends on coordinated deposition and resorption on the external and internal surface and includes interrelated processes of movement: cortical drift, displacement, and relocation. The current work aspires to map patterns of remodeling activity on the endocranial surface of the occipital bone from childhood to adulthood using a larger study sample compared with previous studies. The study sample consists of 5 adult and 10 immature (2(1/4) to 8 years old) occipital bones from skeletal remains from the eighteenth and nineteenth century. Preparation of the samples includes the elaboration of negative impressions, positive replicas coated with gold, and observed with the reflected light microscope. Cerebellar fossae are typically resorptive in both immature and adult specimens. Cerebral fossae, on the other hand, exhibit a resorptive surface in early childhood and turn into depository around the age of 7 years, which places this transition within the age interval of the completion of cerebral development. Depository fields are also observed in adult cerebral fossae. The remodeling map presented here is consistent with the results of Mowbray (Anat Rec B New Anat 2005;283B:14-22) and differs from cellular patterns described by Enlow. Future research implicating more elements of the neurocapsule can shed light on the factors affecting and driving occipital growth.

  7. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Bièche, Ivan; Guinebretière, Jean-Marc; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The SWI/SNF complexes, initially identified in yeast 20 years ago, are a family of multi-subunit complexes that use the energy of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes. Chromatin remodeling processes mediated by the SWI/SNF complexes are critical to the modulation of gene expression across a variety of cellular processes, including stemness, differentiation, and proliferation. The first evidence of the involvement of these complexes in carcinogenesis was provided by the identification of biallelic, truncating mutations of the SMARCB1 gene in malignant rhabdoid tumors, a highly aggressive childhood cancer. Subsequently, genome-wide sequencing technologies have identified mutations in genes encoding different subunits of the SWI/SNF complexes in a large number of tumors. SWI/SNF mutations, and the subsequent abnormal function of SWI/SNF complexes, are among the most frequent gene alterations in cancer. The mechanisms by which perturbation of the SWI/SNF complexes promote oncogenesis are not fully elucidated; however, alterations of SWI/SNF genes obviously play a major part in cancer development, progression, and/or resistance to therapy.

  8. Protective Effects of Paricalcitol on Peritoneal Remodeling during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Stavenuiter, Andrea W. D.; Farhat, Karima; Vila Cuenca, Marc; Schilte, Margot N.; Keuning, Eelco D.; Paauw, Nanne J.; ter Wee, Pieter M.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; Vervloet, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is associated with structural and functional alterations of the peritoneal membrane, consisting of fibrosis, angiogenesis, and loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Vitamin D receptor activation (VDRA) plays an important role in mineral metabolism and inflammation, but also antiangiogenic and antifibrotic properties have been reported. Therefore, the effects of active vitamin D treatment on peritoneal function and remodeling were investigated. Rats were either kept naïve to PDF exposure or daily exposed to 10 mL PDF and were treated for five or seven weeks with oral paricalcitol or vehicle control. Non-PDF-exposed rats showed no peritoneal changes upon paricalcitol treatment. Paricalcitol reduced endogenous calcitriol but did not affect mineral homeostasis. However, upon PDF exposure, loss of ultrafiltration capacity ensued which was fully rescued by paricalcitol treatment. Furthermore, PD-induced ECM thickening was significantly reduced and omental PD-induced angiogenesis was less pronounced upon paricalcitol treatment. No effect of paricalcitol treatment on total amount of peritoneal cells, peritoneal leukocyte composition, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was observed. Our data indicates that oral VDRA reduces tissue remodeling during chronic experimental PD and prevents loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Therefore, VDRA is potentially relevant in the prevention of treatment technique failure in PD patients. PMID:26605330

  9. Steroid control of muscle remodeling during metamorphosis in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Hegstrom, C D; Truman, J W

    1996-04-01

    During metamorphosis in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, the abdominal body-wall muscle DEO1 is remodeled to form the adult muscle DE5. The degeneration of muscle DEO1 involves the dismantling of its contractile apparatus followed by the degeneration of muscle nuclei. As some nuclei are degenerating, others begin to incorporate 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), indicating the onset of nuclear proliferation. This proliferation is initially most evident at the site where the motoneuron contacts the muscle remnant. The developmental events involved in muscle remodeling are under the control of the steroid hormones, the ecdysteroids. The loss of the contractile elements of the larval muscle requires the rise and fall of the prepupal peak of ecdysteroids, whereas the subsequent loss of muscle nuclei is influenced by the slight rise in ecdysteroids seen after pupal ecdysis. Incorporation of BrdU by muscle nuclei depends on both the adult peak of the ecdysteroids and contact with the motoneuron. Unilateral axotomy blocks proliferation within the rudiment, but it does not block its subsequent differentiation into a very thin muscle in the adult.

  10. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings. PMID:25411881

  11. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  12. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.

  13. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis frommore » primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.« less

  14. Dissecting the A-B personality type.

    PubMed

    Ray, J J; Bozek, R

    1980-06-01

    It is suggested that 'freneticism' might be an appropriate name for the type of personality said by Rosenman, Friedman and Jenkins to be at risk from coronary heart disease. In study 1 the measure of this personality type (the JAS) was given a uniform answer format and, as such, was found to give improved reliability. It was administered to a random postal sample of Australians. A short form of 24 items was also produced. In study 2 a similar sample received the 24-item form and scales to measure achievement motivation, dominance and extraversion. 'A' types were found to be very much achievement motivated and dominant. A factor analysis showed these two traits as the main components of the A-B concept with only a third factor of 'freneticism'. This factor was measured in a third study which showed that the factor could be used as a scale in its own right.

  15. Ab Initio Calculation of the Hoyle State

    SciTech Connect

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2011-05-13

    The Hoyle state plays a crucial role in the helium burning of stars heavier than our Sun and in the production of carbon and other elements necessary for life. This excited state of the carbon-12 nucleus was postulated by Hoyle as a necessary ingredient for the fusion of three alpha particles to produce carbon at stellar temperatures. Although the Hoyle state was seen experimentally more than a half century ago nuclear theorists have not yet uncovered the nature of this state from first principles. In this Letter we report the first ab initio calculation of the low-lying states of carbon-12 using supercomputer lattice simulations and a theoretical framework known as effective field theory. In addition to the ground state and excited spin-2 state, we find a resonance at -85(3) MeV with all of the properties of the Hoyle state and in agreement with the experimentally observed energy.

  16. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  17. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  18. Downregulation of β-Adrenoceptors in Isoproterenol-Induced Cardiac Remodeling through HuR

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qian; Yang, Chengzhi; Wu, Jimin; Lu, Haiyan; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Youyi; Lv, Zhizhen; Zheng, Xiaopu; Li, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) play an important role in cardiac remodeling, which is the key pathological process in various heart diseases and leads to heart failure. However, the regulation of β-AR expression in remodeling hearts is still unclear. This study aims to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying the regulation of β1- and β2-AR expression in cardiac remodeling. The rat model of cardiac remodeling was established by subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol(ISO) at the dose of 0.25 mg·kg−1·d−1 for 7days. We found that the expression of β1- and β2-ARs decreased in the remodeling heart. The mechanisms may include the inhibition of DNA transcription and the increase of mRNA degradation. cAMP-response element binding protein(CREB) is a well-known transcription factor of β-AR. However, the expression and activation of CREB was not changed in the remodeling heart. Further, human Antigen-R (HuR), a RNA binding protein, which binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the β-AR mRNA and promotes RNA degradation, was increased in the remodeling model. And in vitro, HuR deficiency reversed the reduction of β-AR mRNA induced by ISO. Therefore, the present findings indicate that HuR, but not CREB, is responsible for the reduction of β-AR expression in ISO induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:27035432

  19. 16 CFR 301.24 - Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.24 Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer. When fur products owned by and...

  20. 16 CFR 301.24 - Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.24 Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer. When fur products owned by and...

  1. 16 CFR 301.24 - Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.24 Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer. When fur products owned by and...

  2. 16 CFR 301.24 - Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.24 Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer. When fur products owned by and...

  3. 16 CFR 301.24 - Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.24 Repairing, restyling and remodeling fur products for consumer. When fur products owned by and...

  4. Relationship between self-reported residential indoor remodeling and semen quality: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mao-Hua; Li, Zheng; Li, De-Kun; Yan, Bei; Liang, Hong; Zhi, Er-Lei; Du, Hong-Wei; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the association between residential indoor remodeling and poor semen quality. Sperm donors aged 18–45 years old were recruited in Shanghai, China. Semen specimens were collected and analyzed. An in-person interview was conducted to obtain information on the history of indoor remodeling and potential confounders. A total of 70 participants with abnormal semen quality (case group) and 68 controls were examined. A total of 20 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months, and among them 17 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Compared with participants with no history of indoor remodeling, participants with a history of indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months were more than three times as likely to have poor sperm quality (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3–12.0) after controlling for potential confounders. The association was strengthened when the analysis was restricted to those who had indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that indoor remodeling has an adverse effect on semen quality. PMID:25432500

  5. AB1402: Design-Build Project Guidelines. 2002 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Div. of School Facilities Planning.

    Assembly Bill (AB) 1402 authorized California's school districts to enter into design-build contracts for projects with design and construction costs exceeding $10 million. These guidelines are intended to accomplish the following purposes: (1) inform school districts of the design-build process under AB 1402; (2) help school districts to…

  6. History of California's AB 1725 and Its Major Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Tab

    This paper addresses the history of California's Assembly Bill 1725 (AB 1725) legislation and describes its major provisions. Signed in 1988 by Governor George Deukmejian, AB 1725's focus is to emphasize the new role of California community colleges as postsecondary institutions committed to transferring students, offering remedial courses, and…

  7. Towards Accurate Ab Initio Predictions of the Spectrum of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have carried out extensive ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of methane, and these results are used to compute vibrational energy levels. We include basis set extrapolations, core-valence correlation, relativistic effects, and Born- Oppenheimer breakdown terms in our calculations. Our ab initio predictions of the lowest lying levels are superb.

  8. Reverse cardiac remodeling enabled by mechanical unloading of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, Konstantinos G; Terrovitis, John V; Drakos, Stavros G; Nanas, John N

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac remodeling is a characteristic and basic component of heart failure progression and is associated with a poor prognosis. Attenuating or reversing remodeling is an accepted goal of heart failure therapy. Cardiac mechanical support with left ventricular assist devices, in addition to its established role as "bridge to transplantation" or "destination therapy" in patients not eligible for cardiac transplantation, offers the potential for significant and sustained myocardial recovery through reverse remodeling. This review discusses the emerging role of left ventricular assist devices as a "bridge to recovery". Clinical and basic aspects of cardiac remodeling and cardiac reverse remodeling enabled by mechanical unloading, potential candidates for this modality of treatment as well as unresolved issues regarding the use of mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to recovery are discussed. PMID:20559975

  9. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  10. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  11. Promoting brain remodeling to aid in stroke recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous brain repair after stroke involves a set of highly interactive processes, such as angiogenesis, neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, synaptogenesis and axonal outgrowth, which together orchestrate neurological recovery. During the past several years, there have been advances in our understanding of miRNAs and histone deacetylases (HDACs) in brain repair processes after stroke. Emerging data indicate the important role of exosomes for intercellular communication in promoting coupled brain remodeling processes. These advances will likely have a major impact on development of restorative therapies for ischemic brain repair, consequently leading to improvement of neurological function. In this review, we provide an update on our current understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of miRNAs, exosomes, and HDACs in brain restorative processes after stroke. PMID:26278490

  12. RSK3 – A Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Eliana C.; Passariello, Catherine L.; Li, Jinliang; Matheson, Christopher J.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Reigan, Philip; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The family of p90 ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK) are pleiotropic effectors for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Recently, RSK3 was shown to be important for pathological remodeling of the heart. While cardiac myocyte hypertrophy can be compensatory for increased wall stress, in chronic heart diseases this non-mitotic cell growth is usually associated with interstitial fibrosis, increased cell death, and decreased cardiac function. Although RSK3 is less abundant in the cardiac myocyte than other RSK family members, RSK3 appears to serve a unique role in cardiac myocyte stress responses. A potential mechanism conferring RSK3’s unique function in the heart is anchoring by the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase Anchoring Protein β (mAKAPβ). Recent findings suggest that RSK3 should be considered as a therapeutic target for the prevention of heart failure, a clinical syndrome of major public health significance. PMID:25988524

  13. mAKAP – A Master Scaffold for Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Passariello, Catherine L.; Li, Jinliang; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. Each of the many signaling pathways in this network contributes uniquely to the control of cellular adaptation. In the last few years, it has become apparent that multimolecular signaling complexes or ‘signalosomes’ are important for fidelity in intracellular signaling and for mediating crosstalk between the different signaling pathways. These complexes integrate upstream signals and control downstream effectors. In the cardiac myocyte, the protein mAKAPβ serves as a scaffold for a large signalosome that is responsive to cAMP, calcium, hypoxia, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. The main function of mAKAPβ signalosomes is to modulate stress-related gene expression regulated by the transcription factors NFATc, MEF2 and HIF-1α and type II histone deacetylases that control pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25551320

  14. JOINING THE DOTS: FROM CHROMATIN REMODELING TO NEURONAL PLASTICITY

    PubMed Central

    Zocchi, Loredana; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In recent years spectacular advances in the field of epigenetics have taken place. Multiple lines of evidence that connect epigenetic regulation to brain functions have been accumulating. Neurons daily convert a variety of external stimuli into rapid or long-lasting changes in gene expression. Control is achieved through several post-translational modifications that occur both on DNA and chromatin. Specific modifications mediate many developmental processes and adult brain functions, such as synaptic plasticity and memory. In this review, we focus on critical chromatin remodeling events that mediate long-lasting neuronal responses. The challenging goal is to reach sufficient understanding of these epigenetic pathways in the brain so that they may be useful for future development of specific pharmacological strategies. PMID:20471240

  15. Molecular Simulations of Actomyosin Network Self-Assembly and Remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komianos, James; Popov, Konstantin; Papoian, Garegin; Papoian Lab Team

    Actomyosin networks are an integral part of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells and play an essential role in determining cellular shape and movement. Actomyosin network growth and remodeling in vivo is based on a large number of chemical and mechanical processes, which are mutually coupled and spatially and temporally resolved. To investigate the fundamental principles behind the self-organization of these networks, we have developed a detailed mechanochemical, stochastic model of actin filament growth dynamics, at a single-molecule resolution, where the nonlinear mechanical rigidity of filaments and their corresponding deformations under internally and externally generated forces are taken into account. Our work sheds light on the interplay between the chemical and mechanical processes governing the cytoskeletal dynamics, and also highlights the importance of diffusional and active transport phenomena. Our simulations reveal how different actomyosin micro-architectures emerge in response to varying the network composition. Support from NSF Grant CHE-1363081.

  16. Stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of steroid hormone receptors in brain regions that mediate virtually every aspect of brain function has broadened the definition of 'neuroendocrinology' to include the reciprocal communication between the brain and the body via hormonal and neural pathways. The brain is the central organ of stress and adaptation to stress because it perceives and determines what is threatening, as well as determining the behavioral and physiological responses to the stressor. The adult and developing brain possess remarkable structural and functional plasticity in response to stress, including neurogenesis leading to neuronal replacement, dendritic remodeling, and synapse turnover. Stress causes an imbalance of neural circuitry subserving cognition, decision-making, anxiety and mood that can alter expression of those behaviors and behavioral states. The two Brain Research papers noted in this review played an important role in triggering these advances. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26740399

  17. Physical determinants of vascular network remodeling during tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Welter, M; Rieger, H

    2010-10-01

    The process in which a growing tumor transforms a hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network into a tumor specific vasculature is analyzed with a theoretical model. The physical determinants of this remodeling involve the morphological and hydrodynamic properties of the initial network, generation of new vessels (sprouting angiogenesis), vessel dilation (circumferential growth), vessel regression, tumor cell proliferation and death, and the interdependence of these processes via spatio-temporal changes of blood flow parameters, oxygen/nutrient supply and growth factor concentration fields. The emerging tumor vasculature is non-hierarchical, compartmentalized into well-characterized zones, displays a complex geometry with necrotic zones and "hot spots" of increased vascular density and blood flow of varying size, and transports drug injections efficiently. Implications for current theoretical views on tumor-induced angiogenesis are discussed.

  18. Dynamics of adherens junctions in epithelial establishment, maintenance, and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Buzz

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)–catenin complex binds to cytoskeletal components and regulatory and signaling molecules to form a mature adherens junction (AJ). This dynamic structure physically connects neighboring epithelial cells, couples intercellular adhesive contacts to the cytoskeleton, and helps define each cell’s apical–basal axis. Together these activities coordinate the form, polarity, and function of all cells in an epithelium. Several molecules regulate AJ formation and integrity, including Rho family GTPases and Par polarity proteins. However, only recently, with the development of live-cell imaging, has the extent to which E-cadherin is actively turned over at junctions begun to be appreciated. This turnover contributes to junction formation and to the maintenance of epithelial integrity during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:21422226

  19. Right heart structural and functional remodeling in athletes.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; La Gerche, Andrè; Golia, Enrica; Teske, Arco J; Bossone, Eduardo; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele; Baggish, Aaron L

    2015-01-01

    Long-term intensive exercise training programs lead to numerous progressive cardiac adaptations, which are collectively termed "athlete's heart." Noninvasive diagnostic techniques, such as color Doppler echocardiography, have been widely used in the analysis of the athlete's heart. Initial experiences focused mainly on left heart adaptations to training. However, in recent years, substantial structural and functional adaptations of the right heart have been documented. The present review article focuses on recent data defining right heart adaptation to short- and long-term periods of exercise training. Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function may be more profoundly affected by intense exercise and, in some cases, functional recovery may be incomplete. Moreover, there is speculation that such changes may represent a substrate for proarrhythmic RV remodeling in some highly trained athletes, even in the absence of a known familial redisposition.

  20. Remodeling Components of the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gkretsi, Vasiliki; Stylianou, Andreas; Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Polydorou, Christiana; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumor pathophysiology is characterized by an abnormal microenvironment that guides tumor progression and poses barriers to the efficacy of cancer therapies. Most common among tumor types are abnormalities in the structure of the tumor vasculature and stroma. Remodeling the tumor microenvironment with the aim to normalize any aberrant properties has the potential to improve therapy. In this review, we discuss structural abnormalities of the tumor microenvironment and summarize the therapeutic strategies that have been developed to normalize tumors as well as their potential to enhance therapy. Finally, we present different in vitro models that have been developed to analyze and better understand the effects of the tumor microenvironment on cancer cell behavior. PMID:26528429