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Sample records for ab ring system

  1. Ab initio path integral ring polymer molecular dynamics: Vibrational spectra of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Motoyuki; Nakayama, Akira

    2008-01-01

    The path integral ring polymer molecular dynamics method is combined with 'on-the-fly' ab initio electronic structure calculations and applied to vibrational spectra of small molecules, LiH and H 2O, at the room temperature. The results are compared with those of the numerically exact solution and ab initio path integral centroid molecular dynamics calculation. The peak positions in the calculated spectra are found to be reasonable, showing the red-shift due to potential anharmonicity. This unification enables the investigation of real-time quantum dynamics of chemically complex molecular systems on the ab initio Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface.

  2. Autonomous Biological System (ABS) experiments.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, T K; Anderson, G A; Poynter, J E; Stodieck, L S; Klaus, D M

    1998-12-01

    Three space flight experiments have been conducted to test and demonstrate the use of a passively controlled, materially closed, bioregenerative life support system in space. The Autonomous Biological System (ABS) provides an experimental environment for long term growth and breeding of aquatic plants and animals. The ABS is completely materially closed, isolated from human life support systems and cabin atmosphere contaminants, and requires little need for astronaut intervention. Testing of the ABS marked several firsts: the first aquatic angiosperms to be grown in space; the first higher organisms (aquatic invertebrate animals) to complete their life cycles in space; the first completely bioregenerative life support system in space; and, among the first gravitational ecology experiments. As an introduction this paper describes the ABS, its flight performance, advantages and disadvantages.

  3. Many-body ab initio study of antiferromagnetic {Cr7M } molecular rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, A.; Carretta, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Pavarini, E.

    2016-12-01

    Antiferromagnetic molecular rings are widely studied both for fundamental quantum-mechanical issues and for technological applications, particularly in the field of quantum information processing. Here we present a detailed first-principles study of two families—purple and green—of {Cr7M } antiferromagnetic rings, where M is a divalent transition metal ion (M =Ni2 + , Mn2 +, and Zn2 +). We employ a recently developed flexible and efficient scheme to build ab initio system-specific Hubbard models. From such many-body models we systematically derive the low-energy effective spin Hamiltonian for the rings. Our approach allows us to calculate isotropic as well as anisotropic terms of the spin Hamiltonian, without any a priori assumption on its form. For each compound we calculate magnetic exchange couplings, zero-field splitting tensors, and gyromagnetic tensors, finding good agreement with experimental results.

  4. Precooler Ring Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Moenich, J.

    1980-10-02

    The precooler vacuum system, as proposed by FNAL, is based on a suitable modification of the existing Electron Cooling Ring System. Because of the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets, distributed ion pumping, as exists in the Electron Cooling Ring, is not applicable. Instead, the proposed pumping will be done with commercial appendage ion pumps mounted approximately every two meters around the circumference of the ring. The loss of effective pumping speed and non-uniformity of system pressure with appendage pumps may not be major considerations but the large number required does effect experimental and analytical equipment placement considerations. There is a distributed pumping technique available which: (1) is not affected by the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets; (2) will provide a minimum of four times the hydrogen pumping speed of the proposed appendage ion pumps; (3) will require no power during pumping after the strip is activated; (4) will provide the heat source for bakeout; (5) is easily replaceable; and (6) can be purchased, installed, and operated at a generous economic advantage over the presently proposed ion pumped system. The pumping technique referred to is non-evaporable gettering with ST101 Zr/Al pumping strip. A technical description of this pumping strip is given on Data Sheet 1 and 2 attached to this report.

  5. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  6. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  7. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E.

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  8. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  9. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  10. APS storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Spectroscopic and Ab Initio Determination of the Ring-Twisting Potential Energy Function for 1,3-Cyclohexadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrey, Daniel; Choo, Jaebum; Laane, Jaan

    2000-10-01

    The ring-twisting vibration of 1,3-cyclohexadiene has been studied using Raman and infrared spectroscopy of the molecule in the vapor phase. The Raman spectrum shows five ring-twisting transitions in the 150 - 200 cm-1 region. The far-infrared spectrum shows only two transitions for this vibration, which is infrared forbidden in the C_2v (planar) approximation. Three ring-twisting combination bands were also observed off a fundamental vibration at 926.1 cm-1. A coordinate dependent kinetic energy expansion for the ring-twisting motion was calculated, and this was used to determine the ring-twisting potential function. Ab initio calculations were performed using Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) using different basis sets. The barrier to planarity of 1150 cm-1 was determined from the spectroscopic data. The various ab initio calculations gave barriers to planarity in the 1197 - 1593 cm-1 range.

  12. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  13. Ab initio calculation of bowl, cage, and ring isomers of C20 and C20-.

    PubMed

    An, Wei; Gao, Yi; Bulusu, Satya; Zeng, X C

    2005-05-22

    High-level ab initio calculations have been carried out to reexamine relative stability of bowl, cage, and ring isomers of C(20) and C(20)(-). The total electronic energies of the three isomers show different energy orderings, strongly depending on the hybrid functionals selected. It is found that among three popular hybrid density-functional (DF) methods B3LYP, B3PW91, PBE1PBE, and a new hybrid-meta-DF method TPSSKCIS, only the PBE1PBE method (with cc-pVTZ basis set) gives qualitatively correct energy ordering as that predicted from ab initio CCSD(T)/cc-pVDZ [CCSD(T)-coupled-cluster method including singles, doubles, and noniterative perturbative triples; cc-pVDZ-correlation consistent polarized valence double zeta] as well as from MP4(SDQ)/cc-pVTZ [MP4-fourth-order Moller-Plesset; cc-pVTZ-correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta] calculations. Both CCSD(T) and MP4 calculations indicate that the bowl is most likely the global minimum of neutral C(20) isomers, followed by the fullerene cage and ring. For the anionic counterparts, the PBE1PBE calculation also agrees with MP4/cc-pVTZ calculation, both predicting that the bowl is still the lowest-energy structure of C(20)(-) at T=0 K, followed by the ring and the cage. In contrast, both B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and B3PW91/cc-pVTZ calculations predict that the ring is the lowest-energy structure of C(20)(-). Apparently, this good reliability in predicting the energy ordering renders the hybrid PBE method a leading choice for predicting relative stability among large-sized carbon clusters and other carbon nanostructures (e.g., finite-size carbon nanotubes, nano-onions, or nanohorns). The relative stabilities derived from total energy with Gibbs free-energy corrections demonstrate a changing ordering in which ring becomes more favorable for both C(20) and C(20)(-) at high temperatures. Finally, photoelectron spectra (PES) for the anionic C(20)(-) isomers have been computed. With binding energies up to 7 eV, the

  14. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  15. Mapping the dopamine receptor. 2. Features derived from modifications in the rings A/B region of the neuroleptic butaclamol.

    PubMed

    Philipp, A H; Humber, L G; Voith, K

    1979-07-01

    Several analogues of the neuroleptic agent butaclamol having modifications in the rings A/B region of the molecule have been synthesized. Pharmacological evaluation identified the benzo[5,6]cyclohepta analogue 2b, isobutaclamol, as being equipotent to butaclamol. The molecular structure of this compound has been analyzed, and the results have been used for mapping the central dopamine receptor. A planar catechol primary binding site, composed of alpha and beta regions, has been identified and its minimal dimensions deduced. Its locus with respect to the nitrogen location site and its complementary hydrogen bond donor site has been specified. Using a Cartesian coordinate system, a receptor model is proposed which incorporates the above-mentioned features. The receptor model has been used to rationalize the observed chirality of the central dopamine receptor.

  16. Recent observations of Jupiter's ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M.; Burns, J.; de Pater, I.; Hamilton, D.; Horanyi, M.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter's faint, dusty ring system has several distinct components: a thin main ring, an inner, vertically extended halo, and an outer, fainter pair of "gossamer" rings. This ring system illustrates the complex dynamics of dust after it is ejected from the local moons (Metis, Adrastea, Amalthea and Thebe) and/or embedded parent bodies, and then evolves orbitally under solar and electromagnetic perturbations. The ring system has been observed by four spacecraft (Voyagers 1 and 2, Galileo and Cassini), as well as from the Earth by ground-based observatories and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). While each individual data set has very limited coverage and content, a complete description of the system is now emerging. This paper will provide a systematic overview of the ring system, based on the latest available data and dynamical models. In particular, the period December 2002 through February 2003 is providing a rare opportunity to watch Jupiter sweep through its full range of Earth-based phase angles while remaining nearly edge-on to the Earth. We will discuss the initial results of an observing program using HST in the visual and the Keck Telescope in the infrared. As the rings pass through opposition, the parent bodies surge in brightness while the dust grains do not; this should provide a new means to distinguish the two populations, better revealing their numbers and locations. Variations in halo thickness with wavelength will provide new information about the sizes and dynamics of the dust grains scattered by Jupiter's strong, inner magnetic field. We will also seek out structures near the outer edge of Amalthea's gossamer ring, hinted at in previous data, which illustrate the dynamics of these dust grains immediately after their initial ejection into the ring.

  17. APS storage ring vacuum system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, J.R.; Gagliano, J.; Goeppner, G.A.

    1997-06-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring was designed to operated with 7-GeV, 100-mA positron beam with lifetimes > 20 hours. The lifetime is limited by residual gas scattering and Touschek scattering at this time. Photon-stimulated desorption and microwave power in the rf cavities are the main gas loads. Comparison of actual system gas loads and design calculations will be given. In addition, several special features of the storage ring vacuum system will be presented.

  18. Keck Infrared Observations of Jupiter's Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Graham, J. R.; Liu, M. C.; Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    We imaged the Jovian ring system at a wavelength of 2.27 mu m with the 10-m W.M. Keck telescope in August and October 1997, when the ring plane was almost edge-on. We obtained the first images of the Jovian halo and gossamer ring in back-scattered light, and the best ground-based images to date of Jupiter's main ring. The main ring is radially confined between 1.70 -- 1.82 R_J, with a maximum (after inversion) at 1.79 R_J, in agreement with the Voyager findings (1 R_J=71398 km). The halo extends inwards from the main ring (at 1.71 R_J) down to 1.40 R_J, bounded by the locations of Lorentz resonances. Roughly 50% of the halo's intensity originates from a region within ~ 700 km from the equatorial plane, while the halo is visible up to ~ 10,000 km above and below the plane. Although the vertical extent agrees with Voyager findings, the halo's intensity relative to that of the main ring in the Keck images is much less than in Voyager images, which is attributed to the fact that the halo contains fewer macroscopic particles, which preferentially backscatter visible light. The gossamer ring is found to have two components, with steep dropoffs in brightness at the orbits of Amalthea and Thebe. The first, Amalthea's gossamer ring, is visible between the main ring's periphery and ~ 2.5 R_J; it is relatively uniform in brightness and has a vertical thickness (FWHM) of 0.06 R_J, clearly broader than the FWHM of the main ring (0.045 R_J) and image resolution of 0.6('') =0.025;R_J. The other component, a factor of five fainter than Amalthea's ring and about twice as broad vertically (FWHM ~ 0.12 ; R_J), is seen inwards from 3.11 R_J, i.e., inwards of Thebe's orbit. Additional material still seems present, albeit barely, at larger distances, until ~ 3.6 R_J, near the edge of our images. Our data are consistent with the Galileo results, and suggest the ring material originates at the bounding satellites Thebe, Amalthea, Adrastea and Metis (see abstracts by Burns et al., and

  19. Lectures on algebraic system theory: Linear systems over rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamen, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    The presentation centers on four classes of systems that can be treated as linear systems over a ring. These are: (1) discrete-time systems over a ring of scalars such as the integers; (2) continuous-time systems containing time delays; (3) large-scale discrete-time systems; and (4) time-varying discrete-time systems.

  20. Centaur's ring system formation by close encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santana, Thamiris; Winter, Othon

    2016-10-01

    Rupture of small bodies due to close approach to a massive body is a frequent event in the Solar System. Some of these small bodies can just disintegrate completely or suffer a material loss.In this work we study the gravitational interaction between a giant planet and a small body in close encounters in order to simulate the formation of a planetary ring system around a centaur by the partial rupture of the small body.Considering the current Chariklo's body and a disk of particles around it, we simulated the system under close encounters with one of giant planets.Another motivation for the study is also the centaur Chiron, that is a candidate to have a ring system like Chariklo. The characteristics of the encounters are defined by the impact parameter and the velocity at infinity.The results are presented in terms of conditions that could lead to a rupture that could generate a ring like system.

  1. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-06-18

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

  2. Integrated Design of Antibodies for Systems Biology Using Ab Designer.

    PubMed

    Pisitkun, Trairak; Dummer, Patrick; Somparn, Poorichaya; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Knepper, Mark A

    2014-03-24

    In the current era of large-scale biology, systems biology has evolved as a powerful approach to identify complex interactions within biological systems. In addition to high throughput identification and quantification techniques, methods based on high-quality mono-specific antibodies remain an essential element of the approach. To assist the large-scale design and production of peptide-directed antibodies for systems biology studies, we developed a fully integrated online application, AbDesigner (http://helixweb.nih.gov/AbDesigner/), to help researchers select optimal peptide immunogens for antibody generation against relatively disordered regions of target proteins. Here we describe AbDesigner in terms of its features, comparing it to other software tools, and use it to design three antibodies against kidney disease-related proteins in human, viz. nephrin, podocin, and apolipoprotein L1.

  3. Chariklo's ring system 1. Structure of the ring system from stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berard, Diane; Sicardy, Bruno; Braga-Ribas, Felipe; camargo, julio; Vieira-Martins, Roberto; Assafin, Marcelo; Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Colas, François; Dauvergne, Jean-Luc; Bath, Karl-Ludwig; Maquet, Lucie; Tancredi, Gonzalo; Richichi, Andrea; Puji, Irawati; Ivanov, Valentin; Bradshaw, Jonathan; Broughton, John; Meza, Erick; Ortiz, Jose-Luis; Duffard, Rene; Leiva, Rodrigo

    2016-10-01

    Two dense and narrow rings around Chariklo (the largest centaur object known to date) were discovered by stellar occultation on June 3, 2013 (Braga-Ribas et al., Nature 508, 72, 2014). The main and larger ring is called C1R, while the faintest one is called C2R.Here we report six others occultations by Chariklo's ring system observed on February 16, March 16, April 29, June 28, 2014 and April 26, May 12, 2015. They provide a total of fifteen ring profiles, among which are four resolved profiles of C1R.The latter exhibits a W-shape profile that is essentially opaque at the edges. Its width varies from 4.8 to 7.7 km over the available longitude range. Those caracteristics have been detected in Uranus elliptic rings. The equivalent width We (normal opacity x physical radial width) of C1R is 2 km with typical rms of 1 km, while C2R has We of 0.2 km (rms ~ 0.1 km). None of the rings exhibits variation of We with longitude.Assuming the rings are circular, we can exhibit a pole which is compatible with the two multi-chord ring detections (June 3, 2013 and April 29, 2014): αp=151.4° and δp=41.5°. We will then estimate an upper limit of a possible ring eccentricity based on those two observations.Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's H2020 (2014-2020/ ERC Grant Agreement n 669416 "LUCKY STAR").

  4. Analysis of water in Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) samples.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Y; Kobayashi, K; Seki, K; Mizutani, H; Kawasaki, Y; Koike, J; Ijiri, K; Yamashita, M; Sugiura, K; Poynter, J; MacCallum, T; Anderson, G

    1998-12-01

    Several soluble components, peptidase and amino acids, and carbon isotopic ratio in the water retrieved from flight experiments of Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) as well as ground control samples are analyzed to interpret the condition, dynamics, material balance of the ABS ecosystems. Organic carbons in flight samples were found to be more abundant compared with the control ones, which suggested the uniform ecosystems in low gravity might easily dissolve more soluble components. The Mir-1997 flight sample showed higher C/N ratio probably because of the dissolution of carbon-rich plant materials.

  5. Ab initio computational applications to complex biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lei

    A series of biomaterial related systems---including water and DNA molecules---have been studied using ab initio (first-principles) methods. By investigating the properties of water as the preliminary step, the hydrogen bond (HB) interactions, which play important roles in biomolecules, were better understood from the quantum mechanical viewpoint. The calculated K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of all 340 oxygen atoms in the model have been accumulated to reproduce the experimental one. The spectra were shown to be very sensitive to the HB configurations of O atoms, which could be used to elucidate the subtle structural variations in complex biomolecules. The simulation of single-molecule DNA overstretching experiments under torsionally constrained condition has been carried out afterwards. The initial DNA models were stretched stepwisely and eventually gained an extension of 1.5-fold (150% x the original length). The variation of total energy, atomic configuration, and the electronic structure during this process were analyzed in details. At the extension of ˜1.3-fold, the ring opening reactions occurred in the backbones. The backbone nicks appeared at elongations of ˜1.40-fold. The whole process was accompanied by HB breaking and charge transfers. We have proposed an overstretched structure named O-DNA (Opened-DNA) to clarify the confusion in understanding the behavior of DNA under high force load. With more experiences gained, a comprehensive methodology revealing the underlying principles of bioprocesses from the quantum mechanical viewpoint eventually come up. For the purpose of better computational accuracy, the scheme of implementing the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation functionals into the Orthogonalized Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (OLCAO) program suite has been discussed, and the computational efficiency has been analyzed correspondingly. Moreover, the parallel strategy for performing

  6. Concluding remarks of Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) experiments.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Y; Kobayashi, K; Mizutani, H; Kawasaki, Y; Koike, J; Ijiri, K; Yamashita, M; Sugiura, K; Poynter, J; MacCallum, T; Anderson, G

    1998-12-01

    Team efforts for analysis on the Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) space experiments are summarized here to conclude scientific findings, and to scope the extended studies in future. From the three experiments on Space Shuttle and Space Station Mir, a closed ecological system modeled by the ABS was verified to be capable of sustaining its members of animals and plants under space environment for a period of several months. The animals successfully completed their life cycle in space during the course of these experiments, this was the first time that the life cycle of higher organisms had been completed in space and ecological system. Importance of gravity for ecology was proven at the same time. Gravity is a dominant factor for ecology by formulating spatial patterns and distribution of members of ecological system. Under microgravity, the fate of ecological system was found highly sensitive against the variation of environmental factor, such as light illumination cycle.

  7. Integrability of particle system around a ring source as the Newtonian limit of a black ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki; Yoshino, Hirotaka

    2015-04-01

    The geodesic equation in the five-dimensional singly rotating black ring is nonintegrable, unlike the case of the Myers-Perry black hole. In the Newtonian limit of the black ring, its geodesic equation agrees with the equation of motion of a particle in the Newtonian potential due to a homogeneous ring gravitational source. In this paper, we show that the Newtonian equation of motion allows the separation of variables in the spheroidal coordinates, providing a nontrivial constant of motion quadratic in momenta. This shows that the Newtonian limit of a black ring recovers the symmetry of its geodesic system, and the geodesic chaos is caused by relativistic effects.

  8. Cooling system for three hook ring segment

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; Eng, Darryl; Lee, Ching-Pang; Patat, Harry

    2014-08-26

    A triple hook ring segment including forward, midsection and aft mounting hooks for engagement with respective hangers formed on a ring segment carrier for supporting a ring segment panel, and defining a forward high pressure chamber and an aft low pressure chamber on opposing sides of the midsection mounting hook. An isolation plate is provided on the aft side of the midsection mounting hook to form an isolation chamber between the aft low pressure chamber and the ring segment panel. High pressure air is supplied to the forward chamber and flows to the isolation chamber through crossover passages in the midsection hook. The isolation chamber provides convection cooling air to an aft portion of the ring segment panel and enables a reduction of air pressure in the aft low pressure chamber to reduce leakage flow of cooling air from the ring segment.

  9. Nature of the attractive interaction between proton acceptors and organic ring systems.

    PubMed

    Arras, Emmanuel; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-12-14

    Systematic ab initio calculations are combined with a deconvolution of electrostatic contributions to analyze the interplay between potential hydrogen bond acceptors and organic rings with C(sp(2))-H groups (benzene, pyridine and cyclopentadiene). A distinct anisotropic interaction between the ring systems and the electron lone pairs of cyanide, water and other acceptor species is revealed that favors the in-plane orientation of the proton acceptor group. In the attractive regime this interaction carries a pronounced electrostatic signature. By decomposing the electrostatic contribution into parts attributed to different subunits of the ring systems we demonstrate that a major proportion of the interaction energy gain is originating from the non-adjacent moieties, that are not in close contact with. This behavior holds equally for homocyclic, heterocyclic and non-aromatic rings but contrasts that of the ethyne molecule, taken as reference for a weak hydrogen bond donor clearly exhibiting the expected localized character. The ring interaction requires the presence of π-electron clouds and typically results in an interaction energy gain of 40 to 80 meV. Our findings suggest the proton acceptor-ring interaction as a new category of intermolecular non-covalent interactions.

  10. Keck Observations of Dusty Rings in our Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2007-08-01

    All four giant planets are surrounded by ring systems, which typically consist of a combination of large and small bodies, as well as fine dust. With the 10-m W.M. Keck telescope on Mauna Kea (Hawaii) we have focused on observing the dusty rings of these planets. In this review I will summarize our data sets. I will focus on our most recent results with regard to Jupiter and Uranus, both observed during ring plane crossings. Jupiter's ring system was observed in December 2002 and January 2003 at 2.2 micron, where we used both the facility near-infrared camera NIRC with a pixel size of 0.151" (˜500 km at Jupiter), and the adaptive optics camera NIRC2, with a pixelsize of 0.04" and 0.01". The images were "onion-peeled" to provide radial scans of the rings. We will compare results of the main ring with Galileo data, and comment on similarities and differences with respect to the location of parent material in the ring. The radial structure of the gossamer rings is very different than expected based upon the Burns et al (1999) formation scenarios. The rings are not sheets of material, but narrow rings located just interior to the orbits of Amalthea and Thebe. The Amalthea ring shows a structure analagous to the main ring. Its inner boundary is near the location of synchronous orbit. Radial variations in the Thebe ring suggest "sculpting" by Lorentz resonances. We will present images of Uranus "hot of the press"; we are scheduled to observe in July and August when the rings are edge-on.

  11. Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system

    DOEpatents

    Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-10-04

    A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener loads and pitch bearing loads. The shroud may further incorporate a ring gear for driving an electric generator. In one embodiment, the electric generator may be cantilevered from the nacelle such that the gear on the generator drive shaft is contacted by the ring gear of the shroud. The shroud also provides protection for the gearing and aids in preventing gear lubricant contamination.

  12. Five-membered rings as diazo components in optical data storage devices: an ab initio investigation of the lowest singlet excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åstrand, Per-Olof; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Hvilsted, Søren; Ramanujam, P. S.; Bak, Keld L.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2000-07-01

    The two lowest singlet excitation energies of 18 azo dyes have been studied by ab initio quantum-chemical methods within the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA). Various combinations of five-membered rings (furan, thiophene, pyrrole, oxazole, thiazole, and imidazole) have been investigated as diazo components for a potential use in optical data storage materials. It is found that the diazo compounds with two heterocyclic five-membered rings have π→π ∗ excitation energies corresponding to laser wavelengths in the region 450-500 nm whereas one five-membered ring and a phenyl group as diazo components results in wavelengths in the region 400-435 nm.

  13. Recent Hubble Observations of Jupiter's Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; de Pater, I.; Hamilton, D. P.; Horanyi, M.

    2003-05-01

    The period December 2002 through February 2003 provided a rare opportunity to watch Jupiter sweep through its full range of Earth-based phase angles while the rings remained nearly edge-on to Earth. We used this period for a series of Jovian ring observations using the High Resolution Channel (HRC) of Hubble's new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Phase angles span 0.17o--10o. Our images showed the main ring, Adrastea and Metis with very high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Amalthea's gossamer ring was detected (and vertically resolved) in a small set of specially targeted images. Somewhat surprisingly, we have not yet been able to detect the halo in any of our images, perhaps because it is obscured by the scattered light from Jupiter's disk, positioned just 4'' outside the HRC's field of view. Preliminary results from this data set are as follows. (1) The ring is substantially less red than the moons, suggesting that fine dust represents a significant fraction of its backscattering intensity. (2) Neither the rings nor the embedded moons Metis and Adrastea have significant opposition surges. We were hoping to use the surge, which is characteristic of most macroscopic bodies but not dust, as an indicator of where any embedded ring parent bodies might reside. (3) Because our data are so sensitive to Metis (radius ˜ 20 km) and Adrastea ( ˜ 8 km), we believe that bodies as small as 3--4 km in radius should have been detected in the data. In an initial search, no additional bodies have been detected. (4) The Amalthea ring shows an enhancement in brightness in its outermost 15,000 km. This is consistent with what was seen in Galileo images at very high phase angles. Support for this work was provided by NASA through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  14. Ring-laser gyroscope system using dispersive element(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A ring-laser gyroscope system includes a ring-laser gyroscope (RLG) and at least one dispersive element optically coupled to the RLG's ring-shaped optical path. Each dispersive element has a resonant frequency that is approximately equal to the RLG's lasing frequency. A group index of refraction defined collectively by the dispersive element(s) has (i) a real portion that is greater than zero and less than one, and (ii) an imaginary portion that is less than zero.

  15. Superfluid qubit systems with ring shaped optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Amico, Luigi; Aghamalyan, Davit; Auksztol, Filip; Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-03-06

    We study an experimentally feasible qubit system employing neutral atomic currents. Our system is based on bosonic cold atoms trapped in ring-shaped optical lattice potentials. The lattice makes the system strictly one dimensional and it provides the infrastructure to realize a tunable ring-ring interaction. Our implementation combines the low decoherence rates of neutral cold atoms systems, overcoming single site addressing, with the robustness of topologically protected solid state Josephson flux qubits. Characteristic fluctuations in the magnetic fields affecting Josephson junction based flux qubits are expected to be minimized employing neutral atoms as flux carriers. By breaking the Galilean invariance we demonstrate how atomic currents through the lattice provide an implementation of a qubit. This is realized either by artificially creating a phase slip in a single ring, or by tunnel coupling of two homogeneous ring lattices. The single qubit infrastructure is experimentally investigated with tailored optical potentials. Indeed, we have experimentally realized scaled ring-lattice potentials that could host, in principle, n ~ 10 of such ring-qubits, arranged in a stack configuration, along the laser beam propagation axis. An experimentally viable scheme of the two-ring-qubit is discussed, as well. Based on our analysis, we provide protocols to initialize, address, and read-out the qubit.

  16. Superfluid qubit systems with ring shaped optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Amico, Luigi; Aghamalyan, Davit; Auksztol, Filip; Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    We study an experimentally feasible qubit system employing neutral atomic currents. Our system is based on bosonic cold atoms trapped in ring-shaped optical lattice potentials. The lattice makes the system strictly one dimensional and it provides the infrastructure to realize a tunable ring-ring interaction. Our implementation combines the low decoherence rates of neutral cold atoms systems, overcoming single site addressing, with the robustness of topologically protected solid state Josephson flux qubits. Characteristic fluctuations in the magnetic fields affecting Josephson junction based flux qubits are expected to be minimized employing neutral atoms as flux carriers. By breaking the Galilean invariance we demonstrate how atomic currents through the lattice provide an implementation of a qubit. This is realized either by artificially creating a phase slip in a single ring, or by tunnel coupling of two homogeneous ring lattices. The single qubit infrastructure is experimentally investigated with tailored optical potentials. Indeed, we have experimentally realized scaled ring-lattice potentials that could host, in principle, n ~ 10 of such ring-qubits, arranged in a stack configuration, along the laser beam propagation axis. An experimentally viable scheme of the two-ring-qubit is discussed, as well. Based on our analysis, we provide protocols to initialize, address, and read-out the qubit. PMID:24599096

  17. The Secular Evolution of a Close Ring-Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2007-10-01

    Current literature on ring-satellite interactions tells us that the long-term orbital stability of a satellite that orbits near a planetary ring is uncertain. This is because the satellite's perturbations at its Lindblad and corotation resonances in the ring tend to alter the satellite's eccentricity e, but it is unclear whether e-damping or e-excitation is the result, since that depends on whether particle motions at the corotation resonances are unsaturated (Goldreich & Tremaine 1982). Further, the stability of the satellite's inclination I seems grim, since the satellite's inclination is excited by its many vertical resonances in the ring (Borderies et al 1984). Consequently, it is unclear whether the small gap-embedded satellites Pan (which inhabits the Encke gap in Saturn's A ring) and Daphnis (which inhabits the Keeler gap) should in fact reside in nearly circular orbits that are coplanar with the ring. To address this uncertainty, the following considers the satellite's secular gravitational perturbations of the ring, which can also alter the satellite's e and I. The Lagrange planetary equations are used to show that a small gap-embedded satellite can launch spiral density and spiral bending waves that propagate radially outwards from the gap's outer edge. These one-armed waves propagate via the secular part of the ring's self-attraction, and they tend to have low amplitudes and long wavelengths, 100's of km in Saturn's A ring. The excitation of these waves also damps the satellite's e and I at rates that depend on the satellite's mass, ring surface density, the gap width, and the planet's oblateness (Hahn 2007). These analytic predictions are also confirmed using the `rings-model' of Hahn (2003) to simulate a ring-satellite system. Whether this secular interaction can stabilize a satellite's e and I will be determined, and whether these low-amplitude waves have any observational consequences will also be discussed.

  18. Chariklo's ring system 3. Exploration of possible Chariklo spin/ring orbit resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, Bruno; El Moutamid, Maryame; Leiva, Rodrigo; Berard, Diane; Renner, Stéfan

    2016-10-01

    Two dense and narrow rings orbit the Centaur object Chariklo at respective radii of 391±3 and 405±3 km (Braga-Ribas et al., Nature 508, 72, 2014).With a rotation period of PC = 7.004 ± 0.036 h (Fornasier et al. A.&A. 568, L11, 2014), Chariklo may adopt either a MacLaurin spheroid or a Jacobi ellipsoid shape, depending on density (and assuming hydrostatic equilibrium). Moreover, being a small icy body, Chariklo is prone to topographic features at several-kilometer scales.Meanwhile, scarce information on Chariklo's size and shape is presently available from occultation works, as only five chords have been obtained during three occultations that have been observed in 2013 and 2014. Those data are consistent with a MacLaurin shape with axes a, b, c ~ 133x133x110 km and mass MC ~ (1-2)x1019 kg, or with a Jacobi shape with a, b, c ~ 167x133x124 km and MC ~ 0.6-0.7x1019 kg, see the companion paper by Leiva et al.Those values imply a corotation radius between 190 and 280 km, depending on the adopted value of MC. This is well inside the ring radii, ruling out the corotation resonance as the main driver for the ring orbital dynamics.The ring orbital period could lie between Pr ~12 and 22 h, depending on MC, thus allowing possible resonances with Chariklo's spin rate ΩC. Two models will be explored. One model assumes a MacLaurin shape with a topographic feature of mass m that acts as perturbing satellites with orbital radius and period a and PC, respectively. This creates 1st order Linblad-type resonances of the kind Pr/PC = m+1/m (m integer) whose possible effects on the ring structure will be evaluated.The other model assumes a Jacobi shape that creates a perturbing potential GMc/r3 [(A+B-2C)2 + (3/2)(A-B).cos(2θ)] with θ= λ-ΩC.t in Chariklo's equatorial plane, where A, B, C are the moments of inertia around a, b, c, respectively, and λ is the mean longitude. This creates qth order Linblad-type resonances of the kind Pr/PC = q+2/q (q integer) that will also be

  19. Ab initio study of the influence of resonance stabilization on intramolecular ring closure reactions of hydrocarbon radicals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Villano, Stephanie M; Dean, Anthony M

    2016-03-28

    The intramolecular ring closure reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbon radicals potentially play an important role for the formation of molecular weight growth species, especially during the pyrolysis and oxidation of alkenes under low to intermediate temperatures. In this work we investigated a series of intramolecular cycloaddition reactions of both allylic- and alkyl-type dienyl radicals. In the first set of reactions, a resonant linear radical is converted into a non-resonant cyclic radical. In the second set, a non-resonant linear alkenyl radical isomerizes to either a resonant cyclic radical or a cyclic carbinyl radical. In both cases, three different reaction schemes are examined based on the location of the partially-formed resonance structure in the cyclic transition state. For each reaction scheme, both the endo- and exo-pathways were investigated. High pressure rate parameters are obtained from the results of CBS-QB3 electronic structure calculations combined with canonical transition state theory calculations. The results are discussed in the context of a Benson-type model to examine the impact of the partially-formed resonance stabilization on both the activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The results are compared to previously reported rate parameters for cycloaddition reactions of alkenyl radicals. The differences in the activation energies are primarily due to the bimolecular component of the activation energy. However, in some cases, the presence of the partial resonance structure significantly increases the strain energy for the ring that is formed in the transition state. The pre-exponential factors are also impacted by the formation of a partial resonance structure in the transition state. Lastly, the C6H9 potential energy surface is examined to show how the trends that are outlined here can be used to estimate rate parameters, which are needed to analyze pressure-dependent reaction systems.

  20. Numerical experiments in ringing of offshore systems under viscous loads

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, K.R.; Kareem, A.

    1996-12-31

    A phenomenon which has recently received much attention in offshore engineering is the ringing response of structures. This high frequency transient type response has been observed in nature, particularly in tension leg platforms (TLPs). Given the implications of this behavior on the fatigue life of tendons, it is important that it be considered for response analysis. Significant progress has been made in recent years in identifying the nonlinear mechanisms that induce ringing in complex offshore structural systems. This introductory study-uses a simple model to numerically demonstrates several of the more salient features that are commonly cited in current literature, and shows that viscous loads may result in inducing ringing type response of members under certain conditions. Ringing response in pitch due to viscous loading is simulated on a column piercing the surface, and the significant contributing force mechanisms are identified. System characteristics are altered to ameliorate the performance of these systems.

  1. The Rings Node for the Planetary Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Bollinger, Kenneth J.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    1994-01-01

    The Planetary Data System's Rings Node is devoted to the archiving and distributing of scientific data sets relevant to planetary ring systems. The two major classes of ring data are images and occultation profiles, although a variety of additional data types (e.g. spectra, particle absorption signatures, etc.) are also of interest. A large fraction of our data sets are from the Voyager missions to the outer planets, but Earth-based and Hubble Space Telescope data sets are also represented. Archiving work often includes re-formatting the data into standardized formats and reconstructing some of the data processing steps. The Rings Node also performs a variety of services to support research into these data sets. These services include developing on-line catalogs and information systems, filling orders for data, developing software tools, and coordinating special observing campaigns.

  2. A coupled "AB" system: Rogue waves and modulation instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wu, C F; Grimshaw, R H J; Chow, K W; Chan, H N

    2015-10-01

    Rogue waves are unexpectedly large and localized displacements from an equilibrium position or an otherwise calm background. For the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) model widely used in fluid mechanics and optics, these waves can occur only when dispersion and nonlinearity are of the same sign, a regime of modulation instability. For coupled NLS equations, rogue waves will arise even if dispersion and nonlinearity are of opposite signs in each component as new regimes of modulation instability will appear in the coupled system. The same phenomenon will be demonstrated here for a coupled "AB" system, a wave-current interaction model describing baroclinic instability processes in geophysical flows. Indeed, the onset of modulation instability correlates precisely with the existence criterion for rogue waves for this system. Transitions from "elevation" rogue waves to "depression" rogue waves are elucidated analytically. The dispersion relation as a polynomial of the fourth order may possess double pairs of complex roots, leading to multiple configurations of rogue waves for a given set of input parameters. For special parameter regimes, the dispersion relation reduces to a cubic polynomial, allowing the existence criterion for rogue waves to be computed explicitly. Numerical tests correlating modulation instability and evolution of rogue waves were conducted.

  3. A ring system detected around the Centaur (10199) Chariklo.

    PubMed

    Braga-Ribas, F; Sicardy, B; Ortiz, J L; Snodgrass, C; Roques, F; Vieira-Martins, R; Camargo, J I B; Assafin, M; Duffard, R; Jehin, E; Pollock, J; Leiva, R; Emilio, M; Machado, D I; Colazo, C; Lellouch, E; Skottfelt, J; Gillon, M; Ligier, N; Maquet, L; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Ramos Gomes, A; Kervella, P; Monteiro, H; Sfair, R; El Moutamid, M; Tancredi, G; Spagnotto, J; Maury, A; Morales, N; Gil-Hutton, R; Roland, S; Ceretta, A; Gu, S-h; Wang, X-b; Harpsøe, K; Rabus, M; Manfroid, J; Opitom, C; Vanzi, L; Mehret, L; Lorenzini, L; Schneiter, E M; Melia, R; Lecacheux, J; Colas, F; Vachier, F; Widemann, T; Almenares, L; Sandness, R G; Char, F; Perez, V; Lemos, P; Martinez, N; Jørgensen, U G; Dominik, M; Roig, F; Reichart, D E; LaCluyze, A P; Haislip, J B; Ivarsen, K M; Moore, J P; Frank, N R; Lambas, D G

    2014-04-03

    Hitherto, rings have been found exclusively around the four giant planets in the Solar System. Rings are natural laboratories in which to study dynamical processes analogous to those that take place during the formation of planetary systems and galaxies. Their presence also tells us about the origin and evolution of the body they encircle. Here we report observations of a multichord stellar occultation that revealed the presence of a ring system around (10199) Chariklo, which is a Centaur--that is, one of a class of small objects orbiting primarily between Jupiter and Neptune--with an equivalent radius of 124 ±  9 kilometres (ref. 2). There are two dense rings, with respective widths of about 7 and 3 kilometres, optical depths of 0.4 and 0.06, and orbital radii of 391 and 405 kilometres. The present orientation of the ring is consistent with an edge-on geometry in 2008, which provides a simple explanation for the dimming of the Chariklo system between 1997 and 2008, and for the gradual disappearance of ice and other absorption features in its spectrum over the same period. This implies that the rings are partly composed of water ice. They may be the remnants of a debris disk, possibly confined by embedded, kilometre-sized satellites.

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei; Wilson, King; Xu, Huijuan; Zigrosser, Douglas

    2016-04-05

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. Also, the majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. Finally, this paper presents the design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    DOE PAGES

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei; ...

    2016-04-05

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. Also, the majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. Finally, thismore » paper presents the design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.« less

  6. Quantized levitation states of superconducting multiple-ring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, S.B.; Fink, H.J.

    1996-02-01

    The quantized levitation, trapped, and suspension states of a magnetic microsphere held in equilibrium by two fixed superconducting (SC) microrings are calculated by minimizing the free energy of the system. Each state is a discrete function of two independent fluxoid quantum numbers of the rings. When the radii of the SC rings are of the same order as the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length {xi}({ital T}), the system exhibits a small set of gravity and temperature-dependent levels. The levels of a weakly magnetized particle are sensitive functions of the gravitational field, indicating potential application as an accelerometer, and for trapping small magnetic particles in outer space or on Earth. The equilibrium states of a SC ring levitated by another SC ring are also calculated. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Progress Report on the g-2 Storage Ring Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.A.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.; Green, M.A.; Jackson, J.; Jia, L.; Krienen, F.; Meier, R.; Meng, W.; Morse, W.; Pai, C.; Polk, I.; Prodell, A.; Shutt, R.; Snydstrup, L.; Yamamoto, A.

    1995-06-01

    The 3.1 GeV muon storage ring for the g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory has three large solenoid magnets that form a continuous 1.451 tesla storage ring dipole with an average beam bend radius of 7.1 meters. In addition to the three storage ring solenoids, there is an inflector dipole with nested dipole coils that create very little stray magnetic field. A superconducting shield on the inflector gets rid of most of the remaining stray flux. This paper reports on the progress made on the storage ring solenoid magnet system and the inflector as of June 1995. The results of cryogenic system tests are briefly reported.

  8. Development of Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) for Vehicles Braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Vu Trieu; Oamen, Godwin; Vassiljeva, Kristina; Teder, Leo

    2016-11-01

    This paper develops a real laboratory of anti-lock braking system (ABS) for vehicle and conducts real experiments to verify the ability of this ABS to prevent the vehicle wheel from being locked while braking. Two controllers of PID and fuzzy logic are tested for analysis and comparison. This ABS laboratory is designed for bachelor and master students to simulate and analyze performances of ABS with different control techniques on various roads and load conditions. This paper provides educational theories and practices on the design of control for system dynamics.

  9. The Ring System Discovered Around the Centaur Object (10199) Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Ortiz, J. L.; Vieira Martins, R.; Colas, F.; Duffard, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Desmars, J.; Gulbis, A.; Assafin, M.; Maquet, L.; Beisker, W.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Vachier, F.; Dumas, C.; Ivanov, V. D.; Renner, S.; Bath, K. L.; Klotz, A.; Pollock, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of a stellar occultation on 03 June 2013 led to the discovery of the first ring system around a small Solar System object, the Centaur (10199) Chariklo (Braga-Ribas et al. 2014, Nature, 508, 72). The object has a radius of about 125 km and moves on an unstable orbit between Saturn and Uranus, with lifetime of about 10 Myr. The fifth ring system ever discovered (after those around the four giant planets) is made of two dense and narrow rings with respective widths of 7 and 3 kilometers, normal optical depths of 0.4 and 0.06, and orbital radii of 391 and 405 kilometers, respectively (see figure). They are separated by an empty gap of about 9 km (see Figure 1). Their current configuration may be explained by the presence of putative kilometric-sized satellites. By means of the shepherd mechanism, satellites can confine and open the gap between the rings, otherwise they would spread out in few thousand years. From 1997 to 2008, the Chariklo system exhibited an unexplained behavior. It dimmed by 0.6 in absolute magnitude and the water-ice band in its spectrum, formerly observed, could not be detected in 2008. All this is simply explained by the rings' pole orientation, which implies that they were seen edge-on in 2007-2008. We can also calculate their reflectivity I/F ~ 0.1. Spectroscopic and photometric observations of the system allowed us to calculate the amount of water ice and silicate elements in the rings as well as on the main body. No water ice is detectable on the surface of Chariklo. New stellar occultations by the Chariklo system were observed in 2014, and they show the fine structure of the rings as well confirm the preferred pole position from the 2013 event. These findings will be presented and possible formation scenarios will be discussed.

  10. Substrate specificity and structural characteristics of the novel Rieske nonheme iron aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases NidAB and NidA3B3 from Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Ohgew; Kim, Seong-Jae; Freeman, James P; Song, Jaekyeong; Baek, Songjoon; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2010-06-15

    The Rieske nonheme iron aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases (RHOs) NidAB and NidA3B3 from Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 have been implicated in the initial oxidation of high-molecular-weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), forming cis-dihydrodiols. To clarify how these two RHOs are functionally different with respect to the degradation of HMW PAHs, we investigated their substrate specificities to 13 representative aromatic substrates (toluene, m-xylene, phthalate, biphenyl, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene) by enzyme reconstitution studies of Escherichia coli. Both Nid systems were identified to be compatible with type V electron transport chain (ETC) components, consisting of a [3Fe-4S]-type ferredoxin and a glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase. Metabolite profiles indicated that the Nid systems oxidize a wide range of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, producing various isomeric dihydrodiol and phenolic compounds. NidAB and NidA3B3 showed the highest conversion rates for pyrene and fluoranthene, respectively, with high product regiospecificity, whereas other aromatic substrates were converted at relatively low regiospecificity. Structural characteristics of the active sites of the Nid systems were investigated and compared to those of other RHOs. The NidAB and NidA3B3 systems showed the largest substrate-binding pockets in the active sites, which satisfies spatial requirements for accepting HMW PAHs. Spatially conserved aromatic amino acids, Phe-Phe-Phe, in the substrate-binding pockets of the Nid systems appeared to play an important role in keeping aromatic substrates within the reactive distance from the iron atom, which allows each oxygen to attack the neighboring carbons.

  11. Gravito-electrodynamics and the structure of planetary ring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent spacecraft observations of the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems have highlighted a plethora of interesting new phenomena associated with those regions containing fine (micron and sub-micron sized) dust. Recognizing that these dust grains, by virtue of being immersed within the planetary magnetospheres, are electrostatically charged to the point that they experience comparable gravitational and electric forces, a new 'gravito-electrodynamic' theory has been developed to describe their dynamics. This theory has been successful in explaining all these phenomena in a systematic way. In this review, the basic model and its range of validity are outlined, and its application to the Saturnian and Jovian ring systems are discussed.

  12. SIMULATION STUDY AND INITIAL TEST OF THESNS RING RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hengjie; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Champion, Mark; Chu, Paul; Cousineau, Sarah M; Hardek, Thomas W; Plum, Michael A; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Piller, Chip

    2008-01-01

    The rfsimulator code was developed for the study of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) dual-harmonic ring RF control. It uses time-domain solvers to compute beam-cavity interactions and FFT methods to simulate the time responses of the linear RF system. The important elements of the system considered in the model include beam loading, dynamic cavity detuning, circuit bandwidth, loop delay, proportional-integral controller for feedback and adaptive feed forward, stochastic noise, width-in-turn loop parameter change, beam current fluctuation, and bunch leakage. As the beam power increases, beam loss in the ring goes up and thus precise control of the bunching RF phase and amplitude is required to limit beam loss. The code will help in the development of a functional RF control and in achieving the goal of minimizing beam loss in the accumulator ring.

  13. Clump detections and limits on moons in Jupiter's ring system.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Mark R; Cheng, Andrew F; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan; Spencer, John R; Throop, Henry B; Birath, Emma M; Rose, Debi; Moore, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-12

    The dusty jovian ring system must be replenished continuously from embedded source bodies. The New Horizons spacecraft has performed a comprehensive search for kilometer-sized moons within the system, which might have revealed the larger members of this population. No new moons were found, however, indicating a sharp cutoff in the population of jovian bodies smaller than 8-kilometer-radius Adrastea. However, the search revealed two families of clumps in the main ring: one close pair and one cluster of three to five. All orbit within a brighter ringlet just interior to Adrastea. Their properties are very different from those of the few other clumpy rings known; the origin and nonrandom distribution of these features remain unexplained, but resonant confinement by Metis may play a role.

  14. Ab initio QM/MM free energy simulations of peptide bond formation in the ribosome support an eight-membered ring reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, John Z H; Xiang, Yun

    2012-10-03

    Ab initio QM/MM free-energy simulations were carried out to study the peptide bond formation reaction in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The QM part of the reaction was treated by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, while the MM part including the solvent and RNA environment was described by molecular force field. The calculated free-energy surfaces for the two popular reaction mechanisms, the six- and eight-membered ring reactions, exhibited large energetic differences which favor the eight-membered reaction mechanism. The simulated quasi-transition state structures clearly indicated a "late" feature consistent with previous theoretical studies. Also the important functional role played by water molecules in the active site of the ribosome and its implication in ribozymic catalysis was discussed in detail.

  15. Synthesis of the ABCDEF and FGHI ring system of yessotoxin and adriatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Rainier, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Yessotoxin and adriatoxin are members of the polycyclic ether family of marine natural products. Outlined in this article is our synthetic approach to two subunits of these targets. Central to our strategy is a coupling sequence that employs an olefinic-ester cyclization reaction. As outlined, this sequence was used in two coupling sequences. First it was used to merge the A,B- and E,F-bicyclic precursors and in the process generate the C, D-rings. Second it was used to couple the F- and I-rings while building the eight-membered G-ring and subsequently the H-ring pyran. PMID:26956788

  16. Nonlinear hopping transport in ring systems and open channels.

    PubMed

    Einax, Mario; Körner, Martin; Maass, Philipp; Nitzan, Abraham

    2010-01-21

    We study the nonlinear hopping transport in one-dimensional rings and open channels. Analytical results are derived for the stationary current response to a constant bias without assuming any specific coupling of the rates to the external fields. It is shown that anomalous large effective jump lengths, as observed in recent experiments by taking the ratio of the third-order nonlinear and the linear conductivity, can occur already in ordered systems. Rectification effects due to site energy disorder in ring systems are expected to become irrelevant for large system sizes. In open channels, in contrast, rectification effects occur already for disorder in the jump barriers and do not vanish in the thermodynamic limit. Numerical solutions for a sinusoidal bias show that the ring system provides a good description for the transport behavior in the open channel for intermediate and high frequencies. For low frequencies temporal variations in the mean particle number have to be taken into account in the open channel, which cannot be captured in the more simple ring model.

  17. Ab initio centroid path integral molecular dynamics: Application to vibrational dynamics of diatomic molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yasuhito; Ohta, Koji; Kinugawa, Kenichi

    2004-01-01

    An ab initio centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) method is developed by combining the CMD method with the ab initio molecular orbital method. The ab initio CMD method is applied to vibrational dynamics of diatomic molecules, H2 and HF. For the H2 molecule, the temperature dependence of the peak frequency of the vibrational spectral density is investigated. The results are compared with those obtained by the ab initio classical molecular dynamics method and exact quantum mechanical treatment. It is shown that the vibrational frequency obtained from the ab initio CMD approaches the exact first excitation frequency as the temperature lowers. For the HF molecule, the position autocorrelation function is also analyzed in detail. The present CMD method is shown to well reproduce the exact quantum result for the information on the vibrational properties of the system.

  18. Rf System Requirements for JLab’s MEIC Collider Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Li, Rui; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. At the top energy are the electron and ion collider rings. For the ion ring, it accelerates five long ion bunches to colliding energy and rebunches ions into a train of very short bunches before colliding. A set of low frequency RF system is needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping. Another set of high frequency RF cavities is needed to rebunch ions. For the electron ring, superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed to compensate the synchrotron radiation energy loss. The impedance of the SRF cavities must be low enough to keep the high current electron beam stable. The preliminary design requirements of these RF cavities are presented.

  19. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joel S. Karp, principal investigator

    2004-12-14

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  20. Gas-phase infrared and ab initio study of the unstable CF3CNO molecule and its stable furoxan ring dimer.

    PubMed

    Havasi, Balázs; Pasinszki, Tibor; Westwood, Nicholas P C

    2005-05-05

    The unstable trifluoroacetonitrile N-oxide molecule, CF3CNO, has been generated in high yield in the gas phase from CF3BrC=NOH and studied for the first time by gas-phase mid-infrared spectroscopy. Cold trapping of this molecule followed by slow warming forms the stable ring dimer, bis(trifluoromethyl)furoxan, also investigated by gas-phase infrared spectroscopy. The spectroscopy provides an investigation into the vibrational character of the two molecules, the assignments supported by calculations of the harmonic vibrational frequencies using in the case of CF3CNO both ab initio (CCSD(T)) and density functional theory (B3LYP) and B3LYP for the ring dimer. The ground-state structures of both molecules were investigated at the B3LYP level of theory, with CF3CNO further investigated using coupled-cluster. The CCSD(T) method suggests a slightly bent (C(s)) structure for CF3CNO, while the B3LYP method (with basis sets ranging from 6-311G(d) to cc-pVTZ) suggests a close-to-linear or linear CCNO chain. The CCN bending potential in CF3CNO was explored at the CCSD(T)(fc)/cc-pVTZ level, with the results suggesting that CF3CNO exhibits strong quasi-symmetric top behavior with a barrier to linearity of 174 cm(-1). Since both isomerization and dimerization are feasible loss processes for this unstable molecule, the relative stability of CF3CNO with respect to the known cyanate (CF3OCN), isocyanate (CF3NCO), and fulminate (CF3ONC) isomers and the mechanism of the dimerization process to the ring furoxan and other isomers were studied with density functional theory.

  1. Documentation for the token ring network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Jeffery H.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    A manual is presented which describes the language features of the Token Ring Network Simulation System. The simulation system is a powerful simulation tool for token ring networks which allows the specification of various Medium Access Control (MAC) layer protocols as well as the specification of various features of upper layer ISO protocols. In addition to these features, it also allows the user to specify message and station classes virtually to any degree of detail desired. The choice of a language instead of an interactive system to specify network parameters was dictated by both flexibility and time considerations. The language was developed specifically for the simulation system, and is very simple. It is also user friendly in that language elements which do not apply to the case at hand are ignored rather than treated as errors.

  2. A Novel Impedimetric Microfluidic Analysis System for Transgenic Protein Cry1Ab Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shunru; Ye, Zunzhong; Wang, Yixian; Ying, Yibin

    2017-01-01

    Impedimetric analysis method is an important tool for food safety detection. In this work, a novel impedimetric microfluidic analysis system consisted of a printed gold electrode chip and a microfluidic flow cell was developed for sensitive and selective detection of transgenic protein Cry1Ab. Anti-Cry1Ab aptamer coated magnetic beads were used to recognize transgenic protein Cry1Ab and form Cry1Ab-aptamer modified magnetic beads. After separation, the obtained Cry1Ab-aptamer modified magnetic beads were dissolved in 0.01 M mannitol and followed by injection into the microfluidic flow cell for impedimetric measurement. At the frequency of 358.3 Hz, the impedance signal shows a good linearity with the concentrations of Cry1Ab protein at a range from 0 to 0.2 nM, and the detection limit is 0.015 nM. The results demonstrate that the impedimetric microfluidic analysis system provides an alternative way to enable sensitive, rapid and specific detection of transgenic protein Cry1Ab. PMID:28251986

  3. Slip-ring-based multi-transducer photoacoustic tomography system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zijian; Li, Wenzhao; Li, Changhui

    2016-06-15

    Although the transducer array-based photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system provides fast imaging speed, its high cost and system complexity hinder its implementations. In this Letter, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the electrical slip ring was used to develop a PAT system that compromises the cost and the imaging speed. This system enables using multiple transducers to image the target simultaneously and continuously. In addition, it is versatile to use different transducers. The performance of this PAT system has been demonstrated by both phantom and in vivo animal experiments.

  4. A conceptual Saturn ring observer mission using standard radioisotope power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    Saturn remains of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields.

  5. Dust in the Jovian System: Streams, Clouds and Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Gruen, E.

    2003-04-01

    Spacecraft investigations during the last ten years have vastly improved our knowledge about dust in the Jovian system. All Galilean satellites, and probably all smaller satellites as well, are sources of dust in the Jovian system. In-situ measurements with the dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have for the first time demonstrated the electromagnetic interaction of charged dust grains with the interplanetary magnetic field and with a planetary magnetosphere. Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a giant mass-velocity spectrometer for charged 10-nanometer dust grains. These grains are released from Jupiter's moon Io with a typical rate of ˜ 1 kg s-1. The seven-year long record of Galileo in-situ dust measurements revealed significant variations of the fluxes of the dust stream particles with Jovian local time which are caused by the dawn-dusk asymmetry of the Io plasma torus. The streams probe the plasma conditions in the torus, and they can be used as a potential monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity. The joint Galileo-Cassini dust measurements at Jupiter imply stream particle speeds up to 400 km s-1. All Galilean satellites are surrounded by tenuous impact-generated clouds of mostly sub-micrometer ejecta grains. Jovian rings not only exist in the well-known region of the main and gossamer rings but also much farther out. Very tenuous rings composed of mostly micron-sized grains have been detected in-situ in the region between the Galilean moons and further beyond out to ˜ 250 R_J from the planet. The dust densities there are much too low to allow detection with imaging techniques. The measurements have demonstrated that impact-ejecta derived from hypervelocity impacts onto satellites are the major constituent of dusty planetary rings. On 5 November 2002 Galileo traversed Jupiter's gossamer rings for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. Several hundred dust impacts have been detected during this passage with the dust detector on

  6. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O'CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  7. Status of the SLC damping ring kicker systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mattison, T.; Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Gough, D.; Gross, G.; Harvey, A.; Hutchinson, D.; Nguyen, M.

    1991-05-01

    The damping ring kickers for the SLAC Linear Collider must meet extreme requirements on rise and fall time, flatness, time and amplitude jitter and drift, voltage, repetition rate, and reliability. After several generations of improvements to the pulsers, magnets, and controls, and evolution in the understanding of the requirements, the kicker systems are no longer a serious constraint on SLC performance. Implications for future linear colliders are discussed. 14 refs.

  8. Uranus. [Scientific study of planetary structure, ring systems, and magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstralh, J.T.

    1987-03-01

    Observations and theoretical investigations of the Uranus (U) system from the period 1983-1986 are reviewed, with an emphasis on the Voyager 2 encounter with U on January 26, 1986. Topics addressed include the bulk U composition, structure, and heat flux; the U atmospheric composition, structure, and circulation; the U rings; the major and minor U satellites; the U magnetosphere; and the Lyman-alpha 'electroglow' observed on the sunlit hemisphere of U. 191 references.

  9. Quantum interference in an electron-hole graphene ring system

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, D.; Schmidt, H.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-04

    Quantum interference is observed in a graphene ring system via the Aharonov Bohm effect. As graphene is a gapless semiconductor, this geometry allows to study the unique situation of quantum interference between electrons and holes in addition to the unipolar quantum interference. The period and amplitude of the observed Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are independent of the sign of the applied gate voltage showing the equivalence between unipolar and dipolar interference.

  10. Irregular Aharonov-Bohm effect for interacting electrons in a ZnO quantum ring.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tapash; Manaselyan, Aram; Barseghyan, Manuk

    2017-02-22

    The electronic states and optical transitions of a ZnO quantum ring containing few interacting electrons in an applied magnetic field are found to be very different from those in a conventional semiconductor system, such as a GaAs ring. The strong Zeeman interaction and the Coulomb interaction of the ZnO system, two important characteristics of the electron system in ZnO, exert a profound influence on the electron states and on the optical properties of the ring. In particular, our results indicate that the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in a ZnO quantum ring strongly depends on the electron number. In fact, for two electrons in the ZnO ring, the AB oscillations become aperiodic, while for three electrons (interacting) the AB oscillations completely disappear. Therefore, unlike in conventional quantum ring topology, here the AB effect (and the resulting persistent current) can be controlled by varying the electron number.

  11. Irregular Aharonov-Bohm effect for interacting electrons in a ZnO quantum ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tapash; Manaselyan, Aram; Barseghyan, Manuk

    2017-02-01

    The electronic states and optical transitions of a ZnO quantum ring containing few interacting electrons in an applied magnetic field are found to be very different from those in a conventional semiconductor system, such as a GaAs ring. The strong Zeeman interaction and the Coulomb interaction of the ZnO system, two important characteristics of the electron system in ZnO, exert a profound influence on the electron states and on the optical properties of the ring. In particular, our results indicate that the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in a ZnO quantum ring strongly depends on the electron number. In fact, for two electrons in the ZnO ring, the AB oscillations become aperiodic, while for three electrons (interacting) the AB oscillations completely disappear. Therefore, unlike in conventional quantum ring topology, here the AB effect (and the resulting persistent current) can be controlled by varying the electron number.

  12. The fluid systems for the SLD Cherenkov ring imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; McCulloch, M.; McShurley, D.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Peterson, H.; Ratcliff, B.; Reif, R.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Shaw, H.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Vavra, J.; Watt, R.; Weber, T.; Williams, S.H.; Baird, K.; Jacques, P.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R.; Stamer, P.; Word, G.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Yellin, S.; Ben-David, R.; Manly, S.; Snyder, J.; Turk, J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Liu, X.; Schneider, M.; Williams, D.A.; Coller, J.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; d`Oliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Martinez, J.; Nussbaum, M.; Santha, A.K.S.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Stockdale, I.; Wilson, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of the fluid delivery, monitor and control systems for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The systems deliver drift gas (C{sub 2}H{sub 6} + TMAE), radiator gas (C{sub 5}F{sub 12} + N{sub 2}) and radiator liquid (C{sub 6}F{sub 14}). Measured critical quantities such as electron lifetime in the drift gas and ultra-violet (UV) transparencies of the radiator fluids, together with the operational experience, are also reported.

  13. Reliability analysis for LEB ring magnet power system in SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, K.

    1991-11-01

    The LEB ring magnet power system contains six subsystems, supervisory control, power supplies, regulation, DC bus, resonant cells, and fault sensing network. The system availability of the total LEB RMPS is required to be 0.999. The work in this paper is to allocate the overall LEB RMPS reliability requirement into reliability requirements for each of the subsystems and lower-tier items. The Feasibility-of-Objective technique combining with engineering experience is the key for the allocation. MIL-HDBK-217F is used to derate SCR components. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Synthesis of nisin AB dicarba analogs using ring-closing metathesis: influence of sp(3) versus sp(2) hybridization of the α-carbon atom of residues dehydrobutyrine-2 and dehydroalanine-5 on the lipid II binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; van Herwerden, Eric F; van Doremalen, Mark F M; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2015-06-07

    Herein the synthesis of two nisin AB dicarba analogs is described, focusing on amino acid modifications at positions 2 and 5. The nisin mimics were synthesized by a combination of solid phase synthesis of the linear peptides, followed by macrocyclization via ring-closing metathesis and fragment assembly by means of solution phase chemistry. The two N-terminal nisin AB-fragment mimics contain either the native dehydrobutyrine (Dhb)/dehydroalanine (Dha) amino acid residues or alanine at position 2 and 5, respectively. The native dehydrobutyrine at position 2 and dehydroalanine at position 5 were introduced as their precursors, namely threonine and serine, respectively, and subsequent dehydration was carried out by EDCI/CuCl as the condensing agent. Both AB-fragment mimics were analyzed in a lipid II binding assay and it was found that the Ala2/Ala5 AB-mimic (2) showed a reduced activity, while the Dhb2/Dha5 AB-mimic (3) was as active as the native AB-fragment (1).

  15. ORBITAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE σ Ori Aa, Ab, B TRIPLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Simón-Díaz, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Apellániz, J. Maíz; Lorenzo, J.; Negueruela, I.; Dorda, R.; Marco, A.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Barbá, R. H.; Montes, D.; Pellerin, A.; Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Sota, A.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a complete characterization of the astrophysical properties of the σ Ori Aa, Ab, B hierarchical triple system and an improved set of orbital parameters for the highly eccentric σ Ori Aa, Ab spectroscopic binary. We compiled a spectroscopic data set comprising 90 high-resolution spectra covering a total time span of 1963 days. We applied the Lehman-Filhés method for a detailed orbital analysis of the radial velocity curves and performed a combined quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the σ Ori Aa, Ab, B system by means of the stellar atmosphere code FASTWIND. We used our own plus other available information on photometry and distance to the system for measuring the radii, luminosities, and spectroscopic masses of the three components. We also inferred evolutionary masses and stellar ages using the Bayesian code BONNSAI. The orbital analysis of the new radial velocity curves led to a very accurate orbital solution of the σ Ori Aa, Ab pair. We provided indirect arguments indicating that σ Ori B is a fast-rotating early B dwarf. The FASTWIND+BONNSAI analysis showed that the Aa, Ab pair contains the hottest and most massive components of the triple system while σ Ori B is a bit cooler and less massive. The derived stellar ages of the inner pair are intriguingly younger than the one widely accepted for the σ Orionis cluster, at 3 ± 1 Ma. The outcome of this study will be of key importance for a precise determination of the distance to the σ Orionis cluster, the interpretation of the strong X-ray emission detected for σ Ori Aa, Ab, B, and the investigation of the formation and evolution of multiple massive stellar systems and substellar objects.

  16. High resolution upgrade of the ATF damping ring BPM system

    SciTech Connect

    Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Frisch, J.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Seryi, A.; Smith, T.; Woodley, M.; Briegel, C.; Dysert, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished in its first stage, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R&D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital downconversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also tests a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  17. Spin polarization in one dimensional ring with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Duan-Yang; Xia, Jian-Bai

    2014-01-28

    We investigate theoretically spin polarization in a square AB ring and in a circular AB ring with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) and the magnetic flux. It is shown that in the presence of both the RSOI and the perpendicular magnetic field, the AB rings can work as a spin polarizer, and the spin polarization transport can be modulated by the values of the system parameters. In addition, we find that the square ring is more suitable for a spin polarizer due to its higher stability.

  18. O-Ring sealing arrangements for ultra-high vacuum systems

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chang-Kyo; Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    An all metal reusable O-ring sealing arrangement for sealing two concentric tubes in an ultra-high vacuum system. An O-ring of a heat recoverable alloy such as Nitinol is concentrically positioned between protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes. The O-ring is installed between the tubes while in a stressed martensitic state and is made to undergo a thermally induced transformation to an austenitic state. During the transformation the O-ring expands outwardly and contracts inwardly toward a previously sized austenitic configuration, thereby sealing against the protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes.

  19. AB-180 circulatory support system: summary of development and phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Griffin, W P; Savage, E B; Clark, R E; Pacella, J J; Johnson, G A; Magovern, J A; Magovern, G J

    1998-01-01

    The AB-180 Circulatory Support System (AB-180 CSS; Cardiac Assist Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA) is a left ventricular assist system for investigational use in patients with postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock who are refractory to standard treatment with an intra-aortic balloon pump, pharmacologic treatment, or both. The intent of the AB-180 CSS is to provide temporary (up to 14 days) mechanical circulatory support until the heart recovers adequate mechanical function. The system consists of a small implantable centrifugal pump and a controller. A unique infusion system produces a hydrodynamic bearing between rotational and stationary components of the AB-180 CSS pump. This infusion system also provides a source of heparin for localized anticoagulation. Extensive bench and animal work has illustrated anticoagulation requirements, established operating guidelines, and demonstrated safety and efficacy. An investigational device exemption has been granted for a Phase I, five patient feasibility study at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. To date, the pump has been implanted in one patient. The results from this first case are presented here.

  20. Spin transfer in a ferromagnet-quantum dot and tunnel-barrier-coupled Aharonov-Bohm ring system with Rashba spin-orbit interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Su, Gang

    2010-05-12

    The spin transfer effect in a ferromagnet-quantum dot (insulator)-ferromagnet Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring system with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interactions is investigated by means of the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function method. It is found that both the magnitude and direction of the spin transfer torque (STT) acting on the right ferromagnet electrode can be effectively controlled by changing the magnetic flux threading the AB ring or the gate voltage on the quantum dot. The STT can be greatly augmented by matching a proper magnetic flux and an SO interaction at a cost of low electrical current. The STT, electrical current and spin current are uncovered to oscillate with the magnetic flux. The present results are expected to be useful for information storage in nanospintronics.

  1. TRANSIT MODEL OF PLANETS WITH MOON AND RING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tusnski, Luis Ricardo M.; Valio, Adriana E-mail: avalio@craam.mackenzie.br

    2011-12-10

    Since the discovery of the first exoplanets, those most adequate for life to begin and evolve have been sought. Due to observational bias, however, most of the discovered planets so far are gas giants, precluding their habitability. However, if these hot Jupiters are located in the habitable zones of their host stars, and if rocky moons orbit them, then these moons may be habitable. In this work, we present a model for planetary transit simulation considering the presence of moons and planetary rings around a planet. The moon's orbit is considered to be circular and coplanar with the planetary orbit. The other physical and orbital parameters of the star, planet, moon, and rings can be adjusted in each simulation. It is possible to simulate as many successive transits as desired. Since the presence of spots on the surface of the star may produce a signal similar to that of the presence of a moon, our model also allows for the inclusion of starspots. The result of the simulation is a light curve with a planetary transit. White noise may also be added to the light curves to produce curves similar to those obtained by the CoRoT and Kepler space telescopes. The goal is to determine the criteria for detectability of moons and/or ring systems using photometry. The results show that it is possible to detect moons with radii as little as 1.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with CoRoT and 0.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with Kepler.

  2. The Ring System of Saturn as Seen by Cassini-VIMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.

    2015-08-01

    Since 2004 the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard Cassini has acquired numerous hyperspectral mosaics in the 0.35-5.1 μm spectral range of Saturn's main rings in very different illumination and viewing geometries. These observations have allowed us to infer the ring particles physical properties and composition: water ice abundance is estimated through the 1.25-1.5-2.0 μm band depths, chromophores distribution is derived from visible spectral slopes while organic material is traced by the aliphatic compounds signature at 3.42 μm which appears stronger on CD and C ring than on A-B rings (Filacchione et al., 2014). Observed reflectance spectra are fitted with a spectrophotometric model based on Montecarlo ray-tracing with the scope to infer particles composition while disentangling photometric effects (caused by multiple scattering, opposition surge and forward scattering) which depend on illumination/viewing geometries. Spectral bond albedo for different regions of the rings has been best-fitted using Hapke's radiative transfer modeling (Ciarniello et al, 2011) by choosing different mixtures of water ice, tholin, and amorphous carbon particles populations. While tholin distribution seems to be fairly constant across the rings, the amorphous carbon appears anti-correlated with optical depth. Moreover, dark material contamination is less effective on densest regions, where the more intense rejuvenation processes occur, in agreement with the ballistic transport theory (Cuzzi and Estrada,1998). Finally, the 3.6 μm continuum peak wavelength is used to infer particles temperature, which is anti-correlated with the albedo and the optical depth (tau): low-albedo/low-tau C ring and CD have higher temperatures than A-B rings where albedo and tau are high. This trend matches direct temperature measurements by CIRS (Spilker et al., 2013).

  3. Androgynous, Reconfigurable Closed Loop Feedback Controlled Low Impact Docking System With Load Sensing Electromagnetic Capture Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor); Morales, Ray H. (Inventor); Le, Thang D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a fully androgynous, reconfigurable closed loop feedback controlled low impact docking system with load sensing electromagnetic capture ring. The docking system of the present invention preferably comprises two Docking- assemblies, each docking assembly comprising a load sensing ring having an outer face, one of more electromagnets, one or more load cells coupled to said load sensing ring. The docking assembly further comprises a plurality of actuator arms coupled to said load sensing ring and capable of dynamically adjusting the orientation of said load sensing ring and a reconfigurable closed loop control system capable of analyzing signals originating from said plurality of load cells and of outputting real time control for each of the actuators. The docking assembly of the present invention incorporates an active load sensing system to automatically dynamically adjust the load sensing ring during capture instead of requiring significant force to push and realign the ring.

  4. The Second Ring-Moon System of Uranus: Discovery and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    Deep exposures of Uranus taken with the Hubble Space Telescope reveal two small moons and two faint rings. All orbit outside of Uranus's previously known (main) ring system, but interior to the large, classical moons. The outer new moon, U XXVI Mab, orbits at roughly twice the radius of the main rings and shares its orbit with a dust ring. The second moon, U XXVII Cupid, orbits just interior to the satellite Belinda. A second ring falls between the orbits of Portia and Rosalind, in a region with no known source bodies. Collectively, these constitute a densely-packed, rapidly varying and possibly unstable dynamica1 system.

  5. The second ring-moon system of Uranus: discovery and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Mark R; Lissauer, Jack J

    2006-02-17

    Deep exposures of Uranus taken with the Hubble Space Telescope reveal two small moons and two faint rings. All of them orbit outside of Uranus's previously known (main) ring system but are interior to the large, classical moons. The outer new moon, U XXVI Mab, orbits at roughly twice the radius of the main rings and shares its orbit with a dust ring. The second moon, U XXVII Cupid, orbits just interior to the satellite Belinda. A second ring falls between the orbits of Portia and Rosalind, in a region with no known source bodies. Collectively, these constitute a densely packed, rapidly varying, and possibly unstable dynamical system.

  6. A THIRD MASSIVE STAR COMPONENT IN THE {sigma} ORIONIS AB SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Simon-Diaz, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Lorenzo, J.

    2011-11-20

    We report on the detection of a third massive star component in the {sigma} Orionis AB system, traditionally considered as a binary system. The system has been monitored by the IACOB Spectroscopic Survey of Northern Massive Stars program, obtaining 23 high-resolution FIES-NOT spectra with a time span of {approx}2.5 years. The analysis of the radial velocity curves of the two spectroscopic components observed in the spectra has allowed us to obtain the orbital parameters of the system, resulting in a high eccentric orbit (e {approx} 0.78) with an orbital period of 143.5 {+-} 0.5 days. This result implies the actual presence of three stars in the {sigma} Orionis AB system when combined with previous results obtained from the study of the astrometric orbit (with an estimated period of {approx}157 years).

  7. Saturn's F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's F ring is a narrow ring of icy particles, located 3,400 km beyond the outer edge of the main ring system. Enigmatically, the F ring is accompanied on either side by two small satellites, Prometheus and Pandora, which are called shepherd satellites. The inner regular satellites of giant planets are thought to form by the accretion of particles from an ancient massive ring and subsequent outward migration. However, the origin of a system consisting of a narrow ring and shepherd satellites remains poorly understood. Here we present N-body numerical simulations to show that a collision of two of the small satellites that are thought to accumulate near the main ring's outer edge can produce a system similar to the F ring and its shepherd satellites. We find that if the two rubble-pile satellites have denser cores, such an impact results in only partial disruption of the satellites and the formation of a narrow ring of particles between two remnant satellites. Our simulations suggest that the seemingly unusual F ring system is a natural outcome at the final stage of the formation process of the ring-satellite system of giant planets.

  8. Synthesis of Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers by Living Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization. 4. Synthesis of Amorphous and Side Chain Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Metathesis Polymerization. 4. Synthesis of C N00014-89-JI542 Amorphous and Side Chain Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolym rs 6. AUTHOR(S) Zen Komiya, Coleen ...Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolymers by Zen Komiya, Coleen Pugh: and Richard R. Schrock* Submitted to Macromolecules F r fCarnegie Mellon University...Amorphous and Side Chain Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolymers by Zen Komiya, Coleen Pught, and Richard R. Schrock* Contribution from Department of Chemistry 6

  9. Serious Gaming for Test & Evaluation of Clean-Slate (Ab Initio) National Airspace System (NAS) Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, B. Danette; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Incremental approaches to air transportation system development inherit current architectural constraints, which, in turn, place hard bounds on system capacity, efficiency of performance, and complexity. To enable airspace operations of the future, a clean-slate (ab initio) airspace design(s) must be considered. This ab initio National Airspace System (NAS) must be capable of accommodating increased traffic density, a broader diversity of aircraft, and on-demand mobility. System and subsystem designs should scale to accommodate the inevitable demand for airspace services that include large numbers of autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and a paradigm shift in general aviation (e.g., personal air vehicles) in addition to more traditional aerial vehicles such as commercial jetliners and weather balloons. The complex and adaptive nature of ab initio designs for the future NAS requires new approaches to validation, adding a significant physical experimentation component to analytical and simulation tools. In addition to software modeling and simulation, the ability to exercise system solutions in a flight environment will be an essential aspect of validation. The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Autonomy Incubator seeks to develop a flight simulation infrastructure for ab initio modeling and simulation that assumes no specific NAS architecture and models vehicle-to-vehicle behavior to examine interactions and emergent behaviors among hundreds of intelligent aerial agents exhibiting collaborative, cooperative, coordinative, selfish, and malicious behaviors. The air transportation system of the future will be a complex adaptive system (CAS) characterized by complex and sometimes unpredictable (or unpredicted) behaviors that result from temporal and spatial interactions among large numbers of participants. A CAS not only evolves with a changing environment and adapts to it, it is closely coupled to all systems that constitute the environment. Thus, the ecosystem that

  10. Photometric Analysis of the Jovian Ring System and Modeling of Ring Origin and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully completed the work described in our proposal. The work supported by this grant resulted in the publication of the following paper: Brooks, S. M., L. W. Esposito, M. R. Showalter, and H. B. Throop. 2002. The size distribution of Jupiter's main ring from Galileo imaging and spectroscopy. Icarus, in press. This was also the major part of Dr. Shawn Brooks PhD dissertation. Dr. Brooks gave oral presentations on this work at the Lunar and Planetary Conference, the annual meetings of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, the annual meetings of the European Geophysical Society, the international Jupiter Conference in Boulder, the Jupiter after Galileo and Cassini Conference in Lisbon and to the Working Group in Non-Linear Dynamics in Potsdam, Germany. This work was reviewed in: Esposito, L. W. 2002. Planetary rings. Rep. hog. Phys. 65, 1741-1783. Planetary rings. LASP reprint 874. Online at http://stacks.iop.org/RoPP/65/1741. Dr. Esposito gave presentations at schools and over the internet on the results of this work. Dr. Brooks lectured in undergraduate and graduate classes on Jupiter's rings, and on the meaning of his research. In August 2003, Dr. Shawn Brooks received the Phd degree from the University of Colorado in Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences.

  11. Arrayed Micro-Ring Spectrometer System and Method of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spectrometer system includes an array of micro-zone plates (MZP) each having coaxially-aligned ring gratings, a sample plate for supporting and illuminating a sample, and an array of photon detectors for measuring a spectral characteristic of the predetermined wavelength. The sample plate emits an evanescent wave in response to incident light, which excites molecules of the sample to thereby cause an emission of secondary photons. A method of detecting the intensity of a selected wavelength of incident light includes directing the incident light onto an array of MZP, diffracting a selected wavelength of the incident light onto a target focal point using the array of MZP, and detecting the intensity of the selected portion using an array of photon detectors. An electro-optic layer positioned adjacent to the array of MZP may be excited via an applied voltage to select the wavelength of the incident light.

  12. RQ-4A/B Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft System (RQ-4A/B Global Hawk)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    additional spares and Peculiar Support Equipment ( PSE ). Cost and Schedule Variance Explanations Cost and Schedule Variance reporting is not required...on this FFP contract. Contract Comments This contract procures PSE (339 items) and Enhanced Integrated Sensor Suite and Airborne Signals Intelligence... PSE and spares. RQ-4A/B Global Hawk December 2013 SAR April 16, 2014 17:20:13 UNCLASSIFIED 43 Appropriation: RDT&E Contract Name IDIQTO1

  13. Results from a survey of the dynamics shaping Uranus' Mab/μ-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kartik; de Pater, Imke; Showalter, Mark R.

    2014-11-01

    Based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, Showalter and Lissauer (2006) reported the discovery of two faint rings beyond Uranus’ main rings: the ν- and μ- rings. They constitute Uranus' outer ring system and are located beyond the ɛ-ring but interior to the large classical moons. After co-adding a series of HST images, Showalter and Lissauer (2006) obtained radial profiles for both new rings. They discovered that the peak radial intensity of the μ-ring aligns closely with the orbit of Mab. Along with numerous other observations, this points to the fact that the Mab/μ-ring system is highly coupled.The discovery of the μ-ring has led to open questions about dust dynamics beyond Uranus' main rings. Like Saturn's E-ring, observations reveal that the μ-ring is blue, indicative of a pre-dominance of sub-micron-sized particles (de Pater et al., 2006). The E-ring results from plumes on Enceladus' south pole, however the origin of the μ-ring remains a mystery. The latter is likely fed by ejecta from micro-meteorite impacts with Mab, much like Jupiter's faint rings are regenerated by companion (small) moons (Burns et al., 1999). The μ-ring's steep size-distribution suggests that there is an unknown mechanism at play that hides or removes large dust particles. We present results from an investigation into the forces shaping the μ-ring. To simulate the motion of dust in the Mab/μ-ring system, we developed a numerical toolbox (Dustsim; Kumar et al., 2015) that uses Tudat (Kumar et al., 2012). We performed integrations using Dustsim that included the effects of Uranus' gravity field, titled magnetic moment, solar radiation pressure, and collisions with a putative suite of large μ-ring bodies, hypothesized as the cause of Mab's anomalous orbital motion (Kumar et al., 2014). Following on from previous studies (e.g., Sfair and Giuliatti Winter, 2009; Sfair and Giuliatti Winter, 2012), we present a survey of the expected lifetime of μ-ring dust, as a function of

  14. The Secular Evolution of a Close Ring-Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2006-06-01

    We use the rings model of Hahn (2003) to examine the secular evolution of a small satellite orbiting in a narrow gap in a dense planetary ring. The model shows that if the satellite has a small eccentricity, then its secular perturbations excites the eccentricities of the nearest ring particles orbiting at the gap edge. The ring's self-gravity then allows that disturbance to propagate outwards and across the ring in the form of a spiral density wave. Similarly, an inclined satellite also launches a spiral bending wave that propagates radially outwards from the gap's outer edge. When we use the rings model to consider Pan, which inhabits the Encke gap in Saturn's main A ring, we find that the satellite excites low amplitude spiral waves having very long wavelengths that are hundreds of km. Whether these low-amplitude waves might be observed by the Cassini spacecraft is also under investigation. The excitation of these waves transmits angular momentum from the satellite to the ring, so this form of wave-action tends to damp the satellite's eccentricity and inclination. Note that the fates of a satellite's eccentricity and inclination are uncertain when it orbits in a gap. This is due to the competition between the satellite's many Lindblad resonances in the ring, which excites the satellite's eccentricity, and and its corotation resonances, which might or might not damp its eccentricity (Goldreich and Tremaine 1980, Goldreich and Sari 2003). The satellite's inclination is also precarious, since its many vertical resonances in the ring tends to pump up the satellite's inclination (Borderies et al 1984). However, the rings model shows that the satellite's secular perturbation of the ring tends to damp its eccentricity and inclination at rates that dwarf the excitation mechanisms. The stability of the satellite's eccentricity and inclination thus seems assured.

  15. Comparison of five blood-typing methods for the feline AB blood group system.

    PubMed

    Seth, Mayank; Jackson, Karen V; Giger, Urs

    2011-02-01

    Objective-To compare the ease of use and accuracy of 5 feline AB blood-typing methods: card agglutination (CARD), immunochromatographic cartridge (CHROM), gel-based (GEL), and conventional slide (SLIDE) and tube (TUBE) agglutination assays. Sample Population-490 anticoagulated blood samples from sick and healthy cats submitted to the Transfusion or Clinical Laboratory at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Procedures-Sample selection was purposely biased toward those from anemic, type B, or type AB cats or those with autoagglutination. All blood samples were tested by use of GEL, SLIDE, and TUBE methods. Fifty-eight samples were also tested by use of CARD and CHROM methods. The presence of alloantibodies in all cats expressing the B antigen as detected by use of any method was also assessed. Results-Compared with the historical gold-standard TUBE method, good to excellent agreement was achieved with the other typing tests: CARD, 53 of 58 (91% agreement); CHROM, 55 of 58 (95%); GEL, 487 of 490 (99%); and SLIDE, 482 of 487 (99%; 3 samples were excluded because of autoagglutination). Four of the samples with discordant test results originated from cats with FeLV-related anemia. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Current laboratory and in-clinic methods provide simple and accurate typing for the feline AB blood group system with few discrepancies. Retyping after in-clinic typing with the GEL or TUBE laboratory methods is recommended to confirm any type B or AB cats.

  16. Development of an Acoustic Levitation Linear Transportation System Based on a Ring-type Structure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gilles; Andrade, Marco Aurelio; Adamowski, Julio; Silva, Emilio

    2017-02-23

    A linear acoustic levitation transportation system based on a ring-type vibrator is presented. The system is composed by two 21 kHz Langevin transducers connected to a ring-shaped structure formed by two semicircular sections and two flat plates. In this system, a flexural standing wave is generated along the ring structure, producing an acoustic standing wave between the vibrating ring and a plane reflector located at a distance of approximately a half wavelength from the ring. The acoustic standing wave in air has a series of pressure nodes, where small particles can be levitated and transported. The ring-type transportation system was designed and analyzed by using the Finite Element Method (FEM). Additionally, a prototype was built and the acoustic levitation and transport of a small polystyrene particle was demonstrated.

  17. Characterization of virulence factor regulation by SrrAB, a two-component system in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pragman, Alexa A; Yarwood, Jeremy M; Tripp, Timothy J; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2004-04-01

    Workers in our laboratory have previously identified the staphylococcal respiratory response AB (SrrAB), a Staphylococcus aureus two-component system that acts in the global regulation of virulence factors. This system down-regulates production of agr RNAIII, protein A, and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), particularly under low-oxygen conditions. In this study we investigated the localization and membrane orientation of SrrA and SrrB, transcription of the srrAB operon, the DNA-binding properties of SrrA, and the effect of SrrAB expression on S. aureus virulence. We found that SrrA is localized to the S. aureus cytoplasm, while SrrB is localized to the membrane and is properly oriented to function as a histidine kinase. srrAB has one transcriptional start site which results in either an srrA transcript or a full-length srrAB transcript; srrB must be cotranscribed with srrA. Gel shift assays of the agr P2, agr P3, protein A (spa), TSST-1 (tst), and srr promoters revealed SrrA binding at each of these promoters. Analysis of SrrAB-overexpressing strains by using the rabbit model of bacterial endocarditis demonstrated that overexpression of SrrAB decreased the virulence of the organisms compared to the virulence of isogenic strains that do not overexpress SrrAB. We concluded that SrrAB is properly localized and oriented to function as a two-component system. Overexpression of SrrAB, which represses agr RNAIII, TSST-1, and protein A in vitro, decreases virulence in the rabbit endocarditis model. Repression of these virulence factors is likely due to a direct interaction between SrrA and the agr, tst, and spa promoters.

  18. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation Based Analysis of an Ammonia Borane (AB) Reactor System for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2010-10-02

    Research on ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has shown it to be a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell applications. AB was selected by DOE’s Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of three molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. A model of a bead reactor system which includes feed and product tanks, hot and cold augers, a ballast tank/reactor, a H2 burner and a radiator was developed to study AB system performance in an automotive application and estimate the energy, mass, and volume requirements for this off-board regenerable hydrogen storage material. Preliminary system simulation results for a start-up case and for a transient drive cycle indicate appropriate trends in the reactor system dynamics. A new controller was developed and validated in simulation for a couple of H2 demand cases.

  19. The Pu-U-Am system: An ab initio informed CALPHAD thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, A.; Turchi, P. E. A.; Landa, A.; Söderlind, P.; Ravat, B.; Oudot, B.; Delaunay, F.

    2015-03-01

    Phase diagram and thermodynamic properties of the Am-U system, that are experimentally unknown, are calculated using the CALPHAD method with input from ab initio electronic-structure calculations for the fcc and bcc phases. A strong tendency toward phase separation across the whole composition range is predicted. In addition, ab initio informed Pu-U and Am-Pu thermodynamic assessments are combined to build a Pu-U-Am thermodynamic database. Regarding the Pu-rich corner of the ternary system, predictions indicate that Am acts as a powerful δ-Pu (fcc) stabilizer. In the U-rich corner, similar predictions are made but to a lesser extent. In both cases, the bcc phase is destabilized and the fcc phase is enhanced. Finally, results and methodology are discussed and compared with previous assessments and guidelines are provided for further experimental studies.

  20. Near-infrared spectra of the uranian ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke; Ádámkovics, Máté; Hammel, Heidi

    2013-09-01

    We present the first high-resolution near-infrared (1.18-2.38 μm) spectrum of the rings of Uranus, as observed with adaptive optics on the W.M. Keck II telescope in August 2010. We derive ring equivalent widths, as well as ring and particle reflectivities for the ɛ ring and ringlet groups based on H- and K-band data. We find the rings to be gray, indicating that they are dominated by large particles rather than dust, and we find no evidence for water ice. We present a reflectivity spectrum for the ɛ ring alone, which we also find to be consistent with a flat spectrum. We derive H-band ring particle reflectivities of 0.022 ± 0.010, 0.051 ± 0.009 0.042 ± 0.012, and 0.043 ± 0.001 and K-band ring particle reflectivities of 0.016 ± 0.010, 0.034 ± 0.012, 0.047 ± 0.008 and 0.041 ± 0.002 for the 456, αβ, ηγδ, and ɛ ring groups. Previous observations have found ring particle reflectivities in the 0.033-0.044 range (de Pater, I., Gibbard, S., Macintosh, B.A., Roe, H.G. [2002]. Icarus 160, 359-374; Gibbard, S.G., de Pater, I., Hammel, H.B. [2005]. Icarus 174, 253-262), and are generally consistent with our results.

  1. An objective reference system for studying rings in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelão, Guilherme P.; Irber, Luiz C.; Villas Boas, Ana B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Rings are marine vortices with a scale of hundreds of kilometers that can last for months, whose associated transport and mixing play an important role in the ocean dynamics. Such features are traditionally treated as a geostrophic flow, but since the centrifugal acceleration is not negligible in the inner core, the cyclo-geostrophic balance is a better approximation for the rings. In the present work, we describe a novel objective technique to identify the ring center, which is used as the origin of a convenient framework to handle rings under the cyclo-geostrophic balance. Furthermore, we correct the velocity field by the translation to isolate the swirl movement, a procedure ignored by other methodologies. We show that the lack of such correction would lead to an error of 30 km on the center definition of a ship surveyed North Brazil Current Ring with 160 km of radius. Another distinct characteristic of our approach is the flexibility in the spatio-temporal structure of the data, because it allows for ungridded data, an important ability for in situ observations. That also enables the use of a hybrid dataset composed from different instruments. The error on the Monte Carlo experiments to identify the center of the propagating ring is less than 10 km, and depends on the level of noise, sampling strategy, and strength of the ring, among other factors. This technique was fully implemented in PyRings, an open Python library with a collection of procedures to handle oceanic rings and mesoscale eddies in general.

  2. Stereocontrolled Additions to a Rigid Bicyclo [3.3.0] Octane Ring System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-05

    reagent added to the competing electrophilic carbonyl of the lactone group on the opposite ring with subsequent ring opening upon acidic work-up...carbon and a stereocenter. In actuality, the cuprate reagent added to the competing electrophilic carbonyl of the lactone group on the opposite ring...According to this accepted mechanism, the number four carbon of a conjugated system serves as the electrophilic center to be attacked by a

  3. Global negative regulation of Streptomyces coelicolor antibiotic synthesis mediated by an absA-encoded putative signal transduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Brian, P; Riggle, P J; Santos, R A; Champness, W C

    1996-01-01

    Streptomycete antibiotic synthesis is coupled to morphological differentiation such that antibiotics are produced as a colony sporulates. Streptomyces coelicolor produces several structurally and genetically distinct antibiotics. The S. coelicolor absA locus was defined by four UV-induced mutations that globally blocked antibiotic biosynthesis without blocking morphological differentiation. We show that the absA locus encodes a putative eubacterial two-component sensor kinase-response regulator system. All four mutations lie within a single open reading frame, designated absA1, which is predicted to encode a sensor histidine kinase. A second gene downstream of absA1, absA2, is predicted to encode the cognate response regulator. In marked contrast to the antibiotic-deficient phenotype of the previously described absA mutants, the phenotype caused by disruption mutations in the absA locus is precocious hyperproduction of the antibiotics actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. Precocious hyperproduction of these antibiotics is correlated with premature expression of XylE activity in a transcriptional fusion to an actinorhodin biosynthetic gene. We propose that the absA locus encodes a signal transduction mechanism that negatively regulates synthesis of the multiple antibiotics produced by S. coelicolor. PMID:8655502

  4. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  5. Multiple internal seal ring micro-electro-mechanical system vacuum packaging method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Peay, Chris S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Multiple Internal Seal Ring (MISR) Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) vacuum packaging method that hermetically seals MEMS devices using MISR. The method bonds a capping plate having metal seal rings to a base plate having metal seal rings by wafer bonding the capping plate wafer to the base plate wafer. Bulk electrodes may be used to provide conductive paths between the seal rings on the base plate and the capping plate. All seals are made using only metal-to-metal seal rings deposited on the polished surfaces of the base plate and capping plate wafers. However, multiple electrical feed-through metal traces are provided by fabricating via holes through the capping plate for electrical connection from the outside of the package through the via-holes to the inside of the package. Each metal seal ring serves the dual purposes of hermetic sealing and providing the electrical feed-through metal trace.

  6. Ring lens focusing and push-pull tracking scheme for optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, R.; Zambuto, J.; Erwin, J. K.; Mansuripur, M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental comparison of the ring lens and the astigmatic techniques of generating focus-error-signal (FES) in optical disk systems reveals that the ring lens generates a FES over two times steeper than that produced by the astigmat. Partly due to this large slope and, in part, because of its diffraction-limited behavior, the ring lens scheme exhibits superior performance characteristics. In particular the undesirable signal known as 'feedthrough' (induced on the FES by track-crossings during the seek operation) is lower by a factor of six compared to that observed with the astigmatic method. The ring lens is easy to align and has reasonable tolerance for positioning errors.

  7. The Ring System of Uranus: Flat as a Pancake, Sprinkled with Dust

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Gibbard, S G; Hammel, H B

    2005-02-02

    We present a high quality image of the uranian ring system, obtained in July 2004 at 2.2 {micro}m with the adaptive optics camera NIRC2 on the Keck II telescope. Using these data, we report the first ground-based image of the ring 1986U2R, seen only once before by the Voyager spacecraft. We show that this ring extends inward to {approx} 7000 km above the Uranus cloud deck. Its VIF (total vertically integrated I/F) is {approx} 100 m. We further detected narrow sheets of dust in between the {delta} and {epsilon} rings, and in between rings 4 and {alpha}, with a VIF of 14 and 20 m, respectively. Surprisingly, we find that the particles in Uranus' 9 main rings are distributed within a mono-layer, rather than the usually adopted poly-layer model. We come to this conclusion via a comparison of the VIF as derived from our 2003 data at a ring opening angle B {approx} 18{sup o} (from Gibbard et al. 2004) with those derived in this paper at B {approx} 11{sup o}. We show that the VIF increases approximately as 1/sinB at the ring ansae, but is independent of sinB in front of the disk. This combination of factors can only be explained if the particles in Uranus' rings are distributed in a mono-layer, a configuration which makes the uranian system unique amongst the giant planets.

  8. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-15

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  9. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  10. Voyager Saturnian ring measurements and the early history of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.; Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.; Lindquist, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The mass distribution in the Saturnian ring system is investigated and compared with predictions from plasma cosmogony. According to this theory, the matter in the rings was once a magnetized plasma, in which gravitation is balanced by the centrifugal and electromagnetic forces. As the plasma is neutralized, the electromagnetic forces disappear and the matter falls in to 2/3 of the original saturnocentric distance. This causes the cosmogonic shadow effect, demonstrated for the large scale structure of the Saturnian ring system. It is shown that many structures of the present ring system can be understood as shadows and antishadows of cosmogonic origin. These appear in the form of double rings centered around a position a factor 0.64 (slightly 2/3) closer to Saturn than the causing feature. Voyager data agree with an accuracy 1%.

  11. Gaseous toroid around Saturn. [Saturnian ring system for atomic hydrogen trapping in Titan atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trapping of Titan's escaping atmosphere in the Saturnian system by a toroidal ring is discussed. The radius of the toroid is comparable to Titan's orbit, or about ten times larger than the visible rings. Theoretical atmospheric models are formulated that consider Saturn's gravitational attraction and magnetospheric properties in forming this toroid and in protecting toroid particles from direct ionization by solar wind particles.

  12. Detecting ring systems around exoplanets using high resolution spectroscopy: the case of 51 Pegasi b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, N. C.; Martins, J. H. C.; Boué, G.; Correia, A. C. M.; Oshagh, M.; Figueira, P.; Santerne, A.; Sousa, S. G.; Melo, C.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Udry, S.; Garcia Munoz, A.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: In this paper we explore the possibility that the recently detected reflected light signal of 51 Peg b could be caused by a ring system around the planet. Methods: We use a simple model to compare the observed signal with the expected signal from a short-period giant planet with rings. We also use simple dynamical arguments to understand the possible geometry of such a system. Results: We provide evidence that, to a good approximation, the observations are compatible with the signal expected from a ringed planet, assuming that the rings are non-coplanar with the orbital plane. However, based on dynamical arguments, we also show that this configuration is unlikely. In the case of coplanar rings we then demonstrate that the incident flux on the ring surface is about 2% the value received by the planet, a value that renders the ring explanation unlikely. Conclusions: The results suggest that the signal observed cannot in principle be explained by a planet+ring system. We discuss, however, the possibility of using reflected light spectra to detect and characterize the presence of rings around short-period planets. Finally, we show that ring systems could have already been detected by photometric transit campaigns, but their signal could have been easily misinterpreted by the expected light curve of an eclipsing binary. Based on observations collected at ESO facilities under program 091.C-0271 (with the HARPS spectrograph at the ESO 3.6-m telescope, La Silla-Paranal Observatory).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Identification and Characterization of the HicAB Toxin-Antitoxin System in the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that are widely distributed in the genomes of bacteria and archaea and have been proposed to fulfill numerous functions. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a type II TA system, comprising the hicAB locus in the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The hicAB locus consists of genes hicA and hicB encoding a toxin and its cognate antitoxin, respectively. BLAST analysis revealed that hicAB is prevalent in approximately 36% of P. aeruginosa strains and locates in the same genomic region. RT-PCR demonstrated that hicAB forms a bicistronic operon that is cotranscribed under normal growth conditions. Overproduction of HicA inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli, and this effect could be counteracted by co-expression of HicB. The Escherichia coli kill/rescue assay showed that the effect of HicA is bacteriostatic, rather than bactericidal. Deletion of hicAB had no effect on the biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa in a mice infection model. Collectively, this study presents the first characterization of the HicAB system in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:27104566

  14. Identification and Characterization of the HicAB Toxin-Antitoxin System in the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Li, Ming

    2016-04-19

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that are widely distributed in the genomes of bacteria and archaea and have been proposed to fulfill numerous functions. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a type II TA system, comprising the hicAB locus in the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The hicAB locus consists of genes hicA and hicB encoding a toxin and its cognate antitoxin, respectively. BLAST analysis revealed that hicAB is prevalent in approximately 36% of P. aeruginosa strains and locates in the same genomic region. RT-PCR demonstrated that hicAB forms a bicistronic operon that is cotranscribed under normal growth conditions. Overproduction of HicA inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli, and this effect could be counteracted by co-expression of HicB. The Escherichia coli kill/rescue assay showed that the effect of HicA is bacteriostatic, rather than bactericidal. Deletion of hicAB had no effect on the biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa in a mice infection model. Collectively, this study presents the first characterization of the HicAB system in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa.

  15. Ab initio energetics for modeling phase stability of the Np-U system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Chang, Y. Austin; Morgan, Dane

    2016-10-01

    The Np-U system has been rarely studied despite this alloy being a key binary subsystem of metallic nuclear fuels. This study aims to further the understanding of the phase stability of the Np-U system through ab initio calculations. We first examined an existing CALPHAD model based on available experimental phase boundary data. We then focused on phases of which the CALPHAD model reproduces reasonably the experimental data and examined if values of the effective Hubbard U (i.e., Ueff) parameter for Np and U fitted previously in the Np-Zr and U-Zr systems are also applicable to the Np-U system, using CALPHAD predicted enthalpies as references. We found that in general DFT + U predicts improved or at least similarly accurate enthalpies compared to standard DFT when the Ueff's used are within the ranges of single-structure optimized Ueff's (0.65-0.9 eV for Np and 1-1.5 eV for U)-for example, the multi-structure optimized Ueff's (0.9 eV for Np and 1.24 eV for U)-determined in our previous U-Zr and Np-Zr studies. Finally, we focused on the intermediate phase ζ(Np,U), which at present is poorly characterized by experiments and unsatisfactorily described in the CALPHAD model. Based on ab initio calculated formation enthalpies for ordered end members and the compound energy formalism, we predicted its site occupations as functions of composition and temperature. Our study demonstrated that Ueff's fitted for U and Np determined in the U-Zr and Np-Zr systems may be transferable to the Np-U system and also provided new prediction of the site occupations for ζ(Np,U), which may serve as reference for future experimental and modeling study of the Np-U system.

  16. A hybrid-structure of a cavity polariton system and an optical-ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Xie, Wei; Zhang, Long; Wang, Yinglei; Gu, Jie; Hu, Tao; Wu, Lin; Chen, Zhanghai

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid-structure of a ZnO polariton system and an optical-ring in this work. In this structure, we create room-temperature polariton condensate in the ZnO nanowire. The coherent light emission from the polariton condensate is coupled to the ring, and the coherence of the coupled light is examined by Young interference experiment using a photoluminescence mapping system. Finally, the efficiency of the waveguide of the coupled light in the ring has been carefully discussed.

  17. Synthesis of fused indazole ring systems and application to nigeglanine hydrobromide.

    PubMed

    Sather, Aaron C; Berryman, Orion B; Rebek, Julius

    2012-03-16

    The single-step synthesis of fused tricyclic pyridazino[1,2-a]indazolium ring systems is described. Structural details revealed by crystallography explain the unexpected reactivity. The method is applied to the gram scale synthesis of nigeglanine hydrobromide.

  18. Feasibility study of shape memory alloy ring spring systems for self-centring seismic resisting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Yam, Michael C. H.; Lam, Angus C. C.; Zhang, Yanyang

    2015-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have recently emerged as promising material candidates for structural seismic resisting purposes. Most of the existing SMA-based strategies, however, are based on the wire or rod form of SMAs, where issues such as gripping complexity and fracture may exist. This paper presents a proof-of-concept study on an innovative type of SMA-based self-centring system, namely, a superelastic SMA ring spring system. The proposed system includes a series of inner high-strength steel (HSS) rings and outer superelastic SMA rings stacked in alternation with mating taper faces, where the resisting load is provided by the wedging action which tends to expand the outer rings and concurrently to squeeze the inner rings. The superelastic effect of the SMA offers energy dissipation and a driving force for recentring, and the frictional effect over the taper face further contributes to the overall resisting load and energy dissipation. The feasibility of the new system is carefully examined via numerical studies considering the parameters of ring thickness, taper angle, and coefficient of friction. The key hysteretic responses, including resisting load, stiffness, stress distributions, source of residual deformation, energy dissipation, and equivalent viscous damping, are discussed in detail. The behaviour of the SMA ring springs is also studied via analytical models, and the analytical predictions are found to agree well with the numerical results. Finally, two practical applications of the new system, namely self-centring HS-SMA ring spring connections, and self-centring SMA ring spring dampers, are discussed via comprehensive numerical studies.

  19. ParABS Systems of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia: New Chromosome Centromeres Confer Partition Specificity†

    PubMed Central

    Dubarry, Nelly; Pasta, Franck; Lane, David

    2006-01-01

    Most bacterial chromosomes carry an analogue of the parABS systems that govern plasmid partition, but their role in chromosome partition is ambiguous. parABS systems might be particularly important for orderly segregation of multipartite genomes, where their role may thus be easier to evaluate. We have characterized parABS systems in Burkholderia cenocepacia, whose genome comprises three chromosomes and one low-copy-number plasmid. A single parAB locus and a set of ParB-binding (parS) centromere sites are located near the origin of each replicon. ParA and ParB of the longest chromosome are phylogenetically similar to analogues in other multichromosome and monochromosome bacteria but are distinct from those of smaller chromosomes. The latter form subgroups that correspond to the taxa of their hosts, indicating evolution from plasmids. The parS sites on the smaller chromosomes and the plasmid are similar to the “universal” parS of the main chromosome but with a sequence specific to their replicon. In an Escherichia coli plasmid stabilization test, each parAB exhibits partition activity only with the parS of its own replicon. Hence, parABS function is based on the independent partition of individual chromosomes rather than on a single communal system or network of interacting systems. Stabilization by the smaller chromosome and plasmid systems was enhanced by mutation of parS sites and a promoter internal to their parAB operons, suggesting autoregulatory mechanisms. The small chromosome ParBs were found to silence transcription, a property relevant to autoregulation. PMID:16452432

  20. Hydrodynamic optimization of trust ring pump and lubricating oil system for large hydroelectric units thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X.; Lu, Z.; Zhang, X.; Yang, S.

    2014-03-01

    Thrust-ring-pump is a kind of extreme-low specific speed centrifugal pump with special structure as numerous restrictions form thrust bearing and operation conditions of hydro turbine generator unit. Because the oil circulating and cooling system with thrust-ring- pump has a lot of advantages in maintenance and compactness in structure, it has widely been used in large and medium-sized hydro-generator units. Since the diameter and the speed of the thrust ring is limited by the generator set, the matching relationship between the flow passage inside the thrust ring (equivalent to impeller) and oil bath (equivalent to volute) has great influence on hydrodynamic performance of thrust-ring-pump, additionally, the head and discharge are varying with the operation conditions of hydro-generator unit and characteristic of the oil circulating and cooling system. As so far, the empirical calculation method is employed during the actual engineering design, in order to guarantee the operating performance of the oil circulating and cooling system with thrust-ring-pump at different conditions, a collaborative hydrodynamic design and optimization of both the oil circulating and cooling system and thrust-ring-pump is purposed in this paper. Firstly, the head and discharge required at different conditions are decided by 1D flow numerical simulation of the oil circulating and cooling system. Secondly, the flow passages of thrust-ring-pump are empirically designed under the restrictions of diameter and the speed of the thrust ring according to the head and discharge from the simulation. Thirdly, the flow passage geometry matching optimization between holes inside the thrust ring and oil bath is implemented by means of 3D flow simulation and performance prediction. Then, the pumps and the oil circulating and cooling system are collaborative hydrodynamic optimized with predicted head- discharge curve and the efficiency-discharge curve of thrust-ring-pump. The presented methodology has

  1. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to ``hop'' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power (>=330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission (~11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

  2. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H.

    2006-01-20

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power ({>=}330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission ({approx}11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

  3. Quantum wave packet ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach to study quantum dynamics in large systems.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S; Jakowski, Jacek

    2005-03-15

    A methodology to efficiently conduct simultaneous dynamics of electrons and nuclei is presented. The approach involves quantum wave packet dynamics using an accurate banded, sparse and Toeplitz representation for the discrete free propagator, in conjunction with ab initio molecular dynamics treatment of the electronic and classical nuclear degree of freedom. The latter may be achieved either by using atom-centered density-matrix propagation or by using Born-Oppenheimer dynamics. The two components of the methodology, namely, quantum dynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics, are harnessed together using a time-dependent self-consistent field-like coupling procedure. The quantum wave packet dynamics is made computationally robust by using adaptive grids to achieve optimized sampling. One notable feature of the approach is that important quantum dynamical effects including zero-point effects, tunneling, as well as over-barrier reflections are treated accurately. The electronic degrees of freedom are simultaneously handled at accurate levels of density functional theory, including hybrid or gradient corrected approximations. Benchmark calculations are provided for proton transfer systems and the dynamics results are compared with exact calculations to determine the accuracy of the approach.

  4. Cellular and molecular phenotypes depending upon the RNA repair system RtcAB of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Engl, Christoph; Schaefer, Jorrit; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    RNA ligases function pervasively across the three kingdoms of life for RNA repair, splicing and can be stress induced. The RtcB protein (also HSPC117, C22orf28, FAAP and D10Wsu52e) is one such conserved ligase, involved in tRNA and mRNA splicing. However, its physiological role is poorly described, especially in bacteria. We now show in Escherichia coli bacteria that the RtcR activated rtcAB genes function for ribosome homeostasis involving rRNA stability. Expression of rtcAB is activated by agents and genetic lesions which impair the translation apparatus or may cause oxidative damage in the cell. Rtc helps the cell to survive challenges to the translation apparatus, including ribosome targeting antibiotics. Further, loss of Rtc causes profound changes in chemotaxis and motility. Together, our data suggest that the Rtc system is part of a previously unrecognized adaptive response linking ribosome homeostasis with basic cell physiology and behaviour. PMID:27402162

  5. Exploring the Photophysical Properties of Molecular Systems Using Excited State Accelerated ab Initio Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Bucher, Denis; Pierce, Levi C T; Markwick, Phineus R L; McCammon, J Andrew

    2012-08-14

    In the present work, we employ excited state accelerated ab initio molecular dynamics (A-AIMD) to efficiently study the excited state energy landscape and photophysical topology of a variety of molecular systems. In particular, we focus on two important challenges for the modeling of excited electronic states: (i) the identification and characterization of conical intersections and crossing seams, in order to predict different and often competing radiationless decay mechanisms, and (ii) the description of the solvent effect on the absorption and emission spectra of chemical species in solution. In particular, using as examples the Schiff bases formaldimine and salicylidenaniline, we show that A-AIMD can be readily employed to explore the conformational space around crossing seams in molecular systems with very different photochemistry. Using acetone in water as an example, we demonstrate that the enhanced configurational space sampling may be used to accurately and efficiently describe both the prominent features and line-shapes of absorption and emission spectra.

  6. Submission of Earth-based ring occultation observations to the NASA planetary data system rings discipline node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a technical report summarizing our progress in our program of contributing high quality Earth-based occultation observations to NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) Rings Node. During our first year of funding, we selected five data sets for eventual inclusion in the PDS Rings Node. These were Uranus occultation observations obtained by the PI and co-workers from the IRTF of event stars U34 (26 April 1986), U1052 (5 May 1988), U65 (21 June 1990), U7872 (25 June 1991), and U7808 (28 June 1991). In our original proposal, we described four tasks: data sets to a common format; documentation of the occultation observations and associated calibrations; calculation of the occultation geometry for each event; establish prototype PDS templates. As discussed in our renewal proposal, submitted 8 June 1993, we have completed the first three tasks, and are working on the fourth. As an indication of our progress to date, we provide information about each of the data sets, their formats, the documentation, and the method used for reconstructing the occultation geometry.

  7. Dynamical systems analysis of fluid transport in time-periodic vortex ring flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony; Ferziger, Joel H.

    2006-04-01

    It is known that the stable and unstable manifolds of dynamical systems theory provide a powerful tool for understanding Lagrangian aspects of time-periodic flows. In this work we consider two time-periodic vortex ring flows. The first is a vortex ring with an elliptical core. The manifolds provide information about entrainment and detrainment of irrotational fluid into and out of the volume transported with the ring. The likeness of the manifolds with features observed in flow visualization experiments of turbulent vortex rings suggests that a similar process might be at play. However, what precise modes of unsteadiness are responsible for stirring in a turbulent vortex ring is left as an open question. The second situation is that of two leapfrogging rings. The unstable manifold shows striking agreement with even the fine features of smoke visualization photographs, suggesting that fluid elements in the vicinity of the manifold are drawn out along it and begin to reveal its structure. We suggest that interpretations of these photographs that argue for complex vorticity dynamics ought to be reconsidered. Recently, theoretical and computational tools have been developed to locate structures analogous to stable and unstable manifolds in aperiodic, or finite-time systems. The usefulness of these analogs is demonstrated, using vortex ring flows as an example, in the paper by Shadden, Dabiri, and Marsden [Phys. Fluids 18, 047105 (2006)].

  8. Manufacture of the ALS storage ring vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kurt

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) storage ring has a 4.9 meter magnetic radius and an antechamber type vacuum chamber. These two requirements makes conventional bent tube manufacturing techniques difficult. The ALS sector vacuum chambers have been made by machining two halves out of aluminum plate and welding at the mid plane. Each of these chambers have over 50 penetrations with metal sealed flanges and seven metal sealed poppet valves which use the chamber wall as the valve seat. The sector chambers are 10 meters long and some features in the chambers must be located to .25 mm. This paper describes how and how successfully these features have been achieved.

  9. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  10. Solar system history as recorded in the Saturnian ring structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-01-01

    Holberg's analysis of the Voyager Saturn photographs in reflected and transparent light, and occultation data of stars seen through the rings are discussed. A hyperfine structure, with 10,000 ringlets can be explained by the Baxter-Thompson negative diffusion. This gives the ringlets a stability which makes it possible to interpret them as fossils, which originated at cosmogonic times. It is shown that the bulk structure can be explained by the combined cosmogonic shadows of the satellites Mimas, Janus and the Shepherd satellites. This structure originated at the transition from the plasma phase to the planetesimal phase. The shadows are not simple void regions but exhibit a characteristic signature. Parts of the fine structure, explained by Holberg as resonances with satellites, are interpreted as cosmogonic shadow effects. However, there are a number of ringlets which can neither be explained by cosmogonic nor by resonance effects. Analysis of ring data can reconstruct the plasma-planetesimal transition with an accuracy of a few percent.

  11. Astrometric search for Planets in the closest Brown Dwarf Binary system Luhman 16AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedin, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Located at 2.0 pc, the L8+T1 dwarfs system Luhman16AB is the third closest system known to Earth, making it a key benchmark for detailed investigation of brown dwarf atmospheric properties, thermal evolution, multiplicity and planet-hosting frequency. Indeed, a recent ground-based astrometric campaign suggested this system to host a 5-30 Jupiter masses exoplanet.We propose to use HST in spatial-scanning mode to obtain the most accurate annual parallax of any brown dwarf to date, achieving an unprecedented accuracy of 1 part in 10000 (50 micro-arcsecond) for each of the two components of Luh16, and to constrain their absolute space motions with similar accuracy. Most importantly, we will be able to confirm the giant planet candidate and to search for faint companions co-moving with the targets, either resolved or through astrometric perturbations of the A-B orbital motion, the latter probing down to few Earth-masses.Present-day ground-based direct imaging and AO facilities have fundamental limitations (field of view, PSF stability, differential chromatic effects, visibility) which introduce systematic and seasonal errors that are hard to quantify, and which have already resulted many times in clamorous false alarm in the recent past. This is particularly true for faint and red objects.Luhman 16A and B will be problematic for GAIA (faint, color, crowding, visibility), and the here proposed HST spatial-scanning mode observations will actually be an important complementary validation of the final GAIA catalog itself (expected 2020). Similarly, JWST is not expected to provide any better astrometry than HST because of its broader and irregular PSFs.

  12. Analysis of a Triple Star System Occulted By Saturn’s Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratcher, Allison; Colwell, J. E.; Bolin, B.

    2012-10-01

    On January 4, 2012, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Cassini Spacecraft observed Saturn’s rings as they occulted the triple star system, Iota Orionis. Remarkably, the brightest star was occulted by the moon Prometheus, and we provide the timing information of first and last contact for navigation purposes and a chord across the moon. The large separation of the individual stars projected in the ring plane makes it possible to measure the profiles of narrow features in the rings as they were occulted by each of the three stars. This occultation thus provides a unique opportunity to measure short-scale longitudinal variations in narrow ringlets with stellar occultation data that usually provide only a single longitudinal sample. Iota Orionis has a low elevation angle (B=1.4 degrees) above the plane of the rings, enhancing the sensitivity of the occultation (by a factor of 1/sin(B)=41) to the optically thin regions of the rings such as the C Ring and the Cassini Division as well as faint ringlets in the Encke gap. We distinguished the three signals by creating a model triple star signal using data from another occultation. We were able to identify several faint, narrow ringlets, including two in the Encke gap, occulted by two of the three stars and more prominent ringlets, such as the Huygens ringlet, in all three stellar light curves. We present the equivalent widths of these ringlets in the data from this triple star system and limits on ring variability over the azimuthal separation of the stars that ranges from 6000 km at the inner C ring to 200 km at the outer A ring.

  13. Clumps and Temporal Changes in the Jovian Ring System as Viewed by New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Cheng, A. F.; Weaver, H. A.; Stern, S. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Throop, H.; Birath, E. M.; Rose, D.; Moore, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    New Horizons obtained 400 ring images of the Jovian ring system using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). This camera has a broad bandpass spanning wavelengths λ = 0.35 to 0.85 µm. The ring was imaged at phase angles 7°-159°. In addition, one sequence of near-IR spectra (λ = 1.25 to 2.5 µm) was obtained by the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) for compositional studies. Two ring rotation movies during Jupiter approach were used to search for small moons embedded within the system. These bodies might serve as source bodies for the prevalent ring dust. No moons were detected down to a threshold of 500 m radius, suggesting a sharp cutoff in the population of inner Jovian moons below 8-km Adrastea. Although this search focused on the main Jovian ring, any 1-km moons from orbital radius r = 100,000 km to beyond the orbit of Amalthea (r = 181,000 km) should have been detected multiple times. More surprisingly, the ring revealed two clusters of tiny clumps, one pair and one set of three. These are definitively not moons because they have longitudinal extents of a few tenths of a degree. Separations between clumps are 2 to 4° but are not uniform. These clump families both orbit within a brightness peak just interior to the orbit of Adrastea, at r = 128,740 km. Their origin is unknown. They are not visible at high phase angles, indicating that they are composed primarily of larger "parent” bodies, not dust. They are definitely not related to a clump detected in Cassini images of the Jovian ring from December 2000, indicating that at least some ring clumps are transient. The large quadrant asymmetries reported in earlier images from Voyager and Galileo are completely absent in the new data.

  14. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE SNS RING VACUUM INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.; SMART,L.A.; TANG,J.Y.

    2001-06-18

    BNL is undertaking the design, construction and commissioning of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring and the beam transport lines [l]. Ultrahigh vacuum of 10{sup {minus}9} Torr is required in the accumulator ring to minimize beam-gas ionization, a contributing factor to the e-p instability observed in a few high-intensity proton storage rings. All vacuum instrumentation must be capable of local and remote operation to achieve a reliable vacuum system, especially in this extremely high intensity accelerator. The design and development of the SNS ring vacuum instrumentation and control through the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) distributed real-time software tools are presented.

  15. Photon antibunching and bunching in a ring-resonator waveguide quantum electrodynamics system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zihao; Zhou, Yao; Shen, Jung-Tsung

    2016-07-15

    We numerically investigate the photonic state generation and its nonclassical correlations in a ring-resonator waveguide quantum electrodynamics system. Specifically, we discuss photon antibunching and bunching in various scenarios, including the imperfect resonator with backscattering and dissipations. Our numerical results indicate that an imperfect ring resonator with backscattering can enhance the quality of antibunching. In addition, we also identify the quantum photonic halo phenomenon in the photon scattering dynamics and the shoulder effect in the second-order correlation function.

  16. Ring retroreflector system consisting of cube-corner reflectors with special coating

    SciTech Connect

    Burmistrov, V B; Sadovnikov, M A; Sokolov, A L; Shargorodskiy, V D

    2013-09-30

    The ring retroreflector system (RS) consisting of cubecorner reflectors (CCRs) with a special coating of reflecting surfaces, intended for uniaxially Earth-oriented navigation satellites, is considered. The error of distance measurement caused by both the laser pulse delay in the CCR and its spatial position (CCR configuration) is studied. It is shown that the ring RS, formed by the CCR with a double-spot radiation pattern, allows the distance measurement error to be essentially reduced. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  17. Ab initio downfolding for electron-phonon-coupled systems: Constrained density-functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-12-01

    We formulate an ab initio downfolding scheme for electron-phonon-coupled systems. In this scheme, we calculate partially renormalized phonon frequencies and electron-phonon coupling, which include the screening effects of high-energy electrons, to construct a realistic Hamiltonian consisting of low-energy electron and phonon degrees of freedom. We show that our scheme can be implemented by slightly modifying the density functional-perturbation theory (DFPT), which is one of the standard methods for calculating phonon properties from first principles. Our scheme, which we call the constrained DFPT, can be applied to various phonon-related problems, such as superconductivity, electron and thermal transport, thermoelectricity, piezoelectricity, dielectricity, and multiferroicity. We believe that the constrained DFPT provides a firm basis for the understanding of the role of phonons in strongly correlated materials. Here, we apply the scheme to fullerene superconductors and discuss how the realistic low-energy Hamiltonian is constructed.

  18. Briefing Paper on Performance Evaluation within an Accountability System: An Addendum to the AB 1417 Performance Reporting Project Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges (RP Group), 2005

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this briefing paper is to review common approaches to performance evaluation in accountability systems, in order to recommend a workable approach for California Community colleges, as the system seeks to meet the requirements of district-level accountability required by AB 1417. The recommendations within this paper capture commonly…

  19. Performance of a two mirror, four reflection, ring field imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1995-01-25

    The surface figure of the individual mirrors of a two mirror, four reflection, ring field imaging system has been measured after each phase of the construction process: substrate fabrication, coating and potting. Contributions to the final system wavefront error and performance of the system in terms of the modulation transfer function and initial imaging tests are discussed.

  20. Plasticizer contamination from vacuum system O-rings in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Verge, Kent M; Agnes, George R

    2002-08-01

    The outgassing of plasticizers from Buna-N and Viton o-rings under vacuum lead to undesired ion-molecule chemistry in an Electrospray Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer. In experiments with the helium bath gas pressure >1.2 mTorr, or whenever analyte ions were stored for >100 ms, extensive loss of analyte ions by proton transfer or adduction with o-ring plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate occurred. A temporary solution to this contamination problem was found to be overnight refluxing in hexane of all the o-rings in the vacuum system. This procedure alleviated this plasticizer contamination for approximately 100 hours of operation. These results, and those that lead to identification of the contamination as plasticizers outgassing from o-rings are described.

  1. Spectra and structure of small ring compounds. LXVII vibrational spectra, variable temperature FT-IR spectra of krypton solutions, conformational stability and ab initio calculations of 1-bromosilacyclobutane.

    PubMed

    Gounev, T K; Guirgis, G A; Zhen, P; Durig, J R

    2000-11-15

    The infrared (3,200-30 cm(-1) spectra of gaseous and solid 1-bromosilacyclobutane, c-C3H6SiBrH, have been recorded. Additionally, the Raman spectra of the liquid (3,200- 30 cm(-1) with quantitative depolarization values and the solid have been recorded. Both the equatorial and the axial conformers have been identified in the fluid phases, Variable temperature ( - 105 to - 150 degrees C) studies of the infrared spectra of the sample dissolved in liquid krypton have been carried out. From these data the enthalpy difference has been determined to be 182 +/- 18 cm(-1) (2.18 +/- 0.22 kJ/mol) with the equatorial conformer the more stable rotamer and only conformer remaining in the annealing solid. At ambient temperature there is approximately 22% of the axial conformer present in the vapor phase. A complete vibrational assignment is proposed for both conformers based on infrared contours, relative intensities, depolarization values and group frequencies. The vibrational assignments are supported by normal coordinate calculations utilizing the force constants from ab initio MP2/6-31G(d) calculations. From the frequencies of the Si-H stretch, the Si-H bond distance of 1.483 A has been determined for both the equatorial and the axial conformers. Complete equilibrium geometries have been determined for both rotamers by ab initio calculations employing the 6-31G(d) and 6-311 +/- G(d,p) basis sets at levels of Hartree Fock (RHF) and/or Moller- Plesset with full electron correlation by the perturbation method to the second order (MP2). The results are discussed and compared to those obtained for some similar molecules.

  2. Phase-locked servo system. [for synchronizing the rotation of slip ring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdin, C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A phase lock servo system is described for synchronizing the rotation of a slip ring assembly with the rotation of an air bearing table so that a minimum of torque will be imparted through cables extending from the slip ring assembly to the air bearing table as such is rotated. The system includes two servo loops. The first servo loop includes a rate gyroscope carried on the air bearing table which generates a signal through a summing junction to be compared with a signal coming from a tachometer coupled to the slip ring assembly. The corrective signal is applied to a torque motor for rotating the slip ring assembly. The second servo loop includes a pair of photo detector cells which generate pulses responsive to the rotation of the air bearing table and slip ring assembly which are fed through a phase detector, and a variable gain amplifier to the summing junction circuit to provide a fine adjustment for rotating the slip ring assembly.

  3. Capture, acceleration and bunching rf systems for the MEIC booster and storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. The electron collider ring accepts electrons from CEBAF at energies from 3 to 12 GeV. Protons and ions are delivered to a booster and captured in a long bunch before being ramped and transferred to the ion collider ring. The ion collider ring accelerates a small number of long ion bunches to colliding energy before they are re-bunched into a high frequency train of very short bunches for colliding. Two sets of low frequency RF systems are needed for the long ion bunch energy ramping in the booster and ion collider ring. Another two sets of high frequency RF cavities are needed for re-bunching in the ion collider ring and compensating synchrotron radiation energy loss in the electron collider ring. The requirements from energy ramping, ion beam bunching, electron beam energy compensation, collective effects, beam loading and feedback capability, RF power capability, etc. are presented. The preliminary designs of these RF systems are presented. Concepts for the baseline cavity and RF station configurations are described, as well as some options that may allow more flexible injection and acceleration schemes.

  4. The interplay between the Aharonov-Bohm interference and parity selective tunneling in graphene nanoribbon rings.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V Hung; Niquet, Y-M; Dollfus, P

    2014-05-21

    We report on a numerical study of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect and parity selective tunneling in pn junctions based on rectangular graphene rings where the contacts and ring arms are all made of zigzag nanoribbons. We find that when applying a magnetic field to the ring, the AB interference can reverse the parity symmetry of incoming waves and hence can strongly modulate the parity selective transmission through the system. Therefore, the transmission between two states of different parity exhibits the AB oscillations with a π-phase shift, compared to the case of states of the same parity. On this basis, it is shown that interesting effects, such as giant (both positive and negative) magnetoresistance and strong negative differential conductance, can be achieved in this structure. Our study thus presents a new property of the AB interference in graphene nanorings, which could be helpful for further understanding the transport properties of graphene mesoscopic systems.

  5. A pinger system for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Developers at the Proton Storage Ring have long desired a modulator and electrode combination capable of kicking the 800-MeV proton beam enough to conduct tune measurements with full intensity beams. At present this has been accomplished by reducing the voltage on one extraction kicker modulator and turning the other off. This method requires that all of the accumulated beam be lost on the walls of the vacuum chamber. In addition to tune measurements a more recent desire is to sweep out beam that may have leaked into the area between bunches. A four-meter electrode has been designed and constructed for the purpose. The design is flexible in that the electrode may be split in the center and rotated in order to provide vertical and horizontal electrodes each 2 meters long. In addition two solid-state pulse modulators that can provide 10kV in burst mode at up to 700 KHz have been purchased. This hardware and its intended use are described. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Ab initio based State Specific Modeling of N2+O System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Han

    Nitrogen and atomic oxygen play an important role in high temperature gas systems. Their Zeldovich reaction product nitric oxide not only affects aerothermal loads and emissions of hypersonic vehicles, but also has the possibility to influence the efficiency of hypersonic propulsion. Atomic oxygen induced nitrogen dissociation is another reaction mechanism of the N2+O system. However, due to the difficulty of conducting ground tests, there are no experimental data for this reaction now. Thermo-chemical nonequilibrium could make the problem more difficult since experiments could only track macroscopic gas properties instead of internal energy distribution. On the other hand, current reaction and internal energy exchange models are able to reproduce equilibrium condition. Whether their predictions at nonequilibrium conditions are reliable is still questionable. The work in this thesis employs quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method based on an ab-initio chemistry calculated potential energy surface for the N2+O system. Through QCT calculations of different initial condition, high fidelity cross sections and rates are obtained. The cross sections are further used to generate a ME-QCT-VT model for vibrational excitation/relaxation, a state-specific exchange (SSE) model and a state-specific dissociation (SSD) model. These models are verified by comparison with direct QCT calculated rates and other experimental data or models. Although there are no flowfield calculations in this work, the models are able to be applied easily in DSMC calculations.

  7. Auto-production of biosurfactants reverses the coffee ring effect in a bacterial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempels, Wouter; de Dier, Raf; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Vermant, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The deposition of material at the edge of evaporating droplets, known as the ‘coffee ring effect’, is caused by a radially outward capillary flow. This phenomenon is common to a wide array of systems including colloidal and bacterial systems. The role of surfactants in counteracting these coffee ring depositions is related to the occurrence of local vortices known as Marangoni eddies. Here we show that these swirling flows are universal, and not only lead to a uniform deposition of colloids but also occur in living bacterial systems. Experiments on Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggest that the auto-production of biosurfactants has an essential role in creating a homogeneous deposition of the bacteria upon drying. Moreover, at biologically relevant conditions, intricate time-dependent flows are observed in addition to the vortex regime, which are also effective in reversing the coffee ring effect at even lower surfactant concentrations.

  8. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  9. Shipboard Application of a Ring Structured Distributed Computing System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Considerable research is currently going on into the application of distributed computing systems. They appear particularly suitable for the...structured distributed computing system might be adapted to function in this environment. Included in this consideration are the feasibility of

  10. The two-component system BfrAB regulates expression of ABC transporters in Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongshu; Whiteley, Marvin; Kreth, Jens; Lei, Yu; Khammanivong, Ali; Evavold, Jamie N.; Fan, Jingyuan; Herzberg, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    The putative two-component system BfrAB is involved in Streptococcus gordonii biofilm development. Here, we provide evidence that BfrAB regulates the expression of bfrCD and bfrEFG, which encode two ABC transporters, and bfrH, which encodes a CAAX amino-terminal protease family protein. BfrC and BfrE are ATP-binding proteins and BfrD, BfrF and BfrG are homologous membrane- spanning polypeptides. Similarly, BfrABss, the BfrAB homologous system in S. sanguinis controls the expression of two bfrCD-homologous operons (bfrCDss and bfrXYss), a bfrH-homologous gene (bfrH1ss) and another CAAX amino- terminal protease family protein gene (bfrH2ss). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the purified BfrA DNA-binding domain from S. gordonii binds to the promoter regions of bfrCD, bfrEFG, bfrH, bfrCDss, bfrXYss, and bfrH1ss in vitro. Finally, we show that the BfrA DNA-binding domain recognizes a conserved DNA motif with a consensuses sequence of TTTCTTTAGAAATATTTTAGAATT. These data suggest, therefore, that S. gordonii BfrAB could control biofilm formation by regulating multiple ABC-transporter systems. PMID:19118357

  11. [A novel pyridazino-fused ring system: synthesis of pyridazino[3,4-b]diazepam].

    PubMed

    Károlyházy, L; Horváth, G; Mátyus, P

    2001-08-01

    As an analogue of pyridazino-fused ring systems with pharmacological activities, the novel pyridazinol[3,4-b][1,5]diazepine ring system was prepared. The synthetic pathway includes three steps from 4 5-(N-benzyl-N-3-hydroxypropyl)amino derivative which is easily available through nucleophilic substitution reaction of the known 4,5-dichloro-2-methyl-6-nitro-3(2H)-pyridazinone (2) with N-benzyl-N-(3-hydroxypropyl)amine. In the first step, compound 4 was treated with thionyl chloride to give the chloropropyl derivative 5. In the second step, a Bechamp reduction was carried out with Fe in acetic acid to obtain the amino compound 6, and finally the ring closure reaction of 6 was performed in N,N-dimethylformamide in the presence of potassium carbonate at 110 degrees C for 40 hours. In this way the bicyclic compound 7 could be isolated in 48% yield.

  12. Configuration maintaining control of three-body ring tethered system based on thrust compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng; Liu, Binbin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Space multi-tethered systems have shown broad prospects in remote observation missions. This paper mainly focuses on the dynamics and configuration maintaining control of space spinning three-body ring tethered system for such mission. Firstly, we establish the spinning dynamic model of the three-body ring tethered system considering the elasticity of the tether using Newton-Euler method, and then validate the suitability of this model by numerical simulation. Subsequently, LP (Likins-Pringle) initial equilibrium conditions for the tethered system are derived based on rigid body's equilibrium theory. Simulation results show that tether slack, snapping and interaction between the tethers exist in the three-body ring system, and its' configuration can not be maintained without control. Finally, a control strategy based on thrust compensation, namely thrust to simulate tether compression under LP initial equilibrium conditions is designed to solve the configuration maintaining control problem. Control effects are verified by numerical simulation compared with uncontrolled situation. Simulation results show that the configuration of the three-body ring tethered system could maintain under this active control strategy.

  13. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Anomalous Kondo-Switching Effect of a Spin-Flip Quantum Dot Embedded in an Aharonov-Bohm Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiong-Wen; Shi, Zhen-Gang; Song, Ke-Hui

    2009-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the Kondo effect of a quantum dot embedded in a mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring in the presence of the spin flip processes by means of the one-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian. Based on the slave-boson mean-field theory, we find that in this system the persistent current (PC) sensitively depends on the parity and size of the AB ring and can be tuned by the spin-flip scattering (R). In the small AB ring, the PC is suppressed due to the enhancing R weakening the Kondo resonance. On the contrary, in the large AB ring, with R increasing, the peak of PC firstly moves up to max-peak and then down. Especially, the PC phase shift of π appears suddenly with the proper value of R, implying the existence of the anomalous Kondo effect in this system. Thus this system may be a candidate for quantum switch.

  14. Ab initio transition state searching in complex systems: fatty acid decarboxylation in minerals.

    PubMed

    Geatches, Dawn L; Greenwell, H Christopher; Clark, Stewart J

    2011-03-31

    Because of the importance of mineral catalyzed decarboxylation reactions in both crude oil formation and, increasingly, biofuel production, we present a model study into the decarboxylation of the shortest fatty acid, propionic acid C(2)H(5)COOH, into an alkane and CO(2) catalyzed by a pyrophillite-like, phyllosilicate clay. To identify the decarboxylation pathway, we searched for a transition state between the reactant, comprised of the clay plus interlayer fatty acid, and the product, comprised of the clay plus interlayer alkane and carbon dioxide. Using linear and quadratic synchronous transit mechanisms we searched for a transition state followed by vibrational analysis to verify the intermediate found as a transition state. We employed a periodic cell, planewave, ab initio density functional theory computation to examine total energy differences, Mulliken charges, vibrational frequencies, and the frontier orbitals of the reactants, intermediates, and products. The results show that interpretation of vibrational data, Mulliken charges and Fermi-level orbital occupancies is necessary for the classification of a transition state in this type of mixed bulk surface plus interlayer species, clay-organic system.

  15. Physical Properties of the Saturnian Ring System Inferred from Cassini VIMS Opposition Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, B.; Nelson, R. M.; Brown, R. H.; Spilker, L. J.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Leader, F.; Matson, D. L.; Edgington, S.; Nicholson, P. D.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R. N.; Bibring, J.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Bellucci, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; McCord, T.; Menella, V.; Sicardy, B.

    2005-12-01

    Much can be learned about the nature of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by studying the wavelength dependence of their reflectance as a function of phase angle. At small phase angles the reflectance of the rings exhibits the opposition effect (OE) a significant increase in reflectance as phase angle approaches zero degrees. The wavelength dependence of the width and the peak of the OE are indicators of important physical properties of the regoliths of the ring particles such as particle size, particle shape, packing density and albedo. The Cassini VIMS multi spectral imaging spectrometer obtained low phase observations of the Saturnian ring system from 0.4-5.2 microns during 2005. These data clearly show a pronounced (OE). Cassini VIMS opposition surge data indicate a wavelength dependence of the OE that relates to the size and separation of the scattering centers on the surface of the ring particles. Laboratory studies and theoretical models of the OE relate the size and shape of the reflectance increase to physical properties of the medium (Nelson et al, 2002; Spilker et al. 1995; Hapke et al., 1993)). The OE arises from two processes, shadow hiding (SH) and coherent backscattering (CB). The SHOE is observed because shadows cast by the particulate grains on one another are eliminated as phase angle approaches zero degrees. The CBOE is due to constructive interference between light rays traveling in opposite paths through the medium as the path length decreases with decreasing phase angle. The VIMS data at 1.9 microns, where the rings are highly reflective, indicate a strong CBOE effect, however, at 2.1 microns, where the rings are very absorbing, the shape of the phase curve is consistent with SHOE. Hapke et al. 1993,Science, 260, 509-511 Nelson, R. M. et al., 2002. Planetary and Space Science, 50, 849-856 Spilker aka Horn, L.J et al., 1995. IAU Colloquium #150 This work done at JPL under contract with NASA

  16. Comments on the interaction between the F ring system and its new discovered objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliatti Winter, S. M.; Ferreira Gonsalves, M. A.; Winter, O.; Cardozo Mourao, D.

    2005-08-01

    The arrival of the Cassini spacecraft to the saturnian system brought a huge amount of data. Among them there is the discovery of three satellites close to the F ring (S/2004 S3, S/2004 S4 and S/2004 S6) and two tenuous rings, one close to the satellite Prometheus (R 2004/S2) and other coorbital to the satellite Atlas (R 2004/ S1). Before the inclusion of these new bodies, this region already had some unexplained features. The F ring presents strands, kinks and clumps probably related to the close satellites Prometheus and Pandora and embedded moonlets. In this work we analysed the behaviour of the ring particles strands disturbed by a sample of small objects varying in size and orbital elements. The new discovered objects is part of this sample of objects. As an example, we showed that an object of 10km in radius forms a gap in the outer strand. There are no scattered particles, the gap is formed by particles which collide with the object. We also analysed a sample of hypothetical objects lying in the F ring region taking into account the perturbation of Prometheus, Pandora and the oblateness of Saturn. This analysis is primarily performed using the secular perturbation theory. Then we computed the Lyapunov characteristic exponent for these objects. These results are presented for a range of semi major axes and eccentricities. By using numerical simulation we can verify that the perturbation of Prometheus on the new rings causes a variation only in R 2004/S2. This perturbation is enough to open a gap and scatter particles in the direction of the F ring region. Acknowledgements: SMGW thanks FUNDUNESP, OCW thanks FUNDUNESP and CNPq, MAFG and DCM thank CAPES for the financial support.

  17. The SLS Storage Ring Vertical Position Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenika, Sasa

    2004-05-12

    The goal of monitoring the vertical position of the SLS machine was achieved by employing a capacitive gauge-based Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS). Although all the preliminary results showed that the aimed HLS micrometric range resolutions and accuracies have been reached, the long-time behavior of the system revealed considerable drifts. A satisfactory solution could eventually be reached only by adding to the working fluid a fungicide.

  18. [The identification of the AB0 blood type system by means of the single nucleotide polymorphisms analysis].

    PubMed

    Lapenkov, M I; Plakhina, N V; Aleksandrova, V Yu; Kuklev, M Yu; Nikolaeva, T L; Konovalova, N V

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a domestically produced test-system for the determination of the AB0 blood type by means of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) analysis. The results of the trials indicate that the proposed test-system can be employed for the investigation of DNA specimens of individual origin obtained from any objects of expertise including micro-objects containing human nuclear DNA.

  19. Weak interactions in Graphane/BN systems under static electric fields—A periodic ab-initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkasserer, Lukas Eugen Marsoner; Gaston, Nicola; Paulus, Beate

    2015-04-21

    Ab-initio calculations via periodic Hartree-Fock (HF) and local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (LMP2) are used to investigate the adsorption properties of combined Graphane/boron nitride systems and their response to static electric fields. It is shown how the latter can be used to alter both structural as well as electronic properties of these systems.

  20. From Satellites to Rings: The Diversity of the Saturnian System Ices in the VIS-NIR at the End of Cassini-VIMS Nominal Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2008-09-01

    After four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the whole population of Saturnian icy objects allowing a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and main rings (A, B, C and Cassini division). The results we present are derived from the whole dataset available at june 2008 which consists of about 1500 full-disk observations of the moons as well as several radial mosaics of the ring system. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (I/F continua, VIS spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide IR bands strengths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to identify the disk-integrated compositional units of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants” abundances and typical regolith grain properties for both satellites and rings. These quantities are varying between the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Some significant differences are detected in the VIS colors of co-orbital moons Epimetheus and Janus, with the first very red and therefore similar to Hyperion while the last is more "neutral” these results could help to decipher the origins and evolutional story of these two moons. The water ice band strengths of the A-B rings are the most intense of the Saturnian system denoting a minimal presence of "contaminants” which can be estimated thanks to the 350-520 nm spectral slope. Finally we compare these spectral parameters with some TNOs and outer solar system objects (1995UG5, 90377-Sedna, 1996TO66, Pholus, Triton, Charon, Oberon, Titania) to search for possible analogies. This research was possible thanks to the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  1. A laser system for the TESLA photon collider based on an external ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, I.; Quast, T.; Redlin, H.; Sandner, W.

    2001-10-01

    We present a concept of a laser system for a photon collider at the TESLA linac. It is based on an external optical ring cavity which is pumped by a short-pulse laser. A detailed discussion of the geometry of the external cavity is given.

  2. Synthesis of Stereochemically and Skeletally Diverse Fused Ring Systems from Functionalized C-Glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Baudouin; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Fitzgerald, Mark E.; Kesavan, Sarathy; Lee, Maurice D.; Lowe, Jason T.; Marié, Jean-Charles; Pandya, Bhaumik A.; Suh, Byung-Chul; O’Shea, Morgan Welzel; Dombrowski, Michael; Hamann, Diane; Lemercier, Berenice; Murillo, Tiffanie; Akella, Lakshmi B.; Foley, Michael A.; Marcaurelle, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    A diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) strategy was developed for the synthesis of stereochemically diverse fused-ring systems containing a pyran moiety. Each scaffold contains an amine and methyl ester for future diversification via amine capping and amide coupling. Scaffold diversity was evaluated in comparison to previously prepared scaffolds via a shape-based principal moments of inertia (PMI) analysis. PMID:23692141

  3. Tunable optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in graphene-ring resonators system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Zengxing; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical ways has shown great potential in optical delay and quantum-information technology due to its flexible design and easy implementation. The chief drawback for these devices is the bad tunability. Here we demonstrate a tunable optical transparency system formed by graphene-silicon microrings which could control the transparent window by electro-optical means. The device consists of cascaded coupled ring resonators and a graphene/graphene capacitor which integrated on one of the rings. By tuning the Fermi level of the graphene sheets, we can modulate the round-trip ring loss so that the transparency window can be dynamically tuned. The results provide a new method for the manipulation and transmission of light in highly integrated optical circuits and quantum information storage devices. PMID:27941895

  4. Tunable optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in graphene-ring resonators system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Zengxing; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-12-01

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical ways has shown great potential in optical delay and quantum-information technology due to its flexible design and easy implementation. The chief drawback for these devices is the bad tunability. Here we demonstrate a tunable optical transparency system formed by graphene-silicon microrings which could control the transparent window by electro-optical means. The device consists of cascaded coupled ring resonators and a graphene/graphene capacitor which integrated on one of the rings. By tuning the Fermi level of the graphene sheets, we can modulate the round-trip ring loss so that the transparency window can be dynamically tuned. The results provide a new method for the manipulation and transmission of light in highly integrated optical circuits and quantum information storage devices.

  5. Fused-Ring Oxazolopyrrolopyridopyrimidine Systems with Gram-Negative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyuan; Moloney, Jonathan G.; Christensen, Kirsten E.; Moloney, Mark G.

    2017-01-01

    Fused polyheterocyclic derivatives are available by annulation of a tetramate scaffold, and been shown to have antibacterial activity against a Gram-negative, but not a Gram-positive, bacterial strain. While the activity is not potent, these systems are structurally novel showing, in particular, a high level of polarity, and offer potential for the optimization of antibacterial activity. PMID:28098784

  6. Tissue culture system using a PANDA ring resonator and wavelength router for hydroponic plant.

    PubMed

    Kamoldilok, Surachart; Suwanpayak, Nathaporn; Suttirak, Saisudawan; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-06-01

    A novel system of nanofluidics trapping and delivery, which is known as a tissue culture system is proposed. By using the intense optical pulse(i.e., a soliton pulse) and a system constructed by a liquid core waveguide, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated, where the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers in the PANDA ring resonator can be formed. By controlling the suitable parameters, the intense optical vortices can be generated within the PANDA ring resonator, in which the nanofluidics can be trapped and moved (transported) dynamically within the Tissue culture system(a wavelength router), which can be used for tissue culture and delivery in the hydroponic plant system.

  7. Photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a dense ring system around Centaur Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Sicardy, B.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Morales, N.; Colazo, C.; Fernández-Valenzuela, E.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2014-08-01

    Context. A stellar occultation observed on 3rd June 2013 revealed the presence of two dense and narrow rings separated by a small gap around the Centaur object (10 199) Chariklo. The composition of these rings is not known. We suspect that water ice is present in the rings, as is the case for Saturn and other rings around the giant planets. Aims: In this work, we aim to determine if the variability in the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and the temporal variation of the spectral ice feature, even when it disappeared in 2007, can be explained by an icy ring system whose aspect angle changes with time. Methods: We explained the variations on the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and its ring by modeling the light reflected by a system as the one described above. Using X-shooter at VLT, we obtained a new reflectance spectra. We compared this new set of data with the ones available in the literature. We showed how the water ice feature is visible in 2013 in accordance with the ring configuration, which had an opening angle of nearly 34° in 2013. Finally, we also used models of light scattering to fit the visible and near-infrared spectra that shows different characteristics to obtain information on the composition of Chariklo and its rings. Results: We showed that absolute photometry of Chariklo from the literature and new photometric data that we obtained in 2013 can be explained by a ring of particles whose opening angle changes as a function of time. We used the two possible pole solutions for the ring system and found that only one of them, α = 151.30 ± 0.5, δ = 41.48 ± 0.2° (λ = 137.9 ± 0.5, β = 27.7 ± 0.2°), provides the right variation of the aspect angle with time to explain the photometry, whereas the other possible pole solution fails to explain the photometry. From spectral modeling, we derived the composition of the Chariklo surface and that of the rings using the result on the pole solution. Chariklo surface is composed with about 60% of amorphous

  8. An innovative seismic bracing system based on a superelastic shape memory alloy ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nan; Jeon, Jong-Su; Hodgson, Darel E.; DesRoches, Reginald

    2016-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have great potential in seismic applications because of their remarkable superelasticity. Seismic bracing systems based on SMAs can mitigate the damage caused by earthquakes. The current study investigates a bracing system based on an SMA ring which is capable of both re-centering and energy dissipation. This lateral force resisting system is a cross-braced system consisting of an SMA ring and four tension-only cable assemblies, which can be applied to both new construction and seismic retrofit. The performance of this bracing system is examined through a quasi-static cyclic loading test and finite element (FE) analysis. This paper describes the experimental design in detail, discusses the experimental results, compares the performance with other bracing systems based on SMAs, and presents an Abaqus FE model calibrated on the basis of experimental results to simulate the superelastic behavior of the SMA ring. The experimental results indicate that the seismic performance of this system is promising in terms of damping and re-centering. The FE model can be used in the simulation of building structures using the proposed bracing system.

  9. Stability Analysis of a Turbocharger Rotor System Supported on Floating Ring Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Shi, Z. Q.; Zhen, D.; Gu, F. S.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    The stability of a turbocharger rotor is governed by the coupling of rotor dynamics and fluid dynamics because the high speed rotor system is supported on a pair of hydrodynamic floating ring bearings which comprise of inner and outer fluid films in series. In order to investigate the stability, this paper has developed a finite element model of the rotor system with consideration of such exciting forces as rotor imbalance, hydrodynamic fluid forces, lubricant feed pressure and dead weight. The dimensionless analytical expression of nonlinear oil film forces in floating ring bearings have been derived on the basis of short bearing theory. Based on numerical simulation, the effects of rotor imbalance, lubricant viscosity, lubricant feed pressure and bearing clearances on the stability of turbocharger rotor system have been studied. The disciplines of the stability of two films and dynamic performances of rotor system have been provided.

  10. Revealing halogen bonding interactions with anomeric systems: an ab initio quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2015-02-01

    A computational study has been performed using MP2 and CCSD(T) methods on a series of O⋯X (X=Br, Cl and I) halogen bonds to evaluate the strength and characteristic of such highly directional noncovalent interactions. The study has been carried out on a series of dimeric complexes formed between interhalogen compounds (such as BrF, BrCl and BrI) and oxygen containing electron donor molecule. The existence and consequences of the anomeric effect of the electron donor molecule has also been investigated through an exploration of halogen bonding interactions in this halogen bonded complexes. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been employed to study both the nature and directionality of the halogen molecules toward the sp(3) oxygen atom in anomeric systems. The presence of anomeric nO→σ*CN interaction involves a dominant role for the availability of the axial and equatorial lone pairs of donor O atom to participate with interhalogen compounds in the halogen-bonded complexes. The energy difference between the axial and equatorial conformers with interhalogen compounds reaches up to 4.60 kJ/mol, which however depends upon the interacting halogen atoms and its attaching atoms. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the total halogen bond interaction energies are mainly contributed by the attractive electrostatic and dispersion components. The role of substituents attached with the halogen atoms has also been evaluated in this study. With the increase of halogen atom size and the positive nature of σ-hole, the halogen atom interacted more with the electron donor atom and the electrostatic contribution to the total interaction energy enhances appreciably. Further, noncovalent interaction (NCI) studies have been carried out to locate the noncovalent halogen bonding interactions in real space.

  11. Dissipative effects on the mu and nu dust particles of Uranus' secondary ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfair, Rafael; Giuliatti Winter, Silvia Maria

    In 2006, an outer ring-moon system composed by the satellites Portia, Rosalind, Puck, and Mab, and two tenuous rings µ and ν, was discovered around Uranus by Showalter Lissauer (2006). We present the results of numerical simulations of an ensemble of micrometric particles of both rings disturbed by a combination of the solar radiation pressure force, the gravitational interaction with the satellites, and the planetary gravity modified by the oblateness. Our results show that the Poynting-Robertson drag component alone is responsible for a de-crease of the semimajor axis in a time scale of 105 to 106 years. In a shorter time scale, the oscillation of the eccentricity, caused by the radiation pressure component, is much more im-portant to the orbital evolution of the particle, even though the amplitude of oscillation is mitigated by the inclusion of the planetary oblateness. The combination of these effects with the gravitational interaction of the satellites result in close encounters between the particles and the satellites, leading the particles to move inward and outward within the ring region, and eventually colliding with the satellites. The percentage of collisions varies between 12% and 94% according to the size of the particle. All collisions with Puck, Portia and Rosalind have the value of impact velocity comparable to the escape velocity, which the most likely result is the deposition of material onto the surface of the satellite. In the other hand, the impact velocity with Mab exceeds the scape velocity of the satellite, so these collisions are energetic enough to eject material and supply material to the µ ring. This mechanics of dust production can also be applied to collisions with macroscopic bodies that my inhabit within the µ and ν rings.

  12. Properties of AdeABC and AdeIJK Efflux Systems of Acinetobacter baumannii Compared with Those of the AcrAB-TolC System of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Etsuko

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii contains RND-family efflux systems AdeABC and AdeIJK, which pump out a wide range of antimicrobial compounds, as judged from the MIC changes occurring upon deletion of the responsible genes. However, these studies may miss changes because of the high backgrounds generated by the remaining pumps and by β-lactamases, and it is unclear how the activities of these pumps compare quantitatively with those of the well-studied AcrAB-TolC system of Escherichia coli. We expressed adeABC and adeIJK of A. baumannii, as well as E. coli acrAB, in an E. coli host from which acrAB was deleted. The A. baumannii pumps were functional in E. coli, and the MIC changes that were observed largely confirmed the substrate range already reported, with important differences. Thus, the AdeABC system pumped out all β-lactams, an activity that was often missed in deletion studies. When the expression level of the pump genes was adjusted to a similar level for a comparison with AcrAB-TolC, we found that both A. baumannii efflux systems pumped out a wide range of compounds, but AdeABC was less effective than AcrAB-TolC in the extrusion of lipophilic β-lactams, novobiocin, and ethidium bromide, although it was more effective at tetracycline efflux. AdeIJK was remarkably more effective than a similar level of AcrAB-TolC in the efflux of β-lactams, novobiocin, and ethidium bromide, although it was less so in the efflux of erythromycin. These results thus allow us to compare these efflux systems on a quantitative basis, if we can assume that the heterologous systems are fully functional in the E. coli host. PMID:25246403

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of a binary system of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Brüssel, Marc; Brehm, Martin; Voigt, Thomas; Kirchner, Barbara

    2011-08-14

    This work presents first insights into the structural properties of a binary mixture of ionic liquids from the perspective of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations were carried out for a one-to-one mixture of 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium thiocyanate and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride and compared to pure 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium thiocyanate.

  14. Pressurized balanced sealing system for use on the ring-liner interface of a coal fired diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, G.L.

    1989-03-14

    A system for minimizing a wear to a reciprocating internal combustion engine is described, consisting of a cylinder having a wall and a combustion chamber within the cylinder; a piston movable in a stroke within the cylinder between a top dead center position and a bottom dead center position, the piston having first and second ends, the first end being adjacent to the combustion chamber and the second end being remote from the combustion chamber; first, second, and third piston rings extending around the piston, the second piston ring being positioned between the first and the third piston rings; a ring pack area on the piston between the first piston ring and the second piston ring; a lubricant blowby area between the second piston ring and the third piston ring; and a pump communicating with an inlet in the wall such that the lubricant blowby area registers with the inlet during at least part of the stroke of the piston, the pump having an outlet in the wall such that the ring pack area registers with the outlet during at least part of the stroke of the piston, the pump operable to draw lubricant from the lubricant blowby area and provide lubricant to the ring pack area.

  15. Formation of regular satellites from ancient massive rings in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Crida, A; Charnoz, S

    2012-11-30

    When a planetary tidal disk--like Saturn's rings--spreads beyond the Roche radius (inside which planetary tides prevent aggregation), satellites form and migrate away. Here, we show that most regular satellites in the solar system probably formed in this way. According to our analytical model, when the spreading is slow, a retinue of satellites appear with masses increasing with distance to the Roche radius, in excellent agreement with Saturn's, Uranus', and Neptune's satellite systems. This suggests that Uranus and Neptune used to have massive rings that disappeared to give birth to most of their regular satellites. When the spreading is fast, only one large satellite forms, as was the case for Pluto and Earth. This conceptually bridges the gap between terrestrial and giant planet systems.

  16. Molecular Characterization of the Cytidine Monophosphate-N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Hydroxylase (CMAH) Gene Associated with the Feline AB Blood Group System.

    PubMed

    Omi, Toshinori; Nakazawa, Shota; Udagawa, Chihiro; Tada, Naomi; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Chong, Yong Hwa; Kato, Yuiko; Mitsui, Hiroko; Gin, Azusa; Oda, Hitomi; Azakami, Daigo; Tamura, Kyoichi; Sako, Toshinori; Inagaki, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko; Bonkobara, Makoto; Tsuchida, Shuichi; Ikemoto, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    Cat's AB blood group system (blood types A, B, and AB) is of major importance in feline transfusion medicine. Type A and type B antigens are Neu5Gc and Neu5Ac, respectively, and the enzyme CMAH participating in the synthesis of Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac is associated with this cat blood group system. Rare type AB erythrocytes express both Neu5Gc and Neu5Ac. Cat serum contains naturally occurring antibodies against antigens occurring in the other blood types. To understand the molecular genetic basis of this blood group system, we investigated the distribution of AB blood group antigens, CMAH gene structure, mutation, diplotypes, and haplotypes of the cat CMAH genes. Blood-typing revealed that 734 of the cats analyzed type A (95.1%), 38 cats were type B (4.9%), and none were type AB. A family of three Ragdoll cats including two type AB cats and one type A was also used in this study. CMAH sequence analyses showed that the CMAH protein was generated from two mRNA isoforms differing in exon 1. Analyses of the nucleotide sequences of the 16 exons including the coding region of CMAH examined in the 34 type B cats and in the family of type AB cats carried the CMAH variants, and revealed multiple novel diplotypes comprising several polymorphisms. Haplotype inference, which was focused on non-synonymous SNPs revealed that eight haplotypes carried one to four mutations in CMAH, and all cats with type B (n = 34) and AB (n = 2) blood carried two alleles derived from the mutated CMAH gene. These results suggested that double haploids selected from multiple recessive alleles in the cat CMAH loci were highly associated with the expression of the Neu5Ac on erythrocyte membrane in types B and AB of the feline AB blood group system.

  17. Molecular Characterization of the Cytidine Monophosphate-N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Hydroxylase (CMAH) Gene Associated with the Feline AB Blood Group System

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Naomi; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Chong, Yong Hwa; Kato, Yuiko; Mitsui, Hiroko; Gin, Azusa; Oda, Hitomi; Azakami, Daigo; Tamura, Kyoichi; Sako, Toshinori; Inagaki, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko; Bonkobara, Makoto; Tsuchida, Shuichi; Ikemoto, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    Cat’s AB blood group system (blood types A, B, and AB) is of major importance in feline transfusion medicine. Type A and type B antigens are Neu5Gc and Neu5Ac, respectively, and the enzyme CMAH participating in the synthesis of Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac is associated with this cat blood group system. Rare type AB erythrocytes express both Neu5Gc and Neu5Ac. Cat serum contains naturally occurring antibodies against antigens occurring in the other blood types. To understand the molecular genetic basis of this blood group system, we investigated the distribution of AB blood group antigens, CMAH gene structure, mutation, diplotypes, and haplotypes of the cat CMAH genes. Blood-typing revealed that 734 of the cats analyzed type A (95.1%), 38 cats were type B (4.9%), and none were type AB. A family of three Ragdoll cats including two type AB cats and one type A was also used in this study. CMAH sequence analyses showed that the CMAH protein was generated from two mRNA isoforms differing in exon 1. Analyses of the nucleotide sequences of the 16 exons including the coding region of CMAH examined in the 34 type B cats and in the family of type AB cats carried the CMAH variants, and revealed multiple novel diplotypes comprising several polymorphisms. Haplotype inference, which was focused on non-synonymous SNPs revealed that eight haplotypes carried one to four mutations in CMAH, and all cats with type B (n = 34) and AB (n = 2) blood carried two alleles derived from the mutated CMAH gene. These results suggested that double haploids selected from multiple recessive alleles in the cat CMAH loci were highly associated with the expression of the Neu5Ac on erythrocyte membrane in types B and AB of the feline AB blood group system. PMID:27755584

  18. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov-Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage Vg applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  19. A new systematic calibration method of ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guo; Gao, Chunfeng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Qun; Xiong, Zhenyu; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    Inertial navigation system has been the core component of both military and civil navigation systems. Before the INS is put into application, it is supposed to be calibrated in the laboratory in order to compensate repeatability error caused by manufacturing. Discrete calibration method cannot fulfill requirements of high-accurate calibration of the mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope navigation system with shock absorbers. This paper has analyzed theories of error inspiration and separation in detail and presented a new systematic calibration method for ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system. Error models and equations of calibrated Inertial Measurement Unit are given. Then proper rotation arrangement orders are depicted in order to establish the linear relationships between the change of velocity errors and calibrated parameter errors. Experiments have been set up to compare the systematic errors calculated by filtering calibration result with those obtained by discrete calibration result. The largest position error and velocity error of filtering calibration result are only 0.18 miles and 0.26m/s compared with 2 miles and 1.46m/s of discrete calibration result. These results have validated the new systematic calibration method and proved its importance for optimal design and accuracy improvement of calibration of mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system.

  20. The triple system AT Mic AB + AU Mic in the β Pictoris association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sergio; Leto, Giuseppe; Pagano, Isabella

    2016-09-01

    Equal-mass stars in young open clusters and loose associations exhibit a wide spread of rotation periods, which likely originates from differences in the initial rotation periods and in the primordial disc lifetimes. We want to explore if the gravitational effects by nearby companions may play an additional role in producing the observed rotation period spread, as well as, the role that magnetic activity may also play. We measure the photometric rotation periods of components of multiple stellar systems and look for correlations of the period differences among the components to their reciprocal distances. In this paper, we analyzed the triple system AU Mic + AT Mic A&B in the 25± 3-Myr β Pictoris association. We have retrieved from the literature the rotation period of AU Mic ({P} = 4.85 d) and measured from photometric archival data the rotation periods of both components of AT Mic ({P} = 1.19 d and {P} = 0.78 d) for the first time. Moreover, we detected a high rate of flare events from AT Mic. Whereas the distant component AU Mic has evolved rotationally as a single star, the A and B components of AT Mic, separated by ˜ 27 AU, exhibit a rotation rate a factor 5 larger than AU Mic. Moreover, the A and B components, despite have about equal mass, show a significant difference (˜ 40 %) between their rotation periods. A possible explanation is that the gravitational forces between the A and B components of AT Mic (that are a factor ˜ 7.3× 106 more intense than those between AU Mic and AT Mic) have enhanced the dispersal of the AT Mic primordial disc, shortening its lifetime and the disc-locking phase duration, making the component A and B of AT Mic to rotate faster than the more distant AU Mic. We suspect that a different level of magnetic activity between the A and B components of AT Mic may be the additional parameter responsible for the difference between their rotation periods.

  1. COMPUTATIONAL BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR IMPROVING THE RING INJECTION AND EXTRACTION SYSTEMS IN SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Plum, Michael A; Wang, Jian-Guang

    2008-01-01

    The ring injection and extraction systems must function as designed in order for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to achieve its specified performance. In commissioning and early operations we have encountered problems that have been traced to these systems. We experienced high beam losses in and around the injection dump, the rectification of which has necessitated ongoing study and development by a multidisciplinary team. Results already include a number of enhancements of existing features and the addition of new elements and diagnostics. The problem in the extraction region stems from tilted beam distributions observed in the ring-to-target beam transport line (RTBT) and on the target, thus complicating the control of the beam-on-target distribution. This indicates the inadvertent introduction of x-y beam coupling somewhere upstream of the RTBT. The present paper describes computational studies, using the ORBIT Code, addressed at the detailed understanding and solution of these problems.

  2. Overall design concepts for the APS storage ring machine protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.; Fuja, R.; Votaw, A.; Wang, X.; Shu, D.; Stepp, J.; Arnold, N.; Nawrocki, G.; Decker, G.; Chung, Y.

    1995-07-01

    The basic design and status of the machine protection system for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring are discussed. The machine is passively safe to the bending magnet sources, but the high power of the insertion devices requires missteering conditions to be identified and the beam aborted in less than one millisecond. The basic aspects of waterflow, temperature, beam position, etc. monitoring are addressed. Initial commissioning of subsystems and sensors is statused.

  3. On the Relation between Stable Matrix Fraction Factorizations and Regulable Realizations of Linear Systems Over Rings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-13

    rings usual theory in which coefficients of x(t) and u(t) are approach is based on generalizations of state space tech- constant, but generalized to...AFOSR-WO) 196. P. P. Khargonekar is with the Center for Mathematical System Theory control-theoretic problems (output regulation. tracking, and and the...denote the minimal possible cardinafity of a set our approach here and that in recent transfer matrix design of generators for the module X. /All "modules

  4. Fluorous Synthesis of Hydantoin-, Piperazinedione-, and Benzodiazepinedione-Fused Tricyclic and Tetracyclic Ring Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Yimin; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Curran, Dennis P; Geib, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Fluorous proline derivatives generated from one-pot, three-component [3+2] cycloaddition of azomethine ylides are employed for different post-condensation reactions to form hydantoin-, piperazinedione-, and benzodiazepinedione-fused tricyclic and tetracyclic ring systems. The high synthetic efficiency is achieved by conducting fast microwave reactions and easy fluorous-solid phase extractions for reaction mixture purifications. Methods developed for these novel drug-like heterocyclic compounds can be applied to diversity-oriented library synthesis.

  5. Fluorous Synthesis of Hydantoin-, Piperazinedione-, and Benzodiazepinedione-Fused Tricyclic and Tetracyclic Ring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Yimin; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Curran, Dennis P.; Geib, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Fluorous proline derivatives generated from one-pot, three-component [3+2] cycloaddition of azomethine ylides are employed for different post-condensation reactions to form hydantoin-, piperazinedione-, and benzodiazepinedione-fused tricyclic and tetracyclic ring systems. The high synthetic efficiency is achieved by conducting fast microwave reactions and easy fluorous-solid phase extractions for reaction mixture purifications. Methods developed for these novel drug-like heterocyclic compounds can be applied to diversity-oriented library synthesis. PMID:18542714

  6. Nonadiabatic charge pumping by oscillating potentials in one dimension: Results for infinite system and finite ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Abhiram; Sen, Diptiman

    2010-09-01

    We study charge pumping when a combination of static potentials and potentials oscillating with a time period T is applied in a one-dimensional system of noninteracting electrons. We consider both an infinite system using the Dirac equation in the continuum approximation and a periodic ring with a finite number of sites using the tight-binding model. The infinite system is taken to be coupled to reservoirs on the two sides which are at the same chemical potential and temperature. We consider a model in which oscillating potentials help the electrons to access a transmission resonance produced by the static potentials and show that nonadiabatic pumping violates the simple sinϕ rule which is obeyed by adiabatic two-site pumping. For the ring, we do not introduce any reservoirs, and we present a method for calculating the current averaged over an infinite time using the time evolution operator U(T) assuming a purely Hamiltonian evolution. We analytically show that the averaged current is zero if the Hamiltonian is real and time-reversal invariant. Numerical studies indicate another interesting result, namely, that the integrated current is zero for any time dependence of the potential if it is applied to only one site. Finally we study the effects of pumping at two sites on a ring at resonant and nonresonant frequencies, and show that the pumped current has different dependences on the pumping amplitude in the two cases.

  7. Constraints on the size and dynamics of the J1407b ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Steven; Kenworthy, Matthew A.

    2016-11-01

    Context. J1407 (1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6 in full) is a young star in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association that underwent a series of complex eclipses over 56 days in 2007. To explain these, it was hypothesised that a secondary substellar companion, J1407b, has a giant ring system filling a large fraction of the Hill sphere, causing the eclipses. Observations have not successfully detected J1407b, but do rule out circular orbits for the companion around the primary star. Aims: We test to what degree the ring model of J1407b could survive in an eccentric orbit required to fit the observations. Methods: We run N-body simulations under the AMUSE framework to test the stability of Hill radius-filling systems where the companion is on an eccentric orbit. Results: We strongly rule out prograde ring systems and find that a secondary of 60 to 100 MJup with an 11 yr orbital period and retrograde orbiting material can survive for at least 104 orbits and produce eclipses with similar durations as the observed one.

  8. Constraining the Movement of the Spiral Features and the Locations of Planetary Bodies within the AB Aur System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Fukagawa, Misato; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne M.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Inoue, Akio; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; Miyama, Shoken; Momose, Munetake; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Schneider, Glenn H.; Serabyn, Eugene; Sitko, Michael L.; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-09-01

    We present a new analysis of multi-epoch, H-band, scattered light images of the AB Aur system. We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simultaneously model the system’s spectral energy distribution (SED) and H-band polarized intensity (PI) imagery. We find that a disk-dominated model, as opposed to one that is envelope-dominated, can plausibly reproduce AB Aur’s SED and near-IR imagery. This is consistent with previous modeling attempts presented in the literature and supports the idea that at least a subset of AB Aur’s spirals originate within the disk. In light of this, we also analyzed the movement of spiral structures in multi-epoch H-band total light and PI imagery of the disk. We detect no significant rotation or change in spatial location of the spiral structures in these data, which span a 5.8-year baseline. If such structures are caused by disk-planet interactions, the lack of observed rotation constrains the location of the orbit of planetary perturbers to be >47 au.

  9. Conditioning of the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring without baking in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. K.; Chang, C. C.; Shueh, C.; Yang, I. C.; Wu, L. H.; Chen, B. Y.; Cheng, C. M.; Huang, Y. T.; Chuang, J. Y.; Cheng, Y. T.; Hsiao, Y. M.; Sheng, Albert

    2017-04-01

    To shorten the machine downtime, a maintenance procedure without baking in situ has been developed and applied to maintain and to upgrade the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring. The data of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) reveal no obvious discrepancy between baking and not baking the vacuum system in situ. A beam-conditioning dose of extent only 11.8 A h is required to recover quickly the dynamic pressure of an unbaked vacuum system to its pre-intervention value according to the TPS maintenance experience.

  10. Monitor and control systems for the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Fernandez, F.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Korff, P.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Rabinowitz, L.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va'Vra, J.; Williams, S.; Whitaker, J.; Wilson, R.J.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; McHugh, S.; Mathys, L.; Morriso

    1989-10-01

    To help ensure the stable long-term operation of a Cherenkov Ring Detector at high efficiency, a comprehensive monitor and control system is being developed. This system will continuously monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor of the pressures, flows, mixing, and purity of the various fluids. In addition the velocities and trajectories of Cherenkov photoelectrons drifting within the imaging chambers will be measured using a pulsed uv lamp and a fiberoptic light injection system. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  12. A search for minor bodies in the Jovian tenuous ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinnikova Bang, A.; Joergensen, J. L.; Connerney, J. E.; Benn, M.; Denver, T.; Oliversen, R. J.; Lawton, P.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetometer experiment on the Juno spacecraft, is equipped with four fully autonomous star trackers, which apart from delivering highly accurate attitude information for the magnetometer sensors, and the inherent imaging capabilities of a low light camera system, also can detect and track luminous objects that exhibit an apparent motion rate relative to the background. The Juno magnetometer star trackers are pointed 13deg of the spacecraft anti-spin vector, each having a field of view of 13 by 18 degrees and operated at 4Hz. As the spacecraft spin, each camera will cover an annulus shaped disk with an inner radius of 7.5 degrees, and an outer radius of 20.5deg. When in science orbit, the Juno trajectory near peri-jove, will result in the anti-spin vector scanning across the tenuous rings. The combination of this scanning motion with the rotation of the camera field of view results in a near perfect opportunity to detect and track minor bodies in the inner part of the rings. The operations of this mode, is first tested in flight during the Juno Earth Flyby 9th October 2013, where the Moon is used as a known target. We present a few results of this test, and based on scale laws we will discuss the systems capability of detecting minor bodies in the Jovian ring system in terms of distance, velocity, albedo and range. Also, because the magnetometer star trackers are offset from the spin axis, the distance to a detected object can be derived by simple triangulation of the apparent direction as observed before, under and after passage under the rings. We discuss how this technique may be used to determine the orbit, size and albedo, of minor bodies thus detected and tracked.

  13. Improved temperature regulation of process water systems for the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, C.; Dortwegt, R.

    2002-10-10

    Beam stability and operational reliability of critical mechanical systems are key performance issues for synchrotron accelerators such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Stability is influenced by temperature fluctuations of the process water (PW) used for cooling and/or temperature conditioning storage ring (SR) components such as vacuum chambers, magnets, absorbers, etc. Operational reliability is crucial in maintaining facility beam operations and remaining within downtime ''budgets.'' Water systems for the APS storage ring were originally provided with a distributive control system (DCS) capable of regulation to {+-}1.0 F, as specified by facility design requirements. After several years of operation, a particular mode of component mortality indicated a need for upgrade of the temperature control system. The upgrade that was implemented was chosen for both improved component reliability and temperature stability (now on the order of {+-}0.2 F for copper components and {+-}0.05 F for aluminum components). The design employs a network of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) for temperature control that functions under supervision of the existing DCS. The human-machine interface (HMI) of the PLC system employs RSView32 software. The PLC system also interfaces with the EPICS accelerator control system to provide monitoring of temperature control parameters. Eventual supervision of the PLC system by EPICS is possible with this design.

  14. James Webb Space Telescope Observations of Stellar Occultations by Solar System Bodies and Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; French, R. G.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Stansberry, J.; Lin, Z-Y.; Zhang, Z-W.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, Th.; Ortiz, J. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Bosh, A.; Duffard, R.; Lellouch, E.; Tancredi, G.; Young, Leslie; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of Solar System bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun–Earth Lagrange point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a byproduct of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  15. Systematic ab initio study of the electronic and magnetic properties of different pure and mixed iron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, J.; Vega, A.; Balbas, L. C.; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Junquera, Javier; Artacho, Emilio; Soler, Jose M.; Ordejon, Pablo

    2000-05-15

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of iron systems in different environments: pure iron systems [dimer, bcc bulk, (100) surface, and free-standing iron monolayer], and low-dimensional iron systems deposited on Ag (100) surface (monoatomic linear wires, iron monolayer, planar, and three-dimensional clusters). Electronic and magnetic properties have been calculated using a recently developed total-energy first-principles method based on density-functional theory with numerical atomic orbitals as a basis set for the description of valence electrons and nonlocal pseudopotentials for the atomic core. The Kohn-Sham equations are solved self-consistently within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Tests on the pseudopotential, the basis set, grid spacing, and k sampling are carefully performed. This technique, which has been proved to be very efficient for large nonmagnetic systems, is applied in this paper to calculate electronic and magnetic properties of different iron nanostructures. The results compare well with previous ab initio all-electron calculations and with experimental data. The method predicts the correct trends in the magnetic moments of Fe systems for a great variety of environments and requires a smaller computational effort than other ab initio methods. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. The fluid systems for the SLD Cherenkov ring imaging detector. [01

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; McCulloch, M.; McShurley, D.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Peterson, H.; Ratcliff, B.; Reif, R.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Shaw,

    1992-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of the fluid delivery, monitor and control systems for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The systems deliver drift gas (C[sub 2]H[sub 6] + TMAE), radiator gas (C[sub 5]F[sub 12] + N[sub 2]) and radiator liquid (C[sub 6]F[sub 14]). Measured critical quantities such as electron lifetime in the drift gas and ultra-violet (UV) transparencies of the radiator fluids, together with the operational experience, are also reported.

  17. Surfaces, atmospheres and magnetospheres of the outer planets and their satellites and ring systems: Part X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Atreya, S.; Castillo, J.; Coll, P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I.; Spilker, L.

    2014-12-01

    This issue contains research work presented during the past year in sessions organized at several international meetings and congresses (such as those of the European Geosciences Union (EGU), the Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS), the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) and others) and focusing on recent observations and models of the atmospheres, magnetospheres and surfaces of the giant planets and their satellites, as well as on their ring systems. Particular attention was devoted this time to the proposals for exploration of the Solar System by spacecraft and probes submitted during the ESA call for science themes for the L2 and L3 missions in 2013.

  18. Simulation and analysis of rf feedback systems on the SLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Himel, T.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.H.; Tighe, R.

    1993-09-01

    The rf system of the SLC Damping Rings has evolved since tighter tolerances on beam stability are encountered as beam intensities are increased. There are now many feedback systems controlling the phase and amplitude of the rf, the phase of the beam, and the tune of the cavity. The bandwidths of the feedback loops range from several MHz to compensate for beam loading to a few Hz for the cavity tuners. To improve our understanding of the interaction of these loops and verify the expected behavior, we have simulated their behavior using computer models. A description of the models and the first results are discussed.

  19. Ballistic transport in planetary ring systems due to particle erosion mechanisms. I - Theory, numerical methods, and illustrative examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, Richard H.; Murphy, Brian W.; Cramer, Nichael Lynn; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Mullikin, Thomas L.

    1989-01-01

    Ballistic transport, defined as the net radial transport of mass and angular momentum due to exchanges of meteoroid hypersonic-impact ejecta by neighboring planetary ring regions on time-scales orders-of-magnitude shorter than the age of the solar system, is presently considered as a problem in mathematical physics. The preliminary results of a numerical scheme for following the combined effects of ballistic transport and viscous diffusion demonstrate that ballistic transport generates structure near sharp edges already present in the ring-mass distribution; the entire ring system ultimately develops an undulatory structure whose length scale is typically of the order of the radial excursion of the impact ejecta.

  20. The Spectral Classes of the Saturnian System Ices: Rings and Satellites Observations by Cassini-VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Hedman, M. M.

    2008-12-01

    The entire population of the Saturnian system ices was investigated by VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment on board Cassini spacecraft. By the end of the nominal mission a very large dataset of hyperspectral data had been collected in the spectral range 0.35-5.0 micron, which includes the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and rings. In this work we present an analysis of spectrophotometric indicators selected to describe the properties of the ices (I/F continuum levels, visible spectral slopes, band depths and positions), and which were retrieved from about 1500 full-disk observations of satellites as well as from mosaics of the main rings (A, B, C, CD, F) sampled with a resolution of 125 km/pixel along the radial axis. This comparative method allows us to highlight the spectral differences in this population of objects orbiting in the Saturnian system. In particular we have retrieved the distribution of the water ice abundance, which varies between the almost pure icy surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the carbon dioxide- and organic-rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Noteworthy is that a significant dichotomy is observed between the two co-orbital moons Epimetheus and Janus, possibly indicating a different origin and evolutionary process: while the first shows a very red visible spectrum (similar to Hyperion), the second has more neutral visible colors, making it a very peculiar object in the Saturnian system. Rings have very peculiar spectral differences when compared with the icy satellites: in the visible range their spectra are characterized by a spectral knee at bluer wavelengths (at about 520 nm compared to 550 nm on satellites); in the infrared range the 1.5-2.0 micron water ice band depths are in general deeper across the A and B rings, indicative of a larger fraction of pure water ice in comparison to

  1. Saturn's seasonal winds and temperature: The effect of the ring system on the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnet, Christopher Dwight

    The radiative properties of Saturn's rings (insolation shadowing, insolation scattering, and thermal emission) were incorporated into a seasonal, zonally-averaged, radiative-dynamical model to investigate the magnitude of small seasonal fluctuations in the troposphere and stratosphere of Saturn. Although the radiative time constant is large in Saturn's troposphere and stratosphere, the rings induce significant latitudinal insolation gradients resulting in potential disturbances in the upper stratosphere. The results of the model are compared to the Pioneer and Voyager Radio Sub-System (RSS) vertical temperature profile measurements and to the Voyager Infrared Interferometric Spectrometer (IRIS) latitudinal temperature profile measurements. In the upper stratosphere (1 to 30 mBar) the heating is dominated by methane and the model can be directly compared to the Voyager data. Below the temperature minimum the radiative time constant is sufficiently long to strongly dampen seasonal variations, however, the temperature excursions seen in the IRIS data are significantly larger than those predicted by the radiative model. The thermal effects of the strong Saturnian zonal winds are simulated with a first-order dynamical model to provide some insight into the lower boundary conditions. The remaining differences between the model and the Voyager IRIS data-sets are used to estimate the quantity of aerosol required near the tropopause region. The magnitudes of the wind and temperature perturbations, caused by the radiative effects of Saturn's rings, are discussed in the context of the future Hubble Space Telescope and the planned Cassini Saturnian Orbiter missions.

  2. A Performance Comparison of Tree and Ring Topologies in Distributed System

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min

    2004-01-01

    A distributed system is a collection of computers that are connected via a communication network. Distributed systems have become commonplace due to the wide availability of low-cost, high performance computers and network devices. However, the management infrastructure often does not scale well when distributed systems get very large. Some of the considerations in building a distributed system are the choice of the network topology and the method used to construct the distributed system so as to optimize the scalability and reliability of the system, lower the cost of linking nodes together and minimize the message delay in transmission, and simplify system resource management. We have developed a new distributed management system that is able to handle the dynamic increase of system size, detect and recover the unexpected failure of system services, and manage system resources. The topologies used in the system are the tree-structured network and the ring-structured network. This thesis presents the research background, system components, design, implementation, experiment results and the conclusions of our work. The thesis is organized as follows: the research background is presented in chapter 1. Chapter 2 describes the system components, including the different node types and different connection types used in the system. In chapter 3, we describe the message types and message formats in the system. We discuss the system design and implementation in chapter 4. In chapter 5, we present the test environment and results, Finally, we conclude with a summary and describe our future work in chapter 6.

  3. Resonant Transmission of Electron Spin States through Multiple Aharonov-Bohm Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutright, Jim; Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2011-10-01

    An Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring with embedded quantum dots (QD) in each arm and one -dimensional nanowires attached as leads acts as a primitive cell in this analysis. When a tunable, external magnetic field is parallel to the surface area of the ring it causes Zeeman splitting in the energy levels of the QDs. An electron that traverses these energy levels has the potential to interfere with other electrons and to produce spin polarized output. It is already known that upon output the transmission of the electrons through this system will have a resonant peak at each Zeeman split energy level. A system where multiple AB rings are connected in series is studied, to see how having the electrons pass through multiple, identical rings effects the resonant peaks in the transmission and the degree of spin polarization.

  4. Remembering AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyayev, S. T.

    2013-06-01

    In 1947 I became a second-year student at Moscow State University's Physics and Engineering Department, where a part of the week's classes were taught at base organizations. Our group's base was the future Kurchatov Institute, at that time known as the mysterious "Laboratory N^circ 2," and later as LIPAN. . Besides group lectures and practical work at the experimental laboratories, we also had access to the general seminars which Igor Vasilyevich Kurchatov tried to hold, with Leonid Vasilyevich Groshev filling in when he was absent. At the seminar, theorists spoke as welcome co-presenters and commentators. In 1949 I felt ready to approach A. B. Migdal to ask if I could transfer to his theoretical sector. In response, he suggested a number of simple qualitative problems, which I then successfully solved. (Incidentally, AB used the very same "introductory problems" for screening many generations of students.) So I wound up among AB's students. From 1952 on (for 10 years) I also served as an employee of the Migdal Sector. My memoirs here are mainly inspired by these years of constant communication with AB. After my departure for Novosibirsk in 1962, although our meetings still took place, they became occasional....

  5. Ground state analytical ab initio intermolecular potential for the Cl{sub 2}-water system

    SciTech Connect

    Hormain, Laureline; Monnerville, Maurice Toubin, Céline; Duflot, Denis; Pouilly, Brigitte; Briquez, Stéphane; Bernal-Uruchurtu, Margarita I.; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón

    2015-04-14

    The chlorine/water interface is of crucial importance in the context of atmospheric chemistry. Modeling the structure and dynamics at this interface requires an accurate description of the interaction potential energy surfaces. We propose here an analytical intermolecular potential that reproduces the interaction between the Cl{sub 2} molecule and a water molecule. Our functional form is fitted to a set of high level ab initio data using the coupled-cluster single double (triple)/aug-cc-p-VTZ level of electronic structure theory for the Cl{sub 2} − H{sub 2}O complex. The potential fitted to reproduce the three minima structures of 1:1 complex is validated by the comparison of ab initio results of Cl{sub 2} interacting with an increasing number of water molecules. Finally, the model potential is used to study the physisorption of Cl{sub 2} on a perfectly ordered hexagonal ice slab. The calculated adsorption energy, in the range 0.27 eV, shows a good agreement with previous experimental results.

  6. Determination of structure and acidity scales in zeolite systems by ab initio and pseudopotential calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassab, E.; Seiti, K.; Allavena, M.

    1988-11-17

    SCF ab initio calculations at the 6-31G level have been used to investigate the structure of several aggregates simulating some of the proton donor sites within faujasite-type zeolites. The Si(OH)/sub 4/, H/sub 3/SiOHAlH/sub 3/, and (OH)/sub 3/SiOHAl(OH)/sub 3/ clusters have been successively examined. Deprotonation energies and charge distribution are determined at a higher level by using a 6-31G basis set augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. The results are compared with values obtained by using pseudopotential methods. The small differences between the two sets of results demonstrate that comparable accuracy should be expected from both procedures. Finally, deprotonation energies of (OH)/sub 3/T/sub 1/OHT/sub 2/(OH)/sub 3/ aggregates (T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/ = AlSi, BSi, GaSi; AlGe, BGe, GaGe) are calculated by using pseudopotential methods and compared with the results given by the semiempirical MNDO method. In some cases ab initio SCF calculations were also performed. The results confirm that the inclusion of boron atom lowers the acidity as already demonstrated by experimental investigation. The effects due to the inclusion of Ga are discussed and compared to available experimental data.

  7. ALMA unveils rings and gaps in the protoplanetary system HD 169142: signatures of two giant protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Walsh, C.; Miotello, A.; Klaassen, P.; Bruderer, S.; Henning, Th.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-04-01

    The protoplanetary system HD 169142 is one of the few cases where a potential candidate protoplanet has recently been detected by direct imaging in the near-infrared. To study the interaction between the protoplanet and the disk itself, observations of the gas and dust surface density structure are needed. This paper reports new ALMA observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm, 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2-1 emission from the system HD 169142 (which is observed almost face-on) at an angular resolution of 0.3 arcsec × 0.2 arcsec ( 35 × 20 au). The dust continuum emission reveals a double-ring structure with an inner ring between 0.17 arcsec{-0.28 arcsec} ( 20-35 au) and an outer ring between 0.48 arcsec{-0.64 arcsec} ( 56-83 au). The size and position of the inner ring is in good agreement with previous polarimetric observations in the near-infrared and is consistent with dust trapping by a massive planet. No dust emission is detected inside the inner dust cavity (R ≲ 20 au) or within the dust gap ( 35-56 au) down to the noise level. In contrast, the channel maps of the J = 2-1 line of the three CO isotopologs reveal gas inside the dust cavity and dust gap. The gaseous disk is also much larger than the compact dust emission; it extends to 1.5 arcsec ( 180 au) in radius. This difference and the sharp drop of the continuum emission at large radii point to radial drift of large dust grains (>μm size). Using the thermo-chemical disk code dali, we modeled the continuum and the CO isotopolog emission to quantitatively measure the gas and dust surface densities. The resulting gas surface density is reduced by a factor of 30-40 inward of the dust gap. The gas and dust distribution indicate that two giant planets shape the disk structure through dynamical clearing (dust cavity and gap) and dust trapping (double-ring dust distribution).

  8. LOCATING THE TRAILING EDGE OF THE CIRCUMBINARY RING IN THE KH 15D SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Capelo, Holly L.; Herbst, William; Leggett, S. K.; Hamilton, Catrina M.; Johnson, John A.

    2012-09-20

    Following two years of complete occultation of both stars in the binary T Tauri star KH 15D by its opaque circumbinary ring, KH 15D has abruptly brightened again during apastron phases, reaching I = 15 mag. Here, we show that the brightening is accompanied by a change in spectral class from K6/K7 (the spectral class of star A) to {approx}K1, and a bluing of the system in V - I by about 0.3 mag. A radial velocity measurement confirms that, at apastron, we are now seeing direct light from star B, which is more luminous and of earlier spectral class than star A. Evidently, the trailing edge of the occulting screen has just become tangent to one anse of star B's projected orbit. This confirms a prediction of the precession models, supports the view that the tilted ring is self-gravitating, and ushers in a new era of the system's evolution that should be accompanied by the same kind of dramatic phenomena observed from 1995 to 2009. It also promotes KH 15D from a single-lined to a double-lined eclipsing binary, greatly enhancing its value for testing pre-main-sequence models. The results of our study strengthen the case for truncation of the outer ring at around 4 AU by a sub-stellar object such as an extremely young giant planet. The system is currently at an optimal configuration for detecting the putative planet and we urge expedient follow-up observations.

  9. An injection system for PEP-based asymmetric storage ring collider for the copious production of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1989-09-18

    The proposed asymmetric energy B-factory utilizing PEP will require high energy, low emittance sources of positrons and electrons suitable for filling the storage rings. Proposed characteristics of this collider operating at a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} have been studied by LBL (Apiary-III). The design consists of two rings, a large 9 GeV ring (PEP or a modification thereof) plus a smaller 3.1 GeV ring, each with a circulating current of 3 Amperes. Ideally the fill time should be much shorter than the luminosity life-time of the rings (set by the size of the low energy ring). As the luminosity lifetime of the collider is not expected to be very high, the PEP-based B-factory should have a powerful, dedicated injector. For the purpose of estimating the characteristics of the injection system the maximum time for a complete fill of the positron ring is taken to be {approx}100 seconds. The design of the injection system is discussed in this paper. 1 ref., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. The Helios A/B cosmic ray instrument /E 7/. [solid state telescope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.; Stilwell, D. E.; Joyce, R. M.; Teegarden, B. J.; White, H. O., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a cosmic ray particle experiment for the Helios A/B space missions. This experiment had to be very lightweight, low power and electronically sophisticated in order to meet the spacecraft and scientific requirements, and very similar to those on the Pioneer 10 and 11 missions to Jupiter. Both sets of missions use several solid-state detector telescopes to measure protons from 100 KeV to 800 MeV per nucleon. Additionally, the Helios experiment includes a proportional counter to monitor the solar X-ray activity. The experiment has functioned quite well for 5 months in space, and large quantities of data are now being received.

  11. Universal cumulants of the current in diffusive systems on a ring.

    PubMed

    Appert-Rolland, C; Derrida, B; Lecomte, V; van Wijland, F

    2008-08-01

    We calculate exactly the first cumulants of the integrated current and of the activity (which is the total number of changes of configurations) of the symmetric simple exclusion process on a ring with periodic boundary conditions. Our results indicate that for large system sizes the large deviation functions of the current and of the activity take a universal scaling form, with the same scaling function for both quantities. This scaling function can be understood either by an analysis of Bethe ansatz equations or in terms of a theory based on fluctuating hydrodynamics or on the macroscopic fluctuation theory of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio, and Landim.

  12. Optical Properties of a Quantum Dot-Ring System Grown Using Droplet Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Linares-García, Gabriel; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Stinaff, Eric; Alsolamy, S M; Ware, M E; Mazur, Y I; Wang, Z M; Lee, Jihoon; Salamo, G J

    2016-12-01

    Electronic and optical properties of InAs/GaAs nanostructures grown by the droplet epitaxy method are studied. Carrier states were determined by k · p theory including effects of strain and In gradient concentration for a model geometry. Wavefunctions are highly localized in the dots. Coulomb and exchange interactions are studied and we found the system is in the strong confinement regime. Microphotoluminescence spectra and lifetimes were calculated and compared with measurements performed on a set of quantum rings in a single sample. Some features of spectra are in good agreement.

  13. Novel, Broad Spectrum Anticancer Agents Containing the Tricyclic 5:7:5-Fused Diimidazodiazepine Ring System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of a series of novel, broad spectrum anticancer agents containing the tricyclic 5:7:5-fused diimidazo[4,5-d:4′,5′-f][1,3]diazepine ring system is reported. Compounds 1, 2, 8, 11, and 12 in the series show promising in vitro antitumor activity with low micromolar IC50 values against prostate, lung, breast, and ovarian cancer cell lines. Some notions about structure−activity relationships and a possible mechanism of biological activity are presented. Also presented are preliminary in vivo toxicity studies of 1 using SCID mice. PMID:21572541

  14. The amplitude and phase control of the ALS Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.C.; Taylor, B.; Baptiste, K.

    1995-03-01

    A 500MHz, 300KW Klystron power amplifier provides RF power to the ALS Storage Ring. In order to accommodate the amplitude and phase changes during beam stacking and decay, which demand continuously varying power levels from the Klystron, four loops are used to keep the system operating properly, with two of those loops dedicated to keeping the two cavity tuners on tune. Description of the control loops and their performance data will be given. Using the modulation anode of the Klystron in the amplitude loop will be discussed.

  15. Universal cumulants of the current in diffusive systems on a ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Derrida, B.; Lecomte, V.; van Wijland, F.

    2008-08-01

    We calculate exactly the first cumulants of the integrated current and of the activity (which is the total number of changes of configurations) of the symmetric simple exclusion process on a ring with periodic boundary conditions. Our results indicate that for large system sizes the large deviation functions of the current and of the activity take a universal scaling form, with the same scaling function for both quantities. This scaling function can be understood either by an analysis of Bethe ansatz equations or in terms of a theory based on fluctuating hydrodynamics or on the macroscopic fluctuation theory of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio, and Landim.

  16. LuxCDE-luxAB-based promoter reporter system to monitor the Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 gene expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bozcal, Elif; Dagdeviren, Melih; Uzel, Atac

    2017-01-01

    It is crucial to understand the in vitro and in vivo regulation of the virulence factor genes of bacterial pathogens. In this study, we describe the construction of a versatile reporter system for Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 (YeO3) based on the luxCDABE operon. In strain YeO3-luxCDE we integrated the luciferase substrate biosynthetic genes, luxCDE, into the genome of the bacterium so that the substrate is constitutively produced. The luxAB genes that encode the luciferase enzyme were cloned into a suicide vector to allow cloning of any promoter-containing fragment upstream the genes. When the obtained suicide-construct is mobilized into YeO3-luxCDE bacteria, it integrates into the recipient genome via homologous recombination between the cloned promoter fragment and the genomic promoter sequence and thereby generates a single-copy and stable promoter reporter. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen (O-ag) and outer core hexasaccharide (OC) of YeO3 are virulence factors necessary to colonization of the intestine and establishment of infection. To monitor the activities of the OC and O-ag gene cluster promoters we constructed the reporter strains YeO3-Poc::luxAB and YeO3-Pop1::luxAB, respectively. In vitro, at 37°C both promoter activities were highest during logarithmic growth and decreased when the bacteria entered stationary growth phase. At 22°C the OC gene cluster promoter activity increased during the late logarithmic phase. Both promoters were more active in late stationary phase. To monitor the promoter activities in vivo, mice were infected intragastrically and the reporter activities monitored by the IVIS technology. The mouse experiments revealed that both LPS promoters were well expressed in vivo and could be detected by IVIS, mainly from the intestinal region of orally infected mice. PMID:28235077

  17. Efficient Routing of Star-Ring Hybrid Topology with Optical Add and Drop Multiplexer in DWDM System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Anju; Dewra, Sanjeev

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the performance of star-ring hybrid topology networks with optical add and drop multiplexer (OADM) in dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) system with 0.8 nm channel spacing at different bit rates (5, 10 and 15 Gbps) in terms of bit error rate (BER), quality factor and optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR). OADM has the capability to add and drop the new channels and provides the wavelength routing between star and ring topologies. It is observed that the hybrid topology supports 128 users on upper and lower ends with 150 km distance between the nodes of ring network without dispersion compensating fiber.

  18. Development of a bilayer ring system for achieving high strain in commercial rheometers.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Michael B; Wolchok, Jeffrey C; Klemuk, Sarah A; Titze, Ingo R

    2015-09-18

    Mechanical stimulation of cell cultures has been shown be an effective means of enhancing ECM production. ECM produced from vocal fold fibroblast cultures has the potential for therapeutic use for vocal fold repair. However, current bioreactor designs generally fail to produce physiological relevant frequency and strain values. Here we present an approach for using commercial oscillatory rheometers and an elastic ring bilayer system to produce physiologically relevant strain values at frequencies in the range of 20-100 Hz. We demonstrate the ability to target specific strain and frequency values by manipulating system parameters, and also show that it is possible to maintain high oscillatory strains for extended periods of time. Such a system could be used to mechanically stimulate cell cultures contained within gel carrier systems and has the potential to be extended to other applications requiring high strains at low frequencies.

  19. Cavity Ring-Down System for Density Measurement of Negative Hydrogen Ion on Negative Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Haruhisa; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Kenichi; Shibuya, Masayuki; Kisaki, Masashi; Ikeda, Katsunori; Osakabe, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu; Asano, Eiji; Kondo, Tomoki; Sato, Mamoru; Komada, Seiji; Sekiguchi, Haruo; Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Fantz, Ursel

    2011-09-26

    A Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) system was applied to measure the density of negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) in vicinity of extraction surface in the H{sup -} source for the development of neutral beam injector on Large Helical Device (LHD). The density measurement with sampling time of 50 ms was carried out. The measured density with the CRD system is relatively good agreement with the density evaluated from extracted beam-current with applying a similar relation of positive ion sources. In cesium seeded into ion-source plasma, the linearity between an arc power of the discharge and the measured density with the CRD system was observed. Additionally, the measured density was proportional to the extracted beam current. These characteristics indicate the CRD system worked well for H{sup -} density measurement in the region of H{sup -} and extraction.

  20. Introduction to the magnet and vacuum systems of an electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1982-08-15

    An accelerator or storage ring complex is a concerted interplay of various functional systems. For the convenience of discussion we can divide it into the following systems: injector, magnet, RF, vacuum, instrumentation and control. In addition, the conventional construction of the building and radiation safety consideration are also needed and finally the beam lines, detector, data acquisition and analysis set-ups for research programs. Dr. L. Teng has given a comprehensive review of the whole complex and the operation of such a facility. I concentrate on the description of magnet and vacuum systems. Only the general function of each system and the basic design concepts will be introduced, no detailed engineering practice will be given which will be best done after a machine design is produced. For further understanding and references a table of bibliography is provided at the end of the paper.

  1. Development of a computer control system for the RCNP ring cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, H.; Yamazaki, T.; Ando, A.; Hosono, K.; Itahashi, T.; Katayama, I.; Kibayashi, M.; Kinjo, S.; Kondo, M.; Miura, I.; Nagayama, K.; Noro, T.; Saito, T.; Shimizu, A.; Uraki, M.; Maruyama, M.; Aoki, K.; Yamada, S.; Kodaira, K.

    1990-08-01

    A hierarchically distributed computer control system for the RCNP ring cyclotron is being developed. The control system consists of a central computer and four subcomputers which are linked together by an Ethernet, universal device controllers which control component devices, man-machine interfaces including an operator console and interlock systems. The universal device controller is a standard single-board computer with an 8344 microcontroller and parallel interfaces, and is usually integrated into a component device and connected to a subcomputer by means of an optical-fiber cable to achieve high-speed data transfer. Control sequences for subsystems are easily produced and improved by using an interpreter language named OPELA (OPEration Language for Accelerators). The control system will be installed in March 1990.

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus SrrAB Regulatory System Modulates Hydrogen Peroxide Resistance Factors, Which Imparts Protection to Aconitase during Aerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mashruwala, Ameya A.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    The SrrAB two-component regulatory system (TCRS) positively influences the transcription of genes involved in aerobic respiration in response to changes in respiratory flux. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can arise as a byproduct of spontaneous interactions between dioxygen and components of respiratory pathways. H2O2 damages cellular factors including protein associated iron-sulfur cluster prosthetic groups. We found that a Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking the SrrAB two-component regulatory system (TCRS) is sensitive to H2O2 intoxication. We tested the hypothesis that SrrAB manages the mutually inclusive expression of genes required for aerobic respiration and H2O2 resistance. Consistent with our hypothesis, a ΔsrrAB strain had decreased transcription of genes encoding for H2O2 resistance factors (kat, ahpC, dps). SrrAB was not required for the inducing the transcription of these genes in cells challenged with H2O2. Purified SrrA bound to the promoter region for dps suggesting that SrrA directly influences dps transcription. The H2O2 sensitivity of the ΔsrrAB strain was alleviated by iron chelation or deletion of the gene encoding for the peroxide regulon repressor (PerR). The positive influence of SrrAB upon H2O2 metabolism bestowed protection upon the solvent accessible iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster of aconitase from H2O2 poisoning. SrrAB also positively influenced transcription of scdA (ytfE), which encodes for a FeS cluster repair protein. Finally, we found that SrrAB positively influences H2O2 resistance only during periods of high dioxygen-dependent respiratory activity. SrrAB did not influence H2O2 resistance when cellular respiration was diminished as a result of decreased dioxygen availability, and negatively influenced it in the absence of respiration (fermentative growth). We propose a model whereby SrrAB-dependent regulatory patterns facilitate the adaptation of cells to changes in dioxygen concentrations, and thereby aids in the prevention of H2O2

  3. Molecular structure, interatomic interactions and vibrational analysis of 1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane parent ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvin, Sergey N.; Rumyantsev, Andrey M.; Zobnina, Anastasia E.; Padkina, Marina V.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular structure of 1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, a parent ring of TAN1251 family of alkaloids, is herein characterized for the first time in comparison with the structure of nortropane (8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane), the parent framework of tropane ring system. The methods of study involve X-ray structural analysis, DFT geometry optimizations with infrared frequency calculations followed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, and vibrational analysis of infrared spectrum.

  4. Resistance to colistin in Acinetobacter baumannii associated with mutations in the PmrAB two-component system.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark D; Nickel, Gabrielle C; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Lavender, Heather; Murthy, A Rekha; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism of colistin resistance (Col(r)) in Acinetobacter baumannii was studied by selecting in vitro Col(r) derivatives of the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate AB0057 and the drug-susceptible strain ATCC 17978, using escalating concentrations of colistin in liquid culture. DNA sequencing identified mutations in genes encoding the two-component system proteins PmrA and/or PmrB in each strain and in a Col(r) clinical isolate. A colistin-susceptible revertant of one Col(r) mutant strain, obtained following serial passage in the absence of colistin selection, carried a partial deletion of pmrB. Growth of AB0057 and ATCC 17978 at pH 5.5 increased the colistin MIC and conferred protection from killing by colistin in a 1-hour survival assay. Growth in ferric chloride [Fe(III)] conferred a small protective effect. Expression of pmrA was increased in Col(r) mutants, but not at a low pH, suggesting that additional regulatory factors remain to be discovered.

  5. The Ring of Fire - an internal illimination system for detector sensitivity and filter bandpass characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; Kent, Stephen M.; Deustua, Susana E.; Sholl, Michael J.; Mufson, Stuart L.; Ott, Melanie N.; Wiesner, Matthew P.; Baptitst, Brian J.; /Indiana U.

    2010-07-01

    We describe a prototype of an illumination system, the Ring of Fire (ROF), which is used as part of an internal calibration system for large focal plane detector arrays in TMA (Three Mirror Anastigmat) telescope designs. Such designs have been proposed for the SNAP (SuperNova Acceleration Probe) version of a Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM). The ROF system illuminates the focal plane with a light beam the closely matches that of the telescope and is used for creating high spatial frequency flat fields and monitoring filter bandpasses for experiments that demand a highly accurate characterization of the detectors. We present measurements of a mockup of this prototype ROF design including studies in variations in illumination across a large focal plane.

  6. Generation of optical frequency combs in a fiber-ring/microresonator laser system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changlei; Che, Kaijun; Xu, Huiying; Zhang, Pan; Tang, Deyu; Ren, Changyan; Luo, Zhengqian; Cai, Zhiping

    2016-06-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme for generating optical frequency combs (OFCs) in a fiber-ring/microresonator laser system. The ultrahigh Q whispering gallery mode microresonator is employed both as a mode reflection mirror to generate erbium lasing and as a Kerr-nonlinearity initiator that introduces optical parametric oscillation signals to form OFCs. By controlling the coupling position between the fiber taper and microresonator, optimizing the fiber polarization, as well as the pump power from a 974 nm laser diode (LD), versatile OFCs can be tuned out from single-wavelength states. The OFCs have single, multiple, or combined free spectral ranges. In addition, a Raman-gain-assisted OFC is also observed with a bandwidth of ∼230  nm. This LD-pumped and multifunctional laser system could find applications in precision spectroscopy, biochemical sensing, and optical fiber communication systems.

  7. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  8. Hubble Observations of the Ongoing Evolution of Neptune's Ring-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark Robert; de Pater, Imke; Lissauer, Jack J.; French, Robert S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a new analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the Neptune system spanning 2004 to 2016. This expands upon an initial analysis we presented in 2013 (Showalter et al., DPS Meeting #45, abstract 206.01), based on HST images from 2004-2009. At that time we reported (1) the discovery of Neptune's fourteenth moon, S/2004 N 1, which orbits between Proteus and Larissa; (2) the recovery of Naiad, Neptune's innermost moon, although at an orbital longitude 90 degrees away from its prediction; and (3) the disappearance of the leading arcs in the Adams Ring, along with a marked decrease in the brightness of the trailing two arcs. Recent HST images extend the time baseline of the system by seven additional years, allowing us to expand upon prior results. We will report on our progress in refining the orbit, size and shape of S/2004 N 1, on understanding the orbital dynamics of Naiad, and on determining the ongoing evolution of the arcs and rings.

  9. Ring system-based chemical graph generation for de novo molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyao, Tomoyuki; Kaneko, Hiromasa; Funatsu, Kimito

    2016-05-01

    Generating chemical graphs in silico by combining building blocks is important and fundamental in virtual combinatorial chemistry. A premise in this area is that generated structures should be irredundant as well as exhaustive. In this study, we develop structure generation algorithms regarding combining ring systems as well as atom fragments. The proposed algorithms consist of three parts. First, chemical structures are generated through a canonical construction path. During structure generation, ring systems can be treated as reduced graphs having fewer vertices than those in the original ones. Second, diversified structures are generated by a simple rule-based generation algorithm. Third, the number of structures to be generated can be estimated with adequate accuracy without actual exhaustive generation. The proposed algorithms were implemented in structure generator Molgilla. As a practical application, Molgilla generated chemical structures mimicking rosiglitazone in terms of a two dimensional pharmacophore pattern. The strength of the algorithms lies in simplicity and flexibility. Therefore, they may be applied to various computer programs regarding structure generation by combining building blocks.

  10. High-level ab initio studies of hydrogen abstraction from prototype hydrocarbon systems.

    PubMed

    Temelso, Berhane; Sherrill, C David; Merkle, Ralph C; Freitas, Robert A

    2006-09-28

    Symmetric and nonsymmetric hydrogen abstraction reactions are studied using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure methods. Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] methods with large correlation consistent basis sets (cc-pVXZ, where X = D,T,Q) are used in determining the transition-state geometries, activation barriers, and thermodynamic properties of several representative hydrogen abstraction reactions. The importance of basis set, electron correlation, and choice of zeroth-order reference wave function in the accurate prediction of activation barriers and reaction enthalpies are also investigated. The ethynyl radical (*CCH), which has a very high affinity for hydrogen atoms, is studied as a prototype hydrogen abstraction agent. Our high-level quantum mechanical computations indicate that hydrogen abstraction using the ethynyl radical has an activation energy of less than 3 kcal mol(-1) for hydrogens bonded to an sp(2) or sp(3) carbon. These low activation barriers further corroborate previous studies suggesting that ethynyl-type radicals would make good tooltips for abstracting hydrogens from diamondoid surfaces during mechanosynthesis. Modeling the diamond C(111) surface with isobutane and treating the ethynyl radical as a tooltip, hydrogen abstraction in this reaction is predicted to be barrierless.

  11. Ab initio Calculations of Relaxations and Miscibility in Pt(111)-Sn System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Weibin; Staikov, Pavlin; Rahman, Talat S.

    1997-03-01

    We will present first the studies of the structure, surface energy, surface stress and workfunction of clean Pt(111), using ab initio, norm-conserving, non-local and soft pseudopotentials with a plane wave basis. A preconditioned steepest descent method (N. Chetty, M. Weinert, T. S. Rahman, and J. W. Davenport, Phys. Rev. B 52) (1995) 6313. is used to solve iteratively Kohn-Sham equations for a given set of atomic positions. For Pt(111) we find an outward relaxation of 0.75% for the top layer and a surface energy 0.119 eV/Åin reasonable agreement with available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. We discuss the convergence of the results with the number of layers included in the supercell and k-point sampling. The local electronic densities of states are evaluated to examine the relative contributions of the s, p, and d orbitals. Next, the electronic structural properties are calculated in the presence of Sn as an impurity. The impact of Sn on the local density of states and the nature of the Pt-Sn bond is assessed.

  12. KELT-2Ab: A HOT JUPITER TRANSITING THE BRIGHT (V = 8.77) PRIMARY STAR OF A BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gould, Andrew; Pepper, Joshua; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Eastman, Jason D.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Manner, Mark; Collins, Karen; DePoy, Darren L.; and others

    2012-09-10

    We report the discovery of KELT-2Ab, a hot Jupiter transiting the bright (V = 8.77) primary star of the HD 42176 binary system. The host is a slightly evolved late F-star likely in the very short-lived 'blue-hook' stage of evolution, with T{sub eff} = 6148 {+-} 48 K, log g = 4.030{sup +0.015}{sub -0.026} and [Fe/H] = 0.034 {+-} 0.78. The inferred stellar mass is M{sub *} = 1.314{sup +0.063}{sub -0.060} M{sub Sun} and the star has a relatively large radius of R{sub *} = 1.836{sup +0.066}{sub -0.046} R{sub Sun }. The planet is a typical hot Jupiter with period 4.1137913 {+-} 0.00001 days and a mass of M{sub P} = 1.524 {+-} 0.088 M{sub J} and radius of R{sub P} = 1.290{sup +0.064}{sub -0.050} R{sub J}. This is mildly inflated as compared to models of irradiated giant planets at the {approx}4 Gyr age of the system. KELT-2A is the third brightest star with a transiting planet identified by ground-based transit surveys, and the ninth brightest star overall with a transiting planet. KELT-2Ab's mass and radius are unique among the subset of planets with V < 9 host stars, and therefore increases the diversity of bright benchmark systems. We also measure the relative motion of KELT-2A and -2B over a baseline of 38 years, robustly demonstrating for the first time that the stars are bound. This allows us to infer that KELT-2B is an early K dwarf. We hypothesize that through the eccentric Kozai mechanism KELT-2B may have emplaced KELT-2Ab in its current orbit. This scenario is potentially testable with Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements, which should have an amplitude of {approx}44 m s{sup -1}.

  13. A new data acquisition system for Schottky signals in atomic physics experiments at GSI's and FAIR's storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trageser, C.; Brandau, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Müller, A.; Nolden, F.; Sanjari, S.; Stöhlker, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new continuous and broadband data acquisition system for measurements of Schottky-signals of ions revolving in a storage ring has been implemented. This set-up is capable of recording the radio frequency (RF) signal of the ions that circulate in the storage ring with a sustained acquisition rate of more than 3.5× {10}7 IQ-samples per second. This allows several harmonics of the full momentum acceptance of a storage ring to be measured at the same time. The RF signal analyzer modules are complemented by further electronic modules such as counters, precision clocks and synchronization modules that facilitate a seamless integration with main experimental data acquisitions for atomic and nuclear physics. In this contribution, the setup and first results from a test run at the experimental storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, are presented.

  14. Optical Analog to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Cascaded Ring-Resonator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Hua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical methods has shown great potential in slow light and sensing applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a coupled resonator induced transparency system with three cascaded ring coupled resonators in a silicon chip. The structure was modeled by using the transfer matrix method. Influences of various parameters including coupling ratio of couplers, waveguide loss and additional loss of couplers on transmission characteristic and group index have been investigated theoretically and numerically in detail. The transmission character of the system was measured by the vertical grating coupling method. The enhanced quality factor reached 1.22 × 105. In addition, we further test the temperature performance of the device. The results provide a new method for the manipulation of light in highly integrated optical circuits and sensing applications. PMID:27463720

  15. Negative ion fragmentations of deprotonated heterocycles. The isothiazole, thiazole, isoxazole, and oxazole ring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Gregory W.; Bowie, John H.; Hayes, Roger N.

    1992-05-01

    The major collision-induced dissociations of deprotonated isothiazole occur from the 5-anion, while deprotonated thiazole fragments almost equally through the 2- and 5-anions. Both 5-anions fragment by a simple retro cleavage yielding HC2S- and HCN. The 5-anion of isothiazole and the 2-anion of thiazole also rearrange to the common intermediate -SCH=CHCN which decomposes by losses of H2, HCN and H2S. There is no evidence for direct interconversion of isothiazole and thiazole anions. The spectra of deprotonated methylisothiazoles are complex, but the major fragmentations are of ring deprotonated ions and are generally analogous to the parent systems. The fragmentation behaviour of deprotonated isoxazole and oxazole is analogous to that of the isothiazole and thiazole systems.

  16. Vacuum system development status for the APS (Advanced Photon Source) storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wherle, R.; Nielson, R.; Kim, S.

    1989-01-01

    The status of the design and fabrication of a prototype sector of the storage ring vacuum system for the Advanced Photon Source is described. The 26.5-m-long prototype sector will be assembled within a full-scale magnet and tunnel mockup to study interspacial component relationships for maintenance, as well as the vacuum system operational performance. Each completed vacuum section is mounted as an integral part of the modular structure that contains the magnets and magnet power supplies on a common base. Unique automatic machine welding designs and techniques are employed in the fabrication of the aluminium vacuum chambers from extrusions. Special chamber bending procedures and measurements checks are used to maintain the required flatness of the insider chamber light gap surfaces. Photo-electron yields due to low-energy photons in the narrow channel gap of the vacuum chamber and their potential effects on the overall outgassing rate are found to be negligible. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Vacuum system of the high energy ring of an asymmetric B-factory based on PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.; Calderon, M.O.; Wong, R. ); Jenkins, T.M. )

    1991-05-07

    The multi-ampere currents required for high luminosity operation of an asymmetric B factory leads to extremely stressing requirements on a vacuum system suitable for maintaining long beam-gas lifetimes and acceptable background levels in the detector. We present the design for a Cu alloy vacuum chamber and its associated pumping system for the 9 GeV electron storage ring of the proposed B factory based on PEP. The excellent thermal and photo-desorption properties of Cu allows handling the high proton flux in a conventional, single chamber design with distributed ion pumps. The x-ray opacity of the Cu is sufficiently high that no additional lead shielding is necessary to protect the dipoles from the intense synchrotron radiation generated by the beam. The design allows chamber commissioning in <500 hr of operation. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Intensity-demodulated fiber-ring laser sensor system for acoustic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Han, Ming; Liu, Tongqing; Hu, Lingling; Zhang, Qi

    2013-12-02

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a fiber-optic ultrasonic sensor system based on a fiber-ring laser whose cavity consisting of a regular fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a tunable optical band-pass filter (TOBPF). The FBG is the sensing element and the TOBPF is used to set the lasing wavelength at a point on the spectral slope of the FBG. The ultrasonic signal is detected by the variations of the laser output intensity in response to the cold-cavity loss modulations from the ultrasonically-induced FBG spectral shift. The system demonstrated here has a simple structure and low cost, making it attractive for acoustic emission detection in structure health monitoring.

  19. Reflective variable optical attenuators and fibre ring lasers for wavelength-division multiplexing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, He Liang

    Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical fibre system is an important enabling technology to fulfill the demands for bandwidth in the modern information age. The main objective of this project is to study novel devices with the potential to enhance the performance of WDM systems. In particular, a novel reflective variable optical attenuator (RVOA) used for dynamic gain equalization (DGE) and fibre lasers based on an entirely new type of erbium-doped fibres with ultrawide tuning range were investigated theoretically and experimentally. We proposed a new type of RVOA device which could be potentially integrated with arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) to reduce the cost of DGE substantially. Initially, fibre-based RVOAs, fabricated with optical fibre components such as fibre coupler and Faraday rotator mirror, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Larger attenuation range up to 22 dB was realized for fibre coupler-based ROVA with a Faraday rotator mirror and its polarization-dependent loss is about 0.5 dB. Then polymeric waveguide-based RVOAs were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Using an epoxy Novolak resin as core material and an UV-cured resin (Norland's NOA61) as cladding material, a polymeric waveguide RVOA was successfully fabricated. The dynamic 15 dB attenuation range was achieved and the PDL was less than 0.2 dB. The measured insertion loss of the polymeric waveguide RVOA was too large (about 18 dB) and was mainly induced by coupling loss, material loss and poor alignment. In the second part of the study, fibre ring lasers with continuous wavelength tuning over wide wavelength range and fibre ring lasers with discrete wavelength tuning were investigated. Tunable lasers are important devices in WDM systems because they could be employed as reserved sources and therefore avoiding the need to stock large inventory of lasers to cover the ITU-wavelength grid. In this project, erbium ions doped bismuth oxide glass fibres instead of

  20. The Neptune System Revisited: New Results on Moons and Rings from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; de Pater, I.; French, R. S.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    We report on observations of Neptune's rings, arcs and inner moons as obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope during 2004-2009. These are the only Earth-based observations of the ring system obtained at visual wavelengths, permitting direct photometric comparison with the Voyager images. This allows us to determine quantitatively how the arcs have evolved from the time they were first imaged. Of the four arcs identified in 1989, the leading two have vanished, but the trailing two appear to have remained quite stable. New analysis of the images has also revealed a small moon, S/2004 N 1, orbiting between Proteus and Larissa. The body has a mean motion of 378.907 +/- 0.001 degrees per day, corresponding to semimajor axis 105,283 km. Its V magnitude is 26.5 +/- 0.3, suggesting a radius of ~ 10 km if its albedo is ~ 10%, comparable to that of the other inner moons. Tentative detections of Naiad, the smallest moon discovered by Voyager, will also be discussed.

  1. BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon (BIB) versus Spatz Adjustable Balloon System (ABS): Our experience in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Russo, Teresa; Aprea, Giovanni; Formisano, Cesare; Ruggiero, Simona; Quarto, Gennaro; Serra, Raffaele; Massa, Guido; Sivero, Luigi

    2017-02-01

    The BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon (BIB) and the Spatz Adjustable Balloon System (ABS) are in fact recommended for weight reduction as a bridge to bariatric surgery. We retrospected studied patients with body mass index (BMI) and age ranges of 37-46 and 70-80 years, respectively, who had undergone BIB from January 2010 to July 2012 and prospected studied patients who had undergone Spatz balloon from July 2012 to August 2014. The aim of this study is to compare BIB and Spatz in terms of weight loss, complications, and maintenance of weight after removal. For both procedures, the median weight loss was 20 ± 3 kg, median BMI at the end of the therapy was 32 ± 2, and no severe complication occurred.

  2. The effects of a single intravenous injection of novel activin A/BMP-2 (AB204) on toxicity and the respiratory and central nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Hak; Lee, Jae Hyup; Na, Kyuheum; Ahn, Chihoon; Cho, Jongho; Ahn, Hyun Chan; Choi, Jungyoun; Oh, Hyosun; Kim, Byong Moon; Choe, Senyon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a single intravenous injection of a novel osteoinductive material, activin A/BMP-2 (AB204), to rodents on toxicity and their respiratory functions and central nervous system (CNS). A single intravenous injection of AB204 was given to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in doses of 0, 0.625, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg to observe the mortality rate, the general symptoms for 14 days. The experimental groups were also given 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively, and the respiration rate, the tidal volume and the minute volume were measured for 240 min. The experimental groups of imprinting control region (ICR) mice were given a single intravenous injection of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg of AB204, respectively. Their body temperature was taken and general behaviors were observed to evaluate the effect of AB204 on the CNS for 240 min. The study on toxicity of a single intravenous injection found no death or abnormal symptoms, abnormal findings from autopsy, or abnormal body weight gain or loss in all the experimental groups. No abnormal variation associated with the test substance was observed in the respiration rate, the tidal volume, the minute volume, body temperature or the general behaviors. On the basis of these results, the approximate lethal dose of AB204 for a single intravenous injection exceeds 10 mg/kg for SD rats and a single intravenous injection of ≤0.8 mg/kg AB204 has no effect on their respiratory system for SD rat and no effect on their CNS for ICR mice.

  3. Quantum molecular mechanics-a noniterative procedure for the fast ab Initio calculation of closed shell systems.

    PubMed

    Moura, Gustavo L C; Simas, Alfredo M

    2012-04-05

    In this article, we advance the foundations of a strategy to develop a molecular mechanics method based not on classical mechanics and force fields but entirely on quantum mechanics and localized electron-pair orbitals, which we call quantum molecular mechanics (QMM). Accordingly, we introduce a new manner of calculating Hartree-Fock ab initio wavefunctions of closed shell systems based on variationally preoptimized nonorthogonal electron pair orbitals constructed by linear combinations of basis functions centered on the atoms. QMM is noniterative and requires only one extremely fast inversion of a single sparse matrix to arrive to the one-particle density matrix, to the electron density, and consequently, to the ab initio electrostatic potential around the molecular system, or cluster of molecules. Although QMM neglects the smaller polarization effects due to intermolecular interactions, it fully takes into consideration polarization effects due to the much stronger intramolecular geometry distortions. For the case of methane, we show that QMM was able to reproduce satisfactorily the energetics and polarization effects of all distortions of the molecule along the nine normal modes of vibration, well beyond the harmonic region. We present the first practical applications of the QMM method by examining, in detail, the cases of clusters of helium atoms, hydrogen molecules, methane molecules, as well as one molecule of HeH(+) surrounded by several methane molecules. We finally advance and discuss the potentialities of an exact formula to compute the QMM total energy, in which only two center integrals are involved, provided that the fully optimized electron-pair orbitals are known.

  4. The B AB AR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; De Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Le Flour, T.; Lees, J. P.; Lieunard, S.; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zachariadou, K.; Palano, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abbott, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Amerman, L.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Clark, A. R.; Dardin, S.; Day, C.; Dow, S. F.; Fan, Q.; Gaponenko, I.; Gill, M. S.; Goozen, F. R.; Gowdy, S. J.; Gritsan, A.; Groysman, Y.; Hernikl, C.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jared, R. C.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Kral, J. F.; Lafever, R.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, S. A.; Lionberger, C.; Liu, T.; Long, M.; Luo, L.; Lynch, G.; Luft, P.; Mandelli, E.; Marino, M.; Marks, K.; Matuk, C.; Meyer, A. B.; Minor, R.; Mokhtarani, A.; Momayezi, M.; Nyman, M.; Oddone, P. J.; Ohnemus, J.; Oshatz, D.; Patton, S.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Perazzo, A.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Pripstein, M.; Quarrie, D. R.; Rasson, J. E.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Stone, R.; Strother, P. D.; Telnov, A. V.; von der Lippe, H.; Weber, T. F.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zizka, G.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Hawkes, C. M.; Kirk, A.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Koch, H.; Krug, J.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; De Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; Mass, A.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Camanzi, B.; Harrison, T. J.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Antohin, E. I.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kolachev, G. M.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Booth, J.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Pier, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Zioulas, G.; Ahsan, A.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Faccini, R.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Prell, S. A.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Callahan, D.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hale, D.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; May, J.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. N.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hanson, J. E.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Jayatilleke, S. M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P.; Broomer, B.; Erdos, E.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Gaede, F.; van Hoek, W. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Michael, A. K.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Warner, D. W.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kocian, M. L.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Behr, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Fouque, G.; Gastaldi, F.; Matricon, P.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Renard, C.; Roussot, E.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Ramusino, A. C.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musenich, R.; Pallavicini, M.; Parodi, R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Priano, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Bartoldus, R.; Dignan, T.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P. A.; Lamsa, J.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Albert, J. N.; Beigbeder, C.; Benkebil, M.; Breton, D.; Cizeron, R.; Du, S.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; LePeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Truong, K.; Valassi, A.; Wormser, G.; Alford, O.; Behne, D.; Bionta, R. M.; Bowman, J.; Brigljević, V.; Brooks, A.; Dacosta, V. A.; Fackler, O.; Fujino, D.; Harper, M.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; O'Connor, T. G.; Olson, H.; Ott, L.; Parker, E.; Pedrotti, B.; Roeben, M.; Shi, X.; van Bibber, K.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wright, D. M.; Wuest, C. R.; Yamamoto, B.; Carroll, M.; Cooke, P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; McMahon, S.; Muir, A.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Sutcliffe, P.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Martin, R.; Nash, J. A.; Price, D. R.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Newman-Coburn, D.; Potter, R. J. L.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Williams, M. I.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Salvatore, F.; Scott, I.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Li, Y.; Pavlovich, J.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Khan, A.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Simopoulos, E. T.; Thompson, R. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Bard, R.; Dallapiccola, C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Lin, C. S.; Willocq, S.; Wittlin, J.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Britton, D. I.; Fernholz, R.; Houde, M.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Trischuk, J.; Lanni, F.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Booke, M.; Cremaldi, L.; Kroeger, R.; Reep, M.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Arguin, J. F.; Beaulieu, M.; Martin, J. P.; Nief, J. Y.; Seitz, R.; Taras, P.; Woch, A.; Zacek, V.; Nicholson, H.; Sutton, C. S.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Cason, N. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R. G.; Gabriel, T. A.; Handler, T.; Heck, J.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Caracciolo, R.; Colecchia, F.; Dal Corso, F.; Galeazzi, F.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Santi, S.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Bailly, P.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; De la Vaissière, C.; Del Buono, L.; Genat, J.-F.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Le Diberder, F.; Lebbolo, H.; Lory, J.; Martin, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Versillé, S.; Zhang, B.; Manfredi, P. F.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J. H.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bosi, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Gaddi, A.; Gagliardi, D.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Neri, N.; Profeti, A.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Bula, C.; Kelsey, M. H.; Lu, C.; McDonald, K. T.; Miftakov, V.; Sands, B.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J. S.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bronzini, F.; Buccheri, A.; Bulfon, C.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Fratini, K.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Waldi, R.; Jacques, P. F.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R. J.; Adye, T.; Claxton, B.; Dowdell, J.; Egede, U.; Franek, B.; Galagedera, S.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Kay, J.; Lidbury, J.; Madani, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Markey, G.; Olley, P.; Watt, M.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.; Convert, P.; De Domenico, G.; de Lesquen, A.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Georgette, Z.; Gosset, L.; Graffin, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hervé, S.; Karolak, M.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Marques, V.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Mols, J. P.; Mouly, J. P.; Penichot, Y.; Rolquin, J.; Serfass, B.; Toussaint, J. C.; Usseglio, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, C.; Zito, M.; Copty, N.; Purohit, M. V.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Adesanya, A.; Anthony, P. L.; Aston, D.; Bartelt, J.; Becla, J.; Bell, R.; Bloom, E.; Boeheim, C. T.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Briggs, D.; Bulos, F.; Burgess, W.; Byers, B.; Calderini, G.; Chestnut, R.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coombes, R.; Cottrell, L.; Coupal, D. P.; Coward, D. H.; Craddock, W. W.; DeBarger, S.; DeStaebler, H.; Dorfan, J.; Doser, M.; Dunwoodie, W.; Dusatko, J. E.; Ecklund, S.; Fieguth, T. H.; Freytag, D. R.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G. L.; Haller, G.; Hanushevsky, A.; Harris, J.; Hasan, A.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kawahara, H.; Keller, L.; King, M. E.; Klaisner, L.; Krebs, H. J.; Langenegger, U.; Langeveld, W.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Louie, S. K.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; McDonald, J.; Manzin, G.; Marsiske, H.; Mattison, T.; McCulloch, M.; McDougald, M.; McShurley, D.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Metcalfe, S.; Morii, M.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, D.; Nordby, M.; O'Grady, C. P.; Olavson, L.; Olsen, J.; O'Neill, F. G.; Oxoby, G.; Paolucci, P.; Pavel, T.; Perl, J.; Pertsova, M.; Petrak, S.; Putallaz, G.; Raines, P. E.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reif, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Rochester, L. S.; Roodman, A.; Russel, J. J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Saxton, O. H.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Sciolla, G.; Seeman, J. T.; Serbo, V. V.; Shapiro, S.; Skarpass, K., Sr.; Snyder, A.; Soderstrom, E.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stahl, A.; Stiles, P.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Talby, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Wang, R.; Weber, T.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; White, J. L.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Young, C. C.; Yu, N.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Kirkby, D.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Khan, N.; Berridge, S.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Hart, E.; Weidemann, A. W.; Benninger, T.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Turcotte, M.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Daudo, F.; Di Girolamo, B.; Gamba, D.; Grosso, P.; Smol, A.; Trapani, P. P.; Zanin, D.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Pompili, A.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaia, I.; Vallazza, E.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C.; De Silva, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Pitman, D.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; Elmer, P.; Johnson, J. R.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Zobernig, H.; Moore, T. B.; Neal, H.

    2002-02-01

    B AB AR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e +e - B Factory operating at the ϒ(4 S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by d E/d x measurements in the tracking detectors and by a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  5. Electromagnetic Calculation of Combined Earthing System with Ring Earth Electrode and Vertical Rods for Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toshiaki; Yasuda, Yoh; Ueda, Toshiaki

    With the worldwide spread of wind turbine installations, various problems such as landscape issues, bird strikes and grid connections have arisen. Protection of wind turbines from lightning is cited as one of the main problems. Wind turbines are often struck by lightning because of their open-air locations, such as in mountainous areas, and their special configuration and very-high construction. Especially, low-voltage and control circuits can fail or suffer burnout while blades can incur serious damage if struck by lightning. Wind turbine failures caused by lightning strikes account for approximately 25% of all failures. The problem is regarded as a global one that needs immediate resolution. It is important to understand the impedance characteristics of wind turbine earthing systems from the viewpoint of lightning protection. A report from IEC TR61400-24 recommends a “ring earth electrode”. This was originally defined in IEC 61024 (currently revised and re-numbered as IEC 62305), where such an electrode is recommended to reduce touch and step voltages in households and buildings. IEC TR61400-24 also recommended additional electrodes of vertical or horizontal rods. However, these concepts have not been fully discussed from the viewpoint of its application to wind turbines. To confirm the effect of a combination of a ring earth electrode and additional vertical rods for protection of a wind turbine, this report uses the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to present an electromagnetic transient analysis on such a wind turbine earthing system. The results show that an optimal combination can be arranged from viewpoints of lightning protection and construction cost. Thus, this report discusses how to establish a quantitative design methodology of the wind turbine earthing system to provide effective lightning protection.

  6. A wireless fatigue monitoring system utilizing a bio-inspired tree ring data tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shi; Li, Xuan; Xie, Zhaohui; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2014-03-05

    Fatigue, a hot scientific research topic for centuries, can trigger sudden failure of critical structures such as aircraft and railway systems, resulting in enormous casualties as well as economic losses. The fatigue life of certain structures is intrinsically random and few monitoring techniques are capable of tracking the full life-cycle fatigue damage. In this paper, a novel in-situ wireless real-time fatigue monitoring system using a bio-inspired tree ring data tracking technique is proposed. The general framework, methodology, and verification of this intelligent system are discussed in details. The rain-flow counting (RFC) method is adopted as the core algorithm which quantifies fatigue damages, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) is introduced as the core module for data collection and analysis. Laboratory test results based on strain gauges and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors have shown that the developed intelligent system can provide a reliable quick feedback and early warning of fatigue failure. With the merits of low cost, high accuracy and great reliability, the developed wireless fatigue sensing system can be further applied to mechanical engineering, civil infrastructures, transportation systems, aerospace engineering, etc.

  7. A Wireless Fatigue Monitoring System Utilizing a Bio-Inspired Tree Ring Data Tracking Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shi; Li, Xuan; Xie, Zhaohui; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue, a hot scientific research topic for centuries, can trigger sudden failure of critical structures such as aircraft and railway systems, resulting in enormous casualties as well as economic losses. The fatigue life of certain structures is intrinsically random and few monitoring techniques are capable of tracking the full life-cycle fatigue damage. In this paper, a novel in-situ wireless real-time fatigue monitoring system using a bio-inspired tree ring data tracking technique is proposed. The general framework, methodology, and verification of this intelligent system are discussed in details. The rain-flow counting (RFC) method is adopted as the core algorithm which quantifies fatigue damages, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) is introduced as the core module for data collection and analysis. Laboratory test results based on strain gauges and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors have shown that the developed intelligent system can provide a reliable quick feedback and early warning of fatigue failure. With the merits of low cost, high accuracy and great reliability, the developed wireless fatigue sensing system can be further applied to mechanical engineering, civil infrastructures, transportation systems, aerospace engineering, etc. PMID:24603635

  8. Small-animal whole-body imaging using a photoacoustic full ring array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In this report, we present a novel 3D photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system for small-animal whole-body imaging. The PACT system, based on a 512-element full-ring transducer array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a 2-mm-thick slice. The light was generated by a pulse laser, and can either illuminate from the top or be reshaped to illuminate the sample from the side, using a conical lens and an optical condenser. The PACT system was capable of acquiring an in-plane image in 1.6 s; by scanning the sample in the elevational direction, a 3D tomographic image could be constructed. We tested the system by imaging a cylindrical phantom made of human hairs immersed in a scattering medium. The reconstructed image achieved an in-plane resolution of 0.1 mm and an elevational resolution of 1 mm. After deconvolution in the elevational direction, the 3D image was found to match well with the phantom. The system was also used to image a baby mouse in situ; the spinal cord and ribs can be seen easily in the reconstructed image. Our results demonstrate that the PACT system has the potential to be used for fast small-animal whole-body tomographic imaging.

  9. Performance of the front end electronics and data acquisition system for the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Hoeflich, J.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Marshall, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Oxoby, G.; Pavel, T.J.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Stiles, P.; Toge, N.; Va'vra, J

    1991-11-01

    The front end electronics and data acquisition system for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) are described. This electronics must provide a 1% charge division measurement with a maximum acceptable noise level of 2000 electrons (rms). Noise and system performance results are presented for the initial SLD engineering run data.

  10. Simulating the Librational Behaviour of Propeller Moons In The Saturnian Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Michael; Seiss, Martin; Hoffmann, Holger; Spahn, Frank

    2016-10-01

    The propeller structure Blériot orbiting in the outer A ring of the Saturnian ring system has been one of the tremendous discoveries of the spacecraft Cassini [Tiscareno et al., 2010, ApJL]. The reconstruction of the orbital evolution of Blériot from recurrent observations in the ISS images yielded a systematic offset motion from the expected Keplerian orbit. This offset motion can be well described by three sinusoidal harmonics with amplitudes and periods of 1845, 152, 58 km and 11.1, 3.7 and 2.2 years, respectively [Sremčević et al., 2014, EPSC]. Oscillatory deviations from the Keplerian orbit are a known phenomenon for the Saturnian moons, which can be explained by resonant interactions with other moons [Spitale et al., 2006, AJ] and which look similar to the observation of Blériot.In this work we present our results from N-Body simulations, where we integrated the orbital evolution of a test particle, orbiting at the radial position of the propeller Blériot and 15 other moons of Saturn. Our simulation yield, that gravitational interactions with the larger moons result in reasonable and observable frequencies, but the resulting amplitudes of the librations are by far too small to explain the observations. Further mechanisms are needed, to amplify the amplitudes of the forced librations -- as e.g. by moonlet-ring interactions. Inspired by the recent work of Pan and Chiang [2010, ApJL; 2012, AJ] we introduce an alternative, physically more reasonable model. In our model, the moonlet is allowed to be slightly displaced with respect to its created gaps, resulting in a repulsive force. As a result, the moonlet's longitude starts to oscillate. In the presence of the additional external forcing by the outer moons the libration amplitude gets amplified, if the forcing frequency is close to the eigenfrequency of the system. Applying our model to Blériot, we can indeed reproduce a libration period of 13 years with an amplitude of about 2000 km.

  11. Photonic crystal channel drop filter based on ring-shaped defects for DWDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dideban, Ali; Habibiyan, Hamidreza; Ghafoorifard, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a novel configuration of channel drop filters based on two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs in silicon-on-insulator platforms. The structure is composed of two photonic crystal line-defect waveguides as input and output ports, along with an L3 cavity with ring-shaped border holes. The effects of structural parameters and fabrication errors on resonance frequency and drop efficiency are investigated. Band structure and propagation of electromagnetic field through device are calculated by plane wave expansion and finite-difference time-domain methods. The results show that the quality factor and line-width of output signal are 5690 and 0.27 nm, respectively, indicating that the proposed filter can be properly used in dense wavelength division multiplexing systems with 0.8 nm channel spacing.

  12. Improved thermometry of low-temperature quantum systems by a ring-structure probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li-Sha; Xu, Bao-Ming; Zou, Jian; Shao, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The thermometry precision of a sample is a question of both fundamental and technological importance. In this paper, we consider a ring-structure system as our probe to estimate the temperature of a bath. Based on the Markovian master equation of the probe, we calculate the quantum Fisher information (QFI) of the probe at any time. We find that for the thermal equilibrium thermometry, the ferromagnetic structure can measure a lower temperature of the bath with a higher precision compared with the nonstructure probe, while for the dynamical thermometry, the antiferromagnetic structure can make the QFI of the probe in the dynamical process much larger than that in equilibrium with the bath, which is somewhat counterintuitive. Moreover, the best accuracy for the thermometry achieved in the antiferromagnetic structure case can be much higher than that in the nonstructure case. The physical mechanisms of the above phenomena are given in this paper.

  13. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  14. Novel DC ring topology and protection system - a comprehensive solution for mega city power grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj-Maharsi, Mohamed Yassine

    2009-07-01

    The development of mega cities leads to increased load concentration and brings additional challenges to managing the electrical grid while keeping power available for critical loads. Techniques using FACTS devices are being applied to alleviate power management difficulties and to confine faults in their originating areas in order to limit the risk of cascading failures in the grid. The addition of many FACTS devices often results in control and protection coordination difficulties, power oscillations between connected networks, subsynchronous resonance problems, and torsional interactions with nearby generator units. The most effective solution is obtained when the individual AC subsystems representing sources and loads are decoupled so a fault in a given subsystem is not propagated to another subsystem. This solution can be achieved by the deployment of a DC system where power sources and loads are connected to the DC bus through voltage source converters. For a mega city, this would be conceived as a DC ring feeding multiple loads and connected to remote and local power sources. Unfortunately, the lack of fast DC circuit breakers has been one of the key issues affecting extensive applications of DC systems with common DC buses; a DC fault would discharge all the capacitors of the DC bus and cause delays in system recovery and possibly a wide system collapse. In this research, I provide a comprehensive solution to mega city power grid problems by proposing a DC system topology that enables grid expansions without affecting existing protection settings or changing existing AC breaker ratings. I also propose the means for protecting the DC system by designing a fast DC breaker and developing a control algorithm capable of isolating DC faults without blocking converter stations or depleting DC bus capacitors. My contribution is three folds: (1) I modeled and simulated Shanghai power grid and performed a study to identify short circuit and voltage stability problems

  15. Rotating machinery dynamics simulation. I. Rigid systems with ball bearing nonlinearities and outer ring ovality under rotating unbalance excitation

    PubMed

    el-Saeidy

    2000-02-01

    The radial clearance in rolling bearing systems, required to compensate for dimensional changes associated with thermal expansion of the various parts during operation, may cause dimensional attrition and comprise bearing life, if unloaded operation occurs and balls skid [D. Childs and D. Moyer, ASME J. Eng. Gas Turb. Power 107, 152-159 (1985)]. Also, it can cause jumps in the response to unbalance excitation. These undesirable effects may be eliminated by introducing two or more loops into one of the bearing races so that at least two points of the ring circumference provide a positive zero clearance [D. Childs, Handbook of Rotordynamics, edited by F. Ehrich (McGraw-Hill, NY, 1992)]. The deviation of the outer ring with two loops, known as ovality, is one of the bearing distributed defects. Although this class of imperfections has received much work, none of the available studies has simulated the effect of the outer ring ovality on the dynamic behavior of rotating machinery under rotating unbalance with consideration of ball bearing nonlinearities, shaft elasticity, and speed of rotation. To fill this gap, the equations of motion of a rotor-ball bearing system are formulated using finite-elements (FE) discretization and Lagrange's equations. The analyses are specialized to a rigid-rotor system, by retaining the rigid body modes only in the FE solution. Samples of the results are presented in both time domain and frequency domain for a system with and without outer ring ovality. It is found that with ideal bearings (no ovality), the vibration spectrum is qualitatively and quantitatively the same in both the horizontal and vertical directions. When the ring ovality is introduced, however, the spectrum in both orthogonal planes is no longer similar. And magnitude of the bearing load has increased in the form of repeated random impacts, between balls and rings, in the horizontal direction (direction of maximum clearance) compared to a continuous contact along the

  16. MRI-compatible ultrasound heating system with ring-shaped phased arrays for breast tumor thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Nien; Chen, Guan-Ming; Lin, Bo-Sian; Lien, Pi-Hsien; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Chen, Gin-Shin; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound transducers can carry out precise and efficient power deposition for tumor thermal therapy under the guidance of magnetic resonance imaging. For a better heating, organ-specific ultrasound transducers with precision location control system should be developed for tumors located at various organs. It is feasible to perform a better heating for breast tumor thermal therapy with a ring-shaped ultrasound phased-array transducer. In this study, we developed ring-shaped phased-array ultrasound transducers with 1.0 and 2.5 MHz and a precision location control system to drive the transducers to the desired location to sonicate the designated region. Both thermo-sensitive hydrogel phantom and ex vivo fresh pork were used to evaluate the heating performance of the transducers. The results showed that the ring-shaped phased array ultrasound transducers were very promising for breast tumor heating with the variation of heating patterns and without overheating the ribs.

  17. Initial test results of the Los Alamos proton-storage-ring bump-magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.; Barlow, D.B.; Redd, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    An upgrade program for increasing the stored beam current in the LANSCE Proton Storage is presently under way. Part of the upgrade effort has been to design, specify, and add four bump-magnet/modulator systems to the ring. This paper describes the initial test results of the first bump-magnet/modulator system. The paper begins with an overview of the pulsed-power system including important specifications of the modulator, magnet, cabling, and control system. In the main portion of the paper, waveforms and test data are included showing the accuracy, repeatability, and stability of the magnet-current pulses. These magnet pulses are programmable both in rise and fall time as well as in amplitude. The amplitude can be set between 50 and 300 A, the rise-time is fixed at 1 ms, and the linear fall-time can be varied between 500 {mu}s and 1500 {mu}s. Other issues such as loading effects and power dissipation in the magnet-bore beamtube are examined and reported.

  18. Intravaginal rings as delivery systems for microbicides and multipurpose prevention technologies

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Clark, Meredith R; Hurlburt, Jennifer A; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in delivering pharmaceutical products via intravaginal rings (IVRs). IVRs are flexible torus-shaped drug delivery systems that can be easily inserted and removed by the woman and that provide both sustained and controlled drug release, lasting for several weeks to several months. In terms of women’s health care products, it has been established that IVRs effectively deliver contraceptive steroids and steroids for the treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy. A novel application for IVRs is the delivery of antiretroviral drugs for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genital infection. Microbicides are antiviral drugs delivered topically for HIV prevention. Recent reviews of microbicide IVRs have focused on technologies in development and optimizing ring design. IVRs have several advantages, including the ability to deliver sustained drug doses for long periods of time while bypassing first pass metabolism in the gut. IVRs are discreet, woman-controlled, and do not require a trained provider for placement or fitting. Previous data support that women and their male sexual partners find IVRs highly acceptable. Multipurpose prevention technology (MPT) products provide protection against unintended/mistimed pregnancy and reproductive tract infections, including HIV. Several MPT IVRs are currently in development. Early clinical testing of new microbicide and MPT IVRs will require a focus on safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Specifically, IVRs will have to deliver tissue concentrations of drugs that are pharmacodynamically active, do not cause mucosal alterations or inflammation, and do not change the resident microbiota. The emergence of resistance to antiretrovirals will need to be investigated. IVRs should not disrupt intercourse or have high rates of expulsion. Herein, we reviewed the microbicide and MPT IVRs currently in development, with a focus on the clinical aspects of IVR assessment and the challenges

  19. Application of an aqueous two-phase systems high-throughput screening method to evaluate mAb HCP separation.

    PubMed

    Oelmeier, Stefan A; Dismer, Florian; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) as separation technique have regained substantial interest from the biotech industry. Biopharmaceutical companies faced with increasing product titers and stiffening economic competition reconsider ATPS as an alternative to chromatography. As the implementation of an ATPS is material, time, and labor intensive, a miniaturized and automated screening process would be beneficial. In this article such a method, its statistical evaluation, and its application to a biopharmaceutical separation task are shown. To speed up early stage ATPS profiling an automated application of the cloud-point method for binodal determination was developed. PEG4000-PO(4) binodals were measured automatically and manually and were found to be identical within the experimental error. The ATPS screening procedure was applied to a model system and an industrial separation task. PEG4000-PO(4) systems at a protein concentration of 0.75 mg/mL were used. The influence of pH, NaCl addition, and tie line length was investigated. Lysozyme as model protein, two monoclonal antibodies, and a host cell protein pool were used. The method was found to yield partition coefficients identical to manually determined values for lysozyme. The monoclonal antibodies were shifted from the bottom into the upper phase by addition of NaCl. This shift occurred at lower NaCl concentration when the pH of the system was closer to the pI of the distributed protein. Addition of NaCl, increase in PEG4000 concentration and pH led to significant loss of the mAb due to precipitation. Capacity limitations of these systems were thus demonstrated. The chosen model systems allowed a reduction of up to 50% HCP with a recovery of greater than 95% of the target proteins. As these values might not be industrially relevant when compared to current chromatographic procedures, the developed screening procedure allows a fast evaluation of more suitable and optimized ATPS system for a given task.

  20. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  1. Beam position controlling method for 3D optical system and its application in non-planar ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Chen, Meixiong; Long, Xingwu; Tan, Yanyang; Kang, Zhenglong; Li, Yingying

    2012-08-13

    A novel theoretical beam position controlling method for 3D optical system has been proposed in this paper. Non-planar ring resonator, which is a typical 3D optical system, has been chosen as an example to show its application. To the best of our knowledge, the generalized ray matrices, augmented 5 × 5 ray matrices for paraxial dielectric interface transmission and paraxial optical-wedge transmission, and their detailed deducing process have been proposed in this paper for the first time. By utilizing the novel coordinate system for Gaussian beam reflection and the generalized ray matrix of paraxial optical-wedge transmission, the rules and some novel results of the optical-axis perturbations of non-planar ring resonators have been obtained. Wedge angle-induced mismatching errors of non-planar ring resonators have been found out and two experimental beam position controlling methods to effectively eliminate the wedge angle-induced mismatching errors have been proposed. All those results have been confirmed by related alignment experiments and the experimental results have been described with diagrammatic representation. These findings are important to the beam control, cavity design, and cavity alignment of high precision non-planar ring laser gyroscopes. Those generalized ray matrices and their deducing methods are valuable for ray analysis of various kinds of paraxial optical-elements and resonators. This novel theoretical beam position controlling method for 3D optical system is valuable for the controlling of various kinds of 3D optical systems.

  2. Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay: a novel homogeneous assay for antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, David A.

    1993-05-01

    A novel immunoassay, Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay (PORSCHA), is described. This assay relies upon the change in fluorescent spectral properties that pyrene and its derivatives show with varying concentration. Because antibodies and other biomolecules can bind two molecules simultaneously, they can change the local concentration of the molecules that they bind. This concentration change may be detected spectrally as a change in the fluorescence emission wavelength of an appropriately labeled biomolecule. Several tests of PORSCHA have been performed which demonstrate this principle. For example: with streptavidin as the binding biomolecule and a biotin labeled pyrene derivative, the production of the excimer emitting at 470 nm is observed. Without the streptavidin present, only the monomer emitting at 378 and 390 nm is observed. The ratio of monomer to excimer provides the concentration of unlabeled biotin in the sample. Approximately 1 ng/mL of biotin may be detected with this system using a 50 (mu) l sample (2 X 10-16 moles biotin). The principles behind PORSCHA, the results with the streptavidin/biotin system are discussed and extensions of the PORSCHA concept to antibodies as the binding partner and DNA in homogeneous assays are suggested.

  3. Flight test results of the strapdown ring laser gyro tetrad inertial navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carestia, R. A.; Hruby, R. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    A helicopter flight test program undertaken to evaluate the performance of Tetrad (a strap down, laser gyro, inertial navigation system) is described. The results of 34 flights show a mean final navigational velocity error of 5.06 knots, with a standard deviation of 3.84 knots; a corresponding mean final position error of 2.66 n. mi., with a standard deviation of 1.48 n. mi.; and a modeled mean position error growth rate for the 34 tests of 1.96 knots, with a standard deviation of 1.09 knots. No laser gyro or accelerometer failures were detected during the flight tests. Off line parity residual studies used simulated failures with the prerecorded flight test and laboratory test data. The airborne Tetrad system's failure--detection logic, exercised during the tests, successfully demonstrated the detection of simulated ""hard'' failures and the system's ability to continue successfully to navigate by removing the simulated faulted sensor from the computations. Tetrad's four ring laser gyros provided reliable and accurate angular rate sensing during the 4 yr of the test program, and no sensor failures were detected during the evaluation of free inertial navigation performance.

  4. Comparison of the BD Veritor System for Flu A+B with the Alere BinaxNOW influenza A&B card for detection of influenza A and B viruses in respiratory specimens from pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ferdaus; Nguyen, Ashley; Formanek, Ashley; Bell, James J; Selvarangan, Rangaraj

    2014-03-01

    The performance characteristics of two commercially available rapid tests for influenza, the BD Veritor System for Flu A+B (BD) and the Alere BinaxNOW influenza A&B card (BN), were evaluated using 200 frozen clinical specimens collected from January 2011 to June 2012 from pediatric patients. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used as the gold standard to evaluate the results obtained by the two different assays. Of the 200 specimens tested, real-time RT-PCR assay detected influenza A or B virus in 116 samples, while BD detected 104 samples and BN detected 84 samples as positive. The overall sensitivity and specificity for detection of both influenza A and B virus in comparison to those of real-time RT-PCR were 89.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82.2 to 94.3) and 98.8% (95% CI, 92.6 to 99.9) for BD Veritor and 72.4% (95% CI, 63.2 to 80.0) and 100% (95% CI, 94.5 to 100.0) for BinaxNOW. Workflow analysis indicated that overall processing times for a batch size of 10 specimens were virtually identical between both systems. Overall, these results indicate that the BD Veritor assay was more sensitive than the BinaxNOW assay in detection of influenza A and B viruses in respiratory specimens from pediatric patients.

  5. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  6. Feature Article: Thermodynamic properties from ab-initio calculations: New theoretical developments, and applications to various materials systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fähnle, Manfred; Drautz, Ralf; Lechermann, Frank; Singer, Reinhard; Diaz-Ortiz, Alejandro; Dosch, Helmut

    2005-05-01

    The cover picture from the Feature Article [1] depicts the calculated landscape of lowest formation energies for the ternary compound system Ni-Fe-Al. The figure shows for each composition the difference in the formation energy (in meV/atom) for the respective homogeneous configuration with lowest energy on the bcc and the fcc parent lattice. The phases on the fcc lattice dominate the Ni- and Al-rich regions of the Gibbs triangle.The first author Manfred Fähnle is Professor at the University of Stuttgart and member of the theory group of the department of Prof. Schütz at the Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung in Stuttgart. In 1980 he was awarded with the Otto-Hahn medal of the Max-Planck Society and in 1985 he received the Academy Award for Physics of the University of Göttingen. His present research interests are the static and dynamic properties of bulk and nanostructured magnetic systems, as well as the ab-initio statistical mechanics of alloys.

  7. Ab initio characterization of electron transfer coupling in photoinduced systems: generalized Mulliken-Hush with configuration-interaction singles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2005-12-29

    To calculate electronic couplings for photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reactions, we propose and test the use of ab initio quantum chemistry calculation for excited states with the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) method. Configuration-interaction singles (CIS) is proposed to model the locally excited (LE) and charge-transfer (CT) states. When the CT state couples with other high lying LE states, affecting coupling values, the image charge approximation (ICA), as a simple solvent model, can lower the energy of the CT state and decouple the undesired high-lying local excitations. We found that coupling strength is weakly dependent on many details of the solvent model, indicating the validity of the Condon approximation. Therefore, a trustworthy value can be obtained via this CIS-GMH scheme, with ICA used as a tool to improve and monitor the quality of the results. Systems we tested included a series of rigid, sigma-linked donor-bridge-acceptor compounds where "through-bond" coupling has been previously investigated, and a pair of molecules where "through-space" coupling was experimentally demonstrated. The calculated results agree well with experimentally inferred values in the coupling magnitudes (for both systems studied) and in the exponential distance dependence (for the through-bond series). Our results indicate that this new scheme can properly account for ET coupling arising from both through-bond and through-space mechanisms.

  8. Testing the rotating lighthouse model with the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhu-Xing; Liang, Yi; Weisberg, Joel M.

    2014-04-01

    Each of the two pulsars in the double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B system exhibits not only the pulses emanating from it, but also displays modulations near the pulse period of the other. Freire et al. (2009, MNRAS, 396, 1764) have put forward a technique using the modulation of B by A to determine the sense of rotation of pulsar A relative to its orbital motion, among other quantities. In this paper, we present another technique with the same purpose. While the Freire et al. approach analyses pulse arrival times, ours instead uses periods or frequencies (their inverses), which can be experimentally determined via power spectral analysis similar to that used in pulsar searches. Our technique is based on the apparent change in spin period of a body when it is measured from an orbiting platform (the other pulsar), and is shown to be entirely analogous to the difference between the sidereal and solar spin period of the Earth (i.e. the sidereal and solar day). Two benefits of this approach are its conceptual and computational simplicity. The direct detection of spin with this technique will observationally validate the rotating lighthouse model of pulsar emission, while the detection of the relative directions of spin and orbital angular momenta has important evolutionary implications. Our technique can be used on other binary systems exhibiting mutually induced phenomena.

  9. Modulation instability and two types of non-autonomous rogue waves for the variable-coefficient AB system in fluid mechanics and nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Qi, Feng-Hua; Tang, Bing; Shi, Yu-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Under investigation in this paper is a variable-coefficient AB (vcAB) system, which describes marginally unstable baroclinic wave packets in geophysical fluids and ultra-short pulses in nonlinear optics. The modulation instability analysis of solutions with variable coefficients in the presence of a small perturbation is studied. The modified Darboux transformation (mDT) of the vcAB system is constructed via a gauge transformation. The first-order non-autonomous rogue wave solutions of the vcAB system are presented based on the mDT. It is found that the wave amplitude of B exhibits two types of structures, i.e. the double-peak structure appears if the plane-wave solution parameter ω is equal to zero, while selecting ω≠0 yields a single-peak one. Effects of the variable coefficients on the rogue waves are graphically discussed in detail. The periodic rogue wave and composite rogue wave are obtained with different inhomogeneous parameters. Additionally, the nonlinear tunneling of the rogue waves through a conventional hyperbolic nonlinear well and barrier are investigated.

  10. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of the ring system [1,2]oxazolo[4,5-g]indole.

    PubMed

    Barraja, Paola; Caracausi, Libero; Diana, Patrizia; Spanò, Virginia; Montalbano, Alessandra; Carbone, Anna; Parrino, Barbara; Cirrincione, Girolamo

    2012-11-01

    Brand new ring: A series of 27 derivatives of the new ring system [1,2]oxazolo[4,5-g]indole were conveniently prepared and tested at the NCI for antiproliferative studies. Several of them showed good inhibitory activity toward all tested cell lines, reaching GI50 values generally at the micromolar and sub-micromolar levels and in some cases at nanomolar concentrations. The mean GI50 values, calculated on the full panel, were in the range 0.25-7.08 μM.

  11. Limits on Pluto's ring system from the June 12 2006 stellar occultation and implications for the New Horizons impact hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.; French, Richard G.; Shoemaker, Kevin; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ruhland, Trina R.; Young, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pluto system passed in front of a 15th magnitude star on 12 June 2006. We observed this occultation from the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT), and took photometric observations every 100 ms for 3 h. Our three-hour baseline of data provides among the longest and highest-quality occultation dataset of the Pluto system ever taken. Results on Pluto's atmospheric structure from these data have been previously reported (Young, E.F. [2008]. Astron. J. 136, 1757-1769). Here we report on limits for rings, ring arcs, and small satellites within the system. We find a 3 σ upper limit on the normal optical depth of τ < 0.07 for narrow rings of width 2.4 km, and τ < 5 ×10-3 for rings of width 1500 km. We also detect no discrete objects of radius 220 m or larger along the occultation path. Motivated by the upcoming flyby of New Horizons through the Pluto system, we estimate the dust impact hazard to the spacecraft based on our optical depth limits and those derived from imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  12. The BpeAB-OprB Efflux Pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b Does Not Play a Role in Quorum Sensing, Virulence Factor Production, or Extrusion of Aminoglycosides but Is a Broad-Spectrum Drug Efflux System

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2010-01-01

    Most Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are intrinsically aminoglycoside resistant, mainly due to AmrAB-OprA-mediated efflux. Rare naturally occurring or genetically engineered mutants lacking this pump are aminoglycoside susceptible despite the fact that they also encode and express BpeAB-OprB, which was reported to mediate efflux of aminoglycosides in the Singapore strain KHW. To reassess the role of BpeAB-OprB in B. pseudomallei aminoglycoside resistance, we used mutants overexpressing or lacking this pump in either AmrAB-OprA-proficient or -deficient strain 1026b backgrounds. Our data show that BpeAB-OprB does not mediate efflux of aminoglycosides but is a multidrug efflux system which extrudes macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, acriflavine, and, to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol. Phylogenetically, BpeAB-OprB is closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM, which has a similar substrate spectrum. AmrAB-OprA is most closely related to MexXY, the only P. aeruginosa efflux pump known to extrude aminoglycosides. Since BpeAB-OprB in strain KHW was also implicated in playing a major role in export of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules and in expression of diverse virulence factors, we explored whether this was also true in the strain 1026b background. The results showed that BpeAB-OprB was not required for AHL export, and mutants lacking this efflux system exhibited normal swimming motility and siderophore production, which were severely impaired in KHW bpeAB-oprB mutants. Biofilm formation was impaired in 1026b Δ(amrRAB-oprA) and Δ(amrRAB-oprA) Δ(bpeAB-oprB) mutants. At present, we do not know why our BpeAB-OprB susceptibility and virulence factor expression results with 1026b and its derivatives are different from those previously published for Singapore strain KHW. PMID:20498323

  13. The BpeAB-OprB efflux pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b does not play a role in quorum sensing, virulence factor production, or extrusion of aminoglycosides but is a broad-spectrum drug efflux system.

    PubMed

    Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2010-08-01

    Most Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are intrinsically aminoglycoside resistant, mainly due to AmrAB-OprA-mediated efflux. Rare naturally occurring or genetically engineered mutants lacking this pump are aminoglycoside susceptible despite the fact that they also encode and express BpeAB-OprB, which was reported to mediate efflux of aminoglycosides in the Singapore strain KHW. To reassess the role of BpeAB-OprB in B. pseudomallei aminoglycoside resistance, we used mutants overexpressing or lacking this pump in either AmrAB-OprA-proficient or -deficient strain 1026b backgrounds. Our data show that BpeAB-OprB does not mediate efflux of aminoglycosides but is a multidrug efflux system which extrudes macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, acriflavine, and, to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol. Phylogenetically, BpeAB-OprB is closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM, which has a similar substrate spectrum. AmrAB-OprA is most closely related to MexXY, the only P. aeruginosa efflux pump known to extrude aminoglycosides. Since BpeAB-OprB in strain KHW was also implicated in playing a major role in export of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules and in expression of diverse virulence factors, we explored whether this was also true in the strain 1026b background. The results showed that BpeAB-OprB was not required for AHL export, and mutants lacking this efflux system exhibited normal swimming motility and siderophore production, which were severely impaired in KHW bpeAB-oprB mutants. Biofilm formation was impaired in 1026b Delta(amrRAB-oprA) and Delta(amrRAB-oprA) Delta(bpeAB-oprB) mutants. At present, we do not know why our BpeAB-OprB susceptibility and virulence factor expression results with 1026b and its derivatives are different from those previously published for Singapore strain KHW.

  14. Circumbinary ring, circumstellar disks, and accretion in the binary system UY Aurigae

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ya-Wen; Ho, Paul T. P.; Dutrey, Anne; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Piétu, Vincent; Gueth, Fréderic; Beck, Tracy; Boehler, Yann; Bary, Jeff; Simon, Michal

    2014-09-20

    Recent exo-planetary surveys reveal that planets can orbit and survive around binary stars. This suggests that some fraction of young binary systems which possess massive circumbinary (CB) disks may be in the midst of planet formation. However, there are very few CB disks detected. We revisit one of the known CB disks, the UY Aurigae system, and probe {sup 13}CO 2-1, C{sup 18}O 2-1, SO 5(6)-4(5) and {sup 12}CO 3-2 line emission and the thermal dust continuum. Our new results confirm the existence of the CB disk. In addition, the circumstellar (CS) disks are clearly resolved in dust continuum at 1.4 mm. The spectral indices between the wavelengths of 0.85 mm and 6 cm are found to be surprisingly low, being 1.6 for both CS disks. The deprojected separation of the binary is 1.''26 based on our 1.4 mm continuum data. This is 0.''07 (10 AU) larger than in earlier studies. Combining the fact of the variation of UY Aur B in R band, we propose that the CS disk of an undetected companion UY Aur Bb obscures UY Aur Ba. A very complex kinematical pattern inside the CB disk is observed due to a mixing of Keplerian rotation of the CB disk, the infall and outflow gas. The streaming gas accreting from the CB ring toward the CS disks and possible outflows are also identified and resolved. The SO emission is found to be at the bases of the streaming shocks. Our results suggest that the UY Aur system is undergoing an active accretion phase from the CB disk to the CS disks. The UY Aur B might also be a binary system, making the UY Aur a triple system.

  15. Comparative investigation of the energetic ion spectra comprising the magnetospheric ring currents of the solar system.

    PubMed

    Mauk, B H

    2014-12-01

    Investigated here are factors that control the intensities and shapes of energetic ion spectra that make up the ring current populations of the strongly magnetized planets of the solar system, specifically those of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Following a previous and similar comparative investigation of radiation belt electrons, we here turn our attention to ions. Specifically, we examine the possible role of the differential ion Kennel-Petschek limit, as moderated by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, as a standard for comparing the most intense ion spectra within the strongly magnetized planetary magnetospheres. In carrying out this investigation, the substantial complexities engendered by the very different ion composition distributions of these diverse magnetospheres must be addressed, given that the dispersion properties of the EMIC waves are strongly determined by the ion composition of the plasmas within which the waves propagate. Chosen for comparison are the ion spectra within these systems that are the most intense observed, specifically at 100 keV and 1 MeV. We find that Earth and Jupiter are unique in having their most intense ion spectra likely limited and sculpted by the Kennel-Petschek process. The ion spectra of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune reside far below their respective limits and are likely limited by interactions with gas and dust (Saturn) and by the absence of robust ion acceleration processes (Uranus and Neptune). Suggestions are provided for further testing the efficacy of the differential Kennel-Petschek limit for ions using the Van Allen Probes.

  16. Hardness in rare earth diboride systems: Ab initio full-potential study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaoui, A.; Abderrahmane, S. Ait; Djermouni, M.; Kacimi, S.; Zazoua, F.; Boukortt, A.; Bejar, M.; Dhahri, E.

    2017-01-01

    We study in this paper the macroscopic hardness of TiB2 and TmB2 compounds and their corresponding ternary alloys Tm1-xTixB2 by calculating the mechanical properties and electronic structure of these systems. The mechanical results show that TiB2 compound is found ultra-hard compared with TmB2 and the covalent Bsbnd B bonds have an enormous impact on the macroscopic hardness of these systems. These results are in excellent agreement with experiment. In addition, a large charge density was observed in the TiB2 compound comparing to that of TmB2 and of the considered alloys. For short interatomic distances Bsbnd B, the hardness in Tm1-xTixB2 alloys is important.

  17. WE-AB-BRB-12: Nanoscintillator Fiber-Optic Detector System for Microbeam Radiation Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J; Dooley, J; Chang, S; Belley, M; Yoshizumi, T; Stanton, I; Langloss, B; Therien, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiation therapy that has demonstrated a higher therapeutic ratio than conventional radiation therapy in animal studies. There are several roadblocks in translating the promising treatment technology to clinical application, one of which is the lack of a real-time, high-resolution dosimeter. Current clinical radiation detectors have poor spatial resolution and, as such, are unsuitable for measuring microbeams with submillimeter-scale widths. Although GafChromic film has high spatial resolution, it lacks the real-time dosimetry capability necessary for MRT preclinical research and potential clinical use. In this work we have demonstrated the feasibility of using a nanoscintillator fiber-optic detector (nanoFOD) system for real-time MRT dosimetry. Methods: A microplanar beam array is generated using a x-ray research irradiator and a custom-made, microbeam-forming collimator. The newest generation nanoFOD has an effective size of 70 µm in the measurement direction and was calibrated against a kV ion chamber (RadCal Accu-Pro) in open field geometry. We have written a computer script that performs automatic data collection with immediate background subtraction. A computer-controlled detector positioning stage is used to precisely measure the microbeam peak dose and beam profile by translating the stage during data collection. We test the new generation nanoFOD system, with increased active scintillation volume, against the previous generation system. Both raw and processed data are time-stamped and recorded to enable future post-processing. Results: The real-time microbeam dosimetry system worked as expected. The new generation dosimeter has approximately double the active volume compared to the previous generation resulting in over 900% increase in signal. The active volume of the dosimeter still provided the spatial resolution that meets the Nyquist criterion for our microbeam widths. Conclusion: We have

  18. Ab initio study of Ga-GaN system: Transition from adsorbed metal atoms to a metal–semiconductor junction

    SciTech Connect

    Witczak, Przemysław; Kempisty, Pawel; Strak, Pawel

    2015-11-15

    Ab initio studies of a GaN(0001)-Ga system with various thicknesses of a metallic Ga layer were undertaken. The studied systems extend from a GaN(0001) surface with a fractional coverage of gallium atoms to a Ga-GaN metal–semiconductor (m–s) contact. Electronic properties of the system are simulated using density functional theory calculations for different doping of the bulk semiconductor. It is shown that during transition from a bare GaN(0001) surface to a m–s heterostructure, the Fermi level stays pinned at a Ga-broken bond highly dispersive surface state to Ga–Ga states at the m–s interface. Adsorption of gallium leads to an energy gain of about 4 eV for a clean GaN(0001) surface and the energy decreases to 3.2 eV for a thickly Ga-covered surface. The transition to the m–s interface is observed. For a thick Ga overlayer such interface corresponds to a Schottky contact with a barrier equal to 0.9 and 0.6 eV for n- and p-type, respectively. Bond polarization-related dipole layer occurring due to an electron transfer to the metal leads to a potential energy jump of 1.5 eV, independent on the semiconductor doping. Additionally high electron density in the Ga–Ga bond region leads to an energy barrier about 1.2 eV high and 4 Å wide. This feature may adversely affect the conductivity of the n-type m–s system.

  19. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  20. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  1. AB025. Diseases with temporary disability of the respiratory system at persons working in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Lidiya; Filippidou, Elisavet-Christina; Chernaeva, Mariya; Tsacheva, Nevena

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective study carried out during the period 2009–2015, represents an examination of people working in a Multi-profile Hospital of Varna, suffering from temporary disability of the respiratory system, with regard to structure, dynamics and relationship to their working conditions. Methods The status and the trends of health of more than 1,000 medical practitioners and other people working in the field of health were examined. Used methods sociological, electronic health record, patient charts and statistical methods. An inquiry was carried out with the purpose of risk assessment for all the workers in the hospital. Leading biological, chemical and physical risk factors at the place of work have been measured. Results We found out that the lung diseases take the first place in the temporary morbidity of the contingent under survey. The acute infections of the upper respiratory tract result in absence from work: (I) the yearly average of 100 workers shows 17 new cases and 812 days of absence due to acute bronchitis; (II) the yearly average of 100 workers—13 new cases and 1,035 days of absence from work due to pneumonia and COPD; (III) the yearly average of 100 workers—4 new cases and 859 days of absence from work. Thereby the overall indexes characterizing the temporary incapacity of the respiratory system are: frequency—35.44 new cases and frequency of the days—249.71 days of absences due to these diseases. Failure to observe the requirements for healthy and safe work conditions and especially the use of personal protective equipment, as well as the restriction of the vaccination of the employees, are one of the main reasons for the temporary incapacity disease of the respiratory system. Conclusions Our study, conducted for many years, proved that the respiratory system disorders are increasingly becoming one of the most important medical, social and financial problems. Most important measures to control and to reduce the respiratory

  2. WE-AB-204-10: Evaluation of a Novel Dedicated Breast PET System (Mammi-PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Z; Swanson, T; O’Connor, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance characteristics of a novel dedicated breast PET system (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). The system has 2 detector rings giving axial/transaxial field of view of 8/17 cm. Each ring consists of 12 monolithic LYSO modules coupled to PSPMTs. Methods: Uniformity, sensitivity, energy and spatial resolution were measured according to NEMA standards. Count rate performance was investigated using a source of F-18 (1384uCi) decayed over 5 half-lives. A prototype PET phantom was imaged for 20 min to evaluate image quality, recovery coefficients and partial volume effects. Under an IRB-approved protocol, 11 patients who just underwent whole body PET/CT exams were imaged prone with the breast pendulant at 5–10 minutes/breast. Image quality was assessed with and without scatter/attenuation correction and using different reconstruction algorithms. Results: Integral/differential uniformity were 9.8%/6.0% respectively. System sensitivity was 2.3% on axis, 2.2% and 2.8% at 3.8 cm and 7.8 cm off-axis. Mean energy resolution of all modules was 23.3%. Spatial resolution (FWHM) was 1.82 mm and 2.90 mm on axis and 5.8 cm off axis. Three cylinders (14 mm diameter) in the PET phantom were filled with activity concentration ratios of 4:1, 3:1, and 2:1 relative to the background. Measured cylinder to background ratios were 2.6, 1.8 and 1.5 (without corrections) and 3.6, 2.3 and 1.5 (with attenuation/scatter correction). Five cylinders (14, 10, 6, 4 and 2 mm diameter) each with an activity ratio of 4:1 were measured and showed recovery coefficients of 1, 0.66, 0.45, 0.18 and 0.18 (without corrections), and 1, 0.53, 0.30, 0.13 and 0 (with attenuation/scatter correction). Optimal phantom image quality was obtained with 3D MLEM algorithm, >20 iterations and without attenuation/scatter correction. Conclusion: The MAMMI system demonstrated good performance characteristics. Further work is needed to determine the optimal reconstruction parameters for qualitative and

  3. The "anthracene problem": closed-form conjugated-circuit models of ring currents in linear polyacenes.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Patrick W; Myrvold, Wendy

    2011-11-17

    Conjugated-circuit models for induced π ring currents differ in the types of circuit that they include and the weights attached to them. Choice of circuits for general π systems can be expressed compactly in terms of matchings of the circuit-deleted molecular graph. Variants of the conjugated-circuit model for induced π currents are shown to have simple closed-form solutions for linear polyacenes. Despite differing assumptions about the effect of cycle area, all the models predict the most intense perimeter current in the central rings, in general agreement with ab initio current-density maps. All tend to overestimate the rate of increase with N of the central ring current for the [N]polyacene, in comparison with molecular-orbital treatments using ipsocentric ab initio, pseudo-π, and Hückel-London approaches.

  4. Long-term detection of methyltestosterone (ab-) use by a yeast transactivation system.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sylvi; Diel, Patrick; Parr, Maria Kristina; Rataj, Felicitas; Schänzer, Willhelm; Vollmer, Günter; Zierau, Oliver

    2011-04-01

    The routinely used analytical method for detecting the abuse of anabolic steroids only allows the detection of molecules with known analytical properties. In our supplementary approach to structure-independent detection, substances are identified by their biological activity. In the present study, urines excreted after oral methyltestosterone (MT) administration were analyzed by a yeast androgen screen (YAS). The aim was to trace the excretion of MT or its metabolites in human urine samples and to compare the results with those from the established analytical method. MT and its two major metabolites were tested as pure compounds in the YAS. In a second step, the ability of the YAS to detect MT and its metabolites in urine samples was analyzed. For this purpose, a human volunteer ingested of a single dose of 5 mg methyltestosterone. Urine samples were collected after different time intervals (0-307 h) and were analyzed in the YAS and in parallel by GC/MS. Whereas the YAS was able to trace MT in urine samples at least for 14 days, the detection limits of the GC/MS method allowed follow-up until day six. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the yeast reporter gene system could detect the activity of anabolic steroids like methyltestosterone with high sensitivity even in urine. Furthermore, the YAS was able to detect MT abuse for a longer period of time than classical GC/MS. Obviously, the system responds to long-lasting metabolites yet unidentified. Therefore, the YAS can be a powerful (pre-) screening tool with the potential that to be used to identify persistent or late screening metabolites of anabolic steroids, which could be used for an enhancement of the sensitivity of GC/MS detection techniques.

  5. Prompt detection of influenza A and B viruses using the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B, Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA, and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B compared to real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jim; Obuekwe, Joy; Baun, Traci; Rogers, Justin; Patel, Twinkle; Snow, Linda

    2014-05-01

    The performance characteristics of rapid influenza diagnostic tests vary widely. This study evaluated the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B (Veritor; BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD, USA), Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA (Sofia; Quidel Corp., San Diego, CA, USA), and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B (Binax; Alere Scarborough, Inc., Scarborough, ME, USA) compared to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of influenza viruses in nasal wash specimens from 240 pediatric patients. Positive percent agreements for influenza A and B virus detection were 93.8% and 94.2%, 95.8% and 98.1%, and 79.2% and 80.8% for Veritor, Sofia, and Binax, respectively. The Veritor and Binax tests demonstrated negative percent agreements >97.9% for detection of both influenza viruses, but the negative percent agreement of the Sofia test was 91.1% for influenza A and 70.7% for influenza B virus. Overall, the Veritor and Sofia tests were nearly as sensitive as RT-PCR and considerably more sensitive than Binax for detection of influenza viruses. However, the accuracy of the Sofia test was significantly lower than either Veritor or Binax.

  6. WE-AB-201-00: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  7. WE-AB-201-01: Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Salomons, G.

    2015-06-15

    Treatment planning systems (TPS) are a cornerstone of modern radiation therapy. Errors in their commissioning or use can have a devastating impact on many patients. To support safe and high quality care, medical physicists must conduct efficient and proper commissioning, good clinical integration, and ongoing quality assurance (QA) of the TPS. AAPM Task Group 53 and related publications have served as seminal benchmarks for TPS commissioning and QA over the past two decades. Over the same time, continuing innovations have made the TPS even more complex and more central to the clinical process. Medical goals are now expressed in terms of the dose and margins around organs and tissues that are delineated from multiple imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET); and even temporally resolved (i.e., 4D) imaging. This information is passed on to optimization algorithms to establish accelerator movements that are programmed directly for IMRT, VMAT and stereotactic treatments. These advances have made commissioning and QA of the TPS much more challenging. This education session reviews up-to-date experience and guidance on this subject; including the recently published AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) #5 “Commissioning and QA of Treatment Planning Dose Calculations: Megavoltage Photon and Electron Beams”. Treatment Planning System Commissioning and QA: Challenges and Opportunities (Greg Salomons) This session will provide some key background and review publications describing prominent incidents relating to TPS commissioning and QA. Traditional approaches have been hardware and feature oriented. They aim to establish a functional configuration and establish specifications for regular testing of features (like dose calculation) to assure stable operation and detect failures. With the advent of more complex systems, more patient-specific testing has also been adopted. A number of actual TPS defects will be presented along with heuristics for identifying similar

  8. Ab initio studies of two pyrimidine derivatives as possible photo-switch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csehi, András; Woywod, Clemens; Halász, Gábor; Vibók, Ágnes

    2013-09-01

    The six lowest lying electronic singlet states of 8-(pyrimidine-2-yl)quinolin-ol and 2-(4-nitropyrimidine-2-yl)ethenol have been studied theoretically using the complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) and M'ller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) methods. Both molecules can be viewed as consisting of a frame and a crane component. As a possible mechanism for the excited-state relaxation process an intramolecular hydrogen transfer promoted by twisting around the covalent bond connecting the molecular frame and crane moieties has been considered. Based on this idea we have attempted to derive abstracted photochemical pathways for both systems. Geometry optimizations for the construction of hypothetical reaction coordinates have been performed at the MP2 level of theory while the CASSCF approach has been employed for the calculation of vertical excitation energies along the pathways. The results of the calculations along the specific twisting displacements investigated in this study do not support the notion of substantial twisting activity upon excitation of any of the five excited states at the planar terminal structures of the torsion coordinates of both molecules. However, the present analysis should be considered only as a first, preliminary step towards an understanding of the photochemistry of the two candidate compounds. For example, we have not performed any excited state geometry optimizations so far and the estimates of vertical excitation energies do not take dynamical electron correlation into account. Further work on this subject is in progress.

  9. New Psychoactive Substances: Chemistry, Pharmacology, Metabolism, and Detectability of Amphetamine Derivatives With Modified Ring Systems.

    PubMed

    Welter-Luedeke, Jessica; Maurer, Hans H

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, new amphetamine derivatives with modified ring systems were sold and consumed as new drugs of abuse. They belong together with other new drugs of abuse classes to the so-called new psychoactive substances (NPS). The chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, metabolism, and toxicokinetics are shortly discussed of camfetamine, 3 methylphenyl-amphetamines (2-MA, 3-MA, and 4-MA), 2-methiopropamine (2-MPA), and 5-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran (5-APB), 6-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran (6-APB, so-called "benzofury") and their N-methyl derivatives 5-MAPB and 6-MAPB. Only a rough assessment of the pharmacology and toxicology NPS can be performed in most cases using published data of analogs, trip reports, and described clinical cases. Accordingly, they all act more or less as central nervous stimulants mainly by increasing the concentration of the neurotransmitters noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin (5-HT) by inducing their release and reuptake inhibition. Thus, the acute toxicity is associated with the sympathomimetic effects, such as mydriasis, hyperthermia, hypertension, tachycardia, insomnia, and anxiety. With the exception of 5- and 6-APB, these NPS were extensively metabolized by N-demethylation and/or aromatic hydroxylation catalyzed by various cytochrome P450 isoenzymes followed by partial glucuronidation and/or sulfation. For urinalysis, the unchanged drugs and/or the nor-metabolites are the main targets.

  10. Pyrrolo[2,3-h]quinolinones: a new ring system with potent photoantiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Barraja, Paola; Diana, Patrizia; Montalbano, Alessandra; Dattolo, Gaetano; Cirrincione, Girolamo; Viola, Giampietro; Vedaldi, Daniela; Dall'Acqua, Francesco

    2006-12-15

    A new class of compounds, the pyrrolo[2,3-h]quinolin-2-ones, nitrogen isosters of the angular furocoumarin Angelicin, was synthesized with the aim of obtaining new photochemotherapeutic agents with increased antiproliferative activity and lower undesired toxic effects than the lead compound. Two synthetic pathways were approached to allow the isolation both of the dihydroderivatives 10-17 and of the aromatic ring system 23. Compounds 10-17 showed a remarkable phototoxicity and a great UVA dose dependence reaching IC(50) values at submicromolar level. Intracellular localization of these compounds has been evaluated by means of fluorescence microscopy using tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and acridine orange, which are specific fluorescent probes for mitochondria and lysosomes, respectively. A weak co-staining was observed with mitochondrial stain, whereas a specific localization in lysosomes was observed. Studies directed to elucidate the mode of action of this series of compounds revealed that they do not intercalate with DNA and do not induce photodamage to the macromolecule. On the contrary, they induce significative photodamage to lipids and proteins.

  11. Understanding the Dynamical Evolution of the Earth Radiation Belt and Ring Current Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri; Usanova, Maria; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and understanding the ring current and radiation belt-coupled system has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long-term simulations with a 3D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. Simulations can reproduce long term variations of the electron radiation belt fluxes and show the importance of local acceleration, radial diffusion, loss to the atmosphere and loss to the magnetopause. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. VERB simulations show that the lower energy inward transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show that at energies of 100s of keV, a number of processes work simultaneously, including convective transport, radial diffusion, local acceleration, loss to the loss cone and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation of the March 2013 storm are compared with Van Allen Probes observations.

  12. X-ray BPM-based feedback system at the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.; Erwin, L.; Decker, G.; Laird, R.; Lenkszus, F.

    2000-05-17

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, the X-ray beam position monitors (X-BPMs) measure accurate photon position down to the submicron level. This level of stable measurement has been possible due to (1) superior thermal insulation and vibration damping of the X-ray BPM support structure, (2) minimal dependence on the bunch pattern and intensity variations, and (3) use of ultrastable preamplifiers and processing electronics. A new X-BPM interface is under development and will be discussed here. This interface will be integrated into the existing rf-based orbit feedback systems. To study preliminary results, an experimental X-BPM orbit feedback set-up was developed and implemented in one of the bending magnet beamlines. The results from this set-up are encouraging. For an operational fill, a typical orbit drift of 30 microns (at X-ray BPMs) has been reduced to less than 5 microns. The fill-to-fill photon orbit reproducibility has been improved from 75 microns to less than 10 microns.

  13. Evolution of the rf systems layout for the SSC collider rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, G.

    1993-10-01

    This note contains information on the results of ongoing reviews concerning the basic design of the 360-MHz rf systems for the 2 {times} 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). For generation of 20-MV peak voltage per ring, with proton beams of 2 {times} 70 mA, several versions have been investigated: Version A (baseline design and modified baseline): 2 {times} 8 five-cell normalconducting cavities; Version B: 2 {times} 24 single-cell normalconducting cavities; and Version C: 2 {times} 8 or 2 {times} 10 single-cell superconducting cavities. For reasons of easier High Order Mode (HOM) damping, multicell cavities have been found inferior in performance when compared to single cells. Superconducting cavities have been found superior in handling transient beam loading when compared to normalconducting cavities. A threefold higher voltage, and a reduced R/Q value of superconducting cells lead to a ninefold increase in stored electromagnetic energy which, by the same factor, reduces the speed of phase changes originating from notches in the circulating beams. The theoretical possibility to operate superconducting cavities half-detuned in order to supply reactive power to the beam may also lead to considerable savings in overall power consumption. On the other hand, many challenges are involved with the use of superconducting cavities, such as the delicacy of the superconductive state, the complexity of cryostat design and operation, tuning requirements, sensitivity to vibration, and other issues.

  14. Heteroditopic ligands based on ferrocenyl benzimidazoles fused to an additional diaza heterocyclic ring system.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, María; Sola, Antonia; Caballero, Antonio; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2009-11-21

    The synthesis of ferrocene-based heteroditopic receptors in which the ferrocene moiety is attached to an imidazo[4,5-e]benzothiadiazole or imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline is reported. These nitrogen-rich ferrocene derivatives show remarkable ion-sensing properties because of the presence of the redox active ferrocene unit and the polyazaheteroaromatic ring systems which act as a dual binding site for anions and metal cations. They display an anodic shift of the oxidation wave (DeltaE(1/2) = 67-200 mV) upon complexation with metal cations and a strong cathodic shift (DeltaE(1/2) = -82 to -100 mV) in the presence of F(-) and HP(2)O(7)(3-) anions. For the Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) metal cations tested, the change in the absorption spectra is accompanied by a dramatic colour change which allows the potential for "naked eye" detection.

  15. Comparative investigation of the energetic ion spectra comprising the magnetospheric ring currents of the solar system

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, B H

    2014-01-01

    Investigated here are factors that control the intensities and shapes of energetic ion spectra that make up the ring current populations of the strongly magnetized planets of the solar system, specifically those of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Following a previous and similar comparative investigation of radiation belt electrons, we here turn our attention to ions. Specifically, we examine the possible role of the differential ion Kennel-Petschek limit, as moderated by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, as a standard for comparing the most intense ion spectra within the strongly magnetized planetary magnetospheres. In carrying out this investigation, the substantial complexities engendered by the very different ion composition distributions of these diverse magnetospheres must be addressed, given that the dispersion properties of the EMIC waves are strongly determined by the ion composition of the plasmas within which the waves propagate. Chosen for comparison are the ion spectra within these systems that are the most intense observed, specifically at 100 keV and 1 MeV. We find that Earth and Jupiter are unique in having their most intense ion spectra likely limited and sculpted by the Kennel-Petschek process. The ion spectra of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune reside far below their respective limits and are likely limited by interactions with gas and dust (Saturn) and by the absence of robust ion acceleration processes (Uranus and Neptune). Suggestions are provided for further testing the efficacy of the differential Kennel-Petschek limit for ions using the Van Allen Probes. PMID:26167438

  16. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  17. Accurate ab initio potential energy computations for the H sub 4 system: Tests of some analytic potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Boothroyd, A.I. ); Dove, J.E.; Keogh, W.J. ); Martin, P.G. ); Peterson, M.R. )

    1991-09-15

    The interaction potential energy surface (PES) of H{sub 4} is of great importance for quantum chemistry, as a test case for molecule--molecule interactions. It is also required for a detailed understanding of certain astrophysical processes, namely, collisional excitation and dissociation of H{sub 2} in molecular clouds, at densities too low to be accessible experimentally. Accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} energies were computed for 6046 conformations of H{sub 4}, using a multiple reference (single and) double excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) program. Both systematic and random'' errors were estimated to have an rms size of 0.6 mhartree, for a total rms error of about 0.9 mhartree (or 0.55 kcal/mol) in the final {ital ab} {ital initio} energy values. It proved possible to include in a self-consistent way {ital ab} {ital initio} energies calculated by Schwenke, bringing the number of H{sub 4} conformations to 6101. {ital Ab} {ital initio} energies were also computed for 404 conformations of H{sub 3}; adding {ital ab} {ital initio} energies calculated by other authors yielded a total of 772 conformations of H{sub 3}. (The H{sub 3} results, and an improved analytic PES for H{sub 3}, are reported elsewhere.) {ital Ab} {ital initio} energies are tabulated in this paper only for a sample of H{sub 4} conformations; a full list of all 6101 conformations of H{sub 4} (and 772 conformations of H{sub 3} ) is available from Physics Auxiliary Publication Service (PAPS), or from the authors.

  18. Lab-on-a-chip bio/chemical sensing system based on the liquid core optical ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian M.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Zhu, Hongying; Oveys, Hesam; Brewington, Lee; Gohring, John; Fan, Xudong

    2007-04-01

    The liquid core optical ring resonator (LCORR) sensor is a newly developed capillary-based ring resonator that integrates microfluidics with photonic sensing technology. The circular cross-section of the capillary forms a ring resonator that supports whispering gallery modes (WGM), which interact with the sample as it passes through the capillary. As in previous ring resonator sensor implementations, the interaction between the WGM evanescent field and the sample enables label-free detection. With a prototype of an LCORR sensor, we have achieved a refractive index detection limit of 10-6 RIU and a detection limit for protein of 2 pg/mm2. Several engineering developments have been accomplished as well, including a thermal noise characterization, a thermal stabilization implementation, integration of the LCORR with a planar waveguide array, and electro-kinetic sample delivery. In the near future, the LCORR will be integrated into a dense 2-dimensional sensing array by integrating multiple capillaries with a chip-based waveguide array. This lab-on-a-chip sensing system will have a number of applications, including environmental sensing for defense purposes, disease diagnostics for medical purposes, and as a lab tool for analytical chemistry and molecular analysis.

  19. Ring currents in azulene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, A. T.; Todorov, T. N.; Elena, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a self consistent polarisable ion tight binding theory for the study of push-pull processes in aromatic molecules. We find that the method quantitatively reproduces ab initio calculations of dipole moments and polarisability. We apply the scheme in a simulation which solves the time dependent Schrödinger equation to follow the relaxation of azulene from the second excited to the ground states. We observe rather spectacular oscillating ring currents which we explain in terms of interference between the HOMO and LUMO states.

  20. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  1. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  2. Redesign of solid rocket booster/external tank attachment ring for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    An improved design concept is presented for the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB)/external tank (ET) attachment ring structural component. This component picks up three struts which attach the aft end of each SRB to the ET. The concept is a partial ring with carefully tapered ends to distribute fastener loads safely into the SRB. Extensive design studies and analyses were performed to arrive at the concept. Experiments on structural elements were performed to determine material strength and stiffness characteristics. Materials and fabrication studies were conducted to determine acceptable tolerances for the design concept. An overview is provided of the work along with conclusions and major recommendations.

  3. Host-specific symbiotic requirement of BdeAB, a RegR-controlled RND-type efflux system in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Andrea; Koch, Marion; Pessi, Gabriella; Müller, Andreas J; Balsiger, Sylvia; Hennecke, Hauke; Fischer, Hans-Martin

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug efflux systems not only cause resistance against antibiotics and toxic compounds but also mediate successful host colonization by certain plant-associated bacteria. The genome of the nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum encodes 24 members of the family of resistance/nodulation/cell division (RND) multidrug efflux systems, of which BdeAB is genetically controlled by the RegSR two-component regulatory system. Phylogenetic analysis of the membrane components of these 24 RND-type transporters revealed that BdeB is more closely related to functionally characterized orthologs in other bacteria, including those associated with plants, than to any of the other 23 paralogs in B. japonicum. A mutant with a deletion of the bdeAB genes was more susceptible to inhibition by the aminoglycosides kanamycin and gentamicin than the wild type, and had a strongly decreased symbiotic nitrogen-fixation activity on soybean, but not on the alternative host plants mungbean and cowpea, and only very marginally on siratro. The host-specific role of a multidrug efflux pump is a novel feature in the rhizobia-legume symbioses. Consistent with the RegSR dependency of bdeAB, a B. japonicum regR mutant was found to have a greater sensitivity against the two tested antibiotics and a symbiotic defect that is most pronounced for soybean.

  4. Merging tree ring chronologies and climate system model simulated temperature by optimal interpolation algorithm in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Xing, Pei; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci; Nie, Suping; Huang, Jianbin; Wang, Shaowu; Tian, Qinhua

    2015-04-01

    A new dataset of annual mean surface temperature has been constructed over North America in recent 500 years by performing optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm. Totally, 149 series totally were screened out including 69 tree ring width (MXD) and 80 tree ring width (TRW) chronologies are screened from International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB). The simulated annual mean surface temperature derives from the past1000 experiment results of Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4). Different from existing research that applying data assimilation approach to (General Circulation Models) GCMs simulation, the errors of both the climate model simulation and tree ring reconstruction were considered, with a view to combining the two parts in an optimal way. Variance matching (VM) was employed to calibrate tree ring chronologies on CRUTEM4v, and corresponding errors were estimated through leave-one-out process. Background error covariance matrix was estimated from samples of simulation results in a running 30-year window in a statistical way. Actually, the background error covariance matrix was calculated locally within the scanning range (2000km in this research). Thus, the merging process continued with a time-varying local gain matrix. The merging method (MM) was tested by two kinds of experiments, and the results indicated standard deviation of errors can be reduced by about 0.3 degree centigrade lower than tree ring reconstructions and 0.5 degree centigrade lower than model simulation. During the recent Obvious decadal variability can be identified in MM results including the evident cooling (0.10 degree per decade) in 1940-60s, wherein the model simulation exhibit a weak increasing trend (0.05 degree per decade) instead. MM results revealed a compromised spatial pattern of the linear trend of surface temperature during a typical period (1601-1800 AD) in Little Ice Age, which basically accorded with the phase transitions of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) and

  5. RND type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of pseudomonas aeruginosa selects bacterial languages, 3-oxo-acyl-homoserine lactones, for cell-to-cell communication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteria release a wide variety of small molecules including cell-to-cell signaling compounds. Gram-negative bacteria use a variety of self-produced autoinducers such as acylated homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) as signal compounds for quorum sensing (QS) within and between bacterial species. QS plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and in beneficial symbiosis by responding to acyl-HSLs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is considered that the selection of bacterial languages is necessary to regulate gene expression and thus it leads to the regulation of virulence and provides a growth advantage in several environments. In this study, we hypothesized that RND-type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of P. aeruginosa might function in the selection of acyl-HSLs, and we provide evidence to support this hypothesis. Results Loss of MexAB-OprM due to deletion of mexB caused increases in QS responses, as shown by the expression of gfp located downstream of the lasB promoter and LasB elastase activity, which is regulated by a LasR-3-oxo-C12-HSL complex. Either complementation with a plasmid containing wild-type mexB or the addition of a LasR-specific inhibitor, patulin, repressed these high responses to 3-oxo-acyl-HSLs. Furthermore, it was shown that the acyl-HSLs-dependent response of P. aeruginosa was affected by the inhibition of MexB transport activity and the mexB mutant. The P. aeruginosa MexAB-OprM deletion mutant showed a strong QS response to 3-oxo-C10-HSL produced by Vibrio anguillarum in a bacterial cross-talk experiment. Conclusion This work demonstrated that MexAB-OprM does not control the binding of LasR to 3-oxo-Cn-HSLs but rather accessibility of non-cognate acyl-HSLs to LasR in P. aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM not only influences multidrug resistance, but also selects acyl-HSLs and regulates QS in P. aeruginosa. The results demonstrate a new QS regulation mechanism via the efflux system MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. PMID:22574700

  6. Single bunch injection system for storage ring FEL using an rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, P. G.; Lancaster, J. A.; Madey, J. M. J.; Sachtschale, R.; Jones, R.

    1997-05-01

    RF photoinjectors have gained acceptance as the source of choice for high-brightness electron accelerators, but have been quite expensive to build and difficult to operate. In this paper we describe the successful operation of an inexpensive, simple and reliable rf photoinjector suitable for single bunch injection into storage rings. For optimum storage ring FEL and Compton Backscatter performance, we require that the electrons be injected to specified ring rf buckets and no others. The injector-linac electron gun is a single-cell s-band rf gun with a LaB6 cathode. The gun is followed by an a-magnet momentum filter and buncher. The LaB6 cathode can be operated in a pure thermionic mode, a laser switched photoemission mode, or in a combined mode. The laser is a near-UV TEA nitrogen laser with a 600 ps pulse, and 0-50 Hz repetition rate. We routinely inject 0.1 nC bunches at 270 MeV. The ratio of charge in the primary ring bucket to that in the other buckets is better than 1000.

  7. The gravito-electrodynamics of charged dust in planetary ring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Hill, J. R.; Northrop, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamics of micron and submicron sized dust grains moving under the combined influence of planetary gravitation and the electromagnetic forces within the corotating regions of planetary magnetospheres are discussed. Magnetogravitational capture of charged grains in planetary rings is outlined. The adiabatic motion of charged dust is reviewed.

  8. A permutationally invariant full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface for the abstraction and exchange channels of the H + CH4 system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Xie, Daiqian; Zhang, Dong H; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-28

    We report a permutationally invariant global potential energy surface (PES) for the H + CH4 system based on ∼63,000 data points calculated at a high ab initio level (UCCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ) using the recently proposed permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method. The small fitting error (5.1 meV) indicates a faithful representation of the ab initio points over a large configuration space. The rate coefficients calculated on the PES using tunneling corrected transition-state theory and quasi-classical trajectory are found to agree well with the available experimental and previous quantum dynamical results. The calculated total reaction probabilities (Jtot = 0) including the abstraction and exchange channels using the new potential by a reduced dimensional quantum dynamic method are essentially the same as those on the Xu-Chen-Zhang PES [Chin. J. Chem. Phys. 27, 373 (2014)].

  9. Simulating the Smallest Ring World of Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    A ring system consisting of two dense narrow rings has been discovered around Centaur Chariklo. The existence of these rings around a small object poses various questions about their origin, stability, and lifetime. In order to understand the nature of Chariklo’s rings, we perform global N-body simulations of the self-gravitating collisional particle rings for the first time. We find that Chariklo should be denser than the ring material in order to avoid the rapid diffusion of the rings. If Chariklo is denser than the ring material, fine spiral structures called self-gravity wakes occur in the inner ring. These wakes accelerate the viscous spreading of the ring significantly and typically occur on timescales of about 100 {years} for m-sized ring particles, which is considerably shorter than the timescales suggested in previous studies. The existence of these narrow rings implies smaller ring particles or the existence of shepherding satellites.

  10. Ballistic transport in planetary ring systems due to particle erosion mechanisms. II - Theoretical models for Saturn's A- and B-ring inner edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, Richard H.; Bode, Paul W.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Cederbloom, Steven E.; Murphy, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    The present numerical simulations and analytic arguments show that many of the common morphological features of the Saturn A- and B-ring inner-edge regions are due to 'ballistic transport', or the net radial transport of mass and angular momentum generated by exchanges of meteoroid impact ejecta. It is suggested that the observed 100-km undulatory structure of the inner B-ring arises from ballistic transport echoing of the inner edge. A strongly prograde ejecta-distribution function is used to fit the edge-region features.

  11. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  12. Size effects in Aharonov-Bohm graphene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cong-Hua; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2010-07-01

    Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effects in mesoscopic metal rings have been extensively studied. In this paper, we investigate these effects on the persistent currents (PCs) in a closed graphene ring with broken time-reversal symmetry. A hard boundary condition is introduced to describe the Dirac electrons moving along such a ring-shaped configuration, and then the induced persistent currents are numerically calculated. Differing from the properties of PCs revealed in the metal AB rings, we show that the present PCs neither show the regular saw-tooth-like features nor present the odd-even symmetry of the electron number. More interestingly, we show that the energy difference between the two valleys and the amplitude of the oscillating PCs increase with the decrease (increase) of the radius (width) of the graphene ring. Our results imply that the AB effect and size-dependent PCs in ring-shaped microstructures could be tested at room temperature.

  13. Size effects in Aharonov-Bohm graphene rings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cong-Hua; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2010-07-28

    Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effects in mesoscopic metal rings have been extensively studied. In this paper, we investigate these effects on the persistent currents (PCs) in a closed graphene ring with broken time-reversal symmetry. A hard boundary condition is introduced to describe the Dirac electrons moving along such a ring-shaped configuration, and then the induced persistent currents are numerically calculated. Differing from the properties of PCs revealed in the metal AB rings, we show that the present PCs neither show the regular saw-tooth-like features nor present the odd-even symmetry of the electron number. More interestingly, we show that the energy difference between the two valleys and the amplitude of the oscillating PCs increase with the decrease (increase) of the radius (width) of the graphene ring. Our results imply that the AB effect and size-dependent PCs in ring-shaped microstructures could be tested at room temperature.

  14. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  15. The T2 phase in the Nb-Si-B system studied by ab initio calculations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, J.-M.; Colinet, C.; Rodrigues, G.; Suzuki, P.A.; Nunes, C.A.; Coelho, G.C.; Tedenac, J.-C.

    2012-06-15

    The solid solution based on Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} (Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3} structure type, D8{sub l}, tI32, I4/mcm, No140, a=6.5767 A, c=11.8967 A) in the Nb-Si-B system was studied from the structural and thermodynamic point of view both experimentally and by ab initio calculations. Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray synchrotron data allowed to determine the boron to silicon substitution mechanism and the structural parameters. Ab initio calculations of different ordered compounds and selected disordered alloys allowed to obtain in addition to the enthalpy of formation of the solution, substitution mechanism and structural parameters which are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The stability of the phase is discussed. - Graphial abstract: Valence-charge electron localization function in the z=0 plane of the D8{sub l} structure for the ordered compound Nb{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupling between ab initio data and experimental results from synchrotron powder diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent agreement between the two techniques for the site occupancies and internal coordinates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Explanation of the phase stability up to Nb{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}.

  16. Evaluation of sediment capping with active barrier systems (ABS) using calcite/zeolite mixtures to simultaneously manage phosphorus and ammonium release.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianwei; Zhan, Yanhui; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency and mechanism of sediment capping with an active barrier system (ABS) using calcite/zeolite mixtures to simultaneously prevent phosphorus (P) and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) release from eutrophic lake sediments under anaerobic conditions was investigated through a series of batch and sediment incubation experiments. For this, natural calcite and various zeolites (natural, NaCl-pretreated and CaCl(2)-pretreated zeolites) were applied. Batch tests showed that the calcite was efficient for the removal of phosphate in aqueous solution and the zeolite was an efficient adsorbent for the removal of NH(4)(+) from aqueous solution. Sediment incubation experiments showed that the P and NH(4)(+) fluxes from the anaerobic sediments were significantly reduced by the ABS using the mixture of calcite and natural zeolite. Higher calcite dosage was found to be favorable for the prevention of P release from the sediments using the ABS. For controlling the P release from the sediments, the mixture of calcite and CaCl(2)-pretreated zeolite as a capping material was more efficient than that of calcite and natural zeolite, whereas the mixture of calcite and NaCl-pretreated zeolite was less efficient than that of calcite and natural zeolite. Batch and sediment incubation experiments proved that the zeolite as a component of the ABS using the mixture of calcite and CaCl(2)-pretreated zeolite has a dual function: (i) preventing NH(4)(+) release from the sediments; and (ii) supplying Ca(2+) through a Ca(2+)/NH(4)(+) exchange to improve the ability of the capping material to immobilize P release from the sediments.

  17. A family of ring system-based structural fragments for use in structure-activity studies: database mining and recursive partitioning.

    PubMed

    Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Nunn, David S; Greenblatt, Lynne; Walker, Gary; Haraki, Kevin; Mobilio, Dominick

    2006-01-01

    In earlier work from our laboratory, we have described the use of the ring system and ring scaffold as descriptors. We showed that these descriptors could be used for fast compound clustering, novelty determination, compound acquisition, and combinatorial library design. Here we extend the concept to a whole family of structural descriptors with the ring system as the centerpiece. We show how this simple idea can be used to build powerful search tools for mining chemical databases in useful ways. We have also built recursive partition trees using these fragments as descriptors. We will discuss how these trees can help in analyzing complex structure-activity data.

  18. Macroscopic anatomy of the ringed seal [Pusa (Phoca) hispida] lower respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Smodlaka, H; Henry, R W; Reed, R B

    2009-06-01

    This investigation serves to document the normal anatomical features of the lower respiratory tract of the ringed seal [Pusa (phoca) hispida]. Evaluation of embalmed specimens and tracheobronchial casts showed that the right lung of this seal consists of four lobes while the left has only three lobes. The ventral margins of the lungs do not reach the sternum causing them to form the boundary of the broad recessus costomediastinalis. Lung lobation corresponds with bronchial tree division. Pulmonary venous drainage includes right and left common veins draining ipsilateral cranial and middle lung lobes, and one common caudal vein draining both caudal lobes and the accessory lobe. The right and left pulmonary arteries divide into cranial and caudal branches at the level of the principal bronchus. The ringed seal has three tracheobronchial lymph nodes. The trachea has an average of 87 cartilages that exhibit a pattern of random anastomoses between adjacent rings. The trachea exhibits to a small degree the dorsoventrally flattened pattern that is described in other pinnipeds. The tracheal diameter is smaller than that of the canine.

  19. Synthesis of the new ring system bispyrido[4',3':4,5]pyrrolo [1,2-a:1',2'-d]pyrazine and its deaza analogue.

    PubMed

    Parrino, Barbara; Spanò, Virginia; Carbone, Anna; Barraja, Paola; Diana, Patrizia; Cirrincione, Girolamo; Montalbano, Alessandra

    2014-08-29

    Derivatives of the new ring systems bispyrido[4',3':4,5]pyrrolo[1,2-a:1',2'-d] pyrazine-6,13-dione and its deaza analogue pyrido[4'',3'':4',5']pyrrolo-[1',2':4,5]pyrazino [1,2-a]indole-6,13-dione were conveniently synthesized through a four-step sequence. Symmetrical derivatives of the former ring system were obtained through self condensation. On the other hand, condensation of 6-azaindole carboxylic acid with indole 2-carboxylic acid afforded the deaza analogue ring system. Derivatives of the title ring system were tested by the National Cancer Institute (Bethesda, MD, USA) and four of them exhibited modest activity against MCF7 (a breast cancer cell line) and/or UO-31 (a renal cancer cell line).

  20. Variable diameter CO2 laser ring-cutting system adapted to a zoom microscope for applications on polymer tapes.

    PubMed

    Förster, Erik; Bohnert, Patrick; Kraus, Matthias; Kilper, Roland; Müller, Ute; Buchmann, Martin; Brunner, Robert

    2016-11-20

    This paper presents the conception and implementation of a variable diameter ring-cutting system for a CO2 laser with a working wavelength of 10.6 μm. The laser-cutting system is adapted to an observation zoom microscope for combined use and is applicable for the extraction of small circular areas from polymer films, such as forensic adhesive tapes in a single shot. As an important characteristic for our application, the variable diameter ring-cutting system provides telecentricity in the target area. Ring diameters are continuously tunable between 500 μm and 2 mm. A minimum width of less than 20 μm was found for the ring profile edge. The basic characteristics of the system, including telecentricity, were experimentally evaluated and demonstrated by cutting experiments on different polymer tapes and further exemplary samples.

  1. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  2. Magnetic edge states in Aharonov-Bohm graphene quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Farghadan, R. Heidari Semiromi, E.; Saffarzadeh, A.

    2013-12-07

    The effect of electron-electron interaction on the electronic structure of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) graphene quantum rings (GQRs) is explored theoretically using the single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian and the mean-field Hubbard model. The electronic states and magnetic properties of hexagonal, triangular, and circular GQRs with different sizes and zigzag edge terminations are studied. The results show that, although the AB oscillations in the all types of nanoring are affected by the interaction, the spin splitting in the AB oscillations strongly depends on the geometry and the size of graphene nanorings. We found that the total spin of hexagonal and circular rings is zero and therefore, no spin splitting can be observed in the AB oscillations. However, the non-zero magnetization of the triangular rings breaks the degeneracy between spin-up and spin-down electrons, which produces spin-polarized AB oscillations.

  3. Obtaining detailed structural information about supramolecular systems on surfaces by combining high-resolution force microscopy with ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeki; Sadeghi, Ali; Xu, Feng; Feng, Xu; Peng, Lifen; Lifen, Peng; Pawlak, Rémy; Glatzel, Thilo; Willand, Alexander; Orita, Akihiro; Otera, Junzo; Goedecker, Stefan; Meyer, Ernst

    2013-10-22

    State-of-the art experimental techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy have great difficulties in extracting detailed structural information about molecules adsorbed on surfaces. By combining atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy with ab initio calculations, we demonstrate that we can obtain a wealth of detailed structural information about the molecule itself and its environment. Studying an FFPB molecule on a gold surface, we are able to determine its exact location on the surface, the nature of its bonding properties with neighboring molecules that lead to the growth of one-dimensional strips, and the internal torsions and bendings of the molecule.

  4. Design and system integration of the superconducting wiggler magnets for the Compact Linear Collider damping rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoerling, Daniel; Antoniou, Fanouria; Bernhard, Axel; Bragin, Alexey; Karppinen, Mikko; Maccaferri, Remo; Mezentsev, Nikolay; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Peiffer, Peter; Rossmanith, Robert; Rumolo, Giovanni; Russenschuck, Stephan; Vobly, Pavel; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 and 4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5 TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultralow emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86 GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. This paper describes a technical design concept for the CLIC damping wigglers.

  5. Transition between different quantum states in a mesoscopic system: The superconducting ring

    SciTech Connect

    Horane, E.M.; Castro, J.I.; Buscaglia, G.C.; Lopez, A.

    1996-04-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a superconducting ring, both analytically and numerically, relying upon the Ginzburg-Landau theory. We find that modulated solutions for the order parameter play a role in describing the thermodynamic transitions between consecutive modes of uniform order parameter, associated with different quantum numbers. Exact expressions for these solutions are given in terms of elliptic functions. We identify the family of energy extrema which, being saddle points of the energy in the functional space of the distributions of the order parameter, represent the energy barrier to be overcome for transitions between different solutions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric π-conjugated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Ryohei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Minami, Takuya; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we apply the ab initio molecular orbital - configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the calculation and analysis of the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities (β) of asymmetric π-conjugated molecules. In this approach, we construct the excited state models by the ab initio configuration interaction singles method. Then, time evolutions of system reduced density matrix ρ(t) and system polarization p(t) are calculated by the QME approach. Dynamic β in the second harmonic generation is calculated based on the nonperturbative definition of nonlinear optical susceptibility, using the frequency domain system polarization p(ω). Spatial contributions of electrons to β are analyzed based on the dynamic hyperpolarizability density map, which visualizes the second-order response of charge density oscillating with a frequency of 2ω. We apply the present method to the calculation of the dynamic β of a series of donor/acceptor substituted polyene oligomers, and then discuss the applicability of the MOQME method to the calculation and analysis of dynamic NLO properties of molecular systems.

  7. Modulational instability and higher-order rogue waves with parameters modulation in a coupled integrable AB system via the generalized Darboux transformation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-12-01

    We study higher-order rogue wave (RW) solutions of the coupled integrable dispersive AB system (also called Pedlosky system), which describes the evolution of wave-packets in a marginally stable or unstable baroclinic shear flow in geophysical fluids. We propose its continuous-wave (CW) solutions and existent conditions for their modulation instability to form the rogue waves. A new generalized N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) is proposed in terms of the Taylor series expansion for the spectral parameter in the Darboux matrix and its limit procedure and applied to the CW solutions to generate multi-rogue wave solutions of the coupled AB system, which satisfy the general compatibility condition. The dynamical behaviors of these higher-order rogue wave solutions demonstrate both strong and weak interactions by modulating parameters, in which some weak interactions can generate the abundant triangle, pentagon structures, etc. Particularly, the trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first-order RWs are explicitly analyzed. The generalized DT method used in this paper can be extended to other nonlinear integrable systems. These results may be useful for understanding the corresponding rogue-wave phenomena in fluid mechanics and related fields.

  8. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  9. Comparing the performance of multiple imaging systems with Fabry-Perot interferometers, concentric ring masks, and diffractive multifocal lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedukhin, Andrey G.

    2007-06-01

    Based on the conditions of alowable angular sampling of interfering waves, monochromatic multiple imaging systems with replicating spatial-frequency filters in the form of Fabry-Perot Interferometers, concentric ring masks, and diffractive multifocal lenses are compared with each other in their performance. Though these systems are shown to realize the same effect of multiple equidistant imaging, the forms of manifestation of the effect are not identical due to the difference in spectral content of the wave fields produced by the systems. The most perfect systems are found to be those with pure-phase diffractive multifocal lenses. First of all, they benefits from the extremely high total light efficiency and the sharply defined longitudinal localization of the visualized object space defined by the efficient focal depth. This enhances considerably the brightness of reproduced images and decreases their parasitic diffraction dispersion, background noise, and blurring.

  10. Transient electric current through an Aharonov-Bohm ring after switching of a two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen

    2002-05-01

    The response of the electronic current through an Aharonov-Bohm ring after a two-level-system is switched on is calculated perturbatively by use of a nonequilibrium Green function. In the ballistic case the amplitude of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation is shown to decay to a new equilibrium value due to scattering into other electronic states. The relaxation of the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillation in the diffusive case, due to the dephasing effect, is also calculated. The time scale of the relaxation is determined by characteristic relaxation times of the system and the splitting of a two-level-system. The oscillation phase is not affected. Experimental studies of current response would give us direct information about characteristic times of mesoscopic systems.

  11. "Propellers" in Saturns Rings? The missing Link?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, F.; Salo, H.; Schmidt, J.; Seiss, M.; Sremcevic, M.

    To date it is not clear how planetary rings have formed. Have they either accreted cogenetically with their central planet and its satellite system or has a catastrophic disruption of a parent body (satellite, comet) created these magnificent cosmic structures? Based upon dynamical arguments the former scenario would ab initio exclude the existence of boulders larger than a few 10 meters in diameter because they cannot stand the planet's tides and collisions. Consequently, if there were such moonlets with sizes between 50 meters up to few kilometers in diameter in the rings a strong argument pro the hypothesis of a "violent birth" of these cosmic disks would have been found! In order to improve or even enable the detectability of such moonlets, we have modeled structures created by such larger ring boulders. We derived a hydrodynamical model describing the combination of counteracting processes of gravitational scattering and nonlinear viscous diffusion. A formation of a "propeller-shaped" structure (Spahn & Sremcevic; A&A 358 (2000), 368) interfered with density wakes have been obtained which scale in radial direction with the Hill radius and azimuthally with the ratio of mass to viscosity of the ring material (Sremcevic et al.; MNRAS 337 (2002), 1139). The formation of the "propellers" flanked by density wakes have been confirmed by numerical particle simulations (Seiss et al. GRL 32 (2005)). These results have been used to search for small embedded satellites in Saturn's rings in the Cassini imaging data (ISS). Two kilometer sized moonlets have already been detected in Saturn's A ring - Pan and Daphnis - which both show all essential density features and scalings. However, these two isolated,large ring-boulders cannot serve yet as a proof for an extended size-distribution which is expected to result from a catastrophic disruption of an icy satellite. The detection of four "Propellers" pointing to moonlets of ca. 40 - 120 metres in size by Tiscareno et al

  12. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L.; Kay, Steven M.; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback. PMID:22772373

  13. Explicitly-correlated ring-coupled-cluster-doubles theory: Including exchange for computations on closed-shell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Holzer, Christof; Klopper, Wim

    2016-11-01

    Random-phase-approximation (RPA) methods have proven to be powerful tools in electronic-structure theory, being non-empirical, computationally efficient and broadly applicable to a variety of molecular systems including small-gap systems, transition-metal compounds and dispersion-dominated complexes. Applications are however hindered due to the slow basis-set convergence of the electron-correlation energy with the one-electron basis. As a remedy, we present approximate explicitly-correlated RPA approaches based on the ring-coupled-cluster-doubles formulation including exchange contributions. Test calculations demonstrate that the basis-set convergence of correlation energies is drastically accelerated through the explicitly-correlated approach, reaching 99% of the basis-set limit with triple-zeta basis sets. When implemented in close analogy to early work by Szabo and Ostlund [36], the new explicitly-correlated ring-coupled-cluster-doubles approach including exchange has the perspective to become a valuable tool in the framework of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) for the computation of dispersion energies of molecular complexes of weakly interacting closed-shell systems.

  14. High-throughput ClonePix FL analysis of mAb-expressing clones using the UCOE expression system.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Hughes, Ben S; Smede, Matthew; Leung, Kar Man; Levine, Kara; Rigby, Susan; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P

    2014-05-25

    Therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are commonly produced by high-expressing, clonal, mammalian cells. Creation of these clones for manufacturing remains heavily reliant on stringent selection and gene amplification, which in turn can lead to genetic instability, variable expression, product heterogeneity and prolonged development timelines. Inclusion of cis-acting ubiquitous chromatin opening elements (UCOE™) in mammalian expression vectors has been shown to improve productivity and facilitate high-level gene expression irrespective of the chromosomal integration site without lengthy gene amplification protocols. In this study we have used high-throughput robotic clone selection in combination with UCOE™ containing expression vectors to develop a rapid, streamlined approach for early-stage cell line development and isolation of high-expressing clones for mAb production using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to go from transfection to stable clones in only 4 weeks, while achieving specific productivities exceeding 20 pg/cell/day. Furthermore, we have used this approach to quickly screen several process-crucial parameters including IgG subtype, enhancer-promoter combination and UCOE™ length. The use of UCOE™-containing vectors in combination with automated robotic selection provides a rapid method for the selection of stable, high-expressing clones.

  15. Ab initio description of continuum effects in A=11 exotic systems with chiral NN+3N forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calci, Angelo; Navratil, Petr; Roth, Robert; Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Based on the fundamental symmetries of QCD, chiral effective field theory (EFT) provides two- (NN), three- (3N) and many-nucleon interactions in a consistent and systematically improvable scheme. The rapid developments to construct divers families of chiral NN+3N interactions and the conceptual and technical improvements of ab initio many-body approaches pose a great opportunity for nuclear physics. By studying particular interesting phenomena in nuclear structure and reaction observables one can discriminate between different forces and study the predictive power of chiral EFT. The accurate description of the 11Be nucleus, in particular, the ground-state parity inversion and exceptionally strong E1 transition between its two bound states constitute an enormous challenge for the developments of nuclear forces and many-body approaches. We present a sensitivity analysis of structure and reaction observables to different NN+3N interactions in 11Be and n+10Be as well as the mirror p+10C scattering using the ab initio NCSM with continuum (NCSMC). Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Work Proposal No. SCW1158. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  16. Commissioning results of the narrow-band beam position monitor system upgrade in the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.

    1999-04-20

    When using a low emittance storage ring as a high brightness synchrotron radiation source, it is critical to maintain a very high degree of orbit stability, both for the short term and for the duration of an operational fill. A fill-to-fill reproducibility is an additional important requirement. Recent developments in orbit correction algorithms have provided tools that are capable of achieving a high degree of orbit stability. However, the performance of these feedback systems can be severely limited if there are errors in the beam position monitors (BPMs). The present orbit measurement and correction system at the APS storage ring utilizes 360 broad-band-type BPMs that provide turn-by-turn diagnostics and an ultra-stable orbit: < 1.8 micron rms vertically and 4.5 microns rms horizontally in a frequency band of 0.017 to 30 Hz. The effects of beam intensity and bunch pattern dependency on these BPMs have been significantly reduced by employing offset compensation correction. Recently, 40 narrow-band switching-type BPMs have been installed in the APS storage ring, two in each of 20 operational insertion device straight sections, bringing the total number of beam position monitors to 400. The use of narrow-band BPM electronics is expected to reduce sensitivity to beam intensity, bunch pattern dependence, and long-term drift. These beam position monitors are used for orbit correction/feedback and machine protection interlocks for the insertion device beamlines. The commissioning results and overall performance for orbit stability are provided.

  17. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  18. Probing the dynamics of Andreev states in a coherent Normal/Superconducting ring

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, F.; Ferrier, M.; Tikhonov, K.; Virtanen, P.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Feigelman, M.; Guéron, S.; Bouchiat, H.

    2011-01-01

    The supercurrent that establishes between two superconductors connected through a normal N mesoscopic link is carried by quasiparticule states localized within the link, the “Andreev bound states (ABS)”. Whereas the dc properties of this supercurrent in SNS junctions are now well understood, its dynamical properties are still an unresolved issue. In this letter we probe this dynamics by inductively coupling an NS ring to a multimode superconducting resonator, thereby implementing both a phase bias and current detection at high frequency. Whereas at very low temperatures we essentially measure the phase derivative of the supercurrent, at higher temperature we find a surprisingly strong frequency dependence in the current response of the ring: the ABS do not follow adiabatically the phase modulation. This experiment also illustrates a new tool to probe the fundamental time scales of phase coherent systems that are decoupled from macroscopic normal contacts and thermal baths. PMID:22355522

  19. Probing the dynamics of Andreev states in a coherent normal/superconducting ring.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, F; Ferrier, M; Tikhonov, K; Virtanen, P; Heikkilä, T T; Feigelman, M; Guéron, S; Bouchiat, H

    2011-01-01

    The supercurrent that establishes between two superconductors connected through a normal N mesoscopic link is carried by quasiparticule states localized within the link, the "Andreev bound states (ABS)". Whereas the dc properties of this supercurrent in SNS junctions are now well understood, its dynamical properties are still an unresolved issue. In this letter we probe this dynamics by inductively coupling an NS ring to a multimode superconducting resonator, thereby implementing both a phase bias and current detection at high frequency. Whereas at very low temperatures we essentially measure the phase derivative of the supercurrent, at higher temperature we find a surprisingly strong frequency dependence in the current response of the ring: the ABS do not follow adiabatically the phase modulation. This experiment also illustrates a new tool to probe the fundamental time scales of phase coherent systems that are decoupled from macroscopic normal contacts and thermal baths.

  20. Tracing water ice and chromophores across Saturn's moons and rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Hedman, M. M.; Buratti, B. J.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    The radial distribution of surface water ice and chromophores across Saturn's rings, regular and minor satellites is traced using Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) data. Reflectance spectra of these different objects are analyzed and clustered in spectral classes using specific VIS-IR indicators applied to VIMS datasets (Filacchione et al., 2012). Specifically, we report about the results retrieved from the analysis of about 3,000 disk-integrated observations of the icy satellites and ten ring's radial mosaics. Surface compositions and regolith properties are inferred through the comparison with laboratory and synthetic spectra of analogue icy materials. For each target it is essential to process as many observations taken at different illumination conditions as possible, in order to decouple the phase response from spectral analysis for both spectral slopes and band depth: we have observed infact a significant reduction in band depth at low phases caused by multiple scattering, which dominates single scattering on the continuum wings. Rings spectra appear more red than the icy satellites in the visible range but show more intense 1.5-2.0 micron band depths (Cuzzi et al., 2009, 2010). Chromophores mixed in ice are constrained thanks to their characteristic reddening shown at visible wavelengths (Nicholson et al., 2008). With the exclusion of Phoebe and the dark material coating Iapetus' leading hemisphere (Clark et al., 2012), VIMS data display that the water ice radial distribution, traced using the 1.5-2.0 micron band depths, is almost constant across the entire saturnian system and reaches maximum abundances on A-B rings and Calypso. The maximum visual reddening is measured across the A-B rings and on Rhea and Hyperion. Moreover our analysis allows us to recognize several other specific effects characterizing the saturnian population, like: 1) the dichotomy between regular satellites leading and trailing hemispheres caused by the

  1. The electronic properties of concentric double quantum ring and possibility designing XOR gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Badry, Lafy. F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper I have investigated the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation in concentric double quantum ring. The outer ring attached to leads while the inner ring only tunnel-coupled to the outer ring. The effect of inner ring on electron transport properties through outer ring studied and found that the conductance spectrum consists of two types of oscillations. One is the normal Aharonov-Bohm oscillation, and other is a small oscillations superposed above AB oscillation. The AB oscillation utilized to designing nanoscale XOR gate by choosing the magnetic flux and tuning the gate voltages which realization XOR gate action.

  2. Ring Enlargement of Three-Membered Boron Heterocycles upon Reaction with Organic π Systems: Implications for the Trapping of Borylenes.

    PubMed

    Krasowska, Małgorzata; Bettinger, Holger F

    2016-07-18

    New low-energy pathways for the reaction between substituted boriranes and borirenes with unsaturated hydrocarbons (ethyne or ethene) were discovered using density functional and coupled cluster theory. The interaction between the π bond of the hydrocarbon and the empty p orbital of the boron center leads to ring expansion of the three-membered to a five-membered boron heterocycle. The reactions are strongly exothermic and have low or even no barriers. They involve intermediates with a pentacoordinate boron center with two hydrocarbon molecules coordinating to boron akin to metal-olefin complexes. These borylene complexes are shallow minima on the potential energy surfaces. But significantly higher barriers for ring formation are computed for 1,5-cyclooctadiene and dibenzocyclooctatetraene complexes of borylenes, making these complexes likely detectable under appropriate experimental conditions. Our computational findings have implications for the interpretation of trapping experiments of thermally generated small borylenes with excess of small π systems. Because of very low barriers for reactions of three-membered boron heterocycles with π systems and the at least locally large excess of the latter under such conditions, formation of five-membered boron heterocycles should be considered.

  3. Flex-gear power transmission system for transmitting EMF between Sun and ring gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plurality of flexible cylindrical members, termed flex-gears and having gear tooth type perimeters are located in an annular space between two concentric rotating gear members, one an inner gear member and the other an outer ring gear member, both of which have mutually facing toothed surfaces which engage the flex-gears. The flex-gears rotate and orbit around the annular space as planetary gears when the inner and outer gear members rotate with respect to one another. Pairs of these elements located in two mutually parallel planes and separated by insulators provide two electrical conductor paths across which an electrical signal source, AC or DC, can be connected and coupled to an electrical device. Alternatively, one set of elements including outer gears segmented into mutually insulated semicircles and inner gears segmented into mutually insulated quadrants can be used.

  4. UHV seal studies for the advanced photon source storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Gonczy, J.D.; Ferry, R.J.; Niemann, R.C.; Roop, B.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Storage Ring Vacuum Chambers (SRVC) are constructed of aluminum. The chamber design incorporates aluminum alloy 2219-T87 Conflat flanges welded to an aluminum alloy 6063-T5 extruded chamber body. Vacuum connections to the aluminum Conflat chamber flanges are by means of 304 stainless steel Conflat flanges. To evaluate the Conflat seal assemblies relative to vacuum bake cycles, a Conflat Bake Test Assembly (CBTA) was constructed, and thermal cycling tests were performed between room temperature and 150{degrees}C on both stainless steel to aluminum Conflat assemblies and aluminum to aluminum Conflat assemblies. A Helicoflex Bake Test Assembly (HBTA) was similarly constructed to evaluate Helicoflex seals. Both Conflat and Helicoflex seals were studied in a SRVC Sector String Test arrangement of five SRVC sections. The CBTA, HBTA and SRVC tests and their results are reported. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Comparative analysis of MazEF and HicAB toxin-antitoxin systems of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Akhilesh A; Raghavan, Prashanth S; Shelke, Ashwini; Nikam, T D; Rajaram, Hema

    2017-01-01

    Anabaena PCC7120 has two annotated toxin-antitoxin systems: MazEF and HicAB. Overexpression of either of the toxins severely inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli BL21(plysS)(DE3). Of the two Anabaena toxins, MazF exhibited higher toxicity than HicA as evidenced by (i) 100-fold lower viability upon overexpression of MazF compared to HicA; (ii) complete loss of cell viability within 1 h of induction of MazF expression, as against >10(3) colony forming units mL(-1) in case of HicA; (iii) inability to maintain the MazF overexpressing plasmid in E. coli cells; and (iv) neutralisation of the toxin was effective at the molar ratio of 1:1.9 for MazF:MazE and 13:1 for HicA:HicB, indicating higher antitoxin requirement for neutralisation of MazF. The growth inhibitory effect of MazF was found to be higher in lag phase cultures compared to mid-logarithmic phase cultures of E. coli, while the reverse was true for HicA. The results suggest possible distinct roles for MazEF and HicAB systems of Anabaena.

  6. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  7. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  8. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  9. The orbits of the uranian satellites and rings, the gravity field of the uranian system, and the orientation of the pole of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    French et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian rings, the orientation of the pole of Uranus, and the gravity harmonics of Uranus from Earth-based and Voyager ring occultations. Jacobson et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian satellites and the masses of Uranus and its satellites from Earth-based astrometry and observations acquired with the Voyager 2 spacecraft; they used the gravity harmonics and pole from French et al. Jacobson and Rush reconstructed the Voyager 2 trajectory and redetermined the Uranian system gravity parameters, satellite orbits, and ring orbits in a combined analysis of the data used previously augmented with additional Earth-based astrometry. Here we report on an extension of that work that incorporates additional astrometry and ring occultations together with improved data processing techniques.

  10. Cyclopropane-ring formation in the acyl groups of chlorosome glycolipids is crucial for acid resistance of green bacterial antenna systems.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Harada, Jiro; Takasaki, Shin; Yoshitomi, Taichi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria have unique light-harvesting antenna systems called chlorosomes. Chlorobaculum tepidum, a model organism of the bacteria, biosynthesized monogalactosyl- and rhamnosylgalactosyldiacylglycerides possessing a methylene-bridged palmitoleyl group characterized by a cis-substituted cyclopropane ring as the dominant glycolipids of its chlorosome surface. The formation of the cyclopropane ring was chemically inhibited by supplementation of sinefungin, an analog of S-adenosyl-L-methionine, into the bacterial cultivation. The presence of the cyclopropane ring reinforced acid resistance of the light-harvesting chlorosomes and suppressed acidic demetalation (pheophytinization) of bacteriochlorophyll-c pigments constructing the core part of chlorosomes. The ring-formation would represent direct and post-synthetic modifications of chlorosome membrane properties and was tolerant of acidic environments.

  11. In-situ calibration: migrating control system IP module calibration from the bench to the storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Jonah M.; Chin, Michael

    2002-04-30

    The Control System for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) uses in-house designed IndustryPack(registered trademark) (IP) modules contained in compact PCI (cPCI) crates with 16-bit analog I/O to control instrumentation. To make the IP modules interchangeable, each module is calibrated for gain and offset compensation. We initially developed a method of verifying and calibrating the IP modules in a lab bench test environment using a PC with LabVIEW. The subsequent discovery that the ADCs have significant drift characteristics over periods of days of installed operation prompted development of an ''in-situ'' calibration process--one in which the IP modules can be calibrated without removing them from the cPCI crates in the storage ring. This paper discusses the original LabVIEW PC calibration and the migration to the proposed in-situ EPICS control system calibration.

  12. Saturn's ``Gossamer'' Ring: The F Ring's Inner Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    Recent Galileo and Earth-based images have revealed for the first time that Jupiter's ``gossamer'' ring is actually composed of two rings, one bounded at the outer edge by Amalthea and the other bounded by Thebe. Dynamical models suggest that these rings are composed of dust grains ejected off the surfaces of the two moons, which then evolve inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. A very faint sheet of material filling the region between Saturn's A and F Rings reported by Burns et al. (BAAS 15, 1013--1014, 1983) may be a dynamically analogous system, in which dust escapes from the F Ring and evolves inward to the A Ring. Unlike Jupiter's gossamer rings, however, the inner sheet of Saturn's F Ring has been well observed from a large range of phase angles and visual wavelengths by Voyager. Voyager images reveal that this faint ring shows a tenfold increase in brightness between phase angles of 125(deg) and 165(deg) , indicating that it is composed of fine dust microns in size. Preliminary estimates of the normal optical depth fall in the range 1--2*E(-4) , depending on the dust size distribution assumed. Initial spectrophotometry reveals that the ring is neutral in color. The ring is uniform in brightness over the entire region between the two rings, with no evidence for internal structure associated with Prometheus and Atlas, suggesting that neither of these embedded moons acts as either a source or a sink. We will refine the aforementioned measurements and develop photometric models to better constrain the properties of the dust in this ring. This will enable us to relate the dust population to that in the F Ring proper, and to better explore the dynamical processes at work.

  13. Investigation of factors affecting loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixator systems at the bone-wire interface.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Pankaj, Pankaj; Simpson, A Hamish R W

    2012-05-01

    The potential for peri-implant bone yielding and subsequent loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixation systems was investigated using non-linear finite element (FE) analyses. A strain-based plasticity model was employed to simulate bone yielding. FE models also incorporated contact behavior at the wire-bone interface, orthotropic elasticity, and periosteal-endosteal variation of bone properties. These simulations were used to determine the extent and location of yielding with change in age-related bone structure and properties for the bone-Ilizarov construct at the tibial midshaft. At critical wire-bone interfaces, the predicted volume of yielded bone with four wires (on either side of the fracture) was ∼40% of that with two wires. Old-aged cases showed considerably greater bone yielding at the wire-bone interface than young cases (1.7-2.2 times greater volumes of yielded bone). The volume of yielded bone at all wire-bone interfaces decreased with an increase in wire pre-tension. The absence of continuous through-thickness yielding offers an explanation for the clinical observation that Ilizarov ring-wire fixation can provide stable fracture fixation even in bone with high porosity.

  14. Understanding the Dynamics of the Coupled Ring Current Radiation Belt System Using 4D VERB Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Drozdov, A.; Orlova, K.; Spasojevic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting and understanding the non-linear response of different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere, including ring current and higher energy radiation belts, has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. During this past decade, there have been a number of long-term simulations that used lower energy boundary condition observations around geosynchronous orbit. In this study, we set up observations at around 15 RE and study how the combined convective-diffusive transport can result in the acceleration of keV to relativistic and ultra-relativistic energies. We show that while lower energy radial transport is dominated by the convection, higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. MLT dependent diffusion confidents allow us to study how difference in wave properties at different MLT can influence the dynamics of the particles. Inclusion of adiabatic changes also allows us to study the radial transport that results from pitch-angle scattering and adiabatic changes. We also show that there exists an intermediate range of energies for electrons for which both processes work simultaneously. We show the comparison of the 4D VERB simulations with the Van Allen Probes measurements.

  15. Study of photon–magnon coupling in a YIG-film split-ring resonant system

    SciTech Connect

    Bhoi, B.; Aiyar, R.; Cliff, T.; Maksymov, I. S.; Kostylev, M.; Venkataramani, N.; Prasad, S.; Stamps, R. L.

    2014-12-28

    By using the stripline Microwave Vector–Network Analyser Ferromagnetic Resonance and Time Domain spectroscopy techniques, we study a strong coupling regime of magnons to microwave photons in the planar geometry of a lithographically formed split-ring resonator (SRR) loaded by a single-crystal epitaxial yttrium–iron–garnet (YIG) film. Strong anti-crossing of the photon modes of SRR and of the magnon modes of the YIG film is observed in the applied-magnetic-field resolved measurements. The coupling strength extracted from the experimental data reaches 9% at 3 GHz. Theoretically, we propose an equivalent circuit model of the SRR loaded by a magnetic film. This model follows from the results of our numerical simulations of the microwave field structure of the SRR and of the magnetisation dynamics in the YIG film driven by the microwave currents in the SRR. The results obtained with the equivalent-circuit model are in good agreement with the experiment. This model provides a simple physical explanation of the process of mode anti-crossing. Our findings are important for future applications in microwave quantum photonic devices as well as in nonlinear and magnetically tuneable metamaterials exploiting the strong coupling of magnons to microwave photons.

  16. Effects of pressure anisotropy on magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium of an internal ring current system

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, M.

    2014-01-15

    Effects of pressure anisotropy on magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium are studied analytically and numerically, where the plasma is confined by only poloidal magnetic field generated by an internal ring current. The plasma current due to finite pressure can be divided into two components; one remains at isotropic pressure and the other arises from pressure anisotropy. When p{sub ⊥}, the pressure perpendicular to the magnetic field, is larger than p{sub ∥}, the pressure parallel to the magnetic field, those two components of plasma current tend to cancel each other to reduce the total amount of plasma current. Equilibrium beta limit is also examined, where the beta is a ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure. The equilibrium beta limit decreases as the pressure anisotropy becomes strong. The beta value is strictly limited by ellipticity of the equilibrium equation when p{sub ∥}>p{sub ⊥}. On the other hand, when p{sub ⊥}>p{sub ∥}, although the tendency of the beta limit agrees with the ellipticity condition of the equilibrium equation, equilibria with a hyperbolic region can be obtained by iterative procedure with practically reasonable convergence criteria.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope faint object spectrograph Quasar Absorption System Snapshot Survey (AbSnap). 1: Astrometric optical positions and finding charts of 269 bright QSO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, David V.; Osmer, Samantha J.; Blades, J. Chris; Tytler, David; Cottrell, Lance; Fan, Xiao-Ming; Lanzetta, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    We present finding charts and optical positions accurate to less than 1 arcsec for 269 bright (V less than or = 18.5) Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs). These objects were selected as candidates for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Quasar Absorption System Snapshot Survey (AbSnap), a program designed to use the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) to obtain short exposure ultraviolet (UV) spectra of bright QSOs. Many quasars were included because of their proximity to bright, low redshift galaxies and positions of these QSOs are measured accurately for the first time. Data were obtained using the digitized sky survey produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute's Guide Stars Selection System Astrometric Support Program.

  18. A Search for Rings, Moons, or Debris in the Pluto System during the 2006 July 12 Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Babcock, B. A.; Souza, S. P.; Gangestad, J. W.; Jaskot, A. E.; Elliot, J. L.; Gulbis, A. A.; Person, M. J.; Kramer, E. A.; Adams, E. R.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Pike, R. E.; Francis, P. J.; Lucas, R.; Bosh, A. S.; Ramm, D. J.; Greenhill, J. G.; Giles, A. B.; Dieters, S. W.

    2006-09-01

    We examined our data runs from four sites for the 2006 July 12 occultation of the star P384.2 (McDonald & Elliot, AJ 120, 1599, 2000; UCAC2 26039859), to search for moons, rings, or other debris in the Pluto system. Our data runs extended 80 minutes, or 115,200 km. Motivated by the discovery of P1 (Hydra) and P2 (Nix), each approximately 50 km in diameter and thought to result from the same collision that formed Charon, S. A. Stern et al. (Nature 439, 946-948, 2006) suggested that such matter might be detectable. Though their first estimate was unobservably low at 5×10-6, it could change by a factor of 10,000 or more in either direction (Stern, private communication). Our cloudless data sets, in declining order of S/N, used our Portable Occultation, Eclipse, and Transit Systems (POETS; Souza et al., in preparation) and include those from the 2.3-m ANU telescope at Siding Spring, Australia; 0.8-m Black Springs telescope near Adelaide, and the 1.8-m EOS telescope at Mt. Stromlo; though the atmospheric observation time at the 1-m Mt. Canopus Telescope at Hobart could be recovered from the comparison stars, cloudy intervals prevent full recovery during the ring/debris possible interval. Our observing with the 1-m Mt. John University Observatory in New Zealand was rendered impossible by the lack of electricity resulting from a major snowstorm. For the ring/debris search, we also evaluated data from past Pluto (Pasachoff et al., AJ 129, 1718-1723, 2005) and Charon (Gulbis et al., Nature 439, 48-51, 2006) occultations. See also Elliot et al. and Gulbis et al. (this meeting). We thank Ian Ritchie of Electro Optic Systems (Mt. Stromlo Observatory), Ian Bedford, Lyndon Hemer, and Fraser Farrell (Black Springs Observatory), and Blair Lade (Stockport Observatory). This work was partially supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy Grants NNH04ZSS001N, NNG04GE48G, and NNG04GF25G.

  19. Passivation process and the mechanism of packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system during the treatment of ABS resin wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling; Zhang, Yunhong; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    This study provides mechanistic insights into the passivation of the packing particles during the treatment of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin wastewater by the Fe0/GAC system. The granular-activated carbon (GAC) and iron chippings (Fe0) were mixed together with a volumetric ratio of 1:1. GAC has a mean particle size of approximately 3-5 mm, a specific surface of 748 m2 g(-1), a total pore volume of 0.48 mL g(-1) and a bulk density of 0.49 g cm(-3). The iron chippings have a compact and non-porous surface morphology. The results show that the packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system would lose their activity because the removal of TOC and PO4(3-) for ABS resin wastewater could not carried out by the Fe0/GAC system after 40 days continuous running. Meanwhile, the availability of O2 and intrinsic reactivity of Fe0 play a key role on the form of passive film with different iron oxidation states. The passive film on the surface of iron chippings was formed by two phases: (a) local corrosion phase (0-20 d) and (b) co-precipitation phase (20-40 d), while that of GAC was mainly formed by the co-precipitation of corrosion products with SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) because SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) would not easily reach the Fe0 surface. Therefore, in order to avoid the occurrence of filler passivation, high concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) in wastewater should be removed before the treatment process of the Fe/GAC system.

  20. Coupling of complex aromatic ring vibrations to solvent through hydrogen bonds: effect of varied on-ring and off-ring hydrogen-bonding substitutions.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Scott, J Nathan; Vanderkooi, Jane M

    2008-04-03

    In this study, we examine the coupling of a complex ring vibration to solvent through hydrogen-bonding interactions. We compare phenylalanine, tyrosine, l-dopa, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and hydroxyl-dl-dopa, a group of physiologically important small molecules that vary by single differences in H-bonding substitution. By examination of the temperature dependence of infrared absorptions of these molecules, we show that complex, many-atom vibrations can be coupled to solvent through hydrogen bonds and that the extent of that coupling is dependent on the degree of both on- and off-ring H-bonding substitution. The coupling is seen as a temperature-dependent frequency shift in infrared spectra, but the determination of the physical origin of that shift is based on additional data from temperature-dependent optical experiments and ab initio calculations. The optical experiments show that these small molecules are most sensitive to their immediate H-bonding environment rather than to bulk solvent properties. Ab initio calculations demonstrate H-bond-mediated vibrational coupling for the system of interest and also show that the overall small molecule solvent dependence is determined by a complex interplay of specific interactions and bulk solvation characteristics. Our findings indicate that a full understanding of biomolecule vibrational properties must include consideration of explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions with the surrounding microenvironment.

  1. The ABC transporter HrtAB confers resistance to hemin toxicity and is regulated in a hemin-dependent manner by the ChrAS two-component system in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Lori A; Schmitt, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the causative agent of the severe respiratory disease diphtheria, utilizes hemin and hemoglobin as iron sources for growth in iron-depleted environments. Because of the toxicity of high levels of hemin and iron, these compounds are often tightly regulated in bacterial systems. In this report, we identify and characterize the C. diphtheriae hrtAB genes, which encode a putative ABC type transporter involved in conferring resistance to the toxic effects of hemin. Deletion of the hrtAB genes in C. diphtheriae produced increased sensitivity to hemin, which was complemented by a plasmid harboring the cloned hrtAB locus. The HrtAB system was not involved in the uptake and use of hemin as an iron source. The hrtAB genes are located on the C. diphtheriae genome upstream from the chrSA operon, which encodes a previously characterized two-component signal transduction system that regulates gene expression in a heme-dependent manner. The hrtB promoter is activated by the ChrAS system in the presence of hemin or hemoglobin, and mutations in the chrSA genes abolish heme-activated expression from the hrtB promoter. It was also observed that transcription from the hrtB promoter is reduced in a dtxR deletion mutant, suggesting that DtxR is required for optimal expression of hrtAB. Previous studies proposed that the ChrS sensor kinase may be responsive to an environmental signal, such as hemin. We show that specific point mutations in the ChrS N-terminal transmembrane domain result in a reduced ability to activate the hrtB promoter in the presence of a heme source, suggesting that this putative sensor region is essential for the detection of a signal produced in response to hemin exposure. This study shows that the HrtAB system is required for protection from hemin toxicity and that expression of the hrtAB genes is regulated by the ChrAS two-component system. This study demonstrates a direct correlation between the detection of heme or a heme

  2. Cooperative activation of cyclobutanones and olefins leads to bridged ring systems by a catalytic [4 + 2] coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Haye Min; Dong, Guangbin

    2014-08-01

    Bridged ring systems are widely found in natural products, and successful syntheses of them frequently feature intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions. These reactions are subclassified as either type I or type II depending on how the diene motif is tethered to the rest of the substrate (type I are tethered at the 1-position of the diene and type II at the 2-position). Although the type I reaction has been used with great success, the molecular scaffolds accessible by the type II reactions are limited by the strain inherent in the formation of an sp2 carbon at a bridgehead position. Here, we describe a complementary approach that provides access to these structures through the C-C activation of cyclobutanones and their coupling with olefins. Various alkenes have been coupled with cyclobutanones to provide a range of bridged skeletons. The ketone group of the products serves as a convenient handle for downstream functionalization.

  3. Flexure-Ring for Centering a Concave Lens in a Bore of a Housing for an Optical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Virginia G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A flexure-ring is provided for centering a lens in a bore of a housing with 3N lens contacting stubs, where N is an integer equal to or greater than one. The stubs are formed by increasing the inside diameter of the ring made to fit tightly around a lens except at 3N locations for the aforesaid stubs, and said ring having an outside diameter made to fit tightly inside the housing bore locations. Behind each stub, a segment of the ring is removed down to a chord perpendicular to a ring diameter passing through the center of each stub. That chord is selected to have a length greater than the lens contacting surface of the stub, thereby to produce a reduced cross section of the ring on both sides of the stub to serve as flexures in relieving stresses due to different coefficients of thermal expansion of the three parts involved due to changes in temperature while in use.

  4. Removal of copper and iron by polyurethane foam column in FIA system for the determination of nickel in pierced ring.

    PubMed

    Vongboot, Monnapat; Suesoonthon, Monrudee

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) mini-column was used to eliminate copper and iron for the determination of nickel in pierced rings. The PUF mini-column was connected to FIA system for on-line sorption of copper and iron in complexes form of CuSCN(+) and FeSCN(2+). For this season, the acid solution containing a mixture of Ni(II), Fe(III), Cu(II) and SCN(-) ions was firstly flew into the PUF column. Then, the percolated solution which Fe(III) and Cu(II) ions is separated from analysis was injected into FIA system to react with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) reagent in basic condition which this method is called pH gradient technique. The Ni-PAR complexes obtained were measured theirs absorbance at 500 nm by UV visible spectrophotometer. In this study, it was found that Cu(II) and Fe(III) were completely to form complexes with 400 mmol/L KSCN and entirely to eliminate in acidic condition at pH 3.0. In the optimum condition of these experiments, the method provided the linear relationship between absorbance and the concentration of Ni(II) in the range from 5.00 to 30.00 mg/L. Linear equation is y=0.0134x+0.0033 (R(2)=0.9948). Precision, assessed in the term of the relative standard deviation, RSD, and accuracy for multiple determinations obtained in values of 0.77-1.73% and 97.4%, respectively. The level of an average amount of Ni(II) in six piercing rings was evaluated to be 14.78 mg/g.

  5. Design of a three-axis magnetic field measurement system for the magnetic shield of the ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Chuiyu; Yao, Xu

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic field is one of the main causes of zero drift in a Ring Laser Gyroscope (RLG), which should be avoided by adopting a magnetic shielding system. The Gauss Meter is usually used to measure the magnetic shielding effectiveness. Generally, the traditional Gauss Meter has advantages of high measure range and high reliability, however, its drawbacks such as complex structure, high price and the PC client software cannot be customized at will, are also obvious. In this paper, aiming at a type of experimental magnetic shielding box of RLG, we design a new portable three-axis magnetic field measurement system. This system has both high modularity degree and reliability, with measuring range at ±48Gs, max resolution at 1.5mGs and can measure the magnetic field in x, y and z direction simultaneously. Besides, its PC client software can be easily customized to achieve the automatic DAQ, analysis, plotting and storage functions. The experiment shows that, this system can meet the measuring requirements of certain type of experimental magnetic shielding box for RLG, meanwhile, for the measurement of some other magnetic shielding effectiveness, this system is also applicable.

  6. Synthetic approaches to the bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane ring system common to the paraherquamides, stephacidins and related prenylated indole alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth A; Williams, Robert M

    2009-11-01

    The bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane ring system is common to a number of highly biologically active secondary metabolites isolated from numerous species of fungi. In this tutorial review, we describe the varied synthetic approaches that have been employed to construct this ring system in the course of recent total synthesis endeavors, and this review should be of interest to synthetic organic chemists and natural product chemists. Detailed herein are a number of synthetic disconnections including intramolecular S(N)2' cyclizations, biomimetic Diels-Alder reactions, radical cyclizations, and cationic cascade reactions.

  7. Uranus' Rings: Leading up to RPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.; Showalter, M.; Hammel, H.; Gibbard, S.; Lissauer, J.

    We summarize recent HST and Keck observations of the uranian ring system, taken over the past years while the viewing geometry is changing. Some highlights of our campaign to date include: i) Detection of a ring system outside of Uranus main ring system by HST (Showalter and Lissauer, Science 311, p.973, 2006), followed by color information from Keck (de Pater et al, Science 312, p.92, 2006). This system consists of two rings. The inner ring, U2, is red and relatively narrow like Saturn's G ring, while the outer ring, U1, is much broader in extent and very blue, like Saturn's E ring. Just like Enceladus is located within the E ring, moon Mab is inside U1. Saturn's E ring is most likely produced by geyser activity on Enceladus. Mab, being over 20 times smaller, is unlikely to be geologically active. However, being this small, its size is optimal to produce a ring via meteorite sputtering. ii) Detection of a ring interior to the main ring system, which might be ring 1986U2R, discovered by Voyager, though its extent and location is different from the Voyager ring. iii) Dust sheets in between the main ring. These may be similar to the dust sheets seen by Voyager in forward scattered light, yet our observations indicate large changes from the Voyager era iv) New moons were detected by HST. The orbits of some of these moons appear to be somewhat erratic. The color of moon Mab appears to be more similar to that of the large outer moons than the small inner moons. Earth will cross Uranus' ring plane three times in 2007-2008 (2 May, 16 Aug. 2007, 20 Feb. 2008), and the Sun will cross it once (7 Dec. 2007). At these times optically thin dusty rings will brighten considerably, making this period an ideal time to study Uranus' outer ring system. Between the May and August crossings, as well as between December and February, the Earth and Sun are on opposite sides of the rings, so that any optically thick rings will essentially be invisible. This allows phenomena normally

  8. Fate of Cry1Ab protein in agricultural systems under slurry management of cows fed genetically modified maize (Zea mays L.) MON810: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Helga; Paul, Vijay; Guertler, Patrick; Spiekers, Hubert; Tichopad, Ales; Meyer, Heinrich H D; Muller, Martin

    2011-07-13

    The objective of the study was to track the fate of recombinant Cry1Ab protein in a liquid manure field trial when feeding GM maize MON810 to dairy cows. A validated ELISA was applied for quantification of Cry1Ab in the agricultural chain from GM maize plants, feed, liquid manure and soil to crops grown on manured fields. Starting with 23.7 μg of Cry1Ab g(-1) dry weight GM maize material, a rapid decline of Cry1Ab levels was observed as 2.6% and 0.9% of Cry1Ab from the GM plant were detected in feed and liquid manure, respectively. Half of this residual Cry1Ab persisted during slurry storage for 25 weeks. After application to experimental fields, final degradation of Cry1Ab to below detectable levels in soil was reported. Cry1Ab exhibited a higher rate of degradation compared to total protein in the agricultural processes. Immunoblotting revealed a degradation of the 65 kDa Cry1Ab into immunoreactive fragments of lower size in all analyzed materials.

  9. Thermochemistry of molecules in the B-N-Cl-H system: Ab initio predictions using the BAC-MP4 method

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

    1997-04-03

    A self-consistent set of thermochemical data for 33 molecules in the B-N-Cl-H system are obtained from a combination of ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical corrections. Calculations were performed for both stable and radical species. Good agreement is found between the calculations and experimental heats of formation for most molecules containing B, H, and Cl. In addition, the BAC-MP4 and experimental heats of formation for H{sub 3}B:NH{sub 3} are also in reasonable agreement, suggesting that the bond additivity parameters chosen for B-N bonds will provide reasonably accurate heats of formation for compounds containing this type of bond. Transition-state energies for two reactions involving BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} are also predicted. Polynomial fits of the predicted thermodynamic data over the 300-4000 K temperature range are included in the Supporting Information. 68 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Ab initio effective rotational and rovibrational Hamiltonians for non-rigid systems via curvilinear second order vibrational Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, P. Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.

    2016-11-01

    We present a perturbative method for ab initio calculations of rotational and rovibrational effective Hamiltonians of both rigid and non-rigid molecules. Our approach is based on a curvilinear implementation of second order vibrational Møller-Plesset perturbation theory extended to include rotational effects via a second order contact transformation. Though more expensive, this approach is significantly more accurate than standard second order vibrational perturbation theory for systems that are poorly described to zeroth order by rectilinear normal mode harmonic oscillators. We apply this method to and demonstrate its accuracy on two molecules: Si2C, a quasilinear triatomic with significant bending anharmonicity, and CH3NO2, which contains a completely unhindered methyl rotor. In addition to these two examples, we discuss several key technical aspects of the method, including an efficient implementation of Eckart and quasi-Eckart frame embedding that does not rely on numerical finite differences.

  11. Ab initio effective rotational and rovibrational Hamiltonians for non-rigid systems via curvilinear second order vibrational Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Changala, P Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H

    2016-11-07

    We present a perturbative method for ab initio calculations of rotational and rovibrational effective Hamiltonians of both rigid and non-rigid molecules. Our approach is based on a curvilinear implementation of second order vibrational Møller-Plesset perturbation theory extended to include rotational effects via a second order contact transformation. Though more expensive, this approach is significantly more accurate than standard second order vibrational perturbation theory for systems that are poorly described to zeroth order by rectilinear normal mode harmonic oscillators. We apply this method to and demonstrate its accuracy on two molecules: Si2C, a quasilinear triatomic with significant bending anharmonicity, and CH3NO2, which contains a completely unhindered methyl rotor. In addition to these two examples, we discuss several key technical aspects of the method, including an efficient implementation of Eckart and quasi-Eckart frame embedding that does not rely on numerical finite differences.

  12. Metallic Ca-Rh/C-methanol, a high-performing system for the hydrodechlorination/ring reduction of mono- and poly chlorinated aromatic substrates.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Kakeda, Mitsunori; Simion, Alina Marieta; Egashira, Naoyoshi; Simion, Cristian

    2009-08-01

    We investigated the reduction of some substituted mono- and poly chlorobenzenes bearing functional groups such as methyl, methoxy, hydroxyl, and amino, under mild conditions (80 degrees C and magnetic stirring, for 2 h) using a system consisting of metallic calcium and methanol (as hydrogen donor system) and 5% wt. Rh/C (as hydrodechlorination/ring reduction catalyst). Hydrodechlorination easily took place for methoxy- and alkyl-chlorobenzenes, yielding the corresponding hydrodechlorinated compounds (57-76%) and affording as secondary reaction products the ring-reduced compounds (16-43%). Treatment of hydroxy- and amino-chlorobenzenes under the same conditions, respectively, gave corresponding hydrodechlorinated compounds (over 60%) along with the ring-reduced compounds. Results show that the reaction of substituted polychlorinated benzenes needs a longer reaction time (6 h), the transformation being nevertheless complete.

  13. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions

    PubMed Central

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3•) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO3• at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50–500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500–2000 ml min−1) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO3• supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N2O5 and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO3• loss through the system, consistency of the NO3• concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h). PMID:22938328

  14. Kayser-Fleischer Rings

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know about Wilson Disease Kayser-Fleischer Rings Definition Kayser-Fleischer Ring: Clinical sign. Brownish-yellow ring ... Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation For Patients & Families Resources Membership Events Centers ...

  15. Implementing Digital Feedback Controls for the Multiple Simultaneous Ring Cavities in the FASOR-X System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    choices for gains and detector saturation and trip levels critically important. For example, some absorption within the LBO crystal or its heated...the chiller ; 2) activate the SFG heater; 3) turn on the Main System Software via a single click and wait 10-20 minutes for the system to produce

  16. How Jupiter's Ring Was Discovered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, James; Kerr, Richard

    1985-01-01

    "Rings" (by astronomer James Elliot and science writer Richard Kerr) is a nontechnical book about the discovery and exploration of ring systems from the time of Galileo to the era of the Voyager spacecraft. One of this book's chapters is presented. (JN)

  17. A microcomputer-based data acquisition and control system for the direct shear, ring shear, triaxial shear, and consolidation tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Philip S.

    1983-01-01

    This report is intended to provide internal documentation for the U.S. Geological Survey laboratory's automatic data acquisition system. The operating procedures for each type of test are designed to independently lead a first-time user through the various stages of using the computer to control the test. Continuing advances in computer technology and the availability of desktop microcomputers with a wide variety of peripheral equipment at a reasonable cost can create an efficient automated geotechnical testing environment. A geotechnical testing environment is shown in figure 1. Using an automatic data acquisition system, laboratory test data from a variety of sensors can be collected, and manually or automatically recorded on a magnetic device at the same apparent time. The responses of a test can be displayed graphically on a CRT in a matter of seconds, giving the investigator an opportunity to evaluate the test data, and to make timely, informed decisions on such matters as whether to continue testing, abandon a test, or modify procedures. Data can be retrieved and results reported in tabular form, or graphic plots, suitable for publication. Thermistors, thermocouples, load cells, pressure transducers, and linear variable differential transformers are typical sensors which are incorporated in automated systems. The geotechnical tests which are most practical to automate are the long-term tests which often require readings to be recorded outside normal work hours and on weekends. Automation applications include incremental load consolidation tests, constant-rate-of-strain consolidation tests, direct shear tests, ring shear tests, and triaxial shear tests.

  18. The fascinating construction of pyridine ring systems by transition metal-catalysed [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Heller, Barbara; Hapke, Marko

    2007-07-01

    Cycloaddition reactions compose one of the most important classes of reactions when it comes to the simultaneous formation of several bonds in one reaction step. The de novo construction of carbocyclic aromatic systems from acetylenes was also found as an excellent possibility for the assembly of heteroaromatic systems. The transition metal-catalysed [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction constitutes a fascinating tool for the synthesis of pyridines from nitriles and the most recent developments demonstrate the ability to control the substitution pattern as well as the possibility of introducing chirality by the use of achiral substrates and a chiral catalyst under mild conditions. In this tutorial review we are focusing on the de novo construction of pyridine ring systems by the transition metal-catalysed [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. After surveying the mechanistic features and intermediates of the reaction depending on the different metal complexes used, we depict the preparation of achiral pyridine derivatives. The last section describes the advances in the synthesis of chiral pyridines and biaryls using the cyclotrimerization method. The various possibilities of introducing chirality by catalytic means are presented and illustrated by instructive examples. This review will be of interest for people active in: Organic Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry, Transition Metal Chemistry, Stereoselective Synthesis, Heterocyclic Chemistry.

  19. Castro ring zone: a 4,500-km2 fossil hydrothermal system in the Challis volcanic field, central Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Ekren, E.B.; Hardyman, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The largest fossil hydrothermal system occupying a 4500 km2 area in central Idaho is revealed by delta 18O studies. The remains of this meteoric-hydrothermal system are preserved within a sharply bounded, 15 km wide, 70-km-diameter annulus of low delta 18O rock (+2.0 to -8.8per mille) termed the Castro ring zone. The zone is centred on a less depleted (+4.5) core zone consisting of granitic rocks of the Castro pluton. This 700-km2 Eocene subvolcanic batholith has intruded, domed, and hydrothermally metamorphosed a thick sequence of Challis Volcanics, the stratigraphically low rocks in the 2000-km2 Van Horn Peak and the 1000-km2 Thunder Mountain cauldron complexes being most strongly altered. Less extreme 18O depletions occur in the youngest major ash-flow sheets of these complexes, indicating a vertical 18O gradient. Water/rock ratios of geothermal systems are surprisingly insensitive to the circulation scale.-L.-di H.

  20. The LEO Archipelago: A system of earth-rings for communications, mass-transport to space, solar power, and control of global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, Andrew; Karthik Balaji, P. S.

    2011-06-01

    Man's quest to get into space is hindered by major problems (e.g., system-development and capital costs, expense of putting mass into orbit, trapped-radiation belts, and environmental impact of a large increase in rocket launches). A multi-purpose low-earth-orbit system of rings circling the earth - the "LEO ARCHIPELAGO TM" - is proposed as a means of solving or bypassing many of them. A fiber-optic ring about the earth would be an initial testing and developmental stage for the Ring Systems, while providing cash-flow through a LEO-based, high-band-width, world-wide communication system. A low-earth-orbit-based space-elevator system, "Sling-on-a-Ring TM", is proposed as the crucial developmental stage of the LEO Archipelago. Being a LEO-based heavy-mass lifter, rather than earth- or GEO-based, it is much less massive and therefore less costly than other proposed space-elevators. With the advent of lower-cost, higher-mass transport to orbit, the options for further space development (e.g., space solar power, radiation, and space-debris dampers, sun shades, and permanent LEO habitation) are greatly expanded. This paper provides an update of the Sling-on-a-Ring concept in terms of new materials, potential applications, and trade-offs associated with an earlier model. The impact of Colossal Carbon Tubes, CCT, a new material with high tensile strength, extremely-low density, and other favorable properties, and other new technologies (e.g., solar-powered lasers, power beaming to near-space and earth, and thermal-control systems) on the development of associated LEO-Ring systems is also explored. The material's effect on the timeline for the system development indicates the feasibility of near-term implementation of the system (possibly within the decade). The Sling-on-a-Ring can provide a less-expensive, environment-friendly mode of access to space. This would pave the way (via eventual operation at >1000 t per day by 2050) for large scale development of space

  1. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  2. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest® laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    French, Deborah; Terrazas, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS) has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer to our Sunquest® LIS. Materials and Methods: We licensed software for the data management interface from the University of Pittsburgh, but extended this work as follows: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX™ × 5500 QTrap® mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code) into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest® via file transfer protocol. Results: The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst® software to the required Sunquest® import format. This required writing of a “pre-processor” by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. Conclusions: We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available. PMID:23599901

  3. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  4. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  5. Dual inhibition of HCV and HIV by ring-expanded nucleosides containing the 5:7-fused imidazo[4,5-e][1,3]diazepine ring System. In vitro results and implications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Peng; Baier, Andrea; Cova, Lucyna; Hosmane, Ramachandra S.

    2014-01-01

    Examples of ring-expanded nucleosides (RENs), represented by general structures 1 and 2, exhibited dual anti-HCV and anti-HIV activities in both cell culture systems and the respective target enzyme assays, including HCV NTPase/helicase and human RNA helicase DDX3. Since HCV is a leading co-infection in late stage HIV AIDS patients, often leading to liver cirrhosis and death, the observed dual inhibition of HCV and HIV by the target nucleoside analogues has potentially beneficial implications in treating HIV patients infected with HCV. PMID:24461293

  6. Multistage ab initio quantum wavepacket dynamics for electronic structure and dynamics in open systems: momentum representation, coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, and external fields.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2011-02-21

    We recently proposed a multistage ab initio wavepacket dynamics (MS-AIWD) treatment for the study of delocalized electronic systems as well as electron transport through donor-bridge-acceptor systems such as those found in molecular-wire/electrode networks. In this method, the full donor-bridge-acceptor open system is treated through a rigorous partitioning scheme that utilizes judiciously placed offsetting absorbing and emitting boundary conditions. In this manner, the electronic coupling between the bridge molecule and surrounding electrodes is accounted. Here, we extend MS-AIWD to include the dynamics of open-electronic systems in conjunction with (a) simultaneous treatment of nuclear dynamics and (b) external electromagnetic fields. This generalization is benchmarked through an analysis of wavepackets propagated on a potential modeled on an Al(27) - C(7) - Al(27) nanowire. The wavepacket results are inspected in the momentum representation and the dependence of momentum of the wavepacket as well as its transmission probabilities on the magnitude of external bias are analyzed.

  7. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. IX. HD 59686 Ab: a massive circumstellar planet orbiting a giant star in a 13.6 au eccentric binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Mauricio; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Mitchell, David S.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Buenzli, Esther; Zimmerman, Neil; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Skemer, Andy; Defrère, Denis; Lee, Man Hoi; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. For over 12 yr, we have carried out a precise radial velocity (RV) survey of a sample of 373 G- and K-giant stars using the Hamilton Échelle Spectrograph at the Lick Observatory. There are, among others, a number of multiple planetary systems in our sample as well as several planetary candidates in stellar binaries. Aims: We aim at detecting and characterizing substellar and stellar companions to the giant star HD 59686 A (HR 2877, HIP 36616). Methods: We obtained high-precision RV measurements of the star HD 59686 A. By fitting a Keplerian model to the periodic changes in the RVs, we can assess the nature of companions in the system. To distinguish between RV variations that are due to non-radial pulsation or stellar spots, we used infrared RVs taken with the CRIRES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Additionally, to characterize the system in more detail, we obtained high-resolution images with LMIRCam at the Large Binocular Telescope. Results: We report the probable discovery of a giant planet with a mass of mp sin i = 6.92-0.24+0.18 MJup orbiting at ap = 1.0860-0.0007+0.0006 au from the giant star HD 59686 A. In addition to the planetary signal, we discovered an eccentric (eB = 0.729-0.003+0.004) binary companion with a mass of mB sin i = 0.5296-0.0008+0.0011 M⊙ orbiting at a close separation from the giant primary with a semi-major axis of aB = 13.56-0.14+0.18 au. Conclusions: The existence of the planet HD 59686 Ab in a tight eccentric binary system severely challenges standard giant planet formation theories and requires substantial improvements to such theories in tight binaries. Otherwise, alternative planet formation scenarios such as second-generation planets or dynamical interactions in an early phase of the system's lifetime need to be seriously considered to better understand the origin of this enigmatic planet. Based on observations collected at the Lick Observatory, University of California.Based on observations collected at the

  8. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  9. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David R.

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receive a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  10. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  11. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2000-01-01

    An all-refelctive optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six refelecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  12. Structural, energetic, spectroscopic and QTAIM analyses of cation-π interactions involving mono- and bi-cyclic ring fused benzene systems.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ayorinde; Dinadayalane, Tandabany C; Grabowski, Sławomir J; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-12-28

    The effect of increasing the number of monocyclic six-membered rings or bicyclic rings of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexenyl fused to benzene on cation-π interactions involving alkali metal ions (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) has been investigated. The binding energy data at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level clearly indicate that the binding affinity of the metal ion with benzene is enhanced by increasing the number of rings fused irrespective of a monocyclic or a bicyclic ring. Calculated binding energies are in good agreement with the available experimental results. The binding strength of cations with ligands decreases in the order Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). Our study establishes that trisannelation of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexene to benzene facilitates a very strong interaction between benzene and cations. Infrared (IR) frequencies and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts are shown to be valuable in characterizing cation-π interactions. The C-C bonds of the central six-membered rings are weakened due to metal ion binding. Based on the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM), we have observed the presence of stabilizing H∙∙∙H interactions in two of the considered systems as opposed to the frequent description of these interactions as non-bonded repulsive interactions. Alkali metal ion binding with those two ligands slightly reduces the strength of such H∙∙∙H interactions.

  13. Total Synthesis and Evaluation of Vinblastine Analogues Containing Systematic Deep-Seated Modifications in the Vindoline Subunit Ring System: Core Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Kristin D.; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Tam, Annie; Kato, Daisuke; Duncan, Katharine K.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    The total synthesis of a systematic series of vinblastine analogues that contain deep-seated structural modifications to the core ring system of the lower vindoline subunit is described. Complementary to the vindoline 6,5 DE ring system, compounds with 5,5, 6,6 and the reversed 5,6 membered DE ring systems were prepared. Both the natural cis and unnatural trans 6,6-membered ring systems proved accessible, with the latter representing a surprisingly effective class for analogue design. Following Fe(III)-promoted coupling with catharanthine and in situ oxidation to provide the corresponding vinblastine analogues, their evaluation provided unanticipated insights into how the structure of the vindoline subunit contributes to activity. Two potent analogues (81 and 44) possessing two different unprecedented modifications to the vindoline subunit core architecture were discovered that matched the potency of the comparison natural products and both lack the 6,7-double bond whose removal in vinblastine leads to a 100-fold drop in activity. PMID:23252481

  14. Enantioselective ring-opening reaction of meso-epoxides with ArSeH catalyzed by heterometallic Ti-Ga-Salen system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minghua; Zhu, Chengjian; Yuan, Fang; Huang, Yijun; Pan, Yi

    2005-05-12

    The first example of enantioselective ring-opening reaction of meso-epoxides with aryl selenols to give optically active beta-arylseleno alcohol in up to 97% ee was realized, using a chiral Ti-Ga-Salen heterometallic catalyst. A strong synergistic effect of different Lewis acids in the system was exhibited in the catalytic process.

  15. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  16. Mu-28: an open-framework fluorogallophosphate with a three-dimensional 12-membered ring channel system

    SciTech Connect

    Josien, Ludovic; Simon-Masseron, Angelique . E-mail: a.simon@univ-mulhouse.fr; Gramlich, Volker; Porcher, Florence; Patarin, Jogl

    2004-10-01

    A new three-dimensional (3-D) microporous fluorogallophosphate, named Mu-28, was obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. It was obtained in the presence of fluoride ions with 1,4-dimethylpiperazine as organic template. This new fluorogallophosphate, with chemical formula [Ga{sub 20}P{sub 20}O{sub 80}(OH){sub 6}F{sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(C{sub 6}H{sub 16}N{sub 2}){sub 6}] 8H{sub 2}O, crystallizes in the monoclinic system space group P2{sub 1} with the following unit cell parameters: a=13.23(1)A, b=15.40(1)A, c=14.80(1)A, {beta}=95.10(9){sup o} (Z=1, R1=0.0435 [I>2{sigma}(I)]). Its structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction with the help of {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. Mu-28 consists of a complex arrangement of GaO{sub 3}(OH,F)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, GaO{sub 4}(OH)F and GaO{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} octahedra, GaO{sub 4}F trigonal bipyramids and GaO{sub 3}(OH,F) and PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. It displays a 3-D channel system delimited by 12-membered ring openings.

  17. A free-flowing soap film combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy as a detection system for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Markus; Welsch, Thomas; Jones, Harold

    2010-05-07

    We have shown that a free-flowing soap film has sufficiently high-quality optical properties to allow it to be used in the cavity of a ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). The flow rates required to maintain a stable soap film were similar to those used in liquid chromatography and thus allowed interfacing with an HPLC system for use as an optical detector. We have investigated the properties of the system in a relevant analytical application. The soap film/CRDS combination was used at 355 nm as a detector for the separation of a mixture of nitroarenes. These compounds play a role in the residue analysis of areas contaminated with explosives and their decomposition products. In spite of the short absorption path length (9 microm) obtained by the soap film, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allowed a limit of detection of 4 x 10(-6) in absorption units (AU) or less than 17 fmol in the detection volume to be achieved.

  18. Erythema ab igne.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristen; Hunt, Raegan; Chu, Julie; Meehan, Shane; Stein, Jennifer

    2011-10-15

    Erythema ab igne is a reticulated, erythematous or hyperpigmented dermatosis that results from chronic and repeated exposure to low levels of infrared radiation. Multiple heat sources have been reported to cause this condition, which include heated reclining chairs, heating pads, hot water bottles, car heaters, electric space heaters, and, more recently, laptop computers. Treatment consists of withdrawing the inciting heat source. Although erythema ab igne carries a good prognosis, it is not necessarily a self-limited diagnosis as patients are at long-term risk of developing subsequent cutaneous malignant conditions, which include squamous cell and merkel-cell carcinomas.

  19. Double-ring network model of the head-direction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Hahnloser, Richard H.; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2002-10-01

    In the head-direction system, the orientation of an animal's head in space is encoded internally by persistent activities of a pool of cells whose firing rates are tuned to the animal's directional heading. To maintain an accurate representation of the heading information when the animal moves, the system integrates horizontal angular head-velocity signals from the vestibular nuclei and updates the representation of directional heading. The integration is a difficult process, given that head velocities can vary over a large range and the neural system is highly nonlinear. Previous models of integration have relied on biologically unrealistic mechanisms, such as instantaneous changes in synaptic strength, or very fast synaptic dynamics. In this paper, we propose a different integration model with two populations of neurons, which performs integration based on the differential input of the vestibular nuclei to these two populations. We mathematically analyze the dynamics of the model and demonstrate that with carefully tuned synaptic connections it can accurately integrate a large range of the vestibular input, with potentially slow synapses.

  20. Ultrafast ring-opening/closing and deactivation channels for a model spiropyran-merocyanine system.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lozano, Marta; Estévez, Carlos Manuel; Esté vez, Carlos Manuel; Hermida-Ramón, Jose; Hermida-Ramó n, Jose; Serrano-Andres, Luis

    2011-08-25

    The photochemistry of a model merocyanine-spiropyran system was analyzed theoretically at the MS-CASPT2//SA-CASSCF(14,12) level. Several excited singlet states were studied in both the closed spiropyran and open merocyanine forms, and the paths to the different S(1)/S(0) conical intersections found were analyzed. After absorption of UV light from the spiropyran form, there are two possible ultrafast routes to efficient conversion to the ground state; one involves the rupture of the C(spiro)-O bond leading to the open form and the other involves the lengthening of the C(spiro)-N bond with no photoreaction. From the merocyanine side the excited state can reach a very broad S(1)/S(0) conical intersection region that leads the system to the closed form after rotation of the central methine bond. Alternatively, rotation of the other methine bonds connects the system through different S(1)/S(0) conical intersections to several merocyanine isomers. The present work provides a theoretical framework for the recent experimental results (Buback , J. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 1610-1619) and sheds light on the complex photochemistry of these kinds of compounds.

  1. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  2. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  3. On Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Regulation of Linear Systems Over Rings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-09

    book (e.g., Bourbaki [1972, Chapt. 2]). Let (m&Ii, be the set of maximal ideals of k[z, zI] such that (2.11) rank [zl - F, G]g< n. After these...Khargonekar [1980], where a . theory of observers and coefficient assignment by causal dynamic state feedback was developed. Although the split condition is...this research was done when the author was at the Center for Mathematical System Theory , University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida 32611, and was

  4. On the rotation periods of the components of the triple system TYC 9300-0891-1AB/TYC 9300-0529-1 in the Octans Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sergio; Monard, Berto; Worters, Hannah L.; Bromage, Gordon E.; Sanchez, Richardo Zanmar

    2016-01-01

    Stellar rotation depends on different parameters such as age, mass, initial chemical composition, initial angular momentum, and environment characteristics. The range of values of these parameters causes the dispersion in the rotation period distributions observed in young stellar clusters/associations. We focus our investigation on the effects of different circumstellar environments on stellar rotation. More specifically, we consider the effects of a perturber stellar companion on the accretion-disc lifetime at early evolution stages. We are searching in stellar Associations for visual triple systems where all stellar parameters are similar, with the only exceptions of the unknown initial rotation period, and of the circum-stellar environment, in the sense that one of the two about equal-mass components has a close-by third 'perturber' component. In the present study we analyze the 35-Myr old visual triple system TYC 9300-0891-1AB + TYC 9300-0529-1 in the young Octans stellar association consisting of three equal-mass K0V components. We collected from the literature all information that allowed us to infer that the three components are actually physically bound forming a triple system and are members of the Octans Association. We collected broad-band photometric timeseries in two observation seasons. We discovered that all the components are variable, magnetically active, and from periodogram analysis we found the unresolved components TYC 9300-0891-1AB to have a rotation period P = 1.383 d and TYC9300-0529-1 a rotation period P = 1.634 d. TYC 9300-0891-1A, TYC 9300-0891-1B, and TYC 9300-0529-1 have same masses, ages, and initial chemical compositions. The relatively small 16% rotation period difference measured by us indicates that all components had similar initial rotation periods and disc lifetimes, and the separation of 157 AU between the component A and the 'perturber' component B (or vice-versa) has been sufficiently large to prevent any significant

  5. Can dispersion corrections annihilate the dispersion-driven nano-aggregation of non-polar groups? An ab initio molecular dynamics study of ionic liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Firaha, Dzmitry S; Thomas, Martin; Hollóczki, Oldamur; Korth, Martin; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-11-28

    In this study, we aim at understanding the influence of dispersion correction on the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ionic liquid (IL) systems. We investigated a large bulk system of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate IL and a small cluster system of ethylamine in ethylammonium nitrate both under periodic boundary conditions. The large system displays several changes upon neglect of dispersion correction, the most striking one is the surprising decrease of the well-known microheterogeneity which is accompanied by an increase of side chain hydrogen atom-anion interplay. For the diffusion coefficient, we observe a correction towards experimental behavior in terms of the cation becoming faster than the anion with dispersion correction. Changes in the electronic structure upon dispersion correction are reflected in larger/smaller dipole moments for anions/cations also seen in the calculated IR spectrum. The energetics of different ion pair dimer subsystems (polar and non-polar) are in accordance with the analysis of the trajectories: A detailed balance in the ionic liquid system determines its particular behavior. While the overall interaction terms for dispersion-corrected calculations are higher, the decrease in microheterogeneity upon inclusion of dispersion interaction becomes obvious due to the relation between all contributions to polar-polar terms. For the small system, we clearly observe the well known behavior that the hybrid functionals show higher reaction barriers than the pure generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals. The correction of dispersion reduces the discrepancies in some cases. Accounting for the number of jumps, we observe that dispersion correction reduces the discrepancies from 50% to less than 10%.

  6. Can dispersion corrections annihilate the dispersion-driven nano-aggregation of non-polar groups? An ab initio molecular dynamics study of ionic liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firaha, Dzmitry S.; Thomas, Martin; Hollóczki, Oldamur; Korth, Martin; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we aim at understanding the influence of dispersion correction on the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ionic liquid (IL) systems. We investigated a large bulk system of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate IL and a small cluster system of ethylamine in ethylammonium nitrate both under periodic boundary conditions. The large system displays several changes upon neglect of dispersion correction, the most striking one is the surprising decrease of the well-known microheterogeneity which is accompanied by an increase of side chain hydrogen atom-anion interplay. For the diffusion coefficient, we observe a correction towards experimental behavior in terms of the cation becoming faster than the anion with dispersion correction. Changes in the electronic structure upon dispersion correction are reflected in larger/smaller dipole moments for anions/cations also seen in the calculated IR spectrum. The energetics of different ion pair dimer subsystems (polar and non-polar) are in accordance with the analysis of the trajectories: A detailed balance in the ionic liquid system determines its particular behavior. While the overall interaction terms for dispersion-corrected calculations are higher, the decrease in microheterogeneity upon inclusion of dispersion interaction becomes obvious due to the relation between all contributions to polar-polar terms. For the small system, we clearly observe the well known behavior that the hybrid functionals show higher reaction barriers than the pure generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals. The correction of dispersion reduces the discrepancies in some cases. Accounting for the number of jumps, we observe that dispersion correction reduces the discrepancies from 50% to less than 10%.

  7. Exciton interference revealed by energy dependent exciton transfer rate for ring-structured molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yun-An

    2016-01-14

    The quantum interference is an intrinsic phenomenon in quantum physics for photon and massive quantum particles. In principle, the quantum interference may also occur with quasi-particles, such as the exciton. In this study, we show how the exciton quantum interference can be significant in aggregates through theoretical simulations with hierarchical equations of motion. The systems under investigation are generalized donor-bridge-acceptor model aggregates with the donor consisting of six homogeneous sites assuming the nearest neighbor coupling. For the models with single-path bridge, the exciton transfer time only shows a weak excitation energy dependence. But models with double-path bridge have a new short transfer time scale and the excitation energy dependence of the exciton transfer time assumes clear peak structure which is detectable with today’s nonlinear spectroscopy. This abnormality is attributed to the exciton quantum interference and the condition for a clear observation in experiment is also explored.

  8. Lactones 41. Synthesis and microbial hydroxylation of unsaturated terpenoid lactones with p-menthane ring systems.

    PubMed

    Grudniewska, Aleksandra; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2013-03-01

    Racemic [(±)-4-isopropyl-1-methyl-7-oxa-cis-bicyclo[4.3.0]non-4-en-8-one] and optically active δ,ε-unsaturated lactones [(-)-(1R,6R)-4-isopropyl-1-methyl-7-oxabicyclo[4.3.0]non-4-en-8-one and (+)-(1S,6S)-4-isopropyl-1-methyl-7-oxabicyclo[4.3.0] non-4-en-8-one)] with the p-menthane system were obtained and their odoriferous properties were evaluated. Biotransformations of the racemic lactone with three fungal strains: Absidia cylindrospora AM336, Absidia glauca AM177 and Syncephalastrum racemosum AM105, were carried out. Microbial transformations afforded hydroxylactones with the hydroxy group in the allylic position.

  9. A Diastereoselective Intramolecular Pauson-Khand Approach to the Construction of the BC Ring System in Tuberostemoninol

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiangna; Williams, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Herein we describe an asymmetric approach to the synthesis of a BC-ring synthon in tuberostemoninol via an intramolecular Pauson-Khand reaction stereocontrolled by a commercially available chiral glycinate. PMID:19779590

  10. Undoing Gender Through Legislation and Schooling: the Case of AB 537 and AB 394 IN California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knotts, Greg

    2009-11-01

    This article investigates California laws AB 537: The Student Safety and Violence Prevention Act of 2000, and the recently enacted AB 394: Safe Place to Learn Act. Both demand that gender identity and sexual orientation be added to the lexicon of anti-harassment protection in public education. However, despite these progressive measures, schools have an unconscious acceptance of heteronormativity and gendered norms, which undermines both the spirit and language of these laws. This paper examines how California schools can both change standard practices and realise the transformative social change that laws like AB 537 and AB 394 can instigate. I assert that the systemic implementation of these laws, through the adoption, enforcement and evaluation of existing AB 537 Task Force Recommendations, is necessary for their success. My second assertion is that AB 537 and AB 394 have the potential to change and reconstitute gender-based and heteronormative standards at school sites.

  11. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Context. Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. Aims: To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808 B, which is in the process of PR formation. Methods: We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging in the F450W, F555W, or F606W and F814W filters. Extensive completeness tests, PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Results: Both PRGs contain young CSSs (<1 Gyr) with masses of up to 5 × 106M⊙, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive CSSs may be progenitors of metal-rich globular clusters or ultra compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies. We identify one such young UCD candidate, NGC 3808 B-8, and measure its size of reff = 25.23+1.43-2.01 pc. We reconstruct the star formation history of the two PRGs and find strong peaks in the star formation rate (SFR, ≃200 M⊙/yr) in NGC 3808 B, while NGC 4650 A shows milder (declining) star formation (SFR< 10 M⊙/yr). This difference may support different evolutionary paths between these PRGs. Conclusions: The spatial distribution, masses, and peak star formation epoch of the clusters in NGC 3808 suggest for a tidally triggered star formation. Incompleteness at old ages prevents us from probing the SFR at earlier epochs of NGC 4650 A, where we observe the fading tail of CSS formation. This also impedes us from testing the formation scenarios of this PRG.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of High Performance Polyimides Containing the Bicyclo(2.2.2)oct-7-ene Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, M.; Harruna, I. I.; Bota, K. B.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the difficulty in processing polyimides with high temperature stability and good solvent resistance, we have synthesized high performance polyimides with bicyclo(2.2.2)-oct-7-ene ring system which can easily be fabricated into films and fibers and subsequently converted to the more stable aromatic polyimides. In order to improve processability, we prepared two polyimides by reacting 1,4-phenylenediamine and 1,3phenylediamine with bicyclo(2.2.2)-7-octene-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxylic dianhydride. The polyimides were characterized by FTIR, FTNMR, solubility and thermal analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the 1,4-phenylenediamine and 1,3-phenylenediamine containing polyimides were stable up to 460 and 379 C, respectively under nitrogen atmosphere. No melting transitions were observed for both polyimides. The 1,4-phenylenediamine containing polyimide is partially soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide, methane sulfonic acid and soluble in sulfuric acid at room temperature. The 1,3-phenylenediamine containing polyimide is partially soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide, tetramethyl urea, N,N-dimethyl acetamide and soluble in methane sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid.

  13. High Precision 13C/12C Measurement of Dissolved Carbon Using a Transportable Cavity Ring-Down Spectrophotometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Crosson, E.

    2009-05-01

    We report here on the measurement of high precision δ13C from total inorganic carbon (TIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) using a sample preparation system coupled to a small footprint Wavelength- Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS). This system is capable of applying a 5% H3PO4 solution or a sodium persulfate oxidation process to a water sample in an exetainer vial, thereby liberating gaseous CO2 and permitting stable carbon isotope measurement in TIC and DOC, respectively. The isotopic carbon signature determination can then be used to trace the origin of carbonates or organic carbon compounds. In a first phase, a manual process was employed in which TIC containing samples were acidified and the evolved CO2 was collected inside gas pillows. The gas pillows were then connected to the inlet of the isotopic WS-CRDS instrument for carbon ratio measurement. In a second phase, the CO2 liberation processes were automated in an integrated analyzer enabling software control of a sample preparation system directly connected to the gas inlet of the isotopic WS-CRDS instrument. A measurement precision of the isotopic ratio in the range of 0.2 to 0.4 permil was achieved in minutes of measurement time. Such precision readily distinguishes the isotopic TIC and DOC signatures from a set of three different stream water samples collected from various sites in Northern California. The current TIC/DOC- CRDS setup will enable shipboard measurement and presents a rugged, portable and inexpensive analytical instrumentation alternative to the traditional use of methods based on the more complex and lab-confined isotope ratio mass spectrometry technique.

  14. A novel FPGA-based bunch purity monitor system at the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Norum, W. E.; APS Engineering Support Division

    2008-01-01

    Bunch purity is an important source quality factor for the magnetic resonance experiments at the Advanced Photon Source. Conventional bunch-purity monitors utilizing time-to-amplitude converters are subject to dead time. We present a novel design based on a single field- programmable gate array (FPGA) that continuously processes pulses at the full speed of the detector and front-end electronics. The FPGA provides 7778 single-channel analyzers (six per rf bucket). The starting time and width of each single-channel analyzer window can be set to a resolution of 178 ps. A detector pulse arriving inside the window of a single-channel analyzer is recorded in an associated 32-bit counter. The analyzer makes no contribution to the system dead time. Two channels for each rf bucket count pulses originating from the electrons in the bucket. The other four channels on the early and late side of the bucket provide estimates of the background. A single-chip microcontroller attached to the FPGA acts as an EPICS IOC to make the information in the FPGA available to the EPICS clients.

  15. Study of the use of methanol-filled Er-doped suspended-core fibres in a temperature-sensing ring laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, J. C.; Berdejo, V.; Vallés, J. A.; Sánchez-Martín, J. A.; Díez, A.; Andrés, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    We report on an experimental/numerical investigation into the use of methanol-filled Er-doped suspended-core fibres (SCFs) in temperature-sensing ring laser systems. We have adopted a ring laser configuration that includes an Er-doped SCF as a temperature-dependent attenuator (TDA) with a step-index Er-doped fibre (EDF) as the laser active medium. The laser performance dependence on the temperature was measured both in continuous wave (CW) and transient regimes. CW laser output power and build-up time values are compared with those of similar laser systems based on other types of Er-doped PCFs or using other laser configurations. A notable variation of 0.73% °C-1 was achieved in CW operation. Then, by means of parameters obtained by numerically fitting the experimental results, the potential sensing performance of the laser configuration with an SCF as a TDA is studied. Moreover, two ring cavity laser configurations (with the SCF acting basically as an attenuator or also as the active media) are compared and the influence of the position of the coupler inside the ring cavity and the contribution of the erbium doping to improve the sensor features are analysed. The longer interaction lengths compatible with laser action using the Er-doped SCF as a TDA could provide variations of laser output power up to 8.6% °C-1 for 90 mW pump power and a 1 m methanol-filled SCF.

  16. Ab initio calculations of van der Waals interactions in one- and two-dimensional infinite periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Karin; Staemmler, Volker

    1995-08-01

    A new CEPA-PNO (coupled electron pair approach with pair natural orbitals) method for the calculation of correlation energies in infinite periodic systems is proposed and applied to one- and two-dimensional He. The method starts from a crystal orbital Hartree-Fock (COHF) wavefunction with the occupied Bloch orbitals transformed into Wannier orbitals. The coupled-cluster equations for the infinite system are simplified by CEPA-type approximations: A CEPA-0 (or linear coupled-cluster) formula is applied for the small intercell contributions to the total correlation energy while CI-SD, ACPF or other CEPA variants are used for the large intracell contributions. The enormous number of single and double excitations into the virtual space is greatly reduced by the use of pair natural orbitals (PNOs), which leads to large savings in the necessary computer time and disk storage. First applications to the van der Waals interaction in the linear chain and the hexagonal plane of He atoms, performed with medium size and large atomic basis sets, show that an accuracy can be reached for the infinite systems which is comparable to the accuracy of the corresponding calculations for small He clusters. Because of the extended use of the translational symmetry of the Wannier orbitals, the calculations for the linear infinite systems are even considerably faster than those for the oligomers He5 and He7.

  17. Belt-hierarchic structure of th ring, satellite and planet systems: prediction S/2001 U1 and others objects in Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2003-04-01

    BELT-HIERARCHIC STRUCTURE OF THE RING, SATELLITE AND PLANET SYSTEMS: PREDICTION S/2001 U1 AND OTHERS OBJECTS IN SOLAR SYSTEM Yu.V.Barkin Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow, Russia, barkin@sai.msu.ru Structure regularities of the planet and satellite systems have been studied. Statistic analysis of the distribution of the major semi-axes of the orbits of the planets, comets and centaurs of the Solar system, satellite and ring systems of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uran, exoplanet systems of the pulsars PSR 1257+12, PSR 1828-11 and of the main consequence star Ups And was fulfilled. The following empirical regularities were described [1]: 1) the bodies of systems are combined into hierarchic groups and main from them combine 5 companions; 2) differences of the major semi-axes of the neighboring orbits for bodies of every group are constant; 4) for main neighboring hierarchic group these distances are distinguished in 6 times increasing to external grope; 5) the filling of the gropes and some present changes in their structure are caused by the past catastrophes in corresponding systems. The special method of reconstruction of the catastrophes which had place in the life of the Solar system (SS) was developed. Suggested method has let us to explain uniformly observed values of the major semi-axes and average values of eccentricities of the planets. In particular the Pancul’s hypothesis about Jupiter formation from two giant protoplanets (Jupiter I and Jupiter II) was confirmed. The new empirical law of the filling of the orbits of the regular groups of the planets or satellites (or rings structures) of the hierarchic ordered systems of celestial bodies was established. It was shown that sum number of bodies is proportional to the value of catastrophic value of the eccentricities which are same for first, second ,.... and fifth orbits of all gropes. The theoretical numbers of bodies for pointed orbits practically coincide with their observed numbers in main

  18. WE-AB-BRB-08: Progress Towards a 2D OSL Dosimetry System Using Al2O3:C Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M F; Yukihara, E; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; Akselrod, M; Brons, S; Greilich, S; Jakel, O; Osinga, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 2D dosimetry system based on the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C films for medical applications. Methods: A 2D laser scanning OSL reader was built for readout of newly developed Al2O3:C films (Landauer Inc.). An image reconstruction algorithm was developed to correct for inherent effects introduced by reader design and detector properties. The system was tested using irradiations with photon and carbon ion beams. A calibration was obtained using a 6 MV photon beam from clinical accelerator and the dose measurement precision was tested using a range of doses and different dose distributions (flat field and wedge field). The dynamic range and performance of the system in the presence of large dose gradients was also tested using 430 MeV/u {sup 12}C single and multiple pencil beams. All irradiations were performed with Gafchromic EBT3 film for comparison. Results: Preliminary results demonstrate a near-linear OSL dose response to photon fields and the ability to measure dose in dose distributions such as flat field and wedge field. Tests using {sup 12}C pencil beam demonstrate ability to measure doses over four orders of magnitude. The dose profiles measured by the OSL film generally agreed well with that measured by the EBT3 film. The OSL image signal-to-noise ratio obtained in the current conditions require further improvement. On the other hand, EBT3 films had large uncertainties in the low dose region due to film-to-film or intra-film variation in the background. Conclusion: A 2D OSL dosimetry system was developed and initial tests have demonstrated a wide dynamic range as well as good agreement between the delivered and measured doses. The low background, wide dynamic range and wide range of linearity in dose response observed for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL film can be beneficial for dosimetry in radiation therapy applications, especially for small field dosimetry. This work has been funded by Landauer Inc. Dr

  19. HLA A/B recombination in a white woman with the S-s-phenotype of the MNS system.

    PubMed

    Salaru, N N

    1995-01-01

    In cases of disputed parentage, the possibility of simultaneous occurrence of rare events in the population must be considered. PURPOSE--To report a case in which HLA-A/B recombination and homozygosity of a silent allele, typical of Negroes, in an individual apparently without this miscegenation were coexistent. METHODS--Alleged father, mother and dizygotic twin children were racially classified according to their apparent somatic characters. Blood group genetic markers of ABO, Rh, MNS, Kell, Duffy, HLA-A, -B systems were phenotyped; mother's HLA genotyping was performed by her parents test. RESULTS--The phenotype of the White mother, in the MNS system, was M+; N-; S-; s-. Alleged father and both twins were phenotipically compatible. The assumed maternity relating to both children was possible if mother presented an HLA-A/B recombination. CONCLUSION--In miscegenated populations, the breakup between ethnical appearance and blood group markers is foreseeable. Allele/haplotypic frequencies of these populations should be estimated. Casuistically, the association of events with low frequency in the population can be the cause of apparent exclusions of parentage.

  20. A Comparison of Density Functional Theory with Ab initio Approaches for Systems Involving First Transition Row Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is found to give a better description of the geometries and vibrational frequencies of FeL and FeL(sup +) systems than second order Moller Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). Namely, the DFT correctly predicts the shift in the CO vibrational frequency between free CO and the Sigma(sup -) state of FeCO and yields a good result for the Fe-C distance in the quartet states of FeCH4(+) 4 These are properties where the MP2 results are unsatisfactory. Thus DFT appears to be an excellent approach for optimizing the geometries and computing the zero-point energies of systems containing first transition row atoms. Because the DFT approach is biased in favor of the 3d(exp 7) occupation, whereas the more traditional approaches are biased in favor of the 3d(exp 6) occupation, differences are found in the relative ordering of states. It is shown that if the dissociation is computed to the most appropriate atomic asymptote and corrected to the ground state asymptote using the experimental separations, the DFT results are in good agreement with high levels of theory. The energetics at the DFT level are much superior to the MP2 and in most cases in good agreement with high levels of theory.

  1. Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. High-level ab initio predictions for the ionization energies and heats of formation of five-membered-ring molecules: thiophene, furan, pyrrole, 1,3-cyclopentadiene, and borole, C4H4X/C4H4X+ (X = S, O, NH, CH2, and BH).

    PubMed

    Lo, Po-Kam; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2011-02-10

    The ionization energies (IEs) and heats of formation (ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298)) for thiophene (C(4)H(4)S), furan (C(4)H(4)O), pyrrole (C(4)H(4)NH), 1,3-cyclopentadiene (C(4)H(4)CH(2)), and borole (C(4)H(4)BH) have been calculated by the wave function-based ab initio CCSD(T)/CBS approach, which involves the approximation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit at the coupled-cluster level with single and double excitations plus a quasi-perturbative triple excitation [CCSD(T)]. Where appropriate, the zero-point vibrational energy correction (ZPVE), the core-valence electronic correction (CV), and the scalar relativistic effect (SR) are included in these calculations. The respective CCSD(T)/CBS predictions for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2), being 8.888, 8.897, 8.222, and 8.582 eV, are in excellent agreement with the experimental values obtained from previous photoelectron and photoion measurements. The ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) values for the aforementioned molecules and their corresponding cations have also been predicted by the CCSD(T)/CBS method, and the results are compared with the available experimental data. The comparisons between the CCSD(T)/CBS predictions and the experimental values for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2) suggest that the CCSD(T)/CBS procedure is capable of predicting reliable IE values for five-membered-ring molecules with an uncertainty of ±13 meV. In view of the excellent agreements between the CCSD(T)/CBS predictions and the experimental values for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2), the similar CCSD(T)/CBS IE and ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) predictions for C(4)H(4)BH, whose thermochemical data are not readily available due to its reactive nature, should constitute a reliable data set. The CCSD(T)/CBS IE(C(4)H(4)BH) value is 8.868 eV, and ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) values for C(4)H(4)BH and C(4)H(4)BH(+) are 269.5/258.6 and 1125.1/1114.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The highest occupied molecular orbitals

  3. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  4. GPU-based low-level trigger system for the standalone reconstruction of the ring-shaped hit patterns in the RICH Cherenkov detector of NA62 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cretaro, P.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-03-01

    This project aims to exploit the parallel computing power of a commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to implement fast pattern matching in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for the level 0 (L0) trigger of the NA62 experiment. In this approach, the ring-fitting algorithm is seedless, being fed with raw RICH data, with no previous information on the ring position from other detectors. Moreover, since the L0 trigger is provided with a more elaborated information than a simple multiplicity number, it results in a higher selection power. Two methods have been studied in order to reduce the data transfer latency from the readout boards of the detector to the GPU, i.e., the use of a dedicated NIC device driver with very low latency and a direct data transfer protocol from a custom FPGA-based NIC to the GPU. The performance of the system, developed through the FPGA approach, for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics runs is presented.

  5. The Saturn Ring Observer: In situ studies of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Spilker, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    targets of observation by the SRO will include “propellers” (thought to be the signature of sub-km moonlets embedded in the rings), the “ropy” and “straw” structure seen in images of strong density waves and gap edges, and km-scale radial oscillations which may be signatures of “viscous overstabilities” in high-optical depth regions. Most of the science goals identified above could be accomplished by high-resolution nadir imaging of the rings from a platform that co-orbits with the ring particles, i.e., from a spacecraft in circular orbit a few km above the rings. The vertical displacement of the spacecraft is maintained by a continuous low-thrust ion engine, which can be tilted to provide a slow inward radial drift across the rings. Chemical thrusters permit the craft to `hop' over vertical obstacles in the rings (e.g., bending waves and inclined ringlets). In addition to an imaging system with a resolution of at least 10 cm (with 1 cm a desirable goal), other instrumentat ion might include a laser altimeter/range-finder to measure the effective thickness of the rings, as well as the vertical component of particle motions, aswell as in situ instruments to measure the density and composition of the neutral and ionized ring atmosphere, meteoritic and secondary dust fluxes, and local electric fields (especially in spoke regions).

  6. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  7. Functional diversification of the RING finger and other binuclear treble clef domains in prokaryotes and the early evolution of the ubiquitin system.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies point to a diverse assemblage of prokaryotic cognates of the eukaryotic ubiquitin (Ub) system. These systems span an entire spectrum, ranging from those catalyzing cofactor and amino acid biosynthesis, with only adenylating E1-like enzymes and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls), to those that are closer to eukaryotic systems by virtue of possessing E2 enzymes. Until recently E3 enzymes were unknown in such prokaryotic systems. Using contextual information from comparative genomics, we uncover a diverse group of RING finger E3s in prokaryotes that are likely to function with E1s, E2s, JAB domain peptidases and Ubls. These E1s, E2s and RING fingers suggest that features hitherto believed to be unique to eukaryotic versions of these proteins emerged progressively in such prokaryotic systems. These include the specific configuration of residues associated with oxyanion-hole formation in E2s and the C-terminal UFD in the E1 enzyme, which presents the E2 to its active site. Our study suggests for the first time that YukD-like Ubls might be conjugated by some of these systems in a manner similar to eukaryotic Ubls. We also show that prokaryotic RING fingers possess considerable functional diversity and that not all of them are involved in Ub-related functions. In eukaryotes, other than RING fingers, a number of distinct binuclear (chelating two Zn atoms) and mononuclear (chelating one zinc atom) treble clef domains are involved in Ub-related functions. Through detailed structural analysis we delineated the higher order relationships and interaction modes of binuclear treble clef domains. This indicated that the FYVE domain acquired the binuclear state independently of the other binuclear forms and that different treble clef domains have convergently acquired Ub-related functions independently of the RING finger. Among these, we uncover evidence for notable prokaryotic radiations of the ZF-UBP, B-box, AN1 and LIM clades of treble clef domains and present

  8. Latitudinal gradients in tree ring stable carbon and oxygen isotopes reveal differential climate influences of the North American Monsoon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szejner, Paul; Wright, William E.; Babst, Flurin; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Trouet, Valerie; Leavitt, Steven W.; Ehleringer, James R.; Monson, Russell K.

    2016-07-01

    The arrival of the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) terminates a presummer hyperarid period in the southwestern United States (U.S.), providing summer moisture that is favorable for forest growth. Montane forests in this region rely on winter snowpack to drive much of their growth; the extent to which they use NAMS moisture is uncertain. We addressed this by studying stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in earlywood and latewood from 11 sites along a latitudinal gradient extending from Arizona and New Mexico to Utah. This study provides the first regional perspective on the relative roles of winter versus summer precipitation as an ecophysiological resource. Here we present evidence that Ponderosa pine uses NAMS moisture differentially across this gradient. 13C/12C ratios suggest that photosynthetic water use efficiency during latewood formation is more sensitive to summer precipitation at the northern than at the southern sites. This is likely due to the fact that NAMS moisture provides sufficiently favorable conditions for tree photosynthesis and growth during most years in the southern sites, whereas the northern sites experience larger summer moisture variability, which in some years is limiting growth. Cellulose δ18O and δ13C values revealed that photoassimilates in the southern sites were produced under higher vapor pressure deficit conditions during spring compared to summer, demonstrating a previously underappreciated effect of seasonal differences in atmospheric humidity on tree ring isotope ratios. Our findings suggest that future changes in NAMS will potentially alter productivity and photosynthetic water use dynamics differentially along latitudinal gradients in southwestern U.S. montane forests.

  9. From the Icy Satellites to Small Moons and Rings: Spectral Indicators by Cassini-VIMS Unveil Compositional Trends in the Saturnian System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Buratti, B. B.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Brown, R. H.

    2017-01-01

    flat reflectance in the visible, making them remarkably different with respect to the other small moons. Moreover, we have observed that the two Tethys' lagrangian moons appear spectrally different, with Calypso characterized by more intense water ice bands than Telesto. Conversely, at visible wavelengths Polydeuces, Telesto and Methone are in absolute the more blue objects in the Saturn's system. The red slopes measured in the visible range on disk-integrated spectral data, showing varying degrees on all of the satellites, could be caused more by exogenic processes than by geologic and endogenic events which are operating on more localized scales. The principal exogenic processes active in the Saturn's system [11] which alter the satellites and rings surfaces are the E ring particles bombardment, the interaction with corotating plasma and energetic particles, the bombardment of exogenic dark material [12] and the water ice photolysis. A discussion about the correlations between these processes and the o bserved spectral classes is given. With the approaching of the Cassini "Gran Finale" orbits, VIMS will unveil with unprecedented spatial resolution the spectral properties of many small moons and rings. These data will be extremely valuable to improve our classification of the Saturn's satellites and rings.

  10. Ab initio theoretical investigation of beryllium and beryllium hydride nanoparticles and nanocrystals with implications for the corresponding infinite systems.

    PubMed

    Zdetsis, Aristides D; Sigalas, Michael M; Koukaras, Emmanuel N

    2014-07-21

    With the initial motivation of optimizing hydrogen storage in beryllium nanocrystals, we have thoroughly and systematically studied the structural, cohesive, and electronic properties of Ben and BenHxn (n = 2-160, x = 0.1-2.4) nanoparticles as a function of both size (n) and hydrogen content (x), using density functional theory with a properly selected meta-hybrid functional and high level coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory for comparison. We have calculated the binding energies of Ben, BenHxn and [BeH2]n nanoparticles for a large range of n values. In the limit n→∞, we have obtained the experimental binding energy of a Be crystal (3.32 eV) with unexpectedly very good agreement (3.26 ± 0.06 eV), and a predicted value of 7.85 eV ± 0.02 eV for the binding energy of the [BeH2]∞ infinite system. We also predict that the majority of the lowest energy stoichiometric BenH2n nanoparticles are chains or chain-like structures. The tendency towards chain stabilization of BenHxn nanoparticles increases, as x approaches the stoichiometric value x = 2, leading for large values of n, as n→∞, to polymeric forms of bulk BeH2, which in the past have been considered as the leading forms of solid BeH2. For such 1-dimensional forms of [BeH2]n we have obtained and verified that the binding energy varies exactly proportionally to n(-1). The extrapolated desorption energy for such polymeric forms of solid BeH2 is found to be 19 ± 3 kJ mol(-1) in juxtaposition to the experimental value of 19 kJ mol(-1) for solid BeH2, suggesting that the difference ΔE in cohesive energy between the orthorhombic and polymeric form is very small (ΔE≈ 3 kJ mol(-1)). This is in full accord with the early discrepancies in the literature in determining and distinguishing the real crystal structure of solid BeH2.

  11. Synthetic studies on schisandra nortriterpenoids. Stereocontrolled synthesis of enantiopure C-5-epi ABC ring systems of micrandilactone A and lancifodilactone G using RCM.

    PubMed

    Maity, Soumitra; Matcha, Kiran; Ghosh, Subrata

    2010-06-18

    A stereocontrolled approach for the construction of ABC ring systems of micrandilactone A and lancifodilactone G has been developed. The synthesis involves construction of an enantiopure functionalized cycloheptene derivative 17 through RCM of the dienol 14 prepared from the known D-mannitol-derived unsaturated ester 12. A remarkable regioselectivity during hydroboration of the cycloheptene derivative 17 was observed during its transformation to the cycloheptanone 20. RCM of the diene 24 prepared stereoselectively from 20 gave the spiro-dihydrofuran 25. The ketal unit in 25 was then converted into the carbinols 28 and 36. A bromonium ion initiated highly stereocontrolled intramolecular etherification in 28 and 37 led to the tricyclic ethers 29 and 38, respectively. Reductive removal of bromine from 29 and 38 followed by RuO(4) oxidation led to the furo-furanone derivatives 31 and 40, the C-5-epi ABC ring systems of the schisandra nortriterpenoids 1 and 2.

  12. Combined Brillouin light scattering and microwave absorption study of magnon-photon coupling in a split-ring resonator/YIG film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, S.; Maier-Flaig, H.; Gross, R.; Hu, C.-M.; Huebl, H.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Weiler, M.

    2016-08-01

    Microfocused Brillouin light scattering (BLS) and microwave absorption (MA) are used to study magnon-photon coupling in a system consisting of a split-ring microwave resonator and an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film. The split-ring resonator is defined by optical lithography and loaded with a 1 μm-thick YIG film grown by liquid phase epitaxy. BLS and MA spectra of the hybrid system are simultaneously recorded as a function of the applied magnetic field magnitude and microwave excitation frequency. Strong coupling of the magnon and microwave resonator modes is found with a coupling strength of geff /2π = 63 MHz. The combined BLS and MA data allow us to study the continuous transition of the hybridized modes from a purely magnonic to a purely photonic mode by varying the applied magnetic field and microwave frequency. Furthermore, the BLS data represent an up-conversion of the microwave frequency coupling to optical frequencies.

  13. Structure-activity relationship studies on anti-HCV activity of ring-expanded (‘fat’) nucleobase analogues containing the imidazo[4,5-e][1,3]diazepine-4,8-dione ring system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Ning; Korba, Brent E.; Hosmane, Ramachandra S.

    2009-01-01

    In continuation of our structure-activity relationship studies on anti-HCV activity of the title imidazo[4,5-e][1,3]diazepine ring system, we report here the synthesis and effect on biological activity of introducing hydrophobic substituents at the 2-position of the heterocycle. Our results suggest that there is no particular advantage to that end as the observed antiviral activity of the test compounds was lower than the unmodified 2-bromo derivative used for comparison. The activity/toxicity profile of all target compounds, however, was still better than the reference compound ribavirin used in the antiviral assay, but not as good as that of interferon-α, the other reference compound used in the assay. PMID:17300935

  14. Recent Developments of Versatile Photoinitiating Systems for Cationic Ring Opening Polymerization Operating at Any Wavelengths and under Low Light Intensity Sources.

    PubMed

    Lalevée, Jacques; Mokbel, Haifaa; Fouassier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-20

    Photoinitiators (PI) or photoinitiating systems (PIS) usable in light induced cationic polymerization (CP) and free radical promoted cationic polymerization (FRPCP) reactions (more specifically for cationic ring opening polymerization (ROP)) together with the involved mechanisms are briefly reviewed. The recent developments of novel two- and three-component PISs for CP and FRPCP upon exposure to low intensity blue to red lights is emphasized in details. Examples of such reactions under various experimental conditions are provided.

  15. Three-dimensional patchy lattice model: Ring formation and phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Tavares, J. M.; Almarza, N. G.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of a model of particles with 2 patches of type A and 10 patches of type B. Particles are placed on the sites of a face centered cubic lattice with the patches oriented along the nearest neighbor directions. The competition between the self-assembly of chains, rings, and networks on the phase diagram is investigated by carrying out a systematic investigation of this class of models, using an extension of Wertheim's theory for associating fluids and Monte Carlo numerical simulations. We varied the ratio r ≡ ε{sub AB}/ε{sub AA} of the interaction between patches A and B, ε{sub AB}, and between A patches, ε{sub AA} (ε{sub BB} is set to 0) as well as the relative position of the A patches, i.e., the angle θ between the (lattice) directions of the A patches. We found that both r and θ (60°, 90°, or 120°) have a profound effect on the phase diagram. In the empty fluid regime (r < 1/2) the phase diagram is reentrant with a closed miscibility loop. The region around the lower critical point exhibits unusual structural and thermodynamic behavior determined by the presence of relatively short rings. The agreement between the results of theory and simulation is excellent for θ = 120° but deteriorates as θ decreases, revealing the need for new theoretical approaches to describe the structure and thermodynamics of systems dominated by small rings.

  16. Competition of phase-breaking and thermal broadening in few-mode mesoscopic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espe Hansen, Adam; Kristensen, Anders; Pedersen, Simon; Sorensen, Claus; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    2001-03-01

    The electron phase coherence length L_φ is measured in a ballistic few-mode ring interferometer. For the first time, it is demonstrated that the phase-breaking rate of the n'th harmonic h/ne of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) magnetoconductance oscillations depends on temperature T like n\\cdot L/L_φ(T), hence scales with the actual pathlength n\\cdot L. Here L is half the ring circumference. To obtain this result, it is necessary to account for the effect of thermal broadening, which depends on the phase-shifts of the AB oscillations. The even harmonics h/2ne are found to be less affected by thermal broadening than the odd harmonics h/(2n+1)e, which can be understood in terms of a simple argument, resembling the argument explaining the h/2e Aharonov-Altshuler-Spivak oscillations in disordered systems. The rings are fabricated by shallow wet-etching in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures. The phase coherence length is found to vary as T-1 in the temperature regime from 0.3 K to 4 K, and is estimated to be of the order of 30 μ m at T = 0.3 K.

  17. Which Ringed Planet...!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Don't worry - you are not the only one who thought this was a nice amateur photo of planet Saturn, Lord of the Rings in our Solar System! But then the relative brightness and positions of the moons may appear somewhat unfamiliar... and the ring system does look unusually bright when compared to the planetary disk...?? Well, it is not Saturn, but Uranus , the next giant planet further out, located at a distance of about 3,000 million km, or 20 times the distance between the Sun and the Earth. The photo shows Uranus surrounded by its rings and some of the moons, as they appear on a near-infrared image that was obtained in the K s -band (at wavelength 2.2 µm) with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile) . The exposure was made on November 19, 2002 (03:00 hrs UT) during a planetary research programme. The observing conditions were excellent (seeing 0.5 arcsec) and the exposure lasted 5 min. The angular diameter of Uranus is about 3.5 arcsec. The observers at ISAAC were Emmanuel Lellouch and Thérése Encrenaz of the Observatoire de Paris (France) and Jean-Gabriel Cuby and Andreas Jaunsen (both ESO-Chile). The rings The rings of Uranus were discovered in 1977, from observations during a stellar occultation event by astronomer teams at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Perth Observatory (Australia). Just before and after the planet moved in front of the (occulted) star, the surrounding rings caused the starlight to dim for short intervals of time. Photos obtained from the Voyager-2 spacecraft in 1986 showed a multitude of very tenuous rings. These rings are almost undetectable from the Earth in visible light. However, on the present VLT near-infrared picture, the contrast between the rings and the planet is strongly enhanced. At the particular wavelength at which this observation was made, the infalling sunlight is almost completely absorbed by gaseous methane present in the planetary atmosphere

  18. Anomalous Oscillations due to Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher Effects of the One-Dimensional Hubbard Ring in the Strong Coupling Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Kazuhiro; Ōno, Yoshiaki

    2016-12-01

    We investigate anomalous oscillations due to the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) effects of the one-dimensional Hubbard ring with flux in the strong coupling limit. By using the exact diagonalization method and the Shiba transformation, we examine the energies of the ground-state and a few excited states in the presence of the flux producing the AB or AC effect, where the transformation not only reverses the sign of the interaction U but also exchanges the role between the AB and AC effects in the model Hamiltonian. We systematically classify the AB and AC oscillations by using the number of minima Nmin of the ground-state energy as a function of a normalized phase shift ϕ for 0 ≤ ϕ < 1, and clarify the close relationship between the AB and AC effects. For example, it is shown that Nmin is given by NL - Ne (NL - N↑ + N↓) for the AB (AC) effect in the very strong attraction, where NL, Ne, N↑, and N↓ are the system size, the total number of electrons, the number of electrons with up-spin, and the number of electrons with down-spin, respectively, under the condition of NL > Ne > N↓ > N↑. In more special cases, such as for a half-filled band and the spin-balanced case (NL = Ne and N↓ = N↑), we find Nmin to be 0 (2) for the AB (AC) effect in the case of very strong repulsion. These results show us the nature of interesting phenomena originating from the interplay between the strong correlation and the quantum interference effect in a mesoscopic ring.

  19. Studies of solvation behaviour of LiI prevailing in diverse solvent systems conductometrically and spectrometrically supported by ab initio technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Koyeli; Bomzan, Pranish; Das, Rajesh Kumar; Rajbanshi, Biplab; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-03-01

    Solvation nature of Lithium iodide (LiI) for both polar and nonpolar organic solvents viz., acetonitrile and benzonitrile have been explored by effect of geometry, spectroscopic, conductometric, ab initio methods . Results of vibrational spectroscopic data were compared with experimental values. Centre of attraction is iodide anion on significant vibrational bands of benzonitrile. Fluorescence spectra provide a supporting to the mentioned facts. Ab initio calculations used for shaping the optimum location of Li+ and I- ions in ion-solvent interactions containing varying nitriles as solvent sphere. Emission band positions, intensity, shape of solvent-sensitive molecules in organic solvents of varying polarities are studied.

  20. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  1. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  2. Accurate ab initio potential energy surfaces for the 3A'' and 3A' electronic states of the O(3P)+HBr system.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G S; Ornellas, Fernando R; Peterson, Kirk A

    2012-05-07

    In this work, we report the construction of potential energy surfaces for the (3)A('') and (3)A(') states of the system O((3)P) + HBr. These surfaces are based on extensive ab initio calculations employing the MRCI+Q/CBS+SO level of theory. The complete basis set energies were estimated from extrapolation of MRCI+Q/aug-cc-VnZ(-PP) (n = Q, 5) results and corrections due to spin-orbit effects obtained at the CASSCF/aug-cc-pVTZ(-PP) level of theory. These energies, calculated over a region of the configuration space relevant to the study of the reaction O((3)P) + HBr → OH + Br, were used to generate functions based on the many-body expansion. The three-body potentials were interpolated using the reproducing kernel Hilbert space method. The resulting surface for the (3)A('') electronic state contains van der Waals minima on the entrance and exit channels and a transition state 6.55 kcal/mol higher than the reactants. This barrier height was then scaled to reproduce the value of 5.01 kcal/mol, which was estimated from coupled cluster benchmark calculations performed to include high-order and core-valence correlation, as well as scalar relativistic effects. The (3)A(') surface was also scaled, based on the fact that in the collinear saddle point geometry these two electronic states are degenerate. The vibrationally adiabatic barrier heights are 3.44 kcal/mol for the (3)A('') and 4.16 kcal/mol for the (3)A(') state.

  3. Vibrational Properties of Hydrogen-Bonded Systems Using the Multireference Generalization to the "On-the-Fly" Electronic Structure within Quantum Wavepacket ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (QWAIMD).

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Li, Xiaohu; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2014-06-10

    We discuss a multiconfigurational treatment of the "on-the-fly" electronic structure within the quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics (QWAIMD) method for coupled treatment of quantum nuclear effects with electronic structural effects. Here, multiple single-particle electronic density matrices are simultaneously propagated with a quantum nuclear wavepacket and other classical nuclear degrees of freedom. The multiple density matrices are coupled through a nonorthogonal configuration interaction (NOCI) procedure to construct the instantaneous potential surface. An adaptive-mesh-guided set of basis functions composed of Gaussian primitives are used to simplify the electronic structure calculations. Specifically, with the replacement of the atom-centered basis functions positioned on the centers of the quantum-mechanically treated nuclei by a mesh-guided band of basis functions, the two-electron integrals used to compute the electronic structure potential surface become independent of the quantum nuclear variable and hence reusable along the entire Cartesian grid representing the quantum nuclear coordinates. This reduces the computational complexity involved in obtaining a potential surface and facilitates the interpretation of the individual density matrices as representative diabatic states. The parametric nuclear position dependence of the diabatic states is evaluated at the initial time-step using a Shannon-entropy-based sampling function that depends on an approximation to the quantum nuclear wavepacket and the potential surface. This development is meant as a precursor to an on-the-fly fully multireference electronic structure procedure embedded, on-the-fly, within a quantum nuclear dynamics formalism. We benchmark the current development by computing structural, dynamic, and spectroscopic features for a series of bihalide hydrogen-bonded systems: FHF(-), ClHCl(-), BrHBr(-), and BrHCl(-). We find that the donor-acceptor structural features are in good

  4. Does the position of the electron-donating nitrogen atom in the ring system influence the efficiency of a dye-sensitized solar cell? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abul Kalam; Barik, Sunirmal; Das, Amitava; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2016-06-01

    We have reported a number of new metal-free organic dyes (2-6) that have cyclic asymmetric benzotripyrrole derivatives as donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms in the ring, fluorine and thiophene groups as π-spacers, and a cyanoacrylic acid acceptor group. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations were employed to examine the influence of the position of the donor nitrogen atom and π-conjugation on solar cell performance. The calculated electron-injection driving force (ΔG inject), electron-regeneration driving force (ΔG regen), light-harvesting efficiency (LHE), dipole moment (μ normal), and number of electrons transferred (∆q) indicate that dyes 3, 4, and 6 have significantly higher efficiencies than reference dye 1, which exhibits high efficiency. We also extended our comparison to some other reported dyes, 7-9, which have a donor nitrogen atom in the middle of the ring system. The computed results suggest that dye 6 possesses a higher incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) than reported dyes 7-9. Thus, the use of donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms appears to lead to more efficient dyes than those in which the nitrogen atom is present in the middle of the donor ring system. Graphical Abstract The locations of the nitrogen atoms in the donor groups in the designed dye molecules have an important influence on DSSC efficiency.

  5. NMR measurement system including two synchronized ring buffers, with 128 rf coils for in situ water monitoring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Aoki, Masaru; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Morisaka, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Seitaro

    2017-01-01

    A small radio-frequency (rf) coil inserted into a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be used to acquire nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from the water in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) or in oxygen gas channels in the PEFC. Measuring the spatial distribution of the water in a large PEFC requires using many rf probes, so an NMR measurement system which acquires NMR signals from 128 rf probes at intervals of 0.5 s was manufactured. The system has eight rf transceiver units with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for modulation of the excitation pulse and quadrature phase detection of the NMR signal, and one control unit with two ring buffers for data control. The sequence data required for the NMR measurement were written into one ring buffer. The acquired NMR signal data were then written temporarily into the other ring buffer and then were transmitted to a personal computer (PC). A total of 98 rf probes were inserted into the PEFC that had an electrical generation area of 16 cm × 14 cm, and the water generated in the PEFC was measured when the PEFC operated at 100 A. As a result, time-dependent changes in the spatial distribution of the water content in the MEA and the water in the oxygen gas channels were obtained.

  6. Visual Measurements of the Multiple Star STT 269 AB-C and ARN 8 AB-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Thomas; Achildiyev, Irina; Alduenda, Chandra; Bridgeman, Reid; Chamberlain, Rebecca; Hendrix, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This astrometry project was performed by a member of the faculty and students from The Evergreen State College at the 2010 Pine Mountain Observatory Summer Science Research Workshop. This study involved measuring and analyzing the separation and position angles of the multiple star system STT 269 AB-C and ARN 8 AB-D. The astrometric binary AB was treated as a single star. Separation and position angles of the C and D components relative to AB were made. Percent differences between observed and literature values were all less than 1 percent.

  7. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  8. Proximity vs. strain in intramolecular ring-closing reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Rafik

    2010-07-01

    The DFT and ab initio calculation results for ring-closing reactions of eight different ω-bromoalkanecarboxylate anions (1-8) reveal that the activation energy (ΔG ‡) for the intramolecular cyclization process is strongly correlated with both (i) the experimental intramolecular cyclization rate (log k intra) and (ii) the distance between the two reactive centres, whereas the slope values of the change in enthalpy (ΔH) vs. the attack angle (α) and the distance between the two reacting centres (r) were found to correlate strongly with the experimental strain energy of the cycle being formed (E s Exp). These results assist in designing pro-prodrug systems that can be utilized to improve the overall biopharmaceutical profile of current medications in order to enhance their effectiveness and ease their utility.

  9. Citrate utilization by Corynebacterium glutamicum is controlled by the CitAB two-component system through positive regulation of the citrate transport genes citH and tctCBA.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Melanie; Schaffer, Steffen; Mack, Christina; Bott, Michael

    2009-06-01

    In this work, the molecular basis of aerobic citrate utilization by the gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was studied. Genome analysis revealed the presence of two putative citrate transport systems. The permease encoded by citH belongs to the citrate-Mg(2+):H(+)/citrate-Ca(2+):H(+) symporter family, whereas the permease encoded by the tctCBA operon is a member of the tripartite tricarboxylate transporter family. The expression of citH or tctCBA in Escherichia coli enabled this species to utilize citrate aerobically, indicating that both CitH and TctABC are functional citrate transporters. Growth tests with the recombinant E. coli strains indicated that CitH is active with Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) but not with Mg(2+) and that TctABC is active with Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) but not with Sr(2+). We could subsequently show that, with 50 mM citrate as the sole carbon and energy source, the C. glutamicum wild type grew best when the minimal medium was supplemented with CaCl(2) but that MgCl(2) and SrCl(2) also supported growth. Each of the two transporters alone was sufficient for growth on citrate. The expression of citH and tctCBA was activated by citrate in the growth medium, independent of the presence or absence of glucose. This activation was dependent on the two-component signal transduction system CitAB, composed of the sensor kinase CitA and the response regulator CitB. CitAB belongs to the CitAB/DcuSR family of two-component systems, whose members control the expression of genes that are involved in the transport and catabolism of tricarboxylates or dicarboxylates. C. glutamicum CitAB is the first member of this family studied in Actinobacteria.

  10. Laptop induced erythema ab igne.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sudhir U K; Shenoi, Shrutakirthi D; Prabhu, Smitha

    2012-03-01

    Erythema ab igne is a reticular, pigmented dermatosis caused by prolonged and repeated exposure to infrared radiation that is insufficient to produce a burn. The use of laptop computers has increased manifold in the recent past. Prolonged contact of the laptop with the skin can lead to the development of erythema ab igne. We present a case of erythema ab igne secondary to laptop use in an Indian student.

  11. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may

  12. UV-laser microdissection system - A novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records (δ13C/δ18O) from tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Helle, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Intra-annual stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) studies of tree rings at various incremental resolutions have been attempting to extract valuable seasonal climatic and environmental information or assessing plant ecophysiological processes. For preparing high-resolution isotope samples normally wood segments or cores are mechanically divided in radial direction or cut in tangential direction. After mechanical dissection, wood samples are ground to a fine powder and either cellulose is extracted or bulk wood samples are analyzed. Here, we present a novel approach for the preparation of high-resolution stable isotope records from tree rings using an UV-laser microdissection system. Firstly, tree-ring cellulose is directly extracted from wholewood cross-sections largely leaving the wood anatomical structure intact and saving time as compared to the classical procedure. Secondly, micro-samples from cellulose cross-sections are dissected with an UV-Laser dissection microscope. Tissues of interest from cellulose cross-sections are identified and marked precisely with a screen-pen and dissected via an UV-laser beam. Dissected cellulose segments were automatically collected in capsules and are prepared for stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) analysis. The new techniques facilitate inter- and intra-annual isotope analysis on tree-ring and open various possibilities for comparisons with wood anatomy in plant eco-physiological studies. We describe the design and the handling of this novel methodology and discuss advantages and constraints given by the example of intra-annual oxygen isotope analysis on tropical trees.

  13. Classifying Saturn's F Ring Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Sremcevic, M.; Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) has recorded more than 113 stellar occultations by Saturn's F ring providing measurements with ring plane resolutions of a few dozen meters and better. Inner and outer F ring strands have been seen throughout the Cassini mission where they revealed themselves as non-continuous, azimuthally and temporally highly variable structures. In the light of a more accurate orbit description of the F ring core we find evidence for a ring that becomes dynamically more active as the system approaches anti-apse alignment with Prometheus. This is consistent with the observed increased strand activity. A recent strand that morphologically resembles the core is the strongest seen to date and points to the intricate relation between core and strands indicating the strands' violent creation. Using more than 150 identifications of various strands, we trace their kinematics and infer dynamical timescales and photometric properties. Implications for the dynamical evolution of the F ring will be discussed. This research was supported by the Cassini Project.

  14. Behavior and reproduction of invertebrate animals during and after a long-term microgravity: space experiments using an Autonomous Biological System (ABS).

    PubMed

    Ijiri, K; Mizuno, R; Narita, T; Ohmura, T; Ishikawa, Y; Yamashita, M; Anderson, G; Poynter, J; MacCallum, T

    1998-12-01

    Aquatic invertebrate animals such as Amphipods, Gastropods (pond snails), Ostracods and Daphnia (water flea) were placed in water-filled cylindrical vessels together with water plant (hornwort). The vessels were sealed completely and illuminated with a fluorescent lamp to activate the photosynthesis of the plant for providing oxygen within the vessels. Such ecosystem vessels, specially termed as Autonomous Biological System or ABS units, were exposed to microgravity conditions, and the behavior of the animals and their reproduction capacity were studied. Three space experiments were carried out. The first experiment used a Space shuttle only and it was a 10-day flight. The other two space experiments were carried out in the Space station Mir (Shuttle/Mir mission), and the flight units had been kept in microgravity for 4 months. Daphnia produced their offspring during a 10-day Shuttle flight. In the first Mir experiment, no Daphnia were detected when recovered to the ground. However, they were alive in the second Mir experiment. Daphnia were the most fragile species among the invertebrate animals employed in the present experiments. All the animals, i.e., Amphipods, pond snails, Ostracods and Daphnia had survived for 4 months in space, i.e., they had produced their offspring or repeated their life-cycles under microgravity. For the two Mir experiments, in both the flight and ground control ecosystem units, an inverse relationship was noted between the number of Amphipods and pond snails in each unit. Amphipods at 10 hours after the recovery to the ground frequently exhibited a movement of dropping straight-downward to the bottom of the units. Several Amphipods had their legs bent abnormally, which probably resulted from some physiological alterations during their embryonic development under microgravity. From the analysis of the video tape recorded in space, for Ostracods and Daphnia, a half of their population were looping under microgravity. Such looping animals

  15. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal localization and time evolution dynamics of an excess electron in heterogeneous CO2-H2O systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Jinxiang; Zhang, Meng; Bu, Yuxiang

    2014-01-28

    In view of the important implications of excess electrons (EEs) interacting with CO2-H2O clusters in many fields, using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation technique, we reveal the structures and dynamics of an EE associated with its localization and subsequent time evolution in heterogeneous CO2-H2O mixed media. Our results indicate that although hydration can increase the electron-binding ability of a CO2 molecule, it only plays an assisting role. Instead, it is the bending vibrations that play the major role in localizing the EE. Due to enhanced attraction of CO2, an EE can stably reside in the empty, low-lying π(*) orbital of a CO2 molecule via a localization process arising from its initial binding state. The localization is completed within a few tens of femtoseconds. After EE trapping, the ∠OCO angle of the core CO2 (-) oscillates in the range of 127°∼142°, with an oscillation period of about 48 fs. The corresponding vertical detachment energy of the EE is about 4.0 eV, which indicates extreme stability of such a CO2-bound solvated EE in [CO2(H2O)n](-) systems. Interestingly, hydration occurs not only on the O atoms of the core CO2 (-) through formation of O⋯H-O H-bond(s), but also on the C atom, through formation of a C⋯H-O H-bond. In the latter binding mode, the EE cloud exhibits considerable penetration to the solvent water molecules, and its IR characteristic peak is relatively red-shifted compared with the former. Hydration on the C site can increase the EE distribution at the C atom and thus reduce the C⋯H distance in the C⋯H-O H-bonds, and vice versa. The number of water molecules associated with the CO2 (-) anion in the first hydration shell is about 4∼7. No dimer-core (C2O4 (-)) and core-switching were observed in the double CO2 aqueous media. This work provides molecular dynamics insights into the localization and time evolution dynamics of an EE in heterogeneous CO2-H2O media.

  16. Decoding Debris System Substructures: Imprints of Planets/Planetesimals and Signatures of Extrinsic Influences on Material in Ring-Like Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, C. A.; Schneider, Glenn; Carson, Joseph; Debes, John H.; Gaspar, Andras; Henning, Thomas; Hines, Dean C.; Hinz, Philip; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kuchner, Marc J.; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Perrin, Marshall D.; Rodigas, T. J.; Serabyn, Gene; Silverstone, Murray D.; Stark, Christopher C.; Tamura, Motohide; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Konishi, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    How do circumstellar (CS) disks evolve and form planetary systems? Is our solar system's two-component debris disk (DD) typical? Are planets implicated by evidence of dynamical stirring in disks? Are DD architectures correlated with stellar mass? To address these highly-compelling questions of fundamental astrophysical import, we obtained deep follow-up HST/STIS coronagraphic imagery of five intermediate-inclination ring-like DDs. By combining data from two coronagraphic apertures we obtain images with unprecedented clarity, sensitivity, and photometric efficacy. We discover a scattered light counterpart to the dust disk previously seen in the mid-IR only in HD 141569 A interior to the 2 rings previously imaged in scattered light. We also place refined optical limits on planets in that system. For HR 4796 A we detect outer nebulosity extending as far as 10 arc seconds from the star, and compare it with other systems with distant dust. We report on early stages of analysis for our other 3 program stars.

  17. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  18. Double-O-Ring Plug For Leak Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Pressure plug features redundant O-ring bore seals and axial port opening laterally into space between O-rings to enable testing of seals. Axial passage in plug connected through radial passage to space between O-rings. Opening used to test O-rings, then sealed with smaller O-ring compressed by machine screw. Useful to seal test or cleanout holes normally kept closed in hydraulic actuators, pumps, and other pressurized systems.

  19. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-10-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  20. Visible and infrared mapping spectrometer for exploration of comets, asteroids, and the Saturnian system of rings and moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergens, David W.; Duval, James E.; Lockhart, Robert F.; Langevin, Yves; Formisano, Vittorio; Bellucci, Giancarlo

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to a visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) developed by American, Italian, and French scientists and engineers as a facility instrument for the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission and as a candidate facility instrument for the Cassini mission to explore Saturn and its rings and moons. VIMS is characterized by 0.35-5.2 micron spectral range with a nominal spatial resolution of 0.5 mrad and spectral resolutions of 7 nm at 0.35-1.0 micron wavelength and 16 nm at 1.0-5.2 micron wavelength.

  1. Characterization and biodegradability of sludge from a high rate A-stage contact tank and B-stage membrane bioreactor of a pilot-scale AB system treating municipal wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Ganda, Lily; Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Zhang, Dong Qing; Lin, Li Leonard; Tao, Guihe; Lee, Yingjie; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    In light of global warming mitigation efforts, increasing sludge disposal costs, and need for reduction in the carbon footprint of wastewater treatment plants, innovation in treatment technology has been tailored towards energy self-sufficiency. The AB process is a promising technology for achieving maximal energy recovery from wastewaters with minimum energy expenditure and therefore inherently reducing excess sludge production. Characterization of this novel sludge and its comparison with the more conventional B-stage sludge are necessary for a deeper understanding of AB treatment process design. This paper presents a case study of a pilot-scale AB system treating municipal wastewaters as well as a bio- (biochemical methane potential and adenosine tri-phosphate analysis) and physico-chemical properties (chemical oxygen demand, sludge volume index, dewaterability, calorific value, zeta potential and particle size distribution) comparison of the organic-rich A-stage against the B-stage activated sludge. Compared to the B-sludge, the A-sludge yielded 1.4 to 4.9 times more methane throughout the 62-week operation.

  2. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-07

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  3. A summary of laboratory testing performed to characterize and select an elastomeric O-ring material to be used in the redesigned solid rocket motors of the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    An elastomeric O-ring material is used in the joints of the redesigned solid motors (RSRM's) of the National Space Transportation System (NSTS). The selection of the O-ring material used in the RSRM's was a very thorough process that included efforts by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Langley Research Center, and the Thiokol Corporation. One of the efforts performed at MSFC was an extensive in-house laboratory test regime to screen potential O-ring materials and ultimately to characterize the elastomeric material that was chosen to be used in the RSRM's. The laboratory tests performed at MSFC are summarized.

  4. Boom and Bust Cycles in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Albers, N.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn’s F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations perturbed by Mimas and Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. The maximum clumping lags the moon by roughly π in the forcing frame. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the aggregate mean size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. For realistic values of the parameters this creates a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the boom-bust economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag roughly consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons at both these locations in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material allows fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. These more persistent objects would then orbit at the Kepler rate. Such processes can create the equinox objects seen at the B ring edge and in the F ring, explain the ragged nature of those ring regions and allow for rare events to aggregate ring particles into solid objects, recycling the ring material and extending the ring lifetime.

  5. Boom and Bust Cycles in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Albers, N.

    2010-10-01

    7/16/10 12:23 PM UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn's F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations perturbed by Mimas and Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. The maximum clumping lags the moon by π in the forcing frame. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the aggregate mean size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. For realistic values of the parameters this creates a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the boom-bust economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons at both these locations in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material allows fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. These more persistent objects would then orbit at the Kepler rate. Such processes can create the equinox objects seen at the B ring edge and in the F ring, explain the ragged nature of those ring regions and allow for rare events to aggregate ring particles into solid objects, recycling the ring material and extending the ring lifetime. 7/16/10 12:23 PM 7/16/10 12:23 PM

  6. Future studies of planetary rings by space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent space probe observations of the rings of Jupiter and Saturn have furnished a substantial enhancement of the current understanding of the outer planets' rings. Voyager 2 offers further opportunities for the study of the Neptune and Uranus ring systems. The Galileo mission to Jupiter furnishes the first opportunity for long term space probe studies of a planetary ring system. It is suggested that an appropriately instrumented Saturn orbiter would not only provide a similar opportunity for the study of the Saturn rings, but may also be the only means by which to adequately address the nature of the diverse phenomena displayed by this prototypical planetary ring system.

  7. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  8. Interactive Visualization of Shadow Effects in the Planetary System of Saturn, its Rings and its Moons using an OpenGL Shader in IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo Hernandez, E. M.; Pomarède, D.

    2012-09-01

    The planetary system of Saturn, its rings and its moons is a fantastic playground where physicists are confronting theories and observations. Since its insertion into orbit in 2004, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has returned a wealth of high-resolution images and data that calls for the development of dedicated interactive, immersive, three-dimensional, multi-purpose analysis and visualization tools. Alongside with observations, numerical simulations also provide new insights into the fundamental processes at stake in the formation of this system. The SDvision graphical interface, developed in the context of IDL Object Graphics and intended primarily for the visualization of complex and massive astrophysical plasma simulations, has been extended to provide an interactive visualization of both numerical simulations and observations of Saturn, its rings, and its moons. One major missing feature of IDL Object Graphics is the ability to render shadow effects at all. We have overcome this limitation by developing a custom GLSL Shader that is invoked by IDL objects. This Shader, based on purely geometrical computations, is fast and allows for seamless exploratory visualization of the planetary system.

  9. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  10. The ultrastructure of the anterior end of male Onchocerca volvulus: papillae, amphids, nerve ring and first indication of an excretory system in the adult filarial worm.

    PubMed

    Strote, G; Bonow, I; Attah, S

    1996-07-01

    A detailed morphological investigation of the anterior sensory organs, the nerve ring and a glomerulus-like structure in male Onchocerca volvulus was performed by means of electron microscopy. The 8 head papillae are arranged in the common 4 + 4 pattern of most filarial worms in circles around the mouth opening. The amphidial openings are found between the circles of inner and outer papillae on both sides of the mouth. Inside, several additional nerve axons are seen in the tissue of the anterior tip not related to one of the identified papillar structures. The inner and outer papillae exhibit a remarkably different fine structure, and are part of a complex system of at least 2 different receptor cell types at the anterior tip of the worm. The amphidial channel contains 8 modified cilia; accessory axons are associated with the cytoplasm of the sheath cell. The anterior nerve ring of male worms is located about 150 micrometers posterior from the outermost tip of the head region. It consists of several fibres coiled around the oesophagus. The comparison of the fine structure of the central nervous system did not show the expected morphological differences associated with the heterogeneous age distribution in the natural worm population. This was in contrast to previous findings with respect to tissues in different parts of the worm. The study also provides the first evidence that suggests the existence of an excretory organ in a filarial worm in the region of the anterior nerve ring. Paired glomerulus-like structures in the lateral chords and a canal formed by a projection of the basal zone of the cuticles were identified.

  11. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  12. On certain Hecke rings

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Sam; Bressler, Paul

    1987-01-01

    We examine rings that embed into the smash product of the group algebra of the Weyl group with the field of meromorphic functions on the Cartan subalgebra and are generated by elements that satisfy braid relations. We prove that every such ring is isomorphic to either the Hecke algebra, the nil Hecke ring, or the group algebra of the Weyl group. PMID:16593804

  13. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  14. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  15. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  16. On the vortex ring state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard; Gillies, E.; Giuni, M.; Hislop, J.; Savas, Omer

    2014-11-01

    The investigation considers the vortex ring state, a phenomenon normally associated with the collapse of a trailing, helical vortex wake into a unstable vortex ring, and is a problem encountered when a helicopter rotor descends into its own wake. A series of wind tunnel and towing tank experiments on rotor systems have been performed, and a comparison is then made with the behaviour of a specially designed open core, annular jet system that generates a mean flow velocity profile similar to that observed below a rotor. In experimentally simulated descents the jet system forms flow patterns that are topologically similar to the vortex ring state of a rotor system. Furthermore the dynamic behaviour of the flow shares many of the important characteristics of the rotor flow. This result suggests that the phenomenon of the vortex ring state of a rotor wake is decoupled from the detailed vortex dynamics of the helical vortex filaments themselves. The presentation will describe the principle behind the investigation, the details of the annular jet system and the results gained using PIV and flow visualisation of the wake and jet systems.

  17. Archiving of Planetary Ring Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Stellar occultation data provide our only Earth-based means of probing planetary rings at kilometer spatial resolution. The occultation data archive at MIT contains original data and analysis products of stellar occultations by the ring systems of the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune observed by members of the group (and other groups) from 1977 to the present. During this time period, several media have been used to record and store the original and processed data: (1) chart records; (2) printed output, (3) audio reel tape; (4) audio cassette tape; (5) 7-track, 1/2-inch computer tape; (6) 9-track, 1/2-inch computer tape at 800, 1600, and 6250 bpi; (7) NOVA disk platters (2.5 and 5.0 Mbyte); (8) write once optical disks; (9) punched cards; and (10) read-write optical disks. With the rapid change of computer technology over this time period, some of these media have become not only obsolete, but nearly extinct. In particular, it has become nearly impossible to find any facilities that can still read 800 bpi tapes, which contain the only copies of several important data sets for the ring system of Uranus. In particular, we have an extensive ring data collection that includes data sets for the following Uranian ring occultations: U0, U11, U12, U13, U14, U25, U17, and U36.

  18. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jacob; Stewart, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of rings have traditionally been done using N-body methods, granting insight into the interactions of individual ring particles on varying scales. However, due to the scale of a typical ring system and the sheer number of particles involved, a global N-body simulation is too computationally expensive, unless particle collisions are replaced by stochastic forces (Bromley & Kenyon, 2013). Rings are extraordinarily flat systems and therefore are well-suited to existing geophysical shallow-water hydrodynamics models with well-established non-linear advection methods. By adopting a general relationship between pressure and surface density such as a polytropic equation of state, we can modify the shallow-water formula to treat a thin, compressible, self-gravitating, shearing fluid. Previous hydrodynamic simulations of planetary rings have been restricted to axisymmetric flows and therefore have not treated the response to nonaxisymmetric perturbations by moons (Schmidt & Tscharnuter 1999, Latter & Ogilvie 2010). We seek to expand on existing hydrodynamic methods and, by comparing our work with complementary N-body simulations and Cassini observations, confirm the veracity of our results at small scales before eventually moving to a global domain size. We will use non-Newtonian, dynamically variable viscosity to model the viscous transport caused by unresolved self-gravity wakes. Self-gravity will be added to model the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as density waves and edge waves. Support from NASA Outer Planets and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Dynamics of dust in Jupiter's gossamer rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D.; Burns, J.; Krueger, H.; Showalter, M.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Galileo spacecraft has drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint rings. We now know the system to be composed of a main ring 7000km wide whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of gossamer rings, each one extending inward from a small moon. These moonlets, Thebe and Amalthea, have large orbital tilts and resulting vertical excursions of 1150km and 4300km, respectively. The vertical thicknesses of the two Gossamer rings accurately match these values, providing compelling evidence that the two small satellites act as the dominant sources of ring material. Ring Material is born during high speed impacts onto the moonlet surfaces, after which the material evolves inward under the action of a dissipative force, either Poynting-Robertson Drag or Resonant Charge Variations. The basic framework for the origin and evolution of the Gossamer Rings is well understood, but there are a few loose ends that are not so easily explained: i) an outward extension of the Thebe Ring, ii) the nature of the dissipative force. In this talk I will report my latest dynamical modeling of the Gossamer rings associated with Thebe and Amalthea, and will discuss how in-situ impact data collected by the Galileo dust detector during the first ever ring "fly-through" may help to resolve some of these and other outstanding issues.

  20. Absence of localization in a disordered one-dimensional ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Jean

    2009-07-22

    Absence of localization is demonstrated analytically to leading order in weak disorder in a one-dimensional Anderson model of a ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux. The result follows from adapting an earlier perturbation treatment of disorder in a superconducting ring subjected to an imaginary vector potential proportional to a depinning field for flux lines bound to random columnar defects parallel to the axis of the ring. The absence of localization in the ring threaded by an AB flux for sufficiently weak disorder is compatible with large free-electron-type persistent current obtained in recent studies of the above model.

  1. 5,10b-Ethanophenanthridine amaryllidaceae alkaloids inspire the discovery of novel bicyclic ring systems with activity against drug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Henry, Sean; Kidner, Ria; Reisenauer, Mary R; Magedov, Igor V; Kiss, Robert; Mathieu, Véronique; Lefranc, Florence; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Antonio; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Xiuye; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Cencic, Regina; Pelletier, Jerry; Cavazos, David A; Brenner, Andrew J; Aksenov, Alexander V; Rogelj, Snezna; Kornienko, Alexander; Frolova, Liliya V

    2016-09-14

    Plants of the Amaryllidaceae family produce a large variety of alkaloids and non-basic secondary metabolites, many of which are investigated for their promising anticancer activities. Of these, crinine-type alkaloids based on the 5,10b-ethanophenanthridine ring system were recently shown to be effective at inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells resistant to various pro-apoptotic stimuli and representing tumors with dismal prognoses refractory to current chemotherapy, such as glioma, melanoma, non-small-cell lung, esophageal, head and neck cancers, among others. Using this discovery as a starting point and taking advantage of a concise biomimetic route to the crinine skeleton, a collection of crinine analogues were synthetically prepared and evaluated against cancer cells. The compounds exhibited single-digit micromolar activities and retained this activity in a variety of drug-resistant cancer cell cultures. This investigation resulted in the discovery of new bicyclic ring systems with significant potential in the development of effective clinical cancer drugs capable of overcoming cancer chemotherapy resistance.

  2. Phenolic Polymer Solvation in Water and Ethylene Glycol II: Ab Initio Computations.

    PubMed

    Bauschlicher, Charles W; Bucholz, Eric W; Haskins, Justin B; Monk, Joshua D; Lawson, John W

    2017-03-14

    Ab initio techniques are used to study the interaction of ethylene glycol and water with phenolic polymer. The water bonds more strongly with the phenolic OH than with the ring. The phenolic OH groups can form hydrogen bonds between themselves. For more than one water molecule, there is a competition between water-water and water-phenolic interactions. Ethylene glycol shows the same effects as water, but the potential energy surface is further complicated by CH$_2$-phenolic interactions, different conformers of ethylene glycol and two OH groups on each molecule. Thus the ethylene glycol-phenolic potential is more complicated than is the water-phenolic potential. The results of the {\\it ab initio} calculations are compared to those obtained using a force field. These calibration studies show that the water system is easier to describe than the ethylene glycol system. The calibrations studies confirm the reliability of force fields used in our companion molecular dynamics study of a phenolic polymer in water and ethylene solutions.

  3. Ab initio Theory of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2007-03-01

    With blooming experimental synthesis of various nanostructures out of many semiconductor materials, there is an urgent need to calculate the electronic structures and optical properties of these nanosystems based on reliable ab initio methods. Unfortunately, due to the O(N^3) scaling of the conventional ab initio calculation methods based on the density functional theory (DFT), and the >1000 atom sizes of the most experimental nanosystems, the direct applications of these conventional ab intio methods are often difficult. Here we will present the calculated results using our O(N) scaling charge patching method (CPM) [1,2] to nanosystems up to 10,000 atoms. The CPM yields the charge density of a nanosystem by patching the charge motifs generated from small prototype systems. The CPM electron/hole eigen energies differ from the directly calculated results by only ˜10-20 meV. We will present the optical band gaps of quantum dots and wires, quantum rods, quantum dot/quantum well, and quantum dots doped with impurities. Besides good agreements with experimental measurements, we will demonstrate why it is important to perform ab initio calculations, in contrast with the continuum model k.p calculations. We will show the effects of surface polarization potentials and the internal electric fields. Finally, a linear scaling 3 dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method will be discussed. The LS3DF method can be used to calculate the total energy and atomic forces of a large nanosystem, with the results practically the same as the direct DFT method. Our work demonstrates that, with the help of supercomputers, it is now feasible to calculate the electronic structures and optical properties of >10,000 atom nanocrystals with ab initio accuracy. [1] L.W. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 256402 (2002). [2] J. Li, L.W. Wang, Phys. Rev. B 72, 125325 (2005).

  4. Transcriptional Analysis of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pumps System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Role in Carbapenem Resistance in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Debarati; Das Talukdar, Anupam; Dutta Choudhury, Manabendra; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Paul, Deepjyoti; Dhar Chanda, Debadatta; Chakravorty, Atanu; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance presents severe threat to the treatment of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The study was undertaken to investigate the role of efflux pumps in conferring meropenem resistance and effect of single dose exposure of meropenem on transcription level of mexA gene in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. Further, in this investigation an effort was made to assess whether different components of MexAB-OprM operon expresses in the same manner and the extent of contributions of those components in meropenem resistance in its natural host (P. aeruginosa) and in a heterologous host (E. coli). Out of 83 meropenem nonsusceptible isolates, 22 isolates were found to possess efflux pump activity phenotypically. Modified hodge test and multiplex PCR confirmed the absence of carbapenemase genes in those isolates. All of them were of multidrug resistant phenotype and were resistant to all the carbepenem drug tested. MexAB-OprM efflux pump was found to be overexpressed in all the study isolates. It could be observed that single dose exposure meropenem could give rise to trivial increase in transcription of mexA gene. Different constructs of MexAB-OprM (mexR-mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB) could be expressed in both its natural (P. aeruginosa PAO1) and heterologous host (E. coli JM107) but transcription level of mexA gene varied in both the hosts before and after single dose exposure of meropenem. Different components of the operon failed to enhance meropenem resistance in E. coli JM107 and P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study could prove that MexAB-OprM efflux pump can significantly contribute to meropenem resistance in hospital isolates of P. aeruginosa where an acquired resistant mechanism is absent. Thus, equal importance should be given for diagnosis of intrinsic resistance mechanism so as to minimize treatment failure. As meropenem could not enhance mexA transcriptions significantly, there

  5. Simulation of Rings about Ellipsoidal Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akash; Nadkarni-Ghosh, Sharvari; Sharma, Ishan

    2016-10-01

    Recent discovery of rings around Chariklo, a centaur orbiting the Sun (F. Braga-Ribas et al., 2014) and speculations of rings around minor planet, Chiron (Ortiz et al., 2015), Saturn's satellites, Rhea (Jones et al., 2008; Schenk et al., 2011), Iapetus (Ip, 2006) or exoplanets, suggest that rings about non-spherical bodies is perhaps a more general phenomenon than anticipated. As a first step towards understanding such systems, we examine the dynamical behavior of rings around similar bodies using N-body simulations. Our code employs the `local simulation method' (Wisdom & Tremaine, 1988; Salo, 1995) and accounts for particle interactions via collisions using Discrete Element Method (Cundall & Strack, 1978; Bhateja et al., 2016) and mutual gravitation. The central body has been modeled as an axisymmetric ellipsoid characterized by its axis ratio, or defined via characteristic frequencies (circular, vertical and epicyclic frequency) representing the gravitational field of an axisymmetric body. We vary the central body's characterizing parameter and observe the change in various ring properties like the granular temperature, impact frequency, radial width and vertical thickness. We also look into the effect on ring properties upon variation in the size of the central body-ring system. Further, we investigate the role of characteristic frequencies in dictating the ring dynamics, and how this could help in qualitatively estimating the ring dynamics about any arbitrary central body with symmetry about the equatorial plane and the axis normal to it.

  6. On the solar dust ring(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.

    Based on a mechanism to form the solar dust ring, it is proved that the observed peak in infrared F-corona cannot be explained by silicate type grains alone. Preliminary analysis on the recent infrared data of the F-corona by Maihara et al. (1984) has suggested that the ring particles have different physical properties compared with the dust grains, which produce the background F-corona.

  7. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  8. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pantcheva, Mina B.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior chamber drainage angle surgery, namely trabeculotomy and goniotomy, has been commonly utilized in children for many years. Its’ reported success has ranged between 68% and 100% in infants and young children with congenital glaucoma. However, the long-term success of these procedures has been limited in adults presumably due to the formation of anterior synechiae (AS) in the postoperative phase. Recently, ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome™ has emerged as a novel surgical approach to effectively and selectively remove and ablate the trabecular meshwork and the inner wall of the Schlemm’s canal in an attempt to avoid AS formation or other forms of wound healing with resultant closure of the cleft. This procedure seems to have an appealing safety profile with respect to early hypotony or infection if compared to trabeculectomy or glaucoma drainage device implantation. This might be advantageous in some of the impoverish regions of the Middle East and Africa where patients experience difficulties keeping up with their postoperative visits. It is important to note that no randomized trial comparing the Trabectome to other glaucoma procedures appears to have been published to date. Trabectome surgery is not a panacea, however, and it is associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may require additional glaucoma surgery as well as a high incidence of hyphema. Reported results show that postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) remains, at best, in the mid-teen range making it undesirable in patients with low-target IOP goals. A major advantage of Trabectome surgery is that it does not preclude further glaucoma surgery involving the conjunctiva, such as a trabeculectomy or drainage device implantation. As prospective randomized long-term clinical data become available, we will be better positioned to elucidate the exact role of this technique in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium. PMID:21180426

  9. Constraining the radial distribution of water ice and chromophores across Saturn's rings, regular and minor satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Hedman, M. M.; Tosi, F.; Buratti, B. J.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R. H.

    2012-04-01

    The main aim of this work is to trace the radial distribution of surface water ice and chromophores across Saturn's rings, regular and minor satellites using Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) data. Reflectance spectra of these different objects are analyzed and clustered in spectral classes using specific VIS-IR indicators applied to VIMS datasets. Specifically, we report results from the analysis of about 3,000 disk-integrated observations of the icy satellites and ten rings radial mosaics. Surface compositions and regolith properties are inferred through the comparison with laboratory and synthetic spectra of analogue materials. In both cases, for each target it is essential to process as many observations taken at different illumination conditions as possible, in order to decouple the phase response from spectral analysis. With the exclusion of Phoebe and the dark material coating Iapetus' leading hemisphere, VIMS data demonstrate that the water ice radial distribution, traced using the 1.5-2.0 µm band depths, is almost constant across the entire Saturnian system. This result is an indication of the "alien" nature of Phoebe and Iapetus dark material in Saturn's original population. Chromophores mixed in ice are constrained thanks to their characteristic reddening shown at visible wavelengths. The maximum reddening is measured across the A-B rings and on Rhea and Hyperion. Moreover our analysis allows us to recognize several other specific effects characterizing the Saturnian population, like: 1) the dichotomy between regular satellites leading and trailing hemispheres caused by the accumulation of exogenic material and by interaction with magnetospheric particles; 2) the low reddening seen in the spectra of the satellites orbiting within the E-ring (from Mimas to Tethys) caused by the coating of Enceladus plumes particles; 3) the spectral similarities among Prometheus, Pandora and A-B ring particles point to a possible common origin; 4

  10. Traversable wormholes: The Roman ring

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this Brief Report I introduce yet another class of geometries for which semiclassical chronology protection theorems are of dubious physical reliability. I consider a {ital {open_quotes}Roman ring{close_quotes}} of traversable wormholes, wherein a number of wormholes are arranged in a ring in such a manner that no subset of wormholes is near chronology violation, though the combined system can be arbitrarily close to chronology violation. I show that (with enough wormholes in the ring) the gravitational vacuum polarization (the expectation value of the quantum stress-energy tensor) can be made arbitrarily small. In particular, the back reaction can be kept arbitrarily small all the way to the {open_quotes}reliability horizon,{close_quotes} so that semiclassical quantum gravity becomes unreliable before the gravitational back reaction becomes large. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Let Freedom Ring! Bulletin, 1937, No. 32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Harold G.; Calhoun, Dorothy; Hatch, Roy W.; Cohen, Philip H.; Schramm, Rudolf

    1937-01-01

    This volume of "Let Freedom Ring!" contains the scripts of the 13 national broadcasts of the radio series of that name presented in the spring of 1937 over the national network of the Columbia Broadcast System. In "Let Freedom Ring!" you will find the courage, the struggle, the triumph of men and women who fought to win and safeguard liberties…

  12. Crystal chemical control of clinopyroxene-melt partitioning in the Di-Ab-An system: implications for elemental fractionations in the depleted mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, C. C.; Shaw, H. F.; Ryerson, F. J.; Williams, Q.; Gill, J.

    1998-08-01

    The partitioning of fifteen trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Yb, Hf, Ta, Pb and Th) between clinopyroxene and synthetic melt has been studied in two compositions along an isotherm in the diopside-albite-anorthite ternary at 1 bar pressure. The two compositions correspond to ~ Di65An35 and ~ Di55Ab45 and produce clinopyroxenes distinct in chemistry while melt compositions range from 49 wt % SiO2 to 61 wt. % SiO2. The partition coefficients of high field strength elements (HFSE) increase by factors of 2 to 8 in Di-An experiments relative to Di-Ab experiments while other elements show very little change (+/- 20%) between compositions. The change in HFSE partitioning correlates with increases in tetrahedral Al2O3 (IVAl) content of clinopyroxenes in the anorthite-bearing experiments. Changes in DTa/DNb also correlate with IVA1 based on a survey of previously published determinations.

  13. Phylogenetic and environmental diversity of DsrAB-type dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Albert Leopold; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Rattei, Thomas; Pester, Michael; Loy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The energy metabolism of essential microbial guilds in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle is based on a DsrAB-type dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase that either catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide during anaerobic respiration of sulfate, sulfite and organosulfonates, or acts in reverse during sulfur oxidation. Common use of dsrAB as a functional marker showed that dsrAB richness in many environments is dominated by novel sequence variants and collectively represents an extensive, largely uncharted sequence assemblage. Here, we established a comprehensive, manually curated dsrAB/DsrAB database and used it to categorize the known dsrAB diversity, reanalyze the evolutionary history of dsrAB and evaluate the coverage of published dsrAB-targeted primers. Based on a DsrAB consensus phylogeny, we introduce an operational classification system for environmental dsrAB sequences that integrates established taxonomic groups with operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at multiple phylogenetic levels, ranging from DsrAB enzyme families that reflect reductive or oxidative DsrAB types of bacterial or archaeal origin, superclusters, uncultured family-level lineages to species-level OTUs. Environmental dsrAB sequences constituted at least 13 stable family-level lineages without any cultivated representatives, suggesting that major taxa of sulfite/sulfate-reducing microorganisms have not yet been identified. Three of these uncultured lineages occur mainly in marine environments, while specific habitat preferences are not evident for members of the other 10 uncultured lineages. In summary, our publically available dsrAB/DsrAB database, the phylogenetic framework, the multilevel classification system and a set of recommended primers provide a necessary foundation for large-scale dsrAB ecology studies with next-generation sequencing methods. PMID:25343514

  14. Multiple-Ring Digital Communication Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1992-01-01

    Optical-fiber digital communication network to support data-acquisition and control