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Sample records for ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

  1. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Cytotoxic Responses in the Tasmanian Devil

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gabriella K.; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A. Bruce; Woods, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  2. A novel one-step, highly sensitive fluorometric assay to evaluate cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nociari, M M; Shalev, A; Benias, P; Russo, C

    1998-04-15

    In this study, a fluorometric method using alamarBlue has been developed for detecting cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. AlamarBlue is a non-toxic metabolic indicator of viable cells that becomes fluorescent upon mitochondrial reduction. Specific lysis of targets by effector cells is quantified by comparing the total number of viable cells in wells containing effector and targets together, with wells where target and effector cells were separately seeded. Cell-mediated cytotoxic activity by alloreactive T cells and natural killer cells has been detected using a novel application of the alamarBlue technique. The assay that we have developed to detect cell-mediated cytotoxicity is extremely sensitive and specific and requires a significant lower number of effector cells than the standard 51Cr assay. Since alamarBlue reagent is non-toxic to cells and the assay can be performed under sterile conditions, effector cells may be recovered at the end for further analysis or cell expansion, if desired. Direct comparison of cell-mediated cytotoxicity measured by the alamarBlue method with the standard 51Cr release assay revealed that the former method is as specific and more sensitive than the conventional assay. Moreover, very small inter and intra-assay variations have been observed for alamarBlue cytotoxicity assays. In conclusion, this study shows that the alamarBlue assay is an extremely sensitive, economical, simple and non-toxic procedure to evaluate cell-mediated cytotoxicity that yields accurate results using a limited number of effector cells. Furthermore, since this assay is a one-step procedure, and does not involve any risk for the personnel, it may be useful to analyze automatically cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a large number of samples.

  3. New flow cytometric assays for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zaritskaya, Liubov; Shurin, Michael R; Sayers, Thomas J; Malyguine, Anatoli M

    2010-06-01

    The exact immunologic responses after vaccination that result in effective antitumor immunity have not yet been fully elucidated and the data from ex vivo T-cell assays have not yet defined adequate surrogate markers for clinical efficacy. A more detailed knowledge of the specific immune responses that correlate with positive clinical outcomes should help to develop better or novel strategies to effectively activate the immune system against tumors. Furthermore, clinically relevant material is often limited and, thus, precludes the ability to perform multiple assays. The two main assays currently used to monitor lymphocyte-mediated cytoxicity in cancer patients are the (51)Cr-release assay and IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The former has a number of disadvantages, including low sensitivity, poor labeling and high spontaneous release of isotope from some tumor target cells. Additional problems with the (51)Cr-release assay include difficulty in obtaining autologous tumor targets, and biohazard and disposal problems for the isotope. The ELISpot assays do not directly measure cytotoxic activity and are, therefore, a surrogate marker of cyotoxic capacity of effector T cells. Furthermore, they do not assess cytotoxicity mediated by the production of the TNF family of death ligands by the cytotoxic cells. Therefore, assays that allow for the simultaneous measurement of several parameters may be more advantageous for clinical monitoring. In this respect, multifactor flow cytometry-based assays are a valid addition to the currently available immunologic monitoring assays. Use of these assays will enable detection and enumeration of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and their specific effector functions and any correlations with clinical responses. Comprehensive, multifactor analysis of effector cell responses after vaccination may help to detect factors that determine the success or failure of a vaccine and its immunological potency.

  4. Fas and its ligand in a general mechanism of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Hanabuchi, S; Koyanagi, M; Kawasaki, A; Shinohara, N; Matsuzawa, A; Nishimura, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Yonehara, S; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity, we estimated the involvement of apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule on the target cells and its ligand on the effector cells. When redirected by ConA or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, a CD4+ T-cell clone, BK1, could lyse the target cells expressing wild-type Fas molecule but not those expressing death signaling-deficient mutants. This indicates the involvement of Fas-mediated signal transduction in the target cell lysis by BK1. Anti-CD3-activated but not resting BK1 expressed Fas ligand as detected by binding of a soluble Fas-Ig fusion protein, and the BK1-mediated cytotoxicity was blocked by the addition of Fas-Ig, implicating the inducible Fas ligand in the BK1 cytotoxicity. Ability to exert the Fas-mediated cytotoxicity was not confined to BK1, but splenic CD4+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD8+ T cells could also exert the Fas-dependent target cell lysis. This indicates that the Fas-mediated target cell lytic pathway can be generally involved in the T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, CD4+ T cells prepared from gld/gld mice did not mediate the Fas-mediated cytotoxicity, indicating defective expression of functional Fas ligand in gld mice. PMID:7515183

  5. RB mutation and RAS overexpression induce resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Morales, Mario; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier; Golán-Cancela, Irene; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Costoya, Jose A; de la Cruz, Verónica Pérez; Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio; Sotelo, Julio; Pineda, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Several theories aim to explain the malignant transformation of cells, including the mutation of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Deletion of Rb (a tumor suppressor), overexpression of mutated Ras (a proto-oncogene), or both, are sufficient for in vitro gliomagenesis, and these genetic traits are associated with their proliferative capacity. An emerging hallmark of cancer is the ability of tumor cells to evade the immune system. Whether specific mutations are related with this, remains to be analyzed. To address this issue, three transformed glioma cell lines were obtained (Rb(-/-), Ras(V12), and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12)) by in vitro retroviral transformation of astrocytes, as previously reported. In addition, Ras(V12) and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12) transformed cells were injected into SCID mice and after tumor growth two stable glioma cell lines were derived. All these cells were characterized in terms of Rb and Ras gene expression, morphology, proliferative capacity, expression of MHC I, Rae1δ, and Rae1αβγδε, mult1, H60a, H60b, H60c, as ligands for NK cell receptors, and their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results show that transformation of astrocytes (Rb loss, Ras overexpression, or both) induced phenotypical and functional changes associated with resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, the transfer of cell lines of transformed astrocytes into SCID mice increased resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, thus suggesting that specific changes in a tumor suppressor (Rb) and a proto-oncogene (Ras) are enough to confer resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells and therefore provide some insight into the ability of tumor cells to evade immune responses.

  6. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity to Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses After Influenza Vaccination in Humans.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weimin; Liu, Feng; Wilson, Jason R; Holiday, Crystal; Li, Zhu-Nan; Bai, Yaohui; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A; Levine, Min Z

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Detection of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) antigens by conventional serological assays is currently the main immune correlate of protection for influenza vaccines However, current prepandemic avian influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic in inducing nAbs despite considerable protection conferred. Recent studies show that Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HA antigens are readily detectable in the sera of healthy individuals and patients with influenza infection. Methods.  Virus neutralization and ADCC activities of serum samples from individuals who received either seasonal or a stock-piled H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay, microneutralization assay, and an improved ADCC natural killer (NK) cell activation assay. Results.  Immunization with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine led to strong expansion of both nAbs and ADCC-mediating antibodies (adccAbs) to H3 antigen of the vaccine virus in 24 postvaccination human sera. In sharp contrast, 18 individuals vaccinated with the adjuvanted H5N1 avian influenza vaccine mounted H5-specific antibodies with strong ADCC activities despite moderate virus neutralization capacity. Strength of HA-specific ADCC activities is largely associated with the titers of HA-binding antibodies and not with the fine antigenic specificity of anti-HA nAbs. Conclusions.  Detection of both nAbs and adccAbs may better reflect protective capacity of HA-specific antibodies induced by avian influenza vaccines. PMID:27419174

  7. Compromised NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Chronic SIV/SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuan; Li, Dan; Luo, Zhenwu; Liang, Hua; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Wang, Nidan; Liu, Donghua; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang; Yan, Huimin; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributes to the control of HIV/SIV infection. However, little is known about the ADCC function of natural killer (NK) cells in non-human primate model. Here we demonstrated that ADCC function of NK cells was significantly compromised in chronic SIV/SHIV infection, correlating closely with the expression of FcγRIIIa receptor (CD16) on NK cells. CD32, another class of IgG Fc receptors, was identified on NK cells with higher expression in the infected macaques and the blockade of CD32 impacted the ability of NK cells to respond to antibody-coated target cells. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a group of enzymes normally involved in tissue/receptor remodeling, could restore NK cell-mediated ADCC with increased CD16 expression on macaque NK cells. These data offer a clearer understanding of NK cell-mediated ADCC in rhesus macaques, which will allow us to evaluate the ADCC repertoire arising from preclinical vaccination studies in non-human primates and inform us in the future design of effective HIV vaccination strategies. PMID:23424655

  8. Effect of Lactobacillus brevis KB290 on the cell-mediated cytotoxic activity of mouse splenocytes: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Erika; Fuke, Nobuo; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Yajima, Nobuhiro

    2013-11-14

    Lactic acid bacteria confer a variety of health benefits. Here, we investigate the mechanisms by which Lactobacillus brevis KB290 (KB290) enhances cell-mediated cytotoxic activity. Female BALB/c mice aged 9 weeks were fed a diet containing KB290 (3 × 10(9) colony-forming units/g) or starch for 1 d. The resulting cytotoxic activity of splenocytes against YAC-1 cells was measured using flow cytometry and analysed for gene expression using DNA microarray technology. KB290 enhanced the cell-mediated cytotoxic activity of splenocytes. DNA microarray analysis identified 327 up-regulated and 347 down-regulated genes that characterised the KB290 diet group. The up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in Gene Ontology terms related to immunity, and, especially, a positive regulation of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity existed among these terms. Almost all the genes included in the term encoded major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules involved in the presentation of antigen to CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells. Marco and Signr1 specific to marginal zone macrophages (MZM), antigen-presenting cells, were also up-regulated. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the proportion of MZM was significantly increased by KB290 ingestion. Additionally, the over-represented Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways among the up-regulated genes were those for natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antigen processing and presentation. The results for the selected genes associated with NK cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. These results suggest that enhanced cytotoxic activity could be caused by the activation of NK cells and/or of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells stimulated via MHC class I presentation.

  9. Augmentation of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity following in vivo therapy with recombinant interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Hank, J A; Robinson, R R; Surfus, J; Mueller, B M; Reisfeld, R A; Cheung, N K; Sondel, P M

    1990-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAB) with tumor specificity are able to enhance the immunological specificity of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells. Antibodies may also be used to broaden the range of tumor types susceptible to immune mediated cytotoxicity by the activated LAK cells. In these studies, mAB with relative tumor specificity were used to target immunologically activated effector cells in an in vitro antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. The mAB included: 3F8 and 14.G2a, which are both specific for neuroblastoma and melanoma and recognize ganglioside GD2, and mAB ING-1, a mouse-human chimeric antibody with constant regions from human IgG1 and kappa chains and variable regions from a mouse mAB that binds to a broad range of human adenocarcinomas. Each of these mAB was able to mediate ADCC with fresh effector cells and antibody binding targets. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from cancer patients prior to and following in vivo therapy with interleukin 2, a significant increase was noted in ADCC activity by peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained following IL-2 therapy. Inclusion of IL-2 in the medium during the cytotoxic assay with mAB further boosted ADCC. The total activity seen was often greater than the sum of the independent LAK activity and standard ADCC activity. The cells responsible for this ADCC had the CD16+ Fc receptor. Combining IL-2 with mAB in clinical tumor therapy may lead to a wider range of tumor types being responsive to immunotherapy and may also enhance the efficacy of therapy by specifically targeting activated effector cells to tumor cells recognized by mAB. Our results provide strong support for the testing of these hypotheses in clinical trials by combining in vivo treatment with IL-2 and mAB able to mediate ADCC.

  10. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  11. NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Morris, Zachary S; Sondel, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be "specifically activated" through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which regulate the function and response of NK cells toward target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR-ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies.

  12. In vitro stimulation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity by acute leukaemias.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Acute leukaemias stimulated proliferative and cell-mediated cytotoxic (CMC) responses in vitro in normal (unprimed) lymphocytes. Proliferation was detected by increases in viable cell counts and [3H]dT incorporation in mixed lymphocyte-leukaemia-cell cultures. CMC detected on cultured cell-line targets (CCL) including K562 was generally much stronger than on fresh leukaemia cells, and correlated with stimulation of [3H]dT uptake in the responding lymphocytes. Leukaemias which were resistant as targets to CMC were able competitively to inhibit CMC on K562, though not as efficiently as blocking by K562 itself. With one leukaemia, blocking of CMC increased as the level of CMC on K562 was amplified by greater numbers of stimulating cells in the sensitization phase. This suggests that in certain cases blocking of effector cells by acute-leukaemia cells may depend upon the state of activation of the effector cells. Lymphocytes from a leukaemia patient in remission, treated with allogeneic leukaemia-cell immunotherapy and stimulated in vitro with immunizing leukaemia cells, developed strong anti-leukaemic CMC. A non-immunized patient's lymphocytes did not respond in this way, despite comparable levels of CMC on K562 in both patients. Dual stimulation of unprimed normal lymphocytes and remission lymphocytes with allogeneic or autologous leukaemias and various cell lines, amplified anti-leukaemic CMC, but did not markedly alter CMC or CCL. These data do not formally exclude the mediation of in vitro-stimulated anti-leukaemic CMC by NK-like cells, but suggest that such effector cells differ qualitatively from NK-like cells detected in the absence of anti-leukaemic CMC. PMID:6451236

  13. In-vitro cell-mediated cytotoxicity for autologous liver cells in chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, M; Alberti, A; Tremolada, F; Williams, R; Eddleston, A L; Realdi, G

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the possible mechanisms of liver cell injury in chronic non-A, non-B (NANB) hepatitis, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from 16 patients with chronic NANB hepatitis were incubated with autologous hepatocytes in a microcytotoxicity assay. Significant cytotoxicity was demonstrated in 11 patients. T-enriched lymphocytes exhibited significantly greater cytotoxicity than non-T enriched cells. No significant inhibition of cytotoxicity was observed following preincubation of the liver cells with either monoclonal or polyclonal anti-HBc, or monoclonal anti-HBs, or addition of either purified HBsAg or recombinant HBcAg to the culture, indicating that there was no detectable cross-reactivity in this system between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and NANB-associated antigen(s). Preincubation of the patients' hepatocytes with polyclonal IgG purified from a serum of a patient who recovered from an acute NANB hepatitis, did not significantly alter cytotoxicity. Liver cell surface-bound IgG was detected by immunofluorescence in only two of the patients, a finding consistent with existing evidence of poor antibody responses to both liver membrane and NANB-associated antigens. Control experiments using PBL from allogeneic normal donors exhibited normal cytotoxicity for the patients' hepatocytes supporting the hypothesis that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is unlikely to play a significant role in this clinical setting. PMID:3082546

  14. Anti-Sp17 monoclonal antibody with antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity activities against human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia-xi; Cao, Wang-li; Li, Fang-qiu; Shi, Li-ning; Jia, Xuan

    2012-12-01

    Sperm protein 17 (Sp17) is a cancer testis antigen that has been shown to be overexpressed in a variety of gynecologic malignancies, in particular ovarian cancer. Emerging evidences indicate that Sp17 is involved in tumorigenesis and in the migration of malignant cells. It has been proposed as a useful target for tumor-vaccine strategies and a novel marker to define tumor subsets and predict drug response. However, the antitumor activity of anti-Sp17 monoclonal antibody (anti-Sp17 mAb) has not been investigated. In this study, the in vitro cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) activities of anti-Sp17 mAb were evaluated using Sp17-positive ovarian cancer cells as targets, Sp17-negative ovarian cancer cells as the control, and healthy human peripheral blood monocytes and healthy human serum as effectors. Our preliminary results indicate that the direct cytotoxicity of anti-Sp17 mAb against the investigated ovarian cancer cells was very weak. However, the cytotoxicity of anti-Sp17 mAb, mediated by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as ADCC, or by human serum, as CDC, was relatively strong in the Sp17-positive ovarian cancer cells. This finding suggested that anti-Sp17 mAb could be a useful tool against ovarian cancer and may provide insight into the development of low side-effect targeting therapy for this malignant disease.

  15. A new sensitive assay for measurement of cell-mediated cytotoxicity to intact layers of cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    De Bueger, M M; Van Els, C A; Kempenaar, J; Ponec, M; Goulmy, E

    1990-02-20

    A cytotoxicity assay for sensitive measurement of cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) of human cultured keratinocytes (cK) is described. The usage of 51Cr-labeled keratinocytes in intact layers as target cells in this assay allows objective and accurate determination of lysis of keratinocytes which have not undergone trypsin- and suspension-induced membrane changes. Furthermore, the problem of high spontaneous 51Cr release values encountered with suspended keratinocytes is overcome. The assay was applied to study antigen-specific CML of cK by cloned cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and to determine the effect of IFN-gamma on the susceptibility of cK to lysis. The results showed that HLA-A2 specific CTLs could reproducibly lyse cK of HLA-A2 positive healthy skin donors both with and without incubation of cK with IFN-gamma. Applications of this keratinocyte cytotoxicity assay lie in determining the antigenic expression of human cK, in analysis of effector cell/keratinocyte interactions in CML and of the modulatory effects of cytokines on these mechanisms. The assay thus may provide a helpful tool in gaining insight into the role of CML of keratinocytes in the destruction of inflamed skin. PMID:2108219

  16. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity against Candida albicans induced by cyclophosphamide: nature of the in vitro cytotoxic effector.

    PubMed Central

    Baccarini, M; Bistoni, F; Puccetti, P; Garaci, E

    1983-01-01

    We have recently reported the in vivo modulation of resistance to experimental Candida albicans infection by cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally) in mice and have shown that increased resistance to the microbial challenge occurs 12 to 21 days after treatment with the drug (Bistoni et al., Infect. Immun. 40: 46-55, 1983). The event is accompanied by the appearance of a highly candidacidal cell population in the spleen and the activation of a subpopulation of natural cytotoxic effectors reactive in vitro against YAC-1 tumor cells. We now provide evidence that these anti-YAC-1 cytotoxic effectors are clearly distinct from the cyclophosphamide-induced candidacidal effectors, which seem to belong to a macrophage-monocyte lineage. The enhanced cytotoxic activity induced by cyclophosphamide was not restricted to C. albicans but was also exerted against a panel of Candida strains. PMID:6352489

  17. Cell-mediated immunity against herpes simplex induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lawman, M J; Rouse, B T; Courtney, R J; Walker, R D

    1980-01-01

    The conditions required for the induction of both primary cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in vivo and secondary CTL in vitro against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected cells were defined. Primary CTL responses occurred only in mice exposed to infectious HSV-1. These responses, which were shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, peaked at 1 week and had disappeared by 2 weeks after infection. The level of primary cytotoxicity was enhanced by treatment of mice with cyclophosphamide before infection. Secondary in vitro CTL responses were more pronounced and were induced by some forms of inactivated virus as well as by infectious HSV-1. Thus, both ultraviolet light- and glutaraldehyde-inactivated preparations of HSV-1 induced CTL, but heat-inactivated and detergent-extracted antigens failed to do so. The reasons for the differing efficiency of infectious and noninfectious HSV-1 for induction of CTL are discussed. PMID:6244225

  18. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Tumor Immunotherapy with Therapeutic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Ursula J. E.; Schlegel, Patrick; Lang, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade several therapeutic antibodies have been Federal Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) approved. Although their mechanisms of action in vivo is not fully elucidated, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by natural killer (NK) cells is presumed to be a key effector function. A substantial role of ADCC has been demonstrated in vitro and in mouse tumor models. However, a direct in vivo effect of ADCC in tumor reactivity in humans remains to be shown. Several studies revealed a predictive value of FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism in monoclonal antibody treatment, indicating a potential effect of ADCC on outcome for certain indications. Furthermore, the use of therapeutic antibodies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an interesting option. Studying the role of the FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism and the influence of Killer-cell Immunoglobuline-like Receptor (KIR) receptor ligand incompatibility on ADCC in this approach may contribute to future transplantation strategies. Despite the success of approved second-generation antibodies in the treatment of several malignancies, efforts are made to further augment ADCC in vivo by antibody engineering. Here, we review currently used therapeutic antibodies for which ADCC has been suggested as effector function. PMID:23543707

  19. Ipilimumab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of regulatory T cells ex vivo by nonclassical monocytes in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Emanuela; Kusio-Kobialka, Monika; Foukas, Periklis G.; Baumgaertner, Petra; Meyer, Christiane; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Michielin, Olivier; Weide, Benjamin; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing immune responses with immune-modulatory monoclonal antibodies directed to inhibitory immune receptors is a promising modality in cancer therapy. Clinical efficacy has been demonstrated with antibodies blocking inhibitory immune checkpoints such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) or PD-1/PD-L1. Treatment with ipilimumab, a fully human CTLA-4–specific mAb, showed durable clinical efficacy in metastatic melanoma; its mechanism of action is, however, only partially understood. This is a study of 29 patients with advanced cutaneous melanoma treated with ipilimumab. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and matched melanoma metastases from 15 patients responding and 14 not responding to ipilimumab by multicolor flow cytometry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, and immunohistochemistry. PBMCs and matched tumor biopsies were collected 24 h before (i.e., baseline) and up to 4 wk after ipilimumab. Our findings show, to our knowledge for the first time, that ipilimumab can engage ex vivo FcγRIIIA (CD16)-expressing, nonclassical monocytes resulting in ADCC-mediated lysis of regulatory T cells (Tregs). In contrast, classical CD14++CD16− monocytes are unable to do so. Moreover, we show that patients responding to ipilimumab display significantly higher baseline peripheral frequencies of nonclassical monocytes compared with nonresponder patients. In the tumor microenvironment, responders have higher CD68+/CD163+ macrophage ratios at baseline and show decreased Treg infiltration after treatment. Together, our results suggest that anti–CTLA-4 therapy may target Tregs in vivo. Larger translational studies are, however, warranted to substantiate this mechanism of action of ipilimumab in patients. PMID:25918390

  20. Vaccination for invasive canine meningioma induces in situ production of antibodies capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Brian M; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Seiler, Charles E; Goulart, Michelle R; SantaCruz, Karen S; Schutten, Melissa M; Meints, Joyce P; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Bentley, R Timothy; Packer, Rebecca A; Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Faissler, Dominik; Chen, Wei; Hunt, Matthew A; Olin, Michael R; Ohlfest, John R

    2013-05-15

    Malignant and atypical meningiomas are resistant to standard therapies and associated with poor prognosis. Despite progress in the treatment of other tumors with therapeutic vaccines, this approach has not been tested preclinically or clinically in these tumors. Spontaneous canine meningioma is a clinically meaningful but underutilized model for preclinical testing of novel strategies for aggressive human meningioma. We treated 11 meningioma-bearing dogs with surgery and vaccine immunotherapy consisting of autologous tumor cell lysate combined with toll-like receptor ligands. Therapy was well tolerated, and only one dog had tumor growth that required intervention, with a mean follow up of 585 days. IFN-γ-elaborating T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of 2 cases, but vaccine-induced tumor-reactive antibody responses developed in all dogs. Antibody responses were polyclonal, recognizing both intracellular and cell surface antigens, and HSP60 was identified as one common antigen. Tumor-reactive antibodies bound allogeneic canine and human meningiomas, showing common antigens across breed and species. Histologic analysis revealed robust infiltration of antibody-secreting plasma cells into the brain around the tumor in posttreatment compared with pretreatment samples. Tumor-reactive antibodies were capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity to autologous and allogeneic tumor cells. These data show the feasibility and immunologic efficacy of vaccine immunotherapy for a large animal model of human meningioma and warrant further development toward human trials.

  1. An impedance-based cytotoxicity assay for real-time and label-free assessment of T-cell-mediated killing of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Schuster, Heiko; Löffler, Markus W; Schmid-Horch, Barbara; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    The in vitro assessment of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity plays an important and increasingly relevant role both in preclinical target evaluation and during immunomonitoring to accompany clinical trials employing targeted immunotherapies. For a long time, the gold standard for this purpose has been the chromium release assay (CRA). This end point assay, however, shows several disadvantages including the inevitable use of radioactivity. Based on electrical impedance measurements (using the xCELLigence system), we have established a label-free assay, facilitating the real-time monitoring of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The coculture of peptide-specific T-cell lines with peptide-loaded target cells reproducibly led to a decrease in impedance due to induced apoptosis and detachment of target cells. Comparing our results to the standard CRA assay, we could demonstrate that impedance-based measurements show comparable results after short incubation periods (6h) but outperform the CRA both in reproducibility and sensitivity after prolonged incubation (24h), enabling the detection of target cell lysis with an effector to target ratio as low as 0.05:1. The impedance-based assay represents a valuable and highly sensitive tool for label-free real-time high throughput analysis of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  2. Characterization of the cell-mediated cytotoxic responses of isogeneic ginbuna crucian carp induced by oral immunisation with hapten-modified cellular antigens.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Okamoto, Nobuaki

    2008-06-01

    A better understanding of the immune responses in fish elicited by oral immunisation is of importance for the development of new and effective oral vaccines for cultured fish. In the present study, we characterized specific cell-mediated cytotoxic responses in isogeneic ginbuna crucian carp (Carassius auratus langsdorfii) following oral immunisation with cellular antigens. Trinitrophenyl- (TNP) or dinitrophenyl- (DNP) modified syngeneic and allogeneic cells were used for studying the fine specificity and genetic restriction of orally-induced cytotoxic cells. Hapten-specific cytotoxic responses were detected in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of fish orally immunised with haptenated syngeneic cells. PBLs from orally immunised fish had cytolytic activity for haptenated syngeneic cells, but they showed little reactivity against both haptenated and unmodified allogeneic targets. Similarly, oral immunisation of fish with hapten-modified allogeneic cells did not induce hapten-specific cytotoxic cells which can lyse haptenated syngeneic targets. Although ginbuna crucian carp possess spontaneous cytotoxic cells that are capable of killing mammalian tumour cells, cold target inhibition studies suggested that such spontaneous cytotoxic cells were not involved in the killing of haptenated syngeneic targets. Oral immunisation of fish with haptenated syngeneic cells also induced hapten-specific cytotoxic memory responses. Oral administration of haptenated fixed cells also effectively induced hapten-specific cytotoxic cells in the treated fish. These findings suggest that oral immunisation with antigens can elicit antigen-specific cytotoxic cells that are capable of recognizing antigens in an MHC-restricted manner. In addition, our results provide indirect evidence that fish possess a mechanism for taking up exogenous non-replicating antigens from the alimentary tract and generating antigen-specific cytotoxic cells.

  3. Immunomodulatory activity of xanthohumol: inhibition of T cell proliferation, cell-mediated cytotoxicity and Th1 cytokine production through suppression of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Liu, Yongbo; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2009-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops (Humulus lupus L.) and beer, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative activity, but has not been studied for effects on T cell-mediated immune responses. Here we demonstrate that XN has profound immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation, development of IL-2 activated killer (LAK) cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and production of Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α). The suppression of these cell-mediated immune responses by XN was at, least in part, due to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor through suppression of phosphorylation of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB. PMID:19555200

  4. Reactive oxygen species induced by therapeutic CD20 antibodies inhibit natural killer cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against primary CLL cells.

    PubMed

    Werlenius, Olle; Aurelius, Johan; Hallner, Alexander; Akhiani, Ali A; Simpanen, Maria; Martner, Anna; Andersson, Per-Ola; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B

    2016-05-31

    The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of natural killer (NK) cells is assumed to contribute to the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other hematopoietic malignancies of B cell origin. We sought to determine whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing monocytes regulate the ADCC of NK cells against primary CLL cells using anti-CD20 as the linking antibody. The monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab were found to trigger substantial release of ROS from monocytes. Antibody-exposed monocytes induced NK cell apoptosis and restricted NK cell-mediated ADCC against autologous CLL cells. The presence of inhibitors of ROS formation and scavengers of ROS preserved NK cell viability and restored NK cell-mediated ADCC against primary CLL cells. We propose that limiting the antibody-induced induction of immunosuppressive ROS may improve the anti-leukemic efficacy of anti-CD20 therapy in CLL. PMID:27097113

  5. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding

    PubMed Central

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs. PMID:25970007

  6. Propanil Exposure Induces Delayed but Sustained Abrogation of Cell-Mediated Immunity through Direct Interference with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, James M.; Frankenberry, Marc A.; Schell, Todd D.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2006-01-01

    The postemergent herbicide propanil (PRN; also known as 3,4-dichloropropionanilide) is used on rice and wheat crops and has well-known immunotoxic effects on various compartments of the immune system, including T-helper lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and macrophages. It is unclear, however, whether PRN also adversely affects cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), the primary (1°) effectors of cell-mediated immunity. In this study we examined both the direct and indirect effects of PRN exposure on CTL activation and effector cell function to gauge its likely impact on cell-mediated immunity. Initial experiments addressed whether PRN alters the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) pathway for antigen processing and presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), thereby indirectly affecting effector function. These experiments demonstrated that PRN does not impair the activation of CTLs by PRN-treated APCs. Subsequent experiments addressed whether PRN treatment of CTLs directly inhibits their activation and revealed that 1° alloreactive CTLs exposed to PRN are unimpaired in their proliferative response and only marginally inhibited in their lytic activity. Surprisingly, secondary stimulation of these alloreactive CTL effectors, however, even in the absence of further PRN exposure, resulted in complete abrogation of CTL lytic function and a delayed but significant long-term effect on CTL responsiveness. These findings may have important implications for the diagnosis and clinical management of anomalies of cell-mediated immunity resulting from environmental exposure to various herbicides and other pesticides. PMID:16835059

  7. Nodavirus infection induces a great innate cell-mediated cytotoxic activity in resistant, gilthead seabream, and susceptible, European sea bass, teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Guardiola, Francisco A; Meseguer, José; Esteban, María A; Cuesta, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Viral nervous necrosis (VNN) virus produces great mortalities in fish having susceptible and reservoir species between the most important marine aquaculture species. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) is considered, towards the interferon (IFN), the most important mechanism of the immune response to fight against viral infections but it has been very scarcely evaluated. We aimed to evaluate the effects of VNNV infection in the reservoir gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and susceptible European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Firstly, after experimental infection we found mortalities in the sea bass (55%) but no in the seabream. Moreover, VNN virus replicates in the brain of both species as it was reflected by the high up-regulation of the Mx gene expression. Interestingly, the head-kidney leucocyte cell-mediated cytotoxic activity was significantly increased in both species reaching highest activity at 7 days: 3.65- and 2.7-fold increase in seabream and sea bass, respectively. This is supported by the significant up-regulation of the non-specific cytotoxic cell receptor (NCCRP-1) in the two fish species. By contrast, phagocytosis was unaffected in both species. The respiratory burst was increased in seabream 7 days post-infection whilst in sea bass this activity was significantly decreased at days 7 and 15. Our results demonstrate the significance of the CMC activity in both gilthead seabream and European sea bass against nodavirus infections but further studies are still needed to understand the role of cytotoxic cells in the antiviral immune response and the mechanisms involved in either reservoir or susceptible fish species. PMID:22981914

  8. Oxaliplatin regulates expression of stress ligands in ovarian cancer cells and modulates their susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Siew, Yin-Yin; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yew, Hui-Chuing; Lim, Shun-Wei; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lew, Si-Min; Seetoh, Wei-Guang; Seow, See-Voon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Selected cytotoxic chemicals can provoke the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant tumors. Most of the studies on immunogenic cell death are focused on the signals that operate on a series of receptors expressed by dendritic cells to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Here, we explored the effects of oxaliplatin, an immunogenic cell death inducer, on the induction of stress ligands and promotion of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that treatment of tumor cells with oxaliplatin induced the production of type I interferons and chemokines and enhanced the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains (MIC) A/B, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)-3, CD155 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-R1/R2. Furthermore, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin treatment enhanced susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis. In addition, activated NK cells completely abrogated the growth of cancer cells that were pretreated with oxaliplatin. However, cancer cells pretreated with the same concentration of oxaliplatin alone were capable of potentiating regrowth over a period of time. These results suggest an advantage in combining oxaliplatin and NK cell-based therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Further investigation on such potential combination therapy is warranted.

  9. Mechanisms of corticosteroid action on lymphocyte subpopulations. III. Differential effects of dexamethasone administration on subpopulations of effector cells mediating cellular cytotoxicity in man

    PubMed Central

    Parrillo, J. E.; Fauci, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    . Neutrophil ADCC against Ch and HHC was minimal and was not affected by DEX administration. This study demonstrates differential effects of corticosteroids on antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, reflecting changes in proportion of circulating effector cell populations. These changes depend on (a) the target cell employed, (b) the effector cell mediating cytotoxicity and (c) the duration of time since the last dose of corticosteroid. PMID:639343

  10. Role of the CD45 (T-200) molecule in anti-CD3-triggered T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Deem, R L; Shanahan, F; Niederlehner, A; Targan, S R

    1988-11-01

    NK-depleted human peripheral blood lymphocytes can be modulated with anti-CD3 to kill certain targets during 3-hr cytotoxicity assays. When triggered by anti-CD3 antibody, these effector T cells killed only NK-sensitive targets, such as K562 and HEL 92.1.7, and NK-resistant targets, such as Daudi, whose killing is inhibited by anti-CD45 (T-200) monoclonal antibodies, such as 13.3. NK-sensitive targets, MOLT-4, U266/AF10, Jurkat, and CCFR-CEM, and 10 NK-resistant cell lines, including Raji, IM-9, U698, U937, and GM-1056, whose killing is not inhibited by anti-CD45 monoclonal antibodies, were not killed by alpha-CD3-T effectors, suggesting that the CD45 molecule may be involved in the killing process. Anti-CD3-triggered T cell killing of target cells was inhibited greater than 95% by the monoclonal antibody 13.3. This inhibition of cytotoxicity by 13.3 was not due to competition of this IgG1 antibody for Fc receptor binding site on the target cell, since the IgG1 monoclonal antibody anti-beta 2-microglobulin did not block cytotoxicity. Single cell assays and calcium pulse assays showed that CD45 is involved in a postbinding, pre-calcium-dependent stage, similar to that shown for NK cytotoxicity. There was a relative shift of importance of different epitopes of CD45 in anti-CD3-T cytotoxicity compared to NK cytotoxicity. Anti-CD45 antibodies which bind to the C terminus end of the molecule played a more important role in anti-CD3-T cytotoxicity than NK cytotoxicity. Thus, a subset of T cells exists that exhibits anti-CD3-triggered non-MHC-restricted killing of certain NK-sensitive and NK-resistant targets in association with a CD45 molecule which is functionally different from the NK CD45 molecule.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of fucose reducing effects in a humanized antibody on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan; Quarmby, Valerie; Gao, Xiaoying; Ying, Yong; Lin, Linda; Reed, Chae; Fong, Chris; Lau, Wendy; Qiu, Zhihua J; Shen, Amy; Vanderlaan, Martin; Song, An

    2012-01-01

    The presence or absence of core fucose in the Fc region N-linked glycans of antibodies affects their binding affinity toward FcγRIIIa as well as their antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. However, the quantitative nature of this structure-function relationship remains unclear. In this study, the in vitro biological activity of an afucosylated anti-CD20 antibody was fully characterized. Further, the effect of fucose reduction on Fc effector functions was quantitatively evaluated using the afucosylated antibody, its "regular" fucosylated counterpart and a series of mixtures containing varying proportions of "regular" and afucosylated materials. Compared with the "regular" fucosylated antibody, the afucosylated antibody demonstrated similar binding interactions with the target antigen (CD20), C1q and FcγRIa, moderate increases in binding to FcγRIIa and IIb, and substantially increased binding to FcγRIIIa. The afucosylated antibodies also showed comparable complement-dependent cytotoxicity activity but markedly increased ADCC activity. Based on EC 50 values derived from dose-response curves, our results indicate that the amount of afucosylated glycan in antibody samples correlate with both FcγRIIIa binding activity and ADCC activity in a linear fashion. Furthermore, the extent of ADCC enhancement due to fucose depletion was not affected by the FcγRIIIa genotype of the effector cells.

  12. Cell surface sialomucin and resistance to natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity of rat mammary tumor ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Sherblom, A P; Moody, C E

    1986-09-01

    MAT-B1 and MAT-C1 ascites sublines of the 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma both contain sialomucin as a major cell surface component and are resistant to cytolysis by normal rat spleen lymphocytes [3 +/- 2% (SD) and 0 +/- 1%, respectively]. Susceptibility to lysis did not increase following treatment of cells with neuraminidase, fucosidase, or alpha- or beta-galactosidase. Treatment with trypsin significantly increased the susceptibility of MAT-B1 (14 +/- 3%) but not MAT-C1 (5 +/- 2%). Following 1 month in culture, the sialomucin content of MAT-B1 cells dropped from 30% to 8% (determined by glucosamine labeling) and natural cell-mediated cytolysis increased to 16 +/- 4%, whereas the sialomucin content and susceptibility of MAT-C1 cells did not change. The results indicate that the relatively minor changes associated with removal of cell surface sialic acid or fucose residues do not result in increased susceptibility of the ascites cells to cytolysis. However, susceptibility of MAT-B1 cells to lysis by normal rat spleen lymphocytes was inversely correlated with the amount of major glycoprotein (r = -0.96).

  13. Contrasting Effects of the Cytotoxic Anticancer Drug Gemcitabine and the EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Gefitinib on NK Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity via Regulation of NKG2D Ligand in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okita, Riki; Wolf, Diana; Yasuda, Koichiro; Maeda, Ai; Yukawa, Takuro; Saisho, Shinsuke; Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Oka, Mikio; Nakayama, Eiichi; Lundqvist, Andreas; Kiessling, Rolf; Seliger, Barbara; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several cytotoxic anticancer drugs inhibit DNA replication and/or mitosis, while EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors inactivate EGFR signalling in cancer cell. Both types of anticancer drugs improve the overall survival of the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although tumors often become refractory to this treatment. Despite several mechanisms by which the tumors become resistant having been described the effect of these compounds on anti-tumor immunity remains largely unknown. Methods This study examines the effect of the cytotoxic drug Gemcitabine and the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor Gefitinib on the expression of NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands as well as the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to the NK-mediated lysis. Results We demonstrate that Gemcitabine treatment leads to an enhanced expression, while Gefitinib downregulated the expression of molecules that act as key ligands for the activating receptor NKG2D and promote NK cell-mediated recognition and cytolysis. Gemcitabine activated ATM and ATM- and Rad-3-related protein kinase (ATR) pathways. The Gemcitabine-induced phosphorylation of ATM as well as the upregulation of the NKG2D ligand expression could be blocked by an ATM-ATR inhibitor. In contrast, Gefitinib attenuated NKG2D ligand expression. Silencing EGFR using siRNA or addition of the PI3K inhibitor resulted in downregulation of NKG2D ligands. The observations suggest that the EGFR/PI3K pathway also regulates the expression of NKG2D ligands. Additionally, we showed that both ATM-ATR and EGFR regulate MICA/B via miR20a. Conclusion In keeping with the effect on NKG2D expression, Gemcitabine enhanced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity while Gefitinib attenuated NK cell killing in NSCLC cells. PMID:26439264

  14. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y; Heery, Christopher R; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2016-06-01

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC.

  15. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R.; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Heery, Christopher R.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC. PMID:27172898

  16. Immunomodulatory properties of medicinal mushrooms: differential effects of water and ethanol extracts on NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Chen; Hsu, Ya-Jing; Chang, Chih-Jung; Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Martel, Jan; Ojcius, David M; Ko, Yun-Fei; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Young, John D

    2016-10-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been used for centuries in Asian countries owing to their beneficial effects on health and longevity. Previous studies have reported that a single medicinal mushroom may produce both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on immune cells, depending on conditions, but the factors responsible for this apparent dichotomy remain obscure. We show here that water and ethanol extracts of cultured mycelium from various species (Agaricus blazei Murrill, Antrodia cinnamomea, Ganoderma lucidum and Hirsutella sinensis) produce opposite effects on NK cells. Water extracts enhance NK cell cytotoxic activity against cancer cells, whereas ethanol extracts inhibit cytotoxicity. Water extracts stimulate the expression and production of cytolytic proteins (perforin and granulysin) and NKG2D/NCR cell surface receptors, and activate intracellular signaling kinases (ERK, JNK and p38). In contrast, ethanol extracts inhibit expression of cytolytic and cell surface receptors. Our results suggest that the mode of extraction of medicinal mushrooms may determine the nature of the immunomodulatory effects produced on immune cells, presumably owing to the differential solubility of stimulatory and inhibitory mediators. These findings have important implications for the preparation of medicinal mushrooms to prevent and treat human diseases. PMID:27469258

  17. Ras-related C3 Botulinum Toxin Substrate (Rac) and Src Family Kinases (SFK) Are Proximal and Essential for Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) Activation in Natural Killer (NK) Cell-mediated Direct Cytotoxicity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Richard F; Stack, Danuta; Huston, Shaunna M; Li, Shu Shun; Ogbomo, Henry; Kyei, Stephen K; Mody, Christopher H

    2016-03-25

    The activity of Rac in leukocytes is essential for immunity. However, its role in NK cell-mediated anti-microbial signaling remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac in NK cell mediated anti-cryptococcal killing. We found thatCryptococcus neoformansindependently activates both Rac and SFK pathways in NK cells, and unlike in tumor killing,Cryptococcusinitiated a novel Rac → PI3K → Erk cytotoxicity cascade. Remarkably, Rac was not required for conjugate formation, despite its essential role in NK cytotoxicity againstC. neoformans Taken together, our data show that, unlike observations with tumor cells, NK cells use a novel Rac cytotoxicity pathway in conjunction with SFK, to killC. neoformans. PMID:26867574

  18. Ras-related C3 Botulinum Toxin Substrate (Rac) and Src Family Kinases (SFK) Are Proximal and Essential for Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) Activation in Natural Killer (NK) Cell-mediated Direct Cytotoxicity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Richard F; Stack, Danuta; Huston, Shaunna M; Li, Shu Shun; Ogbomo, Henry; Kyei, Stephen K; Mody, Christopher H

    2016-03-25

    The activity of Rac in leukocytes is essential for immunity. However, its role in NK cell-mediated anti-microbial signaling remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac in NK cell mediated anti-cryptococcal killing. We found thatCryptococcus neoformansindependently activates both Rac and SFK pathways in NK cells, and unlike in tumor killing,Cryptococcusinitiated a novel Rac → PI3K → Erk cytotoxicity cascade. Remarkably, Rac was not required for conjugate formation, despite its essential role in NK cytotoxicity againstC. neoformans Taken together, our data show that, unlike observations with tumor cells, NK cells use a novel Rac cytotoxicity pathway in conjunction with SFK, to killC. neoformans.

  19. From sabotage to camouflage: viral evasion of cytotoxic T lymphocyte and natural killer cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Farrell, H E; Davis-Poynter, N J

    1998-06-01

    The outcome of a virus infection is strongly influenced by interactions between host immune defences and virus 'antidefence' mechanisms. For many viruses, their continued survival depends on the speed of their attack:their capacity to replicate and transmit to uninfected hosts prior to their elimination by an effective immune response. In contrast, the success of persistent viruses lies in their capacity for immunological subterfuge: the evasion of host defence mechanism by either mutation (covered elsewhere in this issue, by Gould and Bangham, pp. 331-338) or interference with the action of host cellular proteins that are important components of the immune response. This review will focus on the strategies employed by persistent viruses against two formidable host defences against virus infection: the CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cell responses.

  20. Enhancement of natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity by coexpression of GM-CSF/B70 in hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, K Y; Kang, M A; Nam, M J

    2001-05-10

    On investigating the role of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and costimulatory molecule, B70, in antitumor immunity, we have found important effects of GM-CSF/B70 coexpression in the interaction with natural killer (NK) cells. We used the pLSN vector system to contain the neomycin-resistant gene and LTR promoter. The pLSNGM-CSF, pLSNB70 and pLSNB70/GM-CSF, pLSN vectors each containing GM-CSF, B70, and B70/GM-CSF cDNA, respectively, were constructed. They were transfected into human hepatocellular carcinoma cell (SK-HEP1), and stable cells (SK-pLSN, SK-GM, SK-B70 and SK-BG) were selected after neomycin treatment. According to enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis and FACS, we showed that expression of GM-CSF was increased up to 23-fold in SK-GM and SK-BG cells, and also expression of B70 was induced at least 76-97% in SK-B70 and SK-BG cells. Expression of B70 was remarkably increased by autocrine effect of GM-CSF in SK-BG cells. Primary cytolytic ability of GM-CSF and B70 significantly increased almost 4-fold (effector/target ratio, 100:1) in SK-BG cells. In in vivo studies, SK-BG cells showed much less subcutaneous tumor formation in nude mice accompanying increased NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity. Therefore, these results suggest that combining expression of GM-CSF and B70 may enhance NK-mediated cytotoxicity, and then induce the antitumor immunity in hepatoma transplanted into nude mice.

  1. An oral chitosan DNA vaccine against nodavirus improves transcription of cell-mediated cytotoxicity and interferon genes in the European sea bass juveniles gut and survival upon infection.

    PubMed

    Valero, Yulema; Awad, Elham; Buonocore, Francesco; Arizcun, Marta; Esteban, M Ángeles; Meseguer, José; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Vaccines for fish need to be improved for the aquaculture sector, with DNA vaccines and the oral administration route providing the most promising improvements. In this study, we have created an oral chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine (CP-pNNV) for the nodavirus (NNV) in order to protect the very susceptible European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Our data show that the oral CP-pNNV vaccine failed to induce serum circulating or neutralizing specific antibodies (immunoglobulin M) or to up-regulate their gene expression in the posterior gut. However, the vaccine up-regulated the expression of genes related to the cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC; tcrb and cd8a) and the interferon pathway (IFN; ifn, mx and ifng). In addition, 3 months after vaccination, challenged fish showed a retarded onset of fish death and lower cumulative mortality with a relative survival of 45%. Thus, we created a chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine against NNV that is partly protective to European sea bass juveniles and up-regulates the transcription of genes related to CMC and IFN. However, further studies are needed to improve the anti-NNV vaccine and to understand its mechanisms. PMID:27370973

  2. Neutralization capacity and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of separated IgG subclasses 1, 3 and 4 against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, T; Persson, M A; Sundqvist, V A; Wahren, B

    1988-01-01

    IgG subclasses 1, 3 and 4 in sera from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) seropositive donors were separated and their functions assayed. The main neutralizing activity to HSV-1 was found in the IgG1 fractions. Both IgG3 and IgG4 possessed higher neutralizing titres than IgG1 in relation to the respective HSV IgG subclass enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titre. Addition of complement resulted in a strong enhancement of IgG3 neutralizing activity. HSV neutralizations by IgG1 and, surprisingly, IgG4 were also somewhat enhanced by complement. With the addition of complement, the contribution to neutralizing activity of IgG3 was calculated to increase from 31 to 40% of total IgG in HSV neutralization in native sera. The avidities of the IgG fractions to HSV glycoprotein C (gC) were estimated in a few sera but could not be correlated to neutralization results. Antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) was detectable mainly in IgG1 and 3 fractions of sera with high anti-HSV antibody titres. PMID:2842096

  3. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:26870823

  4. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells.

  5. An oral chitosan DNA vaccine against nodavirus improves transcription of cell-mediated cytotoxicity and interferon genes in the European sea bass juveniles gut and survival upon infection.

    PubMed

    Valero, Yulema; Awad, Elham; Buonocore, Francesco; Arizcun, Marta; Esteban, M Ángeles; Meseguer, José; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Vaccines for fish need to be improved for the aquaculture sector, with DNA vaccines and the oral administration route providing the most promising improvements. In this study, we have created an oral chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine (CP-pNNV) for the nodavirus (NNV) in order to protect the very susceptible European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Our data show that the oral CP-pNNV vaccine failed to induce serum circulating or neutralizing specific antibodies (immunoglobulin M) or to up-regulate their gene expression in the posterior gut. However, the vaccine up-regulated the expression of genes related to the cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC; tcrb and cd8a) and the interferon pathway (IFN; ifn, mx and ifng). In addition, 3 months after vaccination, challenged fish showed a retarded onset of fish death and lower cumulative mortality with a relative survival of 45%. Thus, we created a chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine against NNV that is partly protective to European sea bass juveniles and up-regulates the transcription of genes related to CMC and IFN. However, further studies are needed to improve the anti-NNV vaccine and to understand its mechanisms.

  6. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  7. Interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor alpha may be responsible for the lytic mechanism during anti-tumour antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullyblank, A. M.; Guillou, P. J.; Monson, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Antibodies are thought to bring about tumour cell lysis by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), but the exact mechanism is not well elucidated. Monocytes are known to be important mediators of anti-tumour ADCC and are also known to secrete the cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), both of which have been shown to bring about tumour cell lysis. We examined the release of these cytokines during ADCC and attempted to elucidate which components of the ADCC reaction were necessary for cytokine production. We measured TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta in supernatants collected from a standard ADCC assay using each of the anti-colorectal antibodies m17-1A, c17-1A and cSF25. We found that there was significant TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta release during ADCC mediated by each of these three antibodies and that the magnitude of cytokine release seemed to reflect the degree of tumour cell lysis produced by each antibody. Furthermore, we found that effector cells, target cells and a specific anti-tumour antibody were necessary for this to occur. The presence of only some of the components of the reaction or of an irrelevant antibody produced little or no TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. We conclude that TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta are released when an effector and tumour target cell are united by a specific tumour antibody and that these cytokines may be important in bringing about tumour cell lysis during the ADCC reaction. PMID:7669568

  8. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab′)2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition. PMID:27380003

  9. Evaluation of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity and cetuximab response in KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo Nigro, Cristiana; Ricci, Vincenzo; Vivenza, Daniela; Monteverde, Martino; Strola, Giuliana; Lucio, Francesco; Tonissi, Federica; Miraglio, Emanuela; Granetto, Cristina; Fortunato, Mirella; Merlano, Marco Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic role of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in wild type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with cetuximab. METHODS: Forty-one KRAS wt mCRC patients, treated with cetuximab and irinotecan-based chemotherapy in II and III lines were analyzed. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s in the FCGR2A, FCGR3A and in the 3’ untranslated regions of KRAS and mutational analysis for KRAS, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined either by sequencing or allelic discrimination assays. Enriched NK cells were obtained from lymphoprep-peripheral blood mononuclear cell and iNKT cells were defined by co-expression of CD3, TCRVα24, TCRVβ11. ADCC was evaluated as ex vivo NK-dependent activity, measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. RESULTS: At basal, mCRC patients performing ADCC activity above the median level (71%) showed an improved overall survival (OS) compared to patients with ADCC below (median 16 vs 8 mo; P = 0.026). We did not find any significant correlation of iNKT cells with OS (P = 0.19), albeit we observed a trend to a longer survival after 10 mo in patients with iNKT above median basal level (0.382 cells/microliter). Correlation of OS and progression-free survival (PFS) with interesting SNPs involved in ADCC ability revealed not to be significant. Patients carrying alleles both with A in FCGR2A and TT in FCGR3A presented a trend of longer PFS (median 9 vs 5 mo; P = 0.064). Chemotherapy impacted both iNKT cells and ADCC activity. Their prognostic values get lost when we analysed them after 2 and 4 mo of treatment. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a link between iNKT cells, basal ADCC activity, genotypes in FCGR2A and FCGR3A, and efficacy of cetuximab in KRAS wt mCRC patients. PMID:26909137

  10. Cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma and melanoma cells mediated by IgM antibodies derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Mamidi, Srinivas; Plöger, Frank; Dill, Othmar; Blixt, Ola; Kirschfink, Michael; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard

    2016-06-15

    A small percentage of healthy donors identified in the Western population carry antibodies in their peripheral blood which convey cytotoxic activity against certain human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. We measured the cytotoxic activity of sera and plasmas from healthy donors on the human neuroblastoma cell line Kelly and various melanoma cell lines. Antibodies of IgM isotype, presumably belonging to the class of naturally occurring antibodies, exerted cytotoxic activity in a complement-dependent fashion. Apart from complement-dependent tumor cell lysis, we observed C3 opsonization in all tumor cell lines upon treatment with cytotoxic plasmas. Cell lines tested primarily expressed membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRP) CD46, CD55 and CD59 to various extents. Blocking of mCRPs by monoclonal antibodies enhanced cell lysis and opsonization, though some melanoma cells remained resistant to complement attack. Epitopes recognized by cytotoxic antibodies were represented by gangliosides such as GD2 and GD3, as evidenced by cellular sialidase pretreatment and enhanced expression of distinct gangliosides. It remains to be clarified why only a small fraction of healthy persons carry these antitumor cytotoxic antibodies. PMID:26830059

  11. Cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma and melanoma cells mediated by IgM antibodies derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Mamidi, Srinivas; Plöger, Frank; Dill, Othmar; Blixt, Ola; Kirschfink, Michael; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard

    2016-06-15

    A small percentage of healthy donors identified in the Western population carry antibodies in their peripheral blood which convey cytotoxic activity against certain human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. We measured the cytotoxic activity of sera and plasmas from healthy donors on the human neuroblastoma cell line Kelly and various melanoma cell lines. Antibodies of IgM isotype, presumably belonging to the class of naturally occurring antibodies, exerted cytotoxic activity in a complement-dependent fashion. Apart from complement-dependent tumor cell lysis, we observed C3 opsonization in all tumor cell lines upon treatment with cytotoxic plasmas. Cell lines tested primarily expressed membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRP) CD46, CD55 and CD59 to various extents. Blocking of mCRPs by monoclonal antibodies enhanced cell lysis and opsonization, though some melanoma cells remained resistant to complement attack. Epitopes recognized by cytotoxic antibodies were represented by gangliosides such as GD2 and GD3, as evidenced by cellular sialidase pretreatment and enhanced expression of distinct gangliosides. It remains to be clarified why only a small fraction of healthy persons carry these antitumor cytotoxic antibodies.

  12. Chediak-Higashi gene in humans. II. The selectivity of the defect in natural- killer and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity function

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M; Roder, J; Haliotis, T; Korec, S; Jett; Herberman, RB; Katz, P; Fauci, AS

    1980-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) of human tumor cells by FcR(+) nonadherent effector lymphocytes as well as natural killer (NK) activity was markedly impaired in Chediak-Steinbrinck-Higashi Syndrome (C-HS) patients. Compared to a more than 400-fold defect in NK activity in terms of lytic units, the abnormal ADCC response in C-HS donors was 24-fold below normal suggesting a partial but not complete overlap of lymphocytes or lytic mechanisms responsible for ADCC and NK. The ADCC mechanism against erythrocyte targets, however, was normal, thereby suggesting a qualitative difference in these two forms of ADCC. Other effector-cell functions against tumor-cell targets were normal as measured by (a) spontaneous cytolysis mediated by monocytes, (b) spontaneous cytostasis mediated by neutrophils, and (c) lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by neutrophils. Although one C-HS patient was low in lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by lymphocytes, the other C-HS patient was normal, thereby suggesting that cytolytic T function was not linked to the NK-ADCC defect. In addition, the proliferative response to T-dependent mitogens was also relatively normal. These results, combined with other studies showing normal cell-mediated and humoral immunity in these same patients, suggest that patients with C-HS have an immunodeficiency which is selective for NK and ADCC activity. PMID:6966316

  13. NK cell-mediated lysis of autologous antigen-presenting cells is triggered by the engagement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase upon ligation of the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30 and NKp46.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, G M; Carosio, R; Pende, D; Marcenaro, S; Rivera, P; Zocchi, M R; Moretta, L; Poggi, A

    2001-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated polyclonal or clonal NK cells lysed autologous antigen presenting cells (APC) through the engagement of the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46. NK cell-mediated cytolysis of APC correlated with the surface density of these NCR. Indeed, NK cell clones bearing low amounts of NKp30 and NKp46 did not lyse autologous APC, whereas NK cell clones with bright expression of these NCR efficiently killed autologous APC. Upon masking of NKp30 or NKp46 by specific monoclonal antibodies a strong reduction (by 50%) of APC lysis could be detected and the complete inhibition was achieved by the simultaneous masking of these NCR. Interestingly, NK cell-mediated APC lysis was impaired by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3 K) inhibitors LY294002 or wortmannin. Similarly, these drugs strongly reduced NK cell activation triggered by NKp30 or NKp46 in a re-directed killing assay as well as the activation of Akt/PKB, substrate of PI-3 K, induced by the engagement of these receptors. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that NCR are responsible for the killing of autologous APC through the activation of PI-3 K.

  14. Metronomic cyclophosphamide enhances HPV16E7 peptide vaccine induced antigen-specific and cytotoxic T-cell mediated antitumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Genevieve M; Hrytsenko, Olga; Stanford, Marianne M; Berinstein, Neil L; Karkada, Mohan; Liwski, Robert S; Mansour, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In clinical trials, metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPA) is increasingly being combined with vaccines to reduce tumor-induced immune suppression. Previous strategies to modulate the immune system during vaccination have involved continuous administration of low dose chemotherapy, studies that have posed unique considerations for clinical trial design. Here, we evaluated metronomic CPA in combination with a peptide vaccine targeting HPV16E7 in an HPV16-induced tumor model, focusing on the cytotoxic T-cell response and timing of low dose metronomic CPA (mCPA) treatment relative to vaccination. Mice bearing C3 tumors were given metronomic CPA on alternating weeks in combination with immunization with a DepoVax vaccine containing HPV16E749–57 peptide antigen every 3 weeks. Only the combination therapy provided significant long-term control of tumor growth. The efficacy of the vaccine was uncompromised if given at the beginning or end of a cycle of metronomic CPA. Metronomic CPA had a pronounced lymphodepletive effect on the vaccine draining lymph node, yet did not reduce the development of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by vaccination. This enrichment correlated with increased cytotoxic activity in the spleen and increased expression of cytotoxic gene signatures in the tumor. Immunity could be passively transferred through CD8+ T cells isolated from tumor-bearing mice treated with the combinatorial treatment regimen. A comprehensive survey of splenocytes indicated that metronomic CPA, in the absence of vaccination, induced transient lymphodepletion marked by a selective expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These results provide important insights into the multiple mechanisms of metronomic CPA induced immune modulation in the context of a peptide cancer vaccine that may be translated into more effective clinical trial designs. PMID:25960932

  15. MHC-I Molecules Selectively Inhibit Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Triggered by ITAM-Coupled Activating Receptors and 2B4

    PubMed Central

    Corral-San Miguel, Rubén; Hernández-Caselles, Trinidad; Ruiz Alcaraz, Antonio José; Martínez-Esparza, María; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    NK cell effector functions are controlled by a combination of inhibitory receptors, which modulate NK cell activation initiated by stimulatory receptors. Most of the canonical NK cell inhibitory receptors recognize allelic forms of classical and non-classical MHC class I molecules. Furthermore, high expression of MHC-I molecules on effector immune cells is also associated with reverse signaling, giving rise to several immune-regulatory functions. Consequently, the inhibitory function of MHC class I expressed on a human NKL cell line and activated primary NK and T cells on different activating receptors are analyzed in this paper. Our results reveal that MHC-I molecules display specific patterns of “selective” inhibition over cytotoxicity and cytokine production induced by ITAM-dependent receptors and 2B4, but not on NKG2D. This contrasts with the best known “canonical” inhibitory receptors, which constitutively inhibit both functions, regardless of the activating receptor involved. Our results support the existence of a new fine-tuner inhibitory function for MHC-I molecules expressed on cytotoxic effector cells that could be involved in establishing self-tolerance in mature activated NK cells, and could also be important in tumor and infected cell recognition. PMID:25226085

  16. T cell-mediated hepatitis in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Liver cell destruction by H-2 class I-restricted virus-specific cytotoxic T cells as a physiological correlate of the /sup 51/Cr-release assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkernagel, R.M.; Haenseler, E.; Leist, T.; Cerny, A.; Hengartner, H.; Althage, A.

    1986-10-01

    A model for immunologically T cell-mediated hepatitis was established in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of hepatitis was monitored histologically and by determination of changes in serum levels of the enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), and alkaline phosphatase (AP). Kinetics of histological disease manifestations, increases of liver enzyme levels in the serum, and cytotoxic T cell activities in livers and spleens all correlated and were dependent upon several parameters: LCMV-isolate; LCMV-WE caused extensive hepatitis, LCMV-Armstrong virtually none. Virus dose. Route of infection; i.v. or i.p. infection caused hepatitis, whereas infection into the footpad did not. The general genetic background of the murine host; of the strains tested, Swiss mice and A-strain mice were more susceptible than C57BL or CBA mice; BALB/c and DBA/2 mice were least susceptible. The degree of immunocompetence of the murine host; T cell deficient nu/nu mice never developed hepatitis, whereas nu/+ or +/+ mice always did. B cell-depleted anti-IgM-treated mice developed immune-mediated hepatitis comparably or even more extensively than control mice. Local cytotoxic T cell activity; mononuclear cells isolated from livers during the period of overt hepatitis were two to five times more active than equal numbers of spleen cells. Adoptive transfer of nylon wool-nonadherent anti-Thy-1.2 and anti-Lyt-2 plus C-sensitive, anti-L3T4 plus C-resistant lymphocytes into irradiated mice preinfected with LCMV-WE caused a rapid time- and dose-dependent linear increase of serum enzyme levels. This increase was caused by adoptive transfer of lymphocytes if immune cell donors and recipient mice shared class I, but not when they shared class II histocompatibility antigens.

  17. The CD25-binding antibody Daclizumab High-Yield Process has a distinct glycosylation pattern and reduced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in comparison to Zenapax®

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Bishu; Balasa, Balaji; Efros, Lyubov; Hinton, Paul R.; Hartman, Stephen; Thakur, Archana; Xiong, Joanna M.; Schmidt, Brian; Robinson, Randy R.; Sornasse, Thierry; Vexler, Vladimir; Sheridan, James P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CD25-binding antibody daclizumab high-yield process (DAC HYP) is an interleukin (IL)-2 signal modulating antibody that shares primary amino acid sequence and CD25 binding affinity with Zenapax®, a distinct form of daclizumab, which was approved for the prevention of acute organ rejection in patients receiving renal transplants as part of an immunosuppressive regimen that includes cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Comparison of the physicochemical properties of the two antibody forms revealed the glycosylation profile of DAC HYP differs from Zenapax in both glycan distribution and the types of oligosaccharides, most notably high-mannose, galactosylated and galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) oligosaccharides, resulting in a DAC HYP antibody material that is structurally distinct from Zenapax. Although neither antibody elicited complement-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro, DAC HYP antibody had significantly reduced levels of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ADCC activity required natural killer (NK) cells, but not monocytes, suggesting the effects were mediated through binding to Fc-gamma RIII (CD16). Incubation of each antibody with peripheral blood mononuclear cells also caused the down-modulation of CD16 expression on NK cells and the CD16 down-modulation was greater for Zenapax in comparison to that observed for DAC HYP. The substantive glycosylation differences between the two antibody forms and corresponding greater Fc-mediated effector activities by Zenapax, including cell killing activity, manifest as a difference in the biological function and pharmacology between DAC HYP and Zenapax. PMID:27367933

  18. Humanizing murine IgG3 anti-GD2 antibody m3F8 substantially improves antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity while retaining targeting in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Guo, Hongfen; Hu, Jian; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Cheung, Irene Y.

    2012-01-01

    Murine IgG3 anti-GD2 antibody m3F8 has shown anti-neuroblastoma activity in Phase I/II studies, where antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) played a key role. Humanization of m3F8 should circumvent human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response and enhance its ADCC properties to reduce dosing and pain side effect. Chimeric 3F8 (ch3F8) and humanized 3F8 (hu3F8-IgG1 and hu3F8-IgG4) were produced and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. In vitro comparison was made with m3F8 and other anti-GD2 antibodies in binding, cytotoxicity, and cross-reactivity assays. In GD2 binding studies by SPR, ch3F8 and hu3F8 maintained KD comparable to m3F8. Unlike other anti-GD2 antibodies, m3F8, ch3F8 and hu3F8 had substantially slower koff.. Similar to m3F8, both ch3F8 and hu3F8 inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro, while cross-reactivity with other gangliosides was comparable to that of m3F8. Both peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-ADCC and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)-ADCC of ch3F8 and hu3F8-IgG1 were more potent than m3F8. This superiority was consistently observed in ADCC assays, irrespective of donors or NK-92MI-transfected human CD16 or CD32, whereas complement mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) was reduced. As expected, hu3F8-IgG4 had near absent PBMC-ADCC and CMC. Hu3F8 and m3F8 had similar tumor-to-non tumor ratios in biodistribution studies. Anti-tumor effect against neuroblastoma xenografts was better with hu3F8-IgG1 than m3F8. In conclusion, humanizing m3F8 produced next generation anti-GD2 antibodies with substantially more potent ADCC in vitro and anti-tumor activity in vivo. By leveraging ADCC over CMC, they may be clinically more effective, while minimizing pain and HAMA side effects. A Phase I trial using hu3F8-IgG1 is ongoing. PMID:22754766

  19. Removal of terminal alpha-galactosyl residues from xenogeneic porcine endothelial cells. Decrease in complement-mediated cytotoxicity but persistence of IgG1-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Watier, H; Guillaumin, J M; Piller, F; Lacord, M; Thibault, G; Lebranchu, Y; Monsigny, M; Bardos, P

    1996-07-15

    To determine the role of the terminal alpha-galactosyl residue in the endothelial damage mediated by human xenoreactive natural antibodies (IgM and IgG), we treated porcine endothelial cells in culture with green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase. A practically complete removal of terminal alpha-Gal residues (as evaluated by flow cytometry with Bandeiraea simplicifolia isolectin B4) and concomitant exposure of N-acetyllactosamine were obtained without altering cell viability. A dramatic decrease in IgM and IgG binding (from a pool of human sera) was observed, confirming the key role of the alpha-galactosyl residues. The enzyme treatment did not induce any nonspecific immunoglobulin binding sites, but led to the exposure of new epitopes for a minor fraction of IgM. The main residual IgM and IgG binding could be due to xenoantigens other than the alpha-galactosyl residues. When alpha-galactosidase-treated endothelial cells were used as targets in cytotoxicity experiments, they were less susceptible than untreated cells to complement-mediated cytotoxicity induced by fresh human serum. In contrast, they did not acquire resistance to human IgG-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, despite the decrease in IgG binding. Because it is known that antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by CD16+ NK cells is dependent on IgG1 and IgG3, and not on IgG2 or IgG4, which was confirmed by blocking experiments, we studied the binding of all four subclasses to intact and alpha-galactosidase-treated endothelial cells. Two major subclasses, IgG1 and IgG2, bound to untreated endothelial cells, whereas IgG3 binding was low and IgG4 binding was negligible. A decrease in IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 binding was observed upon alpha-galactosidase treatment, indicating that antibodies belonging to these three subclasses recognize alpha-galactosyl residues. The decrease in IgG2 binding was more pronounced than the decrease in IgG1 binding. Collectively, these data indicate that IgG1 xenoreactive natural

  20. Enhancement of dendritic cell-based vaccine potency by anti-apoptotic siRNAs targeting key pro-apoptotic proteins in cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kang, Tae Heung; Noh, Kyung Hee; Bae, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Seok-Ho; Yoo, Young Do; Seong, Seung-Yong; Kim, Tae Woo

    2009-01-29

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have become an important measure for the treatment of malignancies. Current DC preparations, however, generate short-lived DCs because they are subject to cell death from various apoptotic pressures. Antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is one of the main obstacles to limit the DC-mediated immune priming since CTLs can recognize the target antigen expressing DCs as target cells and kill the DCs. CTLs secret perforin and serine protease granzymes during CTL killing. Perforin and serine protease granzymes induce the release of a number of mitochondrial pro-apoptotic factors, which are controlled by members of the BCL-2 family, such as BAK, BAX and BIM. FasL linking to Fas on DCs triggers the activation of caspase-8, which eventually leads to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis via truncation of BID. In this study, we tried to enhance the DC priming capacity by prolonging DC survival using anti-apoptotic siRNA targeting these key pro-apoptotic molecules in CTL killing. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E7 antigen presenting DCs that were transfected with these anti-apoptotic siRNAs showed increased resistance to T cell-mediated death, leading to enhanced E7-specific CD8(+) T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Among them, siRNA targeting BIM (siBIM) generated strongest E7-specific E7-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity. More importantly, vaccination with E7 presenting DCs transfected with siBIM was capable of generating a marked therapeutic effect in vaccinated mice. Our data indicate that ex vivo manipulation of DCs with siBIM may represent a plausible strategy for enhancing dendritic cell-based vaccine potency.

  1. T-cell-mediated ganglionitis associated with acute sensory neuronopathy.

    PubMed

    Hainfellner, J A; Kristoferitsch, W; Lassmann, H; Bernheimer, H; Neisser, A; Drlicek, M; Beer, F; Budka, H

    1996-04-01

    A 67-year-old man presented with acute painful sensory loss, areflexia, ataxia, urinary retention, and severe constipation and became unable to walk within 2 weeks. He died suddenly 5 weeks after the onset of symptoms. Autopsy revealed widespread inflammation of sensory and autonomic ganglia with immunocytochemical evidence of a CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxic attack against ganglion neurons. This observation suggests a novel pathogenetic mechanism of immune-mediated human ganglion cell damage comparable to mechanisms operating in polymyositis.

  2. Cell-mediated immunity in nutritional deficiency.

    PubMed

    McMurray, D N

    1984-01-01

    Dietary deficiencies of specific nutrients profoundly alter cell-mediated immune responses in man and experimental animals. Both moderate and severe deficiencies are associated with significant changes in immunocompetence. Diets with inadequate levels of protein, calories, vitamin A, pyridoxine, biotin and zinc result in loss of thymic cellularity. Secondary to thymic atrophy, the production of thymic hormones critical for the differentiation of T lymphocytes is reduced, especially in protein-calorie malnutrition and zinc deficiency. Confirmation of a T cell maturational defect in nutritional deprivation comes from the observations of decreased total (T3 and rosette-forming) T cells in the peripheral blood of children with kwashiorkor and marasmus, with preferential loss of helper/inducer (T4) T cell subsets. Reduced number and in vitro function of T cells have also been reported in experimental deficiencies of iron, zinc, copper, and vitamins A and E. Loss of cutaneous hypersensitivity to mitogens and antigens is a consistent sequela of dietary deficiencies of protein, vitamins A and C, pyridoxine, iron and zinc. Cell-mediated immunity directed against allogeneic histocompatibility antigens (e.g. mixed leukocyte cultures, graft versus host, skin graft rejection) may actually be enhanced by experimental protein and polyunsaturated fat deficiencies. Alternatively, pyridoxine, ascorbate and biotin deficiencies resulted in delayed rejection of skin allografts. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity is impaired in zinc-, iron- and copper-deficient mice, as well as in scorbutic guinea pigs. Natural killer (NK) cell function may be either enhanced or depressed, depending upon the nutrient and its effects on interferon production. Several authors have demonstrated normal or enhanced macrophage activity in a variety of experimental deficiencies. The extrapolation of these observations to infectious disease resistance is not straightforward, and depends upon the nature of

  3. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  4. Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowski, Mikolaj Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are disorders of the nervous system that are associated with remote effects of malignancy. PNS are considered to have an autoimmune pathology. It has been suggested that immune antitumor responses are the origin of improved outcome in PNS. We describe cell-mediated immune responses in PNS and their potential contributions to antitumor reactions. Experimental and neuropathological studies have revealed infiltrates in nervous tissue and disturbances in lymphocyte populations in both cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood. A predominance of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) over T helper cells has been observed. CTLs can be specifically aggressive against antigens shared by tumors and nervous tissue. Based on genetic studies, a common clonal origin of lymphocytes from blood, tumor, and nervous tissue is suggested. Suppressive regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are dysfunctional. Simultaneously, in tumor tissue, more intense cell-mediated immune responses are observed, which often coincide with a less aggressive course of neoplastic disease. An increased titer of onconeural antibodies is also related to better prognoses in patients without PNS. The evaluation of onconeural and neuronal surface antibodies was recommended in current guidelines. The link between PNS emergence and antitumor responses may result from more active CTLs and less functional Treg lymphocytes. PMID:24575143

  5. Cell-mediated Protection in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul G.; Keating, Rachael; Hulse-Post, Diane J.

    2006-01-01

    Current vaccine strategies against influenza focus on generating robust antibody responses. Because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains over the course of a year, vaccine strains must be reformulated specifically for each influenza season. The time delay from isolating the pandemic strain to large-scale vaccine production would be detrimental in a pandemic situation. A vaccine approach based on cell-mediated immunity that avoids some of these drawbacks is discussed here. Specifically, cell-mediated responses typically focus on peptides from internal influenza proteins, which are far less susceptible to antigenic variation. We review the literature on the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity in influenza infection and the available data on the role of these responses in protection from highly pathogenic influenza infection. We discuss the advantages of developing a vaccine based on cell-mediated immune responses toward highly pathogenic influenza virus and potential problems arising from immune pressure. PMID:16494717

  6. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  7. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  8. Laminin: a possible role as a mediator of natural cell-mediated functions

    SciTech Connect

    Laybourn, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Natural Cell-mediated cytotoxicity is clearly important in regulating host response during tumorgenicity. Natural killer (NK), and Natural Cytotoxic (NC) lymphocytes responsible for mediating cytolysis, are subpopulations of non-B, non-T, nonphagocytic, nonadherent lymphocytes capable of spontaneously lysing a variety of tumor targets. Evidence is presented that laminin, a high molecular weight glycoprotein, is present on the surface of murine NK cells. In addition, NK sensitive tumor targets are able to bind laminin. This suggest that laminin participates as a ligand in the binding of NK cells to their tumor targets. The saturable binding of laminin by NK and NC sensitive tumor targets was shown by laminin-induced cell-cell aggregation/adherence, and /sup 125/I-laminin binding studies. Exogenous laminin inhibited NK cytotoxicity but not CTL cytotoxicity in vitro. In comparison, NK-resistant tumor cells bound little, if any exogenous laminin. Modulating NK activity in vivo prior to challenging mice with an inoculation of a murine fibrosarcoma, showed that elimination or activation of NK activity resulted in an increase or decrease in pulmonary metastases, respectively.

  9. Effects of reactive nitrogen scavengers on NK-cell-mediated killing of K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yili; Huang, Qinmiao; Zheng, Meizhu; Guo, Jianxin; Pan, Jingxin

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effects of reactive nitrogen metabolites (RNMS) on natural-killer- (NK-) cell-mediated killing of K562 cells and the influence of RNM scavengers, such as tiopronin (TIP), glutamylcysteinylglycine (GSH), and histamine dihydrochloride (DHT), on reversing the suppressing effect of RNM. We administered exogenous and endogenous RNM in the NK + K562 culture system and then added RNM scavengers. The concentrations of RNM, TNF-β and IFN-γ, and NK-cell cytotoxicity (NCC) and the percentage of living NK cells were then examined. We found that both exogenous and endogenous RNM caused the KIR to decrease (P < 0.01); however, RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH rescued this phenomenon dose dependently. In conclusion, our data suggests that RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH enhance the antineoplasmic activity of NK cells.

  10. Cell mediated immune response after challenge in Omp25 liposome immunized mice contributes to protection against virulent Brucella abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Goel, Divya; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2013-02-01

    Brucellosis is a disease affecting various domestic and wild life species, and is caused by a bacterium Brucella. Keeping in view the serious economic and medical consequences of brucellosis, efforts have been made to prevent the infection through the use of vaccines. Cell-mediated immune responses [CMI] involving interferon gamma and cytotoxic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are required for removal of intracellular Brucella. Omp25 has been reported to be involved in virulence of Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella ovis. In our previous study, we have shown the protective efficacy of recombinant Omp25, when administered intradermally. In this study, the recombinant Omp25 was formulated in PC-PE liposomes and PLGA microparticles, to enhance the protective immunity generated by it. Significant protection was seen with prime and booster liposome immunization in Balb/c mice against virulent B. abortus 544 as it was comparable to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. However, microparticle prime and booster immunization failed to give better protection when compared to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. This difference can be attributed to the stimulation of cell mediated immune response in PC-PE liposome immunized mice even after challenge which converted to cytotoxicity seen in CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. However, in PLGA microparticle immunized mice, cell mediated immunity was not generated after challenge as observed by decreased cytotoxicity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. Our study emphasizes on the importance of liposome encapsulating Omp25 immunization in conferring protection against B. abortus 544 challenge in Balb/c mice with a single dose immunization regimen.

  11. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  12. MHC-I expression renders catecholaminergic neurons susceptible to T-cell-mediated degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cebrián, Carolina; Zucca, Fabio A.; Mauri, Pierluigi; Steinbeck, Julius A.; Studer, Lorenz; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Kanter, Ellen; Budhu, Sadna; Mandelbaum, Jonathan; Vonsattel, Jean P.; Zecca, Luigi; Loike, John D.; Sulzer, David

    2014-01-01

    Subsets of rodent neurons are reported to express major histocompatibilty complex class I (MHC-I), but such expression has not been reported in normal adult human neurons. Here we provide evidence from immunolabel, RNA expression, and mass spectrometry analysis of postmortem samples that human catecholaminergic substantia nigra and locus coeruleus neurons express MHC-I, and that this molecule is inducible in human stem cell derived dopamine (DA) neurons. Catecholamine murine cultured neurons are more responsive to induction of MHC-I by gamma-interferon than other neuronal populations. Neuronal MHC-I is also induced by factors released from microglia activated by neuromelanin or alpha-synuclein, or high cytosolic DA and/or oxidative stress. DA neurons internalize foreign ovalbumin and display antigen derived from this protein by MHC-I, which triggers DA neuronal death in the presence of appropriate cytotoxic T-cells. Thus, neuronal MHC-I can trigger antigenic response, and catecholamine neurons may be particularly susceptible to T cell-mediated cytotoxic attack. PMID:24736453

  13. Characteristics of ovine cytotoxic lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Knisley, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine characteristics of the effector cells responsible for cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the sheep. Conditions for the production and assay of ovine T cell growth factor (TCGF) activity were evaluated. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) were stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) in the presence of 2% autologous serum or serum-free media. A 28 h proliferation assay with 2.5 x 10/sup 4/ h Con A blasts per well was optimal for detection of TCGF. Peak TCGF activity occurred with a 30-37kD molecular weight fraction. Ovine PBL were used for in vitro generation of genetically-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Peripheral blood leukocytes from sheep that had been previously inoculated with live vaccinia virus were stimulated by being cultured in vitro on glutaraldehyde-fixed vaccinia-infected autologous skin fibroblasts. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity was assessed in a 6 h /sup 51/Cr-release assay on autologous and allogeneic fibroblasts targets. Killing was restricted to virus-infected autologous targets. In vitro generation of both anti-vaccinia and anti-TNP CTL activity could be enhanced by the addition of TCGF containing media from ConA-stimulated PBL.

  14. A hypoxia-induced decrease of either MICA/B or Hsp70 on the membrane of tumor cells mediates immune escape from NK cells.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Daniela; Tetzlaff, Fabian; Konrad, Sarah; Li, Wei; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that hypoxia of the tumor microenvironment contributes to immune escape from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and the stress-regulated major histocompatibility class I chain-related protein A and B (MICA/B) both serve as ligands for activated NK cells when expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells. Herein, we studied the effects of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) on the membrane expression of these NK cell ligands in H1339 with high and MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with low basal HIF-1α levels and its consequences on NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. We could show that a hypoxia-induced decrease in the membrane expression of MICA/B and Hsp70 on H1339 and MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively, is associated with a reduced sensitivity to NK cell-mediated lysis. A knockdown of HIF-1α revealed that the decreased surface expression of MICA/B under hypoxia is dependent on HIF-1α in H1339 cells with high basal HIF-1α levels. Hypoxia and HIF-1α did not affect the MICA/B expression in MDA-MB-231 cells but reduced the Hsp70 membrane expression which in turn also impaired NK cell recognition. Furthermore, we could show that the hypoxia-induced decrease in membrane Hsp70 is independent of HIF-1α in MDA-MB-231. Our data indicate that hypoxia-induced downregulation of both NK cell ligands MICA/B and Hsp70 impairs NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, whereby only MICA/B appears to be regulated by HIF-1α.

  15. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  16. Susceptibility to T cell-mediated liver injury is enhanced in asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Casey, Carol A; Osna, Natalia A; Tuma, Dean J

    2013-05-01

    T cell activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine production is a pathological feature of inflammatory liver disease. It is also known that liver injury is associated with marked impairments in the function of many hepatic proteins including a hepatocyte-specific binding protein, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Recently, it has been suggested that hepatic ASGPRs may play an important role in the physiological regulation of T lymphocytes, leading to our hypothesis that ASGPR defects correlate with inflammatory-mediated events in liver diseases. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether changes in hepatocellular ASGPR expression were related to the dysregulation of intrahepatic T lymphocytes and correlate with the development of T-cell mediated hepatitis. Mice lacking functional ASGPRs (receptor-deficient, RD), and wild-type (WT) controls were intravenously injected with T-cell mitogens, Concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 antibody. As a result of T cell mitogen treatment, RD mice lacking hepatic ASGPRs displayed enhancements in liver pathology, transaminase activities, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and caspase activation compared to that observed in normal WT mice. Furthermore, FACS analysis demonstrated that T-cell mitogen administration resulted in a significant rise in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes present in the livers of RD animals versus WT mice. Since these two mouse strains differ only in whether they express the hepatic ASGPR, it can be concluded that proper ASGPR function exerts a protective effect against T cell mediated hepatitis and that impairments to this hepatic receptor could be related to the accumulation of cytotoxic T cells that are observed in inflammatory liver diseases.

  17. The role of cell-mediated immunity in typhoid.

    PubMed

    Mabel, T J; Paniker, C K

    1979-06-01

    The cell-mediated immunity in typhoid was assessed by the leukocyte migration inhibition test and delayed hypersensitivity skin test in 60 clinical typhoid patients. The property of leukocyte migration inhibition appeared first and was positive in 28 of 60 (46.7%) patients on admission and 45 of 60 (75%) at the time of discharge. This difference was definitely more in blood culture positive patients. The delayed hypersensitivity appeared later and was positive in 18 of 60 (30%) on admission and 31 of 60 (51.7%) at the time of discharge. Patients with positive cellular-immune response against typhoid antigen did not develop relapse. On the whole cell-mediated immunity seems to play an important role in typoid. The control groups--the medical and surgical patients, doctors, clinical students and preclinical students--showed positive cellular immune response of 43.3 81.3, 40.7 and 25% respectively. The significance of these results is discussed.

  18. Cell-mediated immune responses to COPV early proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Suchitra; Moore, Richard A; Anderson, Davina M; Gough, Gerald W; Stanley, Margaret A

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in the regression of papillomavirus-induced warts and intra-epithelial lesions but the target antigens that induce this response are not clear. Canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) infection of the oral cavity in dogs is a well-characterized model of mucosal papillomavirus infection that permits analysis of the immune events during the infectious cycle. In this study we show that during the COPV infectious cycle, systemic T cell responses to peptides of several early proteins particularly the E2 protein, as assayed by delayed type hypersensitivity, lymphoproliferation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT, can be detected. The maximal response occurs in a narrow time window that coincides with maximal viral DNA replication and wart regression: thereafter, systemic T cell responses to early proteins decline quite rapidly. Vaccination using particle-mediated immunotherapeutic delivery (PMID) of codon-modified COPV E2 and E1 genes induces strong antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in the vaccinated animals. These data show that therapeutic immunization by PMID with codon-modified E2 is completely effective, that to E1 is partially protective, that this correlates with the intensity of antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses and, further, they emphasize the importance of these responses and the route of immunization in the generation of protective immunity. PMID:16949120

  19. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  20. Cell mediated autoimmune granulocytopenia in a case of Felty's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, S; Liang, M H

    1980-01-01

    A variety of mechanisms have been demonstrated or suggested to explain the neutropenia that accompanies Felty's syndrome. This case report presents with Felty's syndrome with recurrent infections with initially had a clinical response to splenectomy. Eleven years later profound neutropenia recurred. In-vitro evidence for cell mediated autosensitisation of peripheral blood lymphocytes to autologous bone marrow cells was found. The cellular abnormalities improved after high-dose corticosteroids but not lithium. However, there did not appear to be a reduction in the incidence of clinical infections. The finding suggests that granulocytopenia in some patients with Felty's syndrome may be an autoimmune phenomenon. PMID:7436567

  1. Neonatal Fc receptor expression in dendritic cells mediates protective immunity against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B; Arthur, Janelle C; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D; Odze, Robert D; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-12-12

    Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system that we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8(+) T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DCs) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8(+) T cells that drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DCs activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC), as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12, both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn-IgG IC interaction in murine and human DCs. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance.

  2. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases.

  3. Cell-mediated destruction of cells grown on artificial capillaries.

    PubMed

    Zwilling, B S; Clayman, D A

    1978-11-01

    This investigation was designed to determine the conditions required to assess cell-mediated destruction of target L-cells grown on artificial capillaries. In control cultures that contained L-cells alone, solid nodules with a diameter of 1 mm as well as dense cellular growth could be visually observed by the 12th day of culture. Alloimmune spleen cells from both immunized and normal C57BL/10 mice were shown to be capable of destroying tritiated thymidine-labeled L-cells growing on artificial capillaries. The destruction of target cells grown as monolayers in capillary culture correlated well with monolayer cultures incubated in 16-mm plastic tissue culture wells. When target cells were grown in capillary culture for 5 days before the addition of effector cells, significant destruction by normal effector cells was not observed until the 15th day of culture whereas that mediated by immune cells was observed by the 7th day. The possible effects of cell-culturing conditions on the kinetics of cell-mediated destruction in capillary chambers are discussed.

  4. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  5. Cell-mediated immune reactions to clinical neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Okabe, I; Kurosu, Y; Morita, K

    1985-09-01

    Immunotherapy may be an effective treatment for neuroblastoma. It is of importance to delineate changes in various parameters of tumor immunity over an extended period, before and during the course of treatment, in any given case. In our patients with neuroblastoma, tumor-associated cell-mediated immune-reaction showed a good responsiveness before treatment. However, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions were shown to be negative in many cases, particularly in those with advanced tumor, and T gamma cells were enormously increased in some cases. During the course of therapy, the tumor-associated cellular immune responsiveness showed a tendency to become negative when the patient was tumor free or was in remission, but showed a tendency to become positive on regrowth, recurrence or metastasis of tumor. The T gamma cells showed much the same fluctuations as did the tumor-associated cellular immune responsiveness.

  6. Depressed cell-mediated immunity in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Fourteen coeliac patients on a gluten free diet (GFD) and 10 on a normal diet were studied by lymphocyte transformation in response to PHA to assess the integrity of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Transformation was depressed in the majority taking a normal diet, with improvement after a GFD. In some patients the depression may have been due to a serum factor, as transformation was more nearly normal when the lymphocytes were cultured in pooled AB serum than in their own serum. There was no correlation between transformation and nutritional deficiencies. Mantoux tests were performed in some of these and other coeliac patients and there was a very significant reduction in the incidence of positive tests compared with controls. These findings provide evidence of depressed CMI in coeliac patients taking a normal diet with improvement on a GFD and may be of relevance to the high risk of malignancy in coeliac disease, further strengthening the case for a strict GFD. PMID:1087262

  7. Cell mediated immunity in Antarctic wintering personnel; 1984-1992.

    PubMed

    Muller, H K; Lugg, D J; Quinn, D

    1995-08-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses were studied in 12 Antarctic and sub-Antarctic wintering groups at quarterly intervals over the period 1984-1992, using the cutaneous CMI Multitest. These populations are among the most isolated on earth. While the sub-Antarctic population at Macquarie Island had levels of responsiveness and hypoergy (9%) comparable to healthy populations in temperate zones, the Antarctic Continental group showed a level of hypoergy of 36%. There was no seasonal variation in the pattern of responses. It is concluded that the extreme and isolated environment and stress factors are responsible for the decreased immunological responsiveness but the mechanisms are presently unclear. On review, one factor appears to be perceived anxiety. The high rate of hypoergy in Antarctica, where medical care is limited, may have health implications. These groups provide an excellent analogue for immunological investigations in longer term space flight.

  8. Cell-mediated immune response of patients with meningiomas defined in vitro by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test.

    PubMed Central

    Pees, H W; Seidel, B

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CTX) of meningioma patients was assessed postoperatively by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test. Autologous and allogeneic tumour cells were used for prelabelling with isotope and peripheral blood lymphocytes added in a ratio of 200:1. After 60 hg the plates were washed and residual CMP counted. Control target cells consisted of normal skin fibroblasts. CTX was calculated in percentage reduction compared to cultures incubated with control lymphocytes. Specific CTX on meningioma cells (i.e. not destroying control cells) greater than 20% was considered 'positive' if significant at P less than 0-05. Fifteen of twenty-three meningiomas showed specific CTX (65%). Among eight CNS tumours of different type and thirteen non-malignant diseases and normals only three (14%) were specifically cytotoxic for meningioma cells. A cross-reaction could be demonstrated between autologous and allogeneic meningioma target cells. However, no activity of lymphocytes from patients with meningiomas on glioblastoma cells and foetal brain tissue could be found at the ratio used for evaluation. Evidence is presented indicating that a cellular immune response as measured in the microcytotoxic test may be dependent on a residual or recurrent tumour in the body. PMID:1277580

  9. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:27526715

  10. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  11. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  12. Cell-mediated immunity caused by beryllium compounds.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, S; Sakaguchi, T; Nakamura, I; Kudo, Y

    1987-11-01

    Cells of spleen and lymph nodes were obtained from mice subcutaneously injected with BeCl2 once a week over a 6-week period. These cells were washed twice in cold phosphate-buffered saline and suspended at a final concentration of 2 x 10(7) cells in 1 ml of buffer. Subsequently, 0.5 ml of the suspension was injected into normal mice intravenously (passive transfer). The findings of the experiments using these mice are summarized as follows: (1) The footpad reaction test was performed 24 hrs after passive transfer. The mice receiving spleen cells or lymph node cells from mice sensitized with BeCl2 developed significant footpad swelling 24 and 48 hrs after challenge of BeCl2 as the antigen. (2) After passive transfer with sensitized spleen cells or lymph node cells the ears of the mice were painted with 7% BeCl2 in ethyl alcohol. Ears of these mice showed significant swelling as compared with those of controls. (3) The migration of peritoneal cells from mice receiving spleen or lymph node cells from sensitized mice was inhibited when tested in medium containing the antigen of BeCl2. From our present experiments, it was suggested that the beryllium sensitizing ability was related to active as well as passive cell-mediated immunity.

  13. Use of tetanus toxoid for testing cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Whittingham, S; Feery, B; Mackay, I R

    1982-10-01

    Tetanus toxoid was assessed as a skin test antigen for the measurement of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) by comparing the responses to intradermal injections of aqueous tetanus toxoid and an extract of Candida albicans in 50 randomly selected healthy adults and 10 adults with immunodeficiency. Of 42 healthy subjects previously immunised with tetanus toxoid, 33 (79%) reacted to tetanus toxoid and 33 (79%) reacted to Candida albicans. Of eight non-immunised subjects, none reacted to tetanus toxoid although five reacted to Candida albicans. Ten immunodeficient adults previously shown to be anergic to a standard panel of five skin test antigens including Candida albicans, and who had received primary immunisation and booster doses of tetanus toxoid, were anergic on current testing with tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans. Tetanus toxoid in previously immunised subjects has certain advantages as a "recall" DTH test antigen over the standard skin test antigens candidin, mumps, trichophyton, tuberculin and streptokinase-streptodornase used to diagnose cell-mediated immuno-deficiency. It is a sensitive measurement of DTH, it recalls a defined immunological event, it has a low incidence of side effects, and it produces a slight but beneficial boosting of serum antibody to tetanus toxoid.

  14. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  15. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roit, Fabio Da; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Taylor, Ronald P.; Breij, Esther C.W.; Gritti, Giuseppe; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Introna, Martino; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Beurskens, Frank J.; Golay, Josée

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct cell death of cell lines or chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples mediated by anti-CD20 antibodies. Pre-treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of natural killer cells, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by these cells, as well as phagocytosis by macrophages or neutrophils were inhibited by ibrutinib with a half maximal effective concentration of 0.3–3 μM. Analysis of anti-CD20 mediated activation of natural killer cells isolated from patients on continued oral ibrutinib treatment suggested that repeated drug dosing inhibits these cells in vivo. Finally we show that the phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib similarly inhibited the immune cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies, although the effects of this drug at 10 μM were weaker than those observed with ibrutinib at the same concentration. We conclude that the design of combined treatment schedules of anti-CD20 antibodies with these kinase inhibitors should consider the multiple negative interactions between these two classes of drugs. PMID:25344523

  16. Fc-glycosylation influences Fcγ receptor binding and cell-mediated anti-HIV activity of monoclonal antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Gach, Johannes S; Landucci, Gary; Jez, Jakub; Strasser, Richard; Kunert, Renate; Steinkellner, Herta

    2010-12-01

    Interactions between the Fc segment of IgG and FcγRs on a variety of cells are likely to play an important role in the anti-HIV activity of Abs. Because the nature of the glycan structure on the Fc domain is a critical determinant of Fc-FcγR binding, proper Fc glycosylation may contribute to Ab-mediated protection. We have generated five different glycoforms of the broadly HIV-1-neutralizing mAb 2G12 in wild-type and glycoengineered plants and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Plant-derived 2G12 exhibited highly homogeneous glycosylation profiles with a single dominant N-glycan species. Using flow cytometry with FcγR-expressing cell lines, all 2G12 glycoforms demonstrated similar binding to FcγRI, FcγRIIa, and FcγRIIb. In contrast, two glycoforms derived from glycoengineered plants that lack plant-specific xylose and core α1,3-fucose, and instead carry human-like glycosylation with great uniformity, showed significantly enhanced binding to FcγRIIIa compared with Chinese hamster ovary or wild-type plant-derived 2G12. Using surface plasmon resonance, we show that binding of 2G12 to FcγRIIIa is markedly affected by core fucose, irrespective of its plant-specific α1,3 or mammalian-type α1,6 linkage. Consistent with this finding, 2G12 glycoforms lacking core fucose (and xylose) mediated higher antiviral activity against HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus as measured by Ab-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that specific alterations of Fc glycosylation can improve antiviral activity. Such alterations may result in better immunotherapeutic reagents. Moreover, biasing vaccine-induced immune responses toward optimal Fc glycosylation patterns could result in improved vaccine efficacy. PMID:21041724

  17. Siglecs as targets for therapy in immune cell mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Mary K.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (siglecs) comprise a family of receptors that are differentially expressed on leukocytes and other immune cells. The restricted expression of several siglecs to one or a few cell types makes them attractive targets for cell-directed therapies. The anti-CD33 (Siglec-3) antibody Gemtuzumab (Mylotarg™) is approved for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and antibodies targeting CD22 (Siglec-2) are currently in clinical trials for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Because siglecs are endocytic receptors, they are well suited for a ‘Trojan horse’ strategy, whereby therapeutic agents conjugated to an antibody, or multimeric glycan ligand, bind to the siglec and are efficiently carried into the cell. Although the rapid internalization of unmodified siglec antibodies reduces their utility for induction of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody binding of Siglec-8, Siglec-9, and CD22 have been demonstrated to induce apoptosis of eosinophils, neutrophils, and depletion of B cells, respectively. Here we review the properties of siglecs that make them attractive for cell-targeted therapies. PMID:19359050

  18. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  19. Relationship between laminin binding capacity and laminin expression on tumor cells sensitive or resistant to natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Laybourn, K.A.; Varani, J.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; Hiserodt, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    Previous studies have identified the presence of laminin binding sites on murine NK and NC sensitive tumor cells by /sup 125/I-laminin binding and laminin induced cell-cell aggregation. The finding that the addition of exogenous laminin inhibits NK/NC binding to sensitive tumor cells suggests laminin binding sites may serve as target antigens for NK cells. The present study extends earlier reports by analyzing a large panel of tumor cells for laminin binding capacity, laminin expression and sensitivity to NK/NC killing. The data indicate that all tumor cells which bind to NK/NC cells (8 lines tested) express laminin binding sites. All of these tumor cells were capable of competing for NK lysis of YAC-1 cells in cold target competition assays, and all bound enriched NK cells in direct single cell binding assays. In contrast, tumor cells expressing high levels of surface laminin (B16 melanomas, C57B1/6 fibrosarcomas, and RAS transfected 3T3 fibroblasts) but low levels of laminin binding capacity did not bind NK/NC cells and were resistant to lysis. These data support the hypothesis that expression of laminin/laminin binding sites may contribute to tumor cell sensitivity to NK/NC binding and/or killing.

  20. CD8+ T cell-mediated suppressive activity inhibits HIV-1 after virus entry with kinetics indicating effects on virus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tomaras, G D; Lacey, S F; McDanal, C B; Ferrari, G; Weinhold, K J; Greenberg, M L

    2000-03-28

    Individuals infected with HIV-1 have varying rates of progression to AIDS. Cellular immune responses, comprised of cytolytic and noncytolytic CD8(+) T cell effector functions, are considered important for controlling viremia and maintaining the clinically asymptomatic state. Although there is general agreement regarding CD8(+) T lymphocyte cytotoxic functions, considerable controversy exists over the nature of the noncytolytic antiviral activity of CD8(+) cells. The discovery that RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta (macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and beta) could inhibit HIV-1 replication by blocking viral entry processes led to the notion that these molecules are responsible for the CD8(+) cell suppressive activity. However, T tropic HIV isolates requiring the CXCR4 coreceptor for entry are insensitive to the antiviral effects of these beta-chemokines. Using a CXCR4-dependent virus, we determined that the mechanism of CD8(+) T cell-mediated activity did act after viral entry into the host cell. We also define the kinetics of the HIV life cycle in primary activated human CD4(+)-enriched T cells by using an HIV-1 reporter virus system pseudotyped with the CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 envelope gene of NL4-3. Analysis of these kinetic data indicates that CD8(+) T cell-mediated suppressive activity acts at a stage in the viral life cycle after entry and independently of the HIV envelope. Additionally, we show that the antiviral activity targets stages of the virus life cycle correlating with transcription and early proviral gene expression. These findings not only provide a range of possible targets for the CD8(+) T cell-mediated activity but also support the notion that this antiviral activity is multifactorial in nature.

  1. HLA-A2 as a target for cell-mediated lympholysis: evidence from immunoselected HLA-A2 negative mutant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, P E; Apgar, J R; Cresswell, P

    1980-07-01

    Cloned mutants of the human B lymphoblastoid cell line SB have been isolated using mutagenesis with ethyl methanesulfonate followed by negative selection with an anti-HLA-A2 serum and complement. Absorption analysis with 125I Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to antibody sensitized cells. HLA typing, and immune precipitation analysis showed the mutants to be serologically identical to the SB parent except for the loss of HLA-A2. When tested as target cells for cell-mediated lympholysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes generated in the mixed lymphocyte response, the SB and mutant cell lines demonstrated comparable susceptibility when the putative targets were HLA antigens other than HLA-A2. However, when compared for susceptibility to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes considered to be HLA-A2 specific, the SB parent was effectively killed whereas little or no killing of the HLA-A2 mutants was observed. The results provide a new line of evidence that HLA antigens recognized by antibody can also be the true molecular targets for cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:7263311

  2. Cell-mediated immunity in F 344 rats bearing intraocular tumors derived from human adenovirus 12-induced retinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Sawada, T; Pomeroy, M E

    1983-10-01

    The eyes of 10 F344 rats were inoculated with retinal tumor cells (EXP-5 cell line) induced by human adenovirus 12. The animals were killed at 4 weeks thereafter, and the cytotoxicity of their lymphocytes was investigated by using 51Cr-releasing assay. The percentage of EXP-5 cells killed in vitro by lymphocytes was higher in 10 rats with ocular tumors (24.6% +/- 6.1%, mean +/- SD) than in 10 control rats (6.2% +/- 1.8%). Morphologic investigation using syngeneic spleen cells confirmed the presence of lymphoid cells, resembling T-lymphocytes, adhering to EXP-5 cells. The influence of subcutaneous injection of EXP-5 cells on the growth of intravitreously injected tumor cells was investigated. Cells injected subcutaneously prior to intravitreous injection elicited an immune response that was capable of controlling vitreous tumor growth. These findings suggest that the rats with transplanted retinal tumors develop a cell-mediated immune response in the early stage of tumor bearing, and that a state of pre-existing specific immunity can overcome so-called "immunologic privilege" of the vitreous body.

  3. Marrow grafts between phenotypically DLA-identical and haploidentical unrelated dogs: additional antigens controlling engraftment are not detected by cell-mediated lympholysis

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Weiden, P.L.; DeRose, S.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow transplants with low marrow cell doses (less than or equal to4 X 10/sup 8/ cells/kg) from unrelated donors were carried out in 16 dogs conditioned with 9 Gy (900 rad) of total body irradiation. No immunosuppression was given after grafting. Eleven donor-recipient pairs were phenotypically identical (group 1) for the known antigens of the canine major histocompatibility complex (DLA) and in five the donor was homozygous and the recipient heterozygous for DLA (group 2), as determined by serological histocompatibility typing and mixed leukocyte cultures including homozygous cell typing. In addition, lymphocytes from donors and recipients in group 1 were mutually nonreactive in cell-mediated lympholysis; lymphocytes from recipients in group 2 were not cytotoxic against donor cells. Eight dogs rejected their grafts and eight showed sustained engraftment; of these, four died from graft-versus-host disease. The incidence of rejection was higher than in DLA-identical littermates but lower than in DLA-nonidentical unrelated or littermate dogs. These results indicate that antigens different from the recognized alleles at DLA are involved in the control of engraftment. These antigens most likely represent the expression of unrecognized differences within DLA or are coded for by a locus different from but linked to DLA-A, B, C or D; they are not recognized in the cell-mediated lympholysis assay.

  4. Effects of feed supplementation with glycine chelate and iron sulfate on selected parameters of cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Łukasz; Kwiecień, Małgorzata; Marek, Agnieszka; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Kalinowski, Marcin; Laskowska, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Because little is known about the impact of chelated (Fe-Gly, Fe-Gly+F) and inorganic (FeSO4, FeSO4+F) iron products on immune response parameters in broiler chickens, the objective of the study was to determine the effects of inorganic and organic forms of iron on selected parameters of the cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens by assessing the percentage of CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD25(+), and MHC Class II lymphocytes, as well as the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio and IL-2 concentration in the peripheral blood. The experiments were conducted using 50day-old Ross 308 roosters. The test material was peripheral blood. Flow cytometry was used to determine selected cell-mediated immune response parameters. The results obtained indicate that the use of iron chelates in the diet of broiler chickens may stimulate cellular defense mechanisms. As a result of the experiment an increase was observed in the percentage of Th1, mainly T CD4(+) and T CD8(+). It was also noted that application of chelated iron can increase production of T CD8(+) cytotoxic cells and IL-2, which promotes the body's natural response to developing inflammation. There were no changes in T CD4(+), T CD8(+), T CD25(+) or MHC II lymphocyte subpopulations in the chickens following application of the inorganic form of iron. PMID:27473977

  5. Effects of feed supplementation with glycine chelate and iron sulfate on selected parameters of cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Łukasz; Kwiecień, Małgorzata; Marek, Agnieszka; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Kalinowski, Marcin; Laskowska, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Because little is known about the impact of chelated (Fe-Gly, Fe-Gly+F) and inorganic (FeSO4, FeSO4+F) iron products on immune response parameters in broiler chickens, the objective of the study was to determine the effects of inorganic and organic forms of iron on selected parameters of the cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens by assessing the percentage of CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD25(+), and MHC Class II lymphocytes, as well as the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio and IL-2 concentration in the peripheral blood. The experiments were conducted using 50day-old Ross 308 roosters. The test material was peripheral blood. Flow cytometry was used to determine selected cell-mediated immune response parameters. The results obtained indicate that the use of iron chelates in the diet of broiler chickens may stimulate cellular defense mechanisms. As a result of the experiment an increase was observed in the percentage of Th1, mainly T CD4(+) and T CD8(+). It was also noted that application of chelated iron can increase production of T CD8(+) cytotoxic cells and IL-2, which promotes the body's natural response to developing inflammation. There were no changes in T CD4(+), T CD8(+), T CD25(+) or MHC II lymphocyte subpopulations in the chickens following application of the inorganic form of iron.

  6. Immune response to acute virus infection in the Syrian hamster. II. Studies on the identity of virus-induced cytotoxic effector cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelles, M.J.; Duncan, W.R.; Streilein, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The identity of the effector cell(s) mediating vaccinia virus-induced cytotoxic activity in Syrian hamsters undergoing acute virus infection has been investigated. Two different approaches have been utilized in this regard. Although T cells do not mediate vaccinia virus-induced cytotoxic activity directly, functional T cells were required for the in vivo development of a significant portion of vaccinia virus-induced cytotoxic activity. In addition, incorporation of aggregated gamma-globulins as well as anti-immunoglobulin reagents into the in vitro 51 Cr release assay inhibited a significant proportion of the cytotoxic activity mediated by spleen cells obtained from acutely infected hamsters possessing an intact thymus. Both approaches have yielded information consistent with the idea that a sizable portion of vaccinia virus-induced cytotoxic activity in the Syrian hamster is effected by K cells mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The significance of this observation is discussed with regard to hamster viral immunity in general.

  7. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity after infection with attenuated rubella virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Cusumano, C L; Waldman, R H

    1976-01-01

    The effects of attenuated rubella virus infection upon cell-mediated immunity of human volunteers were studied. The volunteers received the vaccine either by nose drops or by the subcutaneous route. Changes in cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed cutaneous sensitivity to recall antigens, phytohemagglutination stimulation, and spontaneous migration inhibitory factor-like activity were studied at various time periods after infection. Spontaneous migration inhibitory factor-like activity was studied on supernatants of the lymphocytes obtained from the volunteers and incubated for 72 h in the absence of any antigens. A significant proportion of the volunteers showed suppression of one or more parameters of cell-medicated immunity tested by week 2 of infection compared to the control; however, there was no correlation between suppression of the various parameters studied. No difference was noticed in the incidence of cell-mediated immunity suppression between nose drops and subcutaneous route groups. PMID:770329

  8. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  9. Isolation and characterization of cytotoxic effector cells and antibody producing cells from human intestine.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, R P

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the ability of intestinal and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from patients with inflammatory bowel disease to mediate killing against cell line targets in spontaneous, antibody-dependent, lectin-induced, and interferon-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, as well as responsiveness in the allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction, and effector capabilities in cell-mediated lympholysis. IMC were poor mediators of spontaneous or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with cell line cells as targets (in comparison to normal PBMC, but were capable of killing antibody coated chicken red blood cells. Although IMC were capable of responding to allogeneic cell surface antigens in the mixed leukocyte reaction, they did not exhibit effector function in cell-mediated lympholysis. Mitogenic lectins induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity by isolated intestinal mononuclear cells from controls and patients. HFIF induces cytotoxicity by control but not inflammatory bowel disease intestinal cells. Pokeweed mitogen was the lectin which induced the greatest amount of killing against human cell line targets. We therefore speculate that exogenous agents, or endogenous factors released during viral infection, could play a role in inducing cell mediated cytotoxic damage to the intestine in inflammatory bowel disease patients. In addition, the functional differences between IMC and PBMC indicate that intestinal MNC may have unique cell capabilities which must be better understood prior to the delineation of immunopathologic events in solid organ tissues. We have also examined the secretion of IgA, IgM, and IgG by isolated human IMC, human bone marrow MNC from rib specimens, and PBMC from patients with CD, UC, SLE, or Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP). Control IMC exhibited high spontaneous secretion of IgA, while intestinal MNC from UC and CD patients exhibited only modest increases in IgA secretion. PBMC from patients with CD, UC, SLE, or HSP exhibited markedly

  10. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed. PMID:26458801

  11. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  12. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  13. The NKG2D-IL-15 signaling pathway contributes to T-cell mediated pathology in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Afzali, Ali Maisam; Göbel, Kerstin; Glumm, Sarah; Kraft, Peter; Sommer, Claudia; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Preuße, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G

    2015-12-22

    NKG2D is an activating receptor on T cells, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. T cells are critically involved in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and have been proposed as specific therapeutic targets. However, the mechanisms underlying T cell-mediated progressive muscle destruction in IIM remain to be elucidated. We here determined the involvement of the NKG2D - IL-15 signaling pathway. Primary human myoblasts expressed NKG2D ligands, which were further upregulated upon inflammatory stimuli. In parallel, shedding of the soluble NKG2D ligand MICA (sMICA) decreased upon inflammation potentially diminishing inhibition of NKG2D signaling. Membrane-related expression of IL-15 by myoblasts induced differentiation of naïve CD8+ T cells into highly activated, cytotoxic CD8+NKG2Dhigh T cells demonstrating NKG2D-dependent lysis of myoblasts in vitro. CD8+NKG2Dhigh T cell frequencies were increased in the peripheral blood of polymyositis (PM) patients and correlated with serum creatinine kinase concentrations, while serum sMICA levels were not significantly changed. In muscle biopsy specimens from PM patients expression of the NKG2D ligand MICA/B was upregulated, IL-15 was expressed by muscle cells, CD68+ macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells, and CD8+NKG2D+ cells were frequently detected within inflammatory infiltrates arguing for a local signaling circuit in the inflammatory muscle milieu. In conclusion, the NKG2D - IL-15 signaling pathway contributes to progressive muscle destruction in IIM potentially opening new therapeutic avenues. PMID:26646698

  14. The NKG2D – IL-15 signaling pathway contributes to T-cell mediated pathology in inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ruck, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Afzali, Ali Maisam; Göbel, Kerstin; Glumm, Sarah; Kraft, Peter; Sommer, Claudia; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Preuβe, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor on T cells, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. T cells are critically involved in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and have been proposed as specific therapeutic targets. However, the mechanisms underlying T cell-mediated progressive muscle destruction in IIM remain to be elucidated. We here determined the involvement of the NKG2D – IL-15 signaling pathway. Primary human myoblasts expressed NKG2D ligands, which were further upregulated upon inflammatory stimuli. In parallel, shedding of the soluble NKG2D ligand MICA (sMICA) decreased upon inflammation potentially diminishing inhibition of NKG2D signaling. Membrane-related expression of IL-15 by myoblasts induced differentiation of naïve CD8+ T cells into highly activated, cytotoxic CD8+NKG2Dhigh T cells demonstrating NKG2D-dependent lysis of myoblasts in vitro. CD8+NKG2Dhigh T cell frequencies were increased in the peripheral blood of polymyositis (PM) patients and correlated with serum creatinine kinase concentrations, while serum sMICA levels were not significantly changed. In muscle biopsy specimens from PM patients expression of the NKG2D ligand MICA/B was upregulated, IL-15 was expressed by muscle cells, CD68+ macrophages as well as CD4+ T cells, and CD8+NKG2D+ cells were frequently detected within inflammatory infiltrates arguing for a local signaling circuit in the inflammatory muscle milieu. In conclusion, the NKG2D – IL-15 signaling pathway contributes to progressive muscle destruction in IIM potentially opening new therapeutic avenues. PMID:26646698

  15. Challenges and Opportunities for T-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Eliminate HIV Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, Mark A.; Jones, R. Brad; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV’s ability to establish latent reservoirs of reactivation-competent virus is the major barrier to cure. “Shock and kill” methods consisting of latency-reversing agents (LRAs) followed by elimination of reactivating cells through cytopathic effects are under active development. However, the clinical efficacy of LRAs remains to be established. Moreover, recent studies indicate that reservoirs may not be reduced efficiently by either viral cytopathic or CD8+ T-cell-mediated mechanisms. In this perspective, we highlight challenges to T-cell-mediated elimination of HIV reservoirs, including characteristics of responding T cells, aspects of the cellular reservoirs, and properties of the latent virus itself. We also discuss potential strategies to overcome these challenges by targeting the antiviral activity of T cells toward appropriate viral antigens following latency. PMID:26483795

  16. Effect of microencapsulated ampicillin on cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, I S; Kopydlowski, K M; Burge, J R; Setterstrom, J A

    1997-11-01

    The effects of free ampicillin, microencapsulated ampicillin anhydrate (MEAA) and antibiotic-free microspheres on the cell-mediated immune response in Balb/c mice were measured by lymphoproliferation assay, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cytokine production. Injection into mice for seven consecutive days with equivalent subcutaneous doses of ampicillin, MEAA or placebo microspheres did not produce any consistent change in lymphocyte proliferation nor did it affect DTH responses or interleukin-2 production. Although the production of interleukin-4 in mice treated with ampicillin or MEAA increased compared with the control mice, this increase was not statistically significant. These results indicate that ampicillin and MEAA have similar effects on cell-mediated immunity in mice. PMID:9421323

  17. The Potential of Intralesional Rose Bengal to Stimulate T-Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Maker, Ajay V; Prabhakar, Bellur; Pardiwala, Krunal

    2015-01-01

    Rose Bengal (RB) is a red synthetic dye that was initially used in the garment industry and has been used safely for decades as a corneal stain by ophthalmologists. Antineoplastic properties of RB have also been observed, though the mechanism of action remained to be elucidated. Recently, interest in RB as a therapeutic cancer treatment has increased due to significant anti-tumor responses with direct tumor injection in human clinical trials for metastatic melanoma. In these patients, there has been the implication that RB may mount a T-cell mediated anti-tumor response and impart antigen-specific responses in distant bystander lesions. This article serves to evaluate the potential of intralesional rose bengal to stimulate T-cell mediated anti-tumor responses in in-vitro, pre-clinical, and clinical studies. PMID:26618054

  18. T-helper cell-mediated factors in drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinzhi; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) leads to a large burden on the healthcare system due to its potential morbidity and mortality. The key for predicting and preventing DILI is to understand the underlying mechanisms. Hepatic inflammation is one of the most common features of DILI. The inflammation can be attributed to the innate immune response. The adaptive immune system is also affected by the innate immune response resulting in liver damage. T-helper cells are important regulators of acquired immunity. T-helper cell-mediated immune responses play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders. This review summarizes recent advances in the T-helper cell-mediated factors in DILI and potential mechanisms, which may lead to a better understanding of DILI. PMID:25752261

  19. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd. PMID:808340

  20. Effects of intravenous immunoglobulins on T-cell mediated, concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shirin, H; Bruck, R; Aeed, H; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O; Kenet, G; Avni, Y; Halpern, Z

    1997-12-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA) activates T lymphocytes and causes T-cell mediated hepatic injury in mice. The intravenous administration of human immunoglobulins has beneficial effects in T-cell mediated diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis. In the present study, we examined the effects of intravenous immunoglobulins in a mouse model of T-cell mediated, acute liver injury induced by concanavalin A. Balb/c mice were inoculated with 12 mg/kg concanavalin A with or without intravenous immunoglobulins at doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 g/kg body wt. The serum levels of liver enzymes, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-6 were assayed 2, 6 and 24 h after concanavalin A administration. Intravenous immunoglobulins did not prevent concanavalin A-induced hepatitis, as manifested by elevation of serum aminotransferases and histopathological evaluation. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice pretreated with immunoglobulins, measured 2 h after ConA treatment were reduced, while interferon-gamma levels measured 6 h after ConA inoculation were 5-fold higher than control levels. There was no effect of intravenous immunoglobulins on the release of interleukin 6. In conclusion, these results indicate that intravenous immunoglobulin is not effective in preventing T-cell mediated concanavalin A-induced hepatitis. The increased secretion of interferon-gamma and the incomplete suppression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha release may explain the lack of efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin in this experimental model. PMID:9455732

  1. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan; Fitzpatrick, Donna; Saidman, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    The complement-dependent cytotoxic crossmatch is an informative test that detects alloantibodies in pre- and post-transplant patients, which may dictate clinical management of transplant patients. While challenging to perform, the cytotoxic crossmatch represents the only assay that provides direct evidence for the presence of potentially pathologic (i.e., cytotoxic) alloantibodies. The cytotoxic crossmatch combines patient (recipient) serum and donor cells. If donor-reactive alloantibodies are present in patient serum, these antibodies can bind donor cells. Antibody-antigen complexes, in turn, can activate the complement cascade, leading to complement-mediated cytotoxicity. Two commonly performed cytotoxic crossmatches, using donor lymphocytes as target cells, are described.

  2. Nonspecific cytotoxic cells of teleosts are armed with multiple granzymes and other components of the granule exocytosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Kesavannair; Leary, John H; Evans, Donald L; Jaso-Friedmann, Liliana

    2006-03-01

    Granzymes are members of the serine protease family and major components of cytotoxic granules of professional killer cells. Multiple granzymes have been identified from human and rodents with different substrate specificities. Although the significance of granzymes A and B in cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been extensively investigated, recent reports suggest that other granzymes may have either equal or greater importance in mediating cell death. Studies on the evolution of these closely related proteases were hindered by the lack of sequence and biochemical information of granzymes from "lower vertebrates." Here we report the generation of a catalytically active recombinant granzyme identified in the cytotoxic cells of an ectothermic vertebrate. Fully active, soluble recombinant catfish granzyme-1 (CFGR-1) was generated using a yeast-based expression system. In vitro enzyme kinetic assays using various thiobenzyl ester substrates verified its tryptase activity in full agreement with previous observations by sequence comparison and molecular modeling. The tryptase activity that was secreted from catfish NCC during an in vitro cytotoxicity assay strongly correlated with the cytotoxicity induced by these cells. Evidence for additional granzymes with different substrate specificities in NCC was obtained by analysis of the protease activity of supernatants collected from in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Searches of the catfish EST database further confirmed the presence of teleost granzymes with different substrate specificities. Granzyme activity measurements suggested a predominance of chymase and tryptase activities in NCC. Further proof that the granule exocytosis pathway is one of the cytotoxic mechanisms in NCC was provided by the expression of granule components perforin, granulysin and serglycin detected by RT-PCR analysis. These results demonstrate the evidence for a parallel evolution of effector molecules of cell-mediated cytotoxicity in teleosts. PMID

  3. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  4. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext.

  5. Membrane-Bound TRAIL Supplements Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Against Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheard, Michael A.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Liu, Yin; Lin, Tsen-Yin; Wu, Hong-Wei; Ji, Lingyun; Groshen, Susan; Lee, Dean A.; Seeger, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to death induced by soluble, recombinant forms of TRAIL (CD253/TNFSF10) due to low or absent expression of caspase-8 and/or TRAIL-receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2/DR5/CD262/TNFRSF10b). However, their sensitivity to membrane-bound TRAIL on natural killer (NK) cells is not known. Comparing microarray gene expression and response to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, we observed a correlation between TRAIL-R2 expression and the sensitivity of fourteen neuroblastoma cell lines to the cytotoxicity of NK cells activated with IL-2 plus IL-15. Even though most NK cytotoxicity was dependent upon perforin, the cytotoxicity was supplemented by TRAIL in fourteen of seventeen (82%) neuroblastoma cell lines as demonstrated using an anti-TRAIL neutralizing antibody. Similarly, a recently developed NK cell expansion system employing IL-2 plus lethally irradiated K562 feeder cells constitutively expressing membrane-bound IL-21 (K562 clone 9.mbIL21) resulted in activated NK cells derived from normal healthy donors and neuroblastoma patients that also utilized TRAIL to supplement cytotoxicity. Exogenous IFNγ up-regulated expression of caspase-8 in three of four neuroblastoma cell lines and increased the contribution of TRAIL to NK cytotoxicity against two of the three lines; however, relatively little inhibition of cytotoxicity was observed when activated NK cells were treated with an anti-IFNγ neutralizing antibody. Constraining the binding of anti-TRAIL neutralizing antibody to membrane-bound TRAIL but not soluble TRAIL indicated that membrane-bound TRAIL alone was responsible for essentially all of the supplemental cytotoxicity. Together, these findings support a role for membrane-bound TRAIL in the cytotoxicity of NK cells against neuroblastoma cells. PMID:23719242

  6. A novel beta 4, alpha 6 integrin-associated epithelial cell antigen involved in natural killer cell and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Efficient immune responses require interactions between cell adhesion molecules on lymphocytes and counter-receptors on antigen presenting cells or target cells. While target-specific receptors or ligands have not been identified for natural killer (NK) cells, cell adhesion molecules have been implicated in the interaction between NK cell effectors and tumor cell targets. Herein, we describe monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a carcinoma cell line that efficiently block the cytolytic activity of interleukin 2-activated NK cell lines and clones. L280 mAb reacts with secretory epithelial cells in normal human tissues, but does not react with hematopoietic cells or other tissue types. Biochemical analysis revealed that L280 mAb immunoprecipitates the beta 4, alpha 6 integrin, as well as a novel 98-kD glycoprotein, and probably reacts with a carbohydrate epitope on these molecules. Involvement of the L280 antigen in cellular immunity is not restricted to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. L280 mAb also efficiently inhibits alloantigen-specific cytotoxicity against Colo-205 cells mediated by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 alloantigen specific alpha beta-TCR+ and gamma delta-TCR+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones. Additionally, we demonstrate that L280 mAb blocks cytotoxicity mediated by influenza peptide-specific HLA-restricted CTL clones. These data indicate that the antigen recognized by L280 mAb is important in both NK and CTL function, and that an as yet unidentified receptor for this epithelial antigen is present on both NK and T lymphocytes. The restricted expression of L280 antigen indicates that this molecule may be important in immune reactions in epithelial tissues. PMID:1744585

  7. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  8. Ornamental comb colour predicts T-cell-mediated immunity in male red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougeot, Francois

    2008-02-01

    Sexual ornaments might reliably indicate the ability to cope with parasites and diseases, and a better ability to mount a primary inflammatory response to a novel challenge. Carotenoid-based ornaments are amongst the commonest sexual signals of birds and often influence mate choice. Because carotenoids are immuno-stimulants, signallers may trade-off allocating these to ornamental colouration or using them for immune responses, so carotenoid-based ornaments might be particularly useful as honest indicators of immuno-compentence. Tetraonid birds, such as the red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus, exhibit supra-orbital yellow red combs, a conspicuous ornament which functions in intra- and inter-sexual selection. The colour of combs is due to epidermal pigmentation by carotenoids, while their size is testosterone-dependent. In this study, I investigated whether comb characteristics, and in particular, comb colour, indicated immuno-competence in free-living male red grouse. I assessed T-cell-mediated immunity using a standardised challenge with phytohaemagglutinin. Red grouse combs reflect in the red and in the ultraviolet spectrum of light, which is not visible to humans but that grouse most likely see, so I measured comb colour across the whole bird visible spectrum (300 700 nm) using a reflectance spectrometer. I found that males with bigger and redder combs, but with less ultraviolet reflectance, had greater T-cell-mediated immune response. Comb colour predicted T-cell-mediated immune response better than comb size, indicating that the carotenoid-based colouration of this ornament might reliably signal this aspect of male quality.

  9. Immunomodulatory activity of mefenamic acid in mice models of cell-mediated and humoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Arham; Arshad, Hafiza Maida; Shahzad, Muhammad; Shamsi, Sadia; Ashraf, Muhammad Imran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Previously, different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been evaluated for their potential immunomodulatory activities. Mefenamic acid is a well-known NSAID and is used in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, inflammation, fever, and pain. To the best of our knowledge, promising data regarding the immunomodulatory activity of mefenamic acid is scarce. Current study investigates the immunomodulatory activity of mefenamic acid in different models of cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Materials and Methods: Immunomodulatory effects on cell-mediated immunity were evaluated using dinitrochlorobenzene-induced delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cyclophosphamide-induce myelosuppression assays. While effects on humoral immunity were evaluated using hemagglutination assay and mice lethality test. Results: Hematological analysis showed that mefenamic acid significantly reduced white blood cell count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin content, lymphocytes levels, and neutrophils levels in healthy mice as compared with control, suggesting the immunosuppressive activity of mefenamic acid. Treatment with mefenamic acid also significantly reduced all the hematological parameters in cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenic mice, as compared with positive control group. We found that treatment with mefenamic acid significantly suppressed DTH after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, as compared with positive control group. Mefenamic acid treated groups showed a significant reduction in antibody titer against sheep RBCs as compared to control group, similar to the effect of cyclophosphamide. We also found increased mice lethality rate in mefenamic acid treated groups, as compared with positive control group. Conclusions: The results provided basic information of immunosuppression of mefenamic acid on both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. PMID:27127320

  10. The PHA Test Reflects Acquired T-Cell Mediated Immunocompetence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L.; Lemus, Jesús A.; Carrete, Martina; Blanco, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    Background cological immunology requires techniques to reliably measure immunocompetence in wild vertebrates. The PHA-skin test, involving subcutaneous injection of a mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA) and measurement of subsequent swelling as a surrogate of T-cell mediated immunocompetence, has been the test of choice due to its practicality and ease of use in the field. However, mechanisms involved in local immunological and inflammatory processes provoked by PHA are poorly known, and its use and interpretation as an acquired immune response is currently debated. Methodology Here, we present experimental work using a variety of parrot species, to ascertain whether PHA exposure produces larger secondary than primary responses as expected if the test reflects acquired immunocompetence. Moreover, we simultaneously quantified T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+, CD5+ and CD8+) and plasma proteins circulating in the bloodstream, potentially involved in the immunological and inflammatory processes, through flow cytometry and electrophoresis. Principal Findings Our results showed stronger responses after a second PHA injection, independent of species, time elapsed and changes in body mass of birds between first and second injections, thus supporting the adaptive nature of this immune response. Furthermore, the concomitant changes in the plasma concentrations of T-lymphocyte subsets and globulins indicate a causal link between the activation of the T-cell mediated immune system and local tissue swelling. Conclusions/Significance These findings justify the widespread use of the PHA-skin test as a reliable evaluator of acquired T-cell mediated immunocompetence in diverse biological disciplines. Further experimental research should be aimed at evaluating the relative role of innate immunocompetence in wild conditions, where the access to dietary proteins varies more than in captivity, and to ascertain how PHA responses relate to particular host-parasite interactions. PMID:18820730

  11. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  12. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  13. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity.

  14. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity. PMID:21796701

  15. Cell Damage in Light Chain Amyloidosis: FIBRIL INTERNALIZATION, TOXICITY AND CELL-MEDIATED SEEDING.

    PubMed

    Marin-Argany, Marta; Lin, Yi; Misra, Pinaki; Williams, Angela; Wall, Jonathan S; Howell, Kyle G; Elsbernd, Laura R; McClure, Megan; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2016-09-16

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is an incurable human disease characterized by the misfolding, aggregation, and systemic deposition of amyloid composed of immunoglobulin light chains (LC). This work describes our studies on potential mechanisms of AL cytotoxicity. We have studied the internalization of AL soluble proteins and amyloid fibrils into human AC16 cardiomyocytes by using real time live cell image analysis. Our results show how external amyloid aggregates rapidly surround the cells and act as a recruitment point for soluble protein, triggering the amyloid fibril elongation. Soluble protein and external aggregates are internalized into AC16 cells via macropinocytosis. AL amyloid fibrils are shown to be highly cytotoxic at low concentrations. Additionally, caspase assays revealed soluble protein induces apoptosis, demonstrating different cytotoxic mechanisms between soluble protein and amyloid aggregates. This study emphasizes the complex immunoglobulin light chain-cell interactions that result in fibril internalization, protein recruitment, and cytotoxicity that may occur in AL amyloidosis. PMID:27462073

  16. Cell-mediated immune responses of lambs to challenge with bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A K; Woldehiwet, Z

    1995-01-01

    The lamb is a good model to study the pathogenesis and immune responses to infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as lambs experimentally infected with bovine or human RSV may develop overt clinical disease. In the present study the development of cellular cytotoxic responses was studied in splenic, pulmonary and peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from lambs after primary and secondary infection with bovine RSV. Infection with bovine RSV was followed by the appearance of cytotoxic cells in the peripheral blood, the spleen and lung lavage fluids. These effector cells lysed virus-infected targets in a self-restricted manner. Depletion techniques revealed that cytotoxic activity was largely due to OvCD8+ cells. When effector cells obtained from primed lambs were stimulated with inactivated bovine RSV or with virus-infected cells in vitro, virus-specific cytotoxicity was significantly increased. PMID:7544251

  17. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  18. DEPRESSED CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY INTRACRANIAL TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, William H.; Netsky, Martin G.; Normansell, David E.; Horwitz, David A.

    1972-01-01

    Tumor immunity in patients with primary intracranial tumors was assessed in relation to the general status of host immunocompetence. Lymphocyte sensitization to tumor-specific membrane antigens was demonstrated by the proliferative response of lymphocytes in the presence of autochthonous tumor cells. Paradoxically, one-half of the patients could not be sensitized to a primary antigen, dinitrochlorobenzene; existing delayed hypersensitivity was also depressed, as measured by skin tests and lymphocyte transformation in response to common antigens. A heat-stable factor in patients' sera blocked cell-mediated tumor immunity. In addition, these "enhancing" sera consistently suppressed the blastogenic response of autologous and homologous lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and to membrane antigens on allogeneic cells in the one-way mixed lymphocyte culture. When patients' leukocytes were washed and autologous plasma replaced with normal plasma, reactivity in the mixed lymphocyte culture increased to normal values. In vitro immunosuppressive activity in patients' plasma or sera correlated with depressed delayed hypersensitivity. After removal of the tumor, suppressor activity disappeared. IgG fractions of patient sera contained strong immunosuppressive activity. These data suggest that the suppressor factor may be an isoantibody elicited by the tumor that also binds to receptors on the lymphocyte membrane. In addition to specifically blocking cell-mediated tumor immunity, enhancing sera may broadly depress host immunocompetence. PMID:4345108

  19. Cordyceps militaris Enhances Cell-Mediated Immunity in Healthy Korean Men.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Joon; Baik, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sang Jung; Lee, Seong Gyu; Ahn, Hong Yup; Park, Ju Sang; Park, Sang Jong; Jang, Eun Jeong; Park, Sang Woon; Choi, Jin Young; Sung, Ji Hee; Lee, Seung Min

    2015-10-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a mushroom traditionally used for diverse pharmaceutical purposes in East Asia, including China, and has been found to be effective for enhancing immunity through various types of animal testing. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of C. militaris for enhancing cell-mediated immunity and its safety in healthy male adults. Healthy male adults were divided into the experimental group (n = 39), given 1.5 g/day of ethanol treated C. militaris in capsules, and the control group (n = 40), given the same number of identical placebo capsules filled with microcrystalline cellulose and lactose for 4 weeks from February 13 to March 14, 2012; the natural killer (NK) cell activity, lymphocyte proliferation index (PI), and T-helper cell 1 (Th1) cytokine cluster (interferon [IFN]-γ, interleukin [IL]-12, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) were measured, along with stability test, at weeks 0, 2, and 4. The C. militaris group showed a statistically significant greater increase in NK200 (P = .0010), lymphocyte PI (P ≤ .0001), IL-2 (P = .0096), and IFN-γ (P = .0126), compared with the basal level, than the placebo group. There was no statistically significant adverse reaction. C. militaris enhanced the NK cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation and partially increased Th1 cytokine secretion. Therefore, C. militaris is safe and effective for enhancing cell-mediated immunity of healthy male adults. PMID:26284906

  20. CD47 Blockade Triggers T cell-mediated Destruction of Immunogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Pu, Yang; Cron, Kyle; Deng, Liufu; Kline, Justin; Frazier, William A.; Xu, Hairong; Peng, Hua; Fu, Yang-Xin; Xu, Meng Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells mediated by CD47-specific blocking antibodies has been proposed to be the major effector mechanism in xenograft models. Using syngeneic immunocompetent tumor models, we reveal that in the therapeutic effects of CD47 blockade depend on dendritic cell (DC) but not macrophage cross-priming of T cell responses in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic effects of anti-CD47 antibody therapy were abrogated in T cell-deficient mice. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of CD47 blockade required expression of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, but neither MyD88 nor TRIF, in CD11c+ cells, suggesting that cytosolic sensing of DNA from tumor cells is enhanced by anti-CD47 treatment, further bridging the innate and adaptive responses. Notably, the timing of administration of standard chemotherapy markedly impacted the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses by CD47 blockade. Together, our findings indicate that CD47 blockade drives T cell-mediated elimination of immunogenic tumors. PMID:26322579

  1. Cell-mediated BMP-2 liberation promotes bone formation in a mechanically unstable implant environment.

    PubMed

    Hägi, Tobias T; Wu, Gang; Liu, Yuelian; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2010-05-01

    The flexible alloplastic materials that are used in bone-reconstruction surgery lack the mechanical stability that is necessary for sustained bone formation, even if this process is promoted by the application of an osteogenic agent, such as BMP-2. We hypothesize that if BMP-2 is delivered gradually, in a cell-mediated manner, to the surgical site, then the scaffolding material's lack of mechanical stability becomes a matter of indifference. Flexible discs of Ethisorb were functionalized with BMP-2, which was either adsorbed directly onto the material (rapid release kinetics) or incorporated into a calcium-phosphate coating (slow release kinetics). Unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized samples were implanted subcutaneously in rats and retrieved up to 14 days later for a histomorphometric analysis of bone and cartilage volumes. On day 14, the bone volume associated with titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2 was 10-fold higher than that associated with their mechanically unstabilized counterparts. The bone volume associated with discs bearing a coating-incorporated depot of BMP-2 was similar in the mechanically unstabilized and titanium-plate-stabilized groups, and comparable to that associated with the titanium-plate-stabilized discs bearing an adsorbed depot of BMP-2. Hence, if an osteogenic agent is delivered in a cell-mediated manner (via coating degradation), ossification can be promoted even within a mechanically unstable environment.

  2. Human prealbumin fraction: effects on cell-mediated immunity and tumor rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.H.; Ehrke, M.J.; Bercsenyi, K.; Mihich, E.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of human prealbumin fraction as allogeneic cell-mediated immunity in primary sensitization cultures of murine spleen cells was studied by 3H-thymidine uptake and specific 51Cr release assays. Prealbumin caused a dose-dependent augmentation of these responses. Human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and calf-thymosin fraction 5 had little effect. Prealbumin was active when added on day 0 or 1 but not thereafter. Prealbumin added to effector cells from immunized mice did not change their lytic activity. Prealbumin, but not human serum albumin or thymosin fraction 5, augmented secondary cell-mediated immunity in culture after primary immunization in mice. A slow growing mammary tumor line, which originated as a spontaneous mammary tumor in a DBA/2 HaDD breeder mouse, initially grows in 100% of DBA/2J mice but is then rejected in 10 to 20% of them. When prealbumin (59 microgram/day) was given subcutaneously for 2 weeks to DBA/2J mice and the tumor implanted 2 weeks later. 78% of the mice rejected the tumor and were then resistant to a rechallenge.

  3. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  4. Fasting suppresses T cell-mediated immunity in female Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Xu, De-Li; Wang, De-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Immune defense is important for organisms' survival and fitness. Small mammals in temperate zone often face seasonal food shortages. Generally fasting can suppress immune function in laboratory rodents and little information is available for wild rodents. The present study tested the hypothesis that Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) could inhibit T cell-mediated immunity to adapt to acute fasting. Forty-two females were divided into the fed and fasted groups, in which the latter was deprived of food for 3days. After 66h fasting, half of the gerbils in each group were injected with phosphate buffered saline or phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) solution. T cell-mediated immunity assessed by PHA response was suppressed in the fasted gerbils compared with the fed gerbils. The fasted gerbils had lower body fat mass, wet and dry thymus mass, dry spleen mass, white blood cells, serum leptin and blood glucose concentrations, but higher corticosterone concentrations than those of the controls. Moreover, PHA response was positively correlated with body fat mass and serum leptin levels in the immunochallenged groups. Taken together, acute fasting leads to immunosuppression, which might be caused by low body fat mass and low serum leptin concentrations in female Mongolian gerbils.

  5. Ripe fruit of Rubus coreanus inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Choi, Phil Hyung; Yoo, Jin-Su; Jeon, Hoon; Chae, Byeong-Suk; Park, Jeong-Suk; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a water extract of the ripe fruits of Rubus coreanus Miq. (Rosaceae) (RFRC) on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as anaphylaxis, rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. RFRC dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and serum histamine release in mice. RFRC reduced the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. RFRC attenuated histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and human mast cells by the reduction of intracellular calcium. RFRC decreased the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of RFRC on cytokine production was nuclear factor (NF)-κB- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent. In addition, RFRC suppressed the activation of caspase-1. Our findings provide evidence that RFRC inhibits mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions, and for the involvement of calcium, NF-κB, MAPKs and caspase-1 in these effects. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic inflammatory effects of RFRC provide affirmative proof of a possible therapeutic application of this agent in allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22075758

  6. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy.

  7. Spontaneous cytotoxicity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the lymphoblastoid cell line CCRF-CEM: augmentation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Schacter, B; Kleinhenz, M E; Edmonds, K; Ellner, J J

    1981-01-01

    Spontaneous cell-mediated cytotoxicity (SCMC) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for a poor target, CCRF-CEM, a lymphoblastoid cell line, was rapidly and markedly elevated by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). SCMC for K562, a myeloid cell line sensitive to SCMC, was only slightly elevated by LPS. The cytotoxicities of both adherent and non-adherent mononuclear cells for CCRF-CEM were elevated. A response to LPS was found in Fc gamma R-positive and Fc gamma R-negative T cells. LPS increased the binding of non-adherent cells to both targets, but analysis of the binding suggests that a subsequent step, either triggering of the cytotoxic mechanisms or susceptibility of the target was the basis for the increased SCMC. PMID:7039896

  8. Autoxidation and cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D C; Schaich, K M; Elmore, Jr, J J

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive synthesis, or reaction schema, to relate autoxidations of non-lipid compounds to lipid chain peroxidation in vivo is presented. This is done in the context of cytotoxic autoxidation reactions, and it is concluded that hydroxyl radicals produced by iron-dependent Fenton reactions serve as both primary toxicants and as sources of secondary toxicants. The latter stem from lipid chain peroxidation initiated by the Fenton-derived hydroxyl radicals, which are visualized as the obligate coupling step linking enzyme-dependent and non-enzymic autoxidations to potentially toxic outcomes.

  9. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  10. Anti-apoptotic seminal vesicle protein IV inhibits cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fuggetta, M P; Lanzilli, G; Cottarelli, A; Ravagnan, G; Cartenì, M; De Maria, S; Metafora, B M; Metafora, V; Metafora, S

    2008-07-01

    The in vitro effect of seminal vesicle protein IV (SV-IV) on the cytotoxic activity of human natural or acquired cellular immunity has been investigated by standard immunological procedures, a (51)Cr-release cytotoxicity assay, and labeled-ligand binding experiments. The data obtained demonstrate that: (1) fluoresceinated or [(125)I]-labeled SV-IV binds specifically to the surface of human purified non-adherent mononuclear cells (NA-MNC); (2) SV-IV suppresses the cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells against K562 target cells, that of IL-2-stimulated NK (LAK) cells against DAUDI target cells, and that of VEL antigen-sensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) against VEL target cells; (3) treatment of K562 target cells alone with SV-IV decreases their susceptibility to NK-induced lysis. These findings indicate that the protein SV-IV has a marked in vitro inhibitory effect on NK, LAK and CTL cytotoxicity, providing a better understanding of its immune regulatory functions.

  11. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  12. Cytotoxicity of halogenated graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Wei Zhe; Khim Chng, Elaine Lay; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Graphene and its family of derivatives possess unique and remarkable physicochemical properties which make them valuable materials for applications in many areas like electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. In response to the possibility of its large-scale manufacturing as commercial products in the future, an investigation was conducted to determine the cytotoxicity of one particular family of graphene derivatives, the halogenated graphenes, for the first time. Halogenated graphenes were prepared through thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in gaseous chlorine, bromine or iodine atmospheres to yield chlorine- (TRGO-Cl), bromine- (TRGO-Br) and iodine-doped graphene (TRGO-I) respectively. 24 h exposure of human lung carcinoma epithelial cells (A549) to the three halogenated graphenes and subsequent cell viability assessments using methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assays revealed that all the halogenated graphenes examined are rather cytotoxic at the concentrations tested (3.125 μg mL-1 to 200 μg mL-1) and the effects are dose-dependent, with TRGO-Cl reducing the cell viability to as low as 25.7% at the maximum concentration of 200 μg mL-1. Their levels of cytotoxicity can be arranged in the order of TRGO-Cl > TRGO-Br > TRGO-I, and it is suggested that the amount of halogen present in the graphene material is the determining factor for the observed trend. Control experiments were carried out to test for possible nanomaterial-induced interference as a consequence of reaction between the halogenated graphenes and the viability markers (MTT/WST-8 reagent) or binding of the formazan products under cell-free conditions. The data obtained eliminate the probability of significant influence by these interferents as the change in the normalized percentage of formazan formed is relatively small and thorough washings were performed prior to the viability assessments to reduce the amount of halogenated

  13. Cytotoxicity of halogenated graphenes.

    PubMed

    Teo, Wei Zhe; Chng, Elaine Lay Khim; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-21

    Graphene and its family of derivatives possess unique and remarkable physicochemical properties which make them valuable materials for applications in many areas like electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. In response to the possibility of its large-scale manufacturing as commercial products in the future, an investigation was conducted to determine the cytotoxicity of one particular family of graphene derivatives, the halogenated graphenes, for the first time. Halogenated graphenes were prepared through thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in gaseous chlorine, bromine or iodine atmospheres to yield chlorine- (TRGO-Cl), bromine- (TRGO-Br) and iodine-doped graphene (TRGO-I) respectively. 24 h exposure of human lung carcinoma epithelial cells (A549) to the three halogenated graphenes and subsequent cell viability assessments using methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assays revealed that all the halogenated graphenes examined are rather cytotoxic at the concentrations tested (3.125 μg mL(-1) to 200 μg mL(-1)) and the effects are dose-dependent, with TRGO-Cl reducing the cell viability to as low as 25.7% at the maximum concentration of 200 μg mL(-1). Their levels of cytotoxicity can be arranged in the order of TRGO-Cl > TRGO-Br > TRGO-I, and it is suggested that the amount of halogen present in the graphene material is the determining factor for the observed trend. Control experiments were carried out to test for possible nanomaterial-induced interference as a consequence of reaction between the halogenated graphenes and the viability markers (MTT/WST-8 reagent) or binding of the formazan products under cell-free conditions. The data obtained eliminate the probability of significant influence by these interferents as the change in the normalized percentage of formazan formed is relatively small and thorough washings were performed prior to the viability assessments to reduce the amount of halogenated

  14. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  15. A non-surgical approach for male germ cell mediated gene transmission through transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Abul; Ganguli, Nirmalya; Sarkar, Hironmoy; Dhup, Suveera; Batta, Suryaprakash R; Vimal, Manoj; Ganguli, Nilanjana; Basu, Sayon; Nagarajan, P; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2013-01-01

    Microinjection of foreign DNA in male pronucleus by in-vitro embryo manipulation is difficult but remains the method of choice for generating transgenic animals. Other procedures, including retroviral and embryonic stem cell mediated transgenesis are equally complicated and have limitations. Although our previously reported technique of testicular transgenesis circumvented several limitations, it involved many steps, including surgery and hemicastration, which carried risk of infection and impotency. We improved this technique further, into a two step non-surgical electroporation procedure, for making transgenic mice. In this approach, transgene was delivered inside both testes by injection and modified parameters of electroporation were used for in-vivo gene integration in germ cells. Using variety of constructs, germ cell integration of the gene and its transmission in progeny was confirmed by PCR, slot blot and immunohistochemical analysis. This improved technique is efficient, requires substantially less time and can be easily adopted by various biomedical researchers.

  16. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  17. Micronutrient supplementation and T cell-mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Meydani, S N; Urassa, W; Wu, D; Mugusi, F M; Saathoff, E; Bosch, R J; Villamor, E; Spiegelman, D; Fawzi, W W

    2014-07-01

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examined the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T-cell mitogens in a randomized trial conducted on 423 patients with pulmonary TB. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to receive a daily dose of micronutrients (vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and selenium) or placebo at the time of initiation of TB treatment. We found no overall effect of micronutrient supplements on lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytohaemagglutinin or purified protein derivatives in HIV-negative and HIV-positive TB patients. Of HIV-negative TB patients, the micronutrient group tended to show higher proliferative responses to concanavalin A than the placebo group, although the clinical relevance of this finding is not readily notable. The role of nutritional intervention in this vulnerable population remains an important area of future research. PMID:24093552

  18. Female Iberian wall lizards prefer male scents that signal a better cell-mediated immune response

    PubMed Central

    López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2005-01-01

    In spite of the importance of chemoreception in sexual selection of lizards, only a few studies have examined the composition of chemical signals, and it is unknown whether and how chemicals provide honest information. Chemical signals might be honest if there were a trade-off between sexual advertisement and the immune system. Here, we show that proportions of cholesta-5,7-dien-3-ol in femoral secretions of male Iberian wall lizards (Podarcis hispanica) were related to their T-cell-mediated immune response. Thus, only males with a good immune system may allocate higher amounts of this chemical to signalling. Furthermore, females selected scents of males with higher proportions of cholesta-5,7-dien-3-ol and lower proportions of cholesterol. Thus, females might base their mate choice on the males' quality as indicated by the composition of their chemical signals. PMID:17148218

  19. Cell-Mediated Immunity in Elite Controllers Naturally Controlling HIV Viral Load.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luca; Nebuloni, Manuela; Alfano, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The natural course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by high viral load, depletion of immune cells, and immunodeficiency, ultimately leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome phase and the occurrence of opportunistic infections and diseases. Since the discovery of HIV in the early 1980s a naturally selected population of infected individuals has been emerged in the last years, characterized by being infected for many years, with viremia constantly below detectable level and poor depletion of immune cells. These individuals are classified as "elite controllers (EC) or suppressors" and do not develop disease in the absence of anti-retroviral therapy. Unveiling host factors and immune responses responsible for the elite status will likely provide clues for the design of therapeutic vaccines and functional cures. Scope of this review was to examine and discuss differences of the cell-mediated immune responses between HIV+ individuals with disease progression and EC. PMID:23577012

  20. The cell-mediated immunity of Drosophila melanogaster: hemocyte lineages, immune compartments, microanatomy and regulation.

    PubMed

    Honti, Viktor; Csordás, Gábor; Kurucz, Éva; Márkus, Róbert; Andó, István

    2014-01-01

    In the animal kingdom, innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. The dangers of microbial and parasitic attacks are countered by similar mechanisms, involving the prototypes of the cell-mediated immune responses, the phagocytosis and encapsulation. Work on Drosophila has played an important role in promoting an understanding of the basic mechanisms of phylogenetically conserved modules of innate immunity. The aim of this review is to survey the developments in the identification and functional definition of immune cell types and the immunological compartments of Drosophila melanogaster. We focus on the molecular and developmental aspects of the blood cell types and compartments, as well as the dynamics of blood cell development and the immune response. Further advances in the characterization of the innate immune mechanisms in Drosophila will provide basic clues to the understanding of the importance of the evolutionary conserved mechanisms of innate immune defenses in the animal kingdom. PMID:23800719

  1. Role of paracrine factors in stem and progenitor cell mediated cardiac repair and tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Burchfield, Jana S; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2008-01-01

    A new era has begun in the treatment of ischemic disease and heart failure. With the discovery that stem cells from diverse organs and tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord blood, and vessel wall, have the potential to improve cardiac function beyond that of conventional pharmacological therapy comes a new field of research aiming at understanding the precise mechanisms of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair. Not only will it be important to determine the most efficacious cell population for cardiac repair, but also whether overlapping, common mechanisms exist. Increasing evidence suggests that one mechanism of action by which cells provide tissue protection and repair may involve paracrine factors, including cytokines and growth factors, released from transplanted stem cells into the surrounding tissue. These paracrine factors have the potential to directly modify the healing process in the heart, including neovascularization, cardiac myocyte apoptosis, inflammation, fibrosis, contractility, bioenergetics, and endogenous repair. PMID:19014650

  2. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yun, James; Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-04-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B(*)57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B(*)57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  3. Mast cells mediate the immune suppression induced by dermal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Ramos, Gerardo; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2009-11-01

    Applying jet propulsion-8 (JP-8) jet fuel to the skin of mice induces immune suppression. Applying JP-8 to the skin of mice suppresses T-cell-mediated immune reactions including, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) delayed-type hypersensitivity and T-cell proliferation. Because dermal mast cells play an important immune regulatory role in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that mast cells mediate jet fuel-induced immune suppression. When we applied JP-8 to the skin of mast cell deficient mice CHS was not suppressed. Reconstituting mast cell deficient mice with wild-type bone marrow derived mast cells (mast cell "knock-in mice") restored JP-8-induced immune suppression. When, however, mast cells from prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-deficient mice were used, the ability of JP-8 to suppress CHS was not restored, indicating that mast cell-derived PGE(2) was activating immune suppression. Examining the density of mast cells in the skin and lymph nodes of JP-8-treated mice indicated that jet fuel treatment caused an initial increase in mast cell density in the skin, followed by increased numbers of mast cells in the subcutaneous space and then in draining lymph nodes. Applying JP-8 to the skin increased mast cell expression of CXCR4, and increased the expression of CXCL12 by draining lymph node cells. Because CXCL12 is a chemoattractant for CXCR4+ mast cells, we treated JP-8-treated mice with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist. AMD3100 blocked the mobilization of mast cells to the draining lymph node and inhibited JP-8-induced immune suppression. Our findings demonstrate the importance of mast cells in mediating jet fuel-induced immune suppression.

  4. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  5. Oncolytic reovirus enhances rituximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Parrish, C; Scott, G B; Migneco, G; Scott, K J; Steele, L P; Ilett, E; West, E J; Hall, K; Selby, P J; Buchanan, D; Varghese, A; Cragg, M S; Coffey, M; Hillmen, P; Melcher, A A; Errington-Mais, F

    2015-09-01

    The naturally occurring oncolytic virus (OV), reovirus, replicates in cancer cells causing direct cytotoxicity, and can activate innate and adaptive immune responses to facilitate tumour clearance. Reovirus is safe, well tolerated and currently in clinical testing for the treatment of multiple myeloma, in combination with dexamethasone/carfilzomib. Activation of natural killer (NK) cells has been observed after systemic delivery of reovirus to cancer patients; however, the ability of OV to potentiate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is unexplored. This study elucidates the potential of oncolytic reovirus for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), both as a direct cytotoxic agent and as an immunomodulator. We demonstrate that reovirus: (i) is directly cytotoxic against CLL, which requires replication-competent virus; (ii) phenotypically and functionally activates patient NK cells via a monocyte-derived interferon-α (IFNα)-dependent mechanism; and (iii) enhances ADCC-mediated killing of CLL in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. Our data provide strong preclinical evidence to support the use of reovirus in combination with anti-CD20 immunotherapy for the treatment of CLL.

  6. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins.

  7. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  8. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  9. Are diamond nanoparticles cytotoxic?

    PubMed

    Schrand, Amanda M; Huang, Houjin; Carlson, Cataleya; Schlager, John J; Omacr Sawa, Eiji; Hussain, Saber M; Dai, Liming

    2007-01-11

    Finely divided carbon particles, including charcoal, lampblack, and diamond particles, have been used for ornamental and official tattoos since ancient times. With the recent development in nanoscience and nanotechnology, carbon-based nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, nanotubes, nanodiamonds) attract a great deal of interest. Owing to their low chemical reactivity and unique physical properties, nanodiamonds could be useful in a variety of biological applications such as carriers for drugs, genes, or proteins; novel imaging techniques; coatings for implantable materials; and biosensors and biomedical nanorobots. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the possible hazards of nanodiamonds to humans and other biological systems. We have, for the first time, assessed the cytotoxicity of nanodiamonds ranging in size from 2 to 10 nm. Assays of cell viability such as mitochondrial function (MTT) and luminescent ATP production showed that nanodiamonds were not toxic to a variety of cell types. Furthermore, nanodiamonds did not produce significant reactive oxygen species. Cells can grow on nanodiamond-coated substrates without morphological changes compared to controls. These results suggest that nanodiamonds could be ideal for many biological applications in a diverse range of cell types.

  10. Are diamond nanoparticles cytotoxic?

    PubMed

    Schrand, Amanda M; Huang, Houjin; Carlson, Cataleya; Schlager, John J; Omacr Sawa, Eiji; Hussain, Saber M; Dai, Liming

    2007-01-11

    Finely divided carbon particles, including charcoal, lampblack, and diamond particles, have been used for ornamental and official tattoos since ancient times. With the recent development in nanoscience and nanotechnology, carbon-based nanomaterials (e.g., fullerenes, nanotubes, nanodiamonds) attract a great deal of interest. Owing to their low chemical reactivity and unique physical properties, nanodiamonds could be useful in a variety of biological applications such as carriers for drugs, genes, or proteins; novel imaging techniques; coatings for implantable materials; and biosensors and biomedical nanorobots. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the possible hazards of nanodiamonds to humans and other biological systems. We have, for the first time, assessed the cytotoxicity of nanodiamonds ranging in size from 2 to 10 nm. Assays of cell viability such as mitochondrial function (MTT) and luminescent ATP production showed that nanodiamonds were not toxic to a variety of cell types. Furthermore, nanodiamonds did not produce significant reactive oxygen species. Cells can grow on nanodiamond-coated substrates without morphological changes compared to controls. These results suggest that nanodiamonds could be ideal for many biological applications in a diverse range of cell types. PMID:17201422

  11. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs infected ocularly with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Senyk, G; Kerlan, R; Stites, D P; Schanzlin, D J; Ostler, H B; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1981-04-01

    Cell-mediated immune response and humoral response to chlamydial antigens were investigated in guinea pigs infected with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Pronounced cell-mediated immune response to the homologous antigen, as well as to two other chlamydial antigens, 6BC (Chlamydia psittaci) and LB-1 (C. trachomatis), occurred in all infected animals. Cell-mediated immune response to GPIC, and to a lesser extent to 6BC and LB-1 as well, was enhanced with time after infection even without the re-inoculation of the infectious agent. Extensive cross-reactions among the three chlamydial antigens during the cell-mediated immune response appeared to be due to shared species-specific and group-reactive antigens. Serum antibody response was pronounced and uniform to GPIC; it was less marked to 6BC and LB-1, with fewer cross-reactions than seen in tests for cell-mediated immunity.

  12. Short- and long-term beta-carotene supplementation do not influence T cell-mediated immunity in healthy elderly persons.

    PubMed

    Santos, M S; Leka, L S; Ribaya-Mercado, J D; Russell, R M; Meydani, M; Hennekens, C H; Gaziano, J M; Meydani, S N

    1997-10-01

    Supplementation of healthy elderly persons with beta-carotene has been considered a way to enhance immune responses. In study 1 the short-term effect of beta-carotene (90 mg/d for 3 wk) on immunity was assessed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled longitudinal comparison of healthy elderly women. In study 2 the long-term effect of beta-carotene (50 mg every other day for 10-12 y) on immunity was assessed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled longitudinal comparison of men enrolled in the Physicians' Health Study. Subjects from both studies taking active supplements had significantly greater plasma beta-carotene concentrations than did subjects taking placebo. The pre- to postintervention change in delayed-type hypersensitivity skin test responses between beta-carotene and placebo groups in the short-term study was not significantly different, nor was the response between treatment groups in the long-term study. There were no significant effects due to beta-carotene supplementation on in vitro lymphocyte proliferation, production of interleukin 2, or production of prostaglandin E2 as a result of short- or long-term beta-carotene supplementation. In addition, there were no differences in the profiles of lymphocyte subsets [total T cells (CD3+), T helper cells (CD4+), T cytotoxic-suppressor cells (CD8+), and B cells (CD19+)] due to short- or long-term beta-carotene supplementation, nor were there differences in percentages of CD16+ natural killer cells or activated lymphocytes (cells expressing interleukin 2 transferrin receptor) due to long-term beta-carotene supplementation. Consistent results from these two trials show that beta-carotene supplementation did not have an enhancing or suppressive effect on T cell-mediated immunity of healthy elderly.

  13. Regulation of HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation is diversified in different clinical presentations of HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dinney, Colin M; Zhao, Lu-Dong; Conrad, Charles D; Duker, Jay M; Karas, Richard O; Hu, Zhibin; Hamilton, Michele A; Gillis, Thomas R; Parker, Thomas M; Fan, Bing; Advani, Andrew H; Poordad, Fred B; Fauceglia, Paulette L; Kirsch, Kathrin M; Munk, Peter T; Ladanyi, Marc P; Bochner, Bernard A; Bekelman, Justin A; Grandori, Carla M; Olson, James C; Lechan, Ronald D; Abou, Ghassan M A; Goodarzi, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatic cancer, but the individual responses toward HBV infection are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic to chronic active hepatitis B inflammation. In this study, we hypothesized that the different individual responses to HBV infection was associated with differences in HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation and cytotoxicity. Blood samples were collected from subjects with asymptomatic HBV-infection, subjects undergoing active chronic HBV flares (active CHB), and subjects with HBV-infected hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-HCC). By tetramer staining, we found that all three groups had similar frequencies of HBVspecific CD8(+) T cells. However, after HBV peptide stimulation, the HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells in asymptomatic subjects had significantly stronger interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CD107a expression than those in active CHB and HBV-HCC patients. Examination of surface marker expression revealed that the PD-1(-)Tim-3(-) double-negative cell population was the main contributor to HBV-specific inflammation. In active CHB patients and HBV-HCC patients, however, the frequencies of activated PD-1(-)Tim-3(-) cells were significantly reduced. Moreover, the serum HBV DNA titer was not correlated with the frequencies of HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells but was inversely correlated with the frequencies of IFN-g-expressing and CD107a-express cells in response to HBV stimulation. Together, our data demonstrated that the status of HBVspecific CD8(+) T cell exhaustion was associated with different clinical outcomes of chronic HBV infection.

  14. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswari, K. Sri; Sarma, K. R.; Rajvanshi, V. S.; Sharan, R.; Sharma, Manju; Barathwal, Vinita; Singh, Vinod

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoicchambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months ( P<0.01, Δ% 21.5%) and during follow-up ( P<0.01, Δ% 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (Δ mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (Δ%+12.4 vs.+7.54). The animals were sacrified and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed. No significant variation was observed in the tissue T lymphocyte counts of microwave-irradiated rabbits. From these results it is speculated that the T lymphocytes are sequestered to various lymphoid organs under the influence of microwaves. A sub-population of T cells known as T helper cells (mediating DTH response) are

  15. Protection against henipaviruses in swine requires both, cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Brad S; Hardham, John M; Smith, Greg; Weingartl, Eva T; Dominowski, Paul J; Foss, Dennis L; Mwangi, Duncan; Broder, Christopher C; Roth, James A; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-09-14

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are members of the genus Henipavirus, within the family Paramyxoviridae. Nipah virus has caused outbreaks of human disease in Bangladesh, Malaysia, Singapore, India and Philippines, in addition to a large outbreak in swine in Malaysia in 1998/1999. Recently, NiV was suspected to be a causative agent of an outbreak in horses in 2014 in the Philippines, while HeV has caused multiple human and equine outbreaks in Australia since 1994. A swine vaccine able to prevent shedding of infectious virus is of veterinary and human health importance, and correlates of protection against henipavirus infection in swine need to be better understood. In the present study, three groups of animals were employed. Pigs vaccinated with adjuvanted recombinant soluble HeV G protein (sGHEV) and challenged with HeV, developed antibody levels considered to be protective prior to the challenge (titers of 320). However, activation of the cell-mediated immune response was not detected, and the animals were only partially protected against challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of HeV per animal. In the second group, cross-neutralizing antibody levels against NiV in the sGHEV vaccinated animals did not reach protective levels, and with no activation of cellular immune memory, these animals were not protected against NiV. Only pigs orally infected with 5×10(4) PFU of NiV per animal were protected against nasal challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of NiV per animal. This group of pigs developed protective antibody levels, as well as cell-mediated immune memory. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells restimulated with UV-inactivated NiV upregulated IFN-gamma, IL-10 and the CD25 activation marker on CD4(+)CD8(+) T memory helper cells and to lesser extent on CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. In conclusion, both humoral and cellular immune responses were required for protection of swine against henipaviruses. PMID:27544586

  16. [Studies on the cell-mediated immunity in experimental Naegleria spp. infections].

    PubMed

    Lee, S G; Shin, H J; Im, K I

    1989-09-01

    Observations were made on the differences in cell-mediated immune responses in the mice infected with strongly pathogenic Naegleria fowleri ITMAP 359, weakly pathogenic Naegleria jadini 0400, or non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi EGB, respectively. Variations in cell-mediated responses and changes in antibody titers according to the duration after infection were noted. Infections were done by dropping 5 microliters saline suspension containing 10 x 10(4) trophozoites cultured axenically in the CGVS medium into the right nasal cavity of ICR mice aging about 6-7 weeks, under the anesthesia by intraperitoneal injection of secobarbital. Following infection, delayed type hypersensitivity(DTH) responses in the footpad and blastogenic responses of the mouse spleen cells using [3H]-thymidine were observed on the day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 14 after infection. For the preparation of amoeba lysates, each of cultured trophozoites were homogenized with an ultrasonicator, and centrifugated at 20,000 g. The supernatants of amoeba lysates were used as the mitogen and antigen for ELISA. Concanavalin A(Con. A) and lipopolysaccharide(LPS) were also used as mitogens in the blastogenic response. 1. The mice infected with N. fowleri showed the mortality rate of 75.7%. The rate was 6.2% for the N. jadini infected group, while no dead mouse was observed for N. gruberi infections. 2. In regard to DTH responses in the N. fowleri infected mice, the level increased in comparison to the control group but declined after 7 days. An increase was also noted for the N. jadini group after 1 day, but gradual decreases were observed through the infection period. In addition, no difference was noted between the N. gruberi infected and control groups. 3. Concerning the blastogenic response of the splenocytes, it increased after 10 days in the experimental group of N. fowleri infection, but the differences were not statistically significant compared with control group. It was evident that N. jadini group was not

  17. Purification and characterization of a fish granzymeA involved in cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yuta; Yabu, Takeshi; Shiba, Hajime; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2016-07-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases involved in the induction of cell death against non-self cells. The enzymes differ in their primary substrate specificity and have one of four hydrolysis activities: tryptase, Asp-ase, Met-ase and chymase. Although granzyme genes have been isolated from several fishes, evidence for their involvement in cytotoxicity has not yet been reported. In the present study, we attempted to purify and characterize a fish granzyme involved in cytotoxicity using ginbuna crucian carp. The cytotoxicity of leukocytes was significantly inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor ''3, 4-dichloroisocoumarin''. In addition, we found that granzymeA-like activity (hydrolysis of Z-GPR-MCA) was inhibited by the same inhibitor and significantly enhanced by allo-antigen stimulation in vivo. Proteins from leukocyte extracts were subjected to two steps of chromatographic purification using benzamidine-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 26,900 Da by SDS-PAGE analysis. The purified enzyme displayed a Km of 220 μM, a Kcat of 21.7 sec(-1) and a Kcat/Km of 98,796 sec(-1) M(-1) with an optimal pH of 9.5 for the Z-GPR-MCA substrate. The protease was totally inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and showed granzymeA-like substrate specificity. Therefore, we conclude that the purified enzyme belongs to the mammalian granzymeA (EC 3.4.21.78) and appears to be involved in cytotoxicity in fish. PMID:26872543

  18. Noninvasive Imaging of Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Apoptosis in a Mouse Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Lee, Jaetae; Jeon, Yong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that induce apoptosis in cancer cells infected with viruses and bacteria through a caspase-3-dependent pathway. Effective NK cell-based immunotherapy requires highly sensitive imaging tools for in vivo monitoring of the dynamic events involved in apoptosis. Here, we describe a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging approach to determine the antitumor effects of NK cell-based therapy by serial imaging of caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in a mouse model of human glioma. PMID:27177676

  19. Lymphocyte adhesion molecules in T cell-mediated lysis of human kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Suranyi, M G; Bishop, G A; Clayberger, C; Krensky, A M; Leenaerts, P; Aversa, G; Hall, B M

    1991-02-01

    The complementary adhesion molecules LFA-1 (CD11a, 18)/ICAM-1 (CD54) and LFA-2 (CD2)/LFA-3 (CD58) have been shown to be important in T cell interaction with lymphoid target cells. The role of these ligand pairs in cytotoxicity against somatic cells is less well established. While LFA-3 is expressed by all cells in the kidney, ICAM-1 expression is low in normal kidneys but is increased in allograft rejection. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay was used to examine the relative importance of the two adhesion ligands in immune damage against kidney cells in rejection. HLA-A2 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition of cultured human kidney cells (HKC), of predominantly renal tubular cell origin, was studied. Immunofluorescence studies showed that both induced and uninduced HKC target cells expressed ICAM-1, MHC class I and LFA-3, but only MHC class I and class II antigens and ICAM-1 were significantly upregulated by cytokine induction. Effector cells expressed LFA-1 and LFA-2 but little or no ICAM-1 and LFA-3. Cytokine induction of ICAM-1 expression on HKC target cells increased their susceptibility to lysis. Monoclonal antibody against ICAM-1 or LFA-1 produced the greatest inhibition of HKC lysis, and their effects were not additive. Antibody against LFA-2 (CD2) or LFA-3 also produced significant inhibition, but to a lesser degree, and no additive effect was found.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1706002

  20. Candida mannan: chemistry, suppression of cell-mediated immunity, and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R D; Shibata, N; Podzorski, R P; Herron, M J

    1991-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to establish an infection involves multiple components of this fungal pathogen, but its ability to persist in host tissue may involve primarily the immunosuppressive property of a major cell wall glycoprotein, mannan. Mannan and oligosaccharide fragments of mannan are potent inhibitors of cell-mediated immunity and appear to reproduce the immune deficit of patients with the mucocutaneous form of candidiasis. However, neither the exact structures of these inhibitory species nor their mechanisms of action have yet been clearly defined. Different investigators have proposed that mannan or mannan catabolites act upon monocytes or suppressor T lymphocytes, but research from unrelated areas has provided still other possibilities for consideration. These include interference with cytokine activities, lymphocyte-monocyte interactions, and leukocyte homing. To stimulate further research of the immunosuppressive property of C. albicans mannan, we have reviewed (i) the relationship of mannan to other antigens and virulence factors of the fungus; (ii) the chemistry of mannan, together with methods for preparation of mannan and mannan fragments; and (iii) the historical evidence for immunosuppression by Candida mannan and the mechanisms currently proposed for this property; and (iv) we have speculated upon still other mechanisms by which mannan might influence host defense functions. It is possible that understanding the immunosuppressive effects of mannan will provide clues to novel therapies for candidiasis that will enhance the efficacy of both available and future anti-Candida agents. PMID:2004345

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Associated with Diminished Cell-Mediated Immunity in Antarctic Expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cooley, Helen; Dubow, Robin; Lugg, Desmond

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at two Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, which was evaluated two times before winter isolation and three times during isolation. At all five evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished. CMI response. Diminished CMI was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal CMI responses for all five tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, after, and during the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least one occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (p=0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (p<0.0005) when CMI responsiveness was diminished than when CMI status was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter results in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  2. Inhibitory effects of mast cell-mediated allergic reactions by cell cultured Siberian Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Koo, H N; Myung, N I; Shin, M K; Kim, J W; Kim, D K; Kim, K S; Kim, H M; Lee, Y M

    2001-02-01

    The crude drug "Siberian Ginseng (SG)" has long been used in empirical Oriental medicine for the nonspecific enhancement of resistance in humans and animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of cell cultured SG by oral administration in mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. SG dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic allergy with doses of 10(-2) to 1 g/kg 1 h before oral administration. Of special note, SG inhibited systemic allergy with the dose of 1 g/kg by 25%. SG (1 g/kg) also inhibited passive cutaneous allergic reaction by 51%. SG dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. When SG (0.01 mg/ml) was added, the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in antidinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody-stimulated mast cells was inhibited 39.5% and 23.3%, respectively. In addition, SG inhibited anti-DNP IgE antibody-stimulated TNF-alpha protein expression in mast cells. Our studies provide evidence that SG may be beneficial in the treatment of various types of allergic diseases.

  3. Cell mediated immune response of the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus after PAMPs stimulation.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2016-09-01

    The Mediterranean sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) is of great ecological and economic importance for the European aquaculture. Yet, most of the studies regarding echinoderm's immunological defense mechanisms reported so far have used the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus as a model, and information on the immunological defense mechanisms of Paracentrotus lividus and other sea urchins, is scarce. To remedy this gap in information, in this study, flow cytometry was used to evaluate several cellular immune mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, cell cooperation, and ROS production in P. lividus coelomocytes after PAMP stimulation. Two cell populations were described. Of the two, the amoeboid-phagocytes were responsible for the phagocytosis and ROS production. Cooperation between amoeboid-phagocytes and non-adherent cells resulted in an increased phagocytic response. Stimulation with several PAMPs modified the phagocytic activity and the production of ROS. The premise that the coelomocytes were activated by the bacterial components was confirmed by the expression levels of two cell mediated immune genes: LPS-Induced TNF-alpha Factor (LITAF) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). These results have helped us understand the cellular immune mechanisms in P. lividus and their modulation after PAMP stimulation.

  4. Melatonin treatment prevents modulation of cell-mediated immune response induced by propoxur in rats.

    PubMed

    Suke, Sanvidhan G; Pathak, Rahul; Ahmed, Rafat S; Tripathi, A K; Banerjee, B D

    2008-08-01

    The effect of melatonin, a major secretory product of the pineal gland, in attenuation of propoxur (2-isopropoxy phenyl N-methyl carbamate)-induced modulation of cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was studied in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were exposed to propoxur (a widely used pesticide) orally (10 mg/kg) and/or melatonin (10 mg/kg) orally for 4 weeks. CMI was measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), leucocyte and macrophage migration inhibition (LMI and MMI) responses and estimation of cytokines TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels. Rats exposed to propoxur for 4 weeks showed significant decrease in DTH, LMI and MMI responses. Propoxur also suppressed TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma production significantly. Administration of melatonin alone caused a significant increase in DTH response. Although there were no changes in the LMI and MMI response, the cytokine levels were significantly increased, as compared to control. Co-administration of melatonin along with propoxur significantly nullified the effect of the pesticide on the CMI response, except DTH and reversed levels of cytokines to near control/normal values. Thus, melatonin treatment considerably attenuated immunomodulation caused by sub-chronic treatment of propoxur in experimental animals.

  5. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Neuronal Dysfunction and Degeneration in Limbic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Ehling, Petra; Melzer, Nico; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune inflammation of the limbic gray matter structures of the human brain has recently been identified as major cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with interictal temporal epileptiform activity and slowing of the electroencephalogram, progressive memory disturbances, as well as a variety of other behavioral, emotional, and cognitive changes. Magnetic resonance imaging exhibits volume and signal changes of the amygdala and hippocampus, and specific anti-neuronal antibodies binding to either intracellular or plasma membrane neuronal antigens can be detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. While effects of plasma cell-derived antibodies on neuronal function and integrity are increasingly becoming characterized, potentially contributing effects of T cell-mediated immune mechanisms remain poorly understood. CD8+ T cells are known to directly interact with major histocompatibility complex class I-expressing neurons in an antigen-specific manner. Here, we summarize current knowledge on how such direct CD8+ T cell–neuron interactions may impact neuronal excitability, plasticity, and integrity on a single cell and network level and provide an overview on methods to further corroborate the in vivo relevance of these mechanisms mainly obtained from in vitro studies. PMID:26236280

  6. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  7. Srf-dependent paracrine signals produced by myofibers control satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Guerci, Aline; Lahoute, Charlotte; Hébrard, Sophie; Collard, Laura; Graindorge, Dany; Favier, Maryline; Cagnard, Nicolas; Batonnet-Pichon, Sabrina; Précigout, Guillaume; Garcia, Luis; Tuil, David; Daegelen, Dominique; Sotiropoulos, Athanassia

    2012-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscles adapt their fiber size to workload. We show that serum response factor (Srf) is required for satellite cell-mediated hypertrophic muscle growth. Deletion of Srf from myofibers and not satellite cells blunts overload-induced hypertrophy, and impairs satellite cell proliferation and recruitment to pre-existing fibers. We reveal a gene network in which Srf within myofibers modulates interleukin-6 and cyclooxygenase-2/interleukin-4 expressions and therefore exerts a paracrine control of satellite cell functions. In Srf-deleted muscles, in vivo overexpression of interleukin-6 is sufficient to restore satellite cell proliferation but not satellite cell fusion and overall growth. In contrast cyclooxygenase-2/interleukin-4 overexpression rescue satellite cell recruitment and muscle growth without affecting satellite cell proliferation, identifying altered fusion as the limiting cellular event. These findings unravel a role for Srf in the translation of mechanical cues applied to myofibers into paracrine signals, which in turn will modulate satellite cell functions and support muscle growth.

  8. Cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs injected with inactivated chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Senyk, G; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1980-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to chlamydial antigens was readily induced in guinea pigs by a single injection of Betaprone-inactivated chlamydiae in complete Freund adjuvant. The CMI was measured in vivo by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, and in vitro by inhibition of migration of peritoneal exudate cells and by proliferation of lymph node lymphocytes. There was an overall correlation between in vivo and in vitro responses. Of the in vitro assays, migration inhibition reflected the state of sensitization, as judged by skin tests, more uniformly than lymphocyte stimulation. Extensive inter- and intra-species cross-reactivity was noted between LB-1, a strain of C. trachomatis, and three strains of C. psittaci, 6BC, GPIC, and 562F. Cross-reactivity between LB-1 and 6BC was one-way only, by all three parameters: LB-1 elicited strong cross-reactions in 6BC-immunized animals but not vice versa. Antichlamydial antibodies could not be demonstrated in any of the animals by microimmunofluorescence.

  9. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  10. Is cell-mediated immunity related to the evolution of life-history strategies in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L; Scheuerlein, Alex; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2002-01-01

    According to life-history theory, the development of immune function should be balanced through evolutionary optimization of the allocation of resources to reproduction and through mechanisms that promote survival. We investigated interspecific variability in cell-mediated immune response (CMI), as measured by the phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) assay, in relation to clutch size, longevity and other life-history traits in 50 species of birds. CMI exhibited significant repeatability within species, and PHA responses in chicks were consistently stronger than in adults. Univariate tests showed a variety of significant relationships between the CMI of both chicks and adults with respect to size, development period and lifespan, but not clutch size or prevalence of blood parasites in adults. Multivariate analyses confirmed these patterns but independent variables were too highly correlated to isolate unique influences on CMI. The positive relationship of chick CMI to nestling period is further complicated by a parallel relationship of chick CMI to the age at testing. However, multivariate analysis showed that chick CMI varies uniquely with length of the nestling period. Adult CMI was associated with a strong life-history axis of body size, development rate and longevity. Therefore, adult CMI may be associated with prevention and repair mechanisms related to long lifespan, but it also may be allometrically related to body size through other pathways. Neither chick CMI nor adult CMI was related to clutch size, contradicting previous results linking parasite-related mortality to CMI and the evolution of clutch size (reproductive investment) in birds. PMID:12028764

  11. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2005-06-17

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21{sup Cip1}, which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21{sup Cip1}.

  12. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  13. Amacrine cell-mediated input to bipolar cells: variations on a common mechanistic theme.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is a ubiquitous feature of neural circuits in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Analogous to pure electronic circuits, neuronal feedback provides either a positive or negative influence on the output of upstream components/neurons. Although the particulars (i.e., connectivity, physiological encoding/processing/signaling) of circuits in higher areas of the brain are often unclear, the inner retina proves an excellent model for studying both the anatomy and physiology of feedback circuits within the functional context of visual processing. Inner retinal feedback to bipolar cells is almost entirely mediated by a single class of interneurons, the amacrine cells. Although this might sound like a simple circuit arrangement with an equally simple function, anatomical, molecular, and functional evidence suggest that amacrine cells represent an extremely diverse class of CNS interneurons that contribute to a variety of retinal processes. In this review, I classify the amacrine cells according to their anatomical output synapses and target cell(s) (i.e., bipolar cells, ganglion cells, and/or amacrine cells) and discuss specifically our current understandings of amacrine cell-mediated feedback and output to bipolar cells on the synaptic, cellular, and circuit levels, while drawing connections to visual processing.

  14. Cell mediated immune response of the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus after PAMPs stimulation.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2016-09-01

    The Mediterranean sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) is of great ecological and economic importance for the European aquaculture. Yet, most of the studies regarding echinoderm's immunological defense mechanisms reported so far have used the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus as a model, and information on the immunological defense mechanisms of Paracentrotus lividus and other sea urchins, is scarce. To remedy this gap in information, in this study, flow cytometry was used to evaluate several cellular immune mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, cell cooperation, and ROS production in P. lividus coelomocytes after PAMP stimulation. Two cell populations were described. Of the two, the amoeboid-phagocytes were responsible for the phagocytosis and ROS production. Cooperation between amoeboid-phagocytes and non-adherent cells resulted in an increased phagocytic response. Stimulation with several PAMPs modified the phagocytic activity and the production of ROS. The premise that the coelomocytes were activated by the bacterial components was confirmed by the expression levels of two cell mediated immune genes: LPS-Induced TNF-alpha Factor (LITAF) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). These results have helped us understand the cellular immune mechanisms in P. lividus and their modulation after PAMP stimulation. PMID:27113124

  15. Paper-based bioactive scaffolds for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Yu, Seung Jung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Cho, Ann-Na; Kim, Jin; Lee, Bora; Yang, Hee Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Bioactive, functional scaffolds are required to improve the regenerative potential of stem cells for tissue reconstruction and functional recovery of damaged tissues. Here, we report a paper-based bioactive scaffold platform for stem cell culture and transplantation for bone reconstruction. The paper scaffolds are surface-engineered by an initiated chemical vapor deposition process for serial coating of a water-repellent and cell-adhesive polymer film, which ensures the long-term stability in cell culture medium and induces efficient cell attachment. The prepared paper scaffolds are compatible with general stem cell culture and manipulation techniques. An optimal paper type is found to provide structural, physical, and mechanical cues to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). A bioactive paper scaffold significantly enhances in vivo bone regeneration of hADSCs in a critical-sized calvarial bone defect. Stacking the paper scaffolds with osteogenically differentiated hADSCs and human endothelial cells resulted in vascularized bone formation in vivo. Our study suggests that paper possesses great potential as a bioactive, functional, and cost-effective scaffold platform for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the feasibility of a paper material for stem cell application to repair tissue defects.

  16. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  17. Epistasis between microRNAs 155 and 146a during T cell-mediated antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Huffaker, Thomas B.; Hu, Ruozhen; Runtsch, Marah C.; Bake, Erin; Chen, Xinjian; Zhao, Jimmy; Round, June L.; Baltimore, David; O’Connell, Ryan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY An increased understanding of antitumor immunity is necessary to improve cell-based immunotherapies against human cancers. Here, we investigated the roles of two immune system-expressed microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-155 and miR-146a, in the regulation of antitumor immune responses. Our results indicate that miR-155 promotes and miR-146a inhibits IFNγ responses by T cells and reduced solid tumor growth in vivo. Using a novel double knockout (DKO) mouse strain deficient in both miR-155 and miR-146a, we have also identified an epistatic relationship between these two miRNAs. DKO mice had defective T cell responses and tumor growth phenotypes similar to miR-155−/− mice. Further analysis of the T cell compartment revealed that miR-155 modulates IFNγ expression through a mechanism involving repression of Ship1. Our work reveals critical roles for miRNAs in the reciprocal regulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity, and demonstrates the dominant nature of miR-155 during its promotion of immune responses. PMID:23200854

  18. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26635184

  19. Role of stromal cell-mediated Notch signaling in CLL resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamdje, A H Nwabo; Bassi, G; Pacelli, L; Malpeli, G; Amati, E; Nichele, I; Pizzolo, G; Krampera, M

    2012-01-01

    Stromal cells are essential components of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment that regulate and support the survival of different tumors, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In this study, we investigated the role of Notch signaling in the promotion of survival and chemoresistance of human CLL cells in coculture with human BM-mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSCs) of both autologous and allogeneic origin. The presence of BM-MSCs rescued CLL cells from apoptosis both spontaneously and following induction with various drugs, including Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide, Bendamustine, Prednisone and Hydrocortisone. The treatment with a combination of anti-Notch-1, Notch-2 and Notch-4 antibodies or γ-secretase inhibitor XII (GSI XII) reverted this protective effect by day 3, even in presence of the above-mentioned drugs. Overall, our findings show that stromal cell-mediated Notch-1, Notch-2 and Notch-4 signaling has a role in CLL survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore, its blocking could be an additional tool to overcome drug resistance and improve the therapeutic strategies for CLL. PMID:22829975

  20. NLRC5 shields T lymphocytes from NK-cell-mediated elimination under inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ludigs, Kristina; Jandus, Camilla; Utzschneider, Daniel T.; Staehli, Francesco; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Dang, Anh Thu; Rota, Giorgia; Castro, Wilson; Zehn, Dietmar; Vivier, Eric; Held, Werner; Romero, Pedro; Guarda, Greta

    2016-01-01

    NLRC5 is a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I (MHCI), which maintains high MHCI expression particularly in T cells. Recent evidence highlights an important NK–T-cell crosstalk, raising the question on whether NLRC5 specifically modulates this interaction. Here we show that NK cells from Nlrc5-deficient mice exhibit moderate alterations in inhibitory receptor expression and responsiveness. Interestingly, NLRC5 expression in T cells is required to protect them from NK-cell-mediated elimination upon inflammation. Using T-cell-specific Nlrc5-deficient mice, we show that NK cells surprisingly break tolerance even towards ‘self' Nlrc5-deficient T cells under inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, during chronic LCMV infection, the total CD8+ T-cell population is severely decreased in these mice, a phenotype reverted by NK-cell depletion. These findings strongly suggest that endogenous T cells with low MHCI expression become NK-cell targets, having thus important implications for T-cell responses in naturally or therapeutically induced inflammatory conditions. PMID:26861112

  1. First Line of Defense: Innate Cell-Mediated Control of Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Vanessa; Rivera, Amariliz

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic infections and their effect on the human condition have been widely overlooked and poorly surveilled by many health organizations even though mortality rates have increased in recent years. The increased usage of immunosuppressive and myeloablative therapies for the treatment of malignant as well as non-malignant diseases has contributed significantly to the increased incidence of fungal infections. Invasive fungal infections have been found to be responsible for at least 1.5 million deaths worldwide. About 90% of these deaths can be attributed to Cryptococcus, Candida, Aspergillus, and Pneumocystis. A better understanding of how the host immune system contains fungal infection is likely to facilitate the development of much needed novel antifungal therapies. Innate cells are responsible for the rapid recognition and containment of fungal infections and have been found to play essential roles in defense against multiple fungal pathogens. In this review we summarize our current understanding of host-fungi interactions with a focus on mechanisms of innate cell-mediated recognition and control of pulmonary aspergillosis. PMID:26973640

  2. IL-9 regulates intestinal barrier function in experimental T cell-mediated colitis.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Katharina; McKenzie, Andrew N; Neurath, Markus F; Weigmann, Benno

    2015-01-01

    As previous studies suggested that IL-9 may control intestinal barrier function, we tested the role of IL-9 in experimental T cell-mediated colitis induced by the hapten reagent 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The deficiency of IL-9 suppressed TNBS-induced colitis and led to lower numbers of PU.1 expressing T cells in the lamia propria, suggesting a regulatory role for Th9 cells in the experimental TNBS colitis model. Since IL-9 is known to functionally alter intestinal barrier function in colonic inflammation, we assessed the expression of tight junction molecules in intestinal epithelial cells of TNBS-inflamed mice. Therefore we made real-time PCR analyses for tight junction molecules in the inflamed colon from wild-type and IL-9 KO mice, immunofluorescent stainings and investigated the expression of junctional proteins directly in intestinal epithelial cells of TNBS-inflamed mice by Western blot studies. The results demonstrated that sealing proteins like occludin were up regulated in the colon of inflamed IL-9 KO mice. In contrast, the tight junction protein Claudin1 showed lower expression levels when IL-9 is absent. Surprisingly, the pore-forming molecule Claudin2 revealed equal expression in TNBS-treated wild-type and IL-9-deficient animals. These results illustrate the pleiotropic functions of IL-9 in changing intestinal permeability in experimental colitis. Thus, modulation of IL-9 function emerges as a new approach for regulating barrier function in intestinal inflammation.

  3. Crosstalk between PKCζ and the IL4/Stat6 pathway during T-cell-mediated hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Durán, Angeles; Rodriguez, Angelina; Martin, Pilar; Serrano, Manuel; Flores, Juana Maria; Leitges, Michael; Diaz-Meco, María T; Moscat, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    PKCζ is required for nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κB) activation in several cell systems. NF-κB is a suppressor of liver apoptosis during development and in concanavalin A (ConA)-induced T-cell-mediated hepatitis. Here we show that PKCζ−/− mice display inhibited ConA-induced NF-κB activation and reduced damage in liver. As the IL-4/Stat6 pathway is necessary for ConA-induced hepatitis, we addressed here the potential role of PKCζ in this cascade. Interestingly, the loss of PKCζ severely attenuated serum IL-5 and liver eotaxin-1 levels, two critical mediators of liver damage. Stat6 tyrosine phosphorylation and Jak1 activation were ablated in the liver of ConA-injected PKCζ−/− mice and in IL-4-stimulated PKCζ−/− fibroblasts. PKCζ interacts with and phosphorylates Jak1 and PKCζ activity is required for Jak1 function. In contrast, Par-4−/− mice have increased sensitivity to ConA-induced liver damage and IL-4 signaling. This unveils a novel and critical involvement of PKCζ in the IL-4/Stat6 signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15526032

  4. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  5. Aire controls mesenchymal stem cell-mediated suppression in chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Parekkadan, Biju; Fletcher, Anne L; Li, Matthew; Tjota, Melissa Y; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Milwid, Jack M; Lee, Je-Wook; Yarmush, Martin L; Turley, Shannon J

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are emerging as a promising immunotherapeutic, based largely on their overt suppression of T lymphocytes under inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. While paracrine cross-talk between MSCs and T cells has been well-studied, an intrinsic transcriptional switch that programs MSCs for immunomodulation has remained undefined. Here we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs require the transcriptional regulator Aire to suppress T cell-mediated pathogenesis in a mouse model of chronic colitis. Surprisingly, Aire did not control MSC suppression of T cell proliferation in vitro. Instead, Aire reduced T cell mitochondrial reductase by negatively regulating a proinflammatory cytokine, early T cell activation factor (Eta)-1. Neutralization of Eta-1 enabled Aire(-/-) MSCs to ameliorate colitis, reducing the number of infiltrating effector T cells in the colon, and normalizing T cell reductase levels. We propose that Aire represents an early molecular switch imposing a suppressive MSC phenotype via regulation of Eta-1. Monitoring Aire expression in MSCs may thus be a critical parameter for clinical use.

  6. Effects of endosulfan on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, B.D.; Hussain, Q.Z.

    1987-03-01

    Endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10a-hexa-chloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro, 6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepin-3-oxide), a polycyclic chlorinated hydrocarbon of cyclodien group, is a well known insecticide. Food is the main source of exposure of the general population to endosulfan. The physical, chemical as well as toxicological effects of endosulfan in experimental animals have been reported by various workers. However, the reports regarding the effect of endosulfan on immune system are not available. In view of its widespread use there is an urgent need to investigate the immunotoxicological effect of endosulfan in mammals for the safety evaluation of this insecticide. This has, therefore, prompted the authors to investigate the effect of endosulfan on immune system employing albino rats as the experimental animals. Included in this report are their preliminary findings on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in rats exposed to sub-chronic doses of endosulfan.

  7. Anti-allergic effects of nilotinib on mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis like reactions.

    PubMed

    El-Agamy, Dina S

    2012-04-01

    Nilotinib is a new orally bioavailable potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, its effect on mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reaction is still not known. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of nilotinib on the anaphylactic allergic reaction and study its possible mechanism(s) of action. Nilotinib administration prevented systemic anaphylaxis in mice, mediated by compound 48/80, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Also, nilotinib significantly inhibited (P<0.05) allergic paw edema in rats. Furthermore, nilotinib significantly decreased (P<0.05) the IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in a dose dependent manner. In addition, nilotinib dose-dependently reduced histamine release from the rat peritoneal mast cells activated either by compound 48/80 or by ovalbumin. Moreover, nilotinib attenuated the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in the rat peritoneal mast cells. These findings provide evidence that nilotinib inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and so it could be a candidate as an anti-allergic agent.

  8. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  9. Polypropylene Sulfide Nanoparticle p24 Vaccine Promotes Dendritic Cell-Mediated Specific Immune Responses against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Caucheteux, Stephan M; Mitchell, John P; Ivory, Matthew O; Hirosue, Sachiko; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Dolton, Garry; Ladell, Kristin; Miners, Kelly; Price, David A; Kan-Mitchell, June; Sewell, Andrew K; Nestle, Frank; Moris, Arnaud; Karoo, Richard O; Birchall, James C; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbel, Jeffrey A; Blanchet, Fabien P; Piguet, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Delivery of vaccine formulations into the dermis using antigen-coated microneedle patches is a promising and safe approach because of efficient antigen delivery and safety. We evaluated an intradermal vaccine using HIV-1 p24 Gag peptide-conjugated polypropylene sulfide nanoparticles to induce immunity against HIV-1. This peptide-conjugated polypropylene sulfide nanoparticle formulation did not accelerate the maturation of blood- or skin-derived subsets of dendritic cells, either generated in vitro or purified ex vivo, despite efficient uptake in the absence of adjuvant. Moreover, dendritic cell-mediated capture of particulate antigen in this form induced potent HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses, as well as B-cell-mediated antibody production. Nanoparticle-based intradermal antigen delivery may therefore provide a new option in the global effort to develop an effective vaccine against HIV-1. PMID:26896775

  10. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called "second pathway of liver regeneration." The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin.

  11. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called “second pathway of liver regeneration.” The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  12. Evolving models of the immunopathogenesis of T-cell mediated drug allergy: the role of host, pathogens, and drug response

    PubMed Central

    White, Katie D.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Mallal, Simon; Phillips, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated adverse drug reactions (IM-ADRs) are an underrecognized source of preventable morbidity, mortality, and cost. Increasingly, genetic variation in the HLA loci is associated with risk of severe reactions, highlighting the importance of T-cell immune responses in the mechanisms of both B-cell mediated and primary T-cell mediated IM-ADRs. In this review, we summarize the role of host genetics, microbes and drugs in the development of IM-ADRs, expand upon the existing models of IM-ADR pathogenesis to address multiple unexplained observations, discuss the implications of this work in clinical practice today, and describe future applications for pre-clinical drug toxicity screening, drug design, and development. PMID:26254049

  13. Cell-mediated immune responses in owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus) with trachoma to soluble antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D L; Todd, W J; Macdonald, A B

    1978-01-01

    The first temporal study of the cell-mediated immune responses (CMI) following ocular infections with Chlamydia trachomatis is presented. We examined the CMI of owl monkeys infected with trachoma to soluble antigens of C. trachomatis by leucocyte migration inhibition (LIF) and delayed hypersensitivity skin testing. Delayed hypersensitivity of a systemic nature developed after a local eye infection in owl monkeys; clearance of inclusions from conjunctival cells coincided with the onset of this response. The association of eye secretion and circulating antibodies with recovery from primary infection was not so striking. Both cellular and humoral immune responses persisted for at least 2 months, at which time all test animals were completely resistant to re-infection. The elicitation of cell-mediated immune reactions with solubilized chlamydial antigens may permit the isolation of specific antigens involved in the generation of protective immunity in the owl monkey model. PMID:101327

  14. Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds increase the efficacy of stem cell-mediated therapy of surgically resected glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bagó, Juli R; Pegna, Guillaume J; Okolie, Onyi; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Loboa, Elizabeth G; Hingtgen, Shawn D

    2016-06-01

    Engineered stem cell (SC)-based therapy holds enormous promise for treating the incurable brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM). Retaining the cytotoxic SCs in the surgical cavity after GBM resection is one of the greatest challenges to this approach. Here, we describe a biocompatible electrospun nanofibrous scaffold (bENS) implant capable of delivering and retaining tumor-homing cytotoxic stem cells that suppress recurrence of post-surgical GBM. As a new approach to GBM therapy, we created poly(l-lactic acid) (PLA) bENS bearing drug-releasing human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We discovered that bENS-based implant increased hMSC retention in the surgical cavity 5-fold and prolonged persistence 3-fold compared to standard direct injection using our mouse model of GBM surgical resection/recurrence. Time-lapse imaging showed cytotoxic hMSC/bENS treatment killed co-cultured human GBM cells, and allowed hMSCs to rapidly migrate off the scaffolds as they homed to GBMs. In vivo, bENS loaded with hMSCs releasing the anti-tumor protein TRAIL (bENS(sTR)) reduced the volume of established GBM xenografts 3-fold. Mimicking clinical GBM patient therapy, lining the post-operative GBM surgical cavity with bENS(sTR) implants inhibited the re-growth of residual GBM foci 2.3-fold and prolonged post-surgical median survival from 13.5 to 31 days in mice. These results suggest that nanofibrous-based SC therapies could be an innovative new approach to improve the outcomes of patients suffering from terminal brain cancer. PMID:27016620

  15. Seasonal trade-offs in cell-mediated immunosenescence in ruffs (Philomachus pugnax).

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, George A; Lank, David B

    2003-01-01

    The immune system is an energetically expensive self-maintenance complex that, given the risks of parasitism, cannot be carelessly compromised. Life-history theory posits that trade-offs between fitness components, such as self-maintenance and reproduction, vary between genders and age classes depending on their expected residual lifetime reproductive success, and seasonally as energetic requirements change. Using ruff (Philomachus pugnax), a bird with two genetically distinct male morphs, we demonstrate here a decrease in male immunocompetence during the breeding season, greater variance in immune response among males than females, immunosenescence in both sexes and male morphs, and a seasonal shift in the age range required to detect senescence. Using a phytohaemagglutinin delayed hypersensitivity assay, we assessed cell-mediated immunity (CMI) of males of typical breeding age during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons, and of a larger sample that included females and birds of a greater age range during the non-breeding period. CMI was higher for breeding-aged males in May than in November, but the increase was not related to age or male morph. In November, mean CMI did not differ between the sexes, but the variance was higher for males than for females, and there were no differences in mean or variance between the two male morphs. For both sexes and male morphs, CMI was lower for young birds than for birds of typical breeding ages, and it declined again for older birds. In males, senescence was detected in the non-breeding season only when very old birds were included. These results, generally consistent with expectations from life-history theory, indicate that the immune system can be involved in multifarious trade-offs within a yearly cycle and along an individual's lifetime, and that specific predictions about means and variances in immune response should be considered in future immunoecological research. PMID:12816660

  16. Effect of Chicoric Acid on Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na Young; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Jin, Jong Sik; Bang, Keuk Soo; Eom, Ye-Jin; Hong, Chul-Hee; Nugroho, Agung; Park, Hee-Jun; An, Hyo-Jin

    2015-12-24

    Chicoric acid (dicaffeoyl-tartaric acid), is a natural phenolic compound found in a number of plants, such as chicory (Cichorium intybus) and Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea), which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and analgesic activities. Although these biological effects of chicoric acid have been investigated, there are no reports of its antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effects in human mast cells (HMC)-1 or anaphylactic activity in a mouse model. Therefore, we investigated the antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect of chicoric acid and its underlying mechanisms of action using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Chicoric acid decreased the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β. We studied the inhibitory effects of chicoric acid on the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activation of caspase-1. However, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was not sufficient to abrogate the stimulus. In addition, we investigated the ability of chicoric acid to inhibit compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis in vivo. Oral administration of chicoric acid at 20 mg/kg inhibited histamine release and protected mice against compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic mortality. These results suggest that chicoric acid has an antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect that involves modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses. Therefore, chicoric acid could be an efficacious agent for allergy-related inflammatory disorders. PMID:26593037

  17. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27679638

  18. Curcuma oil reduces endothelial cell-mediated inflammation in postmyocardial ischemia/reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Amit; Khanna, Vivek; Prakash, Prem; Goyal, Dipika; Malasoni, Richa; Naqvi, Arshi; Dwivedi, Anil K; Dikshit, Madhu; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu

    2014-09-01

    Endothelial cells initiated inflammation persisting in postmyocardial infarction needs to be controlled and moderated for avoiding fatal complications. Curcuma oil (C.oil, Herbal Medicament), a standardized hexane soluble fraction of Curcuma longa has possessed neuroprotective effect. However, its effect on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/RP) and endothelial cells remains incompletely defined. Here, using in vivo rat MI/RP injury model and in vitro cellular approaches using EA.hy926 endothelial cells, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and myograph, we provide evidence that with effective regimen and preconditioning of rats with C.oil (250 mg/kg, PO), before and after MI/RP surgery protects rats from MI/RP-induced injury. C.oil treatment reduces left ventricular ischemic area and endothelial cell-induced inflammation, specifically in the ischemic region (*P < 0.0001) and improved endothelial function by reducing the expression of proinflammatory genes and adhesion factors on endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, mechanistic studies have revealed that C.oil reduced the expression of adhesion factors like E-selectin (#P = 0.0016) and ICAM-1 ($P = 0.0069) in initiating endothelial cells-induced inflammation. In line to the real-time polymerase chain reaction expression data, C.oil reduced the adhesion of inflammatory cells to endothelial cells as assessed by the interaction of THP-1 monocytes with the endothelial cells using flow-based adhesion and under inflammatory conditions. These studies provide evidence that salutary effect of C.oil on MI/RP could be achieved with pretreatment and posttreatment of rats, C.oil reduced MI/RP-induced injury by reducing the endothelial cell-mediated inflammation, specifically in the ischemic zone of MI/RP rat heart.

  19. Anti-allergic effects of Lycopus lucidus on mast cell-mediated allergy model

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Suk, Kyoungho; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Kim, InKyeom; Lee, Maan-Gee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lim, Jong-Pil; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2005-12-15

    The current study characterizes the mechanism by which the aqueous extract of Lycopus lucidus Turcz. (Labiatae) (LAE) decreases mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. The immediate-type allergic reaction is involved in many allergic diseases such as asthma and allergic rhinitis. LAE has been used as a traditional medicine in Korea and is known to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, its specific mechanism of action is still unknown. LAE was anally administered to mice for high and fast absorption. LAE inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. LAE decreased the local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody. LAE dose-dependently reduced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Furthermore, LAE decreased the secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of LAE on the pro-inflammatory cytokine was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. LAE attenuated PMA plus A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and specifically blocked activation of p38 MAPK, but not that of c-jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Our findings provide evidence that LAE inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, p38 MAPK, and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  20. TWIST modulates prostate cancer cell-mediated bone cell activity and is upregulated by osteogenic induction.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Hiu-Fung; Kwok, Wai-Kei; Chan, Ka-Kui; Chua, Chee-Wai; Chan, Yuen-Piu; Chu, Ying-Ying; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Wang, Xianghong; Chan, Kwok-Wah

    2008-08-01

    TWIST, a helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is highly expressed in many types of human cancer. We have previously found that TWIST confers prostate cancer cells with an enhanced metastatic potential through promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a high TWIST expression in human prostate cancer is associated with an increased metastatic potential. The predilection of prostate cancer cells to metastasize to bone may be due to two interplaying mechanisms (i) by increasing the rate of bone remodeling and (ii) by undergoing osteomimicry. We further studied the role of TWIST in promoting prostate cancer to bone metastasis. TWIST expression in PC3, a metastatic prostate cancer cell line, was silenced by small interfering RNA and we found that conditioned medium from PC3 with lower TWIST expression had a lower activity on stimulating osteoclast differentiation and higher activity on stimulating osteoblast mineralization. In addition, we found that these effects were, at least partly, associated with TWIST-induced expression of dickkopf homolog 1 (DKK-1), a factor that promotes osteolytic metastasis. We also examined TWIST and RUNX2 expressions during osteogenic induction of an organ-confined prostate cancer cell, 22Rv1. We observed increased TWIST and RUNX2 expressions upon osteogenic induction and downregulation of TWIST through short hairpin RNA reduced the induction level of RUNX2. In summary, our results suggest that, in addition to EMT, TWIST may also promote prostate cancer to bone metastasis by modulating prostate cancer cell-mediated bone remodeling via regulating the expression of a secretory factor, DKK-1, and enhancing osteomimicry of prostate cancer cells, probably, via RUNX2.

  1. Precision Subtypes of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Identified by Molecular Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Paul Ostrom; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Finn, Patricia W.; Perkins, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Among kidney transplant recipients, the treatment of choice for acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) with pulse steroids or antibody protocols has variable outcomes. Some rejection episodes are resistant to an initial steroid pulse, but respond to subsequent antibody protocols. The biological mechanisms causing the different therapeutic responses are not currently understood. Histological examination of the renal allograft is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute rejection. The Banff Classification System was established to standardize the histopathological diagnosis and to direct therapy. Although widely used, it shows variability among pathologists and lacks criteria to guide precision individualized therapy. The analysis of the transcriptome in allograft biopsies, which we analyzed in this study, provides a strategy to develop molecular diagnoses that would have increased diagnostic precision and assist the development of individualized treatment. Our hypothesis is that the histological classification of TCMR contains multiple subtypes of rejection. Using R language algorithms to determine statistical significance, multidimensional scaling, and hierarchical, we analyzed differential gene expression based on microarray data from biopsies classified as TCMR. Next, we identified KEGG functions, protein–protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and predicted therapeutic targets using the integrated database ConsesnsusPathDB (CPDB). Based on our analysis, two distinct clusters of biopsies termed TCMR01 and TCMR02 were identified. Despite having the same Banff classification, we identified 1933 differentially expressed genes between the two clusters. These genes were further divided into three major groups: a core group contained within both the TCMR01 and TCMR02 subtypes, as well as genes unique to TCMR01 or TCMR02. The subtypes of TCMR utilized different biological pathways, different regulatory networks and were predicted to

  2. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27679638

  3. Hepatitis B surface antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in human chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, K R; Tiku, M L; Ogra, P L

    1978-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody (anti-HBs), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and antibody (anti-HBe), the nature of T-cell function, and specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg were determined and evaluated serially in groups of subjects with chronic HBsAg carrier states and in seronegative controls. The techniques of in vitro lymphocyte transformation, spontaneous rosette formation, radioimmunoassay, reverse passive hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination, rheophoresis, and liver function tests were employed for these studies. For the lymphocyte transformation assay, multiple concentrations of phytohemagglutinin and purified HBsAg were used as stimulants. Cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg was detectable in 50% of the chronic HBsAg carriers (responders) at one or more concentrations of HBsAg. The remaining carriers (nonresponders) and controls failed to manifest HBsAg-specific lymphocyte transformation activity. The profile of the responders was characterized by elevated serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of anti-HBe, high HBsAg titers, and the conspicuous absence of HBeAg in the serum. The nonresponders were characterized by normal serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe, and lower HBsAg titers. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg in chronic HBsAg carriers who manifest biochemical evidence of liver disease. PMID:80380

  4. Resistance of cyclooxygenase-2 expressing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells against γδ T cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Daniel; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Kellner, Christian; Peipp, Matthias; Sebens, Susanne; Kabelitz, Dieter; Wesch, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The prostaglandin (PG) synthetase cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) promotes tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in a variety of human cancer entities including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In this study, we demonstrate that in PDAC cells such as Colo357 cells, enhanced Cox-2 expression and increased release of the Cox-2 metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes resistance against γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Co-culture with activated γδ T cells induced an upregulation of Cox-2 expression in Colo357 cells, and thereby an enhanced PGE2 release, in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) secretion from γδ T cells. The PGE2-mediated inhibition of γδ T cell cytotoxicity against Cox-2-expressing PDAC cells can be partially overcome by Cox-2 inhibitors. Our results show that differences between PDAC cells in regards to sensitivity to γδ T-cell cytotoxicity can be due to distinct levels of Cox-2 expression associated with varying amounts of PGE2 release. While γδ T cell cytotoxicity against PDAC cells expressing low levels of Cox-2 can be effectively enhanced by tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] with specificity for Vγ9 T cell receptor and HER-2/neu on PDAC cells, a combination of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] and Cox-2 inhibitor is necessary to induce complete lysis of Cox-2 high expressing Colo357. In conclusion, our results suggest that the application of tribody [(Her2)2×Vγ9] that enhances γδ T-cell cytotoxicity and Cox-2 inhibitors that overcome PGE2-mediated resistance of PDAC cells to the cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells might offer a promising combined immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25949900

  5. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R; Verkman, A S; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-12-19

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica.

  6. Expression of killer inhibitory receptors on cytotoxic cells from HIV-1-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, M D; Aguado, E; Tarazona, R; Romero, P; Molina, I; Santamaria, M; Solana, R; PeñA, J

    1999-01-01

    Dysfunction of cytotoxic activity of T and natural killer (NK) lymphocytes is a main immunological feature in patients with AIDS, but its basis are not well understood. It has been recently described that T and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity can be regulated by HLA killer inhibitory receptors (KIR). In this work, we have determined on cytotoxic T cells and NK cells from HIV-1-infected individuals the expression of the following KIR molecules: p58, p70, and ILT2 (immunoglobulin-like family KIR) as well as CD94 and NKG2A (C-lectin-type family KIR). With some exceptions, no significant changes were found on the expression of immunoglobulin-like KIR in either CD8+ or CD56+ cells. Interestingly, the percentages of CD8+ and CD56+ cells expressing CD94 were significantly increased in these individuals. We also show that, in vitro, IL-10 up-regulates CD94 expression on CD8+ and CD56+ cells obtained from normal individuals, suggesting that the augmented expression observed in HIV-infected individuals could be related to the high levels of IL-10 previously described in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:10193420

  7. Macrophage cytotoxicity in lethal and non-lethal murine malaria and the effect of vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, J; Treagust, J D; Playfair, J H

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the development of cell-mediated immunity in lethal and non-lethal malarial infections by assaying the cytotoxic activity of spleen cells for L929 tumour cells at different times after infection of mice with the lethal P. berghei, a lethal variant of Plasmodium yoelii and the non-lethal P. yoelii and P. chabaudi. In all cases the cytotoxicity increased to a peak during the first week and then diminished but the time of the peak varied with the infection; its activity was lowest with P. berghei. A second peak occurred in the non-lethal infections at the time of recovery. A protective vaccine accelerated and enhanced the early peak of cytotoxicity. The activity was mediated by adherent phagocytic cells, probably through the release of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by macrophages since it was inhibited by antiserum against recombinant mouse TNF and did not destroy TNF-resistant L929 cells. Its induction was not dependent on T cells since it occurred in T cell-deficient mice infected with non-lethal P. yoelii. However, the accelerated increase associated with vaccination could be adoptively transferred by spleen lymphocytes from vaccinated mice. PMID:3542317

  8. A Comparative Study of the Expression of Cytotoxic Proteins in Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Yawalkar, Nikhil; Hunger, Robert E.; Buri, Caroline; Schmid, Simone; Egli, Fabienne; Brand, Christoph U.; Mueller, Christoph; Pichler, Werner J.; Braathen, Lasse R.

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that cytotoxic T cells are critically involved in contact hypersensitivity reactions in animals. In this study we sought to investigate the in vivo expression of cytotoxic granule proteins in the elicitation phase of allergic contact dermatitis in humans. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with allergic contact dermatitis (n = 8) and psoriasis (n = 6) and from controls with normal skin (n = 6). Expression of perforin and granzyme B was investigated by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. In contrast to normal skin and psoriasis, a significant enhancement of perforin and granzyme B gene expression and immunoreactivity was observed in the mononuclear cell infiltrate of allergic contact dermatitis. Immunoreactivity for perforin and granzyme B was mainly found in the cytoplasm of lymphocytic cells, which were located in the dense perivascular infiltrate as well as at sites of marked spongiosis in the epidermis. Double immunostaining revealed that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are capable of expressing perforin and granzyme B. In conclusion, our data suggest that T-cell-mediated mechanisms involving cytotoxic granule proteins may elicit epidermal cell injury in vivo and thereby strongly contribute to the development of allergic contact dermatitis in humans. PMID:11238028

  9. Lysis of MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells by MYCN peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, A K; Nuchtern, J G

    2000-04-01

    The effectiveness of cell-mediated immunotherapy for cancer can be limited by loss-of-antigen mutations that occur during tumor growth. In neuroblastoma, amplification of the MYCN oncogene correlates with rapid tumor progression and a poor prognosis overall. We propose that the MYCN protein, the high-level expression of which is required for maintenance of the malignant phenotype, would be an ideal target for vaccine therapy. The MYCN-derived S9K peptide (amino acids 7-15; STMPGMICK), which contains an HLA-A1 binding motif, was used to generate CTLs from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of an HLA-A1+ healthy donor and an HLA-A1+ patient with MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma These CTL lines specifically lysed HLA-matched, MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma tumor cells. They did not lyse either HLA-mismatched, MYCN-amplified, or matched/nonmatched, non-MYCN-amplified tumor cells. The CTL activity was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to a class I HLA monomorphic determinant but not by one specific for HLA class II, consistent with a class I-restricted mechanism of cytotoxicity. Antibodies to CD8, but not those to CD4, also inhibited CTL activity, identifying CD8+ lymphocytes as the effector cell population. These results show that MYCN-derived peptides can serve as tumor-specific antigens and suggest a rational approach to cell-mediated immunotherapy for MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma.

  10. Immunoglobulin GM and FcγRIIIa genotypes influence cytotoxicity of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Janardan P; Namboodiri, Aryan M

    2014-05-15

    Immunoglobulin GM (γ marker) allotypes are strongly associated with neuroblastoma, but the mechanism is not known. One mechanism could involve antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of neuroblastoma cells. Using an ADCC inhibition assay, we show that IgG1 expressing GM 3+,1-,2- allotypes blocked all phenylalanine-expressing FcγRIIIa present on NK cells, resulting in total inhibition of anti-GD2 antibody-mediated ADCC of GD2-overexpressing neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of this protein was significantly lower when the NK cells were homozygous for the valine allele of FcγRIIIa (100 vs. 21%; p=0.00004). These and other findings presented here could lead to a more effective immunotherapy of neuroblastoma.

  11. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  12. Cytotoxic glucosphingolipid from Celtis Africana

    PubMed Central

    Perveen, Shagufta; Al-Taweel, Areej Mohammad; Fawzy, Ghada Ahmed; El-Shafae, Azza Muhammed; Khan, Afsar; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Literature survey proved the use of the powdered sun-dried bark and roots of Celtis africana for the treatment of cancer in South Africa. Objective: The aim of this study was to do further isolation work on the ethyl acetate fraction and to investigate the cytotoxic activities of the various fractions and isolated compound. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol fractions and compound 1 were tested on mouse lymphoma cell line L5178Y using the microculture tetrazolium assay. Results: One new glucosphingolipid 1 was isolated from the aerial parts of C. africana. The structure of the new compound was determined by extensive analysis by one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The ethyl acetate fraction and compound 1 showed strong cytotoxic activity with an EC50 value of 8.3 μg/mL and 7.8 μg/mL, respectively, compared with Kahalalide F positive control (6.3 μg/mL). Conclusion: This is the first report of the occurrence of a cytotoxic glucosphingolipid in family Ulmaceae. PMID:26109753

  13. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  14. Attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 vaccine: defining humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Rabablert, J; Yoksan, S

    2009-01-01

    Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease-dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. Live attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 vaccine was first developed from Mahidol University, Thailand. This vaccine induced both humoral and cell-mediated immunity and lack of reactogeneticity in humans. Infectious cDNA clones of the virulent D2 16681 virus and its attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 were constructed. The attenuated virus elicited neutralizing antibodies in mice and monkeys and developed viremia in monkeys. At molecular level, patterns of cytokines which are immunological mediators released from human mononuclear cells obtained from dengue naïve and immune donors infected with this attenuated virus compared with virulent virus were studied. In dengue naïve PBMC, the virulent and attenuated clones induced alternation in expression of 25 and 24 versus 13 and 18 genes out of 268 genes on day 1 and 3. In dengue immune PBMC, the virulent and attenuated clones induced alternation in expression of 33 and 38 versus 25 and 29 genes on days 1 and 3. Up-regulation of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-alpha, IFNgammaR, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, MIP-2alpha, VEGF and down-regulation of IL-4, IL-4R, IL-RII, MIF, RANTES, IGF-1, GM-CSF-2 were shown. This review pointed out the infectious clones of the attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 was safe and induced both neutralizing antibodies in vivo and cytokine gene expression in vitro at molecular level. Furthermore, the phenotypic markers of ideal dengue vaccine could be included the alteration of cytokine gene expression and cytokine production in human mononuclear cells.

  15. Studies of Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Immune Disorders Using Synthetic Peptides and Rotating Bioreactor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Jagannadha K.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments using mouse immune-precursor cells, and observed that bioreactor culturing results in the loss of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function. The reason for the abrogation of CTL function is microgravity conditions in the bioreactor, but not the antigen per se or its MHC restriction. Similarly, we observed that allostimulation of human PBMC in the bioreactor, but not in the T flask, resulted in the blunting of both allo-CTL function and the NK activity, indicating that the microgravity-associated functional defects are not unique to the mouse system. These results provide further confirmation to the microgravity-associated immune dysfunction, and constitute ground-based confirmatory data for those related to space-travel.

  16. Mechanisms of tumor and viral immune escape from natural killer cell-mediated surveillance.

    PubMed

    Groth, Ariane; Klöss, Stephan; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Koehl, Ulrike; Koch, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells recognize and efficiently eliminate MHC class I low or negative malignant targets and virally infected host cells, without requirement for prior sensitization. However, viruses and various tumor cells display elaborate adaptations to evade and overcome immunosurveillance. The current review focuses on escape mechanisms of viruses and malignantly transformed 'stressed' cells to evade from NK cell cytotoxicity. A general overview of recent clinical studies using allogeneic donor NK cells is given, summarizing first data about a possible benefit for patients suffering from high-risk leukemia and solid tumors. Finally, the review discusses the future perspectives and hypotheses aiming to improve therapeutic NK cell strategies against tumor immune escape mechanisms.

  17. Antibody-dependent antitumor cytotoxicity by human monocytes cultured with recombinant macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Induction of efficient antibody-mediated antitumor cytotoxicity not detected by isotope release assays.

    PubMed

    Munn, D H; Cheung, N K

    1989-08-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is known to stimulate proliferation of monocyte/macrophage progenitors and enhance in vitro antitumor cytotoxicity by murine macrophages. In this paper we have shown that recombinant human M-CSF causes human peripheral blood monocytes to differentiate in culture into metabolically active macrophage-like cells. These cells mediate very efficient antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines in the presence of two murine IgG3 mAbs (3F8 and R24). They also mediate antibody-independent cytotoxicity (or cytostasis) to a lesser extent. Human serum had an inconsistent effect on ADCC, but often induced similar high levels of ADCC. Cytotoxicity was measured using a novel ELISA to detect surviving tumor cells after ADCC. Two conventional isotope-release assays (51Cr and [3H]TdR) underestimated or entirely failed to detect ADCC by M-CSF-activated monocytes. Optimal activation occurred with 100-300 U/ml of M-CSF, and required 9-11 d for completion. Most of the M-CSF cultured monocytes expressed the low-affinity Fc receptor (CD16). ADCC by cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage using murine IgG3 mAbs may have significance for the immunotherapy of human malignancies.

  18. Cloning and expression analysis of nonspecific cytotoxic cell receptor 1 (Ls-NCCRP1) from red snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus).

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia; Wei, Shina; Wang, Bei; Huang, Yucong; Tang, Jufen; Lu, Yishan; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that nonspecific cytotoxic cells (NCCs) are kinds of natural killer cell mediated innate immune responses in teleosts. The nonspecific cytotoxic cell receptor protein 1 (NCCRP-1) is an important cell surface protein on NCC, which serves crucial functions in target cell recognition and cytotoxicity activation. In the present study, a nonspecific cytotoxic cell receptor protein NCCRP-1 (Ls-NCCRP1) was cloned from red snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus. The Ls-NCCRP1 cDNA is composed of 986bp with a 43bp of 5'-UTR, 702bp open reading frame (ORF) and 241bp 3'-UTR, encoding a polypeptide of 233 amino acids (GenBank accession no: ADK32635). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Ls-NCCRP1 showed highest similarity to sea bream NCCRP-1. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that Ls-NCCRP1 had relatively high expression level in the head kidney, spleen and liver. After Vibrio alginolyticus infection, transcripts of Ls-NCCRP1 increased and reached its peak at 4h p.i. These results indicated that Ls-NCCRP1 may play an important role in innate immune response to bacteria.

  19. Antigen-Specific B Cells Reactivate an Effective Cytotoxic T Cell Response against Phagocytosed Salmonella through Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Jelle; Souwer, Yuri; Jorritsma, Tineke; Klaasse Bos, Hanny; ten Brinke, Anja; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2010-01-01

    Background The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response via cross-presentation of bacterial antigens onto MHC class I molecules. Cross-presentation of Salmonella by DCs however, is accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the DCs. Besides antibody production, B cells are required to clear Salmonella infection for other unknown reasons. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that Salmonella-specific B cells that phagocytose Salmonella upon BCR-ligation reactivate human memory CD8+ T cells via cross-presentation yielding a Salmonella-specific cytotoxic T cell response. The reactivation of CD8+ T cells is dependent on CD4+ T cell help. Unlike the DCs, B cell-mediated cross-presentation of Salmonella does not coincide with apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance B cells form a new player in the activation of the cytotoxic effector arm of the immune response and the generation of effective adaptive immunity in Salmonella infection. PMID:20885961

  20. Saponins as cytotoxic agents: a review

    PubMed Central

    Galanty, Agnieszka; Sobolewska, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are natural glycosides which possess a wide range of pharmacological properties including cytotoxic activity. In this review, the recent studies (2005–2009) concerning the cytotoxic activity of saponins have been summarized. The correlations between the structure and the cytotoxicity of both steroid and triterpenoid saponins have been described as well as the most common mechanisms of action. PMID:20835386

  1. Optimization of natural killer T cell-mediated immunotherapy in cancer using cell-based and nanovector vaccines.

    PubMed

    Faveeuw, C; Trottein, F

    2014-03-15

    α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) represents a new class of immune stimulators and vaccine adjuvants that activate type I natural killer T (NKT) cells to swiftly release cytokines and to exert helper functions for acquired immune responses. This unique property prompted clinicians to exploit the antitumor potential of NKT cells. Here, we review the effects of α-GalCer in (pre)clinics and discuss current and future strategies that aim to optimize NKT cell-mediated antitumor therapy, with a particular focus on cell-based and nanovector vaccines.

  2. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI) antibody activity does not correlate with risk of HIV-1 superinfection

    PubMed Central

    FORTHAL, Donald N.; LANDUCCI, Gary; CHOHAN, Bhavna; RICHARDSON, Barbra A.; MCCLELLAND, R. Scott; JAOKO, Walter; BLISH, Catherine; OVERBAUGH, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of HIV-infected women with high risk behavior have indicated that neither neutralizing antibody nor cellular immunity elicited by an initial HIV-1 infection is associated with protection against superinfection with a different HIV-1 strain. Here, we measured antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI) antibody activity in the plasma of 12 superinfected cases and 36 singly infected matched controls against 2 heterologous viruses. We found no association between plasma ADCVI activity and superinfection status. ADCVI antibody activity against heterologous virus elicited by the original infection may not contribute to preventing a superinfecting HIV-1. PMID:23344546

  3. The skin test antigen stimulated killer (STAK) cell mediating NK like CMC is OKM1 positive and OKT3 negative.

    PubMed Central

    Tartof, D; Curran, J J; Levitt, D; Loken, M R

    1983-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated that candida antigen stimulated natural killer cell like cell-mediated cytolysis (NK like CMC) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) isolated from normal individuals (Tartof et al., 1980). Utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed against human mononuclear cell subpopulations in conjunction with a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) we determined that, similar to the previously described NK cell, the skin test antigen stimulated killer (STAK) cell is a larger OKM1 positive, OKT3 negative cell. We obtained similar results using two different skin test antigens. Thus, stimulation of NK like CMC in PBMNC by skin test antigens probably represents activation of NK or NK like cells. PMID:6360439

  4. Overrepresentation of IL-10-Expressing B Cells Suppresses Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cell Activity in HBV-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongwu; Zhu, Zun-Qiang; Zhang, Zhang-Yun; Zhao, Ludong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis and low five-year survival rate. A strong and effective CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was associated with better survival and low recurrence rate in HCC, but the regulatory mechanism that controls CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity in HCC patients is not fully examined. Given that IL-10-expressing B cells could suppress the inflammation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, T helper 1 (Th1) cells and Th17 cells, while promoting regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we examined the role of IL-10-expressing B cells in HBV-related HCC patients. We found that compared to healthy controls, HCC patients exhibited significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-expressing B cells, which were negatively correlated with the frequencies of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin expressing CD4+ T cells. Surface molecule Tim-1 was preferentially expressed on IL-10-expressing B cells. Therefore, we separated total B cells into Tim-1+ and Tim-1- B cells. CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1+ B cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of granzyme A, granzyme B and perforin expression, compared to the CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1- B cells. Antagonizing IL-10 in culture rescued CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity. Compared to that in peripheral blood, the level of IL-10-expressing B cells were further upregulated in resected tumor, while the level of CD4+ cytotoxic T cells was downregulated. The negative correlations between IL-10-expressing B cells and CD4+ cytotoxic T cells were also observed in tumor-infiltrating cells. Together, our data revealed an additional antitumor mechanism mediated by IL-10-expressing B cells. PMID:27136203

  5. Cytotoxic prenylflavonoids from Artocarpus elasticus.

    PubMed

    Ko, Horng-Huey; Lu, Yi-Huang; Yang, Sheng-Zehn; Won, Shen-Jeu; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2005-11-01

    Five new prenylated flavonoids, artelastoheterol (1), artelasticinol (2), cycloartelastoxanthone (3), artelastoxanthone (4), and cycloartelastoxanthendiol (5), along with five known compounds, were isolated from the root bark of Artocarpus elasticus. The structures of 1-5 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and through comparison with data reported in the literature. The previously known compound artonol A (6) exhibited cytotoxic activity against the A549 human cancer cell line, with an ED50 value of 1.1 microg/mL.

  6. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  7. Caspase 3 in dying tumor cells mediates post-irradiation angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengxiang; Yu, Yang; Cheng, Jin; Gong, Yanping; Li, Chuan-Yuan; Huang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic radiotherapy unfavorably induces tumor cells to generate various proangiogenic substances, promoting post-irradiation angiogenesis (PIA), which is one of major causes of radiotherapy failure. Though several studies have reported some mechanisms behind PIA, they have not yet described the beginning proangiogenic motivator buried in the irradiated microenvironment. In this work, we revealed that dying tumor cells induced by irradiation prompted PIA via a caspase 3 dependent mechanism. Proteolytic inactivation of caspase 3 in dying tumor cells by transducing a dominant-negative version weakened proangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. In addition, inhibition of caspase 3 activity suppressed tumor angiogenesis and tumorigenesis in xenograft mouse model. Importantly, we identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A as a downstream proangiogenic factor regulated by caspase 3 possibly through Akt signaling. Collectively, these findings indicated that besides acting as a key executioner in apoptosis, caspase 3 in dying tumor cells may play a central role in driving proangiogenic response after irradiation. Thus, radiotherapy in combination with caspase 3 inhibitors may be a novel promising therapeutic strategy to reduce tumor recurrence due to restrained PIA. PMID:26431328

  8. Modulation by gamma interferon of antiviral cell-mediated immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Utermöhlen, O; Dangel, A; Tárnok, A; Lehmann-Grube, F

    1996-01-01

    Mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and injected once 24 h later with a monoclonal antibody directed against gamma interferon. In comparison with controls, the increase of numbers of CD8+ T cells and the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in spleens and virus clearance from organs were diminished, as was the ability of spleen cells to transmit adoptive immunity to infected recipients. The same treatment slightly but consistently lessened rather than augmented the virus titers early in infection, which was also observed in thymusless nu/nu mice. Injection into infected mice of the lymphokine itself in quantities probably higher than are produced endogenously resulted in lower virus titers in spleens but higher titers in livers. The adoptive immunity in infected mice achieved by infusion of immune spleen cells was not altered by treating the recipients with gamma interferon monoclonal antibody. Such treatment did not measurably affect the production of antiviral serum antibodies. We conclude that in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected mice, gamma interferon is needed for the generation of antivirally active CD8+ T lymphocytes, and furthermore that in this experimental model, direct antiviral effects of the lymphokine elude detection. PMID:8627670

  9. NK Cells and γδ T Cells Mediate Resistance to Polyomavirus–Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Chen, Alex T.; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    NK and γδ T cells can eliminate tumor cells in many experimental models, but their effect on the development of tumors caused by virus infections in vivo is not known. Polyomavirus (PyV) induces tumors in neonatally infected mice of susceptible strains and in adult mice with certain immune deficiencies, and CD8+ αβ T cells are regarded as the main effectors in anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that adult TCRβ knockout (KO) mice that lack αβ but have γδ T cells remain tumor-free after PyV infection, whereas TCRβ×δ KO mice that lack all T cells develop tumors. In addition, E26 mice, which lack NK and T cells, develop the tumors earlier than TCRβ×δ KO mice. These observations implicate γδ T and NK cells in the resistance to PyV-induced tumors. Cell lines established from PyV-induced tumors activate NK and γδ T cells both in culture and in vivo and express Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Moreover, these PyV tumor cells are killed by NK cells in vitro, and this cytotoxicity is prevented by treatment with NKG2D-blocking antibodies. Our findings demonstrate a protective role for NK and γδ T cells against naturally occurring virus-induced tumors and suggest the involvement of NKG2D-mediated mechanisms. PMID:20523894

  10. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  11. Dendritic cell based immunotherapy using tumor stem cells mediates potent antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Amir; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Memarnejadian, Arash; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are demonstrated to be usually less sensitive to conventional methods of cancer therapies, resulting in tumor relapse. It is well-known that an ideal treatment would be able to selectively target and kill CSCs, so as to avoid the tumor reversion. The aim of our present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine against CSCs in a mouse model of malignant melanoma. C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) or CSC lysates were used as a vaccine. Immunization of mice with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs was able to induce a significant prophylactic effect by a higher increase in lifespan and obvious depression of tumor growth in tumor bearing mice. The mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with CSC-lysate were revealed to produce specific cytotoxic responses to CSCs. The proliferation assay and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4) secretion of mice vaccinated with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs also showed more favorable results, when compared to those receiving B16F10 lysate-pulsed DCs. These findings suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy of cancers. PMID:26803056

  12. STING in tumor and host cells cooperatively work for NK cell-mediated tumor growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Ken; Takeda, Yohei; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Shime, Hiroaki; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2016-09-30

    An interferon-inducing DNA sensor STING participates in tumor rejection in mouse models. Here we examined what mechanisms contribute to STING-dependent growth retardation of B16 melanoma sublines by NK cells in vivo. The studies were designed using WT and STING KO black mice, and B16D8 (an NK-sensitive melanoma line having STING) and STING KO B16D8 sublines established for this study. The results from tumor-implant studies suggested that STING in host immune cells and tumor cells induced distinct profiles of chemokines including CXCL10, CCL5 and IL-33, and both participated in NK cell infiltration and activation in B16D8 tumor. Spontaneous activation of STING occurs in host-immune and tumor cells of this NK-sensitive tumor, thereby B16D8 tumor growth being suppressed in this model. Our data show that STING induces tumor cytotoxicity by NK cells through tumor and host immune cell network to contribute to innate surveillance and suppression of tumors in vivo. PMID:27608599

  13. Plasmodium berghei: immunosuppression of the cell-mediated immune response induced by nonviable antigenic preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, A.; Frankenburg, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this work, plasmodial antigens were examined for their ability to suppress the cellular immune response during lethal Plasmodium berghei infection. Splenic enlargement and the number and function of white spleen cells were assessed after injection of normal mice with irradiated parasitized erythrocytes (IPE) or with parasitized erythrocytes (PE) membranes. Both IPE and PE membranes caused splenomegaly and an increase in the number of splenic white cells with concurrent alteration of the relative proportions of T cells and macrophages. The percentage of T lymphocytes was fractionally diminished, but there was a marked increase in Lyt 2.2 positive (suppressor and cytotoxic) T subsets and in the number of splenic macrophage precursors. The pathological enlargement of the spleen was induced by various plasma membrane-derived antigens containing both proteins and carbohydrates. Splenocytes of mice injected with liposomes containing deoxycholate-treated PE or PE fractions showed both diminished interleukin 2 production and a decreased response to mitogen. It appears that some of the changes in the cellular immune response during P. berghei infection are a consequence of the massive provision of a wide spectrum of antigens, capable of suppressing the immune response. Thus, it may be appropriate to evaluate the possible negative effect of parasite epitopes that are candidates for vaccine.

  14. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  15. Mosla punctulata Inhibits Mast Cell-mediated Allergic Reactions Through the Inhibition of Histamine Release and Inflammatory Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Je, I. G.; Shin, T. Y.; Kim, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic inflammatory diseases such as food allergy, asthma, sinusitis and atopic dermatitis are increasing worldwide. This study examined the effects of aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic and immunoglobulin E-mediated local anaphylaxis and it also reduced intracellular calcium level and down-streamed histamine release from mast cells. In addition, aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata decreased gene expression and secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha, an important proinflammatory cytokine, in mast cells. The inhibitory effect on tumour necrosis factor alpha expression was nuclear factor kappa B dependent. The results indicate that aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata inhibited mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reaction by suppressing histamine release and expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha, and involvement of calcium and nuclear factor kappa B in these effects. Hence it can be concluded that, the aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata might be a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory disorders. PMID:24591741

  16. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  17. Gamma-irradiated scrub typhus immunogens: development of cell-mediated immunity after vaccination of inbred mice

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrells, T.R.; Palmer, B.A.; Osterman, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Mice immunized with three injections of gamma-irradiated Karp strain of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were evaluated for the presence of cell-mediated immunity by using delayed-type hypersensitivity, antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-induced lymphokine production. These animals also were evaluated for levels of circulating antibody after immunization as well as for the presence of rickettsemia after intraperitoneal challenge with viable Karp rickettsiae. After immunization with irradiated Karp rickettsiae, a demonstrable cell-mediated immunity was present as evidenced by delayed-type hypersensitivity responsiveness, lymphocyte proliferation, and production of migration inhibition factor and interferon by immune spleen lymphocytes. Also, a reduction in circulating rickettsiae was seen in mice immunized with irradiated rickettsiae after challenge with 1,000 50% mouse lethal doses of viable, homologous rickettsiae. All responses except antibody titer and reduction of rickettsemia were similar to the responses noted in mice immunized with viable organisms. Antibody levels were lower in mice immunized with irradiated rickettsiae than in mice immunized with viable rickettsiae. Furthermore, mice that were immunized with viable rickettsiae demonstrated markedly lower levels of rickettsemia after intraperitoneal challenge compared with either mice immunized with irradiated rickettsiae or nonimmunized mice.

  18. UV-B and the immune system. A review with special emphasis on T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Goettsch, W; Garssen, J; de Gruijl, F R; van Loveren, H

    1993-03-01

    The immunosuppressive activity of ultraviolet light-B (UV-B) has become a major topic of interest, especially now that there are indications of an increased exposure to UV-B on the earth's surface, caused by a decreased thickness of the ozone layer. This review indicates that the thymus-dependent immune system is a prime target for damage by UV-B. Especially the systemic effects of UV-B on T cell mediated immunity are described and analyzed with respect to the mode of action. In summary, this review demonstrated that UV-B can alter T cell mediated immune responses by different pathways in which cytokines (e.g. TNF-alpha) and other soluble mediators (e.g. cis-urocanic acid) may play a role. Effects of UV-B on the location and morphology of different cells in the skin affect functionality of the immune system. Thus, UV-B may suppress local immunity against skin tumours and skin-associated infections as well as systemic immunity against non skin-associated infectious diseases and tumours.

  19. T-Cell-Mediated Inflammatory Myopathies in HIV-Positive Individuals: A Histologic Study of 19 Cases.

    PubMed

    Hiniker, Annie; Daniels, Brianne H; Margeta, Marta

    2016-03-01

    T cell-mediated inflammatory myopathies (polymyositis [PM] and inclusion body myositis [IBM]) sometimes arise in conjunction with HIV infection; however, it is not understood whether PM and IBM arising in the context of HIV (HIV-PM and HV-IBM) differ from PM and IBM arising sporadically in HIV-negative individuals (sPM and sIBM). Here, we report the largest series of T cell-mediated inflammatory myopathies from HIV-infected patients (19 biopsies from 15 subjects); 5 cases were pathologically classified as PM (HIV-PM) and 14 as IBM (HIV-IBM). As with sporadic cases, quantitative immunohistochemistry for LC3, p62, and TDP-43 showed significantly greater percentage of stained fibers (% FS) in HIV-IBM compared to HIV-PM samples; however, there was no significant difference in % FS for any of the three markers between HIV-associated and sporadic cases. Despite histologic similarities between HIV-IBM and sIBM but in concordance with prior case reports, patients with HIV-IBM were significantly younger at diagnosis than patients with sIBM; in contrast, the mean age of HIV-PM and sPM patients was not significantly different. In summary, HIV-PM and HIV-IBM are morphologically similar to sPM and sIBM; thus, it remains unclear why patients with HIV-IBM, in contrast to patients with sIBM, sometimes show clinical improvement in response to immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:26843609

  20. Effects of social manipulations and environmental enrichment on behavior and cell-mediated immune responses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Schapiro, Steven J

    2002-08-01

    This paper reviews a series of studies that have examined the effects of manipulations to the social and the inanimate environments on the behavior and cell-mediated immune responses of rhesus macaques of various ages living in different settings. In general, enrichment of the inanimate environment with toys, structures, foraging devices, and/or videotapes increased the amount of species-typical behavior expressed by the monkeys, but did not affect their immune responses. Housing monkeys socially, on the other hand, not only resulted in increased time spent in species-typical activities, but also resulted in (1) decreases in time spent in abnormal behavior and (2) changes in a number of immune parameters. Additionally, attempts to directly influence the affiliative interactions of socially housed adult rhesus have resulted in systematic changes in affiliative behavior, although anticipated accompanying systematic alterations to cell-mediated immune responses have yet to be realized. The data suggest that aspects of the physical and social environments influence behavioral and immunological parameters in captive macaques in the absence of other experimental manipulations. As such, these influences need to be appropriately managed and/or controlled in order to minimize potential confounds in experimental designs.

  1. T-cell-mediated suppression of anti-tumor immunity. An explanation for progressive growth of an immunogenic tumor

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The results of this paper are consistent with the hypothesis that progressive growth of the Meth A fibrosarcoma evokes the generation of a T-cell-mediated mechanism of immunosuppression that prevents this highly immunogenic tumor from being rejected by its immunocompetent host. It was shown that it is possible to cause the regression of large, established Meth A tumors by intravenous infusion of tumor- sensitized T cells from immune donors, but only if the tumors are growing in T-cell-deficient recipients. It was also shown that the adoptive T-cell-mediated regression of tumors in such recipients can be prevented by prior infusion of splenic T cells from T-cell-intact, tumor-bearing donors. The results leave little doubt that the presence of suppressor T cells in T-cell-intact, tumor-bearing mice is responsible for the loss of an earlier generated state of concomitant immunity, and for the inability of intravenously infused, sensitized T cells to cause tumor regression. Because the presence of suppressor T cells generated in response to the Meth A did not suppress the capacity of Meth A-bearing mice to generate and express immunity against a tumor allograft, it is obvious that they were not in a state of generalized immunosuppression. PMID:6444236

  2. γδ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Disease and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Latha, T. Sree; Reddy, Madhava C.; Durbaka, Prasad V. R.; Rachamallu, Aparna; Pallu, Reddanna; Lomada, Dakshayani

    2014-01-01

    The role of γδ T cells in immunotherapy has gained specific importance in the recent years because of their prominent function involving directly or indirectly in the rehabilitation of the diseases. γδ T cells represent a minor population of T cells that express a distinct T cell receptor (TCR) composed of γδ chains instead of αβ chains. Unlike αβ T cells, γδ T cells display a restricted TCR repertoire and recognize mostly unknown non-peptide antigens. γδ T cells act as a link between innate and adaptive immunity, because they lack precise major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction and seize the ability to recognize ligands that are generated during affliction. Skin epidermal γδ T cells recognize antigen expressed by damaged or stressed keratinocytes and play an indispensable role in tissue homeostasis and repair through secretion of distinct growth factors. γδ T cell based immunotherapy strategies possess great prominence in the treatment because of the property of their MHC-independent cytotoxicity, copious amount of cytokine release, and a immediate response in infections. Understanding the role of γδ T cells in pathogenic infections, wound healing, autoimmune diseases, and cancer might provide knowledge for the successful treatment of these diseases using γδ T cell based immunotherapy. Enhancing the human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions by administration of aminobisphosphonates like zoledronate, pamidronate, and bromohydrin pyrophosphate along with cytokines and monoclonal antibodies shows a hopeful approach for treatment of tumors and infections. The current review summarizes the role of γδ T cells in various human diseases and immunotherapeutic approaches using γδ T cells. PMID:25426120

  3. Melanogenesis and associated cytotoxic reactions: applications to insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Nappi, A J; Christensen, B M

    2005-05-01

    Insects transmit the causative agents for such debilitating diseases as malaria, lymphatic filariases, sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, leishmaniasis, river blindness, Dengue, and yellow fever. The persistence of these diseases provides testimony to the genetic capacity of parasites to evolve strategies that ensure their successful development in two genetically diverse host species: insects and mammals. Current efforts to address the problems posed by insect-borne diseases benefit from a growing understanding of insect and mammalian immunity. Of considerable interest are recent genomic investigations that show several similarities in the innate immune effector responses and associated regulatory mechanisms manifested by insects and mammals. One notable exception, however, is the nearly universal presence of a brown-black pigment accompanying cellular innate immunity in insects. This response, which is unique to arthropods and certain other invertebrates, has focused attention on the elements involved in pigment synthesis as causing or contributing to the death of the parasite, and has even prompted speculation that the enzyme cascade mediating melanogenesis constitutes an ill-defined recognition mechanism. Experimental evidence defining the role of melanin and its precursors in insect innate immunity is severely lacking. A great deal of what is known about melanogenesis comes from studies of the process occurring in mammalian systems, where the pigment is synthesized by such diverse cells as those comprising portions of the skin, hair, inner ear, brain, and retinal epithelium. Fortunately, many of the components in the metabolic pathways leading to the formation of melanin have been found to be common to both insects and mammals. This review examines some of the factors that influence enzyme-mediated melanogenic responses, and how these responses likely contribute to blood cell-mediated, target-specific cytotoxicity in immune challenged insects.

  4. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid; Guan, Peng; Wiener, Susan; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André; Orange, Jordan S; Nichols, Kim E

    2013-04-25

    The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) plays critical roles during invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell ontogeny. As a result, SAP-deficient humans and mice lack iNKT cells. The strict developmental requirement for SAP has made it difficult to discern its possible involvement in mature iNKT cell functions. By using temporal Cre recombinase-mediated gene deletion to ablate SAP expression after completion of iNKT cell development, we demonstrate that SAP is essential for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced iNKT cell cytotoxicity against T-cell and B-cell leukemia targets in vitro and iNKT-cell-mediated control of T-cell leukemia growth in vivo. These findings are not restricted to the murine system: silencing RNA-mediated suppression of SAP expression in human iNKT cells also significantly impairs TCR-induced cytolysis. Mechanistic studies reveal that iNKT cell killing requires the tyrosine kinase Fyn, a known SAP-binding protein. Furthermore, SAP expression is required within iNKT cells to facilitate their interaction with T-cell targets and induce reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center to the immunologic synapse (IS). Collectively, these studies highlight a novel and essential role for SAP during iNKT cell cytotoxicity and formation of a functional IS.

  5. Metastatic consequences of immune escape from NK cell cytotoxicity by human breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zhe; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shi-Cang; Ping, Yi-Fang; Yang, Jing; Xu, Sen-Lin; Ye, Xian-Zong; Xu, Chuan; Yang, Lang; Qian, Cheng; Wang, Ji Ming; Cui, You-Hong; Zhang, Xia; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2014-10-15

    Breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSC) are crucial for metastasis but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report that tumor-infiltrating natural killer (NK) cells failed to limit metastasis and were not associated with improved therapeutic outcome of BCSC-rich breast cancer. Primary BCSCs were resistant to cytotoxicity mediated by autologous/allogeneic NK cells due to reduced expression of MICA and MICB, two ligands for the stimulatory NK cell receptor NKG2D. Furthermore, the downregulation of MICA/MICB in BCSCs was mediated by aberrantly expressed oncogenic miR20a, which promoted the resistance of BCSC to NK cell cytotoxicity and resultant lung metastasis. The breast cancer cell differentiation-inducing agent, all-trans retinoic acid, restored the miR20a-MICA/MICB axis and sensitized BCSC to NK cell-mediated killing, thereby reducing immune escape-associated BCSC metastasis. Together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for immune escape of human BCSC and identify the miR20a-MICA/MICB signaling axis as a therapeutic target to limit metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Dynamics of cytotoxic T cell subsets during immunotherapy predicts outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Rydström, Anna; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Riise, Rebecca; Aurelius, Johan; Anderson, Harald; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B.; Martner, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Preventing relapse after chemotherapy remains a challenge in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighty-four non-transplanted AML patients in first complete remission received relapse-preventive immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride and low-dose interleukin-2 in an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996). Blood samples were drawn during cycles of immunotherapy and analyzed for CD8+ (cytotoxic) T cell phenotypes in blood. During the first cycle of therapy, a re-distribution of cytotoxic T cells was observed comprising a reduction of T effector memory cells and a concomitant increase of T effector cells. The dynamics of T cell subtypes during immunotherapy prognosticated relapse and survival, in particular among older patients and remained significantly predictive of clinical outcome after correction for potential confounders. Presence of CD8+ T cells with specificity for leukemia-associated antigens identified patients with low relapse risk. Our results point to novel aspects of T cell-mediated immunosurveillance in AML and provide conceivable biomarkers in relapse-preventive immunotherapy. PMID:26863635

  7. Hitchhiking nanoparticles: Reversible coupling of lipid-based nanoparticles to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wayteck, Laura; Dewitte, Heleen; De Backer, Lynn; Breckpot, Karine; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Following intravenous injection of anti-cancer nanomedicines, many barriers need to be overcome en route to the tumor. Cell-mediated delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) is promising in terms of overcoming several of these barriers based on the tumoritropic migratory properties of particular cell types. This guided transport aims to enhance the NP accumulation in the tumor and moreover enhance the infiltration of regions that are typically inaccessible for free NPs. Within this study, cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells were selected as carriers based on both their ability to migrate to the tumor and their intrinsic cytolytic activity against tumor cells. Many anti-cancer nanomedicines require tumor cell internalization to mediate cytosolic drug delivery and enhance the anti-cancer effect. This proof-of-concept therefore reports on the reversible attachment of liposomes to the surface of cytotoxic T lymphocytes via a reduction sensitive coupling. The activation status of the T cells and the liposome composition are shown to strongly influence the loading efficiency. Loading the cells with liposomes does not compromise T cell functionalities like proliferation and cytolytic function. Additionally, the triggered liposome release is demonstrated upon the addition of glutathione. Based on this optimization using liposomes as model NPs, a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-loaded NP was developed that can be coupled to the surface of CD8(+) T cells.

  8. B7-H3 as a promising target for cytotoxicity T cell in human cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xin; Han, Huamin; Liu, Changzhen; Tao, Hua; Xiu, Weigang; Cai, Jia; Zhang, Man

    2016-01-01

    Targeting B7-H3 over-expressed tumor cells with anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibodies inhibits tumor growth. Here we demonstrated the expression of B7 family homologue 3 (B7-H3) in a wide range of human tumor cells and further investigated whether B7-H3 could be served as a target for T-cell mediated immunotherapy against human cancers. The specific cytotoxic activity of activated T cell (ATC) armed with a novel anti-CD3 x anti-B7-H3 bispecific antibody (B7-H3Bi-Ab) against tumor cell was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In contrast with unarmed ATC, an increase in cytotoxic activity of B7-H3Bi-armed ATC against tumor cells was observed at effector/target (E/T) ratios of 5:1, 10:1, and 20:1. Moreover, B7-H3Bi-armed ATC secreted more IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 than unarmed ATC. Infusion of B7-H3Bi-armed ATC inhibited tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) xenograft models, along with a significant survival benefit. Therefore, treatment with novel B7-H3Bi-armed ATC will be a promising strategy for current cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27121051

  9. Cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes from F 344 rats bearing intraocular tumor derived from human adenovirus 12-induced retinoblastoma-like cell line.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Pomeroy, M E

    1984-03-01

    Lymphocyte cytotoxicity using 51Cr releasing assay was investigated in 10 F344 rats bearing intraocular tumor derived from human adenovirus 12 (Ad 12)-induced retinoblastoma -like cell line (EXP-5). Lymphocytes obtained from tumor bored animal (1 X 10(6)/well) incubated with 51Cr-labelled EXP-5 cells (1 X 10(5)/well) for 24 hours, and counted by beta-scintillation counter. The cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes of transplanted animals was higher in 3 out of 10 subjected rats (24-30%) than in 10 rats of control (3-5%). The results support the view that the correspond animal model in its resemblance and suggested that the rats with retinal tumor have concomitant cell-mediated immunity in the early stage of tumor bearing.

  10. Cytotoxic quassinoids from Simaba cedron.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, A; Hitotsuyanagi, Y; Hashimoto, E; Itokawa, H; Takeya, K; de Mello Alves, S

    1998-06-26

    Four new quassinoids, cedronolactones A-D (1-4), together with nine known compounds, simalikalactone D (5), chaparrinone (6), chaparrin (7), glaucarubolone (8), glaucarubol (9), samaderine Z (10), guanepolide (11), ailanquassin A (12), and polyandrol (13), were isolated from the wood of Simaba cedron. The chemical structures of 1-4 were elucidated on the basis of their chemical and spectral properties. Cedronolactone A (1) was shown to exhibit a significant in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50 0.0074 microg/mL) against P-388 cells.

  11. Extraordinarily few organisms of a live recombinant BCG vaccine against tuberculosis induce maximal cell-mediated and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Marcus A; Harth, Günter; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Maslesa-Galić, Sasa

    2006-01-23

    In previous studies, we have described a live recombinant BCG vaccine (rBCG30) overexpressing the 30 kDa major secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that induces greater protective immunity against tuberculosis than the current vaccine in the demanding guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In this study, we have investigated the impact of vaccine dose on the development of cell-mediated and protective immunity in the guinea pig model. We found that the protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge of both BCG and rBCG30 was essentially dose-independent over a dose range of 10(1)-10(6) live organisms. As previously observed, rBCG30 was more potent, reducing colony-forming units (CFU) below the level observed in animals immunized with the parental BCG vaccine by 0.7 logs in the lungs and 1.0 logs in the spleen (P<0.0001). To gain a better understanding of the influence of dose on bacterial clearance and immunity, we assessed animals immunized with 10(1), 10(3), or 10(6)CFU of rBCG30. The higher the dose, the higher the peak CFU level achieved in animal organs. However, whereas humoral immune responses to the 30 kDa protein reflected the disparate CFU levels, cell-mediated immune responses did not; high and low doses of rBCG30 ultimately induced comparable peak lymphocyte proliferative responses and cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to the 30 kDa protein. We estimate that the amount of the 30 kDa protein required to induce a strong cell-mediated immune response when delivered via 10 rBCG30 organisms is about 9 orders of magnitude less than that required when the protein is delivered in a conventional protein/adjuvant vaccine. This study demonstrates that a very low inoculum of rBCG30 organisms has the capacity to induce strong protective immunity against tuberculosis and that rBCG30 is an extremely potent delivery system for mycobacterial antigens.

  12. Cutting edge: An antibody recognizing ancestral endogenous virus glycoproteins mediates antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity on HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; SenGupta, Devi; de Mulder, Miguel; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Kobie, James J; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F

    2014-08-15

    The failure of antiviral vaccines is often associated with rapid viral escape from specific immune responses. In the past, conserved epitope or algorithmic epitope selections, such as mosaic vaccines, have been designed to diversify immunity and to circumvent potential viral escape. An alternative approach is to identify conserved stable non-HIV-1 self-epitopes present exclusively in HIV-1-infected cells. We showed previously that human endogenous retroviral (HERV) mRNA transcripts and protein are found in cells of HIV-1-infected patients and that HERV-K (HML-2)-specific T cells can eliminate HIV-1-infected cells in vitro. In this article, we demonstrate that a human anti-HERV-K (HML-2) transmembrane protein Ab binds specifically to HIV-1-infected cells and eliminates them through an Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mechanism in vitro. Thus, Abs directed against epitopes other than HIV-1 proteins may have a role in eliminating HIV-1-infected cells and could be targeted in novel vaccine approaches or immunotherapeutic modalities. PMID:25024383

  13. Efficacy of a modified live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine in pigs naturally exposed to a heterologous European (Italian cluster) field strain: Clinical protection and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Paolo; Gozio, Stefano; Ferrari, Luca; Rosina, Stefano; De Angelis, Elena; Quintavalla, Cecilia; Bottarelli, Ezio; Borghetti, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    specific IFN-gamma production at 21-34 days PE were concomitant and associated to changes in natural killer (NK) cells, gamma/delta T, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the blood. In our field study, evidences of EU attenuated vaccine-induced clinical protection against natural exposure to a genetically diverse (84% homology) PRRSV-1 isolate (Italian cluster) was demonstrated by the statistically significant reduction in clinical signs in terms of incidence, duration and severity and by a more efficient cell-mediated immune response in the vaccinated pigs as compared to the unvaccinated controls.

  14. Tumor specific cytotoxicity of glucosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Oku, Hirosuke; Wongtangtintharn, Sawitree; Iwasaki, Hironori; Inafuku, Masashi; Shimatani, Masayuki; Toda, Takayoshi

    2007-11-01

    To develop a new taxon of anti-cancer agent with lower side effect, this study described a tumor selective cytotoxicity of glucosylceramide extracted from malt feed of beer brewing waste. Interpretation of (13)C- and (1)H-NMR spectra identified the chemical structure of major component of glucosylceramide as 1-O-beta-D: -glucopyranosyl-2(2'-hydroxyeicosanoylamino)-4,11-octadecadiene-1,3-diol. Selective cytotoxicity was studied with three pairs of normal and cancer cells: liver, skin and lung. The glucosylceramide selectively lowered the relative viability of cancer cells. Of the pairs, the selectivity was most pronounced with the liver cells, and, for this reason, further experiment was conducted with this pair of normal (CS-HC) and cancer cells (HepG2) to get more insight into the selective toxicity. The glucosylceramide significantly increased the cell population at G(2)/M phase in HepG2 cells, and also increased the numbers of apoptotic (sub-G(0)/G(1)) cells, but to much lesser extent compared with the increase in G(2)/M phase. Treatment of HepG2 cells with this agent selectively disrupted the mitochondrial membrane integrity without activation of caspase pathway to induce apoptosis. These findings suggested that the glucosylceramide specifically suppressed the growth of cancer cells by inhibiting cell renewal capacity rather than induction of apoptosis. The underlying mechanism for the selectivity remains to be answered in the forthcoming study.

  15. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Omokoko, Tana A; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard (51)Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the (51)Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  16. Induction of potent NK cell-dependent anti-myeloma cytotoxic T cells in response to combined mapatumumab and bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Neeson, Paul J; Hsu, Andy K; Chen, Yin R; Halse, Heloise M; Loh, Joanna; Cordy, Reece; Fielding, Kate; Davis, Joanne; Noske, Josh; Davenport, Alex J; Lindqvist-Gigg, Camilla A; Humphreys, Robin; Tai, Tsin; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Smyth, Mark J; Ritchie, David S

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that some cancer therapies can promote tumor immunogenicity to boost the endogenous antitumor immune response. In this study, we used the novel combination of agonistic anti-TRAIL-R1 antibody (mapatumumab, Mapa) with low dose bortezomib (LDB) for this purpose. The combination induced profound myeloma cell apoptosis, greatly enhanced the uptake of myeloma cell apoptotic bodies by dendritic cell (DC) and induced anti-myeloma cytotoxicity by both CD8+ T cells and NK cells. Cytotoxic lymphocyte expansion was detected within 24 h of commencing therapy and was maximized when myeloma-pulsed DC were co-treated with low dose bortezomib and mapatumumab (LDB+Mapa) in the presence of NK cells. This study shows that Mapa has two distinct but connected modes of action against multiple myeloma (MM). First, when combined with LDB, Mapa produced powerful myeloma cell apoptosis; secondly, it promoted DC priming and an NK cell-mediated expansion of anti-myeloma cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL). Overall, this study indicates that Mapa can be used to drive potent anti-MM immune responses. PMID:26405606

  17. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  18. Modulation in vitro of human natural cytotoxicity, lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogens and cytokine production by essential fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Purasiri, P; Mckechnie, A; Heys, S D; Eremin, O

    1997-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) have been shown in animal studies to have a differential effect on various aspects of immune reactivity. However, there have been few studies in humans. Therefore, we elected to investigate the effects of a variety of EFA [gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] in vitro on human blood lymphocyte reactivity, cytokine secretion and natural cytotoxicity. The proliferative response to polyclonal mitogens (phytohaemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, concanavalin A), as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation into newly synthesized lymphocytes, was inhibited (P < 0.05) by all EFAs tested, in a dose-dependent manner (3-15 micrograms/ml). The greatest inhibition of proliferation was caused by EPA and DHA. Similarly, EPA, DHA and GLA significantly reduced cytotoxic activity [expressed as lytic units, using 51 chromium-release assays natural killer (NK) (K562 cells) and lymphokine-activated (LAK) (Daudi cells) cells] (P < 0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner (5-50 micrograms/ml), without affecting cell viability. EPA and DHA exhibited greater suppression than GLA. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation and suppression of natural cytotoxicity was associated with marked decrease in cytokine [interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-2, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)] production in vitro. Our findings demonstrate that EFAs (GLA, EPA, DHA) have the potential to inhibit significantly various aspects of human lymphocyte cell-mediated and humoral immune reactivities. PMID:9415022

  19. The role of cytokines and chemokines in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune process in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-11-01

    The aetiology of alopecia areata (AA) is still not fully understood. However, recent clinical and experimental studies have provided insights into the pathomechanisms of AA and revealed that it is an organ-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Some triggers, such as viral infections, trauma, hormones and emotional/physical stressors, may cause activation of autoreactive T cells that target hair follicle (HF) autoantigens. In these immunological responses, cytokines and chemokines are regarded as key players that mediate the autoimmune inflammation. This results in the collapse of HF immune privilege, which is central to the pathogenesis of AA. This essay will focus on how cytokines and chemokines contribute to the immunological aspects of AA. The management of AA often remains difficult in a number of cases. Our review suggests that novel therapies for AA may involve targeting cytokines and chemokines. PMID:25040075

  20. The cell mediated and humoral immune response to vaccination with acellular and whole cell pertussis vaccine in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J W; Ibsen, P H; Bentzon, M W; Capiau, C; Heron, I

    1991-10-01

    The cell mediated immune response (CMI) against pertussis antigens following vaccination with the traditional Danish whole cell pertussis vaccine (WC-P) and the Japanese acellular pertussis vaccine (A-PV) JNIH-3 was studied in four adult human volunteers. Vaccination with the A-PV induced an in vitro proliferative response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to pertussis toxin (PT) subunits S2-S4, S3-S4 and S5 and the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and a better serological response to native PT, detoxified PT (dPT) and FHA than the WC-PV. The induced CMI and serological response were followed over a period of 17 weeks, and were not seen to decline during this period. Further, an in vitro proliferative response to Bordetella pertussis agglutinogen 2 and 3 were demonstrated using lymphocytes from recently and not-so-recently pertussis-vaccinated adults. PMID:1797049

  1. The role of cytokines and chemokines in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune process in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-11-01

    The aetiology of alopecia areata (AA) is still not fully understood. However, recent clinical and experimental studies have provided insights into the pathomechanisms of AA and revealed that it is an organ-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Some triggers, such as viral infections, trauma, hormones and emotional/physical stressors, may cause activation of autoreactive T cells that target hair follicle (HF) autoantigens. In these immunological responses, cytokines and chemokines are regarded as key players that mediate the autoimmune inflammation. This results in the collapse of HF immune privilege, which is central to the pathogenesis of AA. This essay will focus on how cytokines and chemokines contribute to the immunological aspects of AA. The management of AA often remains difficult in a number of cases. Our review suggests that novel therapies for AA may involve targeting cytokines and chemokines.

  2. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Janney, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  3. Rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cell-mediated mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, P.; Schlemper, B.; Molitor, E.; Platt, K.L.; Seidel, A.; Oesch, F. )

    1990-08-01

    The ability of isolated rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cells to activate benzo(a)pyrene (BP), trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (DDBP), trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (DDCH), and aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) to mutagenic metabolites was assessed by means of a cell-mediated bacterial mutagenicity assay and compared with the ability of parenchymal cells to activate these compounds. Endothelial and Kupffer cells from untreated rats were able to activate AFB{sub 1} and DDBP; DDBP was activated even in the absence of an NADPH-generating system. Pretreating the animals with Aroclor 1254 strongly enhanced the mutagenicity of the dihydrodiol, whereas the mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} showed a slight increase. BP and DDCH were only activated by endothelial and Kupffer cells isolated from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Parenchymal cells form untreated animals activated all four carcinogens tested; Aroclor 1254 enhanced the parenchymal cell-mediated mutagenicity of BP and DDCH but did not affect that of DDBP and clearly reduced that of AFB{sub 1}. The reduced mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} correlates with the decrease in the amount of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone formed when testosterone was incubated with parenchymal cell microsomes from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats (compared with microsomes from untreated animals): the formation of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone is specifically catalyzed by cytochrome P-450h, a hemoprotein thought to be involved in the activation of AFB{sub 1}. These results show that not only rat liver parenchymal cells, but also endothelial and Kupffer cells, activated several carcinogens to mutagenic metabolites.

  4. The involvement of immune reactions in cardiac damage during acute myocardial infarction: role of cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, M; Vasiljevic, Z; Vuckovic-Dekic, L; Spasic, S

    1997-06-01

    This study was undertaken with the aim of investigating humoral and cell-mediated immune response in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as possible mechanisms involved in the infarction enlargement. Twenty three patients with first AMI and 15 healthy volunteers were examined. Of the AMI patients, 14 had extensive infarction (group A), while 9 patients had small infarction (group B). Immunologic analyses were performed at admission, and repeated after 3, 7, 14 and 21 days of the acute event. Following parameters were tested: number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ cells; serum IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels; polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) function (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, metabolic activity); leukocyte migration in vitro in the presence of water-soluble homologous heart extract. It was demonstrated that the number of B cells, serum IgG, C3, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels were elevated from 7th-14th days after AMI. Concerning these parameters, however, no significant differences were obtained between group A and group B of AMI patients. Chemotaxis and metabolic activity of peripheral blood PMN, but not phagocytosis, were enhanced during AMI, again changes of PMN did not correlate with the extension of infarction. In contrast, leukocyte migration inhibition in vitro revealed that only patients with extensive AMI have developed positive reaction during the first 14 days after the onset of the disease, while leukocyte inhibition reaction appeared in patients with nonextensive AMI not earlier than the 21st day after the infarction. These findings demonstrate generation of immune reactivity during AMI and indicate that humoral immune response seems more likely to be an epiphenomenon related to tissue necrosis, while cell-mediated immune reactions could influence the extensiveness of cardiac damage.

  5. Direct and endothelial cell-mediated effect of cyclosporin A on the proliferation of rat smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynski, D.; Zhao, Y.; Yeagley, T. J.; Foegh, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has been suggested to potentiate graft vascular disease by stimulation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation. Both the in vitro and in vivo data are discordant, showing both stimulatory and inhibitory effects of CsA on vascular SMC proliferation. The direct and endothelial cell-mediated effects of CsA on vascular SMC proliferation were examined in vitro using the incorporation of [3H]thymidine. All experiments were done in serum-free conditions. The exposure of SMC to CsA (0.0001 to 0.1 micrograms/ml) had no effect on proliferation. High doses of CsA (0.5 to 10.0 micrograms/ml) were toxic to the SMC and endothelial cells; 90% of SMC population died within 3 to 6 days of exposure to 10.0 micrograms/ml CsA. In the studies on the endothelial cell-mediated effect of CsA, the endothelial cell-conditioned medium (ECCM) significantly increased SMC proliferation. This stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated when the ECCM was obtained from endothelial cells exposed to CsA. Endothelin (ET) is suggested to be an endothelial-cell-derived growth factor for SMC, and implicated as a possible cause of the uncontrolled proliferation of SMC during development of graft vascular disease. Exposure of SMC to levels of recombinant ET similar to the levels found in the ECCM (0.19 + 0.01 pg/ml) significantly increased SMC proliferation. CsA increased fivefold ET concentration in the ECCM. However, despite this rise in ET levels, there was a 45% decrease in SMC proliferation. In conclusion, CsA does not exert a direct modulatory effect on SMC proliferation in vitro, but may inhibit SMC proliferation indirectly via endothelial cell-derived factors. These unidentified factor(s) inhibit SMC proliferation and abolish the mitogenic effect of ET on SMC. PMID:8424452

  6. Binding of recombinant annexin V to endothelial cells: effect of annexin V binding on endothelial-cell-mediated thrombin formation.

    PubMed Central

    van Heerde, W L; Poort, S; van 't Veer, C; Reutelingsperger, C P; de Groot, P G

    1994-01-01

    Annexin V binds with high affinity to procoagulant phospholipid vesicles and thereby inhibits the procoagulant reactions catalysed by these surfaces in vitro. In vivo, vascular endothelial cells are known to catalyse the formation of thrombin by the expression of binding sites at which procoagulant complexes can assemble. Here, we have studied the binding capacity of recombinant annexin V (rANV) to quiescent, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)-stimulated cultured human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The dissociation constant (Kd) was 15.5 +/- 3.3 nM and the number of binding sites was 8.8 (+/- 3.9) x 10(6)/cell. These binding parameters did not change significantly during a 30 h incubation period with PMA or TNF-alpha. rANV inhibited HUVEC-mediated factor Xa formation via the extrinsic as well as the intrinsic route. Activation of factor X by the tissue factor-factor VII-factor X complex and tenase complex was inhibited with IC50 values of 43 +/- 30 nM and 33 +/- 24 nM respectively. Endothelial-cell-mediated generation of thrombin by the prothrombinase complex was inhibited by rANV with an IC50 of 16 +/- 12 nM. Preincubation of rANV with the endothelial cells did not significantly influence the IC50 values. These results show that rANV binds to the same extent to quiescent, PMA- and TNF-stimulated HUVEC, and, as a result of this binding, rANV efficiently inhibits endothelial-cell-mediated thrombin formation. PMID:8068019

  7. Virus-specific HLA-restricted lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected human monocytes and macrophages mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Torpey, D.J. III

    1987-01-01

    Freshly-isolated peripheral blood human monocytes and 5 day in vitro cultured macrophages were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), labeled with /sup 51/Cr, and used as target cells in a 12-14 hour cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from HSV-1 non-immune individuals, whether unstimulated or stimulated with HSV-1 antigen, did not mediate significant lysis of either target cell. HSV-immune MNL, both freshly-isolated and cultured for 5 days without antigen, demonstrated only low levels of natural killer (NK) cell-mediate lysis. MNL from HSV-immune individuals incubated for 5 days in vitro with HSV-1 antigen mediated significant virus-specific lysis of both target cells. Mean virus-specific lysis of autologous monocytes was 8.5(/+-/2.0)% compared to a three-fold greater virus-specific lysis of autologous macrophages. Greater than 70% of this lytic activity was mediated by Leu-11-negative, T3-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Allogeneic target cells lacking a common HLA determinant were not significantly lysed while T8-positive CTL mediated infrequent lysis of target cells sharing a common HLA-A and/or HLA-B determinant. T4-positive lymphocytes were demonstrated to be the predominant cell mediating lysis of autologous target cells and allogeneic target cells sharing both HLA-A and/or HLA-B plus HLA-DR determinants with the CTL; the T4-positive cell was the sole CTL mediator of lysis of allogeneic target cells having a common HLA-DR determinant.

  8. Cytoplasmic Delivery of Liposomes into MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Cell-Specific Phage Fusion Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2010-01-01

    Earlier, we have shown that doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (Doxil) modified with a chimeric phage fusion coat protein specific towards MCF-7 breast cancer cells identified from a phage landscape library demonstrated a significantly enhanced association with target cells and an increased cytotoxicity. Based on some structural similarities between the N-terminus of the phage potein and known fusogenic peptides, we hypothesized that, in addition to the specific targeting, the phage protein may possess endosome-escaping potential and an increased cytotoxicity of drug-loaded phage protein-targeted liposomes may be explained by an advantageous combination of both, cell targeting and endosomal escape of drug-loaded nanocarrier. The use of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique allowed us to clearly demonstrate the pH-dependent membrane fusion activity of the phage protein. Endosomal escape and cytosolic delivery of phage-liposomes was visualized with fluorescence microscopy. Endosome acidification inhibition by bafilomycin A 1 resulted in decreased cytotoxicity of the phage-Doxil, while the endosome disruption by chloroquine had a negligible effect on efficacy of phage-Doxil, confirming its endosomal escape. Our results demonstrated an endosome-escaping property of the phage protein and provided an insight on mechanism of the enhanced cytotoxicity of phage-Doxil. PMID:20438086

  9. Cytotoxic triterpenoids from Berberis koreana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sang Un; Lee, Kang Ro

    2012-01-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation and chemical investigation of the trunk of Berberis koreana led to the isolation and identification of three new triterpenoids, 2 α,3 α,19 α-trihydroxy-urs-12-en-24-formyl-28-oic acid (1), 2 α,3 β,21 α-trihydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid ( 2), and 3 β-acetyloxy-1-oxo-olean-12-en-28-oic acid (3), along with seven known triterpenoids (4-10). The structures of these new compounds were determined through spectral analysis, including extensive 2D-NMR data. The new compounds 1-3 showed significant cytotoxicity against the A549, SK-OV-3, SK-MEL-2, and HCT-15 human tumor cell lines with IC(50) values ranging from 7.17 to 48.73 µM.

  10. Histamine modulates γδ-T lymphocyte migration and cytotoxicity, via Gi and Gs protein-coupled signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Truta-Feles, K; Lagadari, M; Lehmann, K; Berod, L; Cubillos, S; Piehler, S; Herouy, Y; Barz, D; Kamradt, T; Maghazachi, AA; Norgauer, J

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The biogenic amine, histamine plays a pathophysiological regulatory role in cellular processes of a variety of immune cells. This work analyses the actions of histamine on γδ-T lymphocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, which are critically involved in immunological surveillance of tumours. Experimental approach: We have analysed effects of histamine on the intracellular calcium, actin reorganization, migratory response and the interaction of human γδ T cells with tumour cells such as the A2058 human melanoma cell line, the human Burkitt's Non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell line Raji, the T-lymphoblastic lymphoma cell line Jurkat and the natural killer cell-sensitive erythroleukaemia cell line, K562. Key results: γδ T lymphocytes express mRNA for different histamine receptor subtypes. In human peripheral blood γδ T cells, histamine stimulated Pertussis toxin-sensitive intracellular calcium increase, actin polymerization and chemotaxis. However, histamine inhibited the spontaneous cytolytic activity of γδ T cells towards several tumour cell lines in a cholera toxin-sensitive manner. A histamine H4 receptor antagonist abolished the histamine induced γδ T cell migratory response. A histamine H2 receptor agonist inhibited γδ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Conclusions and implications: Histamine activated signalling pathways typical of chemotaxis (Gi protein-dependent actin reorganization, increase of intracellular calcium) and induced migratory responses in γδ T lymphocytes, via the H4 receptor, whereas it down-regulated γδ T cell mediated cytotoxicity through H2 receptors and Gs protein-coupled signalling. Our data suggest that histamine activated γδ T cells could modulate immunological surveillance of tumour tissue. PMID:20977468

  11. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  12. Characteristics of Cell-mediated, Anti-listerial Immunity Induced by A Naturally Avirulent Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4a Strain HCC23

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The characteristics of cell-mediated, anti-listerial immune response initiated by an avirulent Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4a strain HCC23 was assessed. Similar to virulent strain EGD, avirulent strain HCC23 grew readily within macrophage-like J774 cells, but nonhemolytic strain ATCC 15313 did n...

  13. IL-2-activated haploidentical NK cells restore NKG2D-mediated NK-cell cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma patients by scavenging of plasma MICA.

    PubMed

    Kloess, Stephan; Huenecke, Sabine; Piechulek, Daniel; Esser, Ruth; Koch, Joachim; Brehm, Claudia; Soerensen, Jan; Gardlowski, Tanja; Brinkmann, Andrea; Bader, Peter; Passweg, Jakob; Klingebiel, Thomas; Schwabe, Dirk; Koehl, Ulrike

    2010-11-01

    NK group 2D (NKG2D)-expressing NK cells exhibit cytolytic activity against various tumors after recognition of the cellular ligand MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA). However, release of soluble MICA (sMICA) compromises NKG2D-dependent NK-cell cytotoxicity leading to tumor escape from immunosurveillance. Although some molecular details of the NKG2D-MICA interaction have been elucidated, its impact for donor NK (dNK) cell-based therapy of solid tumors has not been studied. Within an ongoing phase I/II trial, we used allogeneic IL-2 activated dNK cells after haploidentical stem cell transplantation for immunotherapy of patients with high-risk stage IV neuroblastoma. NKG2D levels on activated dNK cells increased strongly when compared with freshly isolated dNK cells and correlated with enhanced NK-cell cytotoxicity. Most importantly, elevated sMICA levels in patients plasma correlated significantly with impaired dNK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This effect could be reversed by high-dose infusion of activated dNK cells, which display high levels of surface NKG2D. Our data suggest that the provided excess of NKG2D leads to clearance of sMICA and preserves cytotoxicity of dNK cells via non-occupied NKG2D. In conclusion, our results identify this tumor immune escape mechanism as a target to improve immunotherapy of neuroblastoma and presumably other tumors.

  14. Ethanol-Induced Mast Cell-Mediated Inflammation Leads to Increased Susceptibility of Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the APC Δ468 Min Mouse Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wimberly, Andre L.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Khan, Mohammad Wasim; Pemberton, Alan; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic and frequent ethanol (EtOH) intake has been associated with an increased incidence of several types of cancers including breast, mouth, throat, esophageal, stomach and colorectal (CRC). The underlying mechanism of this deleterious carcinogenic effect of alcohol has not been clearly established but inflammation may be one unifying feature of these cancers. We have recently shown that intestinal mast cells play a central role in intestinal carcinogenesis. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that mast cell-mediated inflammation is one underlying mechanism by which chronic alcohol promotes intestinal tumorigenesis. Methods APC Δ468 mice were fed either an alcohol containing Nanji liquid diet or isocaloric dextrose containing Nanji diet for 10 weeks and then sacrificed to collect small and large intestine samples. Assessments of tumor number and size as well as mast cell number and mast cell activity and histology score for invasion were compared between Control (dextrose fed) and Alcohol fed APCΔ468 mice. The effect of alcohol on mast cell mediated tumor migration was also assessed using an in vitro migration assay. Results Alcohol feeding increased both polyp number and size within both the small and large intestines of APCΔ468 mice. Only alcohol fed mice showed evidence of tumor invasion. Chronic alcohol feeding also resulted in an increased mast cell number and activity in tumor stroma and invading borders. In vitro migration assay showed that alcohol significantly increases mast cell mediated tumor migration in vitro. Conclusions Our data show that chronic alcohol intake promotes: (1) intestinal tumorigenesis and tumor invasion in genetically susceptible mice; (2) increases in polyp associated mast cells; (3) mast cell mediated tumor migration in vitro. Both our in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that mast cell mediated inflammation could be one mechanism by which alcohol promotes carcinogenesis. PMID:23320800

  15. Serial dilution microchip for cytotoxicity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Hyunwoo; Lim, Sun Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Chung, Seok; Chung, Chanil; Han, Dong-Chul; Chang, Jun Keun

    2004-08-01

    Today's pharmaceutical industry is facing challenges resulting from the vast increases in sample numbers produced by high-throughput screening (HTS). In addition, the bottlenecks created by increased demand for cytotoxicity testing (required to assess compound safety) are becoming a serious problem. We have developed a polymer PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) based microfluidic device that can perform a cytotoxicity test in a rapid and reproducible manner. The concept that the device includes is well adjustable to automated robots in huge HTS systems, so we can think of it as a potential dilution and delivery module. Cytotoxicity testing is all about the dilution and dispensing of a drug sample. Previously, we made a PDMS based microfluidic device which automatically and precisely diluted drugs with a buffer solution with serially increasing concentrations. This time, the serially diluted drug solution was directly delivered to 96 well plates for cytotoxicity testing. Cytotoxic paclitaxel solution with 2% RPMI 1640 has been used while carrying out cancerous cell based cytotoxicity tests. We believe that this rapid and robust use of the PDMS microchip will overcome the growing problem in cytotoxicity testing for HTS.

  16. Host Genetic Background Influences the Response to the Opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Altering Cell-Mediated Immunity and Bacterial Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  17. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  18. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Neff, C. Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K.; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S.; Palmer, Brent E.; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells. PMID:26484769

  19. Altered NK Cell Development and Enhanced NK Cell-Mediated Resistance to MCMV in NKG2D-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zafirova, Biljana; Mandarić, Sanja; Antulov, Ronald; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonsson, Helena; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Jonjić, Stipan; Polić, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    Summary NKG2D is a potent activating receptor on NK cells which acts as a molecular sensor for stressed cells expressing NKG2D ligands such as infected or tumor transformed cells. Although NKG2D is expressed on NK cell precursors, its role in NK cell development is still not known. We have generated NKG2D-deficient mice by targeting the Klrk1 locus. Here we provide evidence for an important regulatory role of NKG2D in the development of NK cells. The absence of NKG2D causes faster division of NK cells, perturbation in size of some NK cell subpopulations and their augmented sensitivity to apoptosis. As expected, NKG2D−/− NK cells are less responsive to tumor targets expressing NKG2D ligands. NKG2D−/− mice, however, show an enhanced NK cell-mediated resistance to MCMV infection as a consequence of NK cell dysregulation. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for yet unknown regulatory function of NKG2D in NK cell physiology. PMID:19631564

  20. New approaches for predicting T cell-mediated drug reactions: A role for inducible and potentially preventable autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Michels, Aaron W; Ostrov, David A

    2015-08-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are commonplace and occur when a drug binds to its intended pharmacologic target (type A ADR) or an unintended target (type B ADR). Immunologically mediated type B ADRs, such as drug hypersensitivity syndrome, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, can be severe and result in a diverse set of clinical manifestations that include fever and rash, as well as multiple organ failure (liver, kidney, lungs, and/or heart) in the case of drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There is increasing evidence that specific HLA alleles influence the risk of drug reactions. Several features of T cell-mediated ADRs are strikingly similar to those displayed by patients with autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, such as strong HLA association, organ-specific adaptive immune responses, viral involvement, and activation of innate immunity. There is a need to better predict patient populations at risk for immunologically mediated type B ADRs. Because methods to predict type 1 diabetes by using genetic and immunologic biomarkers have been developed to a high level of accuracy (predicting 100% of subjects likely to progress), new research strategies based on these methods might also improve the ability to predict drug hypersensitivity. PMID:26254052

  1. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna ( Sturnus tristis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Mansur A.; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S.; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-11-01

    Common myna ( Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher at 25 °C rather than 7 °C either co-incubated with opsonized or unopsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  2. Induction of tibial dyschondroplasia and suppression of cell-mediated immunity in chickens by Fusarium oxysporum grown on sterile corn.

    PubMed

    Chu, Q; Wu, W; Cook, M E; Smalley, E B

    1995-01-01

    An isolate of Fusarium oxysporum from corn associated with Kaschin-Beck disease in humans was tested for its ability to induce tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) and toxicity in chicks. Both leghorn and broiler chicks were fed diets in which corn was replaced with varied amounts (0% to 50%) of the F. oxysporum culture grown on sterile corn, or with known TD-inducing agents. F. oxysporum did not affect body weight in either type of chicks. In leghorn chicks, neither F. oxysporum nor the known TD-inducing agents (F. equiseti, 4%; tetramethylthiuram disulfide [Thiram], 35 ppm) caused TD. However, F. oxysporum at high levels (50%) and the two known TD-inducing agents reduced interdigital cutaneous response to phytohemagglutinin-P challenge. In addition, Thiram also reduced body-weight gain by more than 17%. In female broiler chicks (Cornish Rock), F. oxysporum not only decreased cell-mediated cutaneous response to phytohemagglutinin-P but also increased TD incidence; these same effects were observed with F. equiseti and Thiram. Histological examinations revealed similar pathological changes among dyschondroplastic lesions induced by F. oxysporum, F. equiseti, and Thiram. Results of this experiment indicate that the isolate of F. oxysporum from the region in which Kaschin-Beck disease is endemic can induce TD in broiler chicks and that it is immunosuppressive.

  3. Natural killer cell-mediated eradication of neuroblastoma metastases to bone marrow by targeted interleukin-2 therapy.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Xiang, R; Dreier, T; Varki, N M; Gillies, S D; Reisfeld, R A

    1998-03-01

    Targeted interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy with a genetically engineered antidisialoganglioside GD2 antibody-IL-2 fusion protein induced a cell-mediated antitumor response that effectively eradicated established bone marrow and liver metastases in a syngeneic model of neuroblastoma. The mechanism involved is exclusively natural killer (NK) cell-dependent, because NK-cell deficiency abrogated the antitumor effect. In contrast, the fusion protein remained completely effective in the T-cell-deficient mice or immunocompetent mice depleted of CD8+ T cells in vivo. A strong stimulation of NK-cell activity was also shown in vitro. Immunohistology of the leukocytic infiltrate of livers from treated mice revealed a strong staining for NK cells but not for CD8+ T cells. The therapeutic effect of the fusion protein was increased when combined with NK-cell-stimulating agents, such as poly I:C or recombinant mouse interferon-gamma. In conclusion, these data show that targeted delivery of cytokines to the tumor microenvironment offers a new strategy to elicit an effective cellular immune response mediated by NK cells against metastatic neuroblastoma. This therapeutic effect may have general clinical implications for the treatment of patients with minimal residual disease who suffer from T-cell suppression after high-dose chemotherapy but are not deficient in NK cells.

  4. T Follicular Helper Cell Plasticity Shapes Pathogenic T Helper 2 Cell-Mediated Immunity to Inhaled House Dust Mite.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Tato, André; Randall, Troy D; Lund, Frances E; Spolski, Rosanne; Leonard, Warren J; León, Beatriz

    2016-02-16

    Exposure to environmental antigens, such as house dust mite (HDM), often leads to T helper 2 (Th2) cell-driven allergic responses. However, the mechanisms underlying the development of these responses are incompletely understood. We found that the initial exposure to HDM did not lead to Th2 cell development but instead promoted the formation of interleukin-4 (IL-4)-committed T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Following challenge exposure to HDM, Tfh cells differentiated into IL-4 and IL-13 double-producing Th2 cells that accumulated in the lung and recruited eosinophils. B cells were required to expand IL-4-committed Tfh cells during the sensitization phase, but did not directly contribute to disease. Impairment of Tfh cell responses during the sensitization phase or Tfh cell depletion prevented Th2 cell-mediated responses following challenge. Thus, our data demonstrate that Tfh cells are precursors of HDM-specific Th2 cells and reveal an unexpected role of B cells and Tfh cells in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma.

  5. Cell-mediated immunity and lymphocyte populations in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junín Virus).

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, G; Oubiña, J R; Rondinone, S N; Elsner, B; Frigerio, M J

    1981-01-01

    Guinea pigs infected with the XJ prototype strain of Junín virus reproduce the main features of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, showing hemorrhages, leukothrombocytopenia, and focal lymphoid tissue necrosis. Viral lymphotropism is shown by the presence of viral antigens, severe cytopathic effect, and high virus titers in lymphoid organs. A pronounced depression of humoral immune response to sheep erythrocytes as well as to the virus is described. This study was carried out to determine whether cellular immune response was also modified and which cell populations were affected. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reaction to purified protein derivative was found to be markedly depressed after infection. A noticeable decrease in both percentages and absolute T lymphocyte numbers, detected by E rosettes, in spleen and lymph nodes, together with a low absolute T cell number in peripheral blood, were observed. Total cell counts in spleen, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood were also reduced. On the contrary, no modification in percentages of B lymphocytes, as measured by EAC rosettes, was found. These results indicate that cell-mediated immunity is markedly impaired in guinea pigs infected with the XJ strain of Junín virus. Its relationship with the pathogenesis of the disease is discussed. PMID:6273314

  6. A Possible Role for CD8+ T Lymphocytes in the Cell-Mediated Pathogenesis of Pemphigus Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Fania, Luca; Gnarra, Maria; Toto, Paola; Di Rollo, Daniela; Sauder, Daniel N.; Feliciani, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease whose pathogenesis involves both humoral and cell-mediated immune response. Though the pathogenetic role of autoantibodies directed against desmoglein 3 is certain, a number of other factors have been suggested to determine acantholysis in PV. In this study we examined the possible role of CD8+ T cells in the development of acantholysis by a passive transfer of PV autoantibodies using CD8 deficient mice, and we also studied the inflammatory infiltrate of PV skin lesions by immunohistochemical staining. The results of the immunohistochemical staining to study the expression of CD3, CD4, and CD8 in PV skin lesions showed that CD4+ are more expressed than CD8+ in the inflammatory infiltrate of PV lesions, confirming the data of the previous literature. The passive transfer study showed a lower incidence of pemphigus in the group of CD8 deficient mice compared to the control one of wild-type mice. These results suggest that CD8+ T cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of PV, perhaps through the Fas/FasL pathway. PMID:24347833

  7. Coupling of HIV-1 Antigen to the Selective Autophagy Receptor SQSTM1/p62 Promotes T-Cell-Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Aram Nikolai; Landsverk, Ole Jørgen; Simonsen, Anne; Bogen, Bjarne; Corthay, Alexandre; Øynebråten, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines aiming to promote T-cell-mediated immune responses have so far showed limited efficacy, and there is a need for novel strategies. Studies indicate that autophagy plays an inherent role in antigen processing and presentation for CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Here, we report a novel vaccine strategy based on fusion of antigen to the selective autophagy receptor sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1)/p62. We hypothesized that redirection of vaccine antigen from proteasomal degradation into the autophagy pathway would increase the generation of antigen-specific T cells. A hybrid vaccine construct was designed in which the antigen is fused to the C-terminus of p62, a signaling hub, and a receptor that naturally delivers ubiquitinated cargo for autophagic degradation. Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 antigen Gagp24 to p62 resulted in efficient antigen delivery into the autophagy pathway. Intradermal immunization of mice revealed that, in comparison to Gagp24 delivered alone, fusion to p62 enhanced the number of Gagp24-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells, including CD8(+) T cells. The strategy may also have the potential to modulate the antigenic peptide repertoire. Because p62 and autophagy are highly conserved between species, we anticipate this strategy to be a candidate for the development of T-cell-based vaccines in humans. PMID:27242780

  8. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna (Sturnus tristis).

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Mansur A; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-11-01

    Common myna (Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly (P < 0.05) higher at 25 °C rather than 7 °C either co-incubated with opsonized or unopsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  9. Coupling of HIV-1 Antigen to the Selective Autophagy Receptor SQSTM1/p62 Promotes T-Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Aram Nikolai; Landsverk, Ole Jørgen; Simonsen, Anne; Bogen, Bjarne; Corthay, Alexandre; Øynebråten, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines aiming to promote T-cell-mediated immune responses have so far showed limited efficacy, and there is a need for novel strategies. Studies indicate that autophagy plays an inherent role in antigen processing and presentation for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Here, we report a novel vaccine strategy based on fusion of antigen to the selective autophagy receptor sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1)/p62. We hypothesized that redirection of vaccine antigen from proteasomal degradation into the autophagy pathway would increase the generation of antigen-specific T cells. A hybrid vaccine construct was designed in which the antigen is fused to the C-terminus of p62, a signaling hub, and a receptor that naturally delivers ubiquitinated cargo for autophagic degradation. Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 antigen Gagp24 to p62 resulted in efficient antigen delivery into the autophagy pathway. Intradermal immunization of mice revealed that, in comparison to Gagp24 delivered alone, fusion to p62 enhanced the number of Gagp24-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells, including CD8+ T cells. The strategy may also have the potential to modulate the antigenic peptide repertoire. Because p62 and autophagy are highly conserved between species, we anticipate this strategy to be a candidate for the development of T-cell-based vaccines in humans. PMID:27242780

  10. Cell-mediated responses to heterologous and homologous thyroglobulin in guinea-pigs immunized with heterologous thyroid extracts

    PubMed Central

    Romagnani, S.; Ricci, M.; Passaleva, A.; Billiotti, G.

    1970-01-01

    Immune cellular responses and circulating antibodies to heterologous and homologous thyroglobulin have been studied in two groups of guinea-pigs immunized with human or bovine thyroid extract in Freund's complete adjuvant. In animals immunized with human thyroid extract, the in vitro [2-14C]thymidine incorporation by lymphocytes and the inhibition of peritoneal exudate cell migration in the presence of human thyroglobulin were earlier and more marked than those to bovine thyroglobulin as observed in animals immunized with bovine thyroid extract. In the two groups of guinea-pigs no significant difference was found regarding the production of circulating antibodies. Moreover cellular cross-reaction to homologous thyroglobulin could be detected in animals immunized with human but not in those immunized with bovine thyroid extract. Serological and cellular cross-reactions between human and bovine thyroglobulin were present in both groups of guinea-pigs. Finally a significantly higher incidence of thyroid inflammatory lesions was found in the human thyroid extract immunized animals. The role of cell-mediated immune responses in initiating tissue damage in experimental thyroiditis is discussed. ImagesFIG. 7FIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:5475513

  11. Evaluation of the contribution of mast cell mediators to the hypotensive activity of various peptides in rats.

    PubMed

    Kérouac, R; Fournier, A; Barabé, J; St-Pierre, S; Rioux, F

    1983-04-01

    We have tested the effects of intravenous injections of substance P (SP), bradykinin (BK), somatostatin (SS) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on the blood pressure, histaminemia and hematocrit in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. The four peptides elicited a decrease of the mean arterial blood pressure which varied both in amplitude and in duration depending both on the peptide and on the doses utilized. The hypotensive effects of SP and VIP were more persistent than those caused by BK or SS. Only SP evoked an increase of histaminemia. Both SP and BK caused an increase of hematocrit. The change of hematocrit was more prominent and of longer duration after Sp than after BK. Pretreatment of rats with the antiinflammatory drug dexamethasone inhibited markedly the changes of blood pressure, histaminemia and hematocrit caused by SP. The hypotensive effects of BK, SS and VIP as well as the transient change of hematocrit evoked by BK were not affected by dexamethasone. The results suggest that part of the hypotensive activity and changes of hematocrit evoked by SP in rats is due to the release and action of histamine and possibly of other vasoactive substances, of mast cell origin. The results also indicate that mast cell mediators, particularly histamine, are unlikely to be instrumental in the hypotensive activity of BK, SS or VIP in rats.

  12. Pig but not Human Interferon-γ Initiates Human Cell-Mediated Rejection of Pig Tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Parvez; Murray, Allan G.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lorber, Marc I.; Askenase, Philip W.; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Pober, Jordan S.

    1997-08-01

    Split-thickness pig skin was transplanted on severe combined immunodeficient mice so that pig dermal microvessels spontaneously inosculated with mouse microvessels and functioned to perfuse the grafts. Pig endothelial cells in the healed grafts constitutively expressed class I and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Major histocompatibility complex molecule expression could be further increased by intradermal injection of pig interferon-γ (IFN-γ ) but not human IFN-γ or tumor necrosis factor. Grafts injected with pig IFN-γ also developed a sparse infiltrate of mouse neutrophils and eosinophils without evidence of injury. Introduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into the animals by intraperitoneal inoculation resulted in sparse perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates in the grafts confined to the pig dermis. Injection of pig skin grafts on mice that received human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with pig IFN-γ (but not human IFN-γ or heat-inactivated pig IFN-γ ) induced human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages to more extensively infiltrate the pig skin grafts and injure pig dermal microvessels. These findings suggest that human T cell-mediated rejection of xenotransplanted pig organs may be prevented if cellular sources of pig interferon (e.g., passenger lymphocytes) are eliminated from the graft.

  13. An African horse sickness virus serotype 4 recombinant canarypox virus vaccine elicits specific cell-mediated immune responses in horses.

    PubMed

    El Garch, H; Crafford, J E; Amouyal, P; Durand, P Y; Edlund Toulemonde, C; Lemaitre, L; Cozette, V; Guthrie, A; Minke, J M

    2012-09-15

    A recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing synthetic genes encoding outer capsid proteins, VP2 and VP5, of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) serotype 4 (ALVAC(®)-AHSV4) has been demonstrated to fully protect horses against homologous challenge with virulent field virus. Guthrie et al. (2009) detected weak and variable titres of neutralizing antibody (ranging from <10 to 40) 8 weeks after vaccination leading us to hypothesize that there could be a participation of cell mediated immunity (CMI) in protection against AHSV4. The present study aimed at characterizing the CMI induced by the experimental ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccine. Six horses received two vaccinations twenty-eight days apart and three horses remained unvaccinated. The detection of VP2/VP5 specific IFN-γ responses was assessed by enzyme linked immune spot (ELISpot) assay and clearly demonstrated that all ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinated horses developed significant IFN-γ production compared to unvaccinated horses. More detailed immune responses obtained by flow cytometry demonstrated that ALVAC(®)-AHSV4 vaccinations induced immune cells, mainly CD8(+) T cells, able to recognize multiple T-epitopes through all VP2 and only the N-terminus sequence of VP5. Neither VP2 nor VP5 specific IFN-γ responses were detected in unvaccinated horses. Overall, our data demonstrated that an experimental recombinant canarypox based vaccine induced significant CMI specific for both VP2 and VP5 proteins of AHSV4.

  14. Effect of early vitamin A supplementation on cell-mediated immunity in infants younger than 6 mo.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Mahalanabis, D; Alvarez, J O; Wahed, M A; Islam, M A; Habte, D

    1997-01-01

    One hundred twenty infants were randomly assigned to receive either 15 mg vitamin A or placebo with each of three DPT/OPV (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus/oral polio vaccine) immunizations at monthly intervals. Sixty-two received vitamin A and 58 received placebo. One month after the third supplementation dose, the response to the delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity test [multitest cell-mediated immunity (CMI) skin evaluation] for tetanus, diphtheria, and tuberculin (purified protein derivative, PPD) was the same in the vitamin A and placebo infants. The number of anergic infants was 17 (27%) and 19 (33%) in the vitamin A and placebo groups, respectively. The number of positive tests among well-nourished infants was significantly higher than that in malnourished infants irrespective of supplementation (P < 0.001). Among the infants with adequate serum retinol concentrations (> 0.7 mumol/L) after supplementation, the vitamin A-supplemented infants had a significantly higher proportion of positive CMI tests than the placebo infants (chi-square test: 8.99, P = 0.008). Among the infants with low serum retinol concentrations (< 0.7 mumol/L) after supplementation, vitamin A supplementation had no effect on CMI response. These results indicate that CMI in young infants was positively affected by vitamin A supplementation only in those infants whose vitamin A status was adequate (ie, serum retinol > 0.7 mumol/L) at the time of the CMI test. CMI was consistently better in well-nourished infants irrespective of supplementation. PMID:8988926

  15. Cytotoxic triterpene saponins from Cercodemas anceps.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Vien, Le Thi; Hanh, Tran Thi Hong; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Thao, Do Thi; Thanh, Nguyen Van; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Thung, Do Cong; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van

    2015-08-15

    Seven holostane-type triterpene saponins (1-7), including five new compounds namely cercodemasoides A-E (2-6), were isolated from the sea cucumber Cercodemas anceps. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence including HR ESI MS, ESI MS/MS, 1D and 2D NMR. The cytotoxic effects of isolated compounds were evaluated by SRB method on five human cancer cell lines including Hep-G2 (hepatoma cancer), KB (epidermoid carcinoma), LNCaP (prostate cancer), MCF7 (breast cancer), and SK-Mel2 (melanoma). Compounds 1-7 showed potent cytotoxicity on five tested cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 7.36 ± 0.46 μM. With respect to the potent cytotoxicity of the isolated saponins, further studies are required to confirm efficacy in vivo and the mechanism of cytotoxic effects. PMID:26099533

  16. Intracellular glutathione and cytotoxicity of platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, L; Creaven, P J; Perez, R; Zdanowicz, J R; Raghavan, D

    1995-01-01

    Although there have been a number of reports correlating cellular GSH levels with cytotoxicity of platinum agents, none has examined the relationship between GSH concentrations and cytotoxicity. In this study, using a highly specific HPLC method for measuring GSH and expressing GSH as concentration and also per cell number, we evaluated the correlation between GSH levels and the cytotoxicity to five agents in ten human tumor cell lines. The five platinum agents included the platinum(II) complexes cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin and platinum(IV) complexes iproplatin and tetraplatin. The correlation between intracellular GSH concentration and cytotoxicity was highly significant only for iproplatin (P = 0.002) followed by tetraplatin, which demonstrated a trend toward statistical significance (P = 0.06). Cytotoxicity of the other platinum complexes showed no relation to GSH concentration, cisplatin itself showing a P-value of 0.09. In contrast, the GSH levels normalized to cell number showed a statistically significant correlation with the cytotoxicity of four of the five platinum agents, the exception being carboplatin; the strongest correlation observed was that for iproplatin and tetraplatin. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity in these cell lines showed no correlation with cytotoxicity of any of the platinum complexes. Our results, from the analyses of both GSH concentration as well as GSH per cell number, suggest a significantly higher interaction between GSH and iproplatin compared with the other platinum agents. Moreover, our data suggest that relationships between cytotoxicity and GSH levels on a per-cell basis may not persist when differences in cell volume are taken into account.

  17. The cytotoxicity study of praziquantel enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Mao, Ruifeng; Wang, Dongling; Hu, Changyan; Zheng, Yang; Sun, Dequn

    2016-01-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is prescribed as a racemic mixture (racemic-PZQ, rac-PZQ), which is composed of (R)-PZQ and (S)-PZQ. In this work, the cytotoxicity of rac-PZQ and its two enantiomers (R)-PZQ and (S)-PZQ on eight cell lines (L-02, HepG2, prf-plc-5, SH-SY5Y, HUVEC, A549, HCT-15, Raw264.7) was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphe-nyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays. The morphology of apoptotic cells was studied by fluorescence microscope using Hoechst 33342 staining, and the cytotoxicity of the compounds was also tested by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Results revealed that (R)-PZQ had negligible cytotoxicity against L-02, SH-SY5Y, HUVEC, A549, HCT-15, and Raw264.7 cells but selectively inhibited tumor cell lines (prf-plc-5 and HepG2). However, in contrast to (R)-PZQ, the (S)-isomer showed higher cytotoxicity against L-02 cells and lower inhibition on prf-plc-5 and HepG2 cells. Besides, (R)-PZQ showed lower cytotoxicity on SH-SY5Y cells than (S)-PZQ. Meanwhile, (R)-PZQ at <80 μM concentration could promote proliferation of macrophage cells (Raw264.7). Our research revealed that (R)-PZQ has lower cytotoxicity than (S)-PZQ and has similar cytotoxicity with rac-PZQ. (S)-PZQ is the principal enantiomer to cause side effects on human definitive hosts. These findings gave the reasonable reasons for World Health Organization to produce (R)-PZQ as a replacement for rac-PZQ for the treatment of schistosomiasis. PMID:27445457

  18. Longitudinal analysis of feline leukemia virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes: correlation with recovery from infection.

    PubMed

    Flynn, J Norman; Dunham, Stephen P; Watson, Vivien; Jarrett, Oswald

    2002-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a common naturally occurring gammaretrovirus of domestic cats that is associated with degenerative diseases of the hematopoietic system, immunodeficiency, and neoplasia. Although the majority of cats exposed to FeLV develop a transient infection and recover, a proportion of cats become persistently viremic and many subsequently develop fatal diseases. To define the dominant host immune effector mechanisms responsible for the outcome of infection, we studied the longitudinal changes in FeLV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in a group of naïve cats following oronasal exposure to FeLV. Using (51)Cr release assays to measure ex vivo virus-specific cytotoxicity, the emerging virus-specific CTL response was correlated with modulations in viral burden as assessed by detection of infectious virus, FeLV p27 capsid antigen, and proviral DNA in the blood. High levels of circulating FeLV-specific effector CTLs appeared before virus neutralizing antibodies in cats that recovered from exposure to FeLV. In contrast, persistent viremia was associated with a silencing of virus-specific humoral and cell-mediated host immune effector mechanisms. A single transfer of between 2 x 10(7) and 1 x 10(8) autologous, antigen-activated lymphoblasts was associated with a downmodulation in viral burden in vivo. The results suggest an important role for FeLV-specific CTLs in retroviral immunity and demonstrate the potential to modulate disease outcome by the adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells in vivo.

  19. Mannan as an antigen in cell-mediated immunity (CMI) assays and as a modulator of mannan-specific CMI.

    PubMed

    Domer, J E; Garner, R E; Befidi-Mengue, R N

    1989-03-01

    Mannan (MAN) extracted from Candida albicans 20A was investigated for its potential as an antigen in the detection of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in vivo and in vitro and for its ability to modulate CMI when administered intravenously (i.v.). CBA/J mice were either immunized as adults by the cutaneous inoculation of 10(6) viable blastoconidia or colonized as infants (primed) and then boosted cutaneously as adults. When immunized animals were footpad tested with MAN, highly significant delayed-type hypersensitivity (DH) responses were detected. The DH responses to MAN were of a greater magnitude than those noted with the same quantity of cell wall glycoprotein (GP), an ethylenediamine extract of the cell wall which contains both glucan and MAN. In contrast, GP was a better antigen for the detection of CMI responses in an in vitro lymphoproliferative assay with either spleen or lymph node cell suspensions. Mice treated with MAN i.v. prior to the initiation of immunization or between priming and secondary inoculations developed significantly suppressed DH reactions when tested with either MAN or GP. The lowest effective dose of MAN was 250 micrograms, maximum suppression occurred with 500 micrograms, and either dose given 1 week prior to immunization was suppressive. The suppression by MAN was specific for MAN or the MAN-containing GP. Responses to another unrelated candidal antigen, a membrane extract designated BEX, were relatively unaffected. MAN, therefore, was an effective antigen for the detection of CMI in vivo, and its administration i.v. created what appeared to be a MAN-specific suppression since it could be detected with both MAN and a MAN-containing extract from the cell wall. Caution must be exercised in the interpretation of these data, however, since the protein component of each of these extracts has not been characterized with respect to its potential role in the phenomena observed.

  20. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens.

  1. Antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae-infected and bacterin-vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Furesz, S E; Mallard, B A; Bossé, J T; Rosendal, S; Wilkie, B N; MacInnes, J I

    1997-01-01

    Current porcine pleuropneumonia bacterins afford only partial protection by decreasing mortality but not morbidity. In order to better understand the type(s) of immune response associated with protection, antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses (CMIR) were compared for piglets before and after administration of a commercial bacterin, which confers partial protection, or a low-dose (10(5) CFU/ml) aerosol challenge with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae CM5 (LD), which induces complete protection. Control groups received phosphate-buffered saline or adjuvant. Serum antibody response, antibody avidity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), and lymphocyte blastogenic responses were measured and compared among treatment groups to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capsular polysaccharide (CPS), hemolysin (HLY), and outer membrane proteins (OMP) of A. pleuropneumoniae. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and sera were collected prior to and following primary and secondary immunization-infection and high-dose A. pleuropneumoniae CM5 (10(7) CFU/ml) aerosol challenge. Serum antibody and DTH, particularly that to HLY, differed significantly between treatment groups, and increases were associated with protection. LD-infected piglets had higher antibody responses (P < or = 0.01) and antibody avidity (P < or = 0.10) than bacterin-vaccinated and control groups. Anti-HLY antibodies were consistently associated with protection, whereas anti-LPS and anti-CPS antibodies were not. LD-infected animals had higher DTH responses, particularly to HLY, than bacterin-vaccinated pigs (P < or = 0.03). The LD-infected group maintained consistent blastogenic responses to HLY, LPS, CPS, and OMP over the course of infection, unlike the bacterin-vaccinated and control animals. These data suggest that the immune responses induced by a commercial bacterin are very different from those induced by LD aerosol infection and that current bacterins may be modified, for instance, by addition of HLY, so as to

  2. Role of donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone repair: differentiation vs. paracrine effects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Proto, Jonathan D.; Lu, Aiping; Cummins, James H.; Proctor, Alexander; Chen, Chien-Wen; Huard, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    Murine muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) have been shown capable of regenerating bone in a critical size calvarial defect model when transduced with BMP 2 or 4; however, the contribution of the donor cells and their interactions with the host cells during the bone healing process have not been fully elucidated. To address this question, C57/BL/6J mice were divided into MDSC/BMP4/GFP, MDSC/GFP, and scaffold groups. After transplanting MDSCs into the critical-size calvarial defects created in normal mice, we found that mice transplanted with BMP4GFP-transduced MDSCs healed the bone defect in 4 wk, while the control groups (MDSC-GFP and scaffold) demonstrated no bone healing. The newly formed trabecular bone displayed similar biomechanical properties as the native bone, and the donor cells directly participated in endochondral bone formation via their differentiation into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes via the BMP4-pSMAD5 and COX-2-PGE2 signaling pathways. In contrast to the scaffold group, the MDSC groups attracted more inflammatory cells initially and incurred faster inflammation resolution, enhanced angiogenesis, and suppressed initial immune responses in the host mice. MDSCs were shown to attract macrophages via the secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and promote endothelial cell proliferation by secreting multiple growth factors. Our findings indicated that BMP4GFP-transduced MDSCs not only regenerated bone by direct differentiation, but also positively influenced the host cells to coordinate and promote bone tissue repair through paracrine effects.—Gao, X., Usas, A., Proto, J. D., Lu, A., Cummins, J. H., Proctor, A., Chen, C.-W., Huard, J. Role of donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone repair: differentiation vs. paracrine effects. PMID:24843069

  3. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: Impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression

    SciTech Connect

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M.; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joelle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P.; Bertin, Gerard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 {mu}g pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IFN-{gamma}) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-{gamma} and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  4. Inhibitory effects of BiRyuChe-bang on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions and inflammatory cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Moon, Phil-Dong; Choi, Il Sang; Go, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Byong-Joo; Kang, Sang Woo; Yoon, Sunhee; Han, Seung-Jun; Nam, Sun-Young; Oh, Hyun-A; Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Young-Sick; Kim, Ju-Sung; Kim, Myong-Jo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2013-01-01

    BiRyuChe-bang (BRC) is a Korean prescription medicine, which has been used to treat allergic rhinitis at Kyung Hee Medical Center. In this work, we investigated the effects of BRC on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions and inflammatory cytokines production, and identified the active component of BRC. Histamine release was measured from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). Ear swelling and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) were examined in mouse models. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus A23187-induced inflammatory cytokines production was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used for the expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was analyzed by Western blotting. BRC significantly inhibited the compound 48/80-induced ear swelling response, histamine release from RPMCs, PCA activated by anti-dinitrophenyl IgE, and PMA plus A23187-induced inflammatory cytokines production (p < 0.05). In addition, BRC dose-dependently inhibited the mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 as well as the activation of NF-κB in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. BRC inhibited the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in mice induced with PCA. Several components of BRC, such as 1,8-Cineole, Linalool, Linalyl acetate, α-Pinene, and α-Terpineol, significantly inhibited the release of histamine from RPMCs (p < 0.05). Among these components, Linalyl acetate was the most effective for inhibiting histamine release. These results indicate that BRC has a potential regulatory effect on allergic and inflammatory reactions mediated by mast cells.

  5. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joëlle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P; Bertin, Gérard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 microg pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-gamma and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A; Salgado, Ana Paula C; Cunha, Thiago M; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L O; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4(+) T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  7. Recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens on lymphocytic and myeloid leukemic cells by cytotoxic T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    van der Harst, D; Goulmy, E; Falkenburg, J H; Kooij-Winkelaar, Y M; van Luxemburg-Heijs, S A; Goselink, H M; Brand, A

    1994-02-15

    Clinical studies indicated an enhanced antileukemic effect of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), as compared with autologous BMT. After allogeneic HLA-identical BMT, donor-derived cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed at minor histocompatibility (mH) antigens on the recipients, tissues can be shown. To evaluate the antileukemic reactivity of mH antigen-specific CTLs, we analyzed the expression of mH antigens on circulating lymphocytic and myeloid leukemic cells. We show that the defined mH specificities HA-1 through HA-5 and H-Y are present on leukemic cells, indicating that mH antigen-specific CTLs are capable of HLA class I-restricted antigen-specific lysis of leukemic cells. Compared with interleukin-2-stimulated normal lymphocytes, leukemic cells of lymphocytic origin are less susceptible to T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity by the HA-2 mH antigen-specific CTL and the anti-HLA-A2 CTL clone. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is impaired expression of the LFA-1 adhesion molecule. Our study suggests that mH antigen-specific HLA class I-restricted CD8+ CTLs may be involved in the graft-versus-leukemia reactivity after allogeneic BMT.

  8. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:26459128

  9. Delta-short consensus repeat 4-decay accelerating factor (DAF: CD55) inhibits complement-mediated cytolysis but not NK cell-mediated cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Tomoko; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Kusama, Tamiko; Beppu, Keiko; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Moritan, Toshiyuki; Ahn, Curie; Kim, Jae Young; Fukuta, Daisuke; Shirakura, Ryota

    2004-09-15

    NK cells play a critical role in the rejection of xenografts. In this study, we report on an investigation of the effect of complement regulatory protein, a decay accelerating factor (DAF: CD55), in particular, on NK cell-mediated cytolysis. Amelioration of human NK cell-mediated pig endothelial cell (PEC) and pig fibroblast cell lyses by various deletion mutants and point substitutions of DAF was tested, and compared with their complement regulatory function. Although wild-type DAF and the delta-short consensus repeat (SCR) 1-DAF showed clear inhibition of both complement-mediated and NK-mediated PEC lyses, delta-SCR2-DAF and delta-SCR3-DAF failed to suppress either process. However, delta-SCR4-DAF showed a clear complement regulatory effect, but had no effect on NK cells. Conversely, the point substitution of DAF (L147 x F148 to SS and KKK(125-127) to TTT) was half down-regulated in complement inhibitory function, but the inhibition of NK-mediated PEC lysis remained unchanged. Other complement regulatory proteins, such as the cell membrane-bound form factor H, fH-PI, and C1-inactivator, C1-INH-PI, and CD59 were also assessed, but no suppressive effect on NK cell-mediated PEC lysis was found. These data suggest, for DAF to function on NK cells, SCR2-4 is required but no relation to its complement regulatory function exists.

  10. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity.

  11. In vitro cytotoxic, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects of Plantago major and Plantago asiatica.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Lien-Chai; Chiang, Wen; Chang, Mei-Yin; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2003-01-01

    Plantago major linn. and P. asiatica Linn. (Plantaginaceae) are commonly used as folk medicine in Taiwan for treating infectious diseases related to the respiratory, urinary and digestive tracts. In this study, we investigated the antiviral, cytotoxic and immunomodulatory activities of hot water extracts of these two species in vitro on a series of viruses, namely herpesviruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2), adenoviruses (ADV-3, ADV-8 and ADV-11), and on various human leukemia, lymphoma and carcinoma cells with XTT, BrdU and IFN-gamma kits. Results showed that hot water extract of P. asiatica possessed significant inhibitory activity on the proliferation of lymphoma (U937) and carcinoma (bladder, bone, cervix, kidney, lung and stomach) cells and on viral infection (HSV-2 and ADV-11). P. major and P. asiatica both exhibited dual effects of immunodulatory activity, enhancing lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of interferon-gamma at low concentrations (< 50 microg/ml), but inhibiting this effect at high concentration (> 50 microg/ml). The present study concludes that hot water extracts of P. major and P. asiatica possess abroad-spectrum of antileukemia, anticarcinoma and antiviral activities, as well as activities which modulate cell-mediated immunity. Further investigations to elucidate the active component(s) of P. asiatica and P. major and to evaluate their clinical application are warranted.

  12. In vitro cytotoxic, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects of Plantago major and Plantago asiatica.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Lien-Chai; Chiang, Wen; Chang, Mei-Yin; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2003-01-01

    Plantago major linn. and P. asiatica Linn. (Plantaginaceae) are commonly used as folk medicine in Taiwan for treating infectious diseases related to the respiratory, urinary and digestive tracts. In this study, we investigated the antiviral, cytotoxic and immunomodulatory activities of hot water extracts of these two species in vitro on a series of viruses, namely herpesviruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2), adenoviruses (ADV-3, ADV-8 and ADV-11), and on various human leukemia, lymphoma and carcinoma cells with XTT, BrdU and IFN-gamma kits. Results showed that hot water extract of P. asiatica possessed significant inhibitory activity on the proliferation of lymphoma (U937) and carcinoma (bladder, bone, cervix, kidney, lung and stomach) cells and on viral infection (HSV-2 and ADV-11). P. major and P. asiatica both exhibited dual effects of immunodulatory activity, enhancing lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of interferon-gamma at low concentrations (< 50 microg/ml), but inhibiting this effect at high concentration (> 50 microg/ml). The present study concludes that hot water extracts of P. major and P. asiatica possess abroad-spectrum of antileukemia, anticarcinoma and antiviral activities, as well as activities which modulate cell-mediated immunity. Further investigations to elucidate the active component(s) of P. asiatica and P. major and to evaluate their clinical application are warranted. PMID:12856861

  13. Fc-galactosylation modulates antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Thomann, Marco; Reckermann, Katharina; Reusch, Dietmar; Prasser, Jessica; Tejada, Max L

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic activity of monoclonal antibodies can involve immune cell mediated effector functions including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), an activity that is modulated by the structure of Fc-glycans, and in particular the lack of core fucose. The heterogeneity of these glycostructures and the inherent variability of traditional PBMC-based in vitro ADCC assays, have made it challenging to quantitatively assess the impact of other glycostructures on ADCC activity. We applied a quantitative NK cell based assay to generate a database consisting of Fc-glycostructure and ADCC data from 54 manufacturing batches of a CHO-derived monoclonal antibody. Explorative analysis of the data indicated that, apart from afucosylation, galactosylation levels could influence ADCC activity. We confirmed this hypothesis by demonstrating enhanced ADCC upon enzymatic hypergalactosylation of four different monoclonal antibodies derived using standard CHO manufacturing processes. Furthermore we quantitatively compare the effects of galactosylation and afucosylation in the context of glycan heterogeneity and demonstrate that while galactose can influence ADCC activity, afucosylation remains the primary driver of this activity.

  14. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC.

  15. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27590114

  16. Scavenger receptors of endothelial cells mediate the uptake and cellular pro-atherogenic effects of carbamylated LDL

    PubMed Central

    Apostolov, Eugene O.; Shah, Sudhir V.; Ray, Debarti; Basnakian, Alexei G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Carbamylated LDL (cLDL) has been recently shown to have robust pro-atherogenic effects upon human endothelial cells in vitro; suggesting cLDL may have a significant role in atherosclerosis in uremia. The current study was designed to determine, which receptors are used by cLDL and so may cause the pro-atherogenic effects. Methods and Results In ex vivo or in vitro models as well as in intact animals, administration of cLDL was associated with endothelial internalization of cLDL and subendothelial translocation (transcytosis). In vitro recombinant LOX-1 and SREC-1 receptors showed the greatest cLDL binding. However, pretreatment of the endothelial cells with specific inhibiting antibodies demonstrated that cLDL binds mainly to LOX-1 and CD36 receptors. The transcytosis was dependent on SR-A1, SREC-1 and CD36 receptors while LOX-1 receptor was not involved. The cytotoxicity was mediated by several studied scavenger receptors, but cLDL-induced monocyte adhesion depended only on LOX-1. The cLDL-induced synthesis of LOX-1 protein significantly contributed to both cytotoxicity and accelerated monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that cLDL utilizes unique pattern of scavenger receptors. They show that LOX-1 receptor, and partially, CD36, SREC-1 and SR-A1 receptors are essential for the pro-atherogenic effects of cLDL on human endothelial cells. PMID:19696406

  17. Cytotoxic activities of phytochemicals from Ferula species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ferula species are reputed in folk medicine for the treatment of a variety of disorders. There have been sporadic reports on the chemopreventive and chemosensitizing activities of some terpenoid coumarin derivatives from the genus Ferula. The present study investigated the cytotoxic activity of 11 phytochemicals (conferone, farnesiferol A, acantrifoside E, mogoltadone, diversin, galbanic acid, herniarin, 7-isopentenyloxycoumarin, umbelliprenin, stylosin and tschimgine) from Ferula species together with a newly synthesized prenylated derivative of curcumin (gercumin II). Methods Cytotoxic activity of phytochemicals was evaluated against ovarian carcinoma (CH1), lung cancer (A549) and melanoma (SK-MEL-28) cell lines using MTT assay. Results and conclusion Overall, moderate cytotoxic activity was observed from the tested compounds with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The highest activity against CH1 and A549 lines was from conferone while stylosin and tschimgine were the most potent compounds against SK-MEL-28 line. In conclusion, the findings of the present investigation did not support a potent cytotoxic activity of the tested phytochemicals against CH1, A549 and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. With respect to previous reports, the beneficial impact of these phytochemicals in cancer therapy may be more attributable to their chemopreventive or chemosensitizing activity rather than direct cytotoxic effects. PMID:23701832

  18. Safe handling of cytotoxics: guideline recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Easty, A.C.; Coakley, N.; Cheng, R.; Cividino, M.; Savage, P.; Tozer, R.; White, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background This evidence-based practice guideline was developed to update and address new issues in the handling of cytotoxics, including the use of oral cytotoxics; the selection and use of personal protective equipment; and treatment in diverse settings, including the home setting. Methods The guideline was developed primarily from an adaptation and endorsement of an existing guideline and from three systematic reviews. Before publication, the guideline underwent a series of peer and external reviews to gather feedback. All comments were addressed, and the guideline was amended when required. The guideline applies to health care workers who could come into contact with cytotoxic drugs at any point in the medication circuit. The intended users are hospital administrators, educators, and managers; occupational health and safety services; and pharmacy and health care workers. Results The recommendations represent a reasonable and practical set of procedures that the intended users of this guideline should implement to minimize opportunities for accidental exposure. They are not limited to just the point of care; they cover the entire chain of cytotoxics handling from the time such agents enter the institution until they leave in the patient or as waste. Conclusions Reducing the likelihood of accidental exposure to cytotoxic agents within the medication circuit is the main objective of this evidenced-based guideline. The recommendations differ slightly from earlier guidelines because of the availability of new evidence. PMID:25684994

  19. The mechanism of asbestos-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodglick, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Crocidolite asbestos fibers constitute a serious environmental pollutant capable of causing pleural scarring and cancer. This thesis addresses three questions: (1) what is the mechanism of asbestos-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo (2) What is the influence of fiber size on cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo (3) What is the chronic response of the peritoneal cavity to asbestos fibers of varying lengths Macrophages release reactive oxygen metabolites when exposed to crocidolite in vitro or in vivo. Crocidolite-induced cytotoxicity is prevented with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In addition, presoaking crocidolite fibers in deferoxamine, prevents cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, macrophages exposed to crocidolite also lose mitochondrial membrane potential and undergo lipid peroxidation. Neither of these changes in itself, however, is responsible for macrophage death. We also examined the role of crocidolite fiber size in cytoxicity. Both long and short crocidolite fibers are toxic to macrophages in vitro via an oxidant dependent mechanism. Within the periotoneal cavity long crocidolite fibers are acutely cytotoxic and inflammatory while short fibers are not. Weekly intraperitoneal injections of long and native crocidolite asbestos fibers produced mesotheliomas in 20-40% of mice after 35-50 weeks. Neoplastic and preneoplastic cells were obtained from these mice, cultured, and characterized for in vitro transformation and in vivo tumorigenicity.

  20. Cytotoxicity and intracellular dissolution of nickel nanowires.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jose E; Contreras, Maria F; Vilanova, Enrique; Felix, Laura P; Margineanu, Michael B; Luongo, Giovanni; Porter, Alexandra E; Dunlop, Iain E; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of cytotoxicity of nanostructures is a fundamental step for their development as biomedical tools. As widely used nanostructures, nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) seem promising candidates for such applications. In this work, Ni NWs were synthesized and then characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis, and electron microscopy. After exposure to the NWs, cytotoxicity was evaluated in terms of cell viability, cell membrane damage, and induced apoptosis/necrosis on the model human cell line HCT 116. The influence of NW to cell ratio (10:1 to 1000:1) and exposure times up to 72 hours was analyzed for Ni NWs of 5.4 μm in length, as well as for Ni ions. The results show that cytotoxicity markedly increases past 24 hours of incubation. Cellular uptake of NWs takes place through the phagocytosis pathway, with a fraction of the dose of NWs dissolved inside the cells. Cell death results from a combination of apoptosis and necrosis, where the latter is the outcome of the secondary necrosis pathway. The cytotoxicity of Ni ions and Ni NWs dissolution studies suggest a synergistic toxicity between NW aspect ratio and dissolved Ni, with the cytotoxic effects markedly increasing after 24 hours of incubation. PMID:26692167

  1. Cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wong, C; Xiong, J; Hodgson, P; Wen, C

    2010-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that titanium and the titanium alloying elements of tantalum, niobium, zirconium, molybdenum, tin, and silicon are biocompatible. However, our research in the development of new titanium alloys for biomedical applications indicated that some titanium alloys containing molybdenum, niobium, and silicon produced by powder metallurgy show a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that the cytotoxicity is linked to the ion release from the metals. To prove this hypothesis, we assessed the cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements in both forms of powder and bulk, using osteoblast-like SaOS(2) cells. Results indicated that the metal powders of titanium, niobium, molybdenum, and silicon are cytotoxic, and the bulk metals of silicon and molybdenum also showed cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, we established that the safe ion concentrations (below which the ion concentration is non-toxic) are 8.5, 15.5, 172.0, and 37,000.0 microg/L for molybdenum, titanium, niobium, and silicon, respectively.

  2. CD69 is a stimulatory receptor for natural killer cell and its cytotoxic effect is blocked by CD94 inhibitory receptor

    PubMed Central

    BORREGO, F; ROBERTSON, M J; RITZ, J; PEÑA, J; SOLANA, R

    1999-01-01

    CD69 is a differentiation antigen expressed shortly after activation on T lymphocytes and other cells of haematopoietic origin, including natural killer (NK) cells. The function of CD69 on T lymphocytes acting as a costimulatory molecule in proliferation and lymphokine secretion is well established. NK cells express CD69 after activation by different stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, interferon-α (IFN-α) or anti-CD16 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, although it has been shown that CD69 triggers NK-cell-mediated cytolytic activity, its effect on other NK-cell functions has not been studied. Furthermore, the possible interaction of CD69 triggering with other C-lectin type inhibitory receptors is not known. Thus, the objective of this work is to determine whether CD69-mediated NK cytotoxicity can be regulated by CD94 inhibitory receptor and the role of CD69 on other NK-cell functions different of cytotoxicity. The results show that CD69-mediated NK cytotoxicity can be abrogated by CD94 stimulation in NK cells expressing the CD94 inhibitory form of the receptor, indicating that CD94 regulates the cytotoxic events initiated by a wide variety of NK activatory receptors. We also show that anti-CD69 mAbs, not only triggered NK cytotoxicity, but also induce NK-cell proliferation, CD25 and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, TNF-α production and Ca2+ mobilization in preactivated NK cells. These results suggest that CD69 plays a crucial role in NK-cell function contributing to sustain NK-cell activation, as it has been previously demonstrated in T cells. PMID:10447727

  3. Cytotoxicity associated with electrospun polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Saif G; Fitzgerald, Lisa M; Ali, Syed M; Damrauer, Scott M; Bide, Martin J; Nelson, David W; Ferran, Christiane; Phaneuf, Tina M; Phaneuf, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a synthetic, water-soluble polymer, with applications in industries ranging from textiles to biomedical devices. Research on electrospinning of PVA has been targeted toward optimizing or finding novel applications in the biomedical field. However, the effects of electrospinning on PVA biocompatibility have not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, the cytotoxicity of electrospun PVA (nPVA) which was not crosslinked after electrospinning was assessed. PVA polymers of several molecular weights were dissolved in distilled water and electrospun using the same parameters. Electrospun PVA materials with varying molecular weights were then dissolved in tissue culture medium and directly compared against solutions of nonelectrospun PVA polymer in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and human coronary artery endothelial cells cultures. All nPVA solutions were cytotoxic at a threshold molar concentration that correlated with the molecular weight of the starting PVA polymer. In contrast, none of the nonelectrospun PVA solutions caused any cytotoxicity, regardless of their concentration in the cell culture. Evaluation of the nPVA material by differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that polymer degradation had occurred after electrospinning. To elucidate the identity of the nPVA component that caused cytotoxicity, nPVA materials were dissolved, fractionated using size exclusion columns, and the different fractions were added to HCASMC and human coronary artery endothelial cells cultures. These studies indicated that the cytotoxic component of the different nPVA solutions were present in the low-molecular-weight fraction. Additionally, the amount of PVA present in the 3-10 kg/mol fraction was approximately sixfold greater than that in the nonelectrospun samples. In conclusion, electrospinning of PVA resulted in small-molecular-weight fractions that were cytotoxic to cells. This result demonstrates that biocompatibility of electrospun

  4. KIR/HLA interactions negatively affect rituximab- but not GA101 (obinutuzumab)-induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Terszowski, Grzegorz; Klein, Christian; Stern, Martin

    2014-06-15

    Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by NK cells is regulated by inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs), which interact with target cell HLA class I. We analyzed how KIR/HLA interactions influence ADCC induced by rituximab and by GA101, a novel type II CD20 Ab glycoengineered for increased FcgRIII binding and ADCC capacity. We found that KIR/HLA interactions strongly and selectively inhibit rituximab-induced in vitro ADCC toward target cells expressing cognate HLA KIR ligands. NK cells of donors carrying all three ligands to inhibitory KIR showed weak activation and target cell depletion capacity when incubated with rituximab and KIR-ligand matched target B cells. In contrast, NK cells from individuals missing one or more KIR ligands activated more strongly and depleted KIR ligand-matched target B cells more efficiently in the presence of rituximab. NK cells expressing a KIR for which the ligand was absent were the main effectors of ADCC in these donors. Notably, the influence of KIR/HLA interactions on NK cell activation was synergistic with the effect of the V158F FCGR3A single nucleotide polymorphism. In contrast, GA101 induced activation of NK cells irrespective of inhibitory KIR expression, and efficiency of target cell depletion was not negatively affected by KIR/HLA interactions. These data show that modification of the Fc fragment to enhance ADCC can be an effective strategy to augment the efficacy of therapeutic mAbs by recruiting NK cells irrespective of their inhibitory KIR expression.

  5. Cytotoxic polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols from Hypericum attenuatum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-bo; Zhang, Yang-mei; Pan, Ke; Luo, Jian-guang; Kong, Ling-yi

    2014-06-01

    Six new polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols, attenuatumiones A-F (1-6), together with twelve known analogs (7-18) were isolated from the whole plant of Hypericum attenuatum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, and the absolute configuration of C-13 in attenuatumione C (3) was deduced via the circular dichroism datum of the in situ formed [Rh2(OCOCF3)4] complexes. All isolates were evaluated for the cytotoxic activities on three human cancer cell lines. Compound 3 showed moderate cytotoxic activities with IC50 values of 10.12 and 10.56 μM against SMMC7721 and U2OS, respectively. PMID:24603092

  6. PEROXIDASE-MEDIATED MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Edelson, Paul J.; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1973-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and iodide is cytotoxic for human and mouse lymphoid cells, and human erythrocytes. Myeloperoxidase, in amounts equivalent to 1.5 x 106 neutrophils, readily replaces lactoperoxidase, and allows the substitution of the iodide ion by chloride. The myeloperoxidase-mediated reaction is rapid, and highly efficient, leading to 85–90% cell death in 90 min, as measured by 51chromium release and dye exclusion. The mixture of granulocytes. monocytes, and lymphocytes present in an inflammatory exudate, and the intimate cell-to-cell association characteristic of cytotoxic phenomena may provide the in vivo requirements for such a system. PMID:4717124

  7. Cytotoxic terpenoids and flavonoids from Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Q

    1994-02-01

    The cytotoxic activity of nine terpenoids and flavonoids isolated from Artemisia annua was tested in vitro on several human tumor cell lines. These compounds are artemisinin, deoxyartemisinin, artemisinic acid, arteannuin-B, stigmasterol, friedelin, friedelan-3 beta-ol, artemetin, and quercetagetin 6,7,3',4'-tetramethyl ether. Friedelane-type triterpenoids were isolated for the first time from this plant. Artemisinin and quercetagetin 6,7,3',4'-tetramethyl ether showed significant cytotoxicity against P-388, A-549, HT-29, MCF-7, and KB tumor cells. PMID:8134418

  8. Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Alternate Booster Schedules of Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sabourin, Carol L.; Schiffer, Jarad M.; Niemuth, Nancy A.; Semenova, Vera A.; Li, Han; Rudge, Thomas L.; Brys, April M.; Mittler, Robert S.; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi; Parker, Scott D.; Babcock, Janiine; Keitel, Wendy; Poland, Gregory A.; Keyserling, Harry L.; El Sahly, Hana; Jacobson, Robert M.; Marano, Nina; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Wright, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA)-specific antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to annual and alternate booster schedules of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA; BioThrax) were characterized in humans over 43 months. Study participants received 1 of 6 vaccination schedules: a 3-dose intramuscular (IM) priming series (0, 1, and 6 months) with a single booster at 42 months (4-IM); 3-dose IM priming with boosters at 18 and 42 months (5-IM); 3-dose IM priming with boosters at 12, 18, 30, and 42 months (7-IM); the 1970 licensed priming series of 6 doses (0, 0.5, 1, 6, 12, and 18 months) and two annual boosters (30 and 42 months) administered either subcutaneously (SQ) (8-SQ) or IM (8-IM); or saline placebo control at all eight time points. Antibody response profiles included serum anti-PA IgG levels, subclass distributions, avidity, and lethal toxin neutralization activity (TNA). CMI profiles included frequencies of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 4 (IL-4)-secreting cells and memory B cells (MBCs), lymphocyte stimulation indices (SI), and induction of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. All active schedules elicited high-avidity PA-specific IgG, TNA, MBCs, and T cell responses with a mixed Th1-Th2 profile and Th2 dominance. Anti-PA IgG and TNA were highly correlated (e.g., month 7, r2 = 0.86, P < 0.0001, log10 transformed) and declined in the absence of boosters. Boosters administered IM generated the highest antibody responses. Increasing time intervals between boosters generated antibody responses that were faster than and superior to those obtained with the final month 42 vaccination. CMI responses to the 3-dose IM priming remained elevated up to 43 months. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00119067.) PMID:26865594

  9. Ascaridia galli infection influences the development of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity after Newcastle Disease vaccination in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pleidrup, Janne; Dalgaard, Tina S; Norup, Liselotte R; Permin, Anders; Schou, Torben W; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Vadekær, Dorte F; Jungersen, Gregers; Sørensen, Poul; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2014-01-01

    Potent vaccine efficiency is crucial for disease control in both human and livestock vaccination programmes. Free range chickens and chickens with access to outdoor areas have a high risk of infection with parasites including Ascaridia galli, a gastrointestinal nematode with a potential influence on the immunological response to vaccination against other infectious diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether A. galli infection influences vaccine-induced immunity to Newcastle Disease (ND) in chickens from an MHC-characterized inbred line. Chickens were experimentally infected with A. galli at 4 weeks of age or left as non-parasitized controls. At 10 and 13 weeks of age half of the chickens were ND-vaccinated and at 16 weeks of age, all chickens were challenged with a lentogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). A. galli infection influenced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses after ND vaccination. Thus, significantly lower NDV serum titres were found in the A. galli-infected group as compared to the non-parasitized group early after vaccination. In addition, the A. galli-infected chickens showed significantly lower frequencies of NDV-specific T cells in peripheral blood three weeks after the first ND vaccination as compared to non-parasitized chickens. Finally, A. galli significantly increased local mRNA expression of IL-4 and IL-13 and significantly decreased TGF-ß4 expression in the jejunum two weeks after infection with A. galli. At the time of vaccination (six and nine weeks after A. galli infection) the local expression in the jejunum of both IFN-? and IL-10 was significantly decreased in A. galli-infected chickens. Upon challenge with the NDV LaSota strain, viral genomes persisted in the oral cavity for a slightly longer period of time in A. galli-infected vaccinees as compared to non-parasitized vaccinees. However, more work is needed in order to determine if vaccine-induced protective immunity is impaired in A. galli

  10. Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Alternate Booster Schedules of Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed in Humans.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Conrad P; Sabourin, Carol L; Schiffer, Jarad M; Niemuth, Nancy A; Semenova, Vera A; Li, Han; Rudge, Thomas L; Brys, April M; Mittler, Robert S; Ibegbu, Chris C; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi; Parker, Scott D; Babcock, Janiine; Keitel, Wendy; Poland, Gregory A; Keyserling, Harry L; El Sahly, Hana; Jacobson, Robert M; Marano, Nina; Plikaytis, Brian D; Wright, Jennifer G

    2016-04-01

    Protective antigen (PA)-specific antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to annual and alternate booster schedules of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA; BioThrax) were characterized in humans over 43 months. Study participants received 1 of 6 vaccination schedules: a 3-dose intramuscular (IM) priming series (0, 1, and 6 months) with a single booster at 42 months (4-IM); 3-dose IM priming with boosters at 18 and 42 months (5-IM); 3-dose IM priming with boosters at 12, 18, 30, and 42 months (7-IM); the 1970 licensed priming series of 6 doses (0, 0.5, 1, 6, 12, and 18 months) and two annual boosters (30 and 42 months) administered either subcutaneously (SQ) (8-SQ) or IM (8-IM); or saline placebo control at all eight time points. Antibody response profiles included serum anti-PA IgG levels, subclass distributions, avidity, and lethal toxin neutralization activity (TNA). CMI profiles included frequencies of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 4 (IL-4)-secreting cells and memory B cells (MBCs), lymphocyte stimulation indices (SI), and induction of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. All active schedules elicited high-avidity PA-specific IgG, TNA, MBCs, and T cell responses with a mixed Th1-Th2 profile and Th2 dominance. Anti-PA IgG and TNA were highly correlated (e.g., month 7,r(2)= 0.86,P< 0.0001, log10 transformed) and declined in the absence of boosters. Boosters administered IM generated the highest antibody responses. Increasing time intervals between boosters generated antibody responses that were faster than and superior to those obtained with the final month 42 vaccination. CMI responses to the 3-dose IM priming remained elevated up to 43 months. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00119067.). PMID:26865594

  11. Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Four-Year-Old Children after Primary Immunization with Acellular Pertussis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ausiello, Clara M.; Lande, Roberto; Urbani, Francesca; la Sala, Andrea; Stefanelli, Paola; Salmaso, Stefania; Mastrantonio, Paola; Cassone, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to Bordetella pertussis antigens (pertussis toxin [PT], pertactin [PRN], and filamentous hemagglutinin [FHA]) were assessed in 48-month-old recipients of acellular pertussis [aP] vaccines (either from Chiron-Biocine [aP-CB] or from SmithKline Beecham [aP-SB]) and compared to CMI responses to the same antigens at 7 months of age, i.e., 1 month after completion of the primary immunization cycle. None of the children enrolled in this study received any booster of pertussis vaccines or was affected by pertussis during the whole follow-up period. Overall, around 75% of 4-year-old children showed a CMI-positive response to at least one B. pertussis antigen, independently of the type of aP vaccine received, and the proportion of CMI responders were at least equal at 48 and 7 months of age. However, longitudinal examination of individual responses showed that from 20 (against PT) to 37% (against FHA) of CMI responders after primary immunization became negative at 48 months of age. This loss was more than compensated for by conversion to positive CMI responses, ranging from 36% against FHA to 69% against PRN, in other children who were CMI negative at 7 months of age. In 60 to 80% of these CMI converters, a lack of decline or even marked elevation of antibody (Ab) titers against B. pertussis antigens also occurred between 20 and 48 months of age. In particular, the frequency of seropositivity to PRN and FHA (but not to PT) was roughly three times higher in CMI converters than in nonconverters. The acquisition of CMI response to B. pertussis antigens in 48-month-old children was not associated with a greater frequency of coughing episodes lasting ≥7 days and was characterized by a prevalent type 1 cytokine profile, with high gamma interferon and low or no production of interleukin-5, reminiscent of cytokine patterns following immunization with whole-cell pertussis vaccine or natural infection. Our data imply that vaccination

  12. Incipient cytotoxicity: A time-independent measure of cytotoxic potency in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gülden, Michael; Kähler, Daria; Seibert, Hasso

    2015-09-01

    Time is an important determinant of toxicity but largely ignored in in vitro toxicity assays where exposure times chosen are rather arbitrary. To investigate the impact of time on the cytotoxic potency of chemicals in vitro, the concentration dependent cytotoxic action of selected chemicals (surfactants, metals, oxidative stressors, a mitochondrial poison) was determined after various exposure times (1-72 h) in cultures of Balb/c 3T3 cells. Time affected the cytotoxic potency as well as the cytotoxic efficacy. The median cytotoxic concentrations, EC50, decreased and in most cases approached an "incipient" value, EC50,∞, within 72 h. Cytotoxicity due to mitochondrial insult occurred after a threshold time which was dependent on the medium glucose concentration. Within the chemicals studied the extent of potency change with time ranged from 3- to >1000-fold and the "time to incipient cytotoxicity", tic, from 4 to >72 h. Hence, also the relative cytotoxic potencies depend on exposure time. Ignoring this may lead to severe bias in toxicological hazard and risk assessment. Therefore it is recommended to determine the incipient cytotoxic potency of chemical compounds, represented by, e.g., the incipient median effect (EC50,∞), no effect (NEC∞) or lowest effect concentrations (LEC∞) instead of measures obtained after arbitrary exposure times. If this is not possible, the 72 h-potency measurements appear to be useful surrogates. These time-independent incipient potency values can be reasonably compared between substances, endpoints, cells and biological test systems and may serve to define points of departure for quantitative in vitro-in vivo extrapolations.

  13. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Zhang, Hua; Anderson, Marc O.; Saadoun, Samira; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Verkman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of spinal cord and optic nerve caused by pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) against astrocyte aquaporin-4 (AQP4). We developed a high-throughput screen to identify blockers of NMO-IgG binding to human AQP4 using a human recombinant monoclonal NMO-IgG and transfected Fisher rat thyroid cells stably expressing human M23-AQP4. Screening of ∼60,000 compounds yielded the antiviral arbidol, the flavonoid tamarixetin, and several plant-derived berbamine alkaloids, each of which blocked NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 without affecting AQP4 expression, array assembly, or water permeability. The compounds inhibited NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 in NMO patient sera and blocked NMO-IgG-dependent complement- and cell-mediated cytotoxicity with IC50 down to ∼5 μM. Docking computations identified putative sites of blocker binding at the extracellular surface of AQP4. The blockers did not affect complement-dependent cytotoxicity caused by anti-GD3 antibody binding to ganglioside GD3. The blockers reduced by >80% the severity of NMO lesions in an ex vivo spinal cord slice culture model of NMO and in mice in vivo. Our results provide proof of concept for a small-molecule blocker strategy to reduce NMO pathology. Small-molecule blockers may also be useful for other autoimmune diseases caused by binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to defined targets.—Tradtrantip, L., Zhang, H., Anderson, M. O., Saadoun, S., Phuan, P.-W., Papadopoulos, M. C., Bennett, J. L., Verkman, A. S. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica. PMID:22319008

  14. Anti-β₂M monoclonal antibodies kill myeloma cells via cell- and complement-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Qian, Jianfei; Lan, Yongsheng; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Hong, Bangxing; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Yi, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies showed that anti-β2M monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) at high doses have direct apoptotic effects on myeloma cells, suggesting that anti-β2M mAbs might be developed as a novel therapeutic agent. In this study, we investigated the ability of the mAbs at much lower concentrations to indirectly kill myeloma cells by utilizing immune effector cells or molecules. Our results showed that anti-β2M mAbs effectively lysed MM cells via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), which were correlated with and dependent on the surface expression of β2M on MM cells. The presence of MM bone marrow stromal cells or addition of IL-6 did not attenuate anti-β2M mAb-induced ADCC and CDC activities against MM cells. Furthermore, anti-β2M mAbs only showed limited cytotoxicity toward normal B cells and nontumorous mesenchymal stem cells, indicating that the ADCC and CDC activities of the anti-β2M mAbs were more prone to the tumor cells. Lenalidomide potentiated in vitro ADCC activity against MM cells and in vivo tumor inhibition capacity induced by the anti-β2M mAbs by enhancing the activity of NK cells. These results support clinical development of anti-β2M mAbs, both as a monotherapy and in combination with lenalidomide, to improve MM patient outcome.

  15. Evidence of T-cell mediated neuronal injury in stiff-person syndrome with anti-amphiphysin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Poh, Mervyn Q W; Simon, Neil G; Buckland, Michael E; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Watson, Shaun

    2014-02-15

    Paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome (SPS) has been associated with antibodies against amphiphysin. Current evidence supports a pathogenic role for anti-amphiphysin antibodies. A 74-year-old female was diagnosed with amphiphysin-associated paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome and associated encephalomyelitis. She had initial response to IVIG, however her symptoms worsened after two months and were resistant to further treatment. Subsequently the patient died and a post-mortem was performed. Neuropathology revealed perivascular and parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates, with neuronophagia mediated by CD8+ T cells and microglia in brainstem, spinal cord, and mesial temporal lobe structures. These findings suggest a pathogenic role of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells, with potential implication for therapy of future patients.

  16. Nano-curcumin inhibits proliferation of esophageal adenocarcinoma cells and enhances the T cell mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Milano, Francesca; Mari, Luigi; van de Luijtgaarden, Wendy; Parikh, Kaushal; Calpe, Silvia; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2013-01-01

    In Western countries the incidence of the esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen at a more rapid rate than that of any other malignancy. Despite intensive therapies this cancer is associated with extreme high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, novel effective therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Dendritic Cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is a promising novel treatment strategy, which combined with other anti-cancer strategies has been proven to be beneficial for cancer patients. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), is a natural polyphenol that is known for its anti-cancer effects however, in it's free form, curcumin has poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using a highly absorptive form of curcumin, dispersed with colloidal nano-particles, named Theracurmin would be more effective against EAC cells and to analyze if this new compound affects DC-induced T cell response. As a result, we show efficient uptake of nano-curcumin by the EAC cell lines, OE33, and OE19. Moreover, nano-curcumin significantly decreased the proliferation of the EAC cells, while did not affect the normal esophageal cell line HET-1A. We also found that nano-curcumin significantly up-regulated the expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 in DCs and significantly decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from in vitro activated T cells. When we combined T cells with nano-curcumin treatment in OE19 and OE33, we found that the basic levels of T cell induced cytotoxicity of 6.4 and 4.1%, increased to 15 and 13%, respectively. In conclusion, we found that nano-curcumin is effective against EAC, sensitizes EAC cells to T cell induced cytotoxicity and decreases the pro-inflammatory signals from T cells. Combining DC immunotherapy with nano-curcumin is potentially a promising approach for future treatment of EAC. PMID:23755374

  17. Polyinosinic-cytidylic acid as an adjuvant on natural killer- and dendritic cell-mediated antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Kun; Zheng, Zhi; Qiu, Fu

    2013-06-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that treatment with E7(44-62) and the adjuvant polyinosinic-cytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) in a rodent model generates antitumor immune responses, but the effect of E7(44-62) with poly(I:C) on natural killer (NK)- and dendritic cell (DC)-mediated antitumor activities is still unclear. Our goal was to examine the antitumor effects of E7(44-62) with poly(I:C). We examined the ability of E7(44-62) with poly(I:C) to induce toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expression, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) mRNA expression, and tumor cell-killing activity in human NK cells as well as its ability to induce CD11c and CD86 expression and proliferation in human DCs. We found that E7(44-62) with poly(I:C) treatment markedly increased TLR3 expression and cytotoxicity against HeLa cells in human NK92 cells. Moreover, treatment with E7(44-62) and poly(I:C) markedly up-regulated IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA expression in NK92 cells. Human patients with cervical cancer exhibited a marked decrease in the frequency of DCs; however, ex vivo treatment with E7(44-62) and poly(I:C) restored DC frequency. Stimulation of human DCs in patients with E7(44-62) and poly(I:C) led to high levels of CD11c and CD86 expression. Our data reveal the involvement of E7(44-62) combined with poly(I:C) in potentiating antitumor cytotoxicity and cytokine-producing activities in human NK92 cells and DCs.

  18. SLC gene-modified dendritic cells mediate T cell-dependent anti-gastric cancer immune responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang; Cheng, Ying; Ran, Feng; Li, Xianhui; Huang, Tao; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Yanbiao

    2013-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) with the ability to prime naïve T cells, and play an important role in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus carrying the SLC gene (Ad-SLC), and detected the biological effects of Ad-SLC-modified DCs as an adjuvant for the initiation of gastric cancer immune responses. Human DCs were transfected with Ad-SLC and the recombinant adenovirus carrying the β-galactosidase gene, Ad-LacZ, respectively. Modified DCs were pulsed with the cell lysate antigen of SGC-7901 cells (a type of gastric cancer cell line) and co-cultured with autologous T cells. The T cells were harvested and incubated with SGC-7901 cells and the cytotoxic function of the T cells was detected. Based on the data, the expression of mature DC phenotypes CD83 and CCR7 was upregulated after transfection with Ad-SLC and the chemotaxis function of DCs was augmented after transfection with Ad-SLC. Moreover, the expression of RANTES in DCs was upregulated by Ad-SLC transfection, while expression levels of IL-12p70 and IL-10 were not significantly altered. When co-cultured with autologous T cells, DCs modified with the SLC gene and pulsed with SGC-7901 cell lysates significantly promoted the proliferation of autologous T cells and induced Th1 differentiation, and displayed a strong cytotoxicity to SGC-7901 cells. In conclusion, Ad-SLC promoted DC maturation, enhancing the ability of DCs for T-cell chemotaxis and T-cell stimulation, and induced specific anti-gastric cancer cellular immunity. Recombinant Ad-SLC-modified DCs may be used as an adjuvant to induce an effective anti-gastric cancer immune response.

  19. IL-27 stimulates human NK-cell effector functions and primes NK cells for IL-18 responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Ziblat, Andrea; Domaica, Carolina I; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Iraolagoitia, Ximena L Raffo; Rossi, Lucas E; Avila, Damián E; Torres, Nicolás I; Fuertes, Mercedes B; Zwirner, Norberto W

    2015-01-01

    IL-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, is produced by APCs, and displays pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. How IL-27 affects human NK cells still remains unknown. In this study, we observed that mature DCs secreted IL-27 and that blockade of IL-27R (CD130) reduced the amount of IFN-γ produced by NK cells during their coculture, showing the importance of IL-27 during DC-NK-cell crosstalk. Accordingly, human rIL-27 stimulated IFN-γ secretion by NK cells in a STAT1-dependent manner, induced upregulation of CD25 and CD69 on NK cells, and displayed a synergistic effect with IL-18. Preincubation experiments demonstrated that IL-27 primed NK cells for IL-18-induced IFN-γ secretion, which was associated with an IL-27-driven upregulation of T-bet expression. Also, IL-27 triggered NKp46-dependent NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity against Raji, T-47D, and HCT116 cells, and IL-18 enhanced this cytotoxic response. Such NK-cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved upregulation of perforin, granule exocytosis, and TRAIL-mediated cytotoxicity but not Fas-FasL interaction. Moreover, IL-27 also potentiated Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against mAb-coated target cells. Taken together, IL-27 stimulates NK-cell effector functions, which might be relevant in different physiological and pathological situations. PMID:25308526

  20. Cytotoxicity potentials of eleven Bangladeshi medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Amina; Rahman, Mahmudur; Haque, Tania; Rahman, Md Mahfizur; Akter, Mahfuja; Akter, Subarna; Jhumur, Afrin

    2014-01-01

    Various forms of cancer are rising all over the world, requiring newer therapy. The quest of anticancer drugs both from natural and synthetic sources is the demand of time. In this study, fourteen extracts of different parts of eleven Bangladeshi medicinal plants which have been traditionally used for the treatment of different types of carcinoma, tumor, leprosy, and diseases associated with cancer were evaluated for their cytotoxicity for the first time. Extraction was conceded using methanol. Phytochemical groups like reducing sugars, tannins, saponins, steroids, gums, flavonoids, and alkaloids were tested using standard chromogenic reagents. Plants were evaluated for cytotoxicity by brine shrimp lethality bioassay using Artemia salina comparing with standard anticancer drug vincristine sulphate. All the extracts showed potent to moderate cytotoxicity ranging from LC50 2 to 115 µg/mL. The highest toxicity was shown by Hygrophila spinosa seeds (LC50 = 2.93 µg/mL) and the lowest by Litsea glutinosa leaves (LC50 = 114.71 µg/mL) in comparison with standard vincristine sulphate (LC50 = 2.04 µg/mL). Among the plants, the plants traditionally used in different cancer and microbial treatments showed highest cytotoxicity. The results support their ethnomedicinal uses and require advanced investigation to elucidate responsible compounds as well as their mode of action. PMID:25431796

  1. Natural deep eutectic solvents: cytotoxic profile.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Mbous, Yves Paul; Looi, Chung Yeng; Wong, Won Fen; Hayyan, Adeeb; Salleh, Zulhaziman; Mohd-Ali, Ozair

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic profiles of different ternary natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs) containing water. For this purpose, five different NADESs were prepared using choline chloride as a salt, alongside five hydrogen bond donors (HBD) namely glucose, fructose, sucrose, glycerol, and malonic acid. Water was added as a tertiary component during the eutectics preparation, except for the malonic acid-based mixture. Coincidentally, the latter was found to be more toxic than any of the water-based NADESs. A trend was observed between the cellular requirements of cancer cells, the viscosity of the NADESs, and their cytotoxicity. This study also highlights the first time application of the conductor-like screening model for real solvent (COSMO-RS) software for the analysis of the cytotoxic mechanism of NADESs. COSMO-RS simulation of the interactions between NADESs and cellular membranes' phospholipids suggested that NADESs strongly interacted with cell surfaces and that their accumulation and aggregation possibly defined their cytotoxicity. This reinforced the idea that careful selection of NADESs components is necessary, as it becomes evident that organic acids as HBD highly contribute to the increasing toxicity of these neoteric mixtures. Nevertheless, NADESs in general seem to possess relatively less acute toxicity profiles than their DESs parents. This opens the door for future large scale utilization of these mixtures. PMID:27386357

  2. Targeting cytotoxic T lymphocytes for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maher, J; Davies, E T

    2004-01-01

    In light of their preeminent role in cellular immunity, there is considerable interest in targeting of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes to cancer. This review summarises the active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches under development to achieve this goal, emphasising how recent advances in tumour immunology and gene transfer have impacted upon this field. PMID:15266309

  3. Cytotoxicity Potentials of Eleven Bangladeshi Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Tania; Akter, Mahfuja; Akter, Subarna; Jhumur, Afrin

    2014-01-01

    Various forms of cancer are rising all over the world, requiring newer therapy. The quest of anticancer drugs both from natural and synthetic sources is the demand of time. In this study, fourteen extracts of different parts of eleven Bangladeshi medicinal plants which have been traditionally used for the treatment of different types of carcinoma, tumor, leprosy, and diseases associated with cancer were evaluated for their cytotoxicity for the first time. Extraction was conceded using methanol. Phytochemical groups like reducing sugars, tannins, saponins, steroids, gums, flavonoids, and alkaloids were tested using standard chromogenic reagents. Plants were evaluated for cytotoxicity by brine shrimp lethality bioassay using Artemia salina comparing with standard anticancer drug vincristine sulphate. All the extracts showed potent to moderate cytotoxicity ranging from LC50 2 to 115 µg/mL. The highest toxicity was shown by Hygrophila spinosa seeds (LC50 = 2.93 µg/mL) and the lowest by Litsea glutinosa leaves (LC50 = 114.71 µg/mL) in comparison with standard vincristine sulphate (LC50 = 2.04 µg/mL). Among the plants, the plants traditionally used in different cancer and microbial treatments showed highest cytotoxicity. The results support their ethnomedicinal uses and require advanced investigation to elucidate responsible compounds as well as their mode of action. PMID:25431796

  4. Ethanol cytotoxic effect on trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Clave, S; Joya, X; Salat-Batlle, J; Garcia-Algar, O; Vall, O

    2014-03-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure may cause both, altered fetal neurodevelopment and impaired placental function. These disturbances can lead to growth retardation, which is one of the most prevalent features in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). It is not known whether there is a specific pattern of cytotoxicity caused by ethanol that can be extrapolated to other cell types. The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxic effects caused by sustained exposure of trophoblast cells to ethanol. The cytotoxic effect of sustained exposure to standard doses of ethanol on an in vitro human trophoblast cell line, JEG3, was examined. Viable cell count by exclusion method, total protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and activation of apoptotic markers (P-H2AX, caspase-3 and PARP-1) were determined. Sustained exposure to ethanol decreased viable cell count and total protein concentration. LDH activity did not increased in exposed cells but apoptotic markers were detected. In addition, there was a dose-dependent relationship between ethanol concentration and apoptotic pathways activation. Sustained ethanol exposure causes cellular cytotoxicity by apoptotic pathways induction as a result of DNA damage. This apoptotic induction may partially explain the altered function of placental cells and the damage previously detected in other tissues.

  5. The Human Antibody Fragment DIATHIS1 Specific for CEACAM1 Enhances Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Against Melanoma Cell Lines In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Maria L.; Soriani, Alessandra; Ricci, Biancamaria; Dominici, Sabrina; Moricoli, Diego; Ascione, Alessandro; Santoni, Angela; Magnani, Mauro; Cianfriglia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence show that de novo expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is strongly associated with reduced disease-free survival of patients affected by metastatic melanoma. Previously published investigations report that homophilic interactions between CEACAM1 expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and tumors inhibit the NK cell-mediated killing independently of major histocompatibility complex class I recognition. This biological property can be physiologically relevant in metastatic melanoma because of the increased CEACAM1 expression observed on NK cells from some patients. Moreover, this inhibitory mechanism in many cases might hinder the efficacy of immunotherapeutic treatments of CEACAM1+ malignancies because of tumor evasion by activated effector cells. In the present study, we designed an in vitro experimental model showing that the human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) DIATHIS1 specific for CEACAM1 is able to enhance the lytic machinery of NK cells against CEACAM1+ melanoma cells. The coincubation of the scFv DIATHIS1 with CEACAM1+ melanoma cells and NK-92 cell line significantly increases the cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, pretreatment of melanoma cells with scFv DIATHIS1 promotes the activation and the degranulation capacity of in vitro–expanded NK cells from healthy donors. It is interesting to note that the melanoma cell line MelC and the primary melanoma cells STA that respond better to DIATHIS1 treatment, express higher relative levels of CEACAM1-3L and CEACAM1-3S splice variants isoforms compared with Mel501 cells that are less responsive to DIATHIS1-induced NK cell–mediated cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that the fully human antibody fragment DIATHIS1 originated by biopanning approach from a phage antibody library may represent a relevant biotechnological platform to design and develop completely human antimelanoma therapeutics of biological origin. PMID

  6. Immunization with extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces cell-mediated immune responses and substantial protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, P G; Horwitz, M A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the capacity of a selected fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis extracellular proteins (EP) released into broth culture by mid-logarithmic-growth-phase organisms to induce cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis by aerosol but not uninfected control guinea pigs exhibit strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. Guinea pigs immunized subcutaneously with EP but not sham-immunized control guinea pigs also develop strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. EP is nonlethal and nontoxic to guinea pigs upon subcutaneous immunization. Guinea pigs immunized with EP and then challenged with aerosolized M. tuberculosis exhibit protective immunity. In five independent experiments, EP-immunized guinea pigs were consistently protected against clinical illness, including weight loss. Compared with EP-immunized guinea pigs, sham-immunized control guinea pigs lost 12.9 +/- 2.0% (mean +/- SE) of their total weight. EP-immunized guinea pigs also had a 10-fold reduction in viable M. tuberculosis bacilli in their lungs and spleens (P = 0.004 and 0.001, respectively) compared with sham-immunized control animals. In the two experiments in which some guinea pigs died after aerosol challenge, EP-immunized animals were protected from death. Whereas all 12 (100%) EP-immunized guinea pigs survived challenge with aerosolized M. tuberculosis, only 6 of 12 (50%) sham-immunized control guinea pigs survived challenge (P = 0.007, Fisher exact test). This study demonstrates that actively growing M. tuberculosis cells release immunoprotective molecules extracellularly, that a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis is feasible, and that extracellular molecules of M

  7. Cell-mediated immune responses to Malassezia furfur serovars A, B and C in patients with pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis and controls.

    PubMed

    Ashbee, H R; Ingham, E; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1994-06-01

    It has been postulated that patients with Malassezia furfur-associated dermatoses have a deficient cell-mediated immune response to M. furfur. This study examined the cell-mediated immune responses to M. furfur serovars A, B and C of 10 patients with pityriasis versicolor and 10 age- and sex-matched controls; and 10 patients with seborrheic dermatitis and 10 age- and sex-matched controls. The responses to each serovar of M. furfur were assessed using the lymphocyte transformation assay and the leukocyte migration inhibition assay. The lymphocyte transformation responses of the patients with pityriasis versicolor to M. furfur serovars A, B and C (0/10, 6/10 and 5/10 respectively) were not significantly different from those of controls (0/10, 2/10 and 1/10). However, for patients with seborrheic dermatitis, significantly more patients' lymphocytes responded to serovars B and C (6/10 and 6/10 respectively) than those of controls (1/10 and 1/10). No patient or control responded to serovar A. In the leukocyte migration inhibition assay, the leukocytes from a greater proportion of patients with pityriasis versicolor (5/7) responded to serovar B than controls (2/10); and the leukocytes from a greater proportion of patients with seborrheic dermatitis (4/10) responded to serovar C than controls (0/9). Thus, this data did not indicate the presence of any cell-mediated immune deficiency to M. furfur in patients with pityriasis versicolor or seborrheic dermatitis, as measured by the lymphocyte transformation assay or the leukocyte migration inhibition assay. The greater responsiveness of T lymphocytes from patients may indicate that T lymphocytes might be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  8. A novel liposome adjuvant DPC mediates Mycobacterium tuberculosis subunit vaccine well to induce cell-mediated immunity and high protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Da, Zejiao; Wang, Yue; Niu, Hongxia; Li, Ruiying; Yu, Hongjuan; He, Shanshan; Guo, Ming; Wang, Yong; Luo, Yanping; Ma, Xingming; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease around the world, and protein based subunit vaccine is supposed to be a kind of promising novel vaccine against it. However, there is no effective adjuvant available in clinic to activate cell-mediated immune responses which is required for TB subunit vaccine. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new adjuvant. Here we reported an adjuvant composed of dimethyl dioctadecylammonium (DDA), Poly I:C and cholesterol (DPC for short). DDA can form a kind of cationic liposome with the ability to deliver and present antigen and can induce Th1 type cell-mediated immune response. Poly I:C, a ligand of TLR3 receptor, could attenuate the pathologic reaction induced by following Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Cholesterol, which could enhance rigidity of lipid bilayer, is added to DDA and Poly I:C to improve the stability of the adjuvant. The particle size and Zeta-potential of DPC were analyzed in vitro. Furthermore, DPC was mixed with a TB fusion protein ESAT6-Ag85B-MPT64(190-198)-Mtb8.4-Rv2626c (LT70) to construct a subunit vaccine. The subunit vaccine-induced immune responses and protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis H37Rv infection in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. The results showed that the DPC adjuvant with particle size of 400 nm and zeta potential of 40 mV was in good stability. LT70 in the adjuvant of DPC generated strong antigen-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and induced long-term higher protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis infection (5.41 ± 0.38log10CFU) than traditional vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (6.01 ± 0.33log10CFU) and PBS control (6.53 ± 0.26log10CFU) at 30 weeks post-vaccination. In conclusion, DPC would be a promising vaccine adjuvant with the ability to stimulate Th1 type cell-mediated immunity, and could be used in TB subunit vaccine.

  9. Wnt3a is critical for endothelial progenitor cell-mediated neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yibin; Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Tao; Du, Gongwen; Zhang, Hui; Yin, Zongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether co-culture with bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) affects the proliferation and differentiation of spinal cord-derived neural stem cells (NSCs), and to investigate the underlying mechanism. The proliferation and differentiation of the NSCs were evaluated by an MTT cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assay, and immunofluorescence, respectively. The number of neurospheres and the number of β-tubulin III-positive cells were detected by microscopy. The wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 3a (Wnt3a)/β-catenin signaling pathway was analyzed by western blot analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction to elucidate the possible mechanisms of EPC-mediated NSC proliferation and differentiation. The results revealed that co-culture with EPCs significantly induced NSC proliferation and differentiation. In addition, co-culture with EPCs markedly induced the expression levels of Wnt3a and β-catenin and inhibited the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). By contrast, Wnt3a knockdown using a short hairpin RNA plasmid in the EPCs reduced EPC-mediated NSC proliferation and differentiation, accompanied by inhibition of the EPC-mediated expression of β-catenin, and its phosphorylation and activation of GSK-3β. Taken together, the findings of the present study demonstrated that Wnt3a was critical for EPC-mediated NSC proliferation and differentiation. PMID:27484039

  10. Resveratrol oligomers isolated from Carex species inhibit growth of human colon tumorigenic cells mediated by cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Gromek, Samantha; Niesen, Daniel; Seeram, Navindra P; Henry, Geneive E

    2011-08-24

    Research has shown that members of the Carex genus produce biologically active stilbenoids including resveratrol oligomers. This is of great interest to the nutraceutical industry given that resveratrol, a constituent of grape and red wine, has attracted immense research attention due to its potential human health benefits. In the current study, five resveratrol oligomers (isolated from Carex folliculata and Carex gynandra ), along with resveratrol, were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and normal human colon (CCD-18Co) cells. The resveratrol oligomers included one dimer, two trimers, and two tetramers: pallidol (1); α-viniferin (2) and trans-miyabenol C (3); and kobophenols A (4) and B (5), respectively. Although not cytotoxic, the resveratrol oligomers (1-5), as well as resveratrol, inhibited growth of the human colon cancer cells. Among the six stilbenoids, α-viniferin (2) was most active against the colon cancer cells with IC(50) values of 6-32 μM (>2-fold compared to normal colon cells). Moreover, α-viniferin (at 20 μM) did not induce apoptosis but arrested cell cycle (in the S-phase) for the colon cancer but not the normal colon cells. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge supporting the anticancer effects of resveratrol and its oligomers. Furthermore, Carex species should be investigated for their nutraceutical potential given that they produce biologically active stilbenoids such as α-viniferin. PMID:21761862

  11. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; de Jong, Marein A W P; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2008-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an attractive target to prevent interactions with DCs and subsequent viral transmission. Here, we have investigated whether the structural homologue of DC-SIGN, the nematode C-type lectin Mermaid can be used to prevent HIV-1 transmission by DCs. Our data demonstrate that Mermaid interacts with high mannose structures present on HIV-1 gp120 and thereby inhibits HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN on DCs. Moreover, Mermaid inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission from DC to T cells. We have identified Mermaid as a non-cytotoxic agent that shares the glycan specificity with DC-SIGN and inhibits DC-SIGN-gp120 interaction. The results are important for the anti-HIV-1 microbicide development directed at preventing DC-HIV-1 interactions. PMID:18597806

  12. Protein kinase C theta is not essential for T-cell-mediated clearance of murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Lyon, Ashley B; Wareing, Mark D; Dias, Peter B; Sarawar, Sally R

    2005-06-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a naturally occurring rodent pathogen with significant homology to human pathogens Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. T cells are essential for primary clearance of MHV-68 and survival of mice following intranasal infection. Previous reports have suggested that protein kinase C theta (PKCtheta) is essential for T-cell activation and cytokine production in vitro. To determine the role of this molecule in vivo during the immune response to a viral infection, PKCtheta-/- mice were infected with MHV-68. Despite the essential role of T cells in viral clearance, PKCtheta-/- mice survived infection, cleared lytic virus, and maintained effective long-term control of latency. CD8 T-cell expansion, trafficking to the lung, and cytotoxic activity were similar in PKCtheta+/+ and PKCtheta-/- mice, whereas antiviral antibody and T-helper cell cytokine production were significantly lower in PKCtheta-/- mice than in PKCtheta+/+ mice. These studies demonstrate a differential requirement for PKCtheta in the immune response to MHV-68 and show that PKCtheta is not essential for the T-cell activation events leading to viral clearance.

  13. Resveratrol oligomers isolated from Carex species inhibit growth of human colon tumorigenic cells mediated by cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Gromek, Samantha; Niesen, Daniel; Seeram, Navindra P; Henry, Geneive E

    2011-08-24

    Research has shown that members of the Carex genus produce biologically active stilbenoids including resveratrol oligomers. This is of great interest to the nutraceutical industry given that resveratrol, a constituent of grape and red wine, has attracted immense research attention due to its potential human health benefits. In the current study, five resveratrol oligomers (isolated from Carex folliculata and Carex gynandra ), along with resveratrol, were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and normal human colon (CCD-18Co) cells. The resveratrol oligomers included one dimer, two trimers, and two tetramers: pallidol (1); α-viniferin (2) and trans-miyabenol C (3); and kobophenols A (4) and B (5), respectively. Although not cytotoxic, the resveratrol oligomers (1-5), as well as resveratrol, inhibited growth of the human colon cancer cells. Among the six stilbenoids, α-viniferin (2) was most active against the colon cancer cells with IC(50) values of 6-32 μM (>2-fold compared to normal colon cells). Moreover, α-viniferin (at 20 μM) did not induce apoptosis but arrested cell cycle (in the S-phase) for the colon cancer but not the normal colon cells. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge supporting the anticancer effects of resveratrol and its oligomers. Furthermore, Carex species should be investigated for their nutraceutical potential given that they produce biologically active stilbenoids such as α-viniferin.

  14. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Di Bonito, Paola; Ridolfi, Barbara; Columba-Cabezas, Sandra; Giovannelli, Andrea; Chiozzini, Chiara; Manfredi, Francesco; Anticoli, Simona; Arenaccio, Claudia; Federico, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut), which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV)-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs) incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:25760140

  15. Cytotoxic constituents of ethyl acetate fraction from Dianthus superbus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chengli; Zhang, Wu; Li, Jie; Lei, Jiachuan; Yu, Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate fraction (EE-DS) from Dianthus superbus was found to possess the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in previous study. To investigate cytotoxic constituents, the bioassay-guided isolation of compounds from EE-DS was performed. Two dianthramides (1 and 2), three flavonoids (3-5), two coumarins (6 and 7) and three other compounds (8-10) were obtained. Structures of isolated compounds were identified by spectroscopic analysis. Cytotoxicity of the compounds against HepG2 cells was evaluated. Compound 1 showed the strongest cytotoxicity, compounds 10, 4, 3 and 5 had moderate cytotoxicity.

  16. In vivo Cytotoxicity Studies of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Bastida, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The plant family Amaryllidaceae is recognizable for its esthetic floral characteristics, its widespread usage in traditional medicine as well as its unique alkaloid principles. Few alkaloid-producing families rival the Amaryllidaceae in terms of the diversity of its structures as well as their wide applicability on the biological landscape. In particular, cytotoxic effects have come to be a dominant theme in the biological properties of Amaryllidacea alkaloids. To this extent, a significant number of structures have been subjected to in vitro studies in numerous cell lines from which several targets have been identified as promising chemotherapeutics. By contrast, in vivo models of study involving these alkaloids have been carried out to a lesser extent and should prove crucial in the continued development of a clinical target such as pancratistatin. This survey examines the cytotoxic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in vivo and contrasts these against the corresponding in vitro effects.

  17. Interaction of hyperthermia and cytotoxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Roizin-Towle, R.; Hall, E.J.; Capuano, L.

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells in culture were used to investigate the temperature dependence of the cytotoxic action of 4 widely used chemotherapy agents, i.e., adriamycin, bleomycin, cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride, and N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate. Cells were exposed to graded doses of each drug for 1 hour at a range of temperatures. Bleomycin showed the largest temperature dependence and N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate the least, with adriamycin and cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride between the two extremes. The results presented demonstrated significant differences in the cytotoxicities of chemotherapy agents and their interactions with heat. The idea of combining localized hyperthermia with some chemotherapy agents allowed a targeting of the chemotherapy not otherwise possible.

  18. Cytotoxic diterpenoids from Rabdosia lophanthoides var. gerardianus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Zhan; Zhao, Wei; Feng, Xiu-Li; Liu, Fang-Le; Zhu, Chen-Chen

    2016-03-01

    Two new abietane diterpenoids, Gerardianin B (1) and Gerardianin C (2), one new lignan glycoside, Gerardianin D (3) and one new lupane-type triterpenoid, Gerardianol A (4), together with seven known abietane diterpenoids were isolated from the aerial parts of Rabdosia lophanthoides var. gerardianus. Their structures were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. The cytotoxic activities of the nine diterpenoids were evaluated on human cancer cell lines. Compounds 6-11 exhibited significant cytotoxic activities against HepG2 cell lines with IC50 from 4.68 to 9.43μM and HCF-8 cell lines with IC50 from 9.12 to 13.53μM. PMID:26608401

  19. Cytotoxic steroidal saponins from Agave sisalana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pi-Yu; Chen, Chin-Hui; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lee, Ching-Kuo

    2011-06-01

    Two new steroidal saponins, 8 and 10, along with 7 known steroidal sapogenins and saponins (1-7) and a furostanol saponin (9) were isolated from Agave sisalana Perrine ex Engelm. The structures of these two new compounds were identified and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In addition, acid hydrolysis and GC-FID were used to confirm the sugar moieties of 8 and 10. The cytotoxic effects of 1-10 on MCF-7, NCI-H460, and SF-268 cancer cells were evaluated, and among them, compound 10 proved to be the most cytotoxic with IC₅₀ values of 1.2, 3.8, and 1.5 µM, respectively.

  20. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Methods Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP) recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6) and E7 (FPE7) transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. Results All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. Conclusion These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication. PMID:20409340

  1. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans.

    PubMed

    Meydani, Simin N; Das, Sai K; Pieper, Carl F; Lewis, Michael R; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D; Gupta, Alok K; Villareal, Dennis T; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J; Roberts, Susan B; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype. PMID:27410480

  2. Conventional and monocyte-derived CD11b(+) dendritic cells initiate and maintain T helper 2 cell-mediated immunity to house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Maud; Guilliams, Martin; Vanheerswynghels, Manon; Deswarte, Kim; Branco-Madeira, Filipe; Toussaint, Wendy; Vanhoutte, Leen; Neyt, Katrijn; Killeen, Nigel; Malissen, Bernard; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-02-21

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for mounting allergic airway inflammation, but it is unclear which subset of DCs performs this task. By using CD64 and MAR-1 staining, we reliably separated CD11b(+) monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) from conventional DCs (cDCs) and studied antigen uptake, migration, and presentation assays of lung and lymph node (LN) DCs in response to inhaled house dust mite (HDM). Mainly CD11b(+) cDCs but not CD103(+) cDCs induced T helper 2 (Th2) cell immunity in HDM-specific T cells in vitro and asthma in vivo. Studies in Flt3l(-/-) mice, lacking all cDCs, revealed that moDCs were also sufficient to induce Th2 cell-mediated immunity but only when high-dose HDM was given. The main function of moDCs was the production of proinflammatory chemokines and allergen presentation in the lung during challenge. Thus, we have identified migratory CD11b(+) cDCs as the principal subset inducing Th2 cell-mediated immunity in the LN, whereas moDCs orchestrate allergic inflammation in the lung.

  3. [Cell-mediated immunity and delayed hypersensitivity study in splenectomy patients: a comparative evaluation between IFN-gamma and skin tests].

    PubMed

    Miniello, S; Jirillo, E; Urgesi, G; D'Abbicco, D; Tomasicchio, N; Bonomo, G M

    1999-01-01

    The authors of this paper attempt to indicate a feasible, easy-to-use and inexpensive instrument for daily assessing and monitoring of splenectomized subjects to see if they are immunocompromised. Skin tests which are considered easy and inexpensive, may be useful for immunological investigation if their effectiveness is considered equal to that of more difficult and expensive methods. They have also assessed the effectiveness of ST in the study of specific cell-mediated immunity in general and also in cases of delayed hypersensibility, comparatively to serum IFN gamma dosage. The latter is produced by Th1 lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells and is considered a reasonable indicator of cell-mediated immunity and Th1-related delayed hypersensibility. The results of this study confirm that ST is effective in 100% of all splenectomized patients compared to positivity of 60% for the compromise of the immunocompetent system revealed by serum IFN gamma dosage in the same sample of patients. In addition, the fundamental role of other cytokines was confirmed. These include IL-2 which is produced by Th1 lymphocytes and whose lack of results in splenectomized patients are immunocompromised. This is revealed not only by IFN gamma dosage but also by ST. PMID:10633837

  4. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. PMID:26343487

  5. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans.

    PubMed

    Meydani, Simin N; Das, Sai K; Pieper, Carl F; Lewis, Michael R; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D; Gupta, Alok K; Villareal, Dennis T; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J; Roberts, Susan B; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype.

  6. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Simin N.; Das, Sai K.; Pieper, Carl F.; Lewis, Michael R.; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D.; Gupta, Alok K.; Villareal, Dennis T.; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J.; Roberts, Susan B.; Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype. PMID:27410480

  7. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR.

  8. Systemic cell-mediated reactions in vivo. Effect of the interaction of circulating antigen with sensitized lymphocytes on glomeruli and pulmonary alveoli.

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, A. K.; Schneeberger, E. E.; Collins, A. B.; McCluskey, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of systemic cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions on glomeruli and lungs were investigated in rats. The animals were given an intravenous injection of antigen 7 days after sensitization or were given an intravenous injection of lymph node cells from sensitized syngeneic donors 1 day after antigen injection. Control animals were given an irrelevant antigen or saline. All animals received three injections of 3H-thymidine during the course of the experiments. The animals were sacrificed 2 or 3 days after antigen injection. Autoradiographs of renal and pulmonary tissue showed significantly more labeled mononuclear cells in glomeruli and pulmonary alveolar walls in the experimental groups than in the control groups. Immunofluorescence studies did not reveal antigen, rat IgG, or C3 in glomeruli. The results indicate that systemic cell-mediated reactions can lead to an accumulation of mononuclear cells in glomeruli and lungs, an effect that may contribute to tissue injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6611090

  9. Valproic acid cooperates with hydralazine to augment the susceptibility of human osteosarcoma cells to Fas- and NK cell-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Yamanegi, Koji; Yamane, Junko; Kobayashi, Kenta; Kato-Kogoe, Nahoko; Ohyama, Hideki; Nakasho, Keiji; Yamada, Naoko; Hata, Masaki; Fukunaga, Satoru; Futani, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Haruki; Terada, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the effects of valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with hydralazine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, on the expression of cell-surface Fas and MHC-class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA and B), the ligands of NKG2D which is an activating receptor of NK cells, and on production of their soluble forms in HOS, U-2 OS and SaOS-2 human osteosarcoma cell lines. We also examined the susceptibility of these cells to Fas- and NK cell-mediated cell death. VPA did not increase the expression of Fas on the surface of osteosarcoma cells, while hydralazine did, and the combination of VPA with hydralazine increased the expression of cell-surface Fas. In contrast, the combination of VPA with hydralazine did not increase the production of soluble Fas by osteosarcoma cells. Both VPA and hydralazine increased the expression of cell-surface MICA and B in osteosarcoma cells, and their combination induced a greater increase in their expression. VPA inhibited the production of both soluble MICA and MICB by osteosarcoma cells while hydralazine produced no effect. Both VPA and hydralazine enhanced the susceptibility of osteosarcoma cells to Fas- and NK cell-mediated cell death and the combination of VPA with hydralazine further enhanced the effects. The present results suggest that combined administration of VPA and hydrazine is valuable for enhancing the therapeutic effects of immunotherapy for osteosarcomas.

  10. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  11. Novel cytotoxic annonaceous acetogenins from Annona muricata.

    PubMed

    Chang, F R; Wu, Y C

    2001-07-01

    Seven new annonaceous acetogenins, muricins A-G (1-7), as well as five known compounds, a mixture of muricatetrocin A (8) and muricatetrocin B (9), longifolicin (10), corossolin (11), and corossolone (12), were isolated from the seeds of Annona muricata. The structures of all isolates were elucidated and characterized by spectral and chemical methods. These acetogenins showed significantly selective in vitro cytotoxicities toward the human hepatoma cell lines Hep G(2) and 2,2,15.

  12. Therapeutic implications of iodine-125 cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; McLaughlin, W.H.; Adelstein, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    The biological consequences of differential subcellular radionuclide accumulation within nuclear stuctures have important implications for the design and development of new therapeutic agents for cancer management. A growing body of experimental data demonstrates that localization of /sup 125/I within the genome results in marked cytotoxicity. Investigations of iodine-125 labeled iododeoxyuridine, DNA intercalators and tamoxifen are reviewed as representative of this new group of potential radiotherapeutic agents.

  13. Therapeutic implications of iodine-125 cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; McLaughlin, W.H.; Adelstein, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    The biological consequences of differential subcellular radionuclide accumulation within nuclear structures have important implications for the design and development of new therapeutic agents for cancer management. A growing body of experimental data demonstrates that localization of /sup 125/I within the genome results in marked cytotoxicity. Investigations of iodine-125 labeled iododeoxyuridine, DNA intercalators and tamoxifen are reviewed as representative of this new group of potential radiotherapeutic agents.

  14. Modulation of cisplatin cytotoxicity by sulphasalazine.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, S.; Sharma, R.; Singhal, S. S.; Herzog, N. K.; Chaubey, M.; Awasthi, Y. C.

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); DDP] is hampered by acquired or de novo resistance of malignant cells to its cytotoxic effects. We have previously reported that cisplatin resistance parallels glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in several human small-cell lung cancer cell lines. In the presently described studies, we used sulphasalazine, an inhibitor of GSTs, to evaluate the relative role of GSTs in mediating cisplatin resistance in two human small-cell lung cancer cell lines, NCI H-69 and H-2496. The H-69 cell line, which contained relatively higher GST activity than the H-2496 cell line (317 +/- 7 vs 9 +/- 1 mU mg-1 protein respectively), also displayed a greater degree of cisplatin resistance (IC50 values of 25.0 +/- 3.9 vs 4.5 +/- 1.0 microM respectively). Western blot and Northern blot analyses of purified GSTs revealed the expression of only the pi-class GST in both cell lines. Sulphasalazine inhibited the purified GSTs (IC50 of 10 microM for H-69 and 12 microM for H-2496) from both lines in a competitive manner with similar Ki values (6.5 and 7.9 microM for the H-69 and H-2496 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity studies revealed that sulphasalazine increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin towards both cell lines. Isobologram analysis showed that sulphasalazine synergistically enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin towards both cell lines, the magnitude of synergy being remarkably higher in H-69 cells than in H-2496 cells. Our studies indicate that clinically achievable concentrations of sulphasalazine may be useful in modulating cisplatin resistance in malignancies with increased GST-pi content. Images Figure 1 PMID:7914420

  15. Mutagenic and cytotoxic activities of benfuracarb insecticide.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu

    2016-08-01

    Benfuracarb is a carbamate insecticide used to control insect pests in vegetables and it has anti-acetylcholinesterase activity lower than other carbamates. Cytotoxic effects of benfuracarb were evaluated by using root growth inhibition (EC50), mitotic index (MI), and mitotic phase determinations on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa and mutagenic effects were determined in Salmonella typhymurium Ames test by TA98 and TA100 strains with and without metabolic activation. In Allium test, 1 % DMSO was used as negative control group and 10 ppm MMS was used as positive control group. 75 ppm concentration of benfuracarb was found as EC50. In MI and mitotic phases determination study, 37.5, 75 and 150 ppm doses of benfuracarb were used. Dose-dependent cytotoxic activity was found by root growth inhibition and MI studies. It was identified that mitotic inhibition activity of benfuracarb was higher than 10 ppm MMS. In Ames test, mutagenic activity was not observed and over 200 µg/plate of benfuracarb was determined as cytotoxic to S. typhymurium strains. Benfuracarb can be called as "mitotic inhibitor" but not called as mutagen. PMID:25381170

  16. Initial cytotoxicity of novel titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Lockwood, P E; Wataha, J C; Okabe, T

    2007-11-01

    We assessed the biological response to several novel titanium alloys that have promising physical properties for biomedical applications. Four commercial titanium alloys [Super-TIX(R) 800, Super-TIX(R) 51AF, TIMETAL(R) 21SRx, and Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM grade 5)] and three experimental titanium alloys [Ti-13Cr-3Cu, Ti-1.5Si and Ti-1.5Si-5Cu] were tested. Specimens (n = 6; 5.0 x 5.0 x 3.0 mm(3)) were cast in a centrifugal casting machine using a MgO-based investment and polished to 600 grit, removing 250 mum from each surface. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti: ASTM grade 2) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) were used as positive controls. The specimens were cleaned and disinfected, and then each cleaned specimen was placed in direct contact with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts for 72 h. The cytotoxicity [succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity] of the extracts was assessed using the MTT method. Cytotoxicity of the metals tested was not statistically different compared to the CP Ti and Teflon controls (p > 0.05). These novel titanium alloys pose cytotoxic risks no greater than many other commonly used alloys, including commercially pure titanium. The promising short-term biocompatibility of these Ti alloys is probably due to their excellent corrosion resistance under static conditions, even in biological environments.

  17. Biological microdosimetry based on radiation cytotoxicity data.

    PubMed

    Scott, B R; Hutt, J; Lin, Y; Padilla, M T; Gott, K M; Potter, C A

    2013-01-01

    Researchers in the field of radiation microdosimetry have attempted to explain the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of different ionising photon radiation sources on the basis of the singly stochastic, microdose metric lineal energy y, which only addresses physical stochasticity related to energy (ε) deposition via single events in the critical targets (cell nuclei assumed here). Biological stochasticity related to variable nuclei geometries and cell orientations (relative to the incoming radiation) is usually not addressed. Here a doubly stochastic microdose metric, the single-event hit size q (=ε/T), is introduced which allows the track length T to be stochastic. The new metric is used in a plausible model of metabolic-activity-based in vitro cytotoxicity of low-dose ionising photon radiation. The cytotoxicity model has parameters E{q} (average single-event hit size with q assumed to be exponentially distributed) and E{α}, which is the average value of the cellular response parameter α. E{α} is referred to as the biological signature and it is independent of q. Only E{q} is needed for determination of RBE. The model is used to obtain biological-microdosimetry-based q spectra for 320-kV X-rays and (137)Cs gamma rays and the related RBE for cytotoxicity. The spectra are similar to published lineal energy y spectra for 200-kV X-rays and (60)Co gamma rays for 1-μm biological targets.

  18. Recombinant TLR5 agonist CBLB502 promotes NK cell-mediated anti-CMV immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad S; Ramachandiran, Sampath; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Prior work using allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) models showed that peritransplant administration of flagellin, a toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist protected murine allo-BMT recipients from CMV infection while limiting graft-vs-host disease (GvHD). However, the mechanism by which flagellin-TLR5 interaction promotes anti-CMV immunity was not defined. Here, we investigated the anti-CMV immunity of NK cells in C57BL/6 (B6) mice treated with a highly purified cGMP grade recombinant flagellin variant CBLB502 (rflagellin) followed by murine CMV (mCMV) infection. A single dose of rflagellin administered to mice between 48 to 72 hours prior to MCMV infection resulted in optimal protection from mCMV lethality. Anti-mCMV immunity in rflagellin-treated mice correlated with a significantly reduced liver viral load and increased numbers of Ly49H+ and Ly49D+ activated cytotoxic NK cells. Additionally, the increased anti-mCMV immunity of NK cells was directly correlated with increased numbers of IFN-γ, granzyme B- and CD107a producing NK cells following mCMV infection. rFlagellin-induced anti-mCMV immunity was TLR5-dependent as rflagellin-treated TLR5 KO mice had ∼10-fold increased liver viral load compared with rflagellin-treated WT B6 mice. However, the increased anti-mCMV immunity of NK cells in rflagellin-treated mice is regulated indirectly as mouse NK cells do not express TLR5. Collectively, these data suggest that rflagellin treatment indirectly leads to activation of NK cells, which may be an important adjunct benefit of administering rflagellin in allo-BMT recipients.

  19. Cryopreserved Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Are Susceptible to T-Cell Mediated Apoptosis Which Is Partly Rescued by IFNγ Licensing.

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Copland, Ian B; Garcia, Marco A; Petersen, Christopher T; Lewis, Christopher N; Waller, Edmund K; Kirk, Allan D; Galipeau, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that cryopreservation and thawing lead to altered Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) functionalities. Here, we further analyzed MSC's fitness post freeze-thaw. We have observed that thawed MSC can suppress T-cell proliferation when separated from them by transwell membrane and the effect is lost in a MSC:T-cell coculture system. Unlike actively growing MSCs, thawed MSCs were lysed upon coculture with activated autologous Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) and the lysing effect was further enhanced with allogeneic PBMCs. The use of DMSO-free cryoprotectants or substitution of Human Serum Albumin (HSA) with human platelet lysate in freezing media and use of autophagy or caspase inhibitors did not prevent thaw defects. We tested the hypothesis that IFNγ prelicensing before cryobanking can enhance MSC fitness post thaw. Post thawing, IFNγ licensed MSCs inhibit T cell proliferation as well as fresh MSCs and this effect can be blocked by 1-methyl Tryptophan, an Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor. In addition, IFNγ prelicensed thawed MSCs inhibit the degranulation of cytotoxic T cells while IFNγ unlicensed thawed MSCs failed to do so. However, IFNγ prelicensed thawed MSCs do not deploy lung tropism in vivo following intravenous injection as well as fresh MSCs suggesting that IFNγ prelicensing does not fully rescue thaw-induced lung homing defect. We identified reversible and irreversible cryoinjury mechanisms that result in susceptibility to host T-cell cytolysis and affect MSC's cell survival and tissue distribution. The susceptibility of MSC to negative effects of cryopreservation and the potential to mitigate the effects with IFNγ prelicensing may inform strategies to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of MSC in clinical use. Stem Cells 2016;34:2429-2442. PMID:27299362

  20. Dual Pressure from Antiretroviral Therapy and Cell-Mediated Immune Response on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Gene

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Annika C.; Deeks, Steven G.; Barbour, Jason D.; Heiken, Brandon D.; Younger, Sophie R.; Hoh, Rebecca; Lane, Meghan; Sällberg, Matti; Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Demarest, James F.; Liegler, Teri; Grant, Robert M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte pressure can lead to the development of viral escape mutants, with consequent loss of immune control. Antiretroviral drugs also exert selection pressures on HIV, leading to the emergence of drug resistance mutations and increased levels of viral replication. We have determined a minimal epitope of HIV protease, amino acids 76 to 84, towards which a CD8+ T-lymphocyte response is directed. This epitope, which is HLA-A2 restricted, includes two amino acids that commonly mutate (V82A and I84V) in the face of protease inhibitor therapy. Among 29 HIV-infected patients who were treated with protease inhibitors and who had developed resistance to these drugs, we show that the wild-type PR82V76-84 epitope is commonly recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in HLA-A2-positive patients and that the CTL directed to this epitope are of high avidity. In contrast, the mutant PR82A76-84 epitope is generally not recognized by wild-type-specific CTL, or when recognized it is of low to moderate avidity, suggesting that the protease inhibitor-selected V82A mutation acts both as a CTL and protease inhibitor escape mutant. Paradoxically, the absence of a mutation at position 82 was associated with the presence of a high-avidity CD8+ T-cell response to the wild-type virus sequence. Our results indicate that both HIV type 1-specific CD8+ T cells and antiretroviral drugs provide complex pressures on the same amino acid sequence of the HIV protease gene and, thus, can influence viral sequence evolution. PMID:12767994

  1. CD8 T cell-mediated killing of orexinergic neurons induces a narcolepsy-like phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Valnet, Raphaël; Yshii, Lidia; Quériault, Clémence; Nguyen, Xuan-Hung; Arthaud, Sébastien; Rodrigues, Magda; Canivet, Astrid; Morel, Anne-Laure; Matthys, Arthur; Bauer, Jan; Pignolet, Béatrice; Dauvilliers, Yves; Peyron, Christelle; Liblau, Roland S

    2016-09-27

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare and severe sleep disorder caused by the destruction of orexinergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. The genetic and environmental factors associated with narcolepsy, together with serologic data, collectively point to an autoimmune origin. The current animal models of narcolepsy, based on either disruption of the orexinergic neurotransmission or neurons, do not allow study of the potential autoimmune etiology. Here, we sought to generate a mouse model that allows deciphering of the immune mechanisms leading to orexin(+) neuron loss and narcolepsy development. We generated mice expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) as a "neo-self-antigen" specifically in hypothalamic orexin(+) neurons (called Orex-HA), which were transferred with effector neo-self-antigen-specific T cells to assess whether an autoimmune process could be at play in narcolepsy. Given the tight association of narcolepsy with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele, we first tested the pathogenic contribution of CD4 Th1 cells. Although these T cells readily infiltrated the hypothalamus and triggered local inflammation, they did not elicit the loss of orexin(+) neurons or clinical manifestations of narcolepsy. In contrast, the transfer of cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs) led to both T-cell infiltration and specific destruction of orexin(+) neurons. This phenotype was further aggravated upon repeated injections of CTLs. In situ, CTLs interacted directly with MHC class I-expressing orexin(+) neurons, resulting in cytolytic granule polarization toward neurons. Finally, drastic neuronal loss caused manifestations mimicking human narcolepsy, such as cataplexy and sleep attacks. This work demonstrates the potential role of CTLs as final effectors of the immunopathological process in narcolepsy.

  2. Serglycin determines secretory granule repertoire and regulates natural killer cell and cytotoxic T lymphocyte cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Vivien R; Brennan, Amelia J; Ellis, Sarah; Danne, Jill; Thia, Kevin; Jenkins, Misty R; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Pejler, Gunnar; Johnstone, Ricky W; Andrews, Daniel M; Trapani, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The anionic proteoglycan serglycin is a major constituent of secretory granules in cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)/natural killer (NK) cells, and is proposed to promote the safe storage of the mostly cationic granule toxins, granzymes and perforin. Despite the extensive defects of mast cell function reported in serglycin gene-disrupted mice, no comprehensive study of physiologically relevant CTL/NK cell populations has been reported. We show that the cytotoxicity of serglycin-deficient CTL and NK cells is severely compromised but can be partly compensated in both cell types when they become activated. Reduced intracellular granzyme B levels were noted, particularly in CD27(+) CD11b(+) mature NK cells, whereas serglycin(-/-) TCR-transgenic (OTI) CD8 T cells also had reduced perforin stores. Culture supernatants from serglycin(-/-) OTI T cells and interleukin-2-activated NK contained increased granzyme B, linking reduced storage with heightened export. By contrast, granzyme A was not significantly reduced in cells lacking serglycin, indicating differentially regulated trafficking and/or storage for the two granzymes. A quantitative analysis of different granule classes by transmission electronmicroscopy showed a selective loss of dense-core granules in serglycin(-/-) CD8(+) CTLs, although other granule types were maintained quantitatively. The findings of the present study show that serglycin plays a critical role in the maturation of dense-core cytotoxic granules in cytotoxic lymphocytes and the trafficking and storage of perforin and granzyme B, whereas granzyme A is unaffected. The skewed retention of cytotoxic effector molecules markedly reduces CTL/NK cell cytotoxicity, although this is partly compensated for as a result of activating the cells by physiological means.

  3. Cytotoxic T-cell immunity against telomerase reverse transcriptase in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Titu, Liviu V; Loveday, Ruth L; Madden, Leigh A; Cawkwell, Lynn; Monson, John R; Greenman, John

    2004-10-01

    The catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) has recently been proposed as a potential tumour-associated antigen capable of inducing T-cell mediated immunity in cancer patients. Before any attempts at vaccination with hTERT antigens can be made, one should establish if cancer patients possess cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) that can recognise hTERT epitopes. The T-cell response against two HLA-A2-specific epitopes of hTERT in 37 colorectal cancer patients and 12 normal controls was analysed using an interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) ELISPOT assay. For comparison the response to HLA-A2-restricted epitopes of CEA and influenza A matrix protein was also measured. CTL that recognised either of the two hTERT epitopes studied were found in 7 (19%) of colorectal cancer patients, with 2 (5%) possessing T-cells that recognised both these peptides. Four (11%) colorectal cancer patients had CTL that reacted to the CEA epitope. No relationship between cancer stage and the presence of specific CTL against hTERT or CEA was observed. None of the normal controls possessed T-cells capable of recognising either the hTERT or the CEA epitopes. However, a similar proportion of patients and normal controls had CTL reactive with the influenza A peptide. The results of this study demonstrate that CTL active against hTERT are present in approximately 20% of colorectal cancer patients irrespective of disease stage. Moreover, these cells are functional, able to secrete IFN-gamma when stimulated with the relevant peptide. PMID:15375515

  4. Cord Blood Stem Cell-Mediated Induction of Apoptosis in Glioma Downregulates X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Fassett, Daniel; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Gujrati, Meena; Rao, Jasti S.

    2010-01-01

    Background XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is one of the most important members of the apoptosis inhibitor family. XIAP is upregulated in various malignancies, including human glioblastoma. It promotes invasion, metastasis, growth and survival of malignant cells. We hypothesized that downregulation of XIAP by human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCBSC) in glioma cells would cause them to undergo apoptotic death. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed the effect of hUCBSC on two malignant glioma cell lines (SNB19 and U251) and two glioma xenograft cell lines (4910 and 5310). In co-cultures of glioma cells with hUCBSC, proliferation of glioma cells was significantly inhibited. This is associated with increased cytotoxicity of glioma cells, which led to glioma cell death. Stem cells induced apoptosis in glioma cells, which was evaluated by TUNEL assay, FACS analyses and immunoblotting. The induction of apoptosis is associated with inhibition of XIAP in co-cultures of hUCBSC. Similar results were obtained by the treatment of glioma cells with shRNA to downregulate XIAP (siXIAP). Downregulation of XIAP resulted in activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 to trigger apoptosis in glioma cells. Apoptosis is characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and upregulation of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad. Cell death of glioma cells was marked by downregulation of Akt and phospho-Akt molecules. We observed similar results under in vivo conditions in U251- and 5310-injected nude mice brains, which were treated with hUCBSC. Under in vivo conditions, Smac/DIABLO was found to be colocalized in the nucleus, showing that hUCBSC induced apoptosis is mediated by inhibition of XIAP and activation of Smac/DIABLO. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that downregulation of XIAP by hUCBSC treatment induces apoptosis, which led to the death of the glioma cells and xenograft cells. This study demonstrates the therapeutic

  5. Intracellular haemolytic agents of Heterocapsa circularisquama exhibit toxic effects on H. circularisquama cells themselves and suppress both cell-mediated haemolytic activity and toxicity to rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis).

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Cho, Kichul; Yasutomi, Masumi; Ueno, Mikinori; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Basti, Leila; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Takeshita, Satoshi; Kim, Daekyung; Oda, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    A harmful dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, is highly toxic to shellfish and the zooplankton rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. A previous study found that H. circularisquama has both light-dependent and -independent haemolytic agents, which might be responsible for its toxicity. Detailed analysis of the haemolytic activity of H. circularisquama suggested that light-independent haemolytic activity was mediated mainly through intact cells, whereas light-dependent haemolytic activity was mediated by intracellular agents which can be discharged from ruptured cells. Because H. circularisquama showed similar toxicity to rotifers regardless of the light conditions, and because ultrasonic ruptured H. circularisquama cells showed no significant toxicity to rotifers, it was suggested that live cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity is a major factor responsible for the observed toxicity to rotifers. Interestingly, the ultrasonic-ruptured cells of H. circularisquama suppressed their own lethal effect on the rotifers. Analysis of samples of the cell contents (supernatant) and cell fragments (precipitate) prepared from the ruptured H. circularisquama cells indicated that the cell contents contain inhibitors for the light-independent cell-mediated haemolytic activity, toxins affecting H. circularisquama cells themselves, as well as light-dependent haemolytic agents. Ethanol extract prepared from H. circularisquama, which is supposed to contain a porphyrin derivative that displays photosensitising haemolytic activity, showed potent toxicity to Chattonella marina, Chattonella antiqua, and Karenia mikimotoi, as well as to H. circularisquama at the concentration range at which no significant toxicity to rotifers was observed. Analysis on a column of Sephadex LH-20 revealed that light-dependent haemolytic activity and inhibitory activity on cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity existed in two separate fractions (f-2 and f-3), suggesting that both

  6. Intracellular haemolytic agents of Heterocapsa circularisquama exhibit toxic effects on H. circularisquama cells themselves and suppress both cell-mediated haemolytic activity and toxicity to rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis).

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Cho, Kichul; Yasutomi, Masumi; Ueno, Mikinori; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Basti, Leila; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Takeshita, Satoshi; Kim, Daekyung; Oda, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    A harmful dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, is highly toxic to shellfish and the zooplankton rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. A previous study found that H. circularisquama has both light-dependent and -independent haemolytic agents, which might be responsible for its toxicity. Detailed analysis of the haemolytic activity of H. circularisquama suggested that light-independent haemolytic activity was mediated mainly through intact cells, whereas light-dependent haemolytic activity was mediated by intracellular agents which can be discharged from ruptured cells. Because H. circularisquama showed similar toxicity to rotifers regardless of the light conditions, and because ultrasonic ruptured H. circularisquama cells showed no significant toxicity to rotifers, it was suggested that live cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity is a major factor responsible for the observed toxicity to rotifers. Interestingly, the ultrasonic-ruptured cells of H. circularisquama suppressed their own lethal effect on the rotifers. Analysis of samples of the cell contents (supernatant) and cell fragments (precipitate) prepared from the ruptured H. circularisquama cells indicated that the cell contents contain inhibitors for the light-independent cell-mediated haemolytic activity, toxins affecting H. circularisquama cells themselves, as well as light-dependent haemolytic agents. Ethanol extract prepared from H. circularisquama, which is supposed to contain a porphyrin derivative that displays photosensitising haemolytic activity, showed potent toxicity to Chattonella marina, Chattonella antiqua, and Karenia mikimotoi, as well as to H. circularisquama at the concentration range at which no significant toxicity to rotifers was observed. Analysis on a column of Sephadex LH-20 revealed that light-dependent haemolytic activity and inhibitory activity on cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity existed in two separate fractions (f-2 and f-3), suggesting that both

  7. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine. PMID:26552001

  8. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine.

  9. Quantitative high-throughput single-cell cytotoxicity assay for T cells.

    PubMed

    Liadi, Ivan; Roszik, Jason; Romain, Gabrielle; Cooper, Laurence J N; Varadarajan, Navin

    2013-02-02

    Cancer immunotherapy can harness the specificity of immune response to target and eliminate tumors. Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) based on the adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown considerable promise in clinical trials(1-4). There are several advantages to using CAR(+) T cells for the treatment of cancers including the ability to target non-MHC restricted antigens and to functionalize the T cells for optimal survival, homing and persistence within the host; and finally to induce apoptosis of CAR(+) T cells in the event of host toxicity(5). Delineating the optimal functions of CAR(+) T cells associated with clinical benefit is essential for designing the next generation of clinical trials. Recent advances in live animal imaging like multiphoton microscopy have revolutionized the study of immune cell function in vivo(6,7). While these studies have advanced our understanding of T-cell functions in vivo, T-cell based ACT in clinical trials requires the need to link molecular and functional features of T-cell preparations pre-infusion with clinical efficacy post-infusion, by utilizing in vitro assays monitoring T-cell functions like, cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion. Standard flow-cytometry based assays have been developed that determine the overall functioning of populations of T cells at the single-cell level but these are not suitable for monitoring conjugate formation and lifetimes or the ability of the same cell to kill multiple targets(8). Microfabricated arrays designed in biocompatible polymers like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are a particularly attractive method to spatially confine effectors and targets in small volumes(9). In combination with automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, thousands of effector-target interactions can be monitored simultaneously by imaging individual wells of a nanowell array. We present here a high-throughput methodology for monitoring T-cell mediated

  10. Combined glyco- and protein-Fc engineering simultaneously enhance cytotoxicity and half-life of a therapeutic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, Céline; Jorieux, Sylvie; Souyris, Nathalie; Zaki, Ouafa; Jacquet, Alexandra; Fournier, Nathalie; Crozet, Fabien; de Romeuf, Christophe; Bouayadi, Khalil; Urbain, Rémi; Behrens, Christian K; Mondon, Philippe; Fontayne, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    While glyco-engineered monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with improved antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) are reaching the market, extensive efforts have also been made to improve their pharmacokinetic properties to generate biologically superior molecules. Most therapeutic mAbs are human or humanized IgG molecules whose half-life is dependent on the neonatal Fc receptor FcRn. FcRn reduces IgG catabolism by binding to the Fc domain of endocytosed IgG in acidic lysosomal compartments, allowing them to be recycled into the blood. Fc-engineered mAbs with increased FcRn affinity resulted in longer in vivo half-life in animal models, but also in healthy humans. These Fc-engineered mAbs were obtained by alanine scanning, directed mutagenesis or in silico approach of the FcRn binding site. In our approach, we applied a random mutagenesis technology (MutaGenTM) to generate mutations evenly distributed over the whole Fc sequence of human IgG1. IgG variants with improved FcRn-binding were then isolated from these Fc-libraries using a pH-dependent phage display selection process. Two successive rounds of mutagenesis and selection were performed to identify several mutations that dramatically improve FcRn binding. Notably, many of these mutations were unpredictable by rational design as they were located distantly from the FcRn binding site, validating our random molecular approach. When produced on the EMABling® platform allowing effector function increase, our IgG variants retained both higher ADCC and higher FcRn binding. Moreover, these IgG variants exhibited longer half-life in human FcRn transgenic mice. These results clearly demonstrate that glyco-engineering to improve cytotoxicity and protein-engineering to increase half-life can be combined to further optimize therapeutic mAbs. PMID:24492301

  11. Phagocytic efficiency and cytotoxic responses of Indian freshwater sponge (Eunapius carteri) cells isolated by density gradient centrifugation and flow cytometry: a morphofunctional analysis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2015-02-01

    The freshwater sponge Eunapius carteri (Porifera: Demospongiae: Spongillidae), a resident of Indian freshwater ecosystems, has pharmaceutical and ecological potential, but there is inadequate information on its cellular spectrum and cell-mediated immune responses. Microscopical analysis revealed the existence of eight distinct cellular variants, i.e. blast-like cells, choanocytes, small amoebocytes, granular cells, pinacocytes, large amoebocytes, archaeocytes and sclerocytes. The cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and flow cytometry and used for a morphofunctional analysis. We investigated the phagocytic efficiency of E. carteri cells under the challenge of yeast particles in vitro and spectrophotometrically quantified the generation of cytotoxic molecules (superoxide anions and nitric oxide) in different isolated cellular fractions. The two cell separating technologies did not yield any significant differences in the major findings on morphology, phagocytic response and generation of superoxide anions and nitric oxide. Archaeocytes, granular cells and large amoebocytes were identified as chief phagocytes with a high phagocytic potential as recorded by light microscopy. Archaeocytes were the principal generators of superoxide anions, whereas nitric oxide was recorded in the fractions rich in archaeocytes and large amoebocytes. The present investigation thus provides useful information regarding cellular variation, cytotoxic status and innate phagocytic response of the cells of E. carteri, a common but less studied sponge of India.

  12. High-avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for a new PRAME-derived peptide can target leukemic and leukemic-precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Quintarelli, Concetta; Dotti, Gianpietro; Hasan, Sayyeda T; De Angelis, Biagio; Hoyos, Valentina; Errichiello, Santa; Mims, Martha; Luciano, Luigia; Shafer, Jessica; Leen, Ann M; Heslop, Helen E; Rooney, Cliona M; Pane, Fabrizio; Brenner, Malcolm K; Savoldo, Barbara

    2011-03-24

    The cancer testis antigen (CTA) preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) is overexpressed by many hematologic malignancies, but is absent on normal tissues, including hematopoietic progenitor cells, and may therefore be an appropriate candidate for T cell-mediated immunotherapy. Because it is likely that an effective antitumor response will require high-avidity, PRAME-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we attempted to generate such CTLs using professional and artificial antigen-presenting cells loaded with a peptide library spanning the entire PRAME protein and consisting of 125 synthetic pentadecapeptides overlapping by 11 amino acids. We successfully generated polyclonal, PRAME-specific CTL lines and elicited high-avidity CTLs, with a high proportion of cells recognizing a previously uninvestigated HLA-A*02-restricted epitope, P435-9mer (NLTHVLYPV). These PRAME-CTLs could be generated both from normal donors and from subjects with PRAME(+) hematologic malignancies. The cytotoxic activity of our PRAME-specific CTLs was directed not only against leukemic blasts, but also against leukemic progenitor cells as assessed by colony-forming-inhibition assays, which have been implicated in leukemia relapse. These PRAME-directed CTLs did not affect normal hematopoietic progenitors, indicating that this approach may be of value for immunotherapy of PRAME(+) hematologic malignancies. PMID:21278353

  13. Cytotoxic activities of several geranyl-substituted flavanones.

    PubMed

    Smejkal, Karel; Svacinová, Jana; Slapetová, Tereza; Schneiderová, Kristýna; Dall'acqua, Stefano; Innocenti, Gabbriella; Závalová, Veronika; Kollár, Peter; Chudík, Stanislav; Marek, Radek; Julínek, Ondrej; Urbanová, Marie; Kartal, Murat; Csöllei, Marek; Dolezal, Karel

    2010-04-23

    Nine geranylated flavanones isolated from the fruits of Paulownia tomentosa (4-12) and two from the roots of Morus alba (13 and 14) were examined for cytotoxicity to selected human cancer cell lines and normal human fibroblasts. Cytotoxicity was determined in vitro using a calcein AM cytotoxicity assay. Cytotoxicity for the THP-1 monocytic leukemia cell line was tested using erythrosin B cell staining. The geranylated compounds tested were compared with the known simple flavanone standards taxifolin (1), naringenin (2), and hesperetin (3) and with the standard anticancer drugs olomoucine II, diaziquone, and oxaliplatin and the antineoplastic compound camptothecin, and showed different levels of cytotoxicity. The effects of structural changes on cytotoxic activity, including geranyl substitution of the flavanone skeleton and the oxidation pattern of ring B of the flavanones, are discussed. PMID:20192247

  14. First Occurrence of a Furano-glycyrrhetinoate and Its Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lucie; Sommerwerk, Sven; Tzschöckell, Felix; Wiemann, Jana; Schwarz, Stefan; Siewert, Bianka; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Csuk, René

    2015-12-01

    (18α)-Glycyrrhetinic acid (4) was prepared from (18β)-glycyrrhetinic acid (1), and the cytotoxicity of some derivatives was investigated by photometric SRB assays employing several human tumor cell lines. In summary, (18β)-1 is slightly more cytotoxic than its (18α) epimer 4, but its cytotoxicity is negligible. Higher cytotoxicity was observed for the esters 2 and 5 and for the 3-O-acetylated esters 3 and 6. Cytotoxicity was improved dramatically when the hydroxyl group at position C-3 was replaced by an amino moiety. SeO2 oxidations gave access to a novel furano-glycyrrhetinoate 15. Interestingly, its seleno analog 16 is approximately five to six times less cytotoxic for the tumor cell lines tested, and tumor/non-tumor selectivity is lost upon replacement of the oxygen by a selenium substituent. PMID:26548762

  15. Acylated iridoids with cytotoxicity from Valeriana jatamansi.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Hui-Liang; Yang, Xian-Wen; Chen, Tao; Lu, Long-Hai; Huang, Zheng-Sheng; Liu, Run-Hui; Xu, Xi-Ke; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Wang, Hui

    2009-04-01

    Thirteen new acylated iridoids, jatamanvaltrates A-M (1-13), together with nine known valepotriates (14-22), were isolated from the whole plants of Valeriana jatamansi (syn. Valeriana wallichii). The structures of these new compounds were assigned by detailed interpretation of spectroscopic data. Jatamanvaltrates D (4) and H (9) are the first examples of naturally occurring valepotriates containing an o-hydroxybenzoyloxy moiety at C-10. All isolated compounds were tested for their cytotoxicity against lung adenocarcinoma (A549), metastatic prostate cancer (PC-3M), colon cancer (HCT-8), and hepatoma (Bel7402) cell lines.

  16. Cytotoxic phorbol esters of Croton tiglium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Wang, Lun; Li, Fu; Yu, Kai; Wang, Ming-Kui

    2013-05-24

    Chemical investigation of the seeds of Croton tiglium afforded eight new phorbol diesters (three phorbol diesters, 1-3, and five 4-deoxy-4α-phorbol diesters, 4-8), together with 11 known phorbol diesters (nine phorbol diesters, 9-17, and two 4-deoxy-4α-phorbol diesters, 18 and 19). The structures of compounds 1-8 were determined by spectroscopic data information and chemical degradation experiments. The cytotoxic activities of the phorbol diesters were evaluated against the SNU387 hepatic tumor cell line, and compound 3 exhibited the most potent activity (IC50 1.2 μM).

  17. Flavonoids of Calligonum polygonoides and their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hayam; Moawad, Abeer; Owis, Asmaa; AbouZid, Sameh; Ahmed, Osama

    2016-10-01

    Context Calligonum polygonoides L. subsp. comosum L' Hér. (Polygonaceae), locally known as "arta", is a slow-growing small leafless desert shrub. Objective Isolation, structure elucidation and evaluation of cytotoxic activity of flavonoids from C. polygonoides aerial parts. Materials and methods Flavonoids in the hydroalcoholic extract of the of C. polygonoides were isolated and purified using column chromatography and preparative HPLC. The structures of the isolated flavonoids were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data including 2D NMR techniques. The cytotoxic activity of the isolated flavonoids (6.25, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL) was evaluated against liver HepG2 and breast MCF-7 cancer cell lines using sulphorhodamine-B assay. Results A new flavonoid, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-(6″-n-butyl glucuronide) (1), and 13 known flavonoids, quercetin 3-O-β-D-(6″-n-butyl glucuronide) (2), kaempferol-3-O-β-D-(6″-methyl glucuronide) (3), quercetin-3-O-β-D-(6″-methyl glucuronide) (4), quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (5), kaempferol-3-O-glucuronide (6), quercetin-3-O-α-rhamnopyranoside (7), astragalin (8), quercetin-3-O-glucopyranoside (9), taxifolin (10), (+)-catechin (11), dehydrodicatechin A (12), quercetin (13), and kaempferol (14), were isolated from the aerial parts of C. polygonoides. Quercetin showed significant cytotoxic activity against HepG2 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50 values of 4.88 and 0.87 μg/mL, respectively. Structure-activity relationships were analyzed by comparing IC50 values of several pairs of flavonoids differing in one structural element. Discussion and conclusion The activity against breast cancer cell lines decreased by glycosylation at C-3. The presence of 2,3-double bond in ring C, carbonyl group at C-4 and 3',4'-dihydroxy substituents in ring B are essential structural requirements for the cytotoxic activity against breast cancer cells.

  18. Nature of "memory" in T-cell mediated antibacterial immunity: cellular parameters that distinguish between the active immune response and a state of "memory".

    PubMed Central

    North, R J; Deissler, J F

    1975-01-01

    Immunizing infection in mice with Listeria monocytogenes resulted in the generation of two distinct states of immunological reactivity. There was generated (i) a short-lived state of active immunity that functioned to urgently eliminate the infection organism from the tissues and (ii) a long-lives state of increased immunological potential that enabled the host to respond to seconday infection in an accelerated manner. Short-lived active immunity was mediated by replicating T cells and expressed by activated macrophages, and it ended when these cell types disappeared from the tissue soon after complete elimination of the parasite. Long-lived immunological protential was associated with a persistent level of delayed sensitivity and with the presence of a small number of nonreplicating protective T cells. It is suggested that the state of delayed sensitivity represents a state of immunological T-cell memory of the cell-mediated type. PMID:811559

  19. Human papilloma virus vaccination induces strong human papilloma virus specific cell-mediated immune responses in HIV-infected adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Rainone, Veronica; Giacomet, Vania; Penagini, Francesca; Fabiano, Valentina; Calascibetta, Francesca; Mameli, Chiara; Pisanelli, Stefania; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2015-03-27

    The ability of a quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV)-16/18/6/11 virus-like particles vaccine (Gardasil) to elicit HPV-specific cell-mediated immune responses was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-infected young adults. Results showed that, after three doses of vaccine, central memory and effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, as well as HPV-specific interleukin (IL)2(+)/CD4(+), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ(+))/CD4(+), IFN-γ(+)/CD8(+) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes and Perforin and Granzyme B secreting CD8(+) T lymphocytes were significantly increased. Notably, results obtained in HIV-infected patients were comparable to those seen in HIV-uninfected age-matched healthy controls.

  20. Release of mast cell mediators, vasoconstriction and edema in the isolated, perfused head of the rat following intracarotid infusion of neurotensin.

    PubMed

    Rioux, F; Kérouac, R; St-Pierre, S

    1985-03-01

    Intracarotid infusions of neurotensin (NT) into the isolated, perfused head of rats trigger concentration-dependent histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from the perfused organ. The secretory event was accompanied by a concentration-dependent rise in perfusion pressure and facilitation of edema formation. The three NT effects were markedly reduced in heads derived from rats pretreated with high doses of compound 48/80 to produce mast cell depletion. The vasoconstrictor response to NT was greatly attenuated by the 5-HT receptor antagonist methysergide but unaffected by antihistaminic drugs. The results were interpreted as an indication that NT stimulates histamine and 5-HT release from mast cells of the rat perfused head. The results also suggest that the vasoconstrictor response to NT in the rat head is mediated by mast cell 5-HT. The potentiation of edema formation by NT was attributed to the action of mast cell mediators (most likely histamine and 5-HT) released by NT on microvessels.

  1. Autochthonous primary and metastatic melanomas in Hgf-Cdk4 R24C mice evade T-cell-mediated immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Jennifer; Gaffal, Evelyn; Cron, Mira; Kohlmeyer, Judith; Renn, Marcel; Tüting, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models offer new opportunities to investigate the role of cell-mediated immunity in the natural progression of melanoma in an immunocompetent host. Here we report that Hgf-Cdk4(R24C) mice spontaneously develop a spectrum of primary melanomas with high penetrance during their first year of life. Malignant transformation proceeds in a stepwise manner from multiple melanocytic nevi to single nodular melanomas and disseminated metastases in most mice. Migrating melanoma cells invade the draining lymph nodes without activating the immune system. Autochthonous primary tumors are destroyed following experimental introduction of immune surveillance using an adoptive lymphocyte transfer approach. However, some tumor cells are able to survive, evade immune cell control, and recur both locally and systemically. Immune tolerance in recurring tumors may be supported by immunosuppressive Gr1(+) myeloid cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that primary and metastatic melanomas developing spontaneously in Hgf-Cdk4(R24C) mice effectively evade cellular immune surveillance.

  2. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes on swine viruses: multi-epitope design for universal T cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) are the primary diseases affecting the pig industry globally. Vaccine induced CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune response might be long-lived and cross-serotype and thus deserve further attention. Although large panels of synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the polyproteins of a virus facilitate the detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, it is an exceedingly costly and cumbersome approach. Alternatively, computational predictions have been proven to be of satisfactory accuracy and are easily performed. Such a method enables the systematic identification of genome-wide CTL epitopes by incorporating epitope prediction tools in analyzing large numbers of viral sequences. In this study, we have implemented an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for the identification of CTL epitopes of swine viruses including the CSF virus (CSFV), FMD virus (FMDV) and PRRS virus (PRRSV) and assembled these epitopes on a web resource to facilitate vaccine design. Identification of epitopes for cross protections to different subtypes of virus are also reported in this study and may be useful for the development of a universal vaccine against such viral infections among the swine population. The CTL epitopes identified in this study have been evaluated in silico and possibly provide more and wider protection in compared to traditional single-reference vaccine design. The web resource is free and open to all users through http://sb.nhri.org.tw/ICES. PMID:24358361

  3. Inhibitory effects of various oxygenated sterols on the differentiation and function of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Spangrude, G.J.; Sherris, D.; Daynes, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light (UVL) is capable of causing many biological and biochemical changes in this complex organ. One early consequence is the oxidation of epidermal plasma membrane cholesterol, causing the induction of a wide variety of photoproducts. It is well recognized that some oxygenated sterols possess potent biological activity on mammalian cells by their ability to inhibit endogeneous mevalonate and cholesterol biosynthesis. In the few immunological systems that have been studied, there is general agreement that lymphocyte function is altered in the presence of certain oxygenated sterols. Insight into the biochemical basis for altered lymphocyte function is lacking, as both afferent and efferent blockades have been suggested. These studies were undertaken to determine the effect of various oxygenated sterols (representing a number of known cholesterol-derived photoproducts) on the generation (afferent) and function (efferent) of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Cell-mediated immune responses which result in the generation of both alloantigen-specific and syngeneic tumor-specific CTLs were evaluated. (JMT)

  4. Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Imbalance Modifies NK Cytotoxicity, Lymphocytes B and Lymphoprolipheration in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Úbeda, Natalia; Montero, Ana; Achón, María; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Different vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations could exacerbate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate different dietary folic acid and vitamin B12 levels on the immune response in aged rats. Male Sprague Dawley aged rats were assigned to three folic acid groups (deficient, control, supplemented) each in absence of vitamin B12 for 30 days. Several parameters of innate and acquired immune responses were measured. Serum and hepatic folate levels increased according to folic acid dietary level, while vitamin B12 levels decreased. There was a significant decrease in natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen for the vitamin B12 deficient diet and folic acid control diet groups. Significant changes in CD45 lymphocyte subsets were also observed according to dietary imbalance. Lymphoproliferative response to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin did not differ significantly between groups. The spleen response to lipopolysaccharide increased significantly, but was unmodified for the other organs. An imbalance between dietary vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations alters some immunological parameters in aged rats. Therefore, the ratio between folate and vitamin B12 could be as important as their absolute dietary concentrations. PMID:24288024

  5. Structure of the Human Activating Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor NKp30 Bound to its Tumor Cell Ligand B7-H6

    SciTech Connect

    Y Li; Q Wang; R Mariuzza

    2011-12-31

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that participate in the elimination of tumor cells. In humans, the activating natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) NKp30, NKp44, and NKp46 play a major role in NK cell-mediated tumor cell lysis. NKp30 recognizes B7-H6, a member of the B7 family which is expressed on tumor, but not healthy, cells. To understand the basis for tumor surveillance by NCRs, we determined the structure of NKp30, a member of the CD28 family which includes CTLA-4 and PD-1, in complex with B7-H6. The overall organization of the NKp30-B7-H6-activating complex differs considerably from those of the CTLA-4-B7 and PD-1-PD-L T cell inhibitory complexes. Whereas CTLA-4 and PD-1 use only the front {beta}-sheet of their Ig-like domain to bind ligands, NKp30 uses both front and back {beta}-sheets, resulting in engagement of B7-H6 via the side, as well as face, of the {beta}-sandwich. Moreover, B7-H6 contacts NKp30 through the complementarity-determining region (CDR) - like loops of its V-like domain in an antibody-like interaction that is not observed for B7 or PD-L. This first structure of an NCR bound to ligand provides a template for designing molecules to stimulate NKp30-mediated cytolytic activity for tumor immunotherapy.

  6. SG-HQ2 inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation through suppression of histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Pil-Hoon; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Seo, Seung-Yong; Shin, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of 3,4,5-trihydroxy-N-(8-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)benzamide) (SG-HQ2), a synthetic analogue of gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), on the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and the possible mechanism of action. Mast cells play major roles in immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic responses by the release of histamine, lipid-derived mediators, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. We previously reported the potential effects of gallic acid using allergic inflammation models. For incremental research, we synthesized the SG-HQ2 by the modification of functional groups from gallic acid. SG-HQ2 attenuated histamine release by the reduction of intracellular calcium in human mast cells and primary peritoneal mast cells. The inhibitory efficacy of SG-HQ2 was similar with gallic acid. Enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-4, and interleukin-6 in activated mast cells was significantly diminished by SG-HQ2 100 times lower concentration of gallic acid. This inhibitory effect was mediated by the reduction of nuclear factor-κB. In animal models, SG-HQ2 inhibited compound 48/80-induced serum histamine release and immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Our results indicate that SG-HQ2, an analogue of gallic acid, might be a possible therapeutic candidate for mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory diseases through suppression of histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  7. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Costa, Simone M.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  8. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edson R A; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Costa, Simone M; Azevedo, Adriana S; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M A; Alves, Ada M B

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  9. SG-HQ2 inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation through suppression of histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Pil-Hoon; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of 3,4,5-trihydroxy-N-(8-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)benzamide) (SG-HQ2), a synthetic analogue of gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), on the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and the possible mechanism of action. Mast cells play major roles in immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic responses by the release of histamine, lipid-derived mediators, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. We previously reported the potential effects of gallic acid using allergic inflammation models. For incremental research, we synthesized the SG-HQ2 by the modification of functional groups from gallic acid. SG-HQ2 attenuated histamine release by the reduction of intracellular calcium in human mast cells and primary peritoneal mast cells. The inhibitory efficacy of SG-HQ2 was similar with gallic acid. Enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-4, and interleukin-6 in activated mast cells was significantly diminished by SG-HQ2 100 times lower concentration of gallic acid. This inhibitory effect was mediated by the reduction of nuclear factor-κB. In animal models, SG-HQ2 inhibited compound 48/80-induced serum histamine release and immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Our results indicate that SG-HQ2, an analogue of gallic acid, might be a possible therapeutic candidate for mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory diseases through suppression of histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25349218

  10. Erlotinib inhibits T-cell-mediated immune response via down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Qiong; Gu Yanhong; Zheng Wei; Wu Xingxin; Gong Fangyuan; Gu Liyun; Sun Yang; Xu Qiang

    2011-03-01

    Erlotinib is a potent inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase and has been demonstrated to treat advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer to prolong survival after failure of first-line or second-line chemotherapy. However, little is known about its effects on immune system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the immunosuppressive activity of erlotinib on T lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and further explore its potential molecular mechanism. Erlotinib exerted a significant inhibition on the T cell proliferation and activation induced by concanavalin A, anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, staphylococcal enterotoxin B or phorbol myristate acetate respectively in a concentration-dependent manner and it also inhibited the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-2 and IFN-{gamma} of activated T cells. Further study showed that erlotinib caused G0/G1 arrest and suppressed the phosphorylations of c-Raf, ERK and Akt in activated T cells. Moreover, erlotinib significantly ameliorated picryl chloride-induced ear contact dermatitis in a dose-dependent manner in vivo. In summary, these findings suggest that erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. - Graphical abstract: Erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. Display Omitted

  11. Chronic active hepatitis induced by Helicobacter hepaticus in the A/JCr mouse is associated with a Th1 cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Whary, M T; Morgan, T J; Dangler, C A; Gaudes, K J; Taylor, N S; Fox, J G

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection in A/JCr mice results in chronic active hepatitis characterized by perivascular, periportal, and parenchymal infiltrates of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. This study examined the development of hepatitis and the immune response of A/JCr mice to H. hepaticus infection. The humoral and cell-mediated T helper immune response was profiled by measuring the postinfection (p.i.) antibody response in serum, feces, and bile and by the production of cytokines and proliferative responses by splenic mononuclear cells to H. hepaticus antigens. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG2a antibody developed by 4 weeks p.i. and persisted through 12 months. Splenocytes from infected mice proliferated and produced more gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) than interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-5 when cultured with H. hepaticus outer membrane proteins. The predominantly IgG2a antibody response in serum and the in vitro production of IFN-gamma in excess of IL-4 or IL-5 are consistent with a Th1 immune response reported in humans and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis, respectively. Mice infected with H. hepaticus developed progressively severe perivascular, periportal, and hepatic parenchymal lesions consisting of lymphohistiocytic and plasmacytic cellular infiltrates. In addition, transmural typhlitis was observed at 12 months p.i. The characterization of a cell-mediated Th1 immune response to H. hepaticus infection in the A/JCr mouse should prove valuable as a model for experimental regimens which manipulate the host response to Helicobacter.

  12. Variant antigenic peptide promotes cytotoxic T lymphocyte adhesion to target cells without cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shotton, David M.; Attaran, Amir

    1998-01-01

    Timelapse video microscopy has been used to record the motility and dynamic interactions between an H-2Db-restricted murine cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone (F5) and Db-transfected L929 mouse fibroblasts (LDb) presenting normal or variant antigenic peptides from human influenza nucleoprotein. F5 cells will kill LDb target cells presenting specific antigen (peptide NP68: ASNENMDAM) after “browsing” their surfaces for between 8 min and many hours. Cell death is characterized by abrupt cellular rounding followed by zeiosis (vigorous “boiling” of the cytoplasm and blebbing of the plasma membrane) for 10–20 min, with subsequent cessation of all activity. Departure of cytotoxic T lymphocytes from unkilled target cells is rare, whereas serial killing is sometimes observed. In the absence of antigenic peptide, cytotoxic T lymphocytes browse target cells for much shorter periods, and readily leave to encounter other targets, while never causing target cell death. Two variant antigenic peptides, differing in nonamer position 7 or 8, also act as antigens, albeit with lower efficiency. A third variant peptide NP34 (ASNENMETM), which differs from NP68 in both positions and yet still binds Db, does not stimulate F5 cytotoxicity. Nevertheless, timelapse video analysis shows that NP34 leads to a significant modification of cell behavior, by up-regulating F5–LDb adhesive interactions. These data extend recent studies showing that partial agonists may elicit a subset of the T cell responses associated with full antigen stimulation, by demonstrating that TCR interaction with variant peptide antigens can trigger target cell adhesion and surface exploration without activating the signaling pathway that results in cytotoxicity. PMID:9861010

  13. Study of Cytotoxic Effects of Benzonitrile Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Lovecka, Petra; Thimova, Marketa; Grznarova, Petra; Lipov, Jan; Knejzlik, Zdenek; Stiborova, Hana; Nindhia, Tjokorda Gde Tirta; Demnerova, Katerina; Ruml, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The benzonitrile herbicides bromoxynil, chloroxynil, dichlobenil, and ioxynil have been used actively worldwide to control weeds in agriculture since 1970s. Even though dichlobenil is prohibited in EU since 2008, studies addressing the fate of benzonitrile herbicides in the environment show that some metabolites of these herbicides are very persistent. We tested the cytotoxic effects of benzonitrile herbicides and their microbial metabolites using two human cell lines, Hep G2 and HEK293T, representing liver and kidneys as potential target organs in humans. The cell viability and proliferation were determined by MTT test and RTCA DP Analyzer system, respectively. The latter allows real-time monitoring of the effect of added substances. As the cytotoxic compounds could compromise cell membrane integrity, the lactate dehydrogenase test was performed as well. We observed high toxic effects of bromoxynil, chloroxynil, and ioxynil on both tested cell lines. In contrast, we determined only low inhibition of cell growth in presence of dichlobenil and microbial metabolites originating from the tested herbicides. PMID:26339609

  14. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of biogenic silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R.; Feitosa, L. O.; Ballottin, D.; Marcato, P. D.; Tasic, L.; Durán, N.

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic silver nanoparticles with 40.3 ± 3.5 nm size and negative surface charge (- 40 mV) were prepared with Fusarium oxysporum. The cytotoxicity of 3T3 cell and human lymphocyte were studied by a TaliTM image-based cytometer and the genotoxicity through Allium cepa and comet assay. The results of BioAg-w (washed) and BioAg-nw (unwashed) biogenic silver nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity exceeding 50 μg/mL with no significant differences of response in 5 and 10 μg/mL regarding viability. Results of genotoxicity at concentrations 5.0 and 10.0 ug/mL show some response, but at concentrations 0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL the washed and unwashed silver nanoparticles did not present any effect. This in an important result since in tests with different bacteria species and strains, including resistant, MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) had good answers at concentrations less than 1.9 μg/mL. This work concludes that biogenic silver nanoparticles may be a promising option for antimicrobial use in the range where no cyto or genotoxic effect were observed. Furthermore, human cells were found to have a greater resistance to the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles in comparison with other cells.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fernández, A M; Cordero, M D; de Miguel, M; Delgado-Rufino, M D; Sánchez-Alcázar, J A; Navas, P

    2008-01-14

    Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline in human fibroblasts primary culture. Human fibroblast cells were cultured from healthy subjects and incubated with 50 microM and 100 microM amitriptyline. Cell counting was performed to study dose-dependency of toxicity. Lipid peroxidation analysis and western blotting for antioxidants catalase and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) were carried out in order to evaluate oxidative stress. To investigate mitochondria damage the following determinations were made: cytochrome c, citrate synthase, and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Amitriptyline reduced significantly the number of cultured cells, resulting in a decrease of 45.2%, 65.0% and 94.9% when treated with 20 microM, 50 microM and 100 microM amitriptyline, respectively. This drug enhanced the production of oxidized products during lipid peroxidation, inverting the reduced/oxidized ratio to 25% reduction and 75% oxidation after 24h of amitriptyline administration. A decreased in catalase protein levels has been also observed. Moreover, amitriptyline treatment induced a significant decrease of cytochrome c, DeltaPsi(m), and citrate synthase activity; revealing mitochondrial damage. These findings suggest that amitriptyline has a strong cytotoxic effect in human fibroblasts, decreasing growth rate and mitochondrial activity, and increasing oxidative stress.

  16. Cytotoxic isoferulic acidamide from Myricaria germanica (Tamaricaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Nawwar, Mahmoud A.; Swilam, Noha F.; Hashim, Amani N.; Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Tamgermanitin, a unique N-trans-Isoferuloyltyramine, together with the hitherto unknown polyphenolics, 2,4-di-O-galloyl-(α/β)-glucopyranose and kaempferide 3,7-disulphate have been isolated from the leaf aqueous ethanol extract of the false tamarisk, Myricaria germanica DESV. In addition, 18 known phenolics were also separated and characterized. All structures were elucidated on the basis of detailed analysis of 1D- 1H and 13C NMR, COSY, HSQC, HMBC and HRFTESIMS spectral data. The extract, its chromatographic column fractions and the isolated isoferuloyltyramine, tamgermanetin demonstrated potential cytotoxic effect against three different tumor cell lines, namely liver (Huh-7), breast (MCF-7) and prostate (PC-3). The IC50''s were found to be substantially low with low-resistance possibility. DNA flow-cytometic analysis indicated that column fractions and tamgermanetin enhanced pre-G apoptotic fraction. Both materials showed inhibiting activity against PARP enzyme activity. In conclusion, we report the isolation and identification of a novel compound, tamgermanitin, from the aqueous ethanol extract of Myricaria germanica leaves. Further, different fractions of the extract and tamgermanitin exhibit potent cytotoxic activities which warrant further investigations. PMID:23123452

  17. Cytotoxic activities of flavonoids from Centaurea scoparia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sayed A; Kamel, Emadeldin M

    2014-01-01

    Phytochemical studies on the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Centaurea scoparia led to the isolation of two new flavonoids, 3',4'-dihydroxy-(3'',4''-dihydro-3''-hydroxy-4''-acetoxy)-2'',2''-dimethylpyrano-(5'',6'':7,8)-flavone-3-O- β -D-glucopyranoside (1) and 3,3',4'-trihydroxy-(3'',4''-dihydro-3'',4''-dihydroxy)-2'',2''-dimethylpyrano-(5'',6'':7,8)-flavone (2), along with eight known flavonoids isolated for the first time from this plant, cynaroside (3), Apigetrin (4), centaureidin (5), oroxylin A (6), 5,7-dihydroxy-3',4',5'-trimethoxyflavone (7), atalantoflavone (8), 5-hydroxy-3',4',8-trimethoxy-2'',2''-dimethylpyrano (5'',6'':6,7)-flavone (9), and 3',4',5,8-tetramethoxy-2'',2''-dimethylpyrano (5'',6'':6,7)-flavone (10). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by means of spectroscopic tools including 1D and 2D NMR, UV, IR, and mass spectroscopy. Cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated against human cervical carcinoma HeLa, human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7. Compound 2 was the most potent cytotoxic agent against HeLa cells with an IC50 0.079  μM. PMID:25114960

  18. Study of Cytotoxic Effects of Benzonitrile Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Lovecka, Petra; Thimova, Marketa; Grznarova, Petra; Lipov, Jan; Knejzlik, Zdenek; Stiborova, Hana; Nindhia, Tjokorda Gde Tirta; Demnerova, Katerina; Ruml, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The benzonitrile herbicides bromoxynil, chloroxynil, dichlobenil, and ioxynil have been used actively worldwide to control weeds in agriculture since 1970s. Even though dichlobenil is prohibited in EU since 2008, studies addressing the fate of benzonitrile herbicides in the environment show that some metabolites of these herbicides are very persistent. We tested the cytotoxic effects of benzonitrile herbicides and their microbial metabolites using two human cell lines, Hep G2 and HEK293T, representing liver and kidneys as potential target organs in humans. The cell viability and proliferation were determined by MTT test and RTCA DP Analyzer system, respectively. The latter allows real-time monitoring of the effect of added substances. As the cytotoxic compounds could compromise cell membrane integrity, the lactate dehydrogenase test was performed as well. We observed high toxic effects of bromoxynil, chloroxynil, and ioxynil on both tested cell lines. In contrast, we determined only low inhibition of cell growth in presence of dichlobenil and microbial metabolites originating from the tested herbicides. PMID:26339609

  19. Quercetin-induced cardioprotection against doxorubicin cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer has continually been the leading cause of death worldwide for decades. Thus, scientists have actively devoted themselves to studying cancer therapeutics. Doxorubicin is an efficient drug used in cancer therapy, but also produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that induce severe cytotoxicity against heart cells. Quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid, has been proven to contain potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, this in vitro study investigated whether quercetin can decrease doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity and promote cell repair systems in cardiomyocyte H9C2 cells. Results Proteomic analysis and a cell biology assay were performed to investigate the quercetin-induced responses. Our data demonstrated that quercetin treatment protects the cardiomyocytes in a doxorubicin-induced heart damage model. Quercetin significantly facilitated cell survival by inhibiting cell apoptosis and maintaining cell morphology by rearranging the cytoskeleton. Additionally, 2D-DIGE combined with MALDI-TOF MS analysis indicated that quercetin might stimulate cardiomyocytes to repair damage after treating doxorubicin by modulating metabolic activation, protein folding and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Conclusion Based on a review of the literature, this study is the first to report detailed protective mechanisms for the action of quercetin against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte toxicity based on in-depth cell biology and proteomic analysis. PMID:24359494

  20. Pyruvate anions neutralize peritoneal dialysate cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Brunkhorst, R

    1995-01-01

    A new peritoneal dialysate containing pyruvate anions was developed in order to avoid cytotoxic effect of conventional lactate-based dialysate. The dialysate has a final pH of 5.4 to 5.6 and is composed of 1.36-3.86% glucose-monohydrate; 132 mmol/l sodium; 1.75 mmol/l calcium; 0.75 mmol/l magnesium; 102 mmol/l chloride and 35 mmol/l pyruvate. For cytotoxicity testing peritoneal macrophages, and mesothelial cells (MC) were exposed to conventional lactate dialysate, and pyruvate dialysate. We investigated the O2- generation and cytokine synthesis after endotoxin stimulation in peritoneal macrophages and the proliferation of mesothelial cells of cultured human MC. After exposure to lactate dialysate O2- generation and cytokine synthesis in peritoneal macrophages and proliferation of mesothelial cells were inhibited when compared to solution containing pyruvate and the control solution. After preincubation with 3.86% glucose containing solutions, all negative effects became even more pronounced in the lactate group whereas after pre-exposure to pyruvate containing solution the toxic effects were absent. These results suggest that the acute toxic effects of commercially available peritoneal dialysates can be avoided by the use of sodium pyruvate instead of sodium lactate.

  1. Cytotoxicity of occupationally and environmentally relevant mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Bünger, Jürgen; Westphal, Götz; Mönnich, Angelika; Hinnendahl, Britta; Hallier, Ernst; Müller, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Mycotoxins can cause various toxic effects in humans. Acute and chronic respiratory diseases were reported after inhalation of organic dust containing toxigenic moulds and mycotoxins, respectively. To gain first insights into health effects from airborne exposure to these compounds, five toxigenic airborne moulds of the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium collected at composting plants and eight reference mycotoxins were tested for cytotoxicity in four established cell lines as a surrogate of tissues known or suspected to be targets of toxic effects of mycotoxins. The known mycotoxins sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, verruculogen, penitrem A, and roquefortine C were detected in extracts of the moulds. All five extracts caused serious toxic effects in the cell lines. Sterigmatocystin caused a 80-fold higher toxicity in the A-549 lung cell line compared to Hep-G2 liver cells indicating a specific susceptibility of A-549 to this agent. Since only a minor part of the toxic effects of the extracts in A-549 cells and--to a lesser extent--in the other cell lines could be explained by contents of the identified mycotoxins, the presence of additional mycotoxins or other toxic principles is assumed in the mould extracts. However, the detected mycotoxins in the mould extracts and their distinctive cytotoxicity support the hypothesis that mycotoxins may be involved in the aetiology of lung diseases due to the inhalation of organic dust. PMID:15337583

  2. Preparing cytotoxic agents in an isolator.

    PubMed

    Favier, M; Hansel, S; Bressolle, F

    1993-11-01

    The design of an isolator and its use by an oncology satellite pharmacy for preparing cytotoxic drugs are described. The isolator (Iso Concept, Boulogne, France) is a totally enclosed ventilated biological-safety cabinet of class III polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with positive air pressure, a half-suit with a rotating seal, and attached neoprene gloves. There are three work-stations, one for the half-suit and two along one side of the isolator. The ventilation and air filtration system consists of one entry pipe with a full ventilation-filtration box fitted with one prefilter, one blower, one ball valve, one high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, one airtight nipple connected to an automatic sterilizer, alarms, and one exhaust pipe protected by a HEPA filter. The air lock consists of a rigid, transparent Plexiglas pass-through. The chamber is sterilized with heated compressed air mixed with 3.5% peracetic acid. Maintenance includes regular changing of gloves and HEPA filters; checking of the integrity of the PVC, half-suit, and gloves; and washing and decontamination procedures. Preparation of cytotoxics is planned in advance with prescription data and manufacturing sheets. In the half-suit, a pharmacy technician reads the label, supervises preparation of the sterile admixture, and writes a label. The operators on the side of the unit read the manufacturing sheet and prepare the dose identified by the label.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  4. Cytotoxic Killing and Immune Evasion by Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J. T.; Stark, Jaroslav

    2007-07-01

    The interaction between the immune system and pathogens is a complex one, with pathogens constantly developing new ways of evading destruction by the immune system. The immune system's task is made even harder when the pathogen in question is an intra-cellular one (such as a virus or certain bacteria) and it is necessary to kill the infected host cell in order to eliminate the pathogen. This causes damage to the host, and such killing therefore needs to be carefully controlled, particularly in tissues with poor regenerative potential, or those involved in the immune response itself. Host cells therefore possess repair mechanisms which can counteract killing by immune cells. These in turn can be subverted by pathogens which up-regulate the resistance of infected cells to killing. In this paper, we explore the hypothesis that this repair process plays an important role in determining the efficacy of evasion and escape from immune control. We model a situation where cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells kill pathogen-infected and tumour cells by directed secretion of preformed granules containing perforin and granzymes. Resistance to such killing can be conferred by the expression of serine protease inhibitors (serpins). These are utilized by several virally infected and tumour cells, as well as playing a role in the protection of host bystander, immune and immuneprivileged cells. We build a simple stochastic model of cytotoxic killing, where serpins can neutralize granzymes stoichiometrically by forming an irreversible complex, and the survival of the cell is determined by the balance between serpin depletion and replenishment, which in its simplest form is equivalent to the well known shot noise process. We use existing analytical results for this process, and additional simulations to analyse the effects of repair on cytotoxic killing. We then extend the model to the case of a replicating target cell population, which gives a branching process

  5. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    PubMed Central

    Skaug, V; Davies, R; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells. Images PMID:6318798

  6. Cytotoxic activity and apoptosis induction by gaillardin.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Maryam Hamzeloo; Naghibi, Farzaneh; Atoofi, Azadeh; Rezaie, Mitra Asgharian; Irani, Mahboobeh; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity of gaillardin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Inula oculus-christi L. (Asteraceae), was assessed in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7, human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG-2, human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line A-549, and human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29, resulting in IC50 values of 6.37, 6.20, 4.76, and 1.81 microg/mL, respectively, in the microculture tetrazolium-formazan MTT assay. In vitro apoptosis-inducing properties of gaillardin were also evaluated in MCF-7 cells with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The results suggest gaillardin as a candidate for further studies in cancer therapy PMID:23819305

  7. Antioxidant and cytotoxic flavonols from Calotropis procera.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona A; Hamed, Manal M; Ahmed, Wafaa S; Abdou, Allia M

    2011-01-01

    Phytochemical investigations of Calotropis procera leaves have led to the isolation of two new compounds: quercetagetin-6-methyl ether 3-O-beta-D-4C1-galacturonopyranoside (3) and (E)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl-2-O-beta-D-4C1 -glucopyranoside)-methyl propenoate (4), along with eleven known metabolites: nine flavonol and two cinnamic acid derivatives. All metabolites were isolated for the first time from the genus Calotropis, except for 1 isolated previously from Calotropis gigantea. The structures were determined by spectroscopic methods (UV, ESI-MS, 1H, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). The radical scavenging activity of the aqueous methanol extract and compounds 8-13 was measured by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Cytotoxic screening of the same compounds was carried out on brine shrimps as well.

  8. Fluid dynamics of cytotoxic safety cabinets.

    PubMed

    Braconnier, R; Bonthoux, F

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the specific fluid dynamics characteristics of cytotoxic safety cabinets (CSC), particularly those used in cancer drug reconstitution operations. Measurements taken on site were used to derive characteristic data for these cabinets. An in-depth laboratory investigation of airflows inside another CSC was also conducted. Anemometric values recorded on these two installations enabled the experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics methods applied to CSC. The digital flow simulations conducted provide a better understanding of the detailed flow structure inside a CSC and made it possible to study the influence of different operating parameters on the air velocity distribution inside the cabinet front opening: recycled air temperature, product protection airflow rate, suction openings spatial distribution, air compensation mode and draughts, operator arm penetration, and operator presence in front of the cabinet. PMID:20007340

  9. Cytotoxic clerodane diterpenes from Zuelania guidonia.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carlos; De Ford, Christian; Castro, Victor; Merfort, Irmgard; Murillo, Renato

    2014-03-28

    The leaves of Zuelania guidonia yielded eight new clerodane diterpenes, namely, zuelaguidins A-H (1-8), and the known clerodane diterpene esculentin A (9). Some of these structures contained a 3,6-dihydro-1,2-dioxin moiety. The new compounds were isolated and identified using 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. All compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against the CCRF-CEM (human acute lymphocytic leukemia), CEM-ADR5000 (human acute lymphocytic leukemia resistant to doxorubicin), and MIA-PaCa-2 (human pancreatic carcinoma) cell lines as well as for their selectivity against peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy human subjects. Zuelaguidins B, C, and E were the most potent compounds against the CCRF-CEM cell line, with IC50 values ranging from 1.6 to 2.5 μM. PMID:24484281

  10. Cytotoxic chaetoglobosins from the endophyte Chaetomium globosum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Ge, Hui Ming; Jiao, Rui Hua; Li, Jing; Peng, Hui; Wang, Yu Rong; Wu, Jun Hua; Song, Yong Chun; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2010-11-01

    Two new alkaloids chaetoglobosins V (1) and W (2), together with the six known congeners 3-8, were isolated through bioassay-guided fractionations from the EtOAc extract of a solid culture of Chaetomium globosum IFB-E041. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including mainly 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Chaetoglobosin W (2) was unique in its possession of an oxolane ring formed via an oxygen bridge between C-3 and C-6. The isolated fungal metabolites exhibited moderate cytotoxic activities against four human cancer cell lines (KB, K562, MCF-7, and HepG2) with their IC(50) values in a range of 18-30 µg/mL. PMID:20486076

  11. Study of the in vitro cytotoxicity testing of medical devices

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEIJIA; ZHOU, JING; XU, YUYIN

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity test is one of the biological evaluation and screening tests that use tissue cells in vitro to observe the cell growth, reproduction and morphological effects by medical devices. Cytotoxicity is preferred as a pilot project test and an important indicator for toxicity evaluation of medical devices as it is simple, fast, has a high sensitivity and can save animals from toxicity. Three types of cytotoxicity test are stated in the International Organization for Standardization 109993-5: Extract, direct contact and indirect contact tests. The xCELLigence real-time cell analysis system shows a significant potential in regards to cytotoxicity in recent years. The present review provides a brief insight into the in vitro cytotoxicity testing of medical devices. PMID:26405534

  12. Synthesis and cytotoxic activities of semisynthetic zearalenone analogues.

    PubMed

    Tadpetch, Kwanruthai; Kaewmee, Benyapa; Chantakaew, Kittisak; Kantee, Kawalee; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Phongpaichit, Souwalak

    2016-08-01

    Zearalenone is a β-resorcylic acid macrolide with various biological activities. Herein we report the synthesis and cytotoxic activities of 34 zearalenone analogues against human oral epidermoid carcinoma (KB) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells as well as noncancerous Vero cells. Some zearalenone analogues showed moderately enhanced cytotoxic activities against the two cancer cell lines. We have discovered the potential lead compounds with diminished or no cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Preliminary structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the double bond at the 1' and 2' positions of zearalenone core was crucial for cytotoxic activities on both cell lines. In addition, for zearalenol analogues, the unprotected hydroxyl group at C-2 and an alkoxy substituent at C-4 played key roles on cytotoxic effects of both cell lines.

  13. Cytotoxicity screening of endemic plants from Guayana highlands.

    PubMed

    Guil-Guerrero, José Luis; Campra, Pablo

    2009-08-01

    A chemical-ecology approach has been used to screen plants growing in Guyana Highlands as an indicator of production of biologically active secondary metabolites. Extracts of leaves from 19 species, most of them endemic in this area, and collected at the top of Roraima Tepui (2,723 m) were screened in vitro at different concentrations for their potential cytotoxic activity against three tumour cell lines: HT29 (colon), A549 (lung) and MDA-MB-231 (breast). MTT (tetrazolium blue) colorimetric assay was employed as cytotoxicity test. Extracts of nine species caused less than 30% growth in at least one cell line. From these species, high cytotoxic activity was detected in Casearia sylvestris var. lingua and Ledotamnus sessiliflorus extracts; medium activity was found in Cyathea sp. Two other species, Cyrilla racemiflora and Heliamphora minor showed lower but significant cytotoxicity. Further cytotoxicity-directed fractionation of these extracts would be advisable to isolate and identify the active principles of these plants.

  14. Cytotoxicity of Two Bioactive Root Canal Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Pezelj-Ribaric, Sonja; Roguljić, Marija; Miletic, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of two different bioactive root canal sealers: one based on mineral trioxide aggregate, MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Solucoes Odontologicas, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and the other based on bioceramics, Endosequence BC Sealer (Brasseler, Savannah, Georgia, USA), in culture of mouse L929 fibroblasts. Materials and methods Mouse fibroblasts (L929), obtained from subcutaneous connective tissue of mouse line C3Hf, were cultivated in plastic culture flasks in an incubator at 37şC, with 5% CO2 and 90% humidity. Freshly mixed Endosequence BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex (0.1 g each) were placed on sterile teflon discs, 6 mm in diameter. Teflon discs with the materials as well as empty discs serving as control were placed in wells of 12-well plate. After incubation times of 1, 6, 20 and 24 hours, the teflon discs were removed from the wells and the number of viable cells was determined using trypan blue in Neubauer chamber. Results In comparison to the control group, MTA Fillapex had significantly less viable cells for all incubation periods (p≤0.05), while Endosequence BC sealer had significantly less viable cells after 6, 20, and 24 hours of incubation (p≤0.05). MTA Fillapex comprised significantly less viable cells in comparison to Endosequence BC sealer after the first hour and after 20 hours of incubation (p≤0.05), while for the other incubation periods there were no significant differences (p≥0.05). Conclusion MTA Fillapex and Endosequence BC sealer were both cytotoxic in cultures of mouse L929 fibroblasts.

  15. Cytotoxicity of Two Bioactive Root Canal Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Pezelj-Ribaric, Sonja; Roguljić, Marija; Miletic, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of two different bioactive root canal sealers: one based on mineral trioxide aggregate, MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Solucoes Odontologicas, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and the other based on bioceramics, Endosequence BC Sealer (Brasseler, Savannah, Georgia, USA), in culture of mouse L929 fibroblasts. Materials and methods Mouse fibroblasts (L929), obtained from subcutaneous connective tissue of mouse line C3Hf, were cultivated in plastic culture flasks in an incubator at 37şC, with 5% CO2 and 90% humidity. Freshly mixed Endosequence BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex (0.1 g each) were placed on sterile teflon discs, 6 mm in diameter. Teflon discs with the materials as well as empty discs serving as control were placed in wells of 12-well plate. After incubation times of 1, 6, 20 and 24 hours, the teflon discs were removed from the wells and the number of viable cells was determined using trypan blue in Neubauer chamber. Results In comparison to the control group, MTA Fillapex had significantly less viable cells for all incubation periods (p≤0.05), while Endosequence BC sealer had significantly less viable cells after 6, 20, and 24 hours of incubation (p≤0.05). MTA Fillapex comprised significantly less viable cells in comparison to Endosequence BC sealer after the first hour and after 20 hours of incubation (p≤0.05), while for the other incubation periods there were no significant differences (p≥0.05). Conclusion MTA Fillapex and Endosequence BC sealer were both cytotoxic in cultures of mouse L929 fibroblasts. PMID:27688421

  16. Cytotoxic Activities of Flavonoids from Centaurea scoparia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sayed A.; Kamel, Emadeldin M.

    2014-01-01

    Phytochemical studies on the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Centaurea scoparia led to the isolation of two new flavonoids, 3′,4′-dihydroxy-(3′′,4′′-dihydro-3′′-hydroxy-4′′-acetoxy)-2′′,2′′-dimethylpyrano-(5′′,6′′:7,8)-flavone-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 3,3′,4′-trihydroxy-(3′′,4′′-dihydro-3′′,4′′-dihydroxy)-2′′,2′′-dimethylpyrano-(5′′,6′′:7,8)-flavone (2), along with eight known flavonoids isolated for the first time from this plant, cynaroside (3), Apigetrin (4), centaureidin (5), oroxylin A (6), 5,7-dihydroxy-3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyflavone (7), atalantoflavone (8), 5-hydroxy-3′,4′,8-trimethoxy-2′′,2′′-dimethylpyrano (5′′,6′′:6,7)-flavone (9), and 3′,4′,5,8-tetramethoxy-2′′,2′′-dimethylpyrano (5′′,6′′:6,7)-flavone (10). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by means of spectroscopic tools including 1D and 2D NMR, UV, IR, and mass spectroscopy. Cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated against human cervical carcinoma HeLa, human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7. Compound 2 was the most potent cytotoxic agent against HeLa cells with an IC50 0.079 μM. PMID:25114960

  17. Determining optimal cytotoxic activity of human Her2neu specific CD8 T cells by comparing the Cr51 release assay to the xCELLigence system.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Courtney L; Henle, Andrea M; Knutson, Keith L

    2012-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8 T cells constitute a subgroup of T cells that are capable of inducing the death of infected or malignant host cells. These cells express a specialized receptor, called the T cell receptor (TCR), which can recognize a specific antigenic peptide bound to HLA class I molecules. Engagement of infected cells or tumor cells through their HLA class I molecule results in production of lytic molecules such as granzymes and perforin resulting in target cell death. While it is useful to determine frequencies of antigen-specific CD8 T cells using assays such as the ELIspot or flow cytometry, it is also helpful to ascertain the strength of CD8 T cell responses using cytotoxicity assays. The most recognizable assay for assessing cytotoxic function is the Chromium Release Assay (CRA), which is considered a standard assay. The CRA has several limitations, including exposure of cells to gamma radiation, lack of reproducibility, and a requirement for large numbers of cells. Over the past decade, there has been interest in adopting new strategies to overcome these limitations. Newer approaches include those that measure caspase release , BLT esterase activity and surface expression of CD107. The impedance-based assay, using the Roche xCelligence system, was examined in the present paper for its potential as an alternative to the CRA. Impedance or opposition to an electric current occurs when adherent tumor cells bind to electrode plates. Tumor cells detach following killing and electrical impedance is reduced which can be measured by the xCelligence system. The ability to adapt the impedance-based approach to assess cell-mediated killing rests on the observation that T cells do not adhere tightly to most surfaces and do not appear to have much impact on impedance thus diminishing any concern of direct interference of the T cells with the measurement. Results show that the impedance-based assay can detect changes in the levels of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells

  18. Silica vesicles as nanocarriers and adjuvants for generating both antibody and T-cell mediated immune resposes to Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Mody, Karishma T; Mahony, Donna; Zhang, Jun; Cavallaro, Antonino S; Zhang, Bing; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Timothy J; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2014-12-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is widely distributed in cattle industries and causes significant economic losses worldwide annually. A limiting factor in the development of subunit vaccines for BVDV is the need to elicit both antibody and T-cell-mediated immunity as well as addressing the toxicity of adjuvants. In this study, we have prepared novel silica vesicles (SV) as the new generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. With small particle size of 50 nm, thin wall (~6 nm), large cavity (~40 nm) and large entrance size (5.9 nm for SV-100 and 16 nm for SV-140), the SV showed high loading capacity (∼ 250 μg/mg) and controlled release of codon-optimised E2 (oE2) protein, a major immunogenic determinant of BVDV. The in vivo functionality of the system was validated in mice immunisation trials comparing oE2 plus Quil A (50 μg of oE2 plus 10 μg of Quil A, a conventional adjuvant) to the oE2/SV-140 (50 μg of oE2 adsorbed to 250 μg of SV-140) or oE2/SV-140 together with 10 μg of Quil A. Compared to the oE2 plus Quil A, which generated BVDV specific antibody responses at a titre of 10(4), the oE2/SV-140 group induced a 10 times higher antibody response. In addition, the cell-mediated response, which is essential to recognise and eliminate the invading pathogens, was also found to be higher [1954-2628 spot forming units (SFU)/million cells] in mice immunised with oE2/SV-140 in comparison to oE2 plus Quil A (512-1369 SFU/million cells). Our study has demonstrated that SV can be used as the next-generation nanocarriers and adjuvants for enhanced veterinary vaccine delivery. PMID:25239045

  19. In vitro augmentation of human natural cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, M R; Moore, M

    1981-01-01

    Stimulation of human blood lymphocyte preparations with mitomycin C-treated lymphoid cell lines produced increased levels of cytotoxicity against both NK-susceptible and NK-resistant target cell lines. The greatest effect was seen following stimulation by the B lymphocyte-derived lines, Bri8 and raji. K562 also stimulated high levels of activity while the T lymphocyte-derived lines, CCRF/CEM and MOLT 4, produced smaller increases activity was also found in PHA- and MLC-stimulated populations. Stimulation by lymphoid cell lines gave increased cytotoxic activity against all five cell lines when used as target cells and the pattern of target cell susceptibility was maintained, with K562, CCRF/CEM and MOLT 4 being more susceptible than Bri8 and Raji. No direct correlation was found between the level of cytotoxic activity and the level of 3H-thymidine uptake in stimulated effector cell populations. The B cell lines stimulated high levels of isotopic uptake, while the T cell lines gave no significant stimulation. Similarly, the level of 3H-thymidine incorporation following PHA and MLC stimulation showed no direct correlation with the level of cytotoxic activity. Stimulation of lymphocyte transformation did not appear to be necessary for the induction of cytotoxic activity, although the largest increases in cytotoxicity occurred in populations showing high isotope incorporation. No correlation was found between the target cell susceptibility of the different cell lines and their ability to stimulate cytotoxicity. PMID:7307338

  20. Acrylic Resin Cytotoxicity for Denture Base--Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Freitas, Emily; dos Santos, Daniela; de Medeiros, Rodrigo; Sonego, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Acrylic resin is a widely used material in clinical practice, and a satisfactory biocompatibility is essential. When the resin polymerization reaction is incomplete, residual monomers are released into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through a literature review, the cytotoxicity caused by the denture base acrylic resin used, and its components. The selection of published studies was performed on the Pubmed database from January 2008 to July 2013. The keywords used were: "cytotoxicity and acrylic resins", "cytotoxicity and denture base resins" and "cytotoxicity and oral prosthesis". Inclusion criteria were: in vitro studies and literature reviews published in English that evaluated the acrylic resin cytotoxicity for denture base and its components. Studies with no reference to the search strategy were excluded. A total of 182 articles were found. Among these, only 13 were included for writing this review. The MTT test is the most common test used to evaluate acrylic resin cytotoxicity. Auto-polymerized resin is more cytotoxic than heat-polymerized resin because of its higher quantity of residual monomers which cause cell and tissue changes in the oral mucosa. However, more studies are necessary for the development of biocompatible materials.

  1. Evaluation of the In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Crosslinked Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Martha O.; Etheridge, Julie M.; Thompson, Joshua A.; Vorwald, Charlotte E.; Dean, David; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF). PPF is an aliphatic biodegradable polymer that has been well characterized for use in bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Four different cell types, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), fibroblasts (L929), pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3), and canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSC), were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of PPF. These cell types represent the tissues that PPF would interact with in vivo as a bone tissue scaffold. The sol fraction of the PPF films was measured and then utilized to estimate crosslinking density. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using XTT assay and fluorescence imaging. Results showed that PPF supported similar cell metabolic activities of hMSC, L929, MC3T3 and cMSC compared to the non-cytotoxic control, high density polyethylene (HDPE) and were statistically different than those cultured with the cytotoxic control, a polyurethane film containing 0.1% zinc diethyldithiocarbamate (ZCF). Results showed differing cellular responses to ZCF, the cytotoxic control. The L929 cells had the lowest cell metabolic activity levels after exposure to ZCF compared to the cell metabolic activity levels of the MC3T3, hMSC or cMSC cells. Qualitative verification of the results using fluorescence imaging demonstrated no change in cell morphology, vacuolization, or detachment when cultured with PPF compared to HDPE or blank media cultures. Overall the cytotoxicity response of the cells to PPF was demonstrated to be similar to the cytotoxic response of cells to known non-cytotoxic materials (HDPE). PMID:23627804

  2. Interleukin-2 activation of cytotoxic cells in postmastectomy seroma.

    PubMed

    Gercel-Taylor, C; Hoffman, J P; Taylor, D D; Owens, K J; Eisenberg, B L

    1996-02-15

    Lymphocytes were isolated from breast seroma fluids and used to study the mechanism of activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes and possible role of immunological potentiation following surgery in breast cancer patients. Single or serial samples were obtained from patients who had undergone mastectomy or lumpectomy with axillary node dissection. Lymphocytes were activated with rIL-2 (interleukin-2) and their cytotoxic activity was studied against Daudi and K562 cells and against a breast tumor line (SKBr-3). All of the patients (21/21) responded to IL-2 stimulation by significant activation of cytotoxic activity. The unstimulated cytotoxic activity of these cells against NK targets was low with less than 10% specific release in cytotoxicity assays. In simultaneous experiments, autologous seroma fluid was included during activation of lymphocytes to study possible regulatory molecules that may be present. In 17/21 patients, the presence of their seroma fluid, during the activation period, enhanced or did not effect the cytotoxic potential of their lymphocytes; inhibition was observed when seroma fluids from 4/21 patients were included. Analysis of the cytotoxic population derived from combined IL-2 and seroma treatments indicates the presence of cells with increased expression of CD56, and CD2, as well as in some cases CD16 expression. Cytotoxic lymphocytes derived from IL-2 and seroma treatments appeared to be more effective killers. Modulation of CD2 expression with seroma alone appeared to result in the generation of this highly cytotoxic population. This study demonstrates the role of CD2 expression in the effectiveness of LAK cell killing and also potential benefit of an immunotherapeutic approach to the postoperative treatment of carcinoma of the breast.

  3. Cell-mediated immune responses to Babesia bovis merozoite antigens in cattle following infection with tick-derived or cultured parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W C; Logan, K S; Wagner, G G; Tetzlaff, C L

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cattle experimentally infected with Babesia bovis were examined for parasite-specific cell-mediated immune responses. Unfractionated merozoites and soluble and membrane fractions derived from merozoites were all antigenic for immune cattle, although the membrane fraction was the most stimulatory. Cattle responded to different antigenic fractions in a differential manner, and only that animal immunized with autologous cultured parasites responded to parasitized erythrocyte culture supernatants. Plastic-adherent cells (presumably monocytes/macrophages) were required for a proliferative response to babesial antigens but not to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A, suggesting that babesial proteins are not simply mitogenic for T cells. Lymphocyte responses directed against a different hemoparasite from Mexico, Babesia bigemina, indicate that this parasite shares cross-reactive T-cell epitopes with B. bovis. These studies define a system whereby T lymphocytes from babesia-immune cattle can be used in proliferation assays to identify babesial merozoite antigens which are immunogenic for T cells. Because identification of helper T-cell epitopes is important for the design of a babesial subunit vaccine which will evoke anamnestic responses, the studies described here provide a basis for such experiments. Images PMID:2050406

  4. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    PubMed

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future. PMID:26478541

  5. Analysis of leukocyte populations in Canadian Holsteins classified as high or low immune responders for antibody- or cell-mediated immune response

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Brad C.; Cartwright, Shannon L.; Mallard, Bonnie A.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of dairy cattle for increased milk production with little or no emphasis on health traits leads to an increased prevalence of disease. A possible genetic solution to this problem is to combine production and immune response traits in a weighted selection index. In the current study, leukocyte populations in heifers identified as having a high antibody-mediated immune response (HiAMIR) or high cell-mediated immune response (HiCMIR) phenotype were compared before and after immunization in order to identify leukocyte population profiles associated with these phenotypes. The results demonstrated that the HiCMIR-phenotype animals had a higher baseline proportion of gamma-delta T-cells in peripheral blood. Also, the observed increase in the proportion of B-cells in peripheral blood in response to immunization was greater in the HiAMIR-phenotype animals. It is expected that identifying leukocyte population profiles associated with immune response phenotypes will improve our ability to identify animals with enhanced overall immune responsiveness. PMID:23024458

  6. The T-cell-mediated immune response and return rate of fledgling American kestrels are positively correlated with parental clutch size.

    PubMed Central

    Tella, J L; Bortolotti, G R; Dawson, R D; Forero, M G

    2000-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that parents face a trade-off between the number and viability of the progeny they produce. We found evidence for an apparent trade-off in a free-living population of American kestrels (Falco sparverius), as larger clutches produced more but lighter fledglings. However, while the body mass of fledglings has traditionally been used as a measure of survival prospect, offspring immunocompetence should also play an important role. We thus measured the T-cell-mediated immune response of fledgling kestrels in relation to brood traits and nest-rearing conditions through a cross-fostering experiment. The immune response was positively correlated with the body condition of fledglings, but was also higher in those hatched from five-egg than four-egg clutches. These results were not influenced by other brood traits, nor by current exposure to stressors and infectious agents, as measured by serological variables. Such ability to resist pathogens may account for why the probability of offspring returning to the study area in subsequent years, when controlling for brood size, was higher for five-egg than four-egg clutches. These results suggest an optimal clutch size through maternal effects on offspring immunocompetence rather than a trade-off between the number and quality of the offspring. PMID:10853731

  7. Humoral and cell-mediated immunity to the Plasmodium falciparum ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen in an adult population exposed to highly endemic malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, H P; Felger, I; Genton, B; Alexander, N; al-Yaman, F; Anders, R F; Alpers, M

    1995-01-01

    A parasitological and immunological survey was carried out in an area in Papua New Guinea highly endemic for malaria. Two hundred fourteen adult individuals were selected for studies to assess their immune responses against the malaria vaccine candidate ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA). Total immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies directed against RESA as well as specific IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 antibodies were determined. Humoral responses directed against RESA were frequent in all IgG subclasses. Only IgG3 responses were found to be age dependent. Total anti-RESA IgG antibodies were not correlated with protection against malaria as measured by parasite prevalence, parasite density, or health center attendance. In contrast, cytophilic antibodies (IgG1 and IgG3) were associated with reduced Plasmodium falciparum prevalence and reduced health center attendance. T-cell proliferation in general was low and very infrequent. No correlation between humoral and cellular immune responses could be found. Parasite density, parasite prevalence, and health center visits tended to be reduced in individuals with good humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:7822028

  8. Cell mediated innate responses of cattle and swine are diverse during foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection: a unique landscape of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Toka, Felix N; Golde, William T

    2013-05-01

    Pathogens in general and pathogenic viruses in particular have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to escape the immune response of mammalian species. Viruses that cause acute disease tend to bear characteristics that make them very contagious, as survival does not derive from chronicity of infection, but spread of disease throughout the herd. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is one of the most contagious viruses known. Upon infection of susceptible species, cloven-hoofed animals, the virus proliferates rapidly and causes a vesicular disease within 2-4 days. Disease symptoms resolve by 10 days to 2 weeks and in most cases, virus can no longer be detected. Periods of fever and viremia are usually brief, 1-3 days. In vivo control of virus infection and clearance of the virus during and following acute infection is of particular interest. The interaction of this virus with cells mediating the early, innate immune response has been analyzed in a number of recent studies. In most reports, the virus has a distinct inhibitory effect on the response of cells early in infection. Here we review these new data and discuss the dynamics of the interaction of virus with different cell types mediating the immune response to infection. PMID:23727070

  9. Dim light at night interferes with the development of the short-day phenotype and impairs cell-mediated immunity in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    Winter is a challenging time to survive and breed outside of the tropics. Animals use day length (photoperiod) to regulate seasonally appropriate adaptations in anticipation of challenging winter conditions. The net result of these photoperiod-mediated adjustments is enhanced immune function and increased survival. Thus, the ability to discriminate day length information is critical for survival and reproduction in small animals. However, during the past century, urban and suburban development has rapidly expanded and filled the night sky with light from various sources, obscuring crucial light-dark signals, which alters physiological interpretation of day lengths. Furthermore, reduced space, increased proximity to people, and the presence of light at night may act as stressors for small animals. Whereas acute stressors typically enhance immune responses, chronic exposure to stressors often impairs immune responses. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of dim light at night and chronic stress interferes with enhanced cell-mediated immunity observed during short days. Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were assigned to short or long days with dark nights (0 lux) or dim (5 lux) light at night for 10 weeks. Following 2 weeks of chronic restraint (6 hr/day), a model of chronic stress, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were assessed. Both dim light at night and restraint reduced the DTH response. Dim light at night during long nights produced an intermediate short day phenotype. These results suggest the constant presence of light at night could negatively affect survival of photoperiodic rodents by disrupting the timing of breeding and immune responses.

  10. A comparison of cell mediators and serum cytokines transcript expression between male and female mice infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and/or consuming probiotics.

    PubMed

    Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, Kevin W; Kurkure, Paresh C; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-11-01

    The gut immune system is complex, and dysregulation leads to a number of disorders including inflammatory bowel syndrome and (in livestock) Johne's disease. Previous work has demonstrated that males and females respond differently to treatment with pathologic and probiotic microorganisms, suggesting that a 'one-size-fits-all' approach to treat GIT inflammation may be inadequate. While we had observed significant differences between males and females in terms of cytokine production, it remains unclear how these changes occur. To better understand the mechanisms, transcript expression of genes important to gut immunoregulation were monitored from male and female BALB/c mice consuming the probiotic Lactobacillus animalis (1 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) ) and infected with the gut pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (1 × 10(7) CFU). Expression of transcripts analyzed included those important to the immune system, intestinal cell differentiation, and/or regulation. Males generally displayed increased expression of Th 2 and B-cell mediators, and females showed repressed cytokine expression after MAP infection (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1 among others). Additionally, regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in female mice consuming probiotics suggests females responded positively to L. animalis when compared to males. Therefore, we speculate that studying mechanistic changes associated with sex and immunoregulation in gastrointestinal tissues could further elucidate host response to microorganisms.

  11. Humoral and Cell-mediated Autoimmune Reactions to Human Acidic Ribosomal P2 Protein in Individuals Sensitized to Aspergillus fumigatus P2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christina; Appenzeller, Ulrich; Seelbach, Heike; Achatz, Gernot; Oberkofler, Hannes; Breitenbach, Michael; Blaser, Kurt; Crameri, Reto

    1999-01-01

    A panel of cDNAs encoding allergenic proteins was isolated from an Aspergillus fumigatus cDNA library displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. Solid phase–immobilized serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) from A. fumigatus–allergic individuals was used to enrich phage displaying IgE-binding molecules. One of the cDNAs encoded a 11.1-kD protein that was identified as acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein type 2 (P2 protein). The allergen, formally termed rAsp f 8, shares >62% sequence identity and >84% sequence homology to corresponding eukaryotic P2 proteins, including human P2 protein. The sequences encoding human and fungal P2 protein were subcloned, expressed in Escherichia coli as His6-tagged fusion proteins, and purified by Ni2+–chelate affinity chromatography. Both recombinant P2 proteins were recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic individuals sensitized to the A. fumigatus P2 protein and elicited strong type 1–specific skin reactions in these individuals. Moreover, human and fungal P2 proteins induced proliferative responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of A. fumigatus– allergic subjects sensitized to the fungal P2 protein. These data provide strong evidence for in vitro and in vivo humoral and cell-mediated autoreactivity to human P2 protein in patients suffering from chronic A. fumigatus allergy. PMID:10224291

  12. Modulation of CD112 by the alphaherpesvirus gD protein suppresses DNAM-1–dependent NK cell-mediated lysis of infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Grauwet, Korneel; Cantoni, Claudia; Parodi, Monica; De Maria, Andrea; Devriendt, Bert; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Lorenzo; Vitale, Massimo; Favoreel, Herman W.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key players in the innate response to viruses, including herpesviruses. In particular, the variety of viral strategies to modulate the recognition of certain herpesviruses witnesses the importance of NK cells in the control of this group of viruses. Still, NK evasion strategies have remained largely elusive for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. Here, we report that the gD glycoprotein of the alphaherpesviruses pseudorabies virus (PRV) and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties toward NK cells. Expression of gD during infection or transfection led to degradation and consequent down-regulation of CD112, a ligand for the activating NK receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1). CD112 downregulation resulted in a reduced ability of DNAM-1 to bind to the surface of both virus-infected and gD-transfected cells. Consequently, expression of gD suppressed NK cell degranulation and NK cell-mediated lysis of PRV- or HSV-2–infected cells. These data identify an alphaherpesvirus evasion strategy from NK cells and point out that interactions between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors can have biological consequences that stretch beyond virus entry. PMID:25352670

  13. The TLR7 agonist induces tumor regression both by promoting CD4+T cells proliferation and by reversing T regulatory cell-mediated suppression via dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Xiongyan; Chen, Xuehua; Li, Jianfang; Zhu, Zhenggang; Liu, Bingya; Su, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Treg-induced immunosuppression is now recognized as a key element in enabling tumors to escape immune-mediated destruction. Although topical TLR7 therapies such as imiquimod have been proved successful in the treatment of dermatological malignancy and a number of conditions beyond the FDA-approved indications, the mechanism behind the effect of TLR7 on effector T cell and Treg cell function in cancer immunosurveillance is still not well understood. Here, we found that Loxoribin, one of the TLR7 ligands, could inhibit tumor growth in xenograft models of colon cancer and lung cancer, and these anti-tumor effects of Loxoribin were mediated by promoting CD4+T cell proliferation and reversing Treg-mediated suppression via dendritic cells (DCs). However, deprivation of IL-6 using a neutralizing antibody abrogated the ability of Loxoribin-treated DCs, which reversed the Treg cell-mediated suppression. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of Loxoribin-treated DCs inhibited the tumor growth in vivo. Thus, this study links TLR7 signaling to the functional control of effector T cells and Treg cells and identifies Loxoribin as a new therapeutic strategy in cancer treatment, which may offer new opportunities to improve the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25593198

  14. Strong Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)–specific Cell-mediated Immune Responses in the Absence of Viremia or Antibodies Among Uninfected Siblings of HCV Chronically Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    El-Karaksy, Hanaa; Shata, Mohamed T.; Sobhy, Maha; Helmy, Heba; El-Naghi, Suzan; Galal, Gehan; Ali, Zainab Z.; Esmat, Gamal; Abdelwahab, Sayed F.; Strickland, G. Thomas; El-Kamary, Samer S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens in adults without seroconversion or viremia are biomarkers for prior transient infection. We investigated HCV-specific CMI responses in seronegative children living with HCV-infected siblings. Methods. Children 3–18 years of age living with HCV-infected siblings were screened for HCV antibodies and HCV RNA. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated for HCV-specific CMI responses by interferon γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot assay using 3 recombinant HCV protein antigens. Flow cytometry phenotypically characterized IFN-γ-secreting cells. Results. Forty-five seronegative children and 5 seropositive viremic siblings had functionally viable PBMCs. Among the 45 seronegative siblings, 15 (33.3%) had positive HCV-specific IFN-γ responses, and subsequent RNA testing revealed that 3 were viremic. Compared with the 5 seropositive viremic children, the median number of HCV-specific spot-forming units was significantly higher in the 12 seronegative aviremic children (P = .002) and in the 3 seronegative viremic children (P = .025). Flow cytometric analysis revealed that IFN-γ was synthesized mainly by CD4+ T cells. Conclusion. Strong HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detectable in higher frequency among seronegative, aviremic children compared with persistently infected siblings. Further studies are needed to determine whether these immune responses are protective against HCV infection. PMID:21257736

  15. Amphiregulin activates regulatory T lymphocytes and suppresses CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor response in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wu, Long; Chen, Hao; Feng, Mao-Hui; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2015-10-13

    CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response plays an important role in inhibiting progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For strategic immunotherapy, it is critical to understand why some of the tumor cells escape from this immune attack. In this study, we investigated how HCC cells alter endogenous anti-tumor immunity and their related signaling pathways. We found that HCC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, substantially secret and express amphiregulin (AR). AR in turn activates immunosuppressive function of intratumoral CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), a major inhibitor of CD8+ T cells. Using either lentiviral siRNA, or AR neutralizing antibody, we blocked the expression and function of AR to test the specificity of AR mediated activation of Tregs, Biochemical and cell biology studies were followed and confirmed that blocking of AR inhibited Tregs activation. In addition, we found that AR can trigger the activation of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in Tregs. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin treatment led to compromise Treg function and resulted in enhancing anti-tumor function of CD8+ T cells. Blocking AR/EGFR signaling in Tregs with Gefitinib also enhanced anti-tumor immunity and decreased tumor size in a mouse xenograft tumor model. Taken together, our study suggested a novel mechanism of functional interaction between HCC and Tregs for regulating anti-tumor function of CD8+ T cells. PMID:26451607

  16. Autochthonous primary and metastatic melanomas in Hgf-Cdk4 R24C mice evade T-cell-mediated immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Jennifer; Gaffal, Evelyn; Cron, Mira; Kohlmeyer, Judith; Renn, Marcel; Tüting, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models offer new opportunities to investigate the role of cell-mediated immunity in the natural progression of melanoma in an immunocompetent host. Here we report that Hgf-Cdk4(R24C) mice spontaneously develop a spectrum of primary melanomas with high penetrance during their first year of life. Malignant transformation proceeds in a stepwise manner from multiple melanocytic nevi to single nodular melanomas and disseminated metastases in most mice. Migrating melanoma cells invade the draining lymph nodes without activating the immune system. Autochthonous primary tumors are destroyed following experimental introduction of immune surveillance using an adoptive lymphocyte transfer approach. However, some tumor cells are able to survive, evade immune cell control, and recur both locally and systemically. Immune tolerance in recurring tumors may be supported by immunosuppressive Gr1(+) myeloid cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that primary and metastatic melanomas developing spontaneously in Hgf-Cdk4(R24C) mice effectively evade cellular immune surveillance. PMID:20649939

  17. Designing the method for optical in vitro monitoring of the cell-mediated scaffold technology for bone regeneration based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, P. M.; Maslov, N. A.; Papaeva, E. O.; Tereshchenko, V. P.; Khlestkin, V. K.; Bogachev, S. S.; Proskurina, A. S.; Titov, A. T.; Filipenko, M. L.; Pavlov, V. V.; Kudrov, G. A.; Orishich, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main unsolved problems in traumatology and orthopedics is reconstruction of critical-sized segmental bone defects. We believe that implementation of noninvasive monitoring of the bioengineering stages for cell-mediated bone scaffold by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can become a positive aspect in mastering this technique. An electrospun scaffold model (parameters: 10 wt. % polycaprolactone; 5% wt type A gelatin; mean fiber diameter 877.1 ± 169.1, and contact angle 45.3°) seeded with BHK IR cell culture (182 ± 38 cells/mm2) was used to show the principal possibility of differentiating between the scaffold seeded and unseeded with cells. First of all, the fluorescence spectra of the cell-seeded scaffold contain a peak at 305 nm for the excitation range of 230-290 nm, which can be used to differentiate between the samples. An increase in fluorescence intensity of the cell-seeded scaffold in the range of 400- 580 nm upon excitation at 230-340 nm is also noticeable. The wavelength of 250 nm is characterized by high signal intensity and is most suitable for differentiation between the samples.

  18. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J.; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils.Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ThT fluorescence graphs of buffers and solvents used for

  19. Antileishmanial activity and cytotoxicity of Brazilian plants.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tatiana G; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Valadares, Diogo G; Franca, Juçara R; Lage, Paula S; Duarte, Mariana C; Andrade, Pedro H R; Martins, Vivian T; Costa, Lourena E; Arruda, Ana L A; Faraco, André A G; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Castilho, Rachel O

    2014-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major public health problem, and the alarming spread of parasite resistance has increased the importance of discovering new therapeutic products. The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro leishmanicidal activity from 16 different Brazilian medicinal plants. Stationary-phase promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and murine macrophages were exposed to 44 plant extracts or fractions for 48 h at 37°C, in order to evaluate their antileishmanial activity and cytotoxicity, respectively. The most potent extracts against L. amazonensis were the hexanic extract of Dipteryx alata (IC50 of 0.08 μg/mL), the hexanic extract of Syzygium cumini (IC50 of 31.64 μg/mL), the ethanolic and hexanic extracts of leaves of Hymenaea courbaril (IC50 of 44.10 μg/mL and 35.84 μg/mL, respectively), the ethanolic extract of H. stignocarpa (IC50 of 4.69 μg/mL), the ethanolic extract of Jacaranda caroba (IC50 of 13.22 μg/mL), and the ethanolic extract of J. cuspidifolia leaves (IC50 of 10.96 μg/mL). Extracts of D. alata and J. cuspidifolia presented higher selectivity index, with high leishmanicidal activity and low cytotoxicity in the mammalian cells. The capacity in treated infected macrophages using the extracts and/or fractions of D. alata and J. cuspidifolia was also analyzed, and reductions of 95.80%, 98.31%, and 97.16%, respectively, in the parasite burden, were observed. No nitric oxide (NO) production could be observed in the treated macrophages, after stimulation with the extracts and/or fractions of D. alata and J. cuspidifolia, suggesting that the biological activity could be due to mechanisms other than macrophage activation mediated by NO production. Based on phytochemistry studies, the classes of compounds that could contribute to the observed activities are also discussed. In conclusion, the data presented in this study indicated that traditional medicinal plant extracts present effective antileishmanial activity. Future studies could focus on

  20. CYTOTOXICITY AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF DIRECT AND INDIRECT PULP CAPPING MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Modena, Karin Cristina da Silva; Casas-Apayco, Leslie Caroll; Atta, Maria Teresa; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Hebling, Josimeri; Sipert, Carla Renata; Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima; Santos, Carlos Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    There are several studies about the cytotoxic effects of dental materials in contact with the pulp tissue, such as calcium hydroxide (CH), adhesive systems, resin composite and glass ionomer cements. The aim of this review article was to summarize and discuss the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of materials used for protection of the dentin-pulp complex, some components of resin composites and adhesive systems when placed in direct or indirect contact with the pulp tissue. A large number of dental materials present cytotoxic effects when applied close or directly to the pulp, and the only material that seems to stimulate early pulp repair and dentin hard tissue barrier formation is CH. PMID:20027424

  1. [Shockwave cytotoxicity on neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells].

    PubMed

    Rosell, D; Robles, J E; Abad, J I; Agüera, L G; De Castro, F; Zudaire, J J; Berían, J M

    1993-07-01

    Since initial application of high-energy shockwaves to treat renal lithiasis, their usefulness has been extended within both the clinical and experimental fields. Shockwaves cytotoxic action is determined by means of cell viability methods of vital staining exclusion and nucleoside uptake. Application of shockwaves on cell cultures is carried out by means of an electromagnetic lithotripter. High-energy shockwaves have had cytotoxic action both on non-tumoral and tumoral cells, during "in vitro" experiments. The cytotoxicity produced by the shockwaves, however, is different in tumoral and non-tumoral cells, the viability inhibition being higher in tumoral cells.

  2. Cytotoxicity of Naturally Occurring Isoquinoline Alkaloids of Different Structural Types.

    PubMed

    Chlebek, Jakub; Doskocil, Ivo; Hulcová, Daniela; Breiterová, Katerina; Šafratová, Marcela; Havelek, Radim; Habartová, Klára; Hošt'álková, Anna; Volštátová, Tereza; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2016-06-01

    Forty-six isoquinoline alkaloids, of eleven structural types isolated in our laboratory, have been evaluated for their cytotoxicity against two cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cancer cells), as well as against normal human lung fibroblast cells. Only scoulerine, aromoline, berbamine and parfumidine showed significant cytotoxic effects, but only scoulerine was active against both Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cells (IC50 values 6.44 ± 0.87 and 4.57 ± 0.42, respectively).