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Sample records for abacate persea americana

  1. The Scirtothrips perseae species-group (Thysanoptera), with one new species from avocado, Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Mound, Laurence A; Hoddle, Mark S

    2016-02-12

    Following recent molecular studies on avocado thrips, a new species is described from Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Colombia from the young leaves of avocado, Persea americana. Scirtothrips hansoni sp.n. is closely related to the Californian pest, S. perseae, and also to S. astrictus from Costa Rica that remains known from a single female. An illustrated key to these three species is provided.

  2. Novel anticancer alkene lactone from Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Falodun, Abiodun; Engel, Nadja; Kragl, Udo; Nebe, Barbara; Langer, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) root bark is used in ethnomedicine for a variety of diseases including cancer. To isolate and characterize the chemical constituent in P. americana, and also to determine the anticancer property of a new alkene lactone from the root bark of P. americana. The MCF-7 cells were treated with different concentrations of the pure compound for 48 h. The percentage of cells in the various phases, online monitoring of metabolic changes and integrin receptor expression determined by flow cytometry. One novel alkene lactone (4-hydroxy-5-methylene-3-undecyclidenedihydrofuran-2 (3H)-one) (1) was isolated and characterized using 1D-NMR, 2D-NMR, infrared, UV and MS. At a concentration of 10 µg/mL, significant reduction of proliferation of MCF-7 was induced while MCF-12 A cell was significantly stimulated by 10 µg/mL. The IC50 value for MCF-7 cells is 20.48 µg/mL. Lower concentration of 1 harbor no significant effect on either MCF-7 or MCF-12A. The apoptotic rates of MCF-7 cells were increased significantly. At the final concentration 10 µg/mL, up to 80% of all breast cancer cells were dead. On the non-tumorigenic cell line MCF-12A, the same concentrations (1 and 10 µg/mL) of compound 1 caused significant enhanced apoptotic rates. A total of 1 µg/mL of 1 caused a decrease of α4-, α6-, β1- and β3-integrin expression. The compound caused a stimulatory effect on non-tumorigenic MCF-12A cells with respect to cell adhesion while tumorigenic MCF-7 cells detached continuously. This is the first report on the anticancer effects of this class of compound.

  3. Assimilate partitioning in avocado, Persea americana

    SciTech Connect

    Finazzo, S.; Davenport, T.L.

    1986-04-01

    Assimilate partitioning is being studied in avocado, Persea americana cv. Millborrow in relation to fruit set. Single leaves on girdled branches of 10 year old trees were radiolabeled for 1 hr with 13..mu..Ci of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. The source leaves were sampled during the experiment to measure translocation rates. At harvest the sink tissues were dissected and the incorporated radioactivity was measured. The translocation of /sup 14/C-labelled compounds to other leaves was minimal. Incorporation of label into fruitlets varied with the tissue and the stage of development. Sink (fruitlets) nearest to the labelled leaf and sharing the same phyllotaxy incorporatedmore » the most /sup 14/C. Source leaves for single non-abscising fruitlets retained 3X more /sup 14/C-labelled compounds than did source leaves for 2 or more fruitlets at 31 hrs. post-labelling. Export of label decreased appreciably when fruitlets abscised. If fruitlets abscised within 4 days of labeling then the translocation pattern was similar to the pattern for single fruitlets. If the fruitlet abscised later, the translocation pattern was intermediate between the single and double fruitlet pattern.« less

  4. Analysis of sesquiterpene distributions in leaves, branches, and trunks of avocado (Persea americana Mill.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado is a commercially valuable fruit crop cultivated in tropical and subtropical climates throughout the world. Taxonomists recognize three horticultural races of avocado, consisting of Mexican (Persea americana var. drymifolia), Guatemalan (P. americana var. guatemalensis), and West Indian (P. ...

  5. APPLICATION OF PROPICONAZOLE IN MANAGEMENT OF LAUREL WILT DISEASE IN AVOCADO (Persea americana Mill.) TREES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laurel wilt is a vascular disease of Lauraceous plants caused by a fungus (Raffaelea spp.) that is carried by a recently introduced, nonnative ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus). The disease is devastating to Persea species including redbay (Persea borbonia) and avocado (Persea americana) trees i...

  6. Antiprotozoal and antimycobacterial activities of Persea americana seeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persea americana seeds are widely used in traditional Mexican medicine to treat rheumatism, asthma, infectious processes as well as diarrhea and dysentery caused by intestinal parasites. Methods The chloroformic and ethanolic extracts of P. americana seeds were prepared by maceration and their amoebicidal, giardicidal and trichomonicidal activity was evaluated. These extracts were also tested against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, four mono-resistant and two multidrug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis as well as five non tuberculosis mycobacterium strains by MABA assay. Results The chloroformic and ethanolic extracts of P. americana seeds showed significant activity against E. histolytica, G. lamblia and T. vaginalis (IC50 <0.634 μg/ml). The chloroformic extract inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis MDR SIN 4 isolate, three M. tuberculosis H37Rv mono-resistant reference strains and four non tuberculosis mycobacteria (M. fortuitum, M. avium, M. smegmatis and M. absessus) showing MIC values ≤50 μg/ml. Contrariwise, the ethanolic extract affected only the growth of two mono-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and M. smegmatis (MIC ≤50 μg/ml). Conclusions The CHCl3 and EtOH seed extracts from P. americana showed amoebicidal and giardicidal activity. Importantly, the CHCl3 extract inhibited the growth of a MDR M. tuberculosis isolate and three out of four mono-resistant reference strains of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, showing a MIC = 50 μg/ml. This extract was also active against the NTM strains, M. fortuitum, M. avium, M. smegmatis and M. abscessus, with MIC values <50 μg/ml. PMID:23680126

  7. Antiprotozoal and antimycobacterial activities of Persea americana seeds.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; Ruiz-Nicolás, Ricardo; Cornejo-Garrido, Jorge; Tapia, Amparo; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián

    2013-05-16

    Persea americana seeds are widely used in traditional Mexican medicine to treat rheumatism, asthma, infectious processes as well as diarrhea and dysentery caused by intestinal parasites. The chloroformic and ethanolic extracts of P. americana seeds were prepared by maceration and their amoebicidal, giardicidal and trichomonicidal activity was evaluated. These extracts were also tested against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, four mono-resistant and two multidrug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis as well as five non tuberculosis mycobacterium strains by MABA assay. The chloroformic and ethanolic extracts of P. americana seeds showed significant activity against E. histolytica, G. lamblia and T. vaginalis (IC50 <0.634 μg/ml). The chloroformic extract inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis MDR SIN 4 isolate, three M. tuberculosis H37Rv mono-resistant reference strains and four non tuberculosis mycobacteria (M. fortuitum, M. avium, M. smegmatis and M. absessus) showing MIC values ≤50 μg/ml. Contrariwise, the ethanolic extract affected only the growth of two mono-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and M. smegmatis (MIC ≤50 μg/ml). The CHCl3 and EtOH seed extracts from P. americana showed amoebicidal and giardicidal activity. Importantly, the CHCl3 extract inhibited the growth of a MDR M. tuberculosis isolate and three out of four mono-resistant reference strains of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, showing a MIC = 50 μg/ml. This extract was also active against the NTM strains, M. fortuitum, M. avium, M. smegmatis and M. abscessus, with MIC values <50 μg/ml.

  8. The phytochemical and pharmacological profile of Persea americana Mill

    PubMed Central

    Yasir, Mohammad; Das, Sattwik; Kharya, M. D.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decades, herbal medicine has become a thing of global significance with medicinal and economic implications. Wide spread use of herbs throughout the globe has raised serious concerns over its quality, safety, and efficacy. Thus, exact scientific assessment has become a precondition for acceptance of herbal health claims. Persea americana Mill. (avocado) is a tree, native to central America, cultivated in tropical and subtropical climates around the world, belonging to the family Lauraceae, is widely used in Ayurveda and evidence-based phototherapy. There are 3 principal races or groups of avocado: Mexican, Guatemalan, and West Indian named for the areas where they were originally cultivated. The plant is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments, such as monorrhagia, hypertension, stomach ache, bronchitis, diarrhea, and diabetes. Peptone, b-galactoside, glycosylated abscisic acid, alkaloids, cellulose, polygalacto urease, polyuronoids, cytochrome P-450, and volatile oils are reported to be present in this plant. Biotechnologic approaches show that modified MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg benzyladenine/L, 0-1mg Indole Butyric Acid/L, 0.1 mg Gibberalic Acid 3/L was optimum for adventitious shoot development. In the present review, an effort has been made to study the different aspects of P. americana Mill. PMID:22228945

  9. Genetic differentiation, races and interracial admixture in avocado (Persea americana Mill.), and Persea spp. evaluated using SSR markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a subtropical domesticated fruit tree indigenous to Mesoamerica. It is a member of the Lauraceae family and is separated into three horticultural races (Guatemalan, Mexican, and West Indian) mainly corresponding to their ecological adaptation, botanical, and physi...

  10. The Complex of Scolytinae Inhabiting Persea borbonia and Persea americana in Florida: Possible Interactions with Other Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A diverse number of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) have been found inhabiting Persea borbonia and P. americana in Florida during 2009 and 2010. They include the exotic redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, vector of Raffaelea lauricola, X. volvulus, X. ferrugineus, Xylosandrus crassiu...

  11. Avocado (Persea americana) seed as a source of bioactive phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Dabas, Deepti; Shegog, Rachel M; Ziegler, Gregory R; Lambert, Joshua D

    2013-01-01

    The pulp of avocado (Persea americana, Lauraceae) has been reported to have beneficial cardiovascular health effects. Avocado oil is used for dermatological applications and its unsaponifiable portion is reported to have beneficial effects against osteoarthritis. Although the seed represents a considerable percentage of the total fruit, scientific research on the phytochemistry and biological effects of avocado seeds is in the nascent stages,. Currently, the seed represents an under-utilized resource and a waste issue for avocado processors. There is ethno-pharmacological information on the use of seeds for the treatment of health-related conditions, especially in South American countries where avocados are endemic and currently grown on a large scale. Current research has shown that avocado seeds may improve hypercholesterolemia, and be useful in the treatment of hypertension, inflammatory conditions and diabetes. Seeds have also been found to possess insecticidal, fungicidal, and anti-microbial activities. The avocado seeds and rich in phenolic compounds, and these may play a role in the putative health effects. Historically, extracts of avocado seeds were also used as ink for writing and research in our laboratory has explored the potential colorant properties of a polyphenol oxidase-produced colored avocado seed extract. Here, we review the currently-available data on the bioactivity and other functional properties of avocado seeds. We discuss the strength of the available data, the putative active compounds, and potential directions for future studies.

  12. Acute toxicity and genotoxic activity of avocado seed extract (Persea americana Mill., c.v. Hass).

    PubMed

    Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Flores-Fernández, José Miguel; Villanueva-Rodríguez, Socorro

    2013-01-01

    The use of vegetal extracts requires toxicological and genotoxic evaluations to establish and verify safety before being added to human cosmetic, pharmaceutical medicine, or alimentary products. Persea americana seeds have been used in traditional medicine as treatment for several diseases. In this work, the ethanolic seed extract of Persea americana was evaluated with respect to its genotoxic potential through micronucleus assay in rodents. The frequency of micronuclei in groups of animals treated with avocado seed extract showed no differences compared to the negative control (vehicle); therefore, it is considered that the avocado seed extract showed no genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test.

  13. Acute Toxicity and Genotoxic Activity of Avocado Seed Extract (Persea americana Mill., c.v. Hass)

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Flores-Fernández, José Miguel; Villanueva-Rodríguez, Socorro

    2013-01-01

    The use of vegetal extracts requires toxicological and genotoxic evaluations to establish and verify safety before being added to human cosmetic, pharmaceutical medicine, or alimentary products. Persea americana seeds have been used in traditional medicine as treatment for several diseases. In this work, the ethanolic seed extract of Persea americana was evaluated with respect to its genotoxic potential through micronucleus assay in rodents. The frequency of micronuclei in groups of animals treated with avocado seed extract showed no differences compared to the negative control (vehicle); therefore, it is considered that the avocado seed extract showed no genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test. PMID:24298206

  14. Wound healing activity of Persea americana (avocado) fruit: a preclinical study on rats.

    PubMed

    Nayak, B S; Raju, S S; Chalapathi Rao, A V

    2008-03-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) oil is rich in nutrient waxes, proteins and minerals, as well as vitamins A, D and E. It is an excellent source of enrichment for dry, damaged or chapped skin. This study aimed to evaluate the wound-healing activity of fruit extract of Persea americana in rats. The effect of topical and oral administration of Persea americana fruit extract (300 mg/kg/day) on excision and dead space wound models was evaluated. The rats used in the excision wound model were divided into four groups of five each and received either topical or oral treatment. The rats used in the dead space wound model were divided into two groups of five each and were treated orally. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialisation, granulation tissue weight and hydoxyproline content. In the excision wound model, complete healing (full epithelialisation) was observed on average on day 14 in the rats who receive oral or topical treatment. In contrast, the controls took approximately 17 days to heal completely. The extract-treated wounds were found to epithelialise faster than the controls (p < 0.001). Wet and dry granulation tissue weight and the hydroxyproline content of the tissue obtained from extract-treated animals used in the dead space wound model were significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared with the controls. Rate of wound contraction, epithelialisation time together with the hydroxyproline content and histological observations support the use of Persea americana in the management of wound healing.

  15. Molecular Characterization and Genetic Structure in Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) Using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is an economically important tropical fruit native to Mesoamerica. It belongs to the Lauraceae family and is subdivided in three horticultural races (Guatemalan, Mexican, and West Indian) based primarily on ecological adaptation, botanical and physiological traits. T...

  16. Race, Interracial Admixture and Genetic Differentiation of Avocado (Persea americana Mill)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a major tropical fruit crop native to Mesoamerica and domesticated around 8000 to 7000 BC. It is a member of the Laureace family and currently classified into three subspecies or races: Guatemalan (G), Mexican (M) and West Indian (WI) according to their ecological...

  17. Anticonvulsant effect of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) (Avocado) leaf aqueous extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, John A O; Amabeoku, George J

    2006-08-01

    Various morphological parts of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) (avocado) are widely used in African traditional medicines for the treatment, management and/or control of a variety of human ailments, including childhood convulsions and epilepsy. This study examined the anticonvulsant effect of the plant's leaf aqueous extract (PAE, 50-800 mg/kg i.p.) against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, picrotoxin (PCT)- and bicuculline (BCL)-induced seizures in mice. Phenobarbitone and diazepam were used as reference anticonvulsant drugs for comparison. Like the reference anticonvulsant agents used, Persea americana leaf aqueous extract (PAE, 100-800 mg/kg i.p.) significantly (p < 0.05-0.001) delayed the onset of, and antagonized, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures. The plant's leaf extract (PAE, 100-800 mg/kg i.p.) also profoundly antagonized picrotoxin (PCT)-induced seizures, but only weakly antagonized bicuculline (BCL)-induced seizures. Although the data obtained in the present study do not provide conclusive evidence, it would appear that 'avocado' leaf aqueous extract (PAE) produces its anticonvulsant effect by enhancing GABAergic neurotransmission and/or action in the brain. The findings of this study indicate that Persea americana leaf aqueous extract possesses an anticonvulsant property, and thus lends pharmacological credence to the suggested ethnomedical uses of the plant in the management of childhood convulsions and epilepsy.

  18. Effects of ripening on rheological properties of avocado pulp (Persea americana mill. Cv. Hass)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, F.; Roman, A.; Ortiz, J.

    2015-04-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill) Hass variety is the most planted in Chile with a greater trade prospect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maturity on rheological properties of Chilean Avocado Hass pulp. Fresh unripe avocados were washed and peeled, cut and stored at 3 different times; a portion was treated at 5°C and the other was treated at 20°C until it reached 2 lb puncture pressure. During maturation changes would develop due to temperature and time, with internal cellular structure changes. Preliminary results of the rheological characteristics of avocado puree show a Bingham plastic behavior.

  19. Synthesis and configuration of the nonadecenetriol isolated from seeds of Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Shao-Min; Wu, Yikang; Gao, Po

    2011-10-07

    In an effort to establish the relative as well as absolute configuration of the trypanocidally active natural nonadec-6-en-1,2,4-triol isolated from Persea americana, the (2S,4R), (2S,4S), and (2R,4R) isomers were synthesized. The stereogenic centers taken from enantiopure chiral epoxy building blocks derived from inexpensive and readily available D-glucolactone. The (2R,4R) isomer gave (1)H and (13)C NMR as well as specific rotation in excellent consistence with those reported for the natural triol.

  20. Secondary metabolites from the unripe pulp of Persea americana and their antimycobacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Chen; Chang, Hsun-Shuo; Peng, Chien-Fang; Lin, Chu-Hung; Chen, Ih-Sheng

    2012-12-15

    The fruits of Persea americana (Avocado) are nowadays used as healthy fruits in the world. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the active ethyl acetate soluble fraction has led to the isolation of five new fatty alcohol derivatives, avocadenols A-D (1-4) and avocadoin (5) from the unripe pulp of P. americana, along with 12 known compounds (6-17). These structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolates, avocadenol A (1), avocadenol B (2), (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxynonadecane (6), and (2R,4R)-1,2,4-trihydroxyheptadec-16-ene (7) showed antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)R(V)in vitro, with MIC values of 24.0, 33.8, 24.9, and 35.7 μg/ml, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fusarium symbionts of an ambrosia beetle (Euwallacea sp.) in southern Florida are pathogens of avocado, Persea americana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium dieback, a destructive disease of avocado (Persea americana), was reported in California and Israel in 2012. It is associated with an ambrosia beetle, Euwallacea sp., and damage caused by an unnamed symbiont of the beetle in Clade 3 of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) designated p...

  2. Phenotypic Variations in the Foliar Chemical Profile of Persea americana Mill. cv. Hass.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Yolanda Magdalena; Torres-Gurrola, Guadalupe; Meléndez-González, Claudio; Espinosa-García, Francisco J

    2016-12-01

    The Hass avocado tree Persea americana cv. Hass was derived from a single hybrid tree of P. americana var. drymifolia and P. americana var. guatemalensis, and it is propagated clonally by grafting. This cultivar is the most widely planted in the world but its profile of secondary metabolites has been studied rarely despite of its importance in plant protection. We illustrate the variability of the volatilome of mature leaves by describing the average chemical composition and the phenotypic variability found in 70 trees. Contrary to the uniformity expected in the Hass cultivar, high variability coefficients were found for most of the 36 detected foliar volatile compounds; furthermore we found six chemotypes grouping the foliar phenotypes of the sampled trees using hierarchical cluster analysis. About 48% of trees were grouped in one chemotype; five chemotypes grouped the remaining trees. The compounds that determined these chemotypes were: estragole, α-farnesene, β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, α-cubebene and eugenol. This striking variation in a cultivar propagated clonally is discussed in terms of somatic mutation. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  3. Hypoglycaemic and Tissue-Protective Effects of the Aqueous Extract of Persea Americana Seeds on Alloxan-Induced Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    EZEJIOFOR, Anthonet Ndidi; OKORIE, Abednego; ORISAKWE, Orish Ebere

    2013-01-01

    Background: The tissue-protective potential of Persea americana necessitated a look into the histopathological effects of the plant extract on the pancreas, liver, and kidneys. This study was conceived and designed based on the gaps in the research that has been performed and what is known about the plant. The hypoglycaemic and tissue-protective effects of hot aqueous Persea americana (avocado pear) seed extracts on alloxan-induced albino rats were investigated. Methods: Persea americana seeds were extracted using hot water, and different concentrations of the extract were prepared. The effects of different concentrations (20, 30, 40 g/L) of the hot aqueous P. americana seed extract on alloxan-induced Wistar albino rats were compared with those of a reference drug, glibenclamide. The glucose level of the rats was measured daily, and the weight of the animal was monitored on a weekly basis for 21 days. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes, and the histopathologies of the liver, kidneys, and pancreas were investigated. Phytochemical analysis of P. americana seed extracts indicated the presence of glycosides, tannins, saponins, carbohydrates, flavonoids, and alkaloids. Results: The results showed that the extract possessed a significant hypoglycaemic (P < 0.05) effect and reversed the histopathological damage that occurred in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, comparable to the effects glibenclamide. The seeds of P. americana also had anti-diabetic and protective effects on some rat tissues such as the pancreas, kidneys, and liver. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present study provides a pharmacological basis for the folkloric use of the hot-water extract of P. americana seeds in the management of diabetes mellitus. PMID:24643349

  4. Hypoglycaemic and tissue-protective effects of the aqueous extract of persea americana seeds on alloxan-induced albino rats.

    PubMed

    Ezejiofor, Anthonet Ndidi; Okorie, Abednego; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2013-10-01

    The tissue-protective potential of Persea americana necessitated a look into the histopathological effects of the plant extract on the pancreas, liver, and kidneys. This study was conceived and designed based on the gaps in the research that has been performed and what is known about the plant. The hypoglycaemic and tissue-protective effects of hot aqueous Persea americana (avocado pear) seed extracts on alloxan-induced albino rats were investigated. Persea americana seeds were extracted using hot water, and different concentrations of the extract were prepared. The effects of different concentrations (20, 30, 40 g/L) of the hot aqueous P. americana seed extract on alloxan-induced Wistar albino rats were compared with those of a reference drug, glibenclamide. The glucose level of the rats was measured daily, and the weight of the animal was monitored on a weekly basis for 21 days. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes, and the histopathologies of the liver, kidneys, and pancreas were investigated. Phytochemical analysis of P. americana seed extracts indicated the presence of glycosides, tannins, saponins, carbohydrates, flavonoids, and alkaloids. The results showed that the extract possessed a significant hypoglycaemic (P < 0.05) effect and reversed the histopathological damage that occurred in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, comparable to the effects glibenclamide. The seeds of P. americana also had anti-diabetic and protective effects on some rat tissues such as the pancreas, kidneys, and liver. In conclusion, the present study provides a pharmacological basis for the folkloric use of the hot-water extract of P. americana seeds in the management of diabetes mellitus.

  5. Transcriptional signatures of ancient floral developmental genetics in avocado (Persea americana; Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Chanderbali, André S; Albert, Victor A; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Altman, Naomi S; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S

    2009-06-02

    The debate on the origin and evolution of flowers has recently entered the field of developmental genetics, with focus on the design of the ancestral floral regulatory program. Flowers can differ dramatically among angiosperm lineages, but in general, male and female reproductive organs surrounded by a sterile perianth of sepals and petals constitute the basic floral structure. However, the basal angiosperm lineages exhibit spectacular diversity in the number, arrangement, and structure of floral organs, whereas the evolutionarily derived monocot and eudicot lineages share a far more uniform floral ground plan. Here we show that broadly overlapping transcriptional programs characterize the floral transcriptome of the basal angiosperm Persea americana (avocado), whereas floral gene expression domains are considerably more organ specific in the model eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana. Our findings therefore support the "fading borders" model for organ identity determination in basal angiosperm flowers and extend it from the action of regulatory genes to downstream transcriptional programs. Furthermore, the declining expression of components of the staminal transcriptome in central and peripheral regions of Persea flowers concurs with elements of a previous hypothesis for developmental regulation in a gymnosperm "floral progenitor." Accordingly, in contrast to the canalized organ-specific regulatory apparatus of Arabidopsis, floral development may have been originally regulated by overlapping transcriptional cascades with fading gradients of influence from focal to bordering organs.

  6. Toxicogenetic study of Persea americana fruit pulp oil and its effect on genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Neto, Francisco Rinaldi; Corrêa, Mariana Beltrame; Lopes, Danillo Henrique; Rondon, Edilaura Nunes; Dos Santos, Luiz Felipe Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Damasceno, Jaqueline Lopes; Acésio, Nathália Oliveira; Turatti, Izabel Cristina Casanova; Tozatti, Marcos Gomide; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Furtado, Ricardo Andrade; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2017-03-01

    Persea americana Mill., commonly known as avocado, is a tree native to Central America that is widely used as a food source and for the treatment of diseases. This plant has various biological properties such as analgesic, anti-inflammatory and total cholesterol-lowering activity. In view of its pharmacological potential, we conducted a toxicogenetic study of the fruit pulp oil of P. americana (PAO) and investigated its influence on genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and doxorubicin. V79 cells and Swiss mice were used for the assays. The results showed no genotoxic effects of PAO in the in vitro or in vivo test systems. However, the highest PAO dose tested led to an increase in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, indicating hepatic/tissue damage. This effect may be related to high concentrations of palmitic acid, the main component of PAO. Furthermore, PAO was effective in reducing the chromosome damage induced by MMS and doxorubicin. These results contribute to the safety assessment of PAO as a medicinal plant for human use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pro-apoptotic effect of Persea americana var. Hass (avocado) on Jurkat lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Porras, Angelica R; Salazar-Ospina, Andrea; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Pereañez-Jimenez, Andres; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2013-11-05

    Abstract Context: Therapy for leukemia has a limited efficacy. There is a need to search for alternative anti-leukemia therapies. Persea americana Mill var. Hass (Lauraceae) is a tropical fruit (avocado) that might be used against cancer. Objective: To investigate whether P. americana induces death in Jurkat lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Materials and methods: Four ethanol extracts (0.1, 0.5, 1, 2 and 5 mg/mL) from avocado fruit (endocarp, whole seed, seed and leaves) were analyzed against Jurkat cells. Hydrogen peroxide generation by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate to the fluorescent compound 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein assay, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, flow cytometry analysis of annexin-V/7-amino-actinomycin, mitochondrial membrane potential and immunocytochemistry detection of transcription factor p53, caspase-3 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were evaluated. Results: Endocarp, seed, whole seed, and leaf (0.1 mg/mL) extracts induced significant apoptosis in Jurkat cells (p < 0.001) in an oxidative stress-dependent fashion via mitochondrial membrane depolarization (52-87%), activation of transcription factor p53 (6.3-25.4%), protease caspase-3 (8.3-20%) and predominance of AIF reactivity (20.6-36%) in all extracts. Similar results were obtained with 0.5 mg/mL extracts. However, extract ≥1 mg/mL concentration induced necrosis (100%). Conclusions: P. americana extracts function as a pro-apoptotic compound. Leukemic cells are eliminated through an oxidative stress mechanism. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of the avocado and its therapeutic action on leukemia.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of crude epicarp and seed extracts from mature avocado fruit (Persea americana) of three cultivars.

    PubMed

    Raymond Chia, Teck Wah; Dykes, Gary A

    2010-07-01

    The epicarp and seed of Persea Americana Mill. var. Hass (Lauraceae), Persea Americana Mill. var. Shepard, and Persea americana Mill. var Fuerte cultivars of mature avocados (n = 3) were ground separately and extracted with both absolute ethanol and distilled water. Extracts were analyzed for antimicrobial activity using the microtiter broth microdilution assay against four Gram-positive bacteria, six Gram-negative bacteria, and one yeast. Antimicrobial activity against two molds was determined by the hole plate method. The ethanol extracts showed antimicrobial activity (104.2-416.7 microg/mL) toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (except Escherichia coli), while inhibition of the water extracts was only observed for Listeria monocytogenes (93.8-375.0 microg/mL) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (354.2 microg/mL). The minimum concentration required to inhibit Zygosaccharomyces bailii was 500 microg/mL for the ethanol extracts, while no inhibition was observed for the water extracts. No inhibition by either ethanol or water extracts was observed against Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus flavus.

  9. Anti-diabetic activity of extract from Persea americana Mill. leaf via the activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, C R; Vasconcelos, C F B; Costa-Silva, J H; Maranhão, C A; Costa, J; Batista, T M; Carneiro, E M; Soares, L A L; Ferreira, F; Wanderley, A G

    2012-05-07

    The leaves of Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae) have been popularly used in the treatment of diabetes in countries in Latin America and Africa. To investigate the hypoglycaemic properties and to determine the molecular mechanism by which the hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of Persea americana reduce blood glucose levels in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats via the enzymatic pathway of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). The hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of Persea americana (0.15 and 0.3g/kg/day), vehicle and metformin (0.5g/kg/day) were administered orally to STZ-diabetic rats (n=7/group) for 4 weeks. Changes in body weight, food and water intake, fasting glucose levels and oral glucose tolerance were evaluated. Phosphorylation and the expression of PKB in the liver and soleus muscle were determined by Western blot. The hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of Persea americana reduced blood glucose levels and improved the metabolic state of the animals. Additionally, PKB activation was observed in the liver and skeletal muscle of treated rats when compared with untreated rats. The results indicate that the hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of Persea americana has anti-diabetic properties and possibly acts to regulate glucose uptake in liver and muscles by way of PKB/Akt activation, restoring the intracellular energy balance. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Microsatellite markers in avocado (Persea americana Mill.): genealogical relationships among cultivated avocado genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, V E T M; Clegg, M T

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-five microsatellite markers uniquely differentiated 35 avocado cultivars and two wild relatives. Average heterozygosity was high (60.7%), ranging from 32% in P. steyermarkii to 84% in Fuerte and Bacon. In a subset of 15 cultivars, heterozygosity averaged 63.5% for microsatellites, compared to 41.8% for restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). A neighbor-joining tree, according to average shared allele distances, consisted of three clusters likely corresponding to the botanical races of avocado and intermediate clusters uniting genotypes of presumably racially hybrid origin. Several results were at odds with existing botanical assignments that are sometimes rendered difficult by incomplete pedigree information, the complexity of the hybrid status (multiple backcrossing), or both. For example, cv. Harvest clustered with the Guatemalan race cultivars, yet it is derived from the Guatemalan x Mexican hybrid cv. Gwen. Persea schiedeana grouped with cv. Bacon. The rootstock G875 emerged as the most divergent genotype in our data set. Considerable diversity was found particularly among accessions from Guatemala, including G810 (West Indian race), G6 (Mexican race), G755A (hybrid Guatemalan x P. schiedeana), and G875 (probably not P. americana). Low bootstrap support, even upon exclusion of (known) hybrid genotypes from the data matrix, suggests the existence of ancient hybridization or that the botanical races originated more recently than previously thought.

  11. Utilization of modified starch from avocado (Persea americana Mill.) seed in cream soup production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelia, M.; Christianti, A.

    2018-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) seed was often seen as waste and underutilized resources, especially in the food industry. The aim of this research was to modify the structure of avocado seed starch using the cross-linking method, to improve the viscosity stability in the cream soup. In the preliminary research, starch was isolated from the seed and modified by STPP (sodium tripolyphosphate) with 2%, 4%, and 6% concentration and were reacted for 1, 2, and 3 hours. Starches were analyzed for moisture and ash content, paste clarity, gel strength, swelling power, solubility, yield, and degree of whiteness. Based on the analysis results, the best reaction time and STPP concentration was 6% at 1 hour reaction time. Native starch and the best-modified starch were applied in the cream soup and compared with commercial cream soup. Cream soups were analyzed for viscosity stability using viscometer in 0, 1, 3, and 5 hours after storage in room temperature. The result showed that cream soup using modified starch has better viscosity stability than native starch and commercial cream soup after 5 hours storage, which was 181.7 ± 4.85 cP. Sensory analysis showed that cream soup using modified starch was more acceptable than the others. Avocado seed modified starch has phosphate group that strengthen the starch chain to prevent viscosity breakdown.

  12. Persea americana Mill. Seed: Fractionation, Characterization, and Effects on Human Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Jerz, Maria del R.; Villanueva, Socorro; Jerz, Gerold; Winterhalter, Peter; Deters, Alexandra M.

    2013-01-01

    Methanolic avocado (Persea americana Mill., Lauraceae) seed extracts were separated by preparative HSCCC. Partition and HSCCC fractions were principally characterized by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. Their in vitro influence was investigated on proliferation, differentiation, cell viability, and gene expression on HaCaT and normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). The methanol-water partition (M) from avocado seeds and HSCCC fraction 3 (M.3) were mostly composed of chlorogenic acid and its isomers. Both reduced NHDF but enhanced HaCaT keratinocytes proliferation. HSCCC fraction M.2 composed of quinic acid among chlorogenic acid and its isomers inhibited proliferation and directly induced differentiation of keratinocytes as observed on gene and protein level. Furthermore, M.2 increased NHDF proliferation via upregulation of growth factor receptors. Salidrosides and ABA derivatives present in HSCCC fraction M.6 increased NHDF and keratinocyte proliferation that resulted in differentiation. The residual solvent fraction M.7 contained among low concentrations of ABA derivatives high amounts of proanthocyanidins B1 and B2 as well as an A-type trimer and stimulated proliferation of normal cells and inhibited the proliferation of immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes. PMID:24371457

  13. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in wild avocado (Persea americana Mill.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Haofeng; Morrell, Peter L; de la Cruz, Marlene; Clegg, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Resequencing studies provide the ultimate resolution of genetic diversity because they identify all mutations in a gene that are present within the sampled individuals. We report a resequencing study of Persea americana, a subtropical tree species native to Meso- and Central America and the progenitor of cultivated avocado. The sample includes 21 wild accessions from Mexico, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and the Dominican Republic. Estimated levels of nucleotide polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium (LD) are obtained from fully resolved haplotype data from 4 nuclear loci that span 5960 nucleotide sites. Results show that, although avocado is a subtropical tree crop and a predominantly outcrossing plant, the overall level of genetic variation is not exceptionally high (nucleotide diversity at silent sites, pi(sil) = 0.0102) compared with available estimates from temperate plant species. Intralocus LD decays rapidly to half the initial value within about 1 kb. Estimates of recombination rate (based on the sequence data) show that the rate is not exceptionally high when compared with annual plants such as wild barley or maize. Interlocus LD is significant owing to substantial population structure induced by mixing of the 3 botanical races of avocado.

  14. Bitter-tasting and kokumi-enhancing molecules in thermally processed avocado (Persea americana Mill.).

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Andreas Georg; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-12-22

    Sequential application of solvent extraction and RP-HPLC in combination with taste dilution analyses (TDA) and comparative TDA, followed by LC-MS and 1D/2D NMR experiments, led to the discovery of 10 C(17)-C(21) oxylipins with 1,2,4-trihydroxy-, 1-acetoxy-2,4-dihydroxy-, and 1-acetoxy-2-hydroxy-4-oxo motifs, respectively, besides 1-O-stearoyl-glycerol and 1-O-linoleoyl-glycerol as bitter-tasting compounds in thermally processed avocado (Persea americana Mill.). On the basis of quantitative data, dose-over-threshold (DoT) factors, and taste re-engineering experiments, these phytochemicals, among which 1-acetoxy-2-hydroxy-4-oxo-octadeca-12-ene was found with the highest taste impact, were confirmed to be the key contributors to the bitter off-taste developed upon thermal processing of avocado. For the first time, those C(17)-C(21) oxylipins exhibiting a 1-acetoxy-2,4-dihydroxy- and a 1-acetoxy-2-hydroxy-4-oxo motif, respectively, were discovered to induce a mouthfulness (kokumi)-enhancing activity in sub-bitter threshold concentrations.

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis of Avocado Hass (Persea americana Mill) in the Interaction System Fruit-Chitosan-Colletotrichum

    PubMed Central

    Xoca-Orozco, Luis-Ángel; Cuellar-Torres, Esther Angélica; González-Morales, Sandra; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Porfirio; López-García, Ulises; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Chacón-López, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) is one of the most important crops in Mexico as it is the main producer, consumer, and exporter of avocado fruit in the world. However, successful avocado commercialization is often reduced by large postharvest losses due to Colletotrichum sp., the causal agent of anthracnose. Chitosan is known to have a direct antifungal effect and acts also as an elicitor capable of stimulating a defense response in plants. However, there is little information regarding the genes that are either activated or repressed in fruits treated with chitosan. The aim of this study was to identify by RNA-seq the genes differentially regulated by the action of low molecular weight chitosan in the avocado-chitosan-Colletotrichum interaction system. The samples for RNA-seq were obtained from fruits treated with chitosan, fruits inoculated with Colletotrichum and fruits both treated with chitosan and inoculated with the fungus. Non-treated and non-inoculated fruits were also analyzed. Expression profiles showed that in short times, the fruit-chitosan system presented a greater number of differentially expressed genes, compared to the fruit-pathogen system. Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes showed a large number of metabolic processes regulated by chitosan, including those preventing the spread of Colletotrichum. It was also found that there is a high correlation between the expression of genes in silico and qPCR of several genes involved in different metabolic pathways. PMID:28642771

  16. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass).

    PubMed

    Rojas-Reyes, José O; Robles-Olvera, Victor; Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Castro Matinez, Claudia; Waliszewski, Krzysztof N; Aguilar-Uscanga, María Guadalupe

    2014-07-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass) fruit ranks tenth in terms of the most important products for Mexico. Avocado products are quite unstable due to the presence of oxidative enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The present study is to characterize the activity of purified avocado peroxidase from avocado in order to ascertain the biochemical and kinetic properties and their inhibition conditions. Purification was performed by Sephacryl S 200 HR gel filtration chromatography and its estimated molecular weight was 40 kDa. The zymogram showed an isoelectric point of 4.7. Six substrates were tested in order to ascertain the affinity of the enzyme for these substrates. The purified peroxidase was found to have low Km (0.296 mM) and high catalytic efficiency (2688 mM(-1) s(-1)) using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), optimum activity being reached at 51°C, pH 3.8. The addition of dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, ascorbic acid, sodium azide, L-cysteine and Tween-20 had high inhibitory effects, while metals ions such as Cu(+), Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) had weak inhibitory activity on purified avocado peroxidase. The purified avocado peroxidase exhibits high inhibition (Ki = 0.37 µM) with 1.97 µM n-propyl gallate using ABTS as substrate at 51°C, pH 3.8 for 10 min. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Persea americana (avocado): bringing ancient flowers to fruit in the genomics era.

    PubMed

    Chanderbali, André S; Albert, Victor A; Ashworth, Vanessa E T M; Clegg, Michael T; Litz, Richard E; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S

    2008-04-01

    The avocado (Persea americana) is a major crop commodity worldwide. Moreover, avocado, a paleopolyploid, is an evolutionary "outpost" among flowering plants, representing a basal lineage (the magnoliid clade) near the origin of the flowering plants themselves. Following centuries of selective breeding, avocado germplasm has been characterized at the level of microsatellite and RFLP markers. Nonetheless, little is known beyond these general diversity estimates, and much work remains to be done to develop avocado as a major subtropical-zone crop. Among the goals of avocado improvement are to develop varieties with fruit that will "store" better on the tree, show uniform ripening and have better post-harvest storage. Avocado transcriptome sequencing, genome mapping and partial genomic sequencing will represent a major step toward the goal of sequencing the entire avocado genome, which is expected to aid in improving avocado varieties and production, as well as understanding the evolution of flowers from non-flowering seed plants (gymnosperms). Additionally, continued evolutionary and other comparative studies of flower and fruit development in different avocado strains can be accomplished at the gene expression level, including in comparison with avocado relatives, and these should provide important insights into the genetic regulation of fruit development in basal angiosperms.

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis of Avocado Hass (Persea americana Mill) in the Interaction System Fruit-Chitosan-Colletotrichum.

    PubMed

    Xoca-Orozco, Luis-Ángel; Cuellar-Torres, Esther Angélica; González-Morales, Sandra; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Porfirio; López-García, Ulises; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Chacón-López, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    Avocado ( Persea americana ) is one of the most important crops in Mexico as it is the main producer, consumer, and exporter of avocado fruit in the world. However, successful avocado commercialization is often reduced by large postharvest losses due to Colletotrichum sp., the causal agent of anthracnose. Chitosan is known to have a direct antifungal effect and acts also as an elicitor capable of stimulating a defense response in plants. However, there is little information regarding the genes that are either activated or repressed in fruits treated with chitosan. The aim of this study was to identify by RNA-seq the genes differentially regulated by the action of low molecular weight chitosan in the avocado-chitosan- Colletotrichum interaction system. The samples for RNA-seq were obtained from fruits treated with chitosan, fruits inoculated with Colletotrichum and fruits both treated with chitosan and inoculated with the fungus. Non-treated and non-inoculated fruits were also analyzed. Expression profiles showed that in short times, the fruit-chitosan system presented a greater number of differentially expressed genes, compared to the fruit-pathogen system. Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes showed a large number of metabolic processes regulated by chitosan, including those preventing the spread of Colletotrichum . It was also found that there is a high correlation between the expression of genes in silico and qPCR of several genes involved in different metabolic pathways.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) (avocado) aqueous leaf extract in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, J A O; Kamadyaapa, D R; Gondwe, M M; Moodley, K; Musabayane, C T

    2007-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) aqueous leaf extract (PAE) have been investigated in some experimental animal paradigms. The effects of PAE on myocardial contractile performance was evaluated on guinea pig isolated atrial muscle strips, while the vasodilatory effects of the plant extract were examined on isolated portal veins and thoracic aortic rings of healthy normal Wistar rats in vitro. The hypotensive (antihypertensive) effect of the plant extract was examined in healthy normotensive and hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive rats in vivo. P americana aqueous leaf extract (25-800 mg/ml) produced concentration-dependent, significant (p < 0.05-0.001), negative inotropic and negative chronotropic effects on guinea pig isolated electrically driven left and spontaneously beating right atrial muscle preparations, respectively. Moreover, PAE reduced or abolished, in a concentration-dependent manner, the positive inotropic and chronotropic responses of guinea pig isolated atrial muscle strips induced by noradrenaline (NA, 10(-10)-10(-5) M), and calcium (Ca(2+), 5-40 mM). PAE (50-800 mg/ml) also significantly reduced (p < 0.05-0.001) or abolished, in a concentration-dependent manner, the rhythmic, spontaneous, myogenic contractions of portal veins isolated from healthy normal Wistar rats. Like acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-8)-10(-5) M), the plant extract (25- 800 mg/ml) produced concentration-related relaxations of isolated endothelium-containing thoracic aortic rings pre-contracted with noradrenaline. The vasorelaxant effects of PAE in the isolated, endothelium-intact aortic rings were markedly inhibited or annulled by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10(-5) M), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Furthermore, PAE (25-400 mg/kg iv) caused dose-related, transient but significant reductions (p < 0.05-0.001) in the systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rates of the anaesthetised normotensive and hypertensive rats used. The results of

  20. Pistil starch reserves at anthesis correlate with final flower fate in avocado (Persea americana).

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, María Librada; Hormaza, José Ignacio; Rodrigo, Javier

    2013-01-01

    A common observation in different plant species is a massive abscission of flowers and fruitlets even after adequate pollination, but little is known as to the reason for this drop. Previous research has shown the importance of nutritive reserves accumulated in the flower on fertilization success and initial fruit development but direct evidence has been elusive. Avocado (Persea americana) is an extreme case of a species with a very low fruit to flower ratio. In this work, the implications of starch content in the avocado flower on the subsequent fruit set are explored. Firstly, starch content in individual ovaries was analysed from two populations of flowers with a different fruit set capacity showing that the flowers from the population that resulted in a higher percentage of fruit set contained significantly more starch. Secondly, in a different set of flowers, the style of each flower was excised one day after pollination, once the pollen tubes had reached the base of the style, and individually fixed for starch content analysis under the microscope once the fate of its corresponding ovary (that remained in the tree) was known. A high variability in starch content in the style was found among flowers, with some flowers having starch content up to 1,000 times higher than others, and the flowers that successfully developed into fruits presented significantly higher starch content in the style at anthesis than those that abscised. The relationship between starch content in the ovary and the capacity of set of the flower together with the correlation found between the starch content in the style and the fate of the ovary support the hypothesis that the carbohydrate reserves accumulated in the flower at anthesis are related to subsequent abscission or retention of the developing fruit.

  1. Phylogenetic and expression analysis of the NPR1-like gene family from Persea americana (Mill.).

    PubMed

    Backer, Robert; Mahomed, Waheed; Reeksting, Bianca J; Engelbrecht, Juanita; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; van den Berg, Noëlani

    2015-01-01

    The NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1) forms an integral part of the salicylic acid (SA) pathway in plants and is involved in cross-talk between the SA and jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) pathways. Therefore, NPR1 is essential to the effective response of plants to pathogens. Avocado (Persea americana) is a commercially important crop worldwide. Significant losses in production result from Phytophthora root rot, caused by the hemibiotroph, Phytophthora cinnamomi. This oomycete infects the feeder roots of avocado trees leading to an overall decline in health and eventual death. The interaction between avocado and P. cinnamomi is poorly understood and as such limited control strategies exist. Thus uncovering the role of NPR1 in avocado could provide novel insights into the avocado - P. cinnamomi interaction. A total of five NPR1-like sequences were identified. These sequences were annotated using FGENESH and a maximum-likelihood tree was constructed using 34 NPR1-like protein sequences from other plant species. The conserved protein domains and functional motifs of these sequences were predicted. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR was used to analyze the expression of the five NPR1-like sequences in the roots of avocado after treatment with salicylic and jasmonic acid, P. cinnamomi infection, across different tissues and in P. cinnamomi infected tolerant and susceptible rootstocks. Of the five NPR1-like sequences three have strong support for a defensive role while two are most likely involved in development. Significant differences in the expression profiles of these five NPR1-like genes were observed, assisting in functional classification. Understanding the interaction of avocado and P. cinnamomi is essential to developing new control strategies. This work enables further classification of these genes by means of functional annotation and is a crucial step in understanding the role of NPR1 during P. cinnamomi infection.

  2. Phylogenetic and expression analysis of the NPR1-like gene family from Persea americana (Mill.)

    PubMed Central

    Backer, Robert; Mahomed, Waheed; Reeksting, Bianca J.; Engelbrecht, Juanita; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; van den Berg, Noëlani

    2015-01-01

    The NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1) forms an integral part of the salicylic acid (SA) pathway in plants and is involved in cross-talk between the SA and jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) pathways. Therefore, NPR1 is essential to the effective response of plants to pathogens. Avocado (Persea americana) is a commercially important crop worldwide. Significant losses in production result from Phytophthora root rot, caused by the hemibiotroph, Phytophthora cinnamomi. This oomycete infects the feeder roots of avocado trees leading to an overall decline in health and eventual death. The interaction between avocado and P. cinnamomi is poorly understood and as such limited control strategies exist. Thus uncovering the role of NPR1 in avocado could provide novel insights into the avocado – P. cinnamomi interaction. A total of five NPR1-like sequences were identified. These sequences were annotated using FGENESH and a maximum-likelihood tree was constructed using 34 NPR1-like protein sequences from other plant species. The conserved protein domains and functional motifs of these sequences were predicted. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR was used to analyze the expression of the five NPR1-like sequences in the roots of avocado after treatment with salicylic and jasmonic acid, P. cinnamomi infection, across different tissues and in P. cinnamomi infected tolerant and susceptible rootstocks. Of the five NPR1-like sequences three have strong support for a defensive role while two are most likely involved in development. Significant differences in the expression profiles of these five NPR1-like genes were observed, assisting in functional classification. Understanding the interaction of avocado and P. cinnamomi is essential to developing new control strategies. This work enables further classification of these genes by means of functional annotation and is a crucial step in understanding the role of NPR1 during P. cinnamomi infection. PMID:25972890

  3. Terpenoid Variations within and among Half-Sibling Avocado Trees, Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Niogret, Jerome; Epsky, Nancy D.; Schnell, Raymond J.; Boza, Edward J.; Kendra, Paul E.; Heath, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analyses were conducted to determine the qualitative and quantitative differences in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in plant material from avocado trees, Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae). The initial study analyzed plant material sampled from the trunk to the leaves through different branch diameters to quantify proximo-distal spatial differences within a tree. All trees were seedlings initiated from a single maternal tree. Two-way analysis of variance was conducted on 34 chemicals that comprised at least 3% of the total chemical content of at least one tree and/or location within a tree. There were significant interactions between genotype and location sampled for most chemicals. Parentage analysis using microsatellite molecular markers (SSR's) determined that the four trees had three fathers and that they represented two full-siblings and two half-sibling trees. Descriptive discriminant analysis found that both genotype and location within a tree could be separated based on chemical content, and that the chemical content from full-siblings tended to be more similar than chemical content from half-siblings. To further explore the relationship between genetic background and chemical content, samples were analyzed from leaf material from 20 trees that included two sets of full-sibling seedling trees, the maternal tree and the surviving paternal tree. Descriptive discriminant analysis found good separation between the two full-sibling groups, and that the separation was associated with chemistry of the parental trees. Six groups of chemicals were identified that explained the variation among the trees. We discuss the results in relation to the discrimination process used by wood-boring insects for site-selection on host trees, for tree selection among potential host trees, and the potential use of terpenoid chemical content in chemotaxonomy of avocado trees. PMID:24039994

  4. Terpenoid variations within and among half-sibling avocado trees, Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Niogret, Jerome; Epsky, Nancy D; Schnell, Raymond J; Boza, Edward J; Kendra, Paul E; Heath, Robert R

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analyses were conducted to determine the qualitative and quantitative differences in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in plant material from avocado trees, Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae). The initial study analyzed plant material sampled from the trunk to the leaves through different branch diameters to quantify proximo-distal spatial differences within a tree. All trees were seedlings initiated from a single maternal tree. Two-way analysis of variance was conducted on 34 chemicals that comprised at least 3% of the total chemical content of at least one tree and/or location within a tree. There were significant interactions between genotype and location sampled for most chemicals. Parentage analysis using microsatellite molecular markers (SSR's) determined that the four trees had three fathers and that they represented two full-siblings and two half-sibling trees. Descriptive discriminant analysis found that both genotype and location within a tree could be separated based on chemical content, and that the chemical content from full-siblings tended to be more similar than chemical content from half-siblings. To further explore the relationship between genetic background and chemical content, samples were analyzed from leaf material from 20 trees that included two sets of full-sibling seedling trees, the maternal tree and the surviving paternal tree. Descriptive discriminant analysis found good separation between the two full-sibling groups, and that the separation was associated with chemistry of the parental trees. Six groups of chemicals were identified that explained the variation among the trees. We discuss the results in relation to the discrimination process used by wood-boring insects for site-selection on host trees, for tree selection among potential host trees, and the potential use of terpenoid chemical content in chemotaxonomy of avocado trees.

  5. Pistil Starch Reserves at Anthesis Correlate with Final Flower Fate in Avocado (Persea americana)

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, María Librada; Hormaza, José Ignacio; Rodrigo, Javier

    2013-01-01

    A common observation in different plant species is a massive abscission of flowers and fruitlets even after adequate pollination, but little is known as to the reason for this drop. Previous research has shown the importance of nutritive reserves accumulated in the flower on fertilization success and initial fruit development but direct evidence has been elusive. Avocado (Persea americana) is an extreme case of a species with a very low fruit to flower ratio. In this work, the implications of starch content in the avocado flower on the subsequent fruit set are explored. Firstly, starch content in individual ovaries was analysed from two populations of flowers with a different fruit set capacity showing that the flowers from the population that resulted in a higher percentage of fruit set contained significantly more starch. Secondly, in a different set of flowers, the style of each flower was excised one day after pollination, once the pollen tubes had reached the base of the style, and individually fixed for starch content analysis under the microscope once the fate of its corresponding ovary (that remained in the tree) was known. A high variability in starch content in the style was found among flowers, with some flowers having starch content up to 1,000 times higher than others, and the flowers that successfully developed into fruits presented significantly higher starch content in the style at anthesis than those that abscised. The relationship between starch content in the ovary and the capacity of set of the flower together with the correlation found between the starch content in the style and the fate of the ovary support the hypothesis that the carbohydrate reserves accumulated in the flower at anthesis are related to subsequent abscission or retention of the developing fruit. PMID:24167627

  6. Phenolic compound profiles and antioxidant capacity of Persea americana Mill. peels and seeds of two varieties.

    PubMed

    Kosińska, Agnieszka; Karamać, Magdalena; Estrella, Isabel; Hernández, Teresa; Bartolomé, Begoña; Dykes, Gary A

    2012-05-09

    Avocado processing by the food and cosmetic industries yields a considerable amount of phenolic-rich byproduct such as peels and seeds. Utilization of these byproducts would be favorable from an economic point of view. Methanolic (80%) extracts obtained from lyophilized ground peels and seeds of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) of the Hass and Shepard varieties were characterized for their phenolic compound profiles using the HPLC-PAD technique. The structures of the identified compounds were subsequently unambiguously confirmed by ESI-MS. Compositional analysis revealed that the extracts contained four polyphenolic classes: flavanol monomers, proanthocyanidins, hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonol glycosides. The presence of 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-O-p-coumaroylquinic acid, and procyanidin A trimers was identified in seeds of both varieties. Intervarietal differences were apparent in the phenolic compound profiles of peels. Peels of the Shepard variety were devoid of (+)-catechin and procyanidin dimers, which were present in the peels of the Hass variety. Peels of both varieties contained 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and quercetin derivatives. The differences in the phenolic profiles between varietals were also apparent in the different antioxidant activity of the extracts. The peel extracts had a higher total phenolic compound content and antioxidant activity when compared to the seed extracts. The highest TEAC and ORAC values were apparent in peels of the Haas variety in which they amounted to 0.16 and 0.47 mmol Trolox/g DW, respectively. No significant (p > 0.05) differences were apparent between the TEAC values of seeds of the two varieties but the ORAC values differed significantly (p < 0.05). Overall these findings indicate that both the seeds and peel of avocado can be utilized as a functional food ingredient or as an antioxidant additive.

  7. Cardiotoxicity of acetogenins from Persea americana occurs through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and caspase-dependent apoptosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Silva-Platas, Christian; García, Noemí; Fernández-Sada, Evaristo; Dávila, Daniel; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen; Rodríguez, Dariana; García-Rivas, Gerardo

    2012-08-01

    Acetogenins are cell-membrane permeable, naturally occurring secondary metabolites of plants such as Annonaceae, Lauraceae and other related phylogenic families. They belong to the chemical derivatives of polyketides, which are synthesized from fatty acid precursors. Although acetogenins have displayed diverse biological activities, the anti-proliferative effect on human cancer cells has been widely reported. Acetogenins are inhibitors of complex I in the electron transport chain therefore they interrupt ATP synthesis in mitochondria. We tested a new acetogenins-enriched extract from the seed of Persea americana in order to investigate if any toxicity was induced on cardiac tissue and determine the involved mechanism. In isolated perfused heart we found that contractility was completely inhibited at an accumulative dose of 77 μg/ml. In isolated cardiomyocytes, the acetogenins-enriched extract induced apoptosis through the activation of the intrinsic pathway at 43 μg/ml. In isolated mitochondria, it inhibited complex I activity on NADH-linked respiration, as would be expected, but also induced permeability transition on succinate-linked respiration. Cyclosporine A, a known blocker of permeability transition, significantly prevented the permeability transition triggered by the acetogenins-enriched extract. In addition, our acetogenins-enriched extract inhibited ADP/ATP exchange, suggesting that an important element in phosphate or adenylate transport was affected. In this manner we suggest that acetogenins-enriched extract from Persea americana could directly modulate permeability transition, an entity not yet associated with the acetogenins' direct effects, resulting in cardiotoxicity.

  8. Abundance in Persea americana of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), Vector of Laurel Wilt: A Case of Intra-guild Competition?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus is a pest of plant species in the Lauraceae, including Persea borbonia, P. pallustris, P. americana, and others. Xyleborus glabratus infestation levels in P. borbonia maintain a high proportion compared to other species, such as Xylosandrus crassiuscu...

  9. In vitro evaluation of genotoxicity of avocado (Persea americana) fruit and leaf extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Paresh; Paul, Rajkumar; Ganesh, N

    2010-07-01

    Persea americana is much sought after both for the nutritional value of its fruit and the medicinal values of its various plant parts. A chromosomal aberration assay was undertaken to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of crude extracts from avocado fruits and leaves. Chromosomal aberrations were observed in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to separately increasing concentrations of 50% methanolic extracts of Persea americana fruit and leaves. The groups exposed to leaf and fruit extracts, respectively, showed a concentration-dependent increase in chromosomal aberrations as compared to that in a control group. The mean percentage total aberrant metaphases at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 300 mg/kg concentrations of leaf extract were found respectively to be 58 ± 7.05, 72 ± 6.41, and 78 ± 5.98, which were significantly higher (p < 0.0001 each) than that in the control group (6 ± 3.39). The mean percentage total aberrant metaphases at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 300 mg/kg concentrations of fruit extract were found to be 18 ± 5.49, 40 ± 10.00, and 52 ± 10.20, respectively, which were significantly higher (p = 0.033, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.0001, respectively) than that for control (6 ± 3.39). Acrocentric associations and premature centromeric separation were the two most common abnormalities observed in both the exposed groups. The group exposed to leaf extracts also showed a significant number of a variety of other structural aberrations, including breaks, fragments, dicentrics, terminal deletion, minutes, and Robertsonian translocations. The group exposed to leaf extract showed higher frequency of all types of aberrations at equal concentrations as compared to the group exposed to fruit extract.

  10. Oil biosynthesis in a basal angiosperm: transcriptome analysis of Persea Americana mesocarp.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, Aruna; Cao, Xia; Dabbs, Parker B; Sung, Ha-Jung; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Thrower, Nicholas; Zynda, Greg; Podicheti, Ram; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Ohlrogge, John B

    2015-08-16

    The mechanism by which plants synthesize and store high amounts of triacylglycerols (TAG) in tissues other than seeds is not well understood. The comprehension of controls for carbon partitioning and oil accumulation in nonseed tissues is essential to generate oil-rich biomass in perennial bioenergy crops. Persea americana (avocado), a basal angiosperm with unique features that are ancestral to most flowering plants, stores ~ 70 % TAG per dry weight in its mesocarp, a nonseed tissue. Transcriptome analyses of select pathways, from generation of pyruvate and leading up to TAG accumulation, in mesocarp tissues of avocado was conducted and compared with that of oil-rich monocot (oil palm) and dicot (rapeseed and castor) tissues to identify tissue- and species-specific regulation and biosynthesis of TAG in plants. RNA-Seq analyses of select lipid metabolic pathways of avocado mesocarp revealed patterns similar to that of other oil-rich species. However, only some predominant orthologs of the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway genes in this basal angiosperm were similar to those of monocots and dicots. The accumulation of TAG, rich in oleic acid, was associated with higher transcript levels for a putative stearoyl-ACP desaturase and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated acyl-CoA synthetases, during fruit development. Gene expression levels for enzymes involved in terminal steps to TAG biosynthesis in the ER further indicated that both acyl-CoA-dependent and -independent mechanisms might play a role in TAG assembly, depending on the developmental stage of the fruit. Furthermore, in addition to the expression of an ortholog of WRINKLED1 (WRI1), a regulator of fatty acid biosynthesis, high transcript levels for WRI2-like and WRI3-like suggest a role for additional transcription factors in nonseed oil accumulation. Plastid pyruvate necessary for fatty acid synthesis is likely driven by the upregulation of genes involved in glycolysis and transport of its intermediates

  11. Generation of composite Persea americana (Mill.) (avocado) plants: A proof-of-concept-study.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, S Ashok; Ndlovu, Buyani; Engelbrecht, Juanita; van den Berg, Noëlani

    2017-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana (Mill.)), an important commercial fruit, is severely affected by Phytophthora Root Rot in areas where the pathogen is prevalent. However, advances in molecular research are hindered by the lack of a high-throughput transient transformation system in this non-model plant. In this study, a proof-of-concept is demonstrated by the successful application of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated plant transformation to produce composite avocado plants. Two ex vitro strategies were assessed on two avocado genotypes (Itzamna and A0.74): In the first approach, 8-week-old etiolated seedlings were scarred with a sterile hacksaw blade at the base of the shoot, and in the second, inch-long incisions were made at the base of the shoot (20-week-old non-etiolated plants) with a sterile blade to remove the cortical tissue. The scarred/wounded shoot surfaces were treated with A. rhizogenes strains (K599 or ARqua1) transformed with or without binary plant transformation vectors pRedRootII (DsRed1 marker), pBYR2e1-GFP (GFP- green fluorescence protein marker) or pBINUbiGUSint (GUS- beta-glucuronidase marker) with and without rooting hormone (Dip 'N' Grow) application. The treated shoot regions were air-layered with sterile moist cocopeat to induce root formation. Results showed that hormone application significantly increased root induction, while Agrobacterium-only treatments resulted in very few roots. Combination treatments of hormone+Agrobacterium (-/+ plasmids) showed no significant difference. Only the ARqua1(+plasmid):A0.74 combination resulted in root transformants, with hormone+ARqua1(+pBINUbiGUSint) being the most effective treatment with ~17 and 25% composite plants resulting from strategy-1 and strategy-2, respectively. GUS- and GFP-expressing roots accounted for less than 4 and ~11%, respectively, of the total roots/treatment/avocado genotype. The average number of transgenic roots on the composite plants was less than one per plant in all treatments

  12. Generation of composite Persea americana (Mill.) (avocado) plants: A proof-of-concept-study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, S. Ashok; Ndlovu, Buyani; Engelbrecht, Juanita

    2017-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana (Mill.)), an important commercial fruit, is severely affected by Phytophthora Root Rot in areas where the pathogen is prevalent. However, advances in molecular research are hindered by the lack of a high-throughput transient transformation system in this non-model plant. In this study, a proof-of-concept is demonstrated by the successful application of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated plant transformation to produce composite avocado plants. Two ex vitro strategies were assessed on two avocado genotypes (Itzamna and A0.74): In the first approach, 8-week-old etiolated seedlings were scarred with a sterile hacksaw blade at the base of the shoot, and in the second, inch-long incisions were made at the base of the shoot (20-week-old non-etiolated plants) with a sterile blade to remove the cortical tissue. The scarred/wounded shoot surfaces were treated with A. rhizogenes strains (K599 or ARqua1) transformed with or without binary plant transformation vectors pRedRootII (DsRed1 marker), pBYR2e1-GFP (GFP- green fluorescence protein marker) or pBINUbiGUSint (GUS- beta-glucuronidase marker) with and without rooting hormone (Dip 'N' Grow) application. The treated shoot regions were air-layered with sterile moist cocopeat to induce root formation. Results showed that hormone application significantly increased root induction, while Agrobacterium-only treatments resulted in very few roots. Combination treatments of hormone+Agrobacterium (-/+ plasmids) showed no significant difference. Only the ARqua1(+plasmid):A0.74 combination resulted in root transformants, with hormone+ARqua1(+pBINUbiGUSint) being the most effective treatment with ~17 and 25% composite plants resulting from strategy-1 and strategy-2, respectively. GUS- and GFP-expressing roots accounted for less than 4 and ~11%, respectively, of the total roots/treatment/avocado genotype. The average number of transgenic roots on the composite plants was less than one per plant in all treatments

  13. Acute and sub-acute toxicological assessment of the aqueous seed extract of Persea americana mill (Lauraceae) in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozolua, Raymond I; Anaka, Ogochukwu N; Okpo, Stephen O; Idogun, Sylvester E

    2009-07-03

    The aqueous seed extract of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) is used by herbalists in Nigeria for the management of hypertension. As part of our on-going scientific evaluation of the extract, we designed the present study to assess its acute and sub-acute toxicity profiles in rats. Experiments were conducted to determine the oral median lethal dose (LD(50)) and other gross toxicological manifestations on acute basis. In the sub-acute experiments, the animals were administered 2.5 g/kg (p.o) per day of the extract for 28 consecutive days. Animal weight and fluid intake were recorded during the 28 days period. Terminally, kidneys, hearts, blood/sera were obtained for weight, haematological and biochemical markers of toxicity. Results show that the LD(50) could not be determined after a maximum dose of 10 g/kg. Sub-acute treatment with the extract neither affected whole body weight nor organ-to-body weight ratios but significantly increased the fluid intake (P < 0.0001). Haematological parameters and the levels of ALT, AST, albumin and creatinine were not significantly altered. However, the concentration of total proteins was significantly increased in the treated group. In conclusion, the aqueous seed extract of P. americana is safe on sub-acute basis but extremely high doses may not be advisable.

  14. [Genitalia of three species of Heilipus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that damage avocado fruits (Persea americana Mill.) in Mexico and Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Vildózola, Alvaro; Valdez-Carrasco, Jorge; Equihua-Martínez, Armando; González-Hernández, Héctor; Romero-Nápoles, Jesús; Solís-Aguilar, Juan F; Ramírez-Alarcón, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    The male and female genitaliae of three species of the genus Heilipus Germar (H. lauri Boheman, H. pittieri Barber and H. trifasciatus Fabricius) that damage avocado fruits (Persea americana Mill.) in Mexico and Costa Rica are described and illustrated. The aedeagus, spiculum gastrale, styli of 8th sternite are different in each one of the three species studied and can be used for specific identification.

  15. EST sequencing and gene expression profiling of defence-related genes from Persea americana infected with Phytophthora cinnamomi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Avocado (Persea americana) belongs to the Lauraceae family and is an important commercial fruit crop in over 50 countries. The most serious pathogen affecting avocado production is Phytophthora cinnamomi which causes Phytophthora root rot (PRR). Root pathogens such as P. cinnamomi and their interactions with hosts are poorly understood and despite the importance of both the avocado crop and the effect Phytophthora has on its cultivation, there is a lack of molecular knowledge underpinning our understanding of defence strategies against the pathogen. In order to initiate a better understanding of host-specific defence we have generated EST data using 454 pyrosequencing and profiled nine defence-related genes from Pc-infected avocado roots. Results 2.0 Mb of data was generated consisting of ~10,000 reads on a single lane of the GS FLX platform. Using the Newbler assembler 371 contigs were assembled, of which 367 are novel for Persea americana. Genes were classified according to Gene Ontology terms. In addition to identifying root-specific ESTs we were also able to identify and quantify the expression of nine defence-related genes that were differentially regulated in response to P. cinnamomi. Genes such as metallothionein, thaumatin and the pathogenesis related PsemI, mlo and profilin were found to be differentially regulated. Conclusions This is the first study in elucidating the avocado root transcriptome as well as identifying defence responses of avocado roots to the root pathogen P. cinnamomi. Our data is currently the only EST data that has been generated for avocado rootstocks, and the ESTs identified in this study have already been useful in identifying defence-related genes as well as providing gene information for other studies looking at processes such as ROS regulation as well as hypoxia in avocado roots. Our EST data will aid in the elucidation of the avocado transcriptome and identification of markers for improved rootstock breeding and

  16. EST sequencing and gene expression profiling of defence-related genes from Persea americana infected with Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, Waheed; Berg, Noëlani van den

    2011-11-23

    Avocado (Persea americana) belongs to the Lauraceae family and is an important commercial fruit crop in over 50 countries. The most serious pathogen affecting avocado production is Phytophthora cinnamomi which causes Phytophthora root rot (PRR). Root pathogens such as P. cinnamomi and their interactions with hosts are poorly understood and despite the importance of both the avocado crop and the effect Phytophthora has on its cultivation, there is a lack of molecular knowledge underpinning our understanding of defence strategies against the pathogen. In order to initiate a better understanding of host-specific defence we have generated EST data using 454 pyrosequencing and profiled nine defence-related genes from Pc-infected avocado roots. 2.0 Mb of data was generated consisting of ~10,000 reads on a single lane of the GS FLX platform. Using the Newbler assembler 371 contigs were assembled, of which 367 are novel for Persea americana. Genes were classified according to Gene Ontology terms. In addition to identifying root-specific ESTs we were also able to identify and quantify the expression of nine defence-related genes that were differentially regulated in response to P. cinnamomi. Genes such as metallothionein, thaumatin and the pathogenesis related PsemI, mlo and profilin were found to be differentially regulated. This is the first study in elucidating the avocado root transcriptome as well as identifying defence responses of avocado roots to the root pathogen P. cinnamomi. Our data is currently the only EST data that has been generated for avocado rootstocks, and the ESTs identified in this study have already been useful in identifying defence-related genes as well as providing gene information for other studies looking at processes such as ROS regulation as well as hypoxia in avocado roots. Our EST data will aid in the elucidation of the avocado transcriptome and identification of markers for improved rootstock breeding and screening. The characterization of

  17. Remnant B-cell-stimulative and anti-oxidative effects of Persea americana fruit extract studied in rats introduced into streptozotocin - induced hyperglycaemic state.

    PubMed

    Rao, U S Mahadeva; Adinew, Bizuneh

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-stimulative and anti-oxidative effects of Persea americana fruit extract were evaluated using streptozotocin (STZ). Ethanol extract of P. americana in the concentration of 300 mg/kg body weight/rat /day was orally administered to rats introduced into STZ-induced hyperglycaemic state for a period of 30 days. After the treatment with avocado fruit extract, the elevated levels of blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, blood urea and serum creatinine seen in the hyperglycaemic rats, reverted back to near normal. Similarly, significantly decreased plasma insulin and haemoglobin levels went back to near normal after the treatment, suggesting the insulin-stimulative effect of P. americana fruit. Determination of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), hydroperoxides and both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, confirmed the anti-oxidative potential of avocado fruit extract which, in turn, might be responsible for its hypoglycaemic potential. Changes in activities of enzymes such as serum aspartate transaminase (AST), serum alanine transaminase (ALT), and serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) seen in the control and experimental rats, revealed the tissue-protective nature of Persea americana fruits, while all of the analysed biochemical parameters were comparable to those obtained with gliclazide as a standard reference drug.

  18. Persea americana Glycolic Extract: In Vitro Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Candida albicans Biofilm and Cytotoxicity Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, D; Oliveira, J R; Oliveira, F E; Higa, K C; Junqueira, J C; Jorge, A O C; Back-Brito, G N; Oliveira, L D

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal activity of Persea americana extract on Candida albicans biofilm and its cytotoxicity in macrophage culture (RAW 264.7). To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), microdilution in broth (CLSI M27-S4 protocol) was performed. Thereafter, the concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/mL (n = 10) with 5 min exposure were analyzed on mature biofilm in microplate wells for 48 h. Saline was used as control (n = 10). After treatment, biofilm cells were scraped off and dilutions were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. After incubation (37°C/48 h), the values of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were converted to log10 and analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%). The cytotoxicity of the P. americana extract was evaluated on macrophages by MTT assay. The MIC of the extract was 6.25 mg/mL and with 12.5 mg/mL there was elimination of 100% of planktonic cultures. Regarding the biofilms, a significant reduction (P < 0.001) of the biofilm at concentrations of 50 (0.580 ± 0.209 log10), 100 (0.998 ± 0.508 log10), and 200 mg/mL (1.093 ± 0.462 log10) was observed. The concentrations of 200 and 100 mg/mL were cytotoxic for macrophages, while the concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL showed viability higher than 55%.

  19. Aqueous extracts of avocado pear (Persea americana Mill.) leaves and seeds exhibit anti-cholinesterases and antioxidant activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Odubanjo, Veronica O; Bello, Fatai; Ademosun, Ayokunle O; Oyeleye, Sunday I; Nwanna, Emem E; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O

    2016-03-01

    Avocado pear (Persea americana Mill.) leaves and seeds are used in traditional medicine for the treatment/management of Alzheimer disease (AD); however, information on the mechanism of actions is limited. This study sought to investigate the effect of P. americana leaf and seed aqueous extracts on some enzymes linked with AD (acetylcholinesterase [AChE] and butyrylcholinesterase [BChE] activities) and their antioxidant potentials in vitro. The inhibitory effects of extracts on AChE and BChE activities and antioxidant potentials (inhibition of Fe2+- and sodium nitroprusside-induced thiobarbiturate reactive species [TBARS] production in rat brain homogenates, radicals [1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide] scavenging and iron [Fe] chelation abilities) were investigated. Phenolic content and phytochemical screening were carried out. Alkaloid profile was also determined using gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The extracts inhibited AChE and BChE activities and prooxidant-induced TBARS production in a dose-dependent manner, with the seed extract having the highest inhibitory effect and the leaf extract exhibiting higher phenolic content and radical scavenging abilities, but lower Fe chelation ability compared with that of the seed. The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, alkaloids, and terpenoids in both extracts, whereas the total alkaloid profile was higher in the seed extract than in the leaf extract, as revealed by GC-FID. The anti-cholinesterase and antioxidant activities of avocado leaf and seed could be linked to their phytoconstituents and might be the possible mechanisms underlying their use as a cheap and natural treatment/management of AD. However, these extracts should be further investigated in vivo.

  20. Persea americana Glycolic Extract: In Vitro Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Candida albicans Biofilm and Cytotoxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, D.; Oliveira, J. R.; Oliveira, F. E.; Higa, K. C.; Junqueira, J. C.; Jorge, A. O. C.; Back-Brito, G. N.; Oliveira, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal activity of Persea americana extract on Candida albicans biofilm and its cytotoxicity in macrophage culture (RAW 264.7). To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), microdilution in broth (CLSI M27-S4 protocol) was performed. Thereafter, the concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/mL (n = 10) with 5 min exposure were analyzed on mature biofilm in microplate wells for 48 h. Saline was used as control (n = 10). After treatment, biofilm cells were scraped off and dilutions were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. After incubation (37°C/48 h), the values of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were converted to log10 and analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%). The cytotoxicity of the P. americana extract was evaluated on macrophages by MTT assay. The MIC of the extract was 6.25 mg/mL and with 12.5 mg/mL there was elimination of 100% of planktonic cultures. Regarding the biofilms, a significant reduction (P < 0.001) of the biofilm at concentrations of 50 (0.580 ± 0.209 log10), 100 (0.998 ± 0.508 log10), and 200 mg/mL (1.093 ± 0.462 log10) was observed. The concentrations of 200 and 100 mg/mL were cytotoxic for macrophages, while the concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL showed viability higher than 55%. PMID:26605376

  1. Integrating gene flow, crop biology, and farm management in on-farm conservation of avocado (Persea americana, Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Kenneth; Desalle, Rob; Peters, Charles M; Benfey, Philip N

    2003-11-01

    Maintaining crop diversity on farms where cultivars can evolve is a conservation goal, but few tools are available to assess the long-term maintenance of genetic diversity on farms. One important issue for on-farm conservation is gene flow from crops with a narrow genetic base into related populations that are genetically diverse. In a case study of avocado (Persea americana var. americana) in one of its centers of diversity (San Jerónimo, Costa Rica), we used 10 DNA microsatellite markers in a parentage analysis to estimate gene flow from commercialized varieties into a traditional crop population. Five commercialized genotypes comprised nearly 40% of orchard trees, but they contributed only about 14.5% of the gametes to the youngest cohort of trees. Although commercialized varieties and the diverse population were often planted on the same farm, planting patterns appeared to keep the two types of trees separated on small scales, possibly explaining the limited gene flow. In a simulation that combined gene flow estimates, crop biology, and graft tree management, loss of allelic diversity was less than 10% over 150 yr, and selection was effective in retaining desirable alleles in the diverse subpopulation. Simulations also showed that, in addition to gene flow, managing the genetic makeup and life history traits of the invasive commercialized varieties could have a significant impact on genetic diversity in the target population. The results support the feasibility of on-farm crop conservation, but simulations also showed that higher levels of gene flow could lead to severe losses of genetic diversity even if farmers continue to plant diverse varieties.

  2. A new look at sporoderm ontogeny in Persea americana and the hidden side of development.

    PubMed

    Gabarayeva, Nina I; Grigorjeva, Valentina V; Rowley, John R

    2010-06-01

    The phenomenon of self-assembly, widespread in both the living and the non-living world, is a key mechanism in sporoderm pattern formation. Observations in developmental palynology appear in a new light if they are regarded as aspects of a sequence of micellar colloidal mesophases at genomically controlled initial parameters. The exine of Persea is reduced to ornamentation (spines and gemmae with underlying skin-like ectexine); there is no endexine. Development of Persea exine was analysed based on the idea that ornamentation of pollen occurs largely by self-assembly. Flower buds were collected from trees grown in greenhouses over 11 years in order to examine all the main developmental stages, including the very short tetrad period. After fixing, sections were examined using transmission electron microscopy. The locations of future spines are determined by lipid droplets in invaginations of the microspore plasma membrane. The addition of new sporopollenin monomers into these invaginations leads to the appearance of chimeric polymersomes, which, after splitting into two individual assemblies, give rise to both liquid-crystal conical 'skeletons' of spines and spherical micelles. After autopolymerization of sporopollenin, spines emerge around their skeletons, nested into clusters of globules. These clusters and single globules between spines appear on a base of spherical micelles. The intine also develops on the base of micellar mesophases. Colloidal chemistry helps to provide a more general understanding of the processes and explains recurrent features of pollen walls from remote taxa.

  3. A new look at sporoderm ontogeny in Persea americana and the hidden side of development

    PubMed Central

    Gabarayeva, Nina I.; Grigorjeva, Valentina V.; Rowley, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The phenomenon of self-assembly, widespread in both the living and the non-living world, is a key mechanism in sporoderm pattern formation. Observations in developmental palynology appear in a new light if they are regarded as aspects of a sequence of micellar colloidal mesophases at genomically controlled initial parameters. The exine of Persea is reduced to ornamentaion (spines and gemmae with underlying skin-like ectexine); there is no endexine. Development of Persea exine was analysed based on the idea that ornamentation of pollen occurs largely by self-assembly. Methods Flower buds were collected from trees grown in greenhouses over 11 years in order to examine all the main developmental stages, including the very short tetrad period. After fixing, sections were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Key Results and Conclusions The locations of future spines are determined by lipid droplets in invaginations of the microspore plasma membrane. The addition of new sporopollenin monomers into these invaginations leads to the appearance of chimeric polymersomes, which, after splitting into two individual assemblies, give rise to both liquid-crystal conical ‘skeletons’ of spines and spherical micelles. After autopolymerization of sporopollenin, spines emerge around their skeletons, nested into clusters of globules. These clusters and single globules between spines appear on a base of spherical micelles. The intine also develops on the base of micellar mesophases. Colloidal chemistry helps to provide a more general understanding of the processes and explains recurrent features of pollen walls from remote taxa. PMID:20400758

  4. Profiling LC-DAD-ESI-TOF MS method for the determination of phenolic metabolites from avocado (Persea americana).

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Fernández, Elena; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2011-03-23

    A powerful HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF MS method was established for the efficient identification of the chemical constituents in the methanolic extracts of avocado (Persea americana). Separation and detection conditions were optimized by using a standard mix containing 39 compounds belonging to phenolic acids and different categories of flavonoids, analytes that could be potentially present in the avocado extracts. Optimum LC separation was achieved on a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18 analytical column (4.6×150 mm, 1.8 μm particle size) by gradient elution with water+acetic acid (0.5%) and acetonitrile as mobile phases, at a flow rate of 1.6 mL/min. The detection was carried out by ultraviolet-visible absorption and ESI-TOF MS. The developed method was applied to the study of 3 different varieties of avocado, and 17 compounds were unequivocally identified with standards. Moreover, around 25 analytes were tentatively identified by taking into account the accuracy and isotopic information provided by TOF MS.

  5. Impact of Laurel Wilt, Caused by Raffaelea lauricola, on Leaf Gas Exchange and Xylem Sap Flow in Avocado, Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Ploetz, Randy C; Schaffer, Bruce; Vargas, Ana I; Konkol, Joshua L; Salvatierra, Juanpablo; Wideman, Ronney

    2015-04-01

    Laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola, is a destructive disease of avocado (Persea americana). The susceptibility of different cultivars and races was examined previously but more information is needed on how this host responds to the disease. In the present study, net CO2 assimilation (A), stomatal conductance of H2O (gs), transpiration (E), water use efficiency (WUE), and xylem sap flow rates were assessed in cultivars that differed in susceptibility. After artificial inoculation with R. lauricola, there was a close relationship between symptom development and reductions in A, gs, E, WUE, and mean daily sap flow in the most susceptible cultivar, 'Russell', and significantly greater disease and lower A, gs, E, WUE, and sap flow rates were usually detected after 15 days compared with the more tolerant 'Brogdon' and 'Marcus Pumpkin'. Significant differences in preinoculation A, gs, E, and WUE were generally not detected among the cultivars but preinoculation sap flow rates were greater in Russell than in Brogdon and Marcus Pumpkin. Preinoculation sap flow rates and symptom severity for individual trees were correlated at the end of an experiment (r=0.46), indicating that a plant's susceptibility to laurel wilt was related to its ability to conduct water. The potential management of this disease with clonal rootstocks that reduce sap flow rates is discussed.

  6. Identification of avocado (Persea americana) pulp proteins by nano-LC-MS/MS via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) proteins have been scarcely studied despite their importance, especially in food related allergies. The proteome of avocado pulp was explored in depth by extracting proteins with capture by combinatorial peptide ligand libraries at pH 7.4 and under conditions mimicking reverse-phase capture at pH 2.2. The total number of unique gene products identified amounts to 1012 proteins, of which 174 are in common with the control, untreated sample, 190 are present only in the control and 648 represent the new species detected via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries of all combined eluates and likely represent low-abundance proteins. Among the 1012 proteins, it was possible to identify the already known avocado allergen Pers a 1 and different proteins susceptible to be allergens such as a profilin, a polygalacturonase, a thaumatin-like protein, a glucanase, and an isoflavone reductase like protein. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Hepatoprotective properties of aqueous leaf extract of Persea Americana, Mill (Lauraceae) 'avocado' against CCL4-induced damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brai, Bartholomew I C; Adisa, Rahmat A; Odetola, Adebimpe A

    2014-01-01

    Natural products from plants have received considerable attention in recent years due to their diverse pharmacological properties, including antioxidants and hepatoprotective activities. The protective effects of aqueous extract of Persea americana (AEPA) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in male albino rats was investigated. Liver damage was induced in rats by administering a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of CCl4 and olive oil [3 ml/kg, subcutaneously (sc)] after pre-treatment for 7 days with AEPA. Hepatoprotective effects of AEPA was evaluated by estimating the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and levels of total bilirubin (TBL). The effects of AEPA on biomarkers of oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) and antioxidant enzymes namely, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were measured in liver post mitochondrial fraction. AEPA and Reducdyn® showed significant (p<0.05) hepatoprotective activity by decreasing the activities of ALT, AST, ALP and reducing the levels of TBL. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, levels of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls were also decreased dose-dependently in the AEPA-treated rats. Pre-treatment with AEPA also decreased the serum levels of glutathione significantly. These data revealed that AEPA possesses significant hepatoprotective effects against CCl4-induced toxicity attributable to its constituent phytochemicals. The mechanism of hepatoprotection seems to be through modulation of antioxidant enzyme system.

  8. Isolation and chemical identification of lipid derivatives from avocado (Persea americana) pulp with antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Dariana Graciela; Flores-García, Mirthala; Silva-Platas, Christian; Rizzo, Sheryl; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; De la Peña-Diaz, Aurora; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen; García-Rivas, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in physiological hemostasis. However, in coronary arteries damaged by atherosclerosis, enhanced platelet aggregation, with subsequent thrombus formation, is a precipitating factor in acute ischemic events. Avocado pulp (Persea americana) is a good source of bioactive compounds, and its inclusion in the diet as a source of fatty acid has been related to reduced platelet aggregability. Nevertheless, constituents of avocado pulp with antiplatelet activity remain unknown. The present study aims to characterize the chemical nature of avocado constituents with inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation. Centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) was used as a fractionation and purification tool, guided by an in vitro adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid or collagen-platelet aggregation assay. Antiplatelet activity was initially linked to seven acetogenins that were further purified, and their dose-dependent effects in the presence of various agonists were contrasted. This process led to the identification of Persenone-C (3) as the most potent antiplatelet acetogenin (IC₅₀=3.4 mM) among the evaluated compounds. In vivo evaluations with Persenone A (4) demonstrated potential protective effects against arterial thrombosis (25 mg kg⁻¹ of body weight), as coagulation times increased (2-fold with respect to the vehicle) and thrombus formation was attenuated (71% versus vehicle). From these results, avocado may be referred to as a functional food containing acetogenin compounds that inhibit platelet aggregation with a potential preventive effect on thrombus formation, such as those that occur in ischaemic diseases.

  9. Avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill) exhibits chemo-protective potentiality against cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity in human lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rajkumar; Kulkarni, Paresh; Ganesh, Narayan

    2011-01-01

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been associated with reduced risks for many types of cancers. Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a widely consumed fruit containing many cancer preventing nutrients, vitamins and phytochemicals. Studies have shown that phytochemicals extracted from the avocado fruit selectively induce cell cycle arrest, inhibit growth, and induce apoptosis in precancerous and cancer cell lines. Our recent studies indicate that phytochemicals extracted with 50% Methanol from avocado fruits help in proliferation of human lymphocyte cells and decrease chromosomal aberrations induced by cyclophosphamide. Among three concentrations (100 mg, 150 mg and 200 mg per Kg Body Weight), the most effective conc. of extract was 200 mg/Kg Body Wt. It decreased significant level of numerical and structural aberrations (breaks, premature centromeric division etc. up to 88%, p < 0.0001)), and accrocentric associtation within D & G group (up to 78%, p = 0.0008). These studies suggest that phytochemicals from the avocado fruit can be utilized for making active chemoprotective ingredient for lowering the side effect of chemotherapy like cyclophosphamide in cancer therapy.

  10. Transcriptome responses of an ungrafted Phytophthora root rot tolerant avocado (Persea americana) rootstock to flooding and Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed

    Reeksting, B J; Olivier, N A; van den Berg, N

    2016-09-22

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a commercially important fruit crop worldwide. A major limitation to production is the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi, which causes root rot leading to branch-dieback and tree death. The decline of orchards infected with P. cinnamomi occurs much faster when exposed to flooding, even if flooding is only transient. Flooding is a multifactorial stress compromised of several individual stresses, making breeding and selection for tolerant varieties challenging. With more plantations occurring in marginal areas, with imperfect irrigation and drainage, understanding the response of avocado to these stresses will be important for the industry. Maintenance of energy production was found to be central in the response to flooding, as seen by up-regulation of transcripts related to glycolysis and induction of transcripts related to ethanolic fermentation. Energy-intensive processes were generally down-regulated, as evidenced by repression of transcripts related to processes such as secondary cell-wall biosynthesis as well as defence-related transcripts. Aquaporins were found to be down-regulated in avocado roots exposed to flooding, indicating reduced water-uptake under these conditions. The transcriptomic response of avocado to flooding and P. cinnamomi was investigated utilizing microarray analysis. Differences in the transcriptome caused by the presence of the pathogen were minor compared to transcriptomic perturbations caused by flooding. The transcriptomic response of avocado to flooding reveals a response to flooding that is conserved in several species. This data could provide key information that could be used to improve selection of stress tolerant rootstocks in the avocado industry.

  11. Effect of hydroalcoholic fruit extract of Persea americana Mill. on high fat diet induced obesity: A dose response study in rats.

    PubMed

    Monika, Padmanabhan; Geetha, Arumugam

    2016-06-01

    The fruits of Persea Americana Mill., commonly known as Avocado, are traditionally consumed for various health benefits including weight reduction. Here, we studied the effect of hydroalcoholic fruit extract of Persea americana (HAEPA) on high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in rats. Obesity was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats by feeding HFD for 14 wk. The hypolipidemic effect was evaluated by co-administering 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body wt. of HAEPA. There was a significant increase in weight gain, body mass index (BMI), blood lipids, low density lipoproteins (LDL), lipid peroxides (LPO) and serum transaminases in HFD fed rats. HFD+HAEPA fed rats showed a significant decrease in blood lipids, LPO, liver lipids and increase in antioxidant status when compared to HFD control rats. The activity of lipid metabolic key enzymes such as fatty acid synthase and HMG CoA reductase in liver were also found to be decreased significantly in HAEPA co-administered rats. Lipoprotein lipase activity was found increased in HFD+HAEPA rats. Among the 4 doses studied, 100 mg of HAEPA/kg body wt. exhibited optimum hypolipidemic activity. Histopathological observations in liver and visceral adipose tissue added more evidence for the lipid lowering effect of HAEPA. It can be concluded that avocado fruit extract can act as hypolipidemic agent probably by modulating the activities of HMG CoA reductase and fatty acid synthase in liver.

  12. Biochemical Effects of Aqueous Extract of Persea americana (Mill) on the Myocardium of Left Ventricle of High Salt–Fed Adult Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Olushola, Ayoola I.; Aderibigbe, Komolafe O.; Stephen, Saka O.; Ayodeji, Odukoya S.

    2017-01-01

    Background. The cardioprotective effects of Persea americana extract was investigated on biochemical activities of high salt–fed adult Wistar rats in this study. Method. Forty healthy Wistar rats of both sexes weighing 120 to 150 g were randomly assigned into 8 groups of 5 rats each (groups A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H). Rats in groups A, F, G, and H were fed with standard laboratory pellets, while groups B, C, D, and E were fed on the high-salt diet for 4 weeks. Concomitantly, daily administration of 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg of the P americana extract were given orally to groups C and F, D and G, and E and H, respectively, while rats in groups A and B were administered distilled water. Blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture; concentration of sodium ion, potassium ion, nitric oxide, and activity of lactate dehydrogenase were determined. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze data, followed by Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) test for multiple comparison. Results. Results revealed that concentration of potassium ion and nitric oxide was significantly lower (P < .05) in high salt–fed groups. Sodium ion concentration and activity of lactate dehydrogenase were higher in high salt–fed group while P americana prevented biochemical perturbations in other experimental groups. Conclusion. In conclusion, high salt–diet induced biochemical alterations which were significantly protected by oral administration of P americana extract. PMID:29228805

  13. Biochemical Effects of Aqueous Extract of Persea americana (Mill) on the Myocardium of Left Ventricle of High Salt-Fed Adult Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Olushola, Ayoola I; Aderibigbe, Komolafe O; Stephen, Saka O; Ayodeji, Odukoya S

    2017-10-01

    The cardioprotective effects of Persea americana extract was investigated on biochemical activities of high salt-fed adult Wistar rats in this study. Forty healthy Wistar rats of both sexes weighing 120 to 150 g were randomly assigned into 8 groups of 5 rats each (groups A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H). Rats in groups A, F, G, and H were fed with standard laboratory pellets, while groups B, C, D, and E were fed on the high-salt diet for 4 weeks. Concomitantly, daily administration of 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg of the P americana extract were given orally to groups C and F, D and G, and E and H, respectively, while rats in groups A and B were administered distilled water. Blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture; concentration of sodium ion, potassium ion, nitric oxide, and activity of lactate dehydrogenase were determined. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze data, followed by Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) test for multiple comparison. Results revealed that concentration of potassium ion and nitric oxide was significantly lower ( P < .05) in high salt-fed groups. Sodium ion concentration and activity of lactate dehydrogenase were higher in high salt-fed group while P americana prevented biochemical perturbations in other experimental groups. In conclusion, high salt-diet induced biochemical alterations which were significantly protected by oral administration of P americana extract.

  14. Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from avocado seed (Persea americana var. drymifolia) reveals abundant expression of the gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide snakin.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina J; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; Suárez-Rodríguez, Luis María; Rodríguez-Zapata, Luis C; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Jimenez-Moraila, Beatriz; López-Meza, Joel E; López-Gómez, Rodolfo

    2013-09-01

    Avocado is one of the most important fruits in the world. Avocado "native mexicano" (Persea americana var. drymifolia) seeds are widely used in the propagation of this plant and are the primary source of rootstocks globally for a variety of avocado cultivars, such as the Hass avocado. Here, we report the isolation of 5005 ESTs from the 5' ends of P. americana var. drymifolia seed cDNA clones representing 1584 possible unigenes. These avocado seed ESTs were compared with the avocado flower EST library, and we detected several genes that are expressed either in both tissues or only in the seed. The snakin gene, which encodes an element of the innate immune response in plants, was one of those most frequently found among the seed ESTs, and this suggests that it is abundantly expressed in the avocado seed. We expressed the snakin gene in a heterologous system, namely the bovine endothelial cell line BVE-E6E7. Conditioned media from transfected BVE-E6E7 cells showed antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first study of the function of the snakin gene in plant seed tissue, and our observations suggest that this gene might play a protective role in the avocado seed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Persea americana (avocado) fruit extract on the level of expression of adiponectin and PPAR-γ in rats subjected to experimental hyperlipidemia and obesity.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Monika; Arumugam, Geetha

    2014-06-01

    Persea americana, commonly known as avocado, is traditionally consumed fruit which possesses body fat lowering capacity. Adiponectin plays an important role in regulating obesity. In this study, the effect of hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of P. americana (HAEPA) on the level of blood lipids, glutathione, lipid peroxidation products, adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ expressions was investigated in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups: groups 1 and 2 were fed normal rat chow (5% fat) and groups 3 and 4 were fed HFD (23% fat) for a period of 14 weeks. In addition, groups 2 and 4 rats were administered orally with 100 mg/kg body weight of HAEPA from third week. After 14 weeks, rats were sacrificed, and serum/plasma levels of total cholesterol, phospholipids, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and adiponectin were determined. The mRNA expression of adiponectin, PPAR-γ and protein expression of PPAR-γ were also evaluated. The body mass index (BMI), total fat pad mass and adiposity index were significantly decreased in HAEPA co-administered rats than in HFD-fed rats. The levels of LDL and lipid peroxides were significantly higher in HFD group than in HFD+HAEPA group. Levels of reduced glutathione, adiponectin, mRNA expression of adiponectin, PPAR-γ and protein expression of PPAR-γ were found to be increased in HFD+HAEPA group than in HFD group. The hypolipidemic effect of HAEPA is also evidenced by the histological observations in liver, heart and adipose tissue. The results indicate that HAEPA exhibits hypolipidemic activity probably by increasing the mRNA expression of adiponectin and PPAR-γ, which reduce the risk of hyperlipidemia and obesity.

  16. Epidemiology, pathology and identification of Colletotrichum including a novel species associated with avocado (Persea americana) anthracnose in Israel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gunjan; Maymon, Marcel; Freeman, Stanley

    2017-11-20

    Anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum species is a major constraint for the shelf-life and marketability of avocado fruits. To date, only C. gloeosporioides sensu lato and C. aenigma have been reported as pathogens affecting avocado in Israel. This study was conducted to identify and characterize Colletotrichum species associated with avocado anthracnose and to determine their survival on different host-structures in Israel. The pathogen survived and over-wintered mainly on fresh and dry leaves, as well as fresh twigs in the orchard. A collection of 538 Colletotrichum isolates used in this study was initially characterized based on morphology and banding patterns generated according to arbitrarily primed PCR to assess the genetic diversity of the fungal populations. Thereafter, based on multi-locus phylogenetic analyses involving combinations of ITS, act, ApMat, cal, chs1, gapdh, gs, his3, tub2 gene/markers; eight previously described species (C. aenigma, C. alienum, C. fructicola, C. gloeosporioides sensu stricto, C. karstii, C. nupharicola, C. siamense, C. theobromicola) and a novel species (C. perseae) were identified, as avocado anthracnose pathogens in Israel; and reconfirmed after pathogenicity assays. Colletotrichum perseae sp. nov. and teleomorph of C. aenigma are described along with comprehensive morphological descriptions and illustrations, for the first time in this study.

  17. Stem bark extract and fraction of Persea americana (Mill.) exhibits bactericidal activities against strains of bacillus cereus associated with food poisoning.

    PubMed

    Akinpelu, David A; Aiyegoro, Olayinka A; Akinpelu, Oluseun F; Okoh, Anthony I

    2014-12-30

    The study investigates the in vitro antibacterial potentials of stem bark extracts of Persea americana on strains of Bacillus cereus implicated in food poisoning. The crude stem bark extracts and butanolic fraction at a concentration of 25 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL, respectively, exhibited antibacterial activities against test isolates. The zones of inhibition exhibited by the crude extract and the fraction ranged between 10 mm and 26 mm, while the minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged between 0.78 and 5.00 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged between 3.12 mg/mL-12.5 mg/mL and 1.25-10 mg/mL for the extract and the fraction, respectively. The butanolic fraction killed 91.49% of the test isolates at a concentration of 2× MIC after 60 min of contact time, while a 100% killing was achieved after the test bacterial cells were exposed to the butanolic fraction at a concentration of 3× MIC after 90 min contact time. Intracellular protein and potassium ion leaked out of the test bacterial cells when exposed to certain concentrations of the fraction; this is an indication of bacterial cell wall disruptions by the extract's butanolic fraction and, thus, caused a biocidal effect on the cells, as evident in the killing rate test results.

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Defensin PaDef from Avocado Fruit (Persea americana var. drymifolia) Expressed in Endothelial Cells against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo; Suárez-Rodríguez, Luis M.; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Rodríguez-Zapata, Luis C.; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is a useful tool to control infectious diseases in general and rising antibiotic resistant microorganisms in particular. Alternative strategies are desirable, and antimicrobial peptides (AMP) represent attractive control agents. Mexican avocado (Persea americana var. drymifolia) is used in traditional medicine; however, the AMP production has not been reported in this plant. We obtained a cDNA library from avocado fruit and clone PaDef was identified, which has a cDNA (249 bp) encoding a protein (78 aa) homologous with plant defensins (>80%). We expressed the defensin PaDef cDNA (pBME3) in the bovine endothelial cell line BVE-E6E7. Polyclonal and clonal populations were obtained and their activity was evaluated against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. E. coli viability was inhibited with 100 μg/mL of total protein from clones (>55%). Also, S. aureus viability was inhibited from 50 μg/mL total protein (27–38%) but was more evident at 100 μg/mL (52–65%). This inhibition was higher than the effect showed by polyclonal population (~23%). Finally, we did not detect activity against C. albicans. These results are the first report that shows antimicrobial activity of a defensin produced by avocado and suggest that this AMP could be used in the control of pathogens. PMID:24319695

  19. PaDef defensin from avocado (Persea americana var. drymifolia) is cytotoxic to K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells through extrinsic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Flores-Alvarez, Luis José; Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E

    2018-06-01

    Plant defensins, a group of antimicrobial peptides, show selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. However, their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of PaDef defensin from avocado (Persea americana var. drymifolia) on K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells and analyzed the pathway involved in the induction of cell death. The defensin PaDef was not cytotoxic against human PBMCs; however, it was cytotoxic for K562 cell line (IC 50  = 97.3 μg/ml) activating apoptosis at 12 h. PaDef did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), neither the transmembranal potential or the release of intracellular calcium. Also, PaDef induced gene expression of caspase 8 (∼2 fold), TNF-α (∼4 fold) and TNFR1 (∼10 fold). In addition, the activation of caspase 8 was detected at 24 h, whereas caspase 9 activity was not modified, suggesting that the extrinsic apoptosis pathway could be activated. In conclusion, PaDef induces apoptosis on K562 cells, which is related to the activation of caspase 8 and involves the participation of TNF-α, which is a novel property for a plant defensin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibacterial activity of defensin PaDef from avocado fruit (Persea americana var. drymifolia) expressed in endothelial cells against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo; Suárez-Rodríguez, Luis M; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Rodríguez-Zapata, Luis C; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is a useful tool to control infectious diseases in general and rising antibiotic resistant microorganisms in particular. Alternative strategies are desirable, and antimicrobial peptides (AMP) represent attractive control agents. Mexican avocado (Persea americana var. drymifolia) is used in traditional medicine; however, the AMP production has not been reported in this plant. We obtained a cDNA library from avocado fruit and clone PaDef was identified, which has a cDNA (249 bp) encoding a protein (78 aa) homologous with plant defensins (>80%). We expressed the defensin PaDef cDNA (pBME3) in the bovine endothelial cell line BVE-E6E7. Polyclonal and clonal populations were obtained and their activity was evaluated against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. E. coli viability was inhibited with 100 μg/mL of total protein from clones (>55%). Also, S. aureus viability was inhibited from 50 μg/mL total protein (27-38%) but was more evident at 100 μg/mL (52-65%). This inhibition was higher than the effect showed by polyclonal population (~23%). Finally, we did not detect activity against C. albicans. These results are the first report that shows antimicrobial activity of a defensin produced by avocado and suggest that this AMP could be used in the control of pathogens.

  1. Determination of changes in the metabolic profile of avocado fruits (Persea americana) by two CE-MS approaches (targeted and non-targeted).

    PubMed

    Contreras-Gutiérrez, Paulina K; Hurtado-Fernández, Elena; Gómez-Romero, María; Ignacio Hormaza, José; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    A CZE method with two different MS detection conditions (MRM and Full Scan) was developed to determine qualitative and quantitative changes in the metabolic profile of avocado fruits (Persea americana). LODs in MRM approach were found between 20.1 and 203.0 ppb for abscisic acid and perseitol, respectively, whilst in Full Scan, varied within the range 0.22–1.90 ppm for the same metabolites. The RSDs for reproducibility test did not exceed 11.45%. The two MS approaches were used to quantify 10 metabolites (phenolic acids, flavonoids, a carbohydrate, an organic acid, a vitamin and a phytohormone) in 18 samples of avocado at different ripening states, and the achieved results were compared. Perseitol, quinic, chlorogenic, trans-cinnamic, pantothenic and abscisic acids, as well as epicatechin and catechin decreased during the ripening process, whereas ferulic and p-coumaric acids showed the opposite trend. Moreover, some other unknown compounds whose concentration changed largely during ripening were also studied by MS/MS and QTOF MS to get a tentative identification.

  2. The defensin from avocado (Persea americana var. drymifolia) PaDef induces apoptosis in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are cytotoxic to cancer cells; however, mainly the effects of AMPs from animals have been evaluated. In this work, we assessed the cytotoxicity of PaDef defensin from avocado (Persea americana var. drymifolia) on the MCF-7 cancer cell line (a breast cancer cell line) and evaluated its mechanism of action. PaDef inhibited the viability of MCF-7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50=141.62μg/ml. The viability of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells was unaffected by this AMP. Additionally, PaDef induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells in a time-dependent manner, but did not affect the membrane potential or calcium flow. In addition, PaDef IC50 induced the expression of cytochrome c, Apaf-1, and the caspase 7 and 9 genes. Likewise, this defensin induced the loss of mitochondrial Δψm and increased the phosphorylation of MAPK p38, which may lead to MCF-7 apoptosis by the intrinsic pathway. This is the first report of an avocado defensin inducing intrinsic apoptosis in cancer cells, which suggests that it could be a potential therapeutic molecule in the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) phenolics, in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and inhibition of lipid and protein oxidation in porcine patties.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carpena, Javier-Germán; Morcuende, David; Andrade, María-Jesús; Kylli, Petri; Estévez, Mario

    2011-05-25

    The first aim of the present work (study 1) was to analyze ethyl acetate, 70% acetone, and 70% methanol extracts of the peel, pulp, and seed from two avocado (Persea americana Mill.) varieties, namely, 'Hass' and 'Fuerte', for their phenolic composition and their in vitro antioxidant activity using the CUPRAC, DPPH, and ABTS assays. Their antimicrobial potential was also studied. Peels and seeds had higher amounts of phenolics and a more intense in vitro antioxidant potential than the pulp. Peels and seeds were rich in catechins, procyanidins, and hydroxycinnamic acids, whereas the pulp was particularly rich in hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids and procyanidins. The total phenolic content and antioxidant potential of avocado phenolics was affected by the extracting solvent and avocado variety. The avocado materials also displayed moderate antimicrobial effects against Gram-positive bacteria. Taking a step forward (study 2), extracts (70% acetone) from avocado peels and seeds were tested as inhibitors of oxidative reactions in meat patties. Avocado extracts protected meat lipids and proteins against oxidation with the effect on lipids being dependent on the avocado variety.

  4. Thermal stability of oils added with avocado (Persea americana cv. Hass) or olive (Olea europaea cv. Arbequina) leaf extracts during the French potatoes frying.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Paula; García, Paula; Bustamante, Andrés; Barriga, Andrés; Robert, Paz

    2017-04-15

    Effect of the addition of avocado (Persea americana cv. Hass) or olive (Olea europaea cv. Arbequina) hydroalcoholic leaf extracts (AHE and OHE, respectively) on thermal stability of canola oil (CO) and high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) during French potatoes frying at 180°C was studied. The extracts were characterized by the total phenolic content, phenol chromatographic profiles and antioxidant activity. B-type trimer procyanidins were the major phenolic compounds identified in AHE. OHE showed higher phenol content, antioxidant activity regarding AHE. CO+OHE and HOSO+OHE decreased the formation of polar compounds and showed an anti-polymeric effect with respect to oils without extracts, whereas AHE extract showed a prooxidant effect on HOSO. Therefore, OHE showed an antioxidant effect on HOSO and CO under the studied conditions. In addition, all systems (CO+AHE, HOSO+AHE, CO+OHE and HOSO+OHE) increased the retention of tocopherols. These results demonstrate the potential utility of OHE as natural antioxidant for oils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonhost status of commercial Persea americana 'Hass' to Anastrepha ludens, Anastrepha obliqua, Anastrepha serpentina, and Anastrepha striata (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Martín; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Arredondo, José

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the host status in Mexico of commercially cultivated and marketed avocado, Persea americana (Mill.), 'Hass' to Anastrepha ludens (Loew), Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart), Anastrepha serpentina (Wiedemann), and Anastrepha striata (Schiner) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Experiments in Michoacán, Mexico, were carried out in six orchards located at three altitudes above sea level during two times (August-October 2001 and April-June 2002). They included choice ('Hass' avocado plus natural host) and no-choice foraging behavior tests on trees under field cages; no-choice, forced infestation trials on caged, fruit-bearing branches in the field, and with individual fruit under laboratory conditions; infestation trials using 'Hass' avocados left unprotected over 1 and 7 d on the ground of orchards; studies to ascertain depth of oviposition and determine egg hatchability; and experiments to determine susceptibility by using time elapsed since removal of fruit from tree as the experimental variable. We trapped adult Anastrepha (n = 7,936) in all orchards and dissected fruit (n = 7,695) from orchards and packing houses (n = 1,620) in search of eggs or larvae. Most (96.7%) A. ludens, A. obliqua, A. striata, and A. serpentina adults were captured in low-elevation orchards. No eggs or larvae were detected in any of the fruit from foraging behavior studies or dissected fruit from orchards or packing houses. Of 5,200 mature, intact fruit on trees in the field forcibly exposed to no-choice female oviposition activity (five females/fruit), we only found four fruit infested by A. ludens but no adults emerged. 'Hass' avocados only became marginally susceptible to attack by A. ludens (but not A. obliqua, A. serpentina, and A. striata) 24 h after being removed from the tree. Fruit placed on the ground in orchards (n = 3,600) were occasionally infested by Neosilba batesi (Curran) (Diptera: Lonchaeidae), a decomposer, but not Anastrepha spp. Based on our

  6. Removal of Procion Red dye from colored effluents using H2SO4-/HNO3-treated avocado shells (Persea americana) as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Georgin, Jordana; da Silva Marques, Bianca; da Silveira Salla, Julia; Foletto, Edson Luiz; Allasia, Daniel; Dotto, Guilherme Luiz

    2018-03-01

    The treatment of colored effluents containing Procion Red dye (PR) was investigated using H 2 SO 4 and HNO 3 modified avocado shells (Persea americana) as adsorbents. The adsorbent materials (AS-H 2 SO 4 and AS-HNO 3 ) were properly characterized. The adsorption study was carried out considering the effects of adsorbent dosage and pH. Kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic aspects were also evaluated. Finally, the adsorbents were tested to treat simulated dye house effluents. For both materials, the adsorption was favored using 0.300 g L -1 of adsorbent at pH 6.5, where, more than 90% of PR was removed from the solution. General order model was able to explain the adsorption kinetics for both adsorbents. The Sips model was adequate to represent the isotherm data, being the maximum adsorption capacities of 167.0 and 212.6 mg g -1 for AS-H 2 SO 4 and AS-HNO 3 , respectively. The adsorption processes were thermodynamically spontaneous, favorable (- 17.0 < ΔG 0  < - 13.2 kJ mol -1 ), and exothermic (ΔH 0 values of - 29 and - 55 kJ mol -1 ). AS-H 2 SO 4 and AS-HNO 3 were adequate to treat dye house effluents, attaining color removal percentages of 82 and 75%. Avocado shells, after a simple acid treatment, can be a low-cost option to treat colored effluents.

  7. Effect of cold storage on larval and adult Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) viability in commercially ripe, artificially infested Persea americana 'Hass'.

    PubMed

    Aluja, M; Díaz-Fleischer, F; Arredondo, J; Valle-Mora, J; Rull, J

    2010-12-01

    Commercially ripe 'Hass' avocados, Persea americana Mill, artificially exposed to wild Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae) females 24 h after harvest were placed in a cold storage facility to determine the effect of low temperature on larval survival and adult viability. Fruit were left for 3, 6, 9, and 12 d in a cold room at 5 degrees C followed by a 20-25-d period at ambient temperature to allow for larval development and pupation. Hass avocados and grapefruit, Citrus paradisi Macfadyen, maintained at ambient temperature served as controls. Overall, only 0.23% of the Hass avocados and 19.30% of the grapefruit were infested. The number of infested fruit increased with decreasing exposure time to cold. Puparia from cold-treated Hass avocados were significantly smaller than those stemming from cold-treated grapefruit. Hass avocados exposed for 12 d to 5 degrees C yielded no puparia, and those exposed for 6 and 9 d yielded 22 and two puparia, respectively, but no adults. Although Hass avocados exposed to cold temperature for 3 d yielded adults that reached sexual maturity (N = 16), females laid inviable eggs. Grapefruit exposed to cold for 12 d yielded normal-sized puparia (but no adults), whereas those exposed over 9 d yielded females able to lay viable eggs. We conclude that exposing fruit to cold storage after packing and during transport represents an effective risk-mitigating procedure in the highly improbable event that a gravid A. ludens female might lay eggs in a commercially ripe Hass avocado that had been left unprotected in a packinghouse.

  8. Reduction of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes with electrolyzed oxidizing water on inoculated hass avocados (Persea americana var. Hass).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Garcia, O; González-Romero, V M; Fernández-Escartín, E

    2011-09-01

    This study was intended to evaluate the bactericidal effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) and chlorinated water on populations of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on avocados (Persea americana var. Hass). In the first experiment, inoculated avocados were treated with a water wash applied by spraying tap water containing 1 mg/liter free chlorine for 15 s (WW); WW treatment and then spraying sodium hypochlorite in water containing 75 mg/liter free chlorine for 15 s (Cl75); WW treatment and then spraying alkaline EOW for 30 s (AkEW) and then spraying acid EOW (AcEW) for 15 s; and spraying AkEW and then AcEW. In another experiment, the inoculated avocados were treated by spraying AkEW and then AcEW for 15, 30, 60, or 90 s. All three pathogen populations were lowered between 3.6 and 3.8 log cycles after WW treatment. The application of Cl75 did not produce any further reduction in counts, whereas AkEW and then AcEW treatment resulted in significantly lower bacterial counts for L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 but not for Salmonella. Treatments with AkEW and then AcEW produced a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes, Salmonella, and E. coli O157:H7 populations, with estimated log reductions of 3.9 to 5.2, 5.1 to 5.9, and 4.2 to 4.9 log CFU/cm², respectively. Spraying AcEW for more than 15 s did not produce any further decrease in counts of Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7, whereas L. monocytogenes counts were significantly lower after spraying AcEW for 60 s. Applying AkEW and then AcEW for 15 or 30 s seems to be an effective alternative to reduce bacterial pathogens on avocado surfaces.

  9. Incidence and growth of Salmonella enterica on the peel and pulp of avocado (Persea americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa).

    PubMed

    Rezende, Ana Carolina B; Crucello, Juliana; Moreira, Rafael C; Silva, Beatriz S; Sant'Ana, Anderson S

    2016-10-17

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and to estimate the growth kinetic parameters (maximum growth rate, μ; lag time, λ; and maximum population, κ) of Salmonella on the peel and pulp of avocado (Perseaamericana var. americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa L.) as affected by temperature (10-30°C). The incidence of Salmonella was assessed on the peel and pulp of the fruits (n=200 of each fruit), separately, totalizing 800 analyses. Only three samples of custard apple pulp were positive for Salmonella enterica and the three isolates recovered belonged to serotype S. Typhimurium. Salmonella was not recovered from avocado and custard apple peels and from avocado pulp. Generally, the substrate (pulp or peel) of growth did not affect μ values of S. enterica (p>0.05). Very similar μ values were found for S. enterica inoculated in custard apple and avocado. S. enterica presented the highest λ in the peel of the fruits. The growth of S. enterica resulted in larger λ in custard apple in comparison to avocado. For example, the λ of S. enterica in the pulp of custard apple and avocado were 47.0±0.78h and 10.0±3.78h, respectively. The lowest values of κ were obtained at the lower storage temperature conditions (10°C). For instance, κ values of 3.7±0.06log CFU/g and 2.9±0.03log CFU/g were obtained from the growth of S. enterica in avocado and custard apple pulps at 10°C (p<0.05), respectively. On the other hand, at 30°C, κ values were 6.5±0.25log CFU/g and 6.5±0.05log CFU/g, respectively. Significantly higher κ were obtained from the growth of S. enterica in the pulp than in the peel of the fruits (p<0.05). For instance, the growth of S. enterica in the pulp of avocado led to a κ value of 6.5±0.25log CFU/g, while in the peel led to a κ value of 4.6±0.23log CFU/g (p<0.05). In general, growth kinetic parameters indicated that avocado comprises a better substrate than custard apple for the growth of S. enterica. The square root model

  10. Effects of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) ["Avocado"] ethanolic leaf extract on blood glucose and kidney function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and on kidney cell lines of the proximal (LLCPK1) and distal tubules (MDBK).

    PubMed

    Gondwe, M; Kamadyaapa, D R; Tufts, M A; Chuturgoon, A A; Ojewole, J A O; Musabayane, C T

    2008-01-01

    Extracts of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) ("Avocado") have been traditionally used to treat hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Accordingly, we studied the hypoglycaemic and renal function effects of P. americana leaf ethanolic extracts (PAE) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Oral glucose tolerance responses to various doses of PAE were monitored in fasted rats following a glucose load. Rats treated with deionized water or standard hypoglycaemic drugs acted as untreated and treated positive controls, respectively. Acute renal effects of PAE were investigated in anesthetized rats challenged with 0.077 M NaCl after a 3.5-h equilibration for 4 h comprising 1 h control, 1.5 h treatment and 1.5 h recovery periods. PAE was added to the infusate during the treatment period. Hepatic glycogen concentration was measured after 6 weeks of daily treatment with PAE. PAE induced dose-dependent hypoglycaemic responses in STZ-induced diabetic rats while subchronic PAE treatment additionally increased hepatic glycogen concentrations. Acute PAE infusion decreased urine flow and electrolyte excretion rates, whilst subchronic treatment reduced plasma creatinine and urea concentrations. These results indicate not only the basis of the ethnomedicinal use of P. americana leaf extract in diabetes management, but also of need for further studies to identify and evaluate the safety of PAE's bioactive compounds. (c) 2008 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  11. Short- and long-term modulation of the lutein epoxide and violaxanthin cycles in two species of the Lauraceae: sweet bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) and avocado (Persea americana Mill.).

    PubMed

    Esteban, R; Jiménez, M S; Morales, D; Jiménez, E T; Hormaetxe, K; Becerril, J M; Osmond, B; García-Plazaola, J I

    2008-05-01

    Short- and long-term responses of the violaxanthin (V) and lutein epoxide (Lx) cycles were studied in two species of Lauraceae: sweet bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) and avocado (Persea americana L.). The Lx content exceeded the V content in shade leaves of both species. Both Lx and V were de-epoxidised on illumination, but only V was fully restored by epoxidation in low light. Violaxanthin was preferentially de-epoxidised in low light in L. nobilis. This suggests that Lx accumulates with leaf ageing, partly because its conversion to lutein is limited in shade. After exposure to strong light, shade leaves of avocado readjusted the total pools of alpha- and beta-xanthophyll cycles by de novo synthesis of antheraxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein. This occurred in parallel with a sustained depression of F(v)/F(m). In Persea indica, a closely related but low Lx species, F(v)/F(m) recovered faster after a similar light treatment, suggesting the involvement of the Lx cycle in sustained energy dissipation. Furthermore, the seasonal correlation between non-reversible Lx and V photoconversions and pre-dawn F(v)/F(m) in sun leaves of sweet bay supported the conclusion that the Lx cycle is involved in a slowly reversible downregulation of photosynthesis analogous to the V cycle.

  12. Graphene/TiO2 nanocomposite based solid-phase extraction and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for lipidomic profiling of avocado (Persea americana Mill.).

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing; Yang, Mei; Li, Linqiu; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2014-12-10

    Phospholipids possess important physiological, structural and nutritional functions in biological systems. This study described a solid-phase extraction (SPE) method, employing graphene and titanium dioxide (G/TiO2) nanocomposite as sorbent, for the selective isolation and enrichment of phospholipids from avocado (Persea americana Mill.). Based on the principal that the phosphoryl group in the phospholipid can interact with TiO2 via a bridging bidentate mode, an optimum condition was established for SPE, and was successfully applied to prepare avocado samples. The extracts were monitored by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes. Results showed that phospholipids could be efficiently extracted in a clean manner by G/TiO2 based SPE. In addition, the signals of phospholipids were enhanced while the noise was reduced. Some minor peaks became more obvious. In conclusion, the nanocomposite material of G/TiO2 was proved to be a promising sorbent for selective separation of phospholipids from crude lipid extract. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biochemical analysis of reactive oxygen species production and antioxidative responses in unripe avocado (Persea americana Mill var Hass) fruits in response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Castro-Mercado, E; Martinez-Diaz, Y; Roman-Tehandon, N; Garcia-Pineda, E

    2009-03-01

    We analyzed the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of detoxifying enzymes and enzymes of the ascorbate (ASC) acid cycle in avocado fruit (Pesea Americana Mill cv Hass) in response to wounding. The levels of superoxide anion (O(2-), hydroxyl radicals (OH.) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) increased at 15 min and 2 and 15 h post-wounding. Peroxidase (POD) activity had increased to high levels 24 h after wounding; in contrast, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels hat decreased significantly at 24 h post-treatment. Basic POD was the major POD form induced, and the levels of at least three apoplastic POD isozymes -increased following wounding. Using specific inhibitors, we characterized one MnSOD and two CuZnSOD isozymes. CuZnSOD activities decreased notably 12 h after treatment. The activities of dehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase increased dramatically following the wounding treatment, possibly as a means to compensate for the redox changes due to ROS production.

  14. Assessment of genetic relationship in Persea spp by traditional molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Alemán, J C; Valadez-Moctezuma, E; Barrientos-Priego, A F

    2016-04-04

    Currently, the reclassification of the genus Persea is under discussion with molecular techniques for DNA analysis representing an alternative for inter- and intra-specific differentiation. In the present study, the traditional random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and the inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to determine the genomic relationship of different species and hybrids representative of the subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea in a population conserved in a germplasm bank. The data were analyzed statistically using multivariate methods. In the RAPD analysis, a total of 190 polymorphic bands were produced, with an average of 23.7 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each primer was from 7.66 to 19.63; the polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.23 to 0.45, with an average of 0.35. In the ISSR analysis, a total of 111 polymorphic bands were considered, with an average of 18.5 bands per primer, the percentage contribution of each was from 11.83 to 19.57; the PIC ranged from 0.35 to 0.48, with an average of 0.42. The phenograms obtained in each technique showed the relationship among the accessions through the clusters formed. In general, both the techniques grouped representatives of the Persea americana races (P. americana var. drymifolia, P. americana var. guatemalensis, and P. americana var. americana). However, it was not possible to separate the species of Persea used as reference into independent clades. In addition, they tended to separate the representatives of subgenera Eriodaphne and Persea.

  15. Antihypertensive potential of the aqueous extract which combine leaf of Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae), stems and leaf of Cymbopogon citratus (D.C) Stapf. (Poaceae), fruits of Citrus medical L. (Rutaceae) as well as honey in ethanol and sucrose experimental model.

    PubMed

    Dzeufiet, Paul Désiré Djomeni; Mogueo, Amélie; Bilanda, Danielle Claude; Aboubakar, Bibi-Farouck Oumarou; Tédong, Léonard; Dimo, Théophile; Kamtchouing, Pierre

    2014-12-17

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of the aqueous extract obtained from the mixture of fresh leaf of Persea americana, stems and fresh leaf of Cymbopogon citratus, fruits of Citrus medica and honey on ethanol and sucrose induced hypertension in rats. Rats were divided into eight groups of 6 rats each and daily treated for 5 weeks. The control group received distilled water (1 mL/kg) while rats of groups 2, 3 and 4 received ethanol 40 degrees (3 g/kg/day), 10% sucrose as drinking water and the two substances respectively. The remaining groups received in addition to sucrose and ethanol, the aqueous extract (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) or nifedipine (10 mg/kg) respectively. Many parameters including hemodynamic, biochemical and histopathological were assessed at the end of the study. The concomitant consumption of ethanol and sucrose significantly (p < 0.001) increased the blood pressure and the heart rate compared to distilled water treated-rats. The levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic index, glucose, proteins, AST, ALT, creatinin, potassium, sodium and albumin increased while the HDL-cholesterol decreased under ethanol and sucrose feeding. Chronic ethanol and sucrose intake significantly decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the contents of reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitrites whereas elevated the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Histological analysis revealed among other vascular congestion, inflammation, tubular clarification and thickening of the vessel wall in rats treated with alcohol and sucrose. Administration of the aqueous extract or nifedipine prevented the hemodynamic, biochemical, oxidative and histological impairments induced chronic ethanol and sucrose consumption. Current results suggest that the aqueous extract used in this study possess antihypertensive activity against ethanol and sucrose induced hypertension in rats by the improvement of biochemical

  16. Biology and systematics of the New World Phyllocnistis Zeller leafminers of the avocado genus Persea (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae)

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Donald R.; Wagner, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Four New World species of Phyllocnistis Zeller are described from serpentine mines in Persea (Family Lauraceae). Phyllocnistis hyperpersea,new species, mines the upper leaf surfaces of avocado, Persea americana Mill., and red bay, Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng. and ranges over much of the southeastern United States into Central America. Phyllocnistis subpersea,new species, mines the underside and occasionally upper sides of new leaves of Persea borbonia in southeastern United States. Phyllocnistis longipalpa, new species, known only from southern Florida also mines the undersides of new leaves of Persea borbonia. Phyllocnistis perseafolia,new species, mines both leaf surfaces and possibly fruits of Persea americana in Colombia, South America. As in all known species of Phyllocnistis, the early instars are subepidermal sapfeeders in young (not fully hardened) foliage, and the final instar is an extremely specialized, nonfeeding larval form, whose primary function is to spin the silken cocoon, at the mine terminus, prior to pupation. Early stages are illustrated and described for three of the species. The unusual morphology of the pupae, particularly the frontal process of the head, is shown to be one of the most useful morphological sources of diagnostic characters for species identification of Phyllocnistis. COI barcode sequence distances are provided for the four proposed species and a fifth, undescribed species from Costa Rica. PMID:21594066

  17. Biology and systematics of the New World Phyllocnistis Zeller leafminers of the avocado genus Persea (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae).

    PubMed

    Davis, Donald R; Wagner, David L

    2011-05-11

    Four New World species of Phyllocnistis Zeller are described from serpentine mines in Persea (Family Lauraceae). Phyllocnistis hyperpersea,new species, mines the upper leaf surfaces of avocado, Persea americana Mill., and red bay, Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng. and ranges over much of the southeastern United States into Central America. Phyllocnistis subpersea,new species, mines the underside and occasionally upper sides of new leaves of Persea borbonia in southeastern United States. Phyllocnistis longipalpa, new species, known only from southern Florida also mines the undersides of new leaves of Persea borbonia. Phyllocnistis perseafolia,new species, mines both leaf surfaces and possibly fruits of Persea americana in Colombia, South America. As in all known species of Phyllocnistis, the early instars are subepidermal sapfeeders in young (not fully hardened) foliage, and the final instar is an extremely specialized, nonfeeding larval form, whose primary function is to spin the silken cocoon, at the mine terminus, prior to pupation. Early stages are illustrated and described for three of the species. The unusual morphology of the pupae, particularly the frontal process of the head, is shown to be one of the most useful morphological sources of diagnostic characters for species identification of Phyllocnistis. COI barcode sequence distances are provided for the four proposed species and a fifth, undescribed species from Costa Rica.

  18. Supply of avocado starch (Persea americana mill) as bioplastic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginting, M. H. S.; Hasibuan, R.; Lubis, M.; Alanjani, F.; Winoto, F. A.; Siregar, R. C.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of time precipitation of avocado slurry seed to yield of starch. Starch analysis included starch content, moisture content, amylose content, amylopectin content, ash content, protein content, fat content, Fourier transform infra red analysis and rapid visco analyzer. Supply of starch from avocado seeds was used by extraction method. Every one hundred grams of avocado slurry was precipitated by gravity with variations for 4 hours, 8 hours, 12 hours, 16 hours, 20 hours and 24 hours. The Starch yield was washed, and dried using oven at 70°C for 30 minutes. Starch yield was the highest as 24.20 gram at 24 hours. The result of starch characterization was 73.62%, water content 16.6%, amylose 0.07%, amylopectin 73.55%, ash content 0.23%, protein content 2.16%, fat content 1.09%. Rapid visco analyzer obtained at 91.33°C of gelatinization temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analyzes obtained 20 μm oval-shaped starch granules. Fourier Transform Infra Red analysis of starch obtained the peak spectrum of O-H group of alcohols, C-H alkanes and C-O ether.

  19. Ovary starch reserves and pistil development in avocado (Persea americana).

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, M Librada; Hormaza, J Ignacio; Rodrigo, Javier

    2010-12-01

    In avocado, only a very small fraction of the flowers are able to set fruit. Previous work in other woody perennial plant species has shown the importance of carbohydrates accumulated in the flower in the reproductive process. Thus, in order to explore the implications of the nutritive status of the flower in the reproductive process in avocado, the starch content in the pistil has been examined in individual pollinated and non-pollinated flowers at anthesis and during the days following anthesis. Starch content in different pistilar tissues in each flower was quantified with the help of an image analysis system attached to a microscope. Flowers at anthesis were rich in highly compartmentalized starch. Although no external morphological differences could be observed among flowers, the starch content varied widely at flower opening. Starch content in the ovary is largely independent of flower size because these differences were not correlated with ovary size. Differences in the progress of starch accumulation within the ovule integuments between pollinated and non-pollinated flowers occurred concomitantly with the triggering of the progamic phase. The results suggest that starch reserves in the ovary could play a significant role in the reproductive process in avocado. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  20. A model biorefinery for avocado (Persea americana mill.) processing.

    PubMed

    Dávila, Javier A; Rosenberg, Moshe; Castro, Eulogio; Cardona, Carlos A

    2017-11-01

    This research investigated and evaluated a biorefinery for processing avocado Hass variety into microencapsulated phenolic compounds extract, ethanol, oil and xylitol. Avocado was first characterized for its potential valuable compounds; then, the techno-economic and environmental aspects of the biorefinery were developed and finally the total production costs and potential environmental impact of the proposed biorefinery were investigated. Four scenarios of the biorefinery were evaluated with different extent of mass and energy integration as well as the incorporation of a cogeneration system. Results indicated that the main fatty acid in the pulp of the investigated avocado variety was oleic acid (50.96%) and that this fruit contained significant amount of holocellulose (52.88% and 54.36% in the peel and seed, respectively). Techno-economic and environmental assessment suggested an attractive opportunity for a biorefinery for complete utilization of the avocado fruit as well the importance of the level of integration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison and Field Validation of Binomial Sampling Plans for Oligonychus perseae (Acari: Tetranychidae) on Hass Avocado in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Lara, Jesus R; Hoddle, Mark S

    2015-08-01

    Oligonychus perseae Tuttle, Baker, & Abatiello is a foliar pest of 'Hass' avocados [Persea americana Miller (Lauraceae)]. The recommended action threshold is 50-100 motile mites per leaf, but this count range and other ecological factors associated with O. perseae infestations limit the application of enumerative sampling plans in the field. Consequently, a comprehensive modeling approach was implemented to compare the practical application of various binomial sampling models for decision-making of O. perseae in California. An initial set of sequential binomial sampling models were developed using three mean-proportion modeling techniques (i.e., Taylor's power law, maximum likelihood, and an empirical model) in combination with two-leaf infestation tally thresholds of either one or two mites. Model performance was evaluated using a robust mite count database consisting of >20,000 Hass avocado leaves infested with varying densities of O. perseae and collected from multiple locations. Operating characteristic and average sample number results for sequential binomial models were used as the basis to develop and validate a standardized fixed-size binomial sampling model with guidelines on sample tree and leaf selection within blocks of avocado trees. This final validated model requires a leaf sampling cost of 30 leaves and takes into account the spatial dynamics of O. perseae to make reliable mite density classifications for a 50-mite action threshold. Recommendations for implementing this fixed-size binomial sampling plan to assess densities of O. perseae in commercial California avocado orchards are discussed. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Non-Classical Order in Sphere Forming ABAC Tetrablock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Sides, Scott; Bates, Frank

    2013-03-01

    AB diblock and ABC triblock copolymers have been studied thoroughly. ABAC tetrablock copolymers, representing the simplest variation from ABC triblock by breaking the molecular symmetry via inserting some of the A block in between B and C blocks, have been studied systematically in this research. The model system is poly(styrene-b-isoprene-b-styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (SISO) tetrablock terpolymers and the resulting morphologies were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatography, small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy. Two novel phases are first discovered in a single component block copolymers: hexagonally ordered spherical phase and tentatively identified dodecagonal quasicrystalline (QC) phase. In particular, the discovery of QC phase bridges the world of soft matters to that of metals. These unusual sets of morphologies will be discussed in the context of segregation under the constraints associated with the tetrablock molecular architecture. Theoretical calculations based on the assumption of Gaussian chain statistics provide valuable insights into the molecular configurations associated with these morphologies. the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under contract number DEAC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle LLC at Oak Ridge National Lab.

  3. Mammea americana L.

    Treesearch

    Nadia Navarrete-Tindall; Mario A. Orellana N& #250; & #241; ez; & #241; Mario A. Orellana ez

    2002-01-01

    Mammea americana is native to the West Indies, but is widely cultivated in the tropics in Central America and the Caribbean islands (National Germplasm Repository 1995). It is found in tropical and subtropical life zones in dry and wet forests (Lamberts and Crane 1990).

  4. Hydroalcoholic extract from bark of Persea major (Meisn.) L.E. Kopp (Lauraceae) exerts antiulcer effects in rodents by the strengthening of the gastric protective factors.

    PubMed

    Somensi, Lincon Bordignon; Boeing, Thaise; Cury, Benhur Judah; Steimbach, Viviane Miranda Bispo; Niero, Rivaldo; de Souza, Lauro Mera; da Silva, Luisa Mota; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni

    2017-09-14

    The Persea major (Meisn.) L.E. Kopp (Lauraceae) (botanical synonym: Persea pyrifolia (D. Don) Spreng, Persea pyrifolia Nees and Mart., Persea cordata var. major (Meisn.) Mez and Persea willdenovii Kosterm) is a medicinal plant native in the south of Brazil, where is popularly known as Pau de Andrade, Maçaranduba or Abacate-do-Mato. Its barks are commonly used to prepare an infusion which is administered orally or topically to treat ulcers and wounds, respectively. Thus, this study has been undertaken to contribute to the validation of the popular use of P. major to treat of ulcerative disorders from gastrointestinal system, using different experimental models in rodents. Firstly, ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a mass spectrophotometer has been performed. Next, the potential gastroprotective of hydroalcoholic extract of P. major barks (HEPM) (30-300mg/kg) has been evaluated in ulcer models acute as: ethanol, ethanol/HCl and indomethacin-induced ulcer. The extract (300mg/kg) has been also tested in acetic acid-induced chronic ulcer model. Histological, toxicological, histochemical, oxidative stress and gastric secretion parameters were analyzed. The main compounds found in HEPM were polyphenols as condensed tannins, flavonoids heterosides derivatives from quercetin and kaempferol. HEPM (300mg/kg, p.o) prevented gastric lesions induced by ethanol or indomethacin in rats by 58.98% and 97.48%, respectively, compared to vehicle group (148.00±14.83mm 2 and 12.07±1.61mm 2 , respectively). In acetic acid-induced chronic ulcer model the HEPM (300mg/kg, p.o) reduced the ulcer are by 40.58%, compared to vehicle group (127.90±12.04mm 2 ). The healing effect was confirmed histologically, by an increase in mucin content and by the reduction in oxidative and inflammatory parameters at the ulcer site. Neither significant effect on gastric acid secretion nor toxicological effects and cytotoxicity were provoked by administration of HEPM. The results allows to

  5. Dynamics of spacing adjustment and recovery mechanisms of ABAC-type growth pattern in ternary eutectic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghi, Samira; Şerefoğlu, Melis

    2017-07-01

    In directionally solidified 2D samples at ternary eutectic compositions, the stable three-phase pattern is established to be lamellar structure with ABAC stacking, where A, B, and C are crystalline phases. Beyond the stability limits of the ABAC pattern, the system uses various spacing adjustment mechanisms to revert to the stable regime. In this study, the dynamics of spacing adjustment and recovery mechanisms of isotropic ABAC patterns were investigated using three-phase In-Bi-Sn alloy. Unidirectional solidification experiments were performed on 23.0 and 62.7 μm-thick samples, where solidification front was monitored in real-time from both sides of the sample using a particular microscopy system. At these thicknesses, the pattern was found to be 2D during steady-state growth, i.e. both top and bottom microstructures were the same. However, during spacing adjustment and recovery mechanisms, 3D features were observed. Dynamics of two major instabilities, lamellae branching and elimination, were quantified. After these instabilities, two key ABAC pattern recovery mechanisms, namely, phase invasion and phase exchange processes, were identified and analyzed. After elimination, ABAC pattern is recovered by either continuous eliminations of all phases or by phase exchange. After branching, the recovery mechanisms are established to be phase invasion and phase exchange.

  6. The potential of avocado paste (Persea americana) as fat substitute in non-dairy ice cream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervina; Surjawan, I.; Abdillah, E.

    2018-01-01

    Consumer preferences towards plant-based food have shifted significantly due to sustainable and healthy reasons. Dairy products consist of high Saturated Fatty Acid (SFA) and overconsumption of SFA could lead to cardiovascular diseases. Avocado contains high levels of fat dominated by Monounsaturated Fatty Acid (MUFA) and phytosterol that have the potential as a plant-based fat source to substitute dairy-fat in ice cream. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical, rheological and sensorial properties of ice cream substituted with different concentrations of avocado paste ranging from 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% respectively against dairy fat to produce non-dairy fat ice cream. The psychochemical properties and total fat were determined. Sensorial quality and hedonic attributes of ice cream were investigated using 60 semi-trained panelists. There were significant differences (p<0.05) for overrun, melting rate, and viscosity of the ice cream substituted with avocado paste. The addition of avocado paste lead to the increase in viscosity and hardness of the ice cream significantly (p<0.05) while the sensorial properties for airiness and creaminess were perceived the same (p>0.05). The addition of 50% avocado paste was the most preferred among the panelists. Avocado could provide a potential substitution for dairy-fat in ice cream.

  7. Generation of a Saturated Genetic Recombination Map for Avocado (Persea americana)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two large mapping populations of avocado consisting of 1582 trees were genotyped with 5050 SNP markers from transcribed genes using an Illumina Infinium SNP chip. A Florida mapping population consisted of 527 progeny from 'Tonnage' x 'Simmonds' and 249 from 'Simmonds' x 'Tonnage'. A California map...

  8. Terpenoid variations within and among half-sibling avocado trees, Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Variation of plant chemical phenotypes in a population can be explained by a combination of genetic, developmental and environmental factors. The age structure, environmental heterogeneity, and the limits in gene flow in a natural population will determine the variability and the spatial structure o...

  9. Chemical control of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infesting avocado (Persea americana) in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three trials were undertaken to determine the effectiveness of insecticides against Scolytinae infesting avocado between 2010 and 2011. These included contact and systemic insecticides applied either to trees or to avocado logs. Efficacy of the insecticides was determined either by the number of ent...

  10. Effect of Semisolid Formulation of Persea Americana Mill (Avocado) Oil on Wound Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Franco, Eryvelton de Souza; Rodrigues Barreto, Rafaella; Cordeiro, Daniele Pires; de Melo, Rebeca Gonçalves; de Aquino, Camila Maria Ferreira; e Silva, Antonio Alfredo Rodrigues; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; da Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Góes, Alexandre José da Silva; Maia, Maria Bernadete de Sousa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing activity of a semisolid formulation of avocado oil, SSFAO 50%, or avocado oil in natura, on incisional and excisional cutaneous wound models in Wistar rats. An additional objective was to quantify the fatty acids present in avocado oil. On the 14th day, a significant increase was observed in percentage wound contraction and reepithelialization in the groups treated with 50% SSFAO or avocado oil compared to the petroleum jelly control. Anti-inflammatory activity, increase in density of collagen, and tensile strength were observed inSSFAO 50% or avocado oil groups, when compared to control groups. The analysis of the components of avocado oil by gas chromatography detected the majority presence of oleic fatty acid (47.20%), followed by palmitic (23.66%), linoleic (13.46%) docosadienoic (8.88%), palmitoleic (3.58%), linolenic (1.60%), eicosenoic (1.29%), and myristic acids (0.33%). Our results show that avocado oil is a rich source of oleic acid and contains essential fatty acids. When used in natura or in pharmaceutical formulations for topical use, avocado oil can promote increased collagen synthesis and decreased numbers of inflammatory cells during the wound-healing process and may thus be considered a new option for treating skin wounds. PMID:23573130

  11. Analyses of avocado (Persea americana) nectar properties and their perception by honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Afik, O; Dag, A; Kerem, Z; Shafir, S

    2006-09-01

    Honey bees are important avocado pollinators. However, due to the low attractiveness of flowers, pollination is often inadequate. Previous work has revealed that avocado honey is relatively unattractive to honey bees when compared with honey from competing flowers. We characterized avocado honey and nectar with respect to their odor, color, and composition of sugars, phenolic compounds, and minerals. Furthermore, we tested how honey bees perceive these parameters, using the proboscis extension response bioassay and preference experiments with free-flying bees. Naïve bees were indifferent to odors of avocado and citrus flowers and honey. Experienced bees, which were collected in the field during the blooming season, responded preferentially to odor of citrus flowers. The unique sugar composition of avocado nectar, which contains almost exclusively sucrose and a low concentration of the rare carbohydrate perseitol, and the dark brown color of avocado honey, had no negative effects on its attractiveness to the bees. Phenolic compounds extracted from avocado honey were attractive to bees and adding them to a solution of sucrose increased its attractiveness. Compared with citrus nectar and nonavocado honey, avocado nectar and honey were rich in a wide range of minerals, including potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, sulfur, iron, and copper. Potassium and phosphorus, the two major minerals, both had a repellent effect on the bees. Possible explanations for the presence of repellent components in avocado nectar are discussed.

  12. Enzymatic browning in avocado (Persea americana) revisited: History, advances, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Lea; Aguirre, Carolina

    2017-12-12

    Considering nearly 80 years of research regarding one of the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the formation of pigments in higher animals, plants, fungi and bacteria, this review will focus on collecting and categorizing the existing information about polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in fruits, with particular emphasis on the information in relation to avocado, which is one of the hardiest species in terms of inactivation, has documented dual activity (EC 1.14.18.1/EC 1.10.3.1), and represents one of the oldest challenges for food science research and fruit processors. It is expected that this review will contribute to the further development of the field by highlighting the questions that have arisen during the characterization of PPO, the progress that has been made and the questions that remain today, in addition to new methodologies that are being applied to study this system. Holistic methodologies offer unexplored potential for advancing our understanding of the complex phenomena that govern PPO activity in fruits, because these methodologies will enable the characterization of this family of enzymes in all of its complexity. Subsequently, it will be possible to develop better techniques for controlling enzymatic browning in this valuable fruit.

  13. Effects of Avocado (Persea americana) on Metabolic Syndrome: A Comprehensive Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tabeshpour, Jamshid; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of risk factors including high blood glucose, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity that lead to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which are among leading causes of death in the world. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVDs by approximately five and three folds, respectively. Therefore, it is of vital importance to manage such conditions with herbal options which have less undesirable adverse effects and may be more efficacious in comparison with synthetic options. Avocado is a well-known source of carotenoids, minerals, phenolics, vitamins, and fatty acids. The lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, anti-obesity, antithrombotic, antiatherosclerotic, and cardioprotective effects of avocado have been demonstrated in several studies. In this review, we aimed to find out avocado's pharmacological effects on different components of MetS. Moreover, this review report is performed on the MetS effects of peel, seed, flesh, and leaves of avocado. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Chemical composition, toxicity and larvicidal and antifungal activities of Persea americana (avocado) seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Leite, João Jaime Giffoni; Brito, Erika Helena Salles; Cordeiro, Rossana Aguiar; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Bertini, Luciana Medeiros; Morais, Selene Maia de; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2009-01-01

    The present study had the aim of testing the hexane and methanol extracts of avocado seeds, in order to determine their toxicity towards Artemia salina, evaluate their larvicidal activity towards Aedes aegypti and investigate their in vitro antifungal potential against strains of Candida spp, Cryptococcus neoformans and Malassezia pachydermatis through the microdilution technique. In toxicity tests on Artemia salina, the hexane and methanol extracts from avocado seeds showed LC50 values of 2.37 and 24.13 mg mL-1 respectively. Against Aedes aegypti larvae, the LC50 results obtained were 16.7 mg mL-1 for hexane extract and 8.87 mg mL-1 for methanol extract from avocado seeds. The extracts tested were also active against all the yeast strains tested in vitro, with differing results such that the minimum inhibitory concentration of the hexane extract ranged from 0.625 to 1.25mg L-(1), from 0.312 to 0.625 mg mL-1 and from 0.031 to 0.625 mg mL-1, for the strains of Candida spp, Cryptococcus neoformans and Malassezia pachydermatis, respectively. The minimal inhibitory concentration for the methanol extract ranged from 0.125 to 0.625 mg mL-1, from 0.08 to 0.156 mg mL-1 and from 0.312 to 0.625 mg mL-1, for the strains of Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans and Malassezia pachydermatis, respectively.

  15. Effect of semisolid formulation of persea americana mill (avocado) oil on wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Franco, Eryvelton de Souza; Rodrigues Barreto, Rafaella; Cordeiro, Daniele Pires; de Melo, Rebeca Gonçalves; de Aquino, Camila Maria Ferreira; E Silva, Antonio Alfredo Rodrigues; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; da Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Góes, Alexandre José da Silva; Maia, Maria Bernadete de Sousa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing activity of a semisolid formulation of avocado oil, SSFAO 50%, or avocado oil in natura, on incisional and excisional cutaneous wound models in Wistar rats. An additional objective was to quantify the fatty acids present in avocado oil. On the 14th day, a significant increase was observed in percentage wound contraction and reepithelialization in the groups treated with 50% SSFAO or avocado oil compared to the petroleum jelly control. Anti-inflammatory activity, increase in density of collagen, and tensile strength were observed inSSFAO 50% or avocado oil groups, when compared to control groups. The analysis of the components of avocado oil by gas chromatography detected the majority presence of oleic fatty acid (47.20%), followed by palmitic (23.66%), linoleic (13.46%) docosadienoic (8.88%), palmitoleic (3.58%), linolenic (1.60%), eicosenoic (1.29%), and myristic acids (0.33%). Our results show that avocado oil is a rich source of oleic acid and contains essential fatty acids. When used in natura or in pharmaceutical formulations for topical use, avocado oil can promote increased collagen synthesis and decreased numbers of inflammatory cells during the wound-healing process and may thus be considered a new option for treating skin wounds.

  16. Hypolipidemic effect of avocado (Persea americana Mill) seed in a hypercholesterolemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pahua-Ramos, María Elena; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo; Hernández-Ortega, Marcela

    2012-03-01

    Avocado seed contains elevated levels of phenolic compounds and exhibits antioxidant properties. We investigated the effect of Avocado Seed Flour (ASF) on the lipid levels in mice on a hyperlipidemic diet. The concentration of phenols was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, antioxidant activity was evaluated using the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity method, and dietary fiber was measured using the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) method. The LD50 of ASF was determined using Lorke's method and hypolipidemic activity was evaluated in a hypercholesterolemic model in mice. Protocatechuic acid was the main phenolic compound found in ASF, followed by kaempferide and vanillic acid. The total phenolic content in the methanolic extract of ASF was 292.00 ± 9.81 mg gallic acid equivalents/g seed dry weight and the antioxidant activity resulted in 173.3 μmol Trolox equivalents/g DW. In addition, a high content of dietary fiber was found (34.8%). The oral LD50 for ASF was 1767 mg/kg body weight, and treatment with ASF significantly reduced the levels of total cholesterol, LDL-C, and prediction of the atherogenic index. Therefore, the antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds and dietary fiber in ASF may be responsible for the hypocholesterolemic activity of ASF in a hyperlipidemic model of mice.

  17. Activity-guided identification of acetogenins as novel lipophilic antioxidants present in avocado pulp (Persea americana).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Dariana; Silva-Platas, Christian; Rojo, Rocío P; García, Noemí; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen

    2013-12-30

    Avocado fruit is a rich source of health-related lipophilic phytochemicals such as monounsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols, carotenes, acetogenins and sterols. However, limited information is available on the contribution of specific phytochemicals to the overall antioxidant capacity (AOC) of the fruit. Centrifugal partition chromatography was used as fractionation tool, guided by an in vitro chemical assay of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Subsequent experiments focused on isolation and characterization of the chemical nature of the main contributors to lipophilic AOC of avocado pulp. ORAC values obtained for acetogenins were contrasted with results from an isolated kidney mitochondria membrane lipid peroxidation bioassay. The present study established that lipophilic AOC of the pulp was significantly higher than its hydrophilic AOC. Our results confirmed the presence of acetogenins in the fractions with highest lipophilic AOC, and for the first time linked them as contributors to lipophilic-ORAC values. Further HPLC-PDA/MS-TOF analysis led to structural elucidation of two novel acetogenins, not previously reported as present in avocado pulp, along with five already known related-compounds. Antioxidant properties observed for avocado pulp acetogenins by the ORAC assay suggested that, in the presence of an emulsifying agent, acetogenins could serve as novel lipophilic antioxidants in a food matrix. Results from isolated mitochondria lipid peroxidation bioassay, indicated that L-ORAC values which may have relevance for food matrix applications, should not be interpreted to have a direct relevance in health-related claims, compounds need to be evaluated considering the complexity of biological systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A new species of Histura Razowski (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae: Polyorthini) from Guatemala attacking avocados (Persea americana) Lauraceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Histura perseavora Brown, new species, is described and illustrated from Guatemala. It is compared with Histura curvata (Meyrick) (from Brazil) and Histurodes costaricana Razowski (from Costa Rica). All specimens of H. perseavora were reared from either fruit, fruit pedicels, or young green branches...

  19. Persea declinata (Bl.) Kosterm Bark Crude Extract Induces Apoptosis in MCF-7 Cells via G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest, Bcl-2/Bax/Bcl-xl Signaling Pathways, and ROS Generation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yi Li; Wong, Won Fen; Ali Mohd, Mustafa; Hadi, A. Hamid A.

    2014-01-01

    Persea declinata (Bl.) Kosterm is a member of the Lauraceae family, widely distributed in Southeast Asia. It is from the same genus with avocado (Persea americana Mill), which is widely consumed as food and for medicinal purposes. In the present study, we examined the anticancer properties of Persea declinata (Bl.) Kosterm bark methanolic crude extract (PDM). PDM exhibited a potent antiproliferative effect in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, with an IC50 value of 16.68 µg/mL after 48 h of treatment. We observed that PDM caused cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, as exhibited by increased population at G0/G1 phase, higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and DNA fragmentation. Mechanistic studies showed that PDM caused significant elevation in ROS production, leading to perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, cell permeability, and activation of caspases-3/7. On the other hand, real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that PDM treatment increased the expression of the proapoptotic molecule, Bax, but decreased the expression of prosurvival proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, in a dose-dependent manner. These findings imply that PDM could inhibit proliferation in MCF-7 cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction, indicating its potential as a therapeutic agent worthy of further development. PMID:24808916

  20. Silvical characteristics of white ash (Fraxinus americana)

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Wright

    1959-01-01

    White ash (Fraxinus americana L.) derives its common name from the white under-surface of the leaf; the white effect is created by microscopic papillae with a high light-reflecting capacity. The specific name americana was given to the species because of its range in America.

  1. Bt Jute Expressing Fused δ-Endotoxin Cry1Ab/Ac for Resistance to Lepidopteran Pests

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Shuvobrata; Sarkar, Chirabrata; Saha, Prosanta; Gotyal, Bheemanna S.; Satpathy, Subrata; Datta, Karabi; Datta, Swapan K.

    2018-01-01

    Jute (Corchorus sp.) is naturally occurring, biodegradable, lignocellulosic-long, silky, golden shiny fiber producing plant that has great demands globally. Paper and textile industries are interested in jute because of the easy availability, non-toxicity and high yield of cellulosic biomass produced per acre in cultivation. Jute is the major and most industrially used bast fiber-producing crop in the world and it needs protection from insect pest infestation that decreases its yield and quality. Single locus integration of the synthetically fused cry1Ab/Ac gene of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in Corchorus capsularis (JRC 321) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated shoot tip transformation provided 5 potent Bt jute lines BT1, BT2, BT4, BT7 and BT8. These lines consistently expressed the Cry1Ab/Ac endotoxin ranging from 0.16 to 0.35 ng/mg of leaf, in the following generations (analyzed upto T4). The effect of Cry1Ab/Ac endotoxin was studied against 3 major Lepidopteran pests of jute- semilooper (Anomis sabulifera Guenee), hairy caterpillar (Spilarctia obliqua Walker) and indigo caterpillar (Spodoptera exigua Hubner) by detached leaf and whole plant insect bioassay on greenhouse-grown transgenic plants. Results confirm that larvae feeding on transgenic plants had lower food consumption, body size, body weight and dry weight of excreta compared to non-transgenic controls. Insect mortality range among transgenic feeders was 66–100% for semilooper and hairy caterpillar and 87.50% for indigo caterpillar. Apart from insect resistance, the transgenic plants were at par with control plants in terms of agronomic parameters and fiber quality. Hence, these Bt jutes in the field would survive Lepidopteran pest infestation, minimize harmful pesticide usage and yield good quality fiber. PMID:29354143

  2. Antioxidant neolignans from Cordia americana.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía R; Cirigliano, Adriana; Fabani, María P; Lima, Beatriz; Alberti, Sebastián; Kramer, Fernando; Tapia, Alejandro A; Cabrera, Gabriela; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2013-12-01

    Five new neolignans with a bicyclo[2.2.2]octene framework were isolated from an ethanolic extract of the bark of Cordia americana. The structures and relative configurations of the compounds were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic methods. All the isolated compounds showed good antioxidant activities in the DPPH radical scavenging (0.5-100 µg/mL) and Ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, 1-100 µg/mL) assays. One of the compounds displayed mild fungistatic activity at 0.1 µmol/spot against Fusarium virguliforme while, at the same time, all compounds were inactive against several strains of Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria at all assayed concentrations (10-1,000 µg/mL). Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Germinating pokeberry seed (Phytolacca americana L.)

    Treesearch

    Arnold Krochmal

    1970-01-01

    The seeds of pokeberry (Phytolacca americana L.) can be germinated successfully by storing them dry over winter and then nicking them with a needle to break the seed coat, followed by germination treatment at about 75ºF.

  4. Inhibition of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) formation in emulsified porcine patties by phenolic-rich avocado (Persea americana Mill.) extracts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carpena, Javier-Germán; Morcuende, David; Petrón, María Jesus; Estévez, Mario

    2012-03-07

    The effect of phenolic-rich extracts from avocado peel on the formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) in porcine patties subjected to cooking and chill storage was studied. Eight COPs (7α-hydroxycholesterol, 7β-hydroxycholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, 20α-hydroxycholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, cholestanetriol, 5,6β-epoxycholesterol, and 5,6α-epoxycholesterol) were identified and quantified by GC-MS. The addition of avocado extracts (∼600 GAE/kg patty) to patties significantly inhibited the formation of COPs during cooking. Cooked control (C) patties contained a larger variety and greater amounts of COPs than the avocado-treated (T) counterparts. COPs sharply increased in cooked patties during the subsequent chilled storage. This increase was significantly higher in C patties than in the T patties. Interestingly, the amount of COPs in cooked and chilled T patties was similar to those found in cooked C patties. The mechanisms implicated in cholesterol oxidation in a processed meat product, the protective effect of avocado phenolics, and the potential implication of lipid and protein oxidation are thoroughly described in the present paper.

  5. Fatty acid profile and elemental content of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) oil--effect of extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Mageshni; Moodley, Roshila; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2012-01-01

    Interest in vegetable oil extracted from idioblast cells of avocado fruit is growing. In this study, five extraction methods to produce avocado oil have been compared: traditional solvent extraction using a Soxhlet or ultrasound, Soxhlet extraction combined with microwave or ultra-turrax treatment and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Traditional Soxhlet extraction produced the most reproducible results, 64.76 ± 0.24 g oil/100 g dry weight (DW) and 63.67 ± 0.20 g oil/100 g DW for Hass and Fuerte varieties, respectively. Microwave extraction gave the highest yield of oil (69.94%) from the Hass variety. Oils from microwave extraction had the highest fatty acid content; oils from SFE had wider range of fatty acids. Oils from Fuerte variety had a higher monounsaturated: saturated FA ratio (3.45-3.70). SFE and microwave extraction produced the best quality oil, better than traditional Soxhlet extraction, with the least amount of oxidizing metals present. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  6. Isolation and structure elucidation of avocado seed (Persea americana) lipid derivatives that inhibit Clostridium sporogenes endospore germination.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Dariana Graciela; Pacheco, Adriana; García-Cruz, María Isabel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet Alejandra; Benavides-Lozano, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen

    2013-07-31

    Avocado fruit extracts are known to exhibit antimicrobial properties. However, the effects on bacterial endospores and the identity of antimicrobial compounds have not been fully elucidated. In this study, avocado seed extracts were tested against Clostridium sporogenes vegetative cells and active endospores. Bioassay-guided purification of a crude extract based on inhibitory properties linked antimicrobial action to six lipid derivatives from the family of acetogenin compounds. Two new structures and four compounds known to exist in nature were identified as responsible for the activity. Structurally, most potent molecules shared features of an acetyl moiety and a trans-enone group. All extracts produced inhibition zones on vegetative cells and active endospores. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of isolated molecules ranged from 7.8 to 15.6 μg/mL, and bactericidal effects were observed for an enriched fraction at 19.5 μg/mL. Identified molecules showed potential as natural alternatives to additives and antibiotics used by the food and pharmaceutical industries to inhibit Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria.

  7. Effect of an avocado oil-enhanced diet (Persea americana) on sucrose-induced insulin resistance in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Del Toro-Equihua, Mario; Velasco-Rodríguez, Raymundo; López-Ascencio, Raúl; Vásquez, Clemente

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the effects of vegetable oils with varying percentages of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids on insulin resistance. However, there is no report on the effect of avocado oil on this pathologic condition. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of avocado oil on sucrose-induced insulin resistance in Wistar rats. An experimental study was carried out on Wistar rats that were randomly assigned into six groups. Each group received a different diet over an 8-week period (n = 11 in each group): the control group was given a standard diet, and the other five groups were given the standard feed plus sucrose with the addition of avocado oil at 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30%, respectively. Variables were compared using Student t test and analysis of variance. Statistically significant difference was considered when p < 0.05. Rats that were given diets with 10% and 20% avocado oil showed lower insulin resistance (p = 0.022 and p = 0.024, respectively). Similar insulin resistance responses were observed in the control and 30% avocado oil addition groups (p = 0.85). Addition of 5-30% avocado oil lowered high sucrose diet-induced body weight gain in Wistar rats. It was thus concluded that glucose tolerance and insulin resistance induced by high sucrose diet in Wistar rats can be reduced by the dietary addition of 5-20% avocado oil. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Identification of avocado (Persea americana) root proteins induced by infection with the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi using a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Muñiz, Carlos H; Escobar-Tovar, Lina; Valdes-Rodríguez, Silvia; Fernández-Pavia, Silvia; Arias-Saucedo, Luis J; de la Cruz Espindola Barquera, Maria; Gómez Lim, Miguel Á

    2012-01-01

    Avocado root rot, caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, is the most important disease that limits avocado production. A proteomic approach was employed to identify proteins that are upregulated by infection with P. cinnamomi. Different proteins were shown to be differentially expressed after challenge with the pathogen by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. A densitometric evaluation of protein expression indicated differential regulation during the time-course analyzed. Some proteins induced in response to the infection were identified by standard peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry and sequencing by MALDI LIFT-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Of the 400 protein spots detected on 2-D gels, 21 seemed to change in abundance by 3 hours after infection. Sixteen proteins were upregulated, 5 of these were only detected in infected roots and 11 showed an increased abundance. Among the differentially expressed proteins identified are homologs to isoflavone reductase, glutathione S-transferase, several abscisic acid stress-ripening proteins, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, cysteine synthase and quinone reductase. A 17.3-kDa small heat-shock protein and a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein were identified as downregulated. Our group is the first to report on gene induction in response to oomycete infection in roots from avocado, using proteomic techniques. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  9. Changes in cell wall pectins and their relation to postharvest mesocarp softening of "Hass" avocados (Persea americana Mill.).

    PubMed

    Defilippi, Bruno G; Ejsmentewicz, Troy; Covarrubias, María Paz; Gudenschwager, Orianne; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo

    2018-05-17

    The avocado is a climacteric fruit and begins a softening process after harvest. During ripening, the mesocarp changes in texture, and this affects fruit quality and cold storage capacity. Softening is commonly associated with cell wall disassembly in climacteric fruits. However, changes in the cell wall structure and composition during avocado softening are poorly understood. To understand this process, cell wall pectins in "Hass" avocado fruit were studied during ripening at 20 °C after harvest and after cold storage. Additionally, avocados were treated with 1-MCP to evaluate the delay in softening. Biochemical analysis showed a decrease in galacturonic acid (GalA) in alcohol-insoluble residues (AIR) and water-soluble pectin concomitant to softening, paralleled by an increase in polygalacturonase (PG) activity. In the same way, the β-galactosidase activity increased in soft avocado fruit, along with a reduction in galactose in cell wall material and the Na 2 CO 3 -soluble fraction. The arabinose content in the cell wall material did not change during softening. However, there was a change in arabinose ratios between the different fractions of pectin, mainly in the fractions soluble in water and in Na 2 CO 3 . The cold storage of avocado fruit did not induce softening of the fruit, but the content of GalA showed a substantial decrease, accompanied by an increase in PG activity. Thus, our work supports the hypothesis that the solubilization of neutral sugars such as arabinose and rhamnose, as well as the loss of galactose content mediated by the enzyme β-galactosidase, were the main factors that began the coordinated action of cell wall remodeling enzymes that resulted in the loss of firmness of avocado fruit. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Persea schiedeana (Lauraceae), a new host of Heilipus lauri Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Veracruz, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Vildózola, Alvaro; Del Angel-Coronel, Oscar A; Cruz-Castillo, Juan G; Váldez-Carrasco, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    The presence of the Molytinae Heilipus lauri Boheman is reported for the first time attacking fruits of Persea schiedeana, commonly called 'chinene' in Huatusco and Zongolica, state of Veracruz, Mexico.

  11. Synthetic Polymer Affinity Ligand for Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) Cry1Ab/Ac Protein: The Use of Biomimicry Based on the Bt Protein-Insect Receptor Binding Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingming; Huang, Rong; Weisman, Adam; Yu, Xiaoyang; Lee, Shih-Hui; Chen, Yalu; Huang, Chao; Hu, Senhua; Chen, Xiuhua; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan; Chen, Hao; Shea, Kenneth J

    2018-05-24

    We report a novel strategy for creating abiotic Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) protein affinity ligands by biomimicry of the recognition process that takes place between Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins and insect receptor cadherin-like Bt-R 1 proteins. Guided by this strategy, a library of synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) was prepared and screened for binding to three epitopes 280 FRGSAQGIEGS 290 , 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 and 436 FRSGFSNSSVSIIR 449 located in loop α8, loop 2 and loop 3 of domain II of Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins. A negatively charged and hydrophilic nanoparticle (NP12) was found to have high affinity to one of the epitopes, 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . This same NP also had specific binding ability to both Bt Cry1Ab and Bt Cry1Ac, proteins that share the same epitope, but very low affinity to Bt Cry2A, Bt Cry1C and Bt Cry1F closely related proteins that lack epitope homology. To locate possible NP- Bt Cry1Ab/Ac interaction sites, NP12 was used as a competitive inhibitor to block the binding of 865 NITIHITDTNNK 876 , a specific recognition site in insect receptor Bt-R 1 , to 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . The inhibition by NP12 reached as high as 84%, indicating that NP12 binds to Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins mainly via 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . This epitope region was then utilized as a "target" or "bait" for the separation and concentration of Bt Cry1Ac protein from the extract of transgenic Bt cotton leaves by NP12. This strategy, based on the antigen-receptor recognition mechanism, can be extended to other biotoxins and pathogen proteins when designing biomimic alternatives to natural protein affinity ligands.

  12. Attraction and electroantennogram responses of male Mediterranean fruit fly to volatile chemicals from Persea, Litchi and Ficus wood.

    PubMed

    Niogret, Jerome; Montgomery, Wayne S; Kendra, Paul E; Heath, Robert R; Epsky, Nancy D

    2011-05-01

    Trimedlure is the most effective male-targeted lure for the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann). A similar response is elicited by plant substances that contain α-copaene, a naturally-occurring sesquiterpene. α-Copaene is a complex, highly-volatile, widely-distributed plant compound, and male C. capitata respond to material from both hosts (e.g., Litchi chinensis) and non-hosts (e.g., Ficus benjamina) that contain α-copaene. Avocado, Persea americana, recently was found to contain varying amounts of α-copaene in the bark and underlying cambial tissue. Short-range attraction bioassays and electroantennography (EAG) were used to quantify responses of sterile male C. capitata to samples of rasped wood from four avocado genotypes, L. chinensis, and F. benjamina. Gas chromatography-mass spectral (GC-MS) analysis was used to identify and quantify the major sesquiterpenes. Attraction and EAG amplitude were correlated, with L. chinensis eliciting the highest and F. benjamina the lowest responses. Responses to the avocado genotypes were intermediate, but varied among the four types. GC-MS identified 13 sesquiterpenes, including α-copaene, from all samples. Amounts of α-copaene in volatile collections from samples (3 g) ranged from 11.8 μg in L. chinensis to 0.09 μg in F. benjamina, which correlated with short-range attraction and EAG response. α-Copaene ranged from 8.0 to 0.8 μg in the avocado genotypes, but attraction and EAG responses were not correlated with the amount of α-copaene. Differences in enantiomeric structure of the α-copaene in the different genotypes and/or presence of additional sesquiterpenes may be responsible for the variation in male response. EAG responses were correlated with the amount of several other sesquiterpenes including α-humulene, and this compound elicited a strong antennal response when tested alone.

  13. Ulmus americana is a polyploid complex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The elms (the genus Ulmus) are one of the most important tree crops for the $4.7-billion per year nursery industry. The commercial importance of the genus centers on the American elm, Ulmus americana. Once decimated by Dutch Elm Disease, the recent introduction of cultivars resistant to the diseas...

  14. Phase Behavior of Binary Blends of AB+AC Block Copolymers with compatible B and C blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryamitsyn, Victor; Ganesan, Venkat

    2012-02-01

    Recently the experimental studies of phase behavior of binary blends of PS-b-P2VP and PS-b-PHS demonstrated an interesting effect: blends of symmetric PS-b-P2VP and shorter symmetric (PS-b-PHS) formed cylindrical HEX and spherical BCC phases, while each pure component formed lamellas. The miscibility of P2VP and PHS is caused by the hydrogen bonding between P2VP and PHS,which can be described as a negative Flory ?-parameter between P2VP and PHS. We developed a theory of the microphase segregation of AB+AC blends of diblock copolymers based on strong stretching theory. The main result of our theory is that in the copolymer brush-like layer formed by longer B chain and shorter C chains, the attraction between B and shorter C chains causes relative stretching of short C chains and compression of longer B chains. The latter manifests in an excessive bending force towards the grafting surface (BC|AA interface). Such bending force causes a transition from a symmetric lamella phase to a HEX cylinder or BCC spherical phases with the BC phase being a ``matrix'' component. In a blend of asymmetric BCC sphere forming copolymers (where B and C segments are the minor components), such bending force may unfold BCC spherical phase to a HEX cylinder phase, or even highly uneven lamella phases.

  15. Reproductive Ecology of Vallisneria americana Michaux

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    evolution , maintenance, and loss of self-incompatibility systems. In Plant reproductive ecology : Patterns and strategies. ed. J. Lovett-Doust and L... Plants , Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, 1990 PURPOSE: Nearly 20 years have passed since Korschgen and Green’s publication (1988) on the ecology of V...americana. Photo by J. Kujawski, Maryland Plant Material Center, 1997 After pollination , the stalk of the pistillate flower begins to coil, drawing the

  16. First report of laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola, on redbay (Persea borbonia) in Texas.

    Treesearch

    R. D. Menard; S. R. Clarke; Stephen Fraedrich; T. C. Harrington

    2016-01-01

    Laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola T.C.Harr., Aghayeva, & Fraedrich, a fungal symbiont of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff), is responsible for extensive mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng) and other Lauraceae native to the United States (Fraedrich et al. 2008). The beetle and fungus were introduced into the United...

  17. Predators and parasitoids associated with Scolytinae in Persea spp., and other Lauraceae in Florida and Taiwan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract Due to its association with Raffaelea lauricola, a pathogen that causes laurel wilt, the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus is considered one of the most damaging pests of Persea species including avocado. Currently there is no satisfactory method to control this pest. Biological c...

  18. Towards the development of a laurel wilt screening program in redbay (Persea borbonia)

    Treesearch

    Marc Hughes; Jason Smith

    2012-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a highly destructive disease of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng.) and other Lauraceous natives in the southeastern United States. The disease and associated vector, the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus), has spread through the United States coastal plain. The presence of surviving and...

  19. Outcrossing in Florida and California commercial avocado (Persea americana Mill) orchards estimated using microsatellite markers and the development of a genetic linkage map

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado has an unusual flowering mechanism, diurnally synchronous protogynous dichogamy, which promotes cross pollination. Comemrcial groves usually contain pollinizer rows adjacent to the more desirable commercial cultivars. Conflicting results on the effect of pollinizer rows on out-crossing rates...

  20. De novo sequencing, assembly, and analysis of the root transcriptome of Persea americana (Mill.) in response to Phytophthora cinnamomi and flooding.

    PubMed

    Reeksting, Bianca J; Coetzer, Nanette; Mahomed, Waheed; Engelbrecht, Juanita; van den Berg, Noëlani

    2014-01-01

    Avocado is a diploid angiosperm containing 24 chromosomes with a genome estimated to be around 920 Mb. It is an important fruit crop worldwide but is susceptible to a root rot caused by the ubiquitous oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi. Phytophthora root rot (PRR) causes damage to the feeder roots of trees, causing necrosis. This leads to branch-dieback and eventual tree death, resulting in severe losses in production. Control strategies are limited and at present an integrated approach involving the use of phosphite, tolerant rootstocks, and proper nursery management has shown the best results. Disease progression of PRR is accelerated under high soil moisture or flooding conditions. In addition, avocado is highly susceptible to flooding, with even short periods of flooding causing significant losses. Despite the commercial importance of avocado, limited genomic resources are available. Next generation sequencing has provided the means to generate sequence data at a relatively low cost, making this an attractive option for non-model organisms such as avocado. The aims of this study were to generate sequence data for the avocado root transcriptome and identify stress-related genes. Tissue was isolated from avocado infected with P. cinnamomi, avocado exposed to flooding and avocado exposed to a combination of these two stresses. Three separate sequencing runs were performed on the Roche 454 platform and produced approximately 124 Mb of data. This was assembled into 7685 contigs, with 106 448 sequences remaining as singletons. Genes involved in defence pathways such as the salicylic acid and jasmonic acid pathways as well as genes associated with the response to low oxygen caused by flooding, were identified. This is the most comprehensive study of transcripts derived from root tissue of avocado to date and will provide a useful resource for future studies.

  1. [High-density lipoproteins (HDL) size and composition are modified in the rat by a diet supplemented with "Hass" avocado (Persea americana Miller)].

    PubMed

    Pérez Méndez, Oscar; García Hernández, Lizbeth

    2007-01-01

    To determine the effects of dietary avocado on HDL structure and their associated enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (PON1). Fifteen Wistar male rats received avocado as part of their daily meal (5 g by 17.5 g chow diet), keeping the caloric intake similar to the control group (n=15) that received their usual chow diet. After 5 weeks, HDL were isolated by sequential ultracentrifugation and their size and chemical composition were analyzed. PON1 was determined in serum spectrophotometrically using phenylacetate as substrate. Rats that received avocado had about 27% lower triglycerides plasma levels whereas their HDL-cholesterol was 17% higher as compared to control group. The mean HDL Stokes diameter was significantly lower in avocado group (11.71 +/- 0.8 vs. 12.27 +/- 0.26 nm, in control group, p < 0.05). The HDL size decrease was associated to a lower content of protein, particularly of apo Al, with a concomitant higher proportion of phospholipids in HDL isolated from avocado group. HDL structural modifications induced by avocado were not related to modifications of LCAT and PLTP activities, but occurred in parallel with higher serum levels of PON1 activity when compared to the controls (57.4 +/- 8.9 vs. 43.0 +/- 5.6 micromol/min/mL serum, p < 0.05). The inclusion of avocado in the diet decreased plasma triglycerides, increased HDL-cholesterol plasma levels and modified HDL structure. The latter effect may enhance the antiatherogenic properties of HDL since PON1 activity also increased as a consequence of avocado.

  2. De Novo Sequencing, Assembly, and Analysis of the Root Transcriptome of Persea americana (Mill.) in Response to Phytophthora cinnamomi and Flooding

    PubMed Central

    Reeksting, Bianca J.; Coetzer, Nanette; Mahomed, Waheed; Engelbrecht, Juanita; van den Berg, Noëlani

    2014-01-01

    Avocado is a diploid angiosperm containing 24 chromosomes with a genome estimated to be around 920 Mb. It is an important fruit crop worldwide but is susceptible to a root rot caused by the ubiquitous oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi. Phytophthora root rot (PRR) causes damage to the feeder roots of trees, causing necrosis. This leads to branch-dieback and eventual tree death, resulting in severe losses in production. Control strategies are limited and at present an integrated approach involving the use of phosphite, tolerant rootstocks, and proper nursery management has shown the best results. Disease progression of PRR is accelerated under high soil moisture or flooding conditions. In addition, avocado is highly susceptible to flooding, with even short periods of flooding causing significant losses. Despite the commercial importance of avocado, limited genomic resources are available. Next generation sequencing has provided the means to generate sequence data at a relatively low cost, making this an attractive option for non-model organisms such as avocado. The aims of this study were to generate sequence data for the avocado root transcriptome and identify stress-related genes. Tissue was isolated from avocado infected with P. cinnamomi, avocado exposed to flooding and avocado exposed to a combination of these two stresses. Three separate sequencing runs were performed on the Roche 454 platform and produced approximately 124 Mb of data. This was assembled into 7685 contigs, with 106 448 sequences remaining as singletons. Genes involved in defence pathways such as the salicylic acid and jasmonic acid pathways as well as genes associated with the response to low oxygen caused by flooding, were identified. This is the most comprehensive study of transcripts derived from root tissue of avocado to date and will provide a useful resource for future studies. PMID:24563685

  3. Identification and characterization of a new Bacillus atrophaeus strain B5 as biocontrol agent of postharvest anthracnose disease in soursop (Annona muricata) and avocado (Persea americana).

    PubMed

    Guardado-Valdivia, Lizeth; Tovar-Pérez, Erik; Chacón-López, Alejandra; López-García, Ulises; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Porfirio; Stoll, Alexandra; Aguilera, Selene

    2018-05-01

    Anthracnose is a fungal disease caused by Colletotrichum species that is detrimental to numerous fruit, including soursop and avocado. The use of fungicides to maintain the high quality of fruit creates a potential health risk. One alternative to this problem is the biological control, which has been applied successfully during postharvest. The Bacillus species are one of the most studied biological agents against postharvest pathogens because accomplish their biocontrol performance by producing a variety of metabolites. In this study, we evaluated the activity of metabolites contained in the cell free supernatant, obtained from Bacillus strain B5 culture, against micelial growth and spore germination of two virulent strains of C. gloeosporioides isolated from soursop and avocado. On the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis, this strain was identified as Bacillus atrophaeus. A preventive treatment using cell free supernatant, reduced severity and incidence of anthracnose disease on harvested soursop and avocado fruit. B. atrophaeus strain B5 harbors genes involved in the production of antibiotics such as surfactin, bacillomycin and iturin, which could be contributing to the efficiency of the preventive treatment during postharvest. The antagonistic role of metabolites contained in the cell free supernatant against anthracnose disease, provide a new approach by which to attack this problem and can help reduce the use of chemical pesticides, environmental pollution, leading to the safer fruit preservation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of aqueous extracts of alligator pear seed (Persea americana mill) on blood glucose and histopathology of pancreas in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Edem, Do; Ekanem, Is; Ebong, Pe

    2009-07-01

    Effects of aqueous extract of alligator pear seed on normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats were investigated in 6 groups of rats (5 rats per group). Test groups were made diabetic with intra-peritoneal injection of alloxan and treated with 300 mg and 600 mg/kg body weight of alligator pear seed extract. Two non-diabetic groups were also administered with 300 mg and 600 mg/kg body weight extract. The levels of blood glucose were examined in all 6 experimental groups. In diabetic rats, blood glucose levels were significantly reduced (p<0.05) by 73.26-78.24% on consumption of the extracts, with greater effect exhibited by the 600 mg/kg extract. In normal rats, blood glucose levels were significantly reduced (p<0.05) by 34.68-38.9% on consumption of the seed extract. Histological studies showed a degenerative effect on the pancreatic islet cells of diabetic rats. The result suggested restorative (protective) effect of the extract on pancreatic islet cells. Administration of aqueous extract of alligator pear seed may contribute significantly to the reduction of blood glucose levels and can be useful in the treatment of diabetes.

  5. Regeneration of plants from Fraxinus americana hypocotyls and cotyledons

    Treesearch

    Kaitlin J. Palla; Paula M. Pijut

    2011-01-01

    A plant regeneration protocol was developed for white ash (Fraxinus americana L.). Hypocotyls and cotyledons excised from embryos were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS)mediumsupplementedwith 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) plus thidiazuron (TDZ), and compared for organogenic potential. Sixty-six percent of hypocotyl segments and 10.4% of cotyledon...

  6. Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana): possible source of a molluscicide

    Treesearch

    Arnold Krochmal; P.W. LeQuesne; P.W. LeQuesne

    1970-01-01

    Pokeweed, a plant abundant in Appalachia, exhibits some chemical similarities to a related species that has shown molluscicidal properties. Because this suggests that pokeweed, Phytolacca americana L. (P. decandra L.), has potential for controlling fresh-water snails, we have compiled this report of its chenlical composition, uses, propagation methods, and other...

  7. Current distribution of the american marten, Martes americana, in California

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Kurcera; William J. Zielinski; Reginald H. Barrett

    1996-01-01

    We describe the current distribution of the American marten, Martes americana, in California based on field surveys conducted between 1989 and 1995 that used either sooted track-plates or cameras. The Sierra Nevada marten, M. a. sierrae, occupies much of its historic range from northwestern Shasta County to the southern Sierra...

  8. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Fraxinus americana hypocotyls

    Treesearch

    Kaitlin J. Palla; Paula M. Pijut

    2015-01-01

    An Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation system was successfully developed for white ash (Fraxinus americana) using hypocotyls as the initial explants. Hypocotyls isolated from mature embryos germinated on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 22.2 µM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 0.5 µM...

  9. Characterization and development mechanism of Apios americana tuber starch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apios americana is a wild legume-bearing plant with edible tubers. Domestication of Apios is in progress because of the superior nutritional value and health benefits of the tuber. Objectives of this study were to: 1) characterize physicochemical properties of Apios-tuber starch; and 2) understand d...

  10. Memory Consolidation and Gene Expression in "Periplaneta Americana"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J.; Pinter, Marianna; Lent, David D.

    2005-01-01

    A unique behavioral paradigm has been developed for "Periplaneta americana" that assesses the timing and success of memory consolidation leading to long-term memory of visual-olfactory associations. The brains of trained and control animals, removed at the critical consolidation period, were screened by two-directional suppression subtractive…

  11. Adventitious shoot regeneration and rooting of Fraxinus americana

    Treesearch

    Kaitlin J. Palla; Paula M. Pijut

    2010-01-01

    White ash (Fraxinus americana) trees provide both ecological and economic benefits. Loss of this North American endemic would disturb the environment. The urban ash tree industry in the United States would also suffer, as would manufacturers of baseball bats, furniture, and cabinets.

  12. Teaching German-Americana with Assistance from the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Robert J.; Hoyt, Giles R.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the World Wide Web can assist in teaching about German-Americana in German-language instruction, and discusses some basic Web page uses to find and organize literary texts, syllabi, course outlines, images and realia, and information about people, organizations, events, and places. Some of the most useful German-American resources are…

  13. Baseline susceptibility of persea mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) to abamectin and milbemectin in avocado groves in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Humeres, Eduardo C; Morse, Joseph G

    2005-01-01

    Persea mite, Oligonychus perseae Tuttle, Baker, and Abatiello, susceptibility to abamectin and milbemectin was evaluated in 2003 to determine baseline susceptibility levels in avocado groves in San Diego and Ventura Counties (California, USA) where more than 70% of the state's avocado production is concentrated. Milbemectin has yet to be used in avocado production in California and abamectin has been available for use since 1999. Baseline susceptibility ratios (in relation to the most susceptible population) of five persea mite field strains to milbemectin varied 2.1- to 2.8-fold at the LC50 and LC90, respectively. The susceptibility of seven field strains to abamectin varied slightly more (2.1- to 3.5-fold) with one strain subjected to seven sprays over the past 4 years showing slight but significant separation of LC50 and LC90's from the most susceptible strain, which is suggestive of the early stages of resistance to this product. Based on these data, baseline susceptibility levels are proposed that might be used to monitor for future persea mite resistance to these chemicals as their use in California avocado production continues.

  14. Immunotoxicological Evaluation of Genetically Modified Rice Expressing Cry1Ab/Ac Protein (TT51-1) by a 6-Month Feeding Study on Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xiaobing; Tang, Yao; Lv, Jianjun; Zhang, Lin; Sun, Li; Yang, Yanwei; Miao, Yufa; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Gaofeng; Huang, Zhiying; Wang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the food safety of TT51-1, a new type of genetically modified rice that expresses the Cry1Ab/Ac protein (Bt toxin) and is highly resistant to most lepidopteran pests. Sixteen male and 16 female cynomolgus monkeys were randomly divided into four groups: conventional rice (non-genetically modified rice, non-GM rice), positive control, 17.5% genetically modified rice (GM rice) and 70% GM rice. Monkeys in the non-GM rice, positive control, and GM rice groups were fed on diets containing 70% non-GM rice, 17.5% GM rice or 70% GM rice, respectively, for 182 days, whereas animals in the positive group were intravenously injected with cyclophosphamide every other day for a total of four injections before the last treatment. Six months of treatment did not yield abnormal observations. Specifically, the following parameters did not significantly differ between the non-GM rice group and GM rice groups: body weight, food consumption, electrocardiogram, hematology, immuno-phenotyping of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, mitogen-induced peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation, splenocyte proliferation, KLH-T cell-dependent antibody response, organ weights and ratios, and histological appearance (p>0.05). Animals from the GM rice group differed from animals in the non-GM rice group (p<0.05) in several parameters: specifically, their body temperatures and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were higher, whereas their levels of serum K+, Cl- and cytokines (IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) were lower. Because dose- or time-dependent changes were not observed in this study and animals appeared histologically normal, the aforementioned differences were not considered to be adverse or related to the treatment with GM rice. In conclusion, a 6-month feeding study of TT51-1 did not show adverse immunotoxicological effects on cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:27684490

  15. Antihyperglycemic effect of Persea duthieion blood glucose levels and body weight in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Khushbakht; Zakir, Muhammad; Khan, Haroon; Khan, Ihsaan Ullah; Ayaz, Sultan; Khan, Iqbal; Khan, Jafar; Khan, Murad Ali

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the antihyperglycemic effect of Persea duthieion blood glucose concentration and body weight in alloxan induced diabetic hyperglycemic rabbits. The results illustrated significant antihyperglycemic activity of crude extract with 17.44% and 28.02% amelioration at 25 and 50mg/kg p.o. respectively after 24th day of drug treatment; equally supported by body weight recovery. Upon fractionation, most dominant antihyperglycemic effect was displayed by aqueous fraction with 22.12% and 34.43% effect followed by ethyl acetate fraction with 24.32% and 32.05% effect at 25 and 50mg/kg p.o. respectively after 24th day of drug treatment. The effect on blood glucose was also reflected on body weight of animals. In conclusion, our study documented marked antihyperglycemic activity of extract/fractions of P. duthiei.

  16. Analysis of genetic diversity of Persea bombycina "Som" using RAPD-based molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Medhi, Kalyani; Das, Ambrish P; Saikia, Siddhartha P; Neog, Kartik; Choudhury, S N

    2009-08-01

    The utility of RAPD markers in assessing genetic diversity and phenetic relationships in Persea bombycina, a major tree species for golden silk (muga) production, was investigated using 48 genotypes from northeast India. Thirteen RAPD primer combinations generated 93 bands. On average, seven RAPD fragments were amplified per reaction. In a UPGMA phenetic dendrogram based on Jaccard's coefficient, the P. bombycina accessions showed a high level of genetic variation, as indicated by genetic similarity. The grouping in the phenogram was highly consistent, as indicated by high values of cophenetic correlation and high bootstrap values at the key nodes. The accessions were scattered on a plot derived from principal correspondence analysis. The study concluded that the high level of genetic diversity in the P. bombycina accessions may be attributed to the species' outcrossing nature. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of P. bombycina, which may then be conserved on a priority basis.

  17. A new species of Melitaea from Israel, with notes on taxonomy, cytogenetics, phylogeography and interspecific hybridization in the Melitaea persea complex (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae).

    PubMed

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A

    2017-01-01

    Specimens with intermediate morphology are often considered to be the result of ongoing interspecific hybridization; however, this conclusion is difficult to prove without analysis of chromosomal and/or molecular markers. In the butterfly genus Melitaea , such an intermediacy can be detected in male genitalia, and is more or less regularly observed in localities where two closely related, presumably parental species are found in sympatry. Here I analyze a high altitude Melitaea population from Mt. Hermon in north Israel and show that its male genitalia are clearly differentiated from those found in phenotypically similar M. persea and M. didyma , but in some aspects intermediate between them. This hybrid-like population is unique because, although M. didyma is present on Mt. Hermon, the true, low-altitude M. persea has never been reported from Israel. Cytogenetic analysis revealed no apomorphic chromosomal characters to distinguish the Mt. Hermon population from other known taxa of the M. persea and M. didyma species groups. At the same time, DNA barcode-based phylogeographic study showed that this population is ancient. It was estimated to originate 1-1.6 million years ago in the Levantine refugium from a common ancestor with M. persea . Generally, the data obtained are incompatible with interpretation of the studied population as a taxon conspecific with M. persea or M. didyma , or a swarm of recent hybrids between M. persea and M. didyma , although the possibility of ancient homoploid hybrid speciation cannot be ruled out. I also argue that the name Melitaea montium assigned to butterflies from north Lebanon cannot be applied to the studied taxon from Mt. Hermon. Here I describe this morphologically and ecologically distinct entity as a new species Melitaea acentria sp. n. , and compare it with other taxa of the M. persea complex.

  18. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Persea group (Lauraceae) and its biogeographic implications on the evolution of tropical and subtropical Amphi-Pacific disjunctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Lang; Li, Jie; Rohwer, Jens G; van der Werff, Henk; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Li, Hsi-Wen

    2011-09-01

    The Persea group (Lauraceae) has a tropical and subtropical amphi-pacific disjunct distribution with most of its members, and it includes two Macaronesian species. The relationships within the group are still controversial, and its intercontinental disjunction has not been investigated with extensive sampling and precise time dating. • ITS and LEAFY intron II sequences of 78 Persea group species and nine other Lauraceae species were analyzed with maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Divergence time estimation employed Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method under a relaxed clock. • Several traditional genera or subgenera within the Persea group form well-supported monophyletic groups except Alseodaphne and Dehaasia. The divergence time of the Persea group is estimated as ∼55.3 (95% higher posterior densities [HPD] 41.4-69.9) million years ago (mya). Two major divergences within the Persea group are estimated as ∼51.9 (95% HPD 38.9-63.9) mya and ∼48.5 (95% HPD 35.9-59.9) mya. • Persea can be retained as a genus by the inclusion of Apollonias barbujana and exclusion a few species that do not fit into the established subgenera. A major revision is recommended for the delimitation between Alseodaphne, Dehaasia, and Nothaphoebe. We suggest that the Persea group originated from the Perseeae-Laureae radiation in early Eocene Laurasia. Its amphi-pacific disjunction results from the disruption of boreotropical flora by climatic cooling during the mid- to late Eocene. The American-Macaronesian disjunction may be explained by the long-distance dispersal.

  19. A new species of Melitaea from Israel, with notes on taxonomy, cytogenetics, phylogeography and interspecific hybridization in the Melitaea persea complex (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Specimens with intermediate morphology are often considered to be the result of ongoing interspecific hybridization; however, this conclusion is difficult to prove without analysis of chromosomal and/or molecular markers. In the butterfly genus Melitaea, such an intermediacy can be detected in male genitalia, and is more or less regularly observed in localities where two closely related, presumably parental species are found in sympatry. Here I analyze a high altitude Melitaea population from Mt. Hermon in north Israel and show that its male genitalia are clearly differentiated from those found in phenotypically similar M. persea and M. didyma, but in some aspects intermediate between them. This hybrid-like population is unique because, although M. didyma is present on Mt. Hermon, the true, low-altitude M. persea has never been reported from Israel. Cytogenetic analysis revealed no apomorphic chromosomal characters to distinguish the Mt. Hermon population from other known taxa of the M. persea and M. didyma species groups. At the same time, DNA barcode-based phylogeographic study showed that this population is ancient. It was estimated to originate 1–1.6 million years ago in the Levantine refugium from a common ancestor with M. persea. Generally, the data obtained are incompatible with interpretation of the studied population as a taxon conspecific with M. persea or M. didyma, or a swarm of recent hybrids between M. persea and M. didyma, although the possibility of ancient homoploid hybrid speciation cannot be ruled out. I also argue that the name Melitaea montium assigned to butterflies from north Lebanon cannot be applied to the studied taxon from Mt. Hermon. Here I describe this morphologically and ecologically distinct entity as a new species Melitaea acentria sp. n., and compare it with other taxa of the M. persea complex. PMID:28919968

  20. The ecological role of American elm (Ulmus americana L.) in floodplain forests of northeastern North America

    Treesearch

    Christian O. Marks

    2017-01-01

    Before Dutch elm disease, the American elm (Ulmus americana L.) was a leading dominant tree species in the better drained parts of floodplain forests where flooding occurs about 1 percent of the time. Although still common in these habitats today, U. americana now rarely lives long enough to reach the forest canopy because elm...

  1. Distribution and characterization of Heterobilharzia americana in dogs in Texas.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J Y; Lewis, B C; Snowden, K F

    2014-06-16

    Heterobilharzia americana is a trematode parasite (family Schistosomatidae) that infects a wide range of wild mammalian hosts. Canine cases have been reported in the Gulf coast and south Atlantic states, Kansas, and Oklahoma. A total of 238 canine H. americana cases in Texas were retrospectively collected for a period of approximately 22 years from case records at the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital pathology service, diagnostic parasitology service, and Gastrointestinal Laboratory at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine. Of these cases, 26 patients had 1-2 repeat positive tests for a total of 268 positive tests (26 biopsies, 39 necropsies, 160 fecal examinations, and 43 PCR). Multiple dogs were infected in 12 households. Cases were distributed primarily in the eastern region of Texas in 42 of 254 counties. Cases were seen as far west as Kerr county and in counties bordering Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mexico, and the Gulf of Mexico. The median dog age was 5.6 years (2.7 months to 17.2 years) and the median weight was 20.5 kg (1-61.6 kg). All American Kennel Club (AKC) breed groups were represented (n=186): crossbred (20%), herding (17.8%), sporting (16.1%), toy (10.8%), hounds (10.8%), working (10.1%), terrier (8.5%), non-sporting (4.9%), and miscellaneous (1%). No seasonal pattern of diagnosis was apparent. Clinical signs reported (n=90) were diarrhea (67%), weight loss (38%), anorexia/hyporexia (27%), vomiting (22%), hematochezia (20%), lethargy (17%), polyuria/polydipsia (6%), and collapse (3%). In 39 necropsy cases, trematode eggs were identified by histopathology in the small intestine (84%), liver (84%), large intestine (39%), pancreas (35%), lung (9%), lymph node (8%), spleen (4%), and stomach (3%). Adult parasites were identified histologically in four cases. Granulomatous inflammation associated with the eggs was the most commonly reported histopathologic change. Other changes reported

  2. Trypanocidal activity of polysaccharide extract from Genipa americana leaves.

    PubMed

    Souza, Racquel Oliveira da Silva; Sousa, Paloma Leão; Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra de; Sampaio, Tiago Lima; Tessarolo, Louise Donadello; Silva, Francisca Crislandia Oliveira; Pereira, Maria Gonçalves; Martins, Alice Maria Costa

    2018-01-10

    The parts of the Genipa americana (Rubiaceae) tree, also known as "jenipapo" or "jenipapeiro", has been used in traditional Medicine in parasitic and bacterial infections. Thus, the experimental evolution of the antiparasitic activity of polysaccharide extracts from Genipa americana leaves, and correlation with antiparasitic and popular use is important. To evaluate the effect of polysaccharide extract obtained from Genipa americana leaves on all Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain: benznidazole-resistant) developmental forms, a protozoan that causes Chagas' disease. An extract rich in polysaccharides was obtained from the leaves of Genipa americana (GaEPL) by associating depigmentation in methanol followed by extraction of polysaccharides in NaOH and precipitation with ethanol. Cytotoxicity to mammalian cells (LLC-MK2) was determined using an MTT assay. Antiparasitic activity was evaluated against epimastigote, trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. Cell-death mechanism was determined in epimastigote forms by flow cytometry analysis after FITC-annexin V (Ax), 7-AAD, and H2DCFDA staining. Striking morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscope. GaEPL (6.5% yield; 54.6% total carbohydrate; 21.1% uronic acid and 12% protein), inhibited all T. cruzi developmental forms, epimastigotes after periods of 24h (IC 50 = 740 ± 0.075µg/mL), 48h (IC 50 = 710 ± 0.053µg/mL) and 72h (IC 50 = 870 ± 0.052µg/mL) of incubation; trypomastigotes (IC 50 = 470 ± 0.082µg/mL) after periods of 24h and intracellular amastigotes (IC 50/2 = 235 or IC 50 = 470µg/mL) after periods of 24 and 48h of incubation, with no toxicity on LLC-MK2 cells at the used concentrations. Analysis of the possible action mechanism in the parasites suggested cell death by necrosis with the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed T. cruzi death by necrosis. GaEPL showed significant activity against the epimastigote, trypomastigote

  3. American wild celery (Vallisneria americana): Ecological considerations for restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, C.E.; Green, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The success of vegetation management programs for waterfowl is dependent on knowing the physical and physiological requirements of target species. Lakes and riverine impoundments that contain an abundance of the American wildcelery (Vallisneria americana ) have traditionally been favored by canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria ) and other waterfowl as feeding areas during migration. Information on the ecology of American wildcelery is summarized to serve as a guide for potential wetland restoration projects. Techniques are described for transplanting winter buds. Management programs that employ these techniques should define objectives clearly and evaluate the water regime carefully before initiating major restoration.

  4. Intraspecific Signals Inducing Aggregation in Periplaneta americana (Insecta: Dictyoptera).

    PubMed

    Imen, Saïd; Christian, Malosse; Virginie, Durier; Colette, Rivault

    2015-06-01

    Chemical communication is necessary to induce aggregation and to maintain the cohesion of aggregates in Periplaneta americana (L.) cockroaches. We aimed to identify the chemical message inducing aggregation in this species. Two types of bioassays were used-binary choice tests in Petri dishes and tests in Y-olfactometer. Papers conditioned by direct contact of conspecifics induce aggregation when proposed in binary choice tests and were attractive in a Y-olfactometer. The identification of the molecules present on these conditioned papers indicated that dichloromethane extracts contained mainly cuticular hydrocarbons whereas methanol extracts contained more volatile molecules. Only a mixture of extracts in both solvents induced aggregation. High concentrations of cuticular hydrocarbons are necessary to induce aggregation when presented alone. When presented with volatile molecules present in methanol extracts, low concentrations of cuticular hydrocarbons are sufficient to induce aggregation if they are presented in contact. Among volatile molecules collected on filter paper, a mixture of three compounds-hexadecanoic acid, pentadecanoic acid, and pentaethylene glycol-induced aggregation. Our results provide evidence that aggregation processes in P. americana relies on a dual mechanism: attraction over long distances by three volatile molecules and maintenance on site by contact with cuticular hydrocarbons. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Effectiveness of Persea major Kopp (Lauraceae) extract against Enterococcus faecalis: a preliminary in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Lusiane; Gabardo, Marilisa Carneiro Leão; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Maranho, Leila Teresinha; Baratto-Filho, Flares

    2017-03-06

    Persea major Kopp (Lauraceae) is a plant with wound healing, antibacterial, and analgesic properties. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro antibacterial activity of the concentrated crude extract (CCE) and ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) of this plant against Enterococcus faecalis and compare it with calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH) 2 ] paste and 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX). The plant material was collected, and an extract was prepared according to the requirements of the study (CCE and EAF). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CCE, EAF, Ca(OH) 2 , Ca(OH) 2  + CCE, and CHX against E. faecalis were determined using the broth microdilution method RESULTS: The EAF inhibited E. faecalis at concentrations of 166.50, 83.25, and 41.62 mg mL -1 , and 1.00, 0.50, and 0.25% of CHX solutions showed antimicrobial activity. The MICs of Ca(OH) 2 paste were 166.50 and 83.25 mg mL -1 , whereas Ca(OH) 2  + CCE showed antimicrobial activity only at a concentration of 166.50 mg mL -1 . CCE showed no inhibitory effect at any of the concentrations tested CONCLUSIONS: The CCE did not show any antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis; however, the EAF was the most effective among the three highest concentrations tested.

  6. Exertional myopathy in whooping cranes (Grus americana) with prognostic guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher S; Thomas, Nancy J; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; Hartup, Barry K

    2005-09-01

    Exertional myopathy developed in three whooping cranes (Grus americana) secondary to routine capture, handling, and trauma. Presumptive diagnosis of exertional myopathy was based on history of recent capture or trauma, clinical signs, and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and serum potassium. Treatments were attempted in each case, but ultimately were not successful. Gross and microscopic lesions at necropsy confirmed the diagnosis in each case, with the leg musculature most severely affected. Guidelines for determining prognosis of exertional myopathy in cranes have been included based on the analysis of these cases and others in the literature. As treatment is largely unrewarding, prevention remains the key in controlling exertional myopathy. Identification of predisposing factors and proper handling, immobilization, and transportation techniques can help prevent development of exertional myopathy in cranes.

  7. Exertional myopathy in whooping cranes (Grus americana) with prognostic guidlelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanley, C.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Paul-Murphy, P.; Hartup, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    Exertional myopathy developed in three whooping cranes (Grus americana) secondary to routine capture, handling, and trauma. Presumptive diagnosis of exertional myopathy was based on history of recent capture or trauma, clinical signs, and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and serum potassium. Treatments were attempted in each case, but ultimately were not successful. Gross and microscopic lesions at necropsy confirmed the diagnosis in each case, with the leg musculature most severely affected. Guidelines for determining prognosis of exertional myopathy in cranes have been included based on the analysis of these cases and others in the literature. As treatment is largely unrewarding, prevention remains the key in controlling exertional myopathy. Identification of predisposing factors and proper handling, immobilization, and transportation techniques can help prevent development of exertional myopathy in cranes.

  8. Establishing paternity in Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) by DNA analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, Jonathan L.; Gee, George F.; Hardekopf, C.L.; Mark, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting was used to study paternity and genetic variability within a captive flock of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana). Fingerprint patterns for 42 individuals were obtained by digesting genomic crane DNAs with HaeIII followed by electrophoresis, blotting, and hybridization to the M13 minisatellite probe. Despite finding reduced levels of genetic variation in the Whooping Crane due to a population "bottleneck," these polymorphisms were successfully used to determine paternity in six of seven cases of captive propagation where the maternal-offspring relationship was known, but where the sire was unknown. These determinations of paternity are required for effective genetic management of the crane flock. These results also revealed a number of heterozygous minisatellite loci that will be valuable in future assessments of genetic variability in this endangered species.

  9. Population Fluctuation and Altitudinal Distribution of Tetraleurodes perseae (Nakahara) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Avocado (Lauraceae) in Morelos, Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Palacios, Daniel; Bautista-Martínez, Néstor; Lagunes-Tejeda, Ángel; Carrillo-Sánchez, José Luis; Nieto-Ángel, Daniel; García-Gutiérrez, Cipriano

    2016-01-01

    Although whiteflies Tetraleurodes perseae (Nakahara) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are considered a secondary pest of avocado crops, their presence and the damages that they cause can decrease crop vigor and affect production. The objective of the present work was to determine the population fluctuation and altitudinal distribution of the T. perseae Nakahara whitefly in avocado trees, as well as to determine the number of possible generations in one year. The study was done in three orchards in Morelos state, located at different altitudes, from February 2014 to April 2015. Samplings were done every 21 days from 10 randomly chosen trees in each orchard. The samples were taken randomly from the middle stratus (1.6 m in height) of each tree; in buds or young leaves for the number of adults and leaves only for nymphs. Additionally, two yellow traps (7 × 14 cm) with glue were placed in each tree for adult samplings. Data were collected regarding vegetative budding, rainfall, relative humidity, and temperature. T. perseae was present in all three sampled orchards, with a greater presence in the lowest orchard, during the whole study period. In the orchard with the lowest altitudinal gradient (1,736 masl), 11 whitefly generations developed; 10 generations developed in the medium gradient orchard (1,934 masl); and 8 generations developed in the highest orchard (2,230 masl). The adults showed a positive relationship with regard to vegetative buds, while the nymphs had a negative relationship with regard to relative humidity. The rest of the parameters showed diverse effects on the species depending on the altitude of the orchard. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  10. Population Fluctuation and Altitudinal Distribution of Tetraleurodes perseae (Nakahara) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Avocado (Lauraceae) in Morelos, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    García-Palacios, Daniel; Bautista-Martínez, Néstor; Lagunes-Tejeda, Ángel; Carrillo-Sánchez, José Luis; Nieto-Ángel, Daniel; García-Gutiérrez, Cipriano

    2016-01-01

    Although whiteflies Tetraleurodes perseae (Nakahara) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are considered a secondary pest of avocado crops, their presence and the damages that they cause can decrease crop vigor and affect production. The objective of the present work was to determine the population fluctuation and altitudinal distribution of the T. perseae Nakahara whitefly in avocado trees, as well as to determine the number of possible generations in one year. The study was done in three orchards in Morelos state, located at different altitudes, from February 2014 to April 2015. Samplings were done every 21 days from 10 randomly chosen trees in each orchard. The samples were taken randomly from the middle stratus (1.6 m in height) of each tree; in buds or young leaves for the number of adults and leaves only for nymphs. Additionally, two yellow traps (7 × 14 cm) with glue were placed in each tree for adult samplings. Data were collected regarding vegetative budding, rainfall, relative humidity, and temperature. T. perseae was present in all three sampled orchards, with a greater presence in the lowest orchard, during the whole study period. In the orchard with the lowest altitudinal gradient (1,736 masl), 11 whitefly generations developed; 10 generations developed in the medium gradient orchard (1,934 masl); and 8 generations developed in the highest orchard (2,230 masl). The adults showed a positive relationship with regard to vegetative buds, while the nymphs had a negative relationship with regard to relative humidity. The rest of the parameters showed diverse effects on the species depending on the altitude of the orchard. PMID:27658809

  11. An Ophiostoma sp. causing a vascular wilt disease of red bay (Persea borbonia [L.] Spreng) is also pathogenic to other species in the Lauraceae family

    Treesearch

    Stephen Fraedrich

    2007-01-01

    Extensive mortality of red bay (Persea borbonia [L.] Spreng) has been observed in the coastal plains of South Carolina and Georgia since 2003. Dead and dying trees exhibit wilt-like symptoms, and a fungus (an Ophiostoma sp.) and an exotic ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus [Eichhoff]) have been implicated in...

  12. Chapter 12 - Impacts of laurel wilt disease on native Persea ecosystems (Project SO-EM-B-12-05).

    Treesearch

    Timothy M. Shearman; G. Geoff. Wang

    2018-01-01

    Although mostly occurring as associate tree species in forest communities, Persea has a wide native distribution in southeast coastal plains (Shearman and others 2015). Laurel wilt disease (LWD) is a lethal vascular infection of trees in the laurel family (Lauraceae) caused by the fungus Raffaelea lauricola (Fraedrich and...

  13. Why are there few seedlings beneath the myrmecophyte Triplaris americana?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea-Alcázar, Daniel M.; Simonetti, Javier A.

    2007-07-01

    We compared the relative importance of chemical alellopathy, pruning behaviour of resident ants and other non-related agents to ant-plant mutualism for seedling establishment beneath Triplaris americana L. (Polygonaceae), a myrmecophyte plant. We also included a preliminary analysis of effects of fragmentation on these ecological processes. Seeds and seedlings of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) were used as the target species in all experiments. Leaf-tissue extracts of the myrmecophyte plant did not inhibit germination of cacao seeds. Resident Pseudomyrmex triplarinus Weddell (Pseudomyrmecinae) ants did not remove seeds under the canopy of their host plants. The main seed consumer was the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens L. (Myrmicinae). Leaves of cacao seedlings were partially or totally pruned by Pseudomyrmex ants mainly in forest fragments studied. We offer evidence pointing to the possibility that the absence of seedlings beneath Triplaris may result from effects of both ant species. We discuss the benefits of pruning behaviour for the resident ant colony and the effects of ant-ant interactions on seedling establishment beneath this ant-plant system.

  14. Preparation of Eleutherine americana-Alginate Complex Microcapsules and Application in Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Phoem, Atchara N; Chanthachum, Suphitchaya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation using extrusion and emulsion techniques was prepared for Bifidobacterium longum protection against sequential exposure to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, refrigeration storage and heat treatment. Eleutherine americana was used as the co-encapsulating agent. Hydrolysis of E. americana by gastric and intestinal juices was also determined. E. americana and its oligosaccharide extract demonstrated their resistance to low pH and partial tolerance to human α-amylase. Microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana and oligosaccharide extract prepared by the extrusion technique survived better than that by the emulsion technique under adverse conditions. Survival of microencapsulated cells after exposure to the juices and refrigeration storage was higher than free cells at Weeks 2 and 4. In addition, the viability of microencapsulated cells was better than free cells at 65 °C for 15 min. This work suggested that microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana offers the effective delivery of probiotics to colon and maintains their survival in food products. PMID:25629556

  15. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future. PMID:24864137

  16. Ancestral and derived protein import pathways in the mitochondrion of Reclinomonas americana.

    PubMed

    Tong, Janette; Dolezal, Pavel; Selkrig, Joel; Crawford, Simon; Simpson, Alastair G B; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K; Gabriel, Kipros; Lithgow, Trevor

    2011-05-01

    The evolution of mitochondria from ancestral bacteria required that new protein transport machinery be established. Recent controversy over the evolution of these new molecular machines hinges on the degree to which ancestral bacterial transporters contributed during the establishment of the new protein import pathway. Reclinomonas americana is a unicellular eukaryote with the most gene-rich mitochondrial genome known, and the large collection of membrane proteins encoded on the mitochondrial genome of R. americana includes a bacterial-type SecY protein transporter. Analysis of expressed sequence tags shows R. americana also has components of a mitochondrial protein translocase or "translocase in the inner mitochondrial membrane complex." Along with several other membrane proteins encoded on the mitochondrial genome Cox11, an assembly factor for cytochrome c oxidase retains sequence features suggesting that it is assembled by the SecY complex in R. americana. Despite this, protein import studies show that the RaCox11 protein is suited for import into mitochondria and functional complementation if the gene is transferred into the nucleus of yeast. Reclinomonas americana provides direct evidence that bacterial protein transport pathways were retained, alongside the evolving mitochondrial protein import machinery, shedding new light on the process of mitochondrial evolution.

  17. Dispersal of invasive Phytolacca americana seeds by birds in an urban garden in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Yang, Wen; Fang, Shubo; Li, Xinhai; Liu, Zhanchen; Leng, Xin; An, Shuqing

    2017-01-01

    Although seed dispersal is a key process determining the regeneration and spread of invasive plant populations, few studies have explicitly addressed the link between dispersal vector behavior and seedling recruitment to gain insight into the invasion process within an urban garden context. We evaluated the role of bird vectors in the dispersal of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a North American herb that is invasive in urban gardens in China. Fruiting P. americana attracted both generalist and specialist bird species that fed on and dispersed its seeds. The generalist species Pycnonotus sinensis and Urocissa erythrorhyncha were the most frequent dispersers. Seedling numbers of P. americana were strongly associated with the perching behavior of frugivorous birds. If newly recruited bird species use seedling-safe perching sites, the P. americana will regenerate faster, which would enhance its invasive potential. Based on our observations, we conclude that the 2 main bird vectors, P. sinensis and U. erythrorhyncha, provide potential effective dispersal agents for P. americana. Our results highlight the role of native birds in seed dispersal of invasive plants in urban gardens. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Neuropharmacological and neuroprotective activities of some metabolites produced by cell suspension culture of Waltheria americana Linn.

    PubMed

    Mundo, Jorge; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Gutiérrez, María Del Carmen; Arellano-García, Jesús; León-Rivera, Ismael; Perea-Arango, Irene

    2017-10-01

    Waltheria americana is a plant used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat some nervous system disorders. The aims of the present study were to isolate and determine the neuropharmacological and neurprotective activities of metabolites produced by a cell suspension culture of Waltheria americana. Submerged cultivation of W. americana cells provided biomass. A methanol-soluble extract (WAsc) was obtained from biomass. WAsc was fractionated yielding the chromatographic fractions 4WAsc-H 2 O and WAsc-CH 2 Cl 2 . For the determination of anticonvulsant activity in vivo, seizures were induced in mice by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). Neuropharmacological activities (release of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and neuroprotection) of chromatographic fractions were determined by in vitro histological analysis of brain sections of mice post mortem. Fraction 4WAsc-H 2 O (containing saccharides) did not produce neuronal damage, neurodegeneration, interstitial tissue edema, astrocytic activation, nor cell death. Pretreatment of animals with 4WAsc-H 2 O and WAsc-CH 2 Cl 2 from W. americana cell suspensions induced an increase in: GABA release, seizure latency, survival time, neuroprotection, and a decrease in the degree of severity of tonic/tonic-clonic convulsions, preventing PTZ-induced death of up to 100% of animals of study. Bioactive compounds produced in suspension cell culture of W. americana produce neuroprotective and neuropharmacological activities associated with the GABAergic neurotransmission system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Fecal corticoid monitoring in whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartup, Barry K.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Czekala, Nancy M.

    2005-01-01

    We used radioimmunoassay to determine fecal corticoid concentrations and assess potential stress in 10 endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction to the wild. Fecal samples were collected shortly after hatching at a captive facility in Maryland, during field training in Wisconsin, and throughout a human-led migration to Florida. After a 14-day decline following hatching, fecal corticoid concentrations stabilized at baseline levels for the duration of the captive period, despite exposure to potentially stressful stimuli. Shipment of the cranes to the field training site was correlated with an eight- to 34-fold increase in fecal corticoid concentrations, which returned to baseline levels within 1 week. Increases were positively correlated with age but not body weight at the time of shipping. Fecal corticoid concentrations during the training period increased slightly and exhibited greater variation than levels observed at the captive facility, but were well within expected norms based on previous studies. Fecal corticoid concentrations increased twofold following premigration physical examinations and placement of radiotransmitters, and persisted for up to 4 days before they returned to baseline levels. Though fecal corticoid concentrations and variation during the migration period were similar to training levels, there was an overall decline in fecal corticoid concentrations during the artificial migration. Acute stressors, such as capture, restraint, and severe storms, were associated with stress responses by the cranes that varied in accordance with lasting physical or psychological stimuli. The overall reintroduction process of costume-rearing, ultralight aircraft habituation, training, and artificial migration was not associated with elevations in fecal corticoid concentrations suggestive of chronic stress.

  20. Development and characterization of 32 microsatellite loci in Genipa americana (Rubiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Manoel, Ricardo O.; Freitas, Miguel L. M.; Barreto, Mariana A.; Moraes, Mário L. T.; Souza, Anete P.; Sebbenn, Alexandre M.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the tree species Genipa americana (Rubiaceae) for further population genetic studies. • Methods and Results: We identified 144 clones containing 65 repeat motifs from a genomic library enriched for (CT)8 and (GT)8 motifs. Primer pairs were developed for 32 microsatellite loci and validated in 40 individuals of two natural G. americana populations. Seventeen loci were polymorphic, revealing from three to seven alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.24 to 1.00 and from 0.22 to 0.78, respectively. • Conclusions: The 17 primers identified as polymorphic loci are suitable to study the genetic diversity and structure, mating system, and gene flow in G. americana. PMID:25202610

  1. Morphology and three-dimensional reconstruction of the digestive system of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Bao, Ying; Ran, Pi-Xin; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) model of the digestive system of Periplaneta americana was built for the first time based on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, the study of multiple cross-sections of the larval cockroach, and 3-D reconstruction technology. The digestive system of P. americana includes the foregut, midgut, and hindgut and takes up most of the celom. The foregut comprises almost one half of the digestive system (43.57%). The midgut, the critical region for digestion and absorption, has the second highest volume ratio (35.21%). The hindgut, with the lowest volume ratio (21.22%), includes the ileum, colon, and rectum. After the ileal valve is the colon. The 3-D model presented in this paper provides a stereoscopic view for studying the adjacent relationship and arrangement of different gut sections of P. americana.

  2. Antiedematogenic effects of the polar fractions of Persea cordata Mez. (Lauraceae) on microvascular extravasation in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Schlemper, Valfredo; Schlemper, Susana Regina de Mello; Zampirolo, Júlio Araújo

    2013-10-28

    Persea cordata Mez. (Lauraceae) is a medicinal plant used in veterinary ethnopharmacology, which is a popular medicine used as an anti-inflammatory and healing agent, mainly on animal skin diseases, characterized by cutaneous open wounds, in South Brazil. The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible antiedematogenic effect of ethyl acetate (EtAc) and butanol (BuOH) polar fractions of Persea cordata on Evans blue dye leakage induced by pro-inflammatory agents in rat skin. Male Wistar rats (180-200 g, n=5-6) were pretreated with a single intraperitoneal administration of EtAc or BuOH (1 to 600 mg kg(-1)) fractions followed by intravenous Evans blue dye injection (1%, 30 mg kg(-1), i.v.), 60 min before the injection of phlogistic agents. Animals received intradermal injections (0.05 ml) of carrageenan (CAR, 300 µg/site), 48/80 compound (C4880, 10 µg/site), histamine (HIS, 0.3 µg/site), serotonin (5-HT, 0.01 µg/site), dextran (DEX, 200 µg/site), bradykinin (BK, 0.003 µg/site), capsaicin (CPS, 400 µg/site), substance P (SP, 0.003 µg/site) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 10 nmol/site) and they were submitted to euthanasia after 60 min. Skin samples were obtained in the extravasation sites of Evans blue dye. Skin fragments were soaked in formamide at 37°C (during 24h) for Evans blue extraction. The amount of dye leakage in the tissue fragment was determined by a spectrophotometer (620 nm). In a very similar manner in terms of potency and efficacy, systemic administration of EtAc and BuOH fractions caused dose-dependent inhibition of vascular Evans blue dye leakage induced by phlogistic agents in the rat skin. The results obtained (ID50 values in mgkg(-1) and maximal inhibition in %) with EtAc fraction, as follows were: CAR (34.42 and 63.0), 4880 (8.52 and 59.1), HIS (21.22 and 66.8), 5-HT (32.99 and 73.4), DEX (41.74 and 67.0), BK (34.03 and 68.0), CPS (100.7 and 77), SP (2.1 and 78.9) and PGE2 (133 and 71.0). BuOH fraction significantly inhibited CAR (25

  3. Initial evaluation of fruit of accessions of Persea schiedeana Nees for nutritional value, quality and oil extraction.

    PubMed

    López-Yerena, A; Guerra-Ramírez, D; Jácome-Rincón, J; Espinosa-Solares, T; Reyes-Trejo, B; Famiani, F; Cruz-Castillo, J G

    2018-04-15

    Persea schiedeana Nees is an underutilized and very little known species whose fruit is consumed in Mesoamerica where it grows wild. This study was carried out to evaluate: 1) the variability of fruit characteristics of different accessions; 2) the effects of centrifugation and microwave treatment on extracting oil from the fruit and on its qualitative characteristics; 3) the nutraceutical characteristics of the fruit and seeds of different accessions. The results showed a large variability in fruit size and oil/dry matter contents among the different accessions. There was a significant relationship between the dry matter and oil contents in the pulp. The combined use of centrifugation and microwave treatments gave high oil extraction yields (67-68%). The oils had good fatty acid composition and antioxidant capacity. The results gave an initial picture about the total phenol contents and antioxidant capacities in the seeds and in the different parts of the fruit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of rosmarinic acid as the major active constituent in Cordia americana.

    PubMed

    Geller, F; Schmidt, C; Göttert, M; Fronza, M; Schattel, V; Heinzmann, B; Werz, O; Flores, E M M; Merfort, I; Laufer, S

    2010-04-21

    Preparation from leaves of Cordia americana have been widely used in traditional medicine in South Brazil to treat wounds and various inflammations. The objective of this work was to identify the effective compounds in the ethanolic extract prepared from the leaves of Cordia americana, which is used in traditional South Brazilian medicine as anti-inflammatory and wound healing remedy. Isolation and structure elucidation techniques were performed in order to identify the compounds of Cordia americana and HPLC analysis was used for the quantification. The major constituent and the ethanolic extract were investigated for inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase, p38alpha MAPK, TNFalpha release and NF-kappaB as well as in the fibroblast scratch assay. Rosmarinic acid (1) was identified as the major compound with an amount of 8.44% in the ethanolic extract of the leaves of Cordia americana. The ethanolic extract as well as (1) exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on 5-lipoxygenase (IC(50)=0.69 and 0.97microg/mL, resp., IC50 of BWA4C as reference: 0.3microM) and p38alpha (IC50=3.25 and 1.16microg/mL, resp., IC50 of SB203580 as reference: 0.046microM) and moderate inhibitory effects on TNFalpha release. Slight effects were observed in the fibroblast scratch assay. This study increases our knowledge on the effective compound in Cordia americana and supports its use in traditional medicine. We demonstrated for the first time pharmacological effects of Cordia americana and we provide evidences for a crucial role of rosmarinic acid as the major key player. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrating transient heterogeneity of non-photochemical quenching in shade-grown heterobaric leaves of avocado (Persea americana L.): responses to CO2 concentration, stomatal occlusion, dehydration and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kotaro; King, Diana; Robinson, Sharon A; Osmond, Barry

    2013-11-01

    Long-lived shade leaves of avocado had extremely low rates of photosynthesis. Gas exchange measurements of photosynthesis were of limited use, so we resorted to Chl fluorescence imaging (CFI) and spot measurements to evaluate photosynthetic electron transport rates (ETRs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Imaging revealed a remarkable transient heterogeneity of NPQ during photosynthetic induction in these hypostomatous, heterobaric leaves, but was adequately integrated by spot measurements, despite long-lasting artifacts from repeated saturating flashes during assays. Major veins (mid-vein, first- and second-order veins) defined areas of more static large-scale heterogeneous NPQ, with more dynamic small-scale heterogeneity most strongly expressed in mesophyll cells between third- and fourth-order veins. Both responded to external CO2 concentration ([CO2]), occlusion of stomata with Vaseline™, leaf dehydration and relative humidity (RH). We interpreted these responses in terms of independent behavior of stomata in adjacent areoles that was largely expressed through CO2-limited photosynthesis. Heterogeneity was most pronounced and prolonged in the absence of net CO2 fixation in 100 p.p.m. [CO2] when respiratory and photorespiratory CO2 cycling constrained the inferred ETR to ~75% of values in 400 or 700 p.p.m. [CO2]. Likewise, sustained higher NPQ under Vaseline™, after dehydration or at low RH, also restricted ETR to ~75% of control values. Low NPQ in chloroplast-containing cells adjacent to major veins but remote from stomata suggested internal sources of high [CO2] in these tissues.

  6. Methyl de-esterification as a major factor regulating the extent of pectin depolymerization during fruit ripening: a comparison of the action of avocado (Persea americana) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) polygalacturonases.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki; Huber, Donald J

    2003-06-01

    Pectinmethylesterase (PME, EC 3.2.1.11) and polygalacturonase (PG, EC 3.2.1.15) are known to operate in tandem to degrade methylesterified polyuronides. In this study, PGs purified from tomato and avocado fruit were compared in terms of their capacity to hydrolyze water-soluble polyuronides from avocado before and following enzymic or chemical de-esterification. When assayed using polygalacturonic acid or polyuronides from avocado fruit, the activity of PG from tomato fruit was 3-4 times higher than that from avocado fruit. High molecular mass, low methylesterified (33%) water-soluble polyuronides (WSP) from pre-ripe avocado fruit (day 0) were partially depolymerized upon incubation with purified avocado and tomato PGs. In contrast, middle molecular mass, highly methylesterified (74%) WSP from day 2 fruit were largely resistant to the action of both PGs. PME or weak alkali treatment of highly methylesterified WSP decreased the methylesterification values to 11 and 4.5%, respectively. Treatment of de-esterified WSP with either avocado or tomato PGs caused extensive molecular mass downshifts, paralleling those observed during avocado fruit ripening. Although PME and PG are found in many fruits, the pattern of depolymerization of native polyuronides indicates that the degree of cooperativity between these enzymes in vivo differs dramatically among fruits. The contribution of PME to patterns of polyuronide depolymerization observed during ripening compared with physically compromised fruit tissues is discussed.

  7. The modulating effect of Persea americana fruit extract on the level of expression of fatty acid synthase complex, lipoprotein lipase, fibroblast growth factor-21 and leptin--A biochemical study in rats subjected to experimental hyperlipidemia and obesity.

    PubMed

    Monika, Padmanabhan; Geetha, Arumugam

    2015-09-15

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder which is closely associated with hyperlipidemia. Avocados are edible fruits traditionally consumed for various health benefits including body weight reduction. To determine the hypolipidemic and anti-obesity effect of hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of avocado (HFEA) in rats fed with high fat diet (HFD). Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 rats were fed with normal diet. Groups 3 and 4 rats were fed with HFD for 14 weeks. In addition, Groups 2 and 4 rats were co-administered with 100 mg/kg body weight of HFEA from 3rd week onwards. The HFEA was subjected to HPLC to quantify the major phytonutrients. Body mass index (BMI), adiposity index (ADI), total fat pad mass (TFP), blood lipid levels were determined in all the groups of rats. The mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and leptin was also assessed. HFEA was found to contain flavonoids: rutin-141.79, quercetin-5.25, luteolin-165, phenolic compounds: gallic acid-198.57, ellagic acid-238.22, vanillic acid-4.79 and phytosterols: betasitosterol-70, stigmasterol-12.5 (mg/100 g). HFEA reduced BMI, ADI, TFP, blood cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL in rats fed with HFD. Serum leptin was found reduced in HFEA co-administered rats. The mRNA expression of FASN, LPL, and leptin in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue was found to be significantly reduced in HFEA co-administered rats. The gene expression of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) was found to be significantly increased in HFEA treated rats when compared to HFD control rats. The hypolipidemic effect of HFEA may be partly due to its modulating effect on endogenous fat synthesis and adiponectin formation through the transcription factor FGF21. The results also show that avocado fruit extract has profound influence on leptin activity, which controls satiety and hunger to regulate the food intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Soboliphyme baturini infection does not affect the nutritional condition of American marten (Martes americana) in Alaska

    Treesearch

    J.G. Thomas; J.N. Pauli; E. Donaldio; S.W. Buskirk

    2008-01-01

    Soboliphyme baturini, a stomach-dwelling nematode of American martens (Martes americana). reaches high levels of infection; however, its effects on the nutritional condition of the host are unknown. To understand the effects of this parasite on American martens, we collected S. baturini and measured abdominal fat...

  9. White ash (Fraxinus americana) decline and mortality: the role of site nutrition and stress history

    Treesearch

    Alejandro A. Royo; Kathleen S. Knight

    2012-01-01

    Over the past century, white ash (Fraxinus americana) populations throughout its range have deteriorated as a result of declining tree health and increased mortality rates. Although co-occurring factors including site nutritional deficiencies and punctuated stress events (e.g., defoliations, drought) are hypothesized to trigger white ash decline,...

  10. In-situ genetic conservation of white ash (Fraxinus americana) at the Allegheny national forest

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Flower; Elijah Aubihl; Jeremie Fant; Stephen Forry; Andrea Hille; Kathleen S. Knight; William K. Oldland; Alejandro A. Royo; Richard M. Turcotte

    2017-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) is a non-native forest pest that has been sweeping across North America causing widespread mortality of trees in the genus Fraxinus, which includes the economically valuable white ash (F. americana). The rapid spread and lethality of EAB, paired with low levels of natural...

  11. Diets of sympatric populations of American martens (Martes americana) and fishers (Martes pennanti) in California

    Treesearch

    William J. Zielinski; Neil P. Duncan

    2004-01-01

    American martens (Martes americana) and fishers (M. pennanti) occur together in mixed-conifer forests of the southern Sierra Nevada. We studied their diets in the area of sympatry by examining their feces and comparing diet diversity and overlap. Diets of both species were more diverse than previously reported in North America...

  12. Winter home-range characteristics of American Marten (Martes americana) in Northern Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Joseph B. Dumyahn; Patrick A. Zollner

    2007-01-01

    We estimated home-range size for American marten (Martes americana) in northern Wisconsin during the winter months of 2001-2004, and compared the proportion of cover-type selection categories (highly used, neutral and avoided) among home-ranges (95% fixed-kernel), core areas (50% fixed-kernel) and the study area. Average winter homerange size was 3....

  13. Multi scale habitat relationships of Martes americana in northern Idaho, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    Tzeidle N. Wasserman; Samuel A. Cushman; David O. Wallin; Jim Hayden

    2012-01-01

    We used bivariate scaling and logistic regression to investigate multiple-scale habitat selection by American marten (Martes americana). Bivariate scaling reveals dramatic differences in the apparent nature and strength of relationships between marten occupancy and a number of habitat variables across a range of spatial scales. These differences include reversals in...

  14. Evaluation of phenotypic variation in a collection of Apios americana: an edible tuberous legume

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apios americana, sometimes called “potato bean,” is native to the central and eastern parts of the United States and southeastern Canada. Apios is a nitrogen-fixing legume with a vining habit that produces protein rich tubers at nodes along below-ground stolons originating from a “mother tuber.” A b...

  15. Effects of inoculation timing on symptom development in Ulmus americana L.

    Treesearch

    Garrett L. Beier; Benjamin W. Held; Chad P. Giblin; Robert A. Blanchette

    2017-01-01

    Field inoculation trials are an important component of screening American elms (Ulmus americana) for levels of resistance to Dutch elm disease. A major concern in screening is variability in disease ratings from year to year. Previous studies have demonstrated that timing of inoculation can have a significant impact on disease susceptibility. In...

  16. Interbreeding among deeply divergent mitochondrial lineages in the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Beeren, Christoph; Stoeckle, Mark Y.; Xia, Joyce; Burke, Griffin; Kronauer, Daniel J. C.

    2015-02-01

    DNA barcoding promises to be a useful tool to identify pest species assuming adequate representation of genetic variants in a reference library. Here we examined mitochondrial DNA barcodes in a global urban pest, the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana). Our sampling effort generated 284 cockroach specimens, most from New York City, plus 15 additional U.S. states and six other countries, enabling the first large-scale survey of P. americana barcode variation. Periplaneta americana barcode sequences (n = 247, including 24 GenBank records) formed a monophyletic lineage separate from other Periplaneta species. We found three distinct P. americana haplogroups with relatively small differences within (<=0.6%) and larger differences among groups (2.4%-4.7%). This could be interpreted as indicative of multiple cryptic species. However, nuclear DNA sequences (n = 77 specimens) revealed extensive gene flow among mitochondrial haplogroups, confirming a single species. This unusual genetic pattern likely reflects multiple introductions from genetically divergent source populations, followed by interbreeding in the invasive range. Our findings highlight the need for comprehensive reference databases in DNA barcoding studies, especially when dealing with invasive populations that might be derived from multiple genetically distinct source populations.

  17. Occurrence of Internal Stipe Necrosis of Cultivated Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) Caused by Ewingella americana in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jhune, Chang-Sung; Cheong, Jong-Chun; Yun, Hyung-Sik; Cho, Weon-Dae

    2009-01-01

    The internal stipe necrosis of cultivated mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) is caused by the bacterium Ewingella americana, a species of the Enterobacteriaceae. Recently, Ewingella americana was isolated from cultivated white button mushrooms in Korea evidencing symptoms of internal stipe browning. Its symptoms are visible only at harvest, and appear as a variable browning reaction in the center of the stipes. From these lesions, we isolated one bacterial strain (designated CH4). Inoculation of the bacterial isolate into mushroom sporocarps yielded the characteristic browning symptoms that were distinguishable from those of the bacterial soft rot that is well known to mushroom growers. The results of Gram stain, flagellal staining, and biochemical tests identified these isolates as E. americana. This was verified by pathogenicity, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and the results of an analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and the fatty acids profile. This is the first report of the isolation of E. americana from cultivated white button mushrooms in Korea. PMID:23983509

  18. Genomics-assisted characterization of a breeding collection of Apios americana, an edible tuberous legume

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For species with potential as new crops, rapid improvement may be facilitated by new genomic methods. Apios (Apios americana Medik.), once a staple food source of Native American Indians, produces protein-rich tubers, tolerates a wide range of soils, and symbiotically fixes nitrogen. We report the f...

  19. Foot-and-Mouth Disease in a small sample of experimentally infected pronghorn (Antilocapra americana)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is limited information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in North American wildlife, and none concerning pronghorn (Antilocapra americana). In this experimental study, we compared the susceptibility of pronghorn to FMD virus (FMDV) strain O, with that of ...

  20. Characterizing the molecular variation among American marten (Martes americana) subspecies from Oregon and California

    Treesearch

    Keith M. Slauson; Bill Zielinski; Karen D. Stone

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the subspecific identity of a rediscovered population of American martens within the range of a presumed extinct subspecies (Martes americana humboldtensis) by comparing mitochondrial DNA sequence diversity from contemporary individuals within the described ranges of M. a. humboldtensis, nearby ranges of

  1. Developmental ecdysteroid titers and DNA puffs in larvae of two sciarid species, Rhynchosciara americana and Rhynchosciara milleri (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Soares, M A M; Hartfelder, K; Tesserolli de Souza, J M; Stocker, A J

    2015-10-01

    Ecdysteroid titers, developmental landmarks and the presence of prominent amplifying regions (DNA puffs) have been compared during late larval to pupal development in four groups of Rhynchosciara americana larvae and in R. americana and Rhynchosciara milleri. Three prominent DNA puffs (B2, C3 and C8) expand and regress sequentially on the rising phase of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) titer in R. americana as a firm, cellular cocoon is being constructed. A sharp rise in 20E coincides with the regression of these puffs. The shape of the 20E curve is similar in R. milleri, a species that does not construct a massive cocoon, but the behavior of certain DNA puffs and their temporal relationship to the curve differs. Regions corresponding to B2 and C3 can be identified in R. milleri by banding pattern similarity with R. americana chromosomes and, in the case of B2, by hybridization to an R. americana probe. A B2 puff appears in R. milleri as the 20E titer rises but remains small in all gland regions. A puff similar to the R. americana C3 puff occurs in posterior gland cells of R. milleri (C3(Rm)) after the B2 puff, but this site did not hybridize to R. americana C3 probes. C3(Rm) incorporated (3)H-thymidine above background, but showed less post-puff DNA accumulation than C3 of R. americana. R. americana C8 probes hybridized to a more distal region of the R. milleri C chromosome that did not appear to amplify or form a large puff. These differences can be related to developmental differences, in particular differences in cocoon construction between the two species.

  2. Evaluation of Piper aduncum Linn. Essential Oil (Fam:Piperaceae) against Periplaneta americana (L.).

    PubMed

    Ling A, I; Sulaiman, S; Othman, H

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of Piper aduncum essential oil was evaluated against Periplaneta americana adults and nymphs in the laboratory. The plant essential oil at varying concentrations ranging between 10,000 to 80,000 ppm were placed inside glass beakers, rolled horizontally to ensure the essential oil covers all sides of the beakers and exposed to adults and nymphs of P. americana. Resigen (R) 1ppm was used as positive control and distilled water as negative control. The LT50 and LT90 was obtained using Log Probit programme. Exposure of essential oil to females P. americana at concentrations between 10,000 to 80,000 ppm indicated the LT50 and LT90 values between 5.31 h-189.19 h and 14.90 h-2105.31 h, respectively. Treatment with the same concentrations against males P. americana ,the LT50 and LT90 were 2.08 h-181.73 h and 5.4 h-8460.51 h, respectively. Treatment against the nymphal stage with the same range of concentrations indicated the LT50 and LT 90 of 4.68 h-381.02 h and 28.71 h-5313.36 h, respectively.The nymphs and males were more susceptible than the females cockroaches. Treatment with Resigen (R) at 1ppm indicated much lower LT 50 and LT 90 values of 2.54 h-9.47 h for the females, 1.47 h-4.22 h for the males and 4.69 h-8.92 h for the nymphs.The negative control indicated no mortality for all stages of the cockroach. Piper aduncum essential oil can be used as an alternative natural product for controlling the cockroach Peripatetic americana.

  3. Evaluation of Piper aduncum Linn. Essential Oil (Fam:Piperaceae) against Periplaneta americana (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ling A, I; Sulaiman, S; Othman, H

    2009-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of Piper aduncum essential oil was evaluated against Periplaneta americana adults and nymphs in the laboratory. Methods: The plant essential oil at varying concentrations ranging between 10,000 to 80,000 ppm were placed inside glass beakers, rolled horizontally to ensure the essential oil covers all sides of the beakers and exposed to adults and nymphs of P. americana. Resigen (R) 1ppm was used as positive control and distilled water as negative control. The LT50 and LT90 was obtained using Log Probit programme. Results: Exposure of essential oil to females P. americana at concentrations between 10,000 to 80,000 ppm indicated the LT50 and LT90 values between 5.31 h–189.19 h and 14.90 h–2105.31 h, respectively. Treatment with the same concentrations against males P. americana ,the LT50 and LT90 were 2.08 h–181.73 h and 5.4 h–8460.51 h, respectively. Treatment against the nymphal stage with the same range of concentrations indicated the LT50 and LT 90 of 4.68 h–381.02 h and 28.71 h–5313.36 h, respectively.The nymphs and males were more susceptible than the females cockroaches. Treatment with Resigen (R) at 1ppm indicated much lower LT 50 and LT 90 values of 2.54 h–9.47 h for the females, 1.47 h–4.22 h for the males and 4.69 h–8.92 h for the nymphs.The negative control indicated no mortality for all stages of the cockroach. Conclusion: Piper aduncum essential oil can be used as an alternative natural product for controlling the cockroach Peripatetic americana. PMID:22808375

  4. Hypoxylon sp., an endophyte of Persea indica, producing 1,8-cineole and other bioactive volatiles with fuel potential.

    PubMed

    Tomsheck, Angela R; Strobel, Gary A; Booth, Eric; Geary, Brad; Spakowicz, Dan; Knighton, Berk; Floerchinger, Cody; Sears, Joe; Liarzi, Orna; Ezra, David

    2010-11-01

    An endophytic fungus of Persea indica was identified, on the basis of its anamorphic stage, as Nodulosporium sp. by SEM. Partial sequence analysis of ITS rDNA revealed the identity of the teleomorphic stage of the fungus as Hypoxylon sp. It produces an impressive spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), most notably 1,8-cineole, 1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene, and tentatively identified (+)-.alpha.-methylene-.alpha.-fenchocamphorone, among many others, most of which are unidentified. Six-day-old cultures of Hypoxylon sp. displayed maximal VOC-antimicrobial activity against Botrytis cinerea, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Cercospora beticola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum suggesting that the VOCs may play some role in the biology of the fungus and its survival in its host plant. Media containing starch- or sugar-related substrates best supported VOC production by the fungus. Direct on-line quantification of VOCs was measured by proton transfer mass spectrometry covering a continuous range with optimum VOC production occurred at 6 days at 145 ppmv with a rate of production of 7.65 ppmv/h. This report unequivocally demonstrates that 1,8-cineole (a monoterpene) is produced by a microorganism, which represents a novel and important source of this compound. This monoterpene is an octane derivative and has potential use as a fuel additive as do the other VOCs of this organism. Thus, fungal sourcing of this compound and other VOCs as produced by Hypoxylon sp. greatly expands their potential applications in medicine, industry, and energy production.

  5. Applications of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium longum with Eleutherine americana in fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice.

    PubMed

    Phoem, Atchara N; Chanthachum, Suphitchaya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2015-04-03

    Bifidobacterium longum was microencapsulated by extrusion technique and added in fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice. Microencapsulation of B. longum with Eleutherine americana extract, oligosaccharides extract, and commercial fructo-oligosaccharides was assessed for the bacterial survival after sequential exposure to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, and refrigeration storage. Microencapsulated B. longum with the extract and oligosaccharides extract in the food products showed better survival than free cells under adverse conditions. Sensory analysis demonstrated that the products containing co-encapsulated bacterial cells were more acceptable by consumers than free cells. Pineapple juice prepared with co-encapsulated cells had lower values for over acidification, compared with the juice with free cells added. This work suggested that microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana could enhance functional properties of fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice.

  6. Applications of Microencapsulated Bifidobacterium Longum with Eleutherine Americana in Fresh Milk Tofu and Pineapple Juice

    PubMed Central

    Phoem, Atchara N.; Chanthachum, Suphitchaya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P.

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum was microencapsulated by extrusion technique and added in fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice. Microencapsulation of B. longum with Eleutherine americana extract, oligosaccharides extract, and commercial fructo-oligosaccharides was assessed for the bacterial survival after sequential exposure to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, and refrigeration storage. Microencapsulated B. longum with the extract and oligosaccharides extract in the food products showed better survival than free cells under adverse conditions. Sensory analysis demonstrated that the products containing co-encapsulated bacterial cells were more acceptable by consumers than free cells. Pineapple juice prepared with co-encapsulated cells had lower values for over acidification, compared with the juice with free cells added. This work suggested that microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana could enhance functional properties of fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice. PMID:25854832

  7. Survey for blood parasites in redheads (Aythya americana) wintering at the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Michot, T C; Garvin, M C; Weidner, E H

    1995-01-01

    We detected no infections with species of Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Sarcocystis or Trypanosoma in blood smears, liver and spleen impressions, and muscle tissue from 136 redheads (Aythya americana) collected or captured at the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana (USA), during three winters (1987 to 1990). One bird, a juvenile male, was infected with an unidentified species of microfilaria. Thus, we found no evidence that hematozoa had an effect on redheads during the course of the study.

  8. White ash (Fraxinus americana L.) survival and growth in unmanaged upland forests

    Treesearch

    Jeffery S. Ward

    1997-01-01

    Crown class and diameter of 704 white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) > 0.5 inches dbh have been monitored at 10-yr intervals since 1927. Nominal stand age was 25 years in 1927. Although the density of white ash in the upper canopy declined from 14/acre to 3/acre between stand ages 25 through 85, the proportion of the upper canopy comprised by white...

  9. The distribution of Vallisneria americana seeds and seedling light requirements in the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimber, A.; Korschgen, C.E.; Van Der Valk, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    Vallisneria americana declined in backwaters of the Upper Mississippi River, U.S.A., after a drought in 1988. To determine whether viable seeds of V. americana occurred in the seed bank of navigation pool 7, Lake Onalaska, the upper 5 cm of sediment was collected from 103 sites in May 1990. These sediment samples were kept in pots at a depth of 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 m in an outdoor pond for 12 weeks. Vallisneria americana seeds germinated from sites throughout the lake, and some seedlings produced overwintering buds by the end of the study. Seeds, spores, or fragments of 12 other species of aquatic plants also germinated. Seed germination trials with fresh and stored seeds in both greenhouse and ponds in which light availability was reduced with shade cloths indicated that seed germination was insensitive to light level. To determine the tight requirements for seedling survival and bud production, sediment from Lake Onalaska was incubated in ponds under neutral density shade screens reducing light to 2, 5, 9, and 25% of full sun. Seeds germinated under all shade treatments but survival was significantly higher in the 9 and 25% light treatments, and bud production was restricted to these light levels.

  10. Simple Y-autosomal incompatibilities cause hybrid male sterility in reciprocal crosses between Drosophila virilis and D. americana.

    PubMed

    Sweigart, Andrea L

    2010-03-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation evolves when hybrid incompatibilities accumulate between diverging populations. Here, I examine the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility between two species of Drosophila, Drosophila virilis and D. americana. From these analyses, I reach several conclusions. First, neither species carries any autosomal dominant hybrid male sterility alleles: reciprocal F(1) hybrid males are perfectly fertile. Second, later generation (backcross and F(2)) hybrid male sterility between D. virilis and D. americana is not polygenic. In fact, I identified only three genetically independent incompatibilities that cause hybrid male sterility. Remarkably, each of these incompatibilities involves the Y chromosome. In one direction of the cross, the D. americana Y is incompatible with recessive D. virilis alleles at loci on chromosomes 2 and 5. In the other direction, the D. virilis Y chromosome causes hybrid male sterility in combination with recessive D. americana alleles at a single QTL on chromosome 5. Finally, in contrast with findings from other Drosophila species pairs, the X chromosome has only a modest effect on hybrid male sterility between D. virilis and D. americana.

  11. Simple Y-Autosomal Incompatibilities Cause Hybrid Male Sterility in Reciprocal Crosses Between Drosophila virilis and D. americana

    PubMed Central

    Sweigart, Andrea L.

    2010-01-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation evolves when hybrid incompatibilities accumulate between diverging populations. Here, I examine the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility between two species of Drosophila, Drosophila virilis and D. americana. From these analyses, I reach several conclusions. First, neither species carries any autosomal dominant hybrid male sterility alleles: reciprocal F1 hybrid males are perfectly fertile. Second, later generation (backcross and F2) hybrid male sterility between D. virilis and D. americana is not polygenic. In fact, I identified only three genetically independent incompatibilities that cause hybrid male sterility. Remarkably, each of these incompatibilities involves the Y chromosome. In one direction of the cross, the D. americana Y is incompatible with recessive D. virilis alleles at loci on chromosomes 2 and 5. In the other direction, the D. virilis Y chromosome causes hybrid male sterility in combination with recessive D. americana alleles at a single QTL on chromosome 5. Finally, in contrast with findings from other Drosophila species pairs, the X chromosome has only a modest effect on hybrid male sterility between D. virilis and D. americana. PMID:20048051

  12. Accumulation and fractionation of rare earth elements (REEs) in the naturally grown Phytolacca americana L. in southern China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Liu, Chang; Liu, Wen-Shen; Guo, Mei-Na; Morel, Jean Louis; Huot, Hermine; Yu, Hong-Jie; Tang, Ye-Tao; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2018-04-16

    The widespread use of rare earth elements (REEs) has resulted in problems for soil and human health. Phytolacca americana L. is a herbaceous plant widely distributed in Dingnan county of Jiangxi province, China, which is a REE mining region (ion absorption rare earth mine) and the soil has high levels of REEs. An investigation of REE content of P. americana growing naturally in Dingnan county was conducted. REE concentrations in the roots, stems, and leaves of P. americana and in their rhizospheric soils were determined. Results showed that plant REEs concentrations varied among the sampling sites and can reach 1040 mg/kg in the leaves. Plant REEs concentrations decreased in the order of leaf > root > stem and all tissues were characterized by a light REE enrichment and a heavy REE depletion. However, P. americana exhibited preferential accumulation of light REEs during the absorption process (from soil to root) and preferential accumulation of heavy REEs during the translocation process (from stem to leaf). The ability of P. americana to accumulate high REEs in the shoot makes it a potential candidate for understanding the absorption mechanisms of REEs and for the phytoremediation of REEs contaminated soil.

  13. Allergenicity of native/recombinant tropomyosin, per a 7, of American cockroach (CR), Periplaneta americana, among CR allergic Thais.

    PubMed

    Sookrung, Nitat; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee; Bunnag, Chaweewan; Tantilipikorn, Pongsakorn; Kwangsri, Sukanya; Chaicump, Wanpen

    2009-03-01

    In this study, native tropomyosin (Per a 7) of American cockroach (CR), Periplaneta americana, caught in Thailand was purified. Also, gene sequence encoding full length tropomyosin of the CR was PCR amplified by using degenerate primers designed from gene sequences coding for P. americana tropomyosin of the database (Per a 7.0101 and Per a 7.0102; accession no.Y14854 and AF106961, respectively). Amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence encoding P. americana tropomyosin of this study (GenBank accession no. FJ976895) had 98.59% identity with the sequences of Per a 7.0101 and Per a 7.0102 and was 97.18% identical to the Bla g 7 sequence of German cockroach, Blatella germanica (accession no. AF260897). The native and recombinant tropomyosins (approximately 34 kDa) were used as antigens in sandwich ELISA for detecting specific IgE in serum samples of 14 consented allergic patients who were positive by skin test to crude CR extract in comparison to 5 individuals who were skin test negative. It was found that 8 (57%) and 6 (43%) of the CR allergic patients gave positive IgE binding results to the native and the recombinant proteins, respectively, while none of the non-allergic counterparts was positive. Results of immunoblotting conformed to the ELISA results. Tropomyosin extracted from the P. americana caught in Thailand has potential as standard P. americana allergen in clinical monitoring of the allergic Thai patients.

  14. Identification of a serine protease as a major allergen (Per a 10) of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Sudha, V T; Arora, N; Gaur, S N; Pasha, S; Singh, B P

    2008-06-01

    Cockroach allergens are associated with the development of asthma, but none of these has been characterized for proteolytic activity. This study was undertaken to isolate and characterize a protease from Periplaneta americana and determine its allergenicity. A serine protease was isolated from P. americana extract using benzamidine sepharose column and characterized by immunobiochemical methods. Allergenicity of the protease was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, intradermal testing, histamine release and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) proliferation. Affinity purified protein of approximately 28 kDa (Per a 10) showed a single band of activity in gelatin zymogram and agarose plate assay. N-terminal sequence (IVGGRPAQI) revealed similarity with mite serine protease allergens and insect trypsins. It demonstrated proteolytic activity with azocollagen > gelatin > defatted-milk > casein including serine protease specific substrate, N-benzoyl-arginine-ethyl-ester-hydrochloride. It was inhibited by serine protease inhibitors, namely aprotinin > pefabloc > AEBSF > PMSF > benzamidine > antipain > leupeptin and trypsin-specific inhibitor (tosyl-lysyl-chloromethyl-ketone) suggesting it to be a trypsin-like serine protease. Per a 10 was recognized as a major allergen, showing IgE reactivity with >80% of cockroach sensitized patients by skin tests and immunoblot. It could induce significant histamine release (P < 0.05) in blood and secretion of interleukin-4 (IL-4) (P < 0.05) and IL-5 (P < 0.05) in culture supernatant of PBMCs from cockroach hypersensitive patients, suggesting a strong allergenic potency. A serine protease isolated from P. americana was demonstrated to be a major allergen (Per a 10). It has a potential for component-based diagnosis of allergy and will be useful in elucidating the mechanism of allergy.

  15. Technical approaches of a natural dye extracted from Phytolacca americana L.-berries with chemical mordants.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Youn; Jung, Suk-Yul

    2014-01-01

    Phytolacca americana L. is a large semi-succulent herbaceous plant which reaches three meters in height. It is native to eastern North America, the Midwest, and the Gulf Coast, with more scattered populations in the far West. It is imported into Korea and has been frequently used as a traditional natural drug for diseases such as systemic edema and nephritis. Its berries, that is, fruits are shiny dark purple held in racemous clusters on pink pedicels with a pink peduncle. They are round with a flat indented top and bottom. Immature berries are green, maturing into white and then blackish purple. It is not well known how the berries are used for a natural staining yet. In this study, using Phytolacca americana L.-berries, a natural staining was analyzed. Moreover, due to the broad use of chemical mordants, five different mordants including copper acetate, aluminum potassium sulfate, sodium tartrate plus citric acid, Iron II sulfate and potassium dichromate were combined. Extracted dye from the berries stained silk fabrics with ivory. The original purple color from the berries disappeared and transformed into ivory. Although the silk fabrics were differentially stained by the berries that were combined with mordants of aluminum potassium sulfate, sodium tartrate plus citric acid and potassium dichromate, only differences in lightness and darkness were observed. Interestingly, the combination of the dye from the berries with a mordant of copper acetate and Iron II sulfate induced the staining of the silk fabrics into khaki and dark khaki, respectively. This study is the first systemic report on staining silk fabrics with Phytolacca americana L.-berries and chemical mordants and suggests application of natural products to the fiber industry.

  16. Visual pigments, oil droplets, lens, and cornea characterization in the whooping crane (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Megan L.; Kingston, Alexandra C. N.; McCready, Robert; Cameron, Evan G.; Hofmann, Christopher M.; Suarez, Lauren; Olsen, Glenn H.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Robinson, Phyllis R.

    2014-01-01

    Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane, Grus americana (Gruiformes: Gruidae). G. americana (an endangered species) is one of only two North American crane species and represents a large, long-lived bird where ultraviolet sensitivity may be degraded by chromatic aberrations and entrance of ultraviolet light into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate if the ocular media (i.e., the lens and cornea) absorbs UV light. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (λmax) at 500 nm, while the cone visual pigments λmax values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2), and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cutoff wavelength (λcut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded from other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type), and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system, although based on the λmax of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm) may also have some ability for UV sensitivity.

  17. DNA extracellular traps are part of the immune repertoire of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, M T C; Silva, K P; Garcia, M C F; Medeiros, M N; Machado, E A; Nascimento, S B; Saraiva, E M

    2018-07-01

    Extracellular traps (ETs), web-like structures composed of DNA and histones, are released by innate immune cells in a wide range of organisms. ETs capture microorganisms, thereby avoiding their spread, and also concentrate antimicrobial molecules, which helps to kill microbes. Although vertebrate innate immune systems share homology with the insect immune system, ETosis have yet to be characterized in insects. Here, we report that the hemocytes of the hemimetabolous insect Periplaneta americana release ETs upon in vitro stimulation. We further discuss the relationship between ETs and nodulation and in controlling bacterial spread in vivo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mycotoxin-induced disease in captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Glenn H.; Carpenter, J.W.; Gee, G.F.; Thomas, N.J.; Dein, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    In 1987, an epizootic in cranes at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, USA, caused illness in 80% of 300 captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and death of 15 of these cranes. Gross pathology findings were inconclusive and consisted of dehydration, atrophy of fat, renal insufficiency, and small spleens. Extensive testing resulted in isolation of Fusarium sp. mold from constituents of the grain-based diet. Low levels of two mycotoxins, T2 (1-2 ppm) and deoxynivalenol (0.4 ppm), were isolated from the pelleted feed.

  19. Temperature preference of the white perch, Morone americana, collected in the Wicomico River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Hocutt, C.H.; Stauffer, J.R. Jr.

    1979-06-01

    Temperature preference tests were conducted on fresh water white perch (Morone americana), collected from the Wicomico River, Maryland. Collection temperature was 27/sup 0/C and acclimation temperatures used in temperature preference tests were 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 33/sup 0/C. The following methods were used to determine the final temperature preference:linear regression, quadratic equation, and eyeball plots. Recorded final temperature preference values were 28.9, 29.3, and 30.6/sup 0/C using each method respectively.

  20. Effect of certain entomopathogenic fungi on oxidative stress and mortality of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Abhilasha; Lone, Yaqoob; Wani, Owais; Gupta, U S

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports the effects of Metarhizium anisopliae, Isaria fumosoroseus and Hirsutella thompsonaii on Periplaneta americana. I. fumosoroseus and H. thompsonaii were cultured at 28±1°C on potato carrot agar and M. anisopliae was cultured at 28±1°C on potato dextrose agar for 14days. Conidial suspensions of fungi were given to cockroaches through different routes. M. anisopliae shows high virulence against adult cockroaches and mortality ranges from 38.65% to 78.36% after 48h. I. fumosoroseus and H. thompsonii show less virulence compared to M. anisopliae. We also investigated the effect of these three fungi on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, lipid peroxidation and catalase in different tissues of the insect to gain an understanding of the different target site. The result suggested that the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, catalase and level of malondialdehyde varies in different organs and through different routes of exposure. Based on mortality percentages, all tested fungi had high potentials for biocontrol agents against P. americana. Our study reveals for the first time that I. fumosoroseus and H. thompsonaii fungal infections initiate oxidative stress in the midgut, fat body, whole body and hemolymph of cockroach thereby suggesting them to be the target organs for oxidative damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Agave americana and Agave salmiana Ripeness on Saponin Content from Aguamiel (Agave Sap).

    PubMed

    Leal-Díaz, Ana María; Santos-Zea, Liliana; Martínez-Escobedo, Hilda Cecilia; Guajardo-Flores, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet Alejandra; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio Othón

    2015-04-22

    Steroidal saponins have shown beneficial health effects. Agave spp. leaves and rhizomes are sources of these compounds, but their presence has not been reported in the aguamiel. Aguamiel is the sweet edible sap from mature agave, and its quality is influenced by the plant ripening stage. The purpose of this research was to identify and quantitate saponins in aguamiel from Agave americana and Agave salmiana at two ripening stages. Saponins and sapogenins were identified with HPLC/ESI-MS/TOF and quantitated with HPLC/ELSD. Results proved the presence of saponins derived from kammogenin, manogenin, gentrogenin, and hecogenin. The saponin content in aguamiel from immature A. salmiana was 2-fold higher (478.3 protodioscin equivalents (PE) μg/g aguamiel (DM)) compared with A. americana (179.0 PE μg/g aguamiel (DM)). In both species, saponin content decreased when plants reached sexual maturity. This should be considered before evaluating the effects of Agave spp. as a source of bioactive saponins.

  2. Characterization of an Invertebrate-Type Dopamine Receptor of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Troppmann, Britta; Balfanz, Sabine; Krach, Christian; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA coding for a putative invertebrate-type dopamine receptor (Peadop2) from P. americana brain by using a PCR-based strategy. The mRNA is present in samples from brain and salivary glands. We analyzed the distribution of the PeaDOP2 receptor protein with specific affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies. On Western blots, PeaDOP2 was detected in protein samples from brain, subesophageal ganglion, thoracic ganglia, and salivary glands. In immunocytochemical experiments, we detected PeaDOP2 in neurons with their somata being located at the anterior edge of the medulla bilaterally innervating the optic lobes and projecting to the ventro-lateral protocerebrum. In order to determine the functional and pharmacological properties of the cloned receptor, we generated a cell line constitutively expressing PeaDOP2. Activation of PeaDOP2-expressing cells with dopamine induced an increase in intracellular cAMP. In contrast, a C-terminally truncated splice variant of this receptor did not exhibit any functional property by itself. The molecular and pharmacological characterization of the first dopamine receptor from P. americana provides the basis for forthcoming studies focusing on the significance of the dopaminergic system in cockroach behavior and physiology. PMID:24398985

  3. Characterization of an invertebrate-type dopamine receptor of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Troppmann, Britta; Balfanz, Sabine; Krach, Christian; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2014-01-06

    We have isolated a cDNA coding for a putative invertebrate-type dopamine receptor (Peadop2) from P. americana brain by using a PCR-based strategy. The mRNA is present in samples from brain and salivary glands. We analyzed the distribution of the PeaDOP2 receptor protein with specific affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies. On Western blots, PeaDOP2 was detected in protein samples from brain, subesophageal ganglion, thoracic ganglia, and salivary glands. In immunocytochemical experiments, we detected PeaDOP2 in neurons with their somata being located at the anterior edge of the medulla bilaterally innervating the optic lobes and projecting to the ventro-lateral protocerebrum. In order to determine the functional and pharmacological properties of the cloned receptor, we generated a cell line constitutively expressing PeaDOP2. Activation of PeaDOP2-expressing cells with dopamine induced an increase in intracellular cAMP. In contrast, a C-terminally truncated splice variant of this receptor did not exhibit any functional property by itself. The molecular and pharmacological characterization of the first dopamine receptor from P. americana provides the basis for forthcoming studies focusing on the significance of the dopaminergic system in cockroach behavior and physiology.

  4. Effect of increasing photon irradiance on the growth of Vallisneria americana in the tidal Potomac River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, V.; Rybicki, N.B.; Turtora, M.

    1996-01-01

    Following declines in submersed macrophyte populations in tidal ecosystems, revegetation of areas devoid of macrophytes may be sudden and rapid or may not occur for years. Declines of submersed macrophyte populations in the Chesapeake Bay and the tidal Potomac River have been attributed to insufficient light in the water column; however, the role of light in promoting revegetation has never been unequivocally documented. Photon irradiance was artificially increased for Vallisneria americana transplants in two unvegetated embayments in the otherwise vegetated freshwater tidal Potomac River: Pohick Bay and Belmont Bay. Pohick Bay had high nutrient concentrations and frequent algal blooms. Belmont Bay was broader and shallower than Pohick Bay with turbidity resulting from wind- driven resuspension of sediment. The total number of plants of V. americana in the lighted cages was 7.5 times higher than that in the unlighted cages at Pohick Bay and 11 times higher than that in the unlighted control cages in Belmont Bay. The biomass in the lighted cages was 11-fold higher in Belmont Bay and 38-fold higher in Pohick Bay than that in the control cages. Plants were less numerous and more robust in lighted cages in Pohick Bay than in Belmont Bay.

  5. Developing and testing a landscape habitat suitability model for the American marten (Martes americana) in the Cascades mountains of California

    Treesearch

    Thomas A. Kirk; William J. Zielinski

    2009-01-01

    We used field surveys and Geographic Information System data to identify landscape-scale habitat associations of American martens (Martes americana) and to develop a model to predict their occurrence in northeastern California. Systematic surveys using primarily enclosed track plates, with 10-km spacing, were conducted across a 27,700 km

  6. Simulating the effects of climate change on population connectivity of American marten (Martes americana) in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA

    Treesearch

    T. N. Wasserman; S. A. Cushman; A. S. Shirk; E. L. Landguth; J. S. Littell

    2012-01-01

    We utilize empirically derived estimates of landscape resistance to assess current landscape connectivity of American marten (Martes americana) in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA, and project how a warming climate may affect landscape resistance and population connectivity in the future. We evaluate the influences of five potential future temperature scenarios...

  7. Use of culture filtrates of Ceratocystis ulmi as a bioassay to screen for disease tolerant Ulmus americana

    Treesearch

    Paula M. Pijut; Subash C. Domir; R. Daniel Lineberger; Lawrence R. Schreiber

    1990-01-01

    Callus cultures of elm (Ulmus americana L.) derived from Dutch elm disease susceptible, intermediate-resistant, and resistant genotypes were exposed to the culture filtrates of three pathogenic isolates of Ceratocystis ulmi, the causal agent of Dutch elm disease. Callus fresh weights, cell viability, and reactions of stem cuttings...

  8. Characterization of a Polymicrobial Dermal Infection in a Peninsular Pronghorn ( Antilocapra americana peninsularis) in Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velez, Patricia; Romero, Lucía; Lopez-Tello, Jamvier; Callejas-Negrete, Olga A; Riquelme, Meritxell

    2018-04-01

      In situ conservation efforts are assisting the recovery of free-ranging populations of the endangered peninsular pronghorns ( Antilocapra americana peninsularis) at the Vizcaino Biosphere Reserve, Baja California Sur, Mexico. We detected a polymicrobial dermal infection. Etiologic agents were identified as a keratinophilic dermatomycete and opportunistic pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Callicarpenal and Intermedeol: Two Natural Arthropod Feeding Deterrent and Repellent Compounds Identified from the Southern Folk Remedy Plant, Callicarpa americana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In previous studies on the American beautyberry (Callicarpa americana), it was demonstrated that callicarpenal and intermedeol were responsible for the arthropod repellent and feeding deterrent activity of this folk remedy. Both compounds showed significant bite-deterring activity against Aedes aeg...

  10. Glycosylation and immunocytochemistry of binucleate cells in pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana, Antilocapridae) shows features of both Giraffidae and Bovidae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although the Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) resembles an antelope, its nearest relatives are the Giraffe and Okapi. In this study we have examined the placentae of 6 pronghorns using lectin histochemistry to identify any giraffid features. Results showed that the binucleate cell (BNC) of the pla...

  11. Secondary metabolite production by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf-5 confers protection against Naegleria americana in the wheat rhizosphere

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteria employ a variety of morphological and metabolic mechanisms to avoid protozoan predation. In Pseudomonas fluorescens strains SS101 and SBW25, cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) production served as a defense mechanism that limited predation by the amoeba-flagellate Naegleria americana, and secondary m...

  12. The Core Gut Microbiome of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana, Is Stable and Resilient to Dietary Shifts.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Kara A; Ottesen, Elizabeth A

    2016-11-15

    The omnivorous cockroach Periplaneta americana hosts a diverse hindgut microbiota encompassing hundreds of microbial species. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to examine the effect of diet on the composition of the P. americana hindgut microbial community. Results show that the hindgut microbiota of P. americana exhibit a highly stable core microbial community with low variance in compositions between individuals and minimal community change in response to dietary shifts. This core hindgut microbiome is shared between laboratory-hosted and wild-caught individuals, although wild-caught specimens exhibited a higher diversity of low-abundance microbes that were lost following extended cultivation under laboratory conditions. This taxonomic stability strongly contrasts with observations of the gut microbiota of mammals, which have been shown to be highly responsive to dietary change. A comparison of P. americana hindgut samples with human fecal samples indicated that the cockroach hindgut community exhibited higher alpha diversity but a substantially lower beta diversity than the human gut microbiome. This suggests that cockroaches have evolved unique mechanisms for establishing and maintaining a diverse and stable core microbiome. The gut microbiome plays an important role in the overall health of its host. A healthy gut microbiota typically assists with defense against pathogens and the digestion and absorption of nutrients from food, while dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been associated with reduced health. In this study, we examined the composition and stability of the gut microbiota from the omnivorous cockroach Periplaneta americana. We found that P. americana hosts a diverse core gut microbiome that remains stable after drastic long-term changes in diet. While other insects, notably ant and bee species, have evolved mechanisms for maintaining a stable association with specific gut microbiota, these insects typically host low-diversity gut

  13. Surgical removal of a tracheal foreign body from a whooping crane (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, P.E.; Dein, F.J.; Langenberg, J.A.; Frischmeyer, K.J.; Brunson, D.

    1991-01-01

    The left wing of a whooping crane (Grus americana) was amputated for treatment of severe nonunion and malunion fractures of the radius and ulna. During the postoperative convalescent period, the bird aspirated a corn kernel and subsequently suffered episodic bouts of dyspnea. The bird was anesthetized with tiletamine-zolazepam. Attempts to deliver the kernel through the glottis with endoscopic instruments were unsuccessful. The corn kernel was retrieved via a tracheotomy incision. Endoscopy of the trachea 2 mo postoperatively showed complete healing of the tracheal incision. Mucosal integrity had been reestablished, and tracheal lumen diameter was not compromised. The bird continues in good health 2.5 yr after surgery, shows no sign of respiratory disease, and currently is in a captive breeding program.

  14. Meat quality traits in the Greater rhea (Rhea americana) as influenced by muscle, sex and age.

    PubMed

    Bernad, L; Casado, P D; Murillo, N L; Picallo, A B; Garriz, C A; Maceira, N O

    2018-05-01

    Meat from the Greater rhea (Rhea americana) could compete with traditional red meats, diversifying the market of protein products of animal origin. The meat from 32 rheas was used to study quality aspects and this included ultimate pH (pHu), color, water-holding capacity (WHC%), cooking loss (CL%) and tenderness. The muscles sampled were the Gastrocnemius pars externa, Iliofibularis and Obturatorius medialis from both sexes at multiple ages (10, 12, 14, 16 months). Age at slaughter affected WHC%, CL%, and color in raw meat and tenderness in cooked meat. Muscles under study showed differences in terms of pHu, raw meat color, and tenderness of cooked meat. Sex did not have a significant effect on any of the variables studied. According to our results, rhea meat from younger animals, between 10 to 14 months old, was tender and moderately juicy and the visual color was appreciated by the consumers.

  15. On the use of microwave radar devices in chronobiology studies: an application with Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Vittorio; Renzi, Paolo

    2005-08-01

    Modified motion detectors can be used to monitor locomotor activity and measure endogenous rhythms. Although these devices can help monitor insects in their home cages, the small size of the animals requires a very short wavelength detector. We modified a commercial microwave-based detection device, connected the detector's output to the digital input of a computer, and validated the device by recording circadian and ultradian rhythms. Periplaneta americana were housed in individual cages, and their activity was monitored at 18 degrees C and subsequently at 28 degrees C in constant darkness. Time series were analyzed by a discrete Fourier transform and a chi-square periodogram. Q10 values and the circadian free-running period confirmed the data reported in the literature, validating the apparatus. Moreover, the spectral analysis and periodogram revealed the presence of ultradian rhythmicity in the range of 1-8 h.

  16. Niche evolution and thermal adaptation in the temperate species Drosophila americana.

    PubMed

    Sillero, N; Reis, M; Vieira, C P; Vieira, J; Morales-Hojas, R

    2014-08-01

    The study of ecological niche evolution is fundamental for understanding how the environment influences species' geographical distributions and their adaptation to divergent environments. Here, we present a study of the ecological niche, demographic history and thermal performance (locomotor activity, developmental time and fertility/viability) of the temperate species Drosophila americana and its two chromosomal forms. Temperature is the environmental factor that contributes most to the species' and chromosomal forms' ecological niches, although precipitation is also important in the model of the southern populations. The past distribution model of the species predicts a drastic reduction in the suitable area for the distribution of the species during the last glacial maximum (LGM), suggesting a strong bottleneck. However, DNA analyses did not detect a bottleneck signature during the LGM. These contrasting results could indicate that D. americana niche preference evolves with environmental change, and thus, there is no evidence to support niche conservatism in this species. Thermal performance experiments show no difference in the locomotor activity across a temperature range of 15 to 38 °C between flies from the north and the south of its distribution. However, we found significant differences in developmental time and fertility/viability between the two chromosomal forms at the model's optimal temperatures for the two forms. However, results do not indicate that they perform better for the traits studied here in their respective optimal niche temperatures. This suggests that behaviour plays an important role in thermoregulation, supporting the capacity of this species to adapt to different climatic conditions across its latitudinal distribution. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Structural analysis of fructans from Agave americana grown in South Africa for spirit production.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Neil; Cescutti, Paola; Hearshaw, Meredith A; Ramsout, Ronica; Rizzo, Roberto; Timme, Elizabeth M

    2009-05-27

    Fructans isolated from Agave americana grown in South Africa are currently used for spirit production. Structural studies on water-soluble fructans were performed to facilitate the development of other applications including its use as a prebiotic. Acid hydrolysis followed by HPAEC-PAD analysis confirmed that the fructan was composed of glucose and fructose, and size analysis by HPAEC-PAD and size exclusion chromatography indicated that the saccharides have a DP range from 6 to 50. An average DP of 14 was estimated by (1)H NMR analysis. Linkage analysis and ESI-MS studies suggest that A. americana has a neofructan structure consisting of a central sucrose to which (2 → 1)- and (2 → 6)-linked β-D-Fruf chains are attached. The (2 → 1)-linked units extend from C-1 of Fru and C-6 of glucose, whereas the (2 → 6)-linked β-D-Fruf units are attached to C-6 of the central Fru. This structure accounts for the presence of equimolar amounts of 1,6-linked Glu and 1,2,6-linked Fru found in linkage analysis and the multiplicity of the NMR signals observed. Detailed ESI-MS studies were performed on fructan fractions: native, periodate oxidized/reduced, and permethylated oligomers. These derivatizations introduced mass differences between Glc and Fru following oxidation and between 1,2-, 1,6-, 2,6-, and 1,2,6-linked units after methylation. Thus, ESI-MS showed the presence of a single Glc per fructan chain and that it is predominantly internal, rather than terminal as found in inulin. These structural features were confirmed by the use of 1D and 2D NMR experiments.

  18. Characterization of visual pigments, oil droplets, lens and cornea in the whooping crane Grus americana

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Megan L.; Kingston, Alexandra C. N.; McCready, Robert; Cameron, Evan G.; Hofmann, Christopher M.; Suarez, Lauren; Olsen, Glenn H.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Robinson, Phyllis R.

    2014-01-01

    Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane Grus americana (Gruiformes, Gruidae), which is one of only two North American crane species. It is a large, long-lived bird in which UV sensitivity might be reduced by chromatic aberration and entrance of UV radiation into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate whether the ocular media (i.e. the lens and cornea) absorb UV radiation. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (λmax) at 500 nm, whereas the cone visual pigment λmax values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2) and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cut-off wavelength (λcut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded in other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type) and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system; however, as a consequence of the λmax of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm), it might also have some UV sensitivity. PMID:25267845

  19. Evaluation of the ability of Eleutherine americana crude extract as natural food additive in cooked pork.

    PubMed

    Ifesan, B O T; Siripongvutikorn, S; Hutadilok-Towatana, N; Voravuthikunchai, S P

    2009-09-01

    The scavenging activities of crude ethanolic extract from Eleutherine americana, on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl free radicals were investigated. The results revealed that the extract produced IC(50) values of 8.4 microg/mL and 0.78 mg/mL on DPPH and hydroxyl free radicals, respectively. The total phenolic content of the extract was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and the crude extract yielded high phenolic content of 4.56 mumol gallic acid equivalent per milligram dried extract. The extract, at different concentrations, was incorporated into pork, cooked in the microwave, and stored at 4 degrees C for 9 d. The crude extract demonstrated antioxidant activity, which increases with increased extract concentrations and retarded lipid oxidation in the cooked pork. Antibacterial activity of the extract against Staphylococcus aureus in the cooked pork revealed that at a concentration of 10.8 mg/100 g, the extract reduced the bacterial population by 0.57 log compared to control at 9 d of storage. The sensory results revealed that the pork samples treated with the extract and the control sample were not significantly different from day 0 to 6; however, on day 9 the treatments were significantly scored higher than the control. Furthermore, addition of the extract led to an increase in the redness values of the pork and this was acceptable from the sensory point of view. E. americana crude extract could be a promising novel antioxidant to prevent lipid oxidation and a potential natural color enhancer of red meat and meat products.

  20. A new species of armored scale, Mycetaspis ailynaomi (Hemiptera, Diaspididae, Aspidiotinae), associated with Mammea americana L. (Malpighiales, Calophyllaceae) from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Dones, Ramón A.; Evans, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A new species of armored scale, Mycetaspis ailynaomi Dones and Evans is described and illustrated from specimens collected on mamey (Mammea americana) from Puerto Rico. A key to the species of Mycetaspis is provided. PMID:21852924

  1. Hepatoprotective and hypoglycemic effects of a tannin rich extract from Ximenia americana var. caffra root.

    PubMed

    Sobeh, Mansour; Mahmoud, Mona F; Abdelfattah, Mohamed A O; El-Beshbishy, Hesham A; El-Shazly, Assem M; Wink, Michael

    2017-09-15

    Liver diseases and diabetes are serious health disorders associated with oxidative stress and ageing. Some plant polyphenols can lower the risk of these diseases. We investigated the phytochemical profiling of a root extract from Ximenia americana var. caffra using HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS. The antioxidant activities in vitro were investigated. The hepatoprotective activities were studied in rat models with d-galactosamine (d-GaIN)-induced hepatotoxicity and the antidiabetic activities in STZ-diabetic rats were also investigated. HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS was used to identify plant phenolics. The antioxidant activities in vitro were determined using DPPH and FRAP assays. The in vivo hepatoprotective activities were determined for d-GaIN-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. We determined the liver markers alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), liver peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione content (GSH), albumin and total bilirubin concentration. The histopathological changes in rat liver were also studied. The antidiabetic activities were also investigated in STZ-diabetic rats and serum glucose, serum insulin hormone, and lipid peroxides were determined. The root extract is rich in tannins with 20 compounds including a series of stereoisomers of (epi)catechin, (epi)catechin-(epi)catechin, (epi)catechin-(epi)catechin-(epi)catechin, and their galloyl esters. Promising antioxidant potential was observed in vitro in DPPH assay with EC 50 of 6.5 µg extract / 26 µg raw material and in FRAP assay with 19.54 mM FeSO 4 compared with ascorbic acid (EC 50 of 2.92 µg/ml) and quercetin (FeSO 4 24.04 mM/mg), respectively. Significant reduction of serologic enzymatic markers and hepatic oxidative stress markers such as ALT, AST, MDA, GGT, and total bilirubin, as well as elevation of GSH and albumin were observed in rats with d-galactosamine-induced liver damage treated with the extract. These findings agree

  2. Antiviral effect of compounds derived from the seeds of Mammea americana and Tabernaemontana cymosa on Dengue and Chikungunya virus infections.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Calderón, Cecilia; Mesa-Castro, Carol; Robledo, Sara; Gómez, Sergio; Bolivar-Avila, Santiago; Diaz-Castillo, Fredyc; Martínez-Gutierrez, Marlen

    2017-01-18

    The transmission of Dengue virus (DENV) and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has increased worldwide, due in part to the lack of a specific antiviral treatment. For this reason, the search for compounds with antiviral potential, either as licensed drugs or in natural products, is a research priority. The objective of this study was to identify some of the compounds that are present in Mammea americana (M. americana) and Tabernaemontana cymosa (T. cymosa) plants and, subsequently, to evaluate their cytotoxicity in VERO cells and their potential antiviral effects on DENV and CHIKV infections in those same cells. Dry ethanolic extracts of M. americana and T. cymosa seeds were subjected to open column chromatographic fractionation, leading to the identification of four compounds: two coumarins, derived from M. americana; and lupeol acetate and voacangine derived from T. cymosa.. The cytotoxicity of each compound was subsequently assessed by the MTT method (at concentrations from 400 to 6.25 μg/mL). Pre- and post-treatment antiviral assays were performed at non-toxic concentrations; the resulting DENV inhibition was evaluated by Real-Time PCR, and the CHIKV inhibition was tested by the plating method. The results were analyzed by means of statistical analysis. The compounds showed low toxicity at concentrations ≤ 200 μg/mL. The compounds coumarin A and coumarin B, which are derived from the M. americana plant, significantly inhibited infection with both viruses during the implementation of the two experimental strategies employed here (post-treatment with inhibition percentages greater than 50%, p < 0.01; and pre-treatment with percentages of inhibition greater than 40%, p < 0.01). However, the lupeol acetate and voacangine compounds, which were derived from the T. cymosa plant, only significantly inhibited the DENV infection during the post-treatment strategy (at inhibition percentages greater than 70%, p < 0.01). In vitro, the coumarins are capable of

  3. Anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, as prey for white perch, Morone americana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J.R.; Mink, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    The reintroduction of anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, to their historic habitats in the inland waters of the United States and Canada, has prompted concerns about possible interactions with a popular sport fish, white perch, Morone americana. Both species are now widely distributed in northeastern North America. Diets of white perch in Lake George, Maine, U.S.A., where alewives were absent, were monitored and compared with those of white perch populations that were sympatric with anadromous alewives in two coastal Maine lakes, Biscay Pond and North Pond. In the presence of introduced alewives, the diet of adult white perch became almost exclusively juvenile alewives by late summer in ponds where both species were present. White perch that were sympatric with alewives were more piscivorus than were Lake George white perch, which primarily consumed Cladocera. Not only were alewives the principal prey item in the diet of white perch in Biscay and North ponds, but adult alewives were largely cannibalistic by August. Thus, success of reintroducing anadromous alewives in waters containing white perch may be negatively impacted by predation as well as cannibalism.

  4. Seasonal movements and multiscale habitat selection of Whooping Crane (Grus americana) in natural and agricultural wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pickens, Bradley A.; King, Sammy L.; Vasseur, Phillip L.; Zimorski, Sara E.; Selman, Will

    2017-01-01

    Eleven of 15 species of cranes (family: Gruidae) are considered vulnerable or endangered, and the increase of agriculture and aquaculture at the expense of natural wetlands and grasslands is a threat to Gruidae worldwide. A reintroduced population of Whooping Crane (Grus americana) was studied in coastal and agricultural wetlands of Louisiana and Texas, USA. The objectives were to compare Whooping Crane movements across seasons, quantify multiscale habitat selection, and identify seasonal shifts in selection. Whooping Cranes (n = 53) were tracked with satellite transmitters to estimate seasonal core-use areas (50% home range contours) via Brownian bridge movement models and assess habitat selection. Whooping Crane core-use areas (n = 283) ranged from 4.7 to 438.0 km2, and habitat selection changed seasonally as shallow water availability varied. Whooping Crane core-use areas were composed of more fresh marsh in spring/summer, but shifted towards rice and crawfish (Procambarus spp.) aquaculture in the fall/winter. Within core-use areas, aquaculture was most strongly selected, particularly in fall when fresh marsh became unsuitable. Overall, the shifting of Whooping Crane habitat selection over seasons is likely to require large, heterogeneous areas. Whooping Crane use of agricultural and natural wetlands may depend on spatio-temporal dynamics of water depth.

  5. Food habits of stunted and non-stunted white perch (Morone americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosch, N.J.C.; Stittie, J.R.; Pope, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    We studied food habits of white perch (Morone americana) from two populations with different stable states (stunted [Branched Oak Lake, Nebraska] and nonstunted [Pawnee Lake, Nebraska]) to determine if change in food habits of white perch is likely to occur in situations where a stunted white perch population is altered to a nonstunted state and vice versa. Three approaches were used to quantitatively describe seasonal (spring = March-May, summer = June-August, autumn = September-November) diets of white perch - 1) frequency of occurrence, 2) percentage of composition by volume, and 3) mean stomach fullness. White perch diets were dominated by cladocerans and dipterans in both reservoirs during all seasons. Fish egg predation was similar between reservoirs, and white perch rarely consumed fishes in either the stunted or the non-stunted population. Shifting a white perch population between stunted and non-stunted states will likely cause little or no change in food habits; fish in both states will primarily consume invertebrates.

  6. The role of gut microbiota in the regulation of standard metabolic rate in female Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Ayayee, Paul A; Ondrejech, Andrew; Keeney, George; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí

    2018-01-01

    Insect gut microbiota contribute significantly to host nutritional ecology. Disrupting insect gut microbial assemblages impacts nutrient provisioning functions, and can potentially affect host standard metabolic rate (SMR), a measure of host energy balance. In this study, we evaluated the effect of disrupting gut microbial assemblages on the SMR of female Periplaneta americana cockroaches fed dog food (DF, high protein/carbohydrate (p/c) ratio), and cellulose-amended dog food (CADF, 30% dog food, 70% cellulose, low p/c ratio) diets, supplemented with none, low, or high antibiotic doses. Bacterial loads decreased significantly between diet types ( P = 0.04) and across antibiotic doses ( P = 0.04). There was a significant diet type x antibiotic dose interaction on SMR of females on both diets ( P = 0.05) by the end of the seven-day experimental period. In CADF-fed females, SMR decreased linearly with decreasing bacterial load. However, SMR of DF-fed females on the low dose was significantly higher than those in the control and high dose groups. This is interpreted as a diet-dependent response by low dose DF-fed females to the loss of nutritional services provided by gut bacteria. Severe reductions in bacterial load at high doses reduced SMR of females on both diet types. This study provides insights into the potential role of gut bacteria as modulators of host energy expenditure under varying dietary conditions.

  7. Head-bobbing behavior in walking whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Kinloch, Matthew R.; Olsen, Glenn H.

    2007-01-01

    Head-bobbing is a common and characteristic behavior of walking birds. While the activity could have a relatively minor biomechanical function, for balance and stabilization of gait, head-bobbing is thought to be primarily a visual behavior in which fixation of gaze alternates with a forward movement that generates visual flow. We studied head-bobbing in locomoting whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis), using food strewn on the ground to motivate them to walk or run. When the cranes walked, head-bobbing proceeded in a four-step sequence that was closely linked to the stepping cycle. The time available for gaze stabilization decreased with travel speed, and running cranes did not head-bob at all. As a crane extended its bill towards the ground for food, it also exhibited a series of short head-bobs that were not associated with forward travel. Head-bobbing is a flexible behavior that varies with gait and with visual search, most notably as the cranes prepare to strike with the bill.

  8. Direct visualization of hemolymph flow in the heart of a grasshopper (Schistocerca americana)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wah-Keat; Socha, John J

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemolymph flow patterns in opaque insects have never been directly visualized due to the lack of an appropriate imaging technique. The required spatial and temporal resolutions, together with the lack of contrast between the hemolymph and the surrounding soft tissue, are major challenges. Previously, indirect techniques have been used to infer insect heart motion and hemolymph flow, but such methods fail to reveal fine-scale kinematics of heartbeat and details of intra-heart flow patterns. Results With the use of microbubbles as high contrast tracer particles, we directly visualized hemolymph flow in a grasshopper (Schistocerca americana) using synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging. In-vivo intra-heart flow patterns and the relationship between respiratory (tracheae and air sacs) and circulatory (heart) systems were directly observed for the first time. Conclusion Synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging is the only generally applicable technique that has the necessary spatial, temporal resolutions and sensitivity to directly visualize heart dynamics and flow patterns inside opaque animals. This technique has the potential to illuminate many long-standing questions regarding small animal circulation, encompassing topics such as retrograde heart flow in some insects and the development of flow in embryonic vertebrates. PMID:19272159

  9. Effects of generalist herbivory on resistance and resource allocation by the invasive plant, Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Ding, Jianqing

    2016-04-01

    Successful invasions by exotic plants are often attributed to a loss of co-evolved specialists and a re-allocation of resources from defense to growth and reproduction. However, invasive plants are rarely completely released from insect herbivory because they are frequently attacked by generalists in their introduced ranges. The novel generalist community may also affect the invasive plant's defensive strategies and resource allocation. Here, we tested this hypothesis using American pokeweed (Phytolacca americana L.), a species that has become invasive in China, which is native to North America. We examined resistance, tolerance, growth and reproduction of plant populations from both China and the USA when plants were exposed to natural generalist herbivores in China. We found that leaf damage was greater for invasive populations than for native populations, indicating that plants from invasive ranges had lower resistance to herbivory than those from native ranges. A regression of the percentage of leaf damage against mass showed that there was no significant difference in tolerance between invasive and native populations, even though the shoot, root, fruit and total mass were larger for invasive populations than for native populations. These results suggest that generalist herbivores are important drivers mediating the defensive strategies and resource allocation of the invasive American pokeweed. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Genomics-assisted characterization of a breeding collection of Apios americana, an edible tuberous legume

    PubMed Central

    Belamkar, Vikas; Farmer, Andrew D.; Weeks, Nathan T.; Kalberer, Scott R.; Blackmon, William J.; Cannon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    For species with potential as new crops, rapid improvement may be facilitated by new genomic methods. Apios (Apios americana Medik.), once a staple food source of Native American Indians, produces protein-rich tubers, tolerates a wide range of soils, and symbiotically fixes nitrogen. We report the first high-quality de novo transcriptome assembly, an expression atlas, and a set of 58,154 SNP and 39,609 gene expression markers (GEMs) for characterization of a breeding collection. Both SNPs and GEMs identify six genotypic clusters in the collection. Transcripts mapped to the Phaseolus vulgaris genome–another phaseoloid legume with the same chromosome number–provide provisional genetic locations for 46,852 SNPs. Linkage disequilibrium decays within 10 kb (based on the provisional genetic locations), consistent with outcrossing reproduction. SNPs and GEMs identify more than 21 marker-trait associations for at least 11 traits. This study demonstrates a holistic approach for mining plant collections to accelerate crop improvement. PMID:27721469

  11. Distribution, occupancy, and habitat correlates of American martens (Martes americana) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, R.A.; Bender, L.C.

    2008-01-01

    A clear understanding of habitat associations of martens (Martes americana) is necessary to effectively manage and monitor populations. However, this information was lacking for martens in most of their southern range, particularly during the summer season. We studied the distribution and habitat correlates of martens from 2004 to 2006 in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) across 3 spatial scales: site-specific, home-range, and landscape. We used remote-sensored cameras from early August through late October to inventory occurrence of martens and modeled occurrence as a function of habitat and landscape variables using binary response (BR) and binomial count (BC) logistic regression, and occupancy modeling (OM). We also assessed which was the most appropriate modeling technique for martens in RMNP. Of the 3 modeling techniques, OM appeared to be most appropriate given the explanatory power of derived models and its incorporation of detection probabilities, although the results from BR and BC provided corroborating evidence of important habitat correlates. Location of sites in the western portion of the park, riparian mixed-conifer stands, and mixed-conifer with aspen patches were most frequently positively correlated with occurrence of martens, whereas more xeric and open sites were avoided. Additionally, OM yielded unbiased occupancy values ranging from 91% to 100% and 20% to 30% for the western and eastern portions of RMNP, respectively. ?? 2008 American Society of Mammalogists.

  12. Comparison of Serum Protein Electrophoresis Values in Wild and Captive Whooping Cranes ( Grus americana ).

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Jennifer C; Cray, Carolyn; Hartup, Barry K

    2015-09-01

    Protein electrophoresis of serum samples from endangered, wild whooping cranes ( Grus americana ) was performed to help assess the health of the only self-sustaining, migratory population in North America. Serum samples from wild adult cranes (n = 22) were taken at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, USA during winter. Wild juvenile cranes (n = 26) were sampled at Wood Buffalo National Park, Northwest Territories, Canada, in midsummer. All captive crane samples were acquired from the International Crane Foundation, Baraboo, WI, USA. Captive adult cranes (n = 30) were sampled during annual examinations, and archived serum samples from captive juvenile cranes (n = 19) were selected to match the estimated age of wild juveniles. Wild juveniles had significantly lower concentrations of all protein fractions than wild adults, except for prealbumin and γ globulins. All protein fraction concentrations for wild juveniles were significantly lower compared with captive juveniles, except for prealbumin and γ globulins, which were higher. Wild adults had significantly greater γ globulin concentrations than captive adults. Captive juveniles had significantly lower prealbumin and albumin concentrations and albumin : globulin ratios than captive adults. The higher γ globulin concentrations in wild versus captive cranes are likely because of increased antigenic exposure and immune stimulation. Protein fraction concentrations vary significantly with age and natural history in this species. Reference intervals for serum protein electrophoresis results from captive adult whooping cranes are provided in this study.

  13. Molecular characterization and localization of the first tyramine receptor of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Rotte, C; Krach, C; Balfanz, S; Baumann, A; Walz, B; Blenau, W

    2009-09-15

    The phenolamines octopamine and tyramine control, regulate, and modulate many physiological and behavioral processes in invertebrates. Vertebrates possess only small amounts of both substances, and thus, octopamine and tyramine, together with other biogenic amines, are referred to as "trace amines." Biogenic amines evoke cellular responses by activating G-protein-coupled receptors. We have isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA) that encodes a biogenic amine receptor from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana, viz., Peatyr1, which shares high sequence similarity to members of the invertebrate tyramine-receptor family. The PeaTYR1 receptor was stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, and its ligand response has been examined. Receptor activation with tyramine reduces adenylyl cyclase activity in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) approximately 350 nM). The inhibitory effect of tyramine is abolished by co-incubation with either yohimbine or chlorpromazine. Receptor expression has been investigated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. The mRNA is present in various tissues including brain, salivary glands, midgut, Malpighian tubules, and leg muscles. The effect of tyramine on salivary gland acinar cells has been investigated by intracellular recordings, which have revealed excitatory presynaptic actions of tyramine. This study marks the first comprehensive molecular, pharmacological, and functional characterization of a tyramine receptor in the cockroach.

  14. Effects of freezing on white perch Morone americana (Gmelin, 1789): Implications for multivariate morphometrics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocovsky, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that duration of freezing differentially affects whole-body morphometrics of a derived teleost. Whole-body morphometrics are frequently analyzed to test hypotheses of different species, or stocks within a species, of fishes. Specimens used for morphometric analyses are typically fixed or preserved prior to analysis, yet little research has been done on how fixation or preservation methods or duration of preservation of specimens might affect outcomes of multivariate statistical analyses of differences in shape. To determine whether whole-body morphometrics changed as a result of freezing, 23 whole-body morphometrics of age-1 white perch (Morone americana) from western Lake Erie (n = 211) were analyzed immediately after capture, after being held on ice overnight, and after freezing for 100 or 200 days. Discriminant function analysis revealed that all four groups differed significantly from one another (P < 0.0001). The first canonical axis reflected long-axis morphometrics, where there was a clear pattern of positive translation along this axis with duration of preservation. Re-classification analysis demonstrated fish were typically assigned to their original preservation class except for fish frozen 100 days, which assigned mostly to frozen 200 days. Morphometric comparisons using frozen fish must be done on fish frozen for identical periods of time to avoid biases related to the length of time they were frozen. Similar experiments should be conducted on other species and also using formalin- and alcohol-preserved specimens.

  15. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  16. Environmental friendly cold-mechanical/sonic enzymatic assisted extraction of genipin from genipap (Genipa americana).

    PubMed

    Ramos-de-la-Peña, Ana Mayela; Renard, Catherine M G C; Wicker, Louise; Montañez, Julio C; García-Cerda, Luis Alfonso; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    An efficient cold-mechanical/sonic-assisted extraction technique was developed for extraction of genipin from genipap (Genipa americana) peel. Ultrasound assisted extraction (285 W, 24 kHz) was performed at 5, 10 and 15 °C for 5, 10 and 15 min. After cold-extraction, genipin was separated from pectin and proteins by aid of fungal pectinesterase. The maximum yield of non-cross-linked genipin was 7.85±0.33 mg/g, at 10 °C for 15 min by means of ultrasound extraction. The protein amount in extracts decreased in all samples. If mechanical process is combined with ultrasound assisted extraction the yield is increased by 8 times after the pectinesterase-assisted polyelectrolyte complex formation between pectic polysaccharides and proteins, avoiding the typical cross-linking of genipin. This novel process is viable to obtain non-cross-linked genipin, to be used as a natural colorant and cross-linker in the food and biotechnological industries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fast and Powerful: Biomechanics and Bite Forces of the Mandibles in the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Weihmann, Tom; Reinhardt, Lars; Weißing, Kevin; Siebert, Tobias; Wipfler, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the functionality and capabilities of masticatory apparatuses is essential for the ecological classification of jawed organisms. Nevertheless insects, especially with their outstanding high species number providing an overwhelming morphological diversity, are notoriously underexplored with respect to maximum bite forces and their dependency on the mandible opening angles. Aiming for a general understanding of insect biting, we examined the generalist feeding cockroach Periplaneta americana, characterized by its primitive chewing mouth parts. We measured active isometric bite forces and passive forces caused by joint resistance over the entire mandibular range with a custom-built 2D force transducer. The opening angle of the mandibles was quantified by using a video system. With respect to the effective mechanical advantage of the mandibles and the cross-section areas, we calculated the forces exerted by the mandible closer muscles and the corresponding muscle stress values. Comparisons with the scarce data available revealed close similarities of the cockroaches’ mandible closer stress values (58 N/cm2) to that of smaller specialist carnivorous ground beetles, but strikingly higher values than in larger stag beetles. In contrast to available datasets our results imply the activity of faster and slower muscle fibres, with the latter becoming active only when the animals chew on tough material which requires repetitive, hard biting. Under such circumstances the coactivity of fast and slow fibres provides a force boost which is not available during short-term activities, since long latencies prevent a specific effective employment of the slow fibres in this case. PMID:26559671

  18. Behavioral responses of Schistocerca americana (Orthoptera: Acrididae) to Azadirex (neem)-treated host plants.

    PubMed

    Capinera, John L; Froeba, Jason G

    2007-02-01

    Azadirex (azadirachtin and other biologically active extracts from neem trees) has been shown to have considerable potential to be used in integrated pest management systems based on its growth regulator/insecticide properties. Less well known are the antifeedant properties. The feeding-deterrent properties of a commercial azadirex formulation (Azatrol EC) were evaluated using both no-choice and choice tests, the American grasshopper, Schistocerca americana (Drury), and four host plants [savoy cabbage, Brassica oleracea variety capitata L.; cos (romaine) lettuce, Lactuca sativa variety longifolia Lam.; sweet orange, Citrus sinensis variety Hamlin L.; and peregrina, Jatropha integerrima Jacq.]. These studies demonstrated that azadirex application can significantly affect the feeding behavior of grasshoppers. Some degree of protection can be afforded to plants that differ markedly in their innate attractiveness to the insect, although the level of protection varies among hosts. The tendency of grasshoppers to sometimes feed on azadirex-treated foliage suggests that it will be difficult to prevent damage from occurring at all times, on all hosts. No evidence of rapid habituation to azadirex was detected. Rapid loss of efficacy was observed under field conditions, suggesting that daily retreatment might be necessary to maintain protection of plants from feeding.

  19. Coccidian Parasites and Conservation Implications for the Endangered Whooping Crane (Grus americana)

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Miranda R.; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Snowden, Karen F.; Hartup, Barry K.; Hamer, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    While the population of endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) has grown from 15 individuals in 1941 to an estimated 304 birds today, the population growth is not sufficient to support a down-listing of the species to threatened status. The degree to which disease may be limiting the population growth of whooping cranes is unknown. One disease of potential concern is caused by two crane-associated Eimeria species: Eimeria gruis and E. reichenowi. Unlike most species of Eimeria, which are localized to the intestinal tract, these crane-associated species may multiply systemically and cause a potentially fatal disease. Using a non-invasive sampling approach, we assessed the prevalence and phenology of Eimeria oocysts in whooping crane fecal samples collected across two winter seasons (November 2012–April 2014) at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge along the Texas Gulf coast. We also compared the ability of microscopy and PCR to detect Eimeria in fecal samples. Across both years, 26.5% (n = 328) of fecal samples were positive for Eimeria based on microscopy. Although the sensitivity of PCR for detecting Eimeria infections seemed to be less than that of microscopy in the first year of the study (8.9% vs. 29.3%, respectively), an improved DNA extraction protocol resulted in increased sensitivity of PCR relative to microscopy in the second year of the study (27.6% and 20.8%, respectively). The proportion of positive samples did not vary significantly between years or among sampling sites. The proportion of Eimeria positive fecal samples varied with date of collection, but there was no consistent pattern of parasite shedding between the two years. We demonstrate that non-invasive fecal collections combined with PCR and DNA sequencing techniques provides a useful tool for monitoring Eimeria infection in cranes. Understanding the epidemiology of coccidiosis is important for management efforts to increase population growth of the endangered whooping crane. PMID

  20. Delineating and identifying long-term changes in the whooping crane (Grus americana) migration corridor.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Aaron T; Rabbe, Matt; Juliusson, Lara M; Bidwell, Mark T; Craig-Moore, Lea; Brandt, David A; Harrell, Wade

    2018-01-01

    Defining and identifying changes to seasonal ranges of migratory species is required for effective conservation. Historic sightings of migrating whooping cranes (Grus americana) have served as sole source of information to define a migration corridor in the Great Plains of North America (i.e., Canadian Prairies and United States Great Plains) for this endangered species. We updated this effort using past opportunistic sightings from 1942-2016 (n = 5,055) and more recent (2010-2016) location data from 58 telemetered birds (n = 4,423) to delineate migration corridors that included 50%, 75%, and 95% core areas. All migration corridors were well defined and relatively compact, with the 95% core corridor averaging 294 km wide, although it varied approximately ±40% in width from 170 km in central Texas to 407 km at the international border of the United States and Canada. Based on historic sightings and telemetry locations, we detected easterly movements in locations over time, primarily due to locations west of the median shifting east. This shift occurred from northern Oklahoma to central Saskatchewan at an average rate of 1.2 km/year (0.3-2.8 km/year). Associated with this directional shift was a decrease in distance of locations from the median in the same region averaging -0.7 km/year (-0.3--1.3 km/year), suggesting a modest narrowing of the migration corridor. Changes in the corridor over the past 8 decades suggest that agencies and organizations interested in recovery of this species may need to modify where conservation and recovery actions occur. Whooping cranes showed apparent plasticity in their migratory behavior, which likely has been necessary for persistence of a wetland-dependent species migrating through the drought-prone Great Plains. Behavioral flexibility will be useful for whooping cranes to continue recovery in a future of uncertain climate and land use changes throughout their annual range.

  1. Antioxidant and Hypolipidemic Activity of the Hydroethanolic Extract of Curatella americana L. Leaves.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rafael Henrique Oliveira; Macorini, Luis Fernando Benitez; Antunes, Katia Ávila; Espindola, Priscilla Pereira de Toledo; Alfredo, Tamaeh Monteiro; da Rocha, Paola Dos Santos; Pereira, Zefa Valdivina; Dos Santos, Edson Lucas; de Picoli Souza, Kely

    2016-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species in the body and hyperlipidemia are key factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the antioxidant and hypolipidemic activity of hydroethanolic extract of Curatella americana L. leaves (ExC). The antioxidant activity of ExC was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging capacity and protection against hemolysis induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), followed by quantification of malondialdehyde (MDA). Wistar rats with hyperlipidemia induced by high-fructose diet (60%) were treated for 60 days with water, simvastatin (30 mg·Kg(-1)), ciprofibrate (2 mg·Kg(-1)), and ExC (200 mg·Kg(-1)). ExC revealed IC50 of 6.0 ± 0.5 μg·mL(-1), an intermediary value among positive controls used in the assay of DPPH scavenging capacity. At all concentrations (50 to 125 μg·mL(-1)) and times (60 to 240 min) evaluated, ExC protected erythrocytes against AAPH-induced hemolysis, which was confirmed by lower MDA levels. In vivo tests showed a reduction of 34 and 45%, respectively, in serum concentration of cholesterol and triglycerides in hyperlipidemic rats treated with ExC, a similar effect compared to the reference drugs, simvastatin and ciprofibrate, respectively. Together, the results showed the antioxidant activity of ExC and its ability to improve the serum lipid profile in hyperlipidemic rats.

  2. Foraging behavior of redheads (Aythya americana) wintering in Texas and Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodin, M.C.; Michot, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    Redheads, Aythya americana, concentrate in large numbers annually in traditional wintering areas along the western and northern rim of the Gulf of Mexico. Two of these areas are the Laguna Madre of Texas and Chandeleur Sound of Louisiana. We collected data on 54,340 activities from 103 redhead flocks in Texas and 51,650 activities from 57 redhead flocks in Louisiana. Males and females fed similarly, differing neither in levels of feeding (percent of all birds in flock that were feeding) (p>0.90) nor in percentages of birds feeding by diving, tipping, dipping, or gleaning from the surface (p>0.10). The foraging level of redheads in the upper Laguna Madre region was relatively constant throughout two winters. Foraging of redheads in early winter in Louisiana was significantly greater than redhead foraging in the upper Laguna Madre, but by late winter, foraging by redheads in Louisiana had declined to the same level as that shown by redheads foraging in the upper Laguna Madre. The overall foraging level of redheads from Chandeleur Sound was greater (41%) than that of redheads in the upper Laguna Madre (26%), yet it was quite similar to the 46% foraging level reported for redheads from the lower Laguna Madre. Redheads in the upper Laguna Madre region of Texas fed more by diving than did those in the Chandeleur Sound and the lower Laguna Madre. Diving increased in frequency in late winter. Greater reliance by redheads on diving in January and February indicates that the birds altered their foraging to feed in deeper water, suggesting that the large concentrations of redheads staging at this time for spring migration may have displaced some birds to alternative foraging sites. Our results imply that the most likely period for food resources to become limiting for wintering redheads is when they are staging in late winter. ?? Springer 2006.

  3. Delineating and identifying long-term changes in the whooping crane (Grus americana) migration corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Rabbe, Matt; Juliusson, Lara M.; Bidwell, Mark T.; Craig-Moore, Lea; Brandt, David; Harrell, Wade C.

    2018-01-01

    Defining and identifying changes to seasonal ranges of migratory species is required for effective conservation. Historic sightings of migrating whooping cranes (Grus americana) have served as sole source of information to define a migration corridor in the Great Plains of North America (i.e., Canadian Prairies and United States Great Plains) for this endangered species. We updated this effort using past opportunistic sightings from 1942–2016 (n = 5,055) and more recent (2010–2016) location data from 58 telemetered birds (n = 4,423) to delineate migration corridors that included 50%, 75%, and 95% core areas. All migration corridors were well defined and relatively compact, with the 95% core corridor averaging 294 km wide, although it varied approximately ±40% in width from 170 km in central Texas to 407 km at the international border of the United States and Canada. Based on historic sightings and telemetry locations, we detected easterly movements in locations over time, primarily due to locations west of the median shifting east. This shift occurred from northern Oklahoma to central Saskatchewan at an average rate of 1.2 km/year (0.3–2.8 km/year). Associated with this directional shift was a decrease in distance of locations from the median in the same region averaging -0.7 km/year (-0.3–-1.3 km/year), suggesting a modest narrowing of the migration corridor. Changes in the corridor over the past 8 decades suggest that agencies and organizations interested in recovery of this species may need to modify where conservation and recovery actions occur. Whooping cranes showed apparent plasticity in their migratory behavior, which likely has been necessary for persistence of a wetland-dependent species migrating through the drought-prone Great Plains. Behavioral flexibility will be useful for whooping cranes to continue recovery in a future of uncertain climate and land use changes throughout their annual range.

  4. Physiology of digestion and the molecular characterization of the major digestive enzymes from Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Fábio K; Pimentel, André C; Dias, Alcides B; Cardoso, Christiane; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Ferreira, Clélia; Terra, Walter R

    2014-11-01

    Cockroaches are among the first insects to appear in the fossil record. This work is part of ongoing research on insects at critical points in the evolutionary tree to disclose evolutionary trends in the digestive characteristics of insects. A transcriptome (454 Roche platform) of the midgut of Periplanetaamericana was searched for sequences of digestive enzymes. The selected sequences were manually curated. The complete or nearly complete sequences showing all characteristic motifs and highly expressed (reads counting) had their predicted sequences checked by cloning and Sanger sequencing. There are two chitinases (lacking mucin and chitin-binding domains), one amylase, two α- and three β-glucosidases, one β-galactosidase, two aminopeptidases (none of the N-group), one chymotrypsin, 5 trypsins, and none β-glucanase. Electrophoretic and enzymological data agreed with transcriptome data in showing that there is a single β-galactosidase, two α-glucosidases, one preferring as substrate maltase and the other aryl α-glucoside, and two β-glucosidases. Chromatographic and enzymological data identified 4 trypsins, one chymotrypsin (also found in the transcriptome), and one non-identified proteinase. The major digestive trypsin is identifiable to a major P. americana allergen (Per a 10). The lack of β-glucanase expression in midguts was confirmed, thus lending support to claims that those enzymes are salivary. A salivary amylase was molecularly cloned and shown to be different from the one from the midgut. Enzyme distribution showed that most digestion occurs under the action of salivary and midgut enzymes in the foregut and anterior midgut, except the posterior terminal digestion of proteins. A counter-flux of fluid may be functional in the midgut of the cockroach to explain the low excretory rate of digestive enzymes. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical localization data showed that amylase and trypsin are released by both merocrine and apocrine secretion

  5. Dopamine- and Tyrosine Hydroxylase-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Brain of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Minoura, Run; Nishino, Hiroshi; Miura, Toru; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The catecholamine dopamine plays several vital roles in the central nervous system of many species, but its neural mechanisms remain elusive. Detailed neuroanatomical characterization of dopamine neurons is a prerequisite for elucidating dopamine’s actions in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of dopaminergic neurons in the brain of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, using two antisera: 1) an antiserum against dopamine, and 2) an antiserum against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, an enzyme required for dopamine synthesis), and identified about 250 putatively dopaminergic neurons. The patterns of dopamine- and TH-immunoreactive neurons were strikingly similar, suggesting that both antisera recognize the same sets of “dopaminergic” neurons. The dopamine and TH antibodies intensively or moderately immunolabeled prominent brain neuropils, e.g. the mushroom body (memory center), antennal lobe (first-order olfactory center) and central complex (motor coordination center). All subdivisions of the mushroom body exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. Comparison of immunolabeled neurons with those filled by dye injection revealed that a group of immunolabeled neurons with cell bodies near the calyx projects into a distal region of the vertical lobe, which is a plausible site for olfactory memory formation in insects. In the antennal lobe, ordinary glomeruli as well as macroglomeruli exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. It is noteworthy that the dopamine antiserum labeled tiny granular structures inside the glomeruli whereas the TH antiserum labeled processes in the marginal regions of the glomeruli, suggesting a different origin. In the central complex, all subdivisions excluding part of the noduli and protocerebral bridge exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. These anatomical findings will accelerate our understanding of dopaminergic systems, specifically in neural circuits underlying aversive memory

  6. Delineating and identifying long-term changes in the whooping crane (Grus americana) migration corridor

    PubMed Central

    Rabbe, Matt; Juliusson, Lara M.; Bidwell, Mark T.; Craig-Moore, Lea; Brandt, David A.; Harrell, Wade

    2018-01-01

    Defining and identifying changes to seasonal ranges of migratory species is required for effective conservation. Historic sightings of migrating whooping cranes (Grus americana) have served as sole source of information to define a migration corridor in the Great Plains of North America (i.e., Canadian Prairies and United States Great Plains) for this endangered species. We updated this effort using past opportunistic sightings from 1942–2016 (n = 5,055) and more recent (2010–2016) location data from 58 telemetered birds (n = 4,423) to delineate migration corridors that included 50%, 75%, and 95% core areas. All migration corridors were well defined and relatively compact, with the 95% core corridor averaging 294 km wide, although it varied approximately ±40% in width from 170 km in central Texas to 407 km at the international border of the United States and Canada. Based on historic sightings and telemetry locations, we detected easterly movements in locations over time, primarily due to locations west of the median shifting east. This shift occurred from northern Oklahoma to central Saskatchewan at an average rate of 1.2 km/year (0.3–2.8 km/year). Associated with this directional shift was a decrease in distance of locations from the median in the same region averaging -0.7 km/year (-0.3–-1.3 km/year), suggesting a modest narrowing of the migration corridor. Changes in the corridor over the past 8 decades suggest that agencies and organizations interested in recovery of this species may need to modify where conservation and recovery actions occur. Whooping cranes showed apparent plasticity in their migratory behavior, which likely has been necessary for persistence of a wetland-dependent species migrating through the drought-prone Great Plains. Behavioral flexibility will be useful for whooping cranes to continue recovery in a future of uncertain climate and land use changes throughout their annual range. PMID:29447213

  7. Evaluation of the enteric microflora of captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis).

    PubMed

    Hoar, Bryanne M; Whiteside, Douglas P; Ward, Linda; Douglas Inglis, G; Morck, Douglas W

    2007-03-01

    The enteric flora of captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) has not been well described, despite its potential importance in the understanding of both the normal condition of the intestinal physiology of these animals and the altered colonization within disease states in these birds. Nineteen whooping cranes and 23 sandhill cranes housed currently at the Calgary Zoo or its affiliated Devonian Wildlife Conservation Centre (DWCC) in Calgary, Alberta were sampled from October 2004-February 2005 by collecting aerobic and anaerobic cloacal swabs from each bird. There were seven major groupings of bacteria isolated from both species of crane. Gram-positive cocci, coliforms, and gram-negative bacilli were the most prevalent types of bacteria isolated for both crane species, with Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus Group D, not Enterococcus the bacterial species isolated most commonly. There was a significant difference in the average number of isolates per individual between the two crane species but no differences between age or gender categories within crane species. Campylobacter sp. were isolated from five whooping cranes. The potential zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from one whooping crane and C. upsaliensis was isolated from a second. Three other isolates were unspeciated members of the Campylobacter genus and likely belong to a species undescribed previously. The evaluation of the enteric cloacal flora of whooping cranes and sandhill cranes illustrates that differences exist between these two closely related crane species, and highlights the potential implications these differences may have for current practices involving captive wildlife. Zoo Biol 0:1-13, 2007. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Adipokinetic hormones control amylase activity in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) gut.

    PubMed

    Bodláková, Karolina; Jedlička, Pavel; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the biochemical characteristics of α-amylase and hormonal (adipokinetic hormone: AKH) stimulation of α-amylase activity in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) midgut. We applied two AKHs in vivo and in vitro, then measured resultant amylase activity and gene expression, as well as the expression of AKH receptor (AKHR). The results revealed that optimal amylase activity is characterized by the following: pH: 5.7, temperature: 38.4 °C, K m (Michaelis-Menten constant): 2.54 mg starch/mL, and V max (maximum reaction velocity): 0.185 μmol maltose/mL/min. In vivo application of AKHs resulted in significant increase of amylase activity: by two-fold in the gastric caeca and 4-7 fold in the rest of the midgut. In vitro experiments supported results seen in vivo: a 24-h incubation with the hormones resulted in the increase of amylase activity by 1.4 times in the caeca and 4-9 times in the midgut. Further, gene expression analyses reveal that AKHR is expressed in both the caeca and the rest of the midgut, although expression levels in the former were 23 times higher than levels in the latter. A similar pattern was found for the amylase (AMY) gene. Hormonal treatment did not affect the expression of either gene. This study is the first to provide evidence indicating direct AKH stimulation of digestive enzyme activity in the insect midgut, supported by specific AKHR gene expression in this organ. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. SEROSURVEY, HEMATOLOGY, AND CAUSES OF MORTALITY OF FREE-RANGING AMERICAN MARTENS ( MARTES AMERICANA) IN MICHIGAN.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Maria C; Gerhold, Richard W; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Keenlance, Paul; Sanders, Robert L; Witt, Jill; Clark, Eric; Miller, Debra

    2018-06-01

      To better understand the clinical pathology, diseases, and causes of mortality of reintroduced American martens ( Martes americana) in Michigan, a study was conducted from 2011 to 2015 in the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan. Samples obtained from live trapping ( n = 58) or harvested carcasses ( n = 34) were serologically tested for select pathogens. Antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii and canine distemper virus were detected in 58 and 3.4% of samples, respectively. All samples were seronegative for Leptospira spp. and negative for Dirofilaria immitis antigen. Urine samples tested for Leptospira spp. via immunofluorescent antibody assay ( n = 7), polymerase chain reaction ( n = 6) , or both ( n = 3) were all negative. Parvovirus DNA was detected in 9.1% of small intestine samples ( n = 22) collected from carcasses and in 3.7% of fecal samples ( n = 27) collected during live trapping. Complete blood counts ( n = 64) and serum biochemistries ( n = 63) were obtained from 49 live-trapped martens. Biochemical parameters found to be significantly different ( P < 0.05) between genders were calcium, creatinine, glucose, and phosphorus. There was no significant difference between genders for any hematologic parameter. Significant differences ( P < 0.05) between summer and winter seasons were found in total estimated white blood cell count, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, alkaline phosphatase, bicarbonate, calcium, creatinine, globulin, glucose, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and total protein. There was no significant difference in blood cell count or serum biochemistry values between radio-collared ( n = 17) and noncollared ( n = 47) martens. Animals seropositive for T. gondii were found to have significantly higher ( P < 0.05) eosinophil and globulin levels than seronegative animals. The primary natural cause for mortality of radio-collared American martens was predation. Histologic examinations revealed a high percentage (60%) of martens with verminous or

  10. Symbiotic essential amino acids provisioning in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus) under various dietary conditions.

    PubMed

    Ayayee, Paul A; Larsen, Thomas; Sabree, Zakee

    2016-01-01

    Insect gut microbes have been shown to provide nutrients such as essential amino acids (EAAs) to their hosts. How this symbiotic nutrient provisioning tracks with the host's demand is not well understood. In this study, we investigated microbial essential amino acid (EAA) provisioning in omnivorous American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana), fed low-quality (LQD) and comparatively higher-quality dog food (DF) diets using carbon stable isotope ratios of EAAs (δ (13)CEAA). We assessed non-dietary EAA input, quantified as isotopic offsets (Δ(13)C) between cockroach (δ (13)CCockroach EAA) and dietary (δ (13)CDietary EAA) EAAs, and subsequently determined biosynthetic origins of non-dietary EAAs in cockroaches using (13)C-fingerprinting with dietary and representative bacterial and fungal δ (13)CEAA. Investigation of biosynthetic origins of de novo non-dietary EAAs indicated bacterial origins of EAA in cockroach appendage samples, and a mixture of fungal and bacterial EAA origins in gut filtrate samples for both LQD and DF-fed groups. We attribute the bacteria-derived EAAs in cockroach appendages to provisioning by the fat body residing obligate endosymbiont, Blattabacterium and gut-residing bacteria. The mixed signatures of gut filtrate samples are attributed to the presence of unassimilated dietary, as well as gut microbial (bacterial and fungal) EAAs. This study highlights the potential impacts of dietary quality on symbiotic EAA provisioning and the need for further studies investigating the interplay between host EAA demands, host dietary quality and symbiotic EAA provisioning in response to dietary sufficiency or deficiency.

  11. Mycosis Inhibits Cannibalism by Melanoplus sanguinipes, M. differentialis, Schistocerca americana, and Anabrus simplex

    PubMed Central

    Jaronski, Stefan T.

    2013-01-01

    Cannibalism is common among the Acrididae and the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex Haldeman (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). This behavior has been proposed as a mechanism for the horizontal transmission of Microsporida and entomopathogenic fungi. Aanecdotal observations suggested that the migratory grasshopper, Melanoplus sanguinipes Fabricius (Acrididae), and A. simplex did not eat cadavers that had been killed by insect pathogenic fungi. The hypothesis tested was that A. simplex or M. sanguinipes would not cannibalize individuals freshly killed by the entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana Bals.-Criv. (Vuill.) (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae), or Metarhizium acridum (Driver and Milner) Bischoff, Rehner, and Humber. Cannibalism was examined in a series of no-choice tests with individual insects. Test insects included healthy adults of M. sanguinipes; the differential grasshopper, M. differentialis (Thomas); the American grasshopper, Schistocerca americana (Drury) (Acrididae); and A. simplex. Individual, starved Acrididae or A. simplex were confined in small cages with either a fungus-killed (but unsporulated) or uninfected cadaver. The insects were then observed periodically for the first 4 hr. After 24 hr, the cadavers were scored for the degree to which they had been consumed. Very few mycotic cadavers were fed upon by the healthy insects, and, at most only the tarsi were eaten. All four species generally refused to eat fungus-infected cadavers. In contrast, freeze-killed cadavers were partly or entirely consumed by most of the test insects, often within a few hours. Transmission of infection through contact in these tests was between 0–18.9%, depending upon the fungus and insect species, and was lower than the prevalence of cannibalism in all cases. PMID:24786183

  12. The effects of copper, manganese and zinc on plant growth and elemental accumulation in the manganese-hyperaccumulator Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huijun; Wu, Liangqi; Chai, Tuanyao; Zhang, Yuxiu; Tan, Jinjuan; Ma, Shengwen

    2012-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were used to estimate major, minor and trace elements in Cu-, Zn- and Mn-treated Phytolacca americana. The effects of the addition of Cu, Zn and Mn on morphological parameters, such as root length, shoot height, and fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots, were also examined. In addition, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidases (GPX) and catalase (CAT) and the expression of Fe-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, metallothionein-2 and glutathione S-transferase (GST) exposed to the highest amounts of Cu, Zn or Mn were detected. Our results confirmed the following: (1) Zn supplementation leads to chlorosis, disturbed elemental homeostasis and decreased concentrations of micro- and macroelements such as Fe, Mg, Mn, Ca and K. Cu competed with Fe, Mn and Zn uptake in plants supplemented with 25 μM Cu. However, no antagonistic interactions took place between Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe uptake in plants supplemented with 100 μM Cu. Mn supplementation at various concentrations had no negative effects on elemental deficits. Mn was co-located with high concentrations of Fe and Zn in mature leaves and the concentrations of macro elements were unchanged. (2) P. americana supplemented with increased concentrations of Zn and Cu exhibited lower biomass production and reduced plant growth. (3) When plants were supplemented with the highest Zn and Cu concentrations, symptoms of toxicity corresponded to decreased SOD or CAT activities and increased APX and GPX activities. However, Mn tolerance corresponded to increased SOD and CAT activities and decreased POD and APX activities. Our study revealed that heavy metals partially exert toxicity by disturbing the nutrient balance and modifying enzyme activities that induce damage in plants. However, P. americana has evolved hyper accumulating mechanisms to maintain elemental balance and redox homeostasis under

  13. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a membrane bound acyl-CoA binding protein from Agave americana L. epidermis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Consuelo; Martín-Rufián, M; Reina, José J; Heredia, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a cDNA library made from mRNA isolated from epidermis of young leaves of Agave americana L. The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein corresponding to the membrane-associated form of ACBPs only previously described in Arabidopsis and rice. Northern blot analysis showed that the A. americana ACBP gene is mainly expressed in the epidermis of mature zone of the leaves. The epidermis of A. americana leaves have a well developed cuticle with the highest amounts of the cuticular components waxes, cutin and cutan suggesting a potential role of the protein in cuticle formation.

  14. Nervous System of Periplaneta americana Cockroach as a Model in Toxinological Studies: A Short Historical and Actual View

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Maria; Dąbrowski, Marcin; de Lima, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    Nervous system of Periplaneta americana cockroach is used in a wide range of pharmacological studies, including electrophysiological techniques. This paper presents its role as a preparation in the development of toxinological studies in the following electrophysiological methods: double-oil-gap technique on isolated giant axon, patch-clamp on DUM (dorsal unpaired median) neurons, microelectrode technique in situ conditions on axon in connective and DUM neurons in ganglion, and single-fiber oil-gap technique on last abdominal ganglion synapse. At the end the application of cockroach synaptosomal preparation is mentioned. PMID:22666245

  15. Variation in manuka oil lure efficacy for capturing Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scholytinae), and Cubeb oil as an alternative attractant

    Treesearch

    James Hanula; Brian Sullivan; David Wakarchuk

    2013-01-01

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff, is an exotic species to North America vectoring a deadly vascular wilt disease of redbay [Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng], swampbay [P. palustris (Raf.) Sarg.], avocado (P. americana Mill.), and sassafras [Sassafras albidum (...

  16. Novel inhibitory activity of the Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux pump by a kaempferol rhamnoside isolated from Persea lingue Nees.

    PubMed

    Holler, Jes Gitz; Christensen, S Brøgger; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Rasmussen, Hasse B; Gúzman, Alfonso; Olsen, Carl-Erik; Petersen, Bent; Mølgaard, Per

    2012-05-01

    To isolate a plant-derived compound with efflux inhibitory activity towards the NorA transporter of Staphylococcus aureus. Bioassay-guided isolation was used, with inhibition of ethidium bromide efflux via NorA as a guide. Characterization of activity was carried out using MIC determination and potentiation studies of a fluoroquinolone antibiotic in combination with the isolated compound. Everted membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli cells enriched with NorA were prepared to study efflux inhibitory activity in an isolated manner. The ethanolic extract of Persea lingue was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and led to the isolation of the known compound kaempferol-3-O-α-L-(2,4-bis-E-p-coumaroyl)rhamnoside (compound 1). Evaluation of the dose-response relationship of compound 1 showed that ethidium bromide efflux was inhibited, with an IC(50) value of 2 μM. The positive control, reserpine, was found to have an IC(50) value of 9 μM. Compound 1 also inhibited NorA in enriched everted membrane vesicles of E. coli. Potentiation studies revealed that compound 1 at 1.56 mg/L synergistically increased the antimicrobial activity of ciprofloxacin 8-fold against a NorA overexpresser, and the synergistic activity was exerted at a fourth of the concentration necessary for reserpine. Compound 1 was not found to exert a synergistic effect on ciprofloxacin against a norA deletion mutant. The 2,3-coumaroyl isomer of compound 1 has been shown previously not to cause acute toxicity in mice at 20 mg/kg/day. Our results show that compound 1 acts through inhibition of the NorA efflux pump. Combination of compound 1 with subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin renders a wild-type more susceptible and a NorA overexpresser S. aureus susceptible.

  17. Diversity of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attracted to avocado, lychee, and essential oil lures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and native Persea species (redbay, swampbay). As part...

  18. First report of laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola , on Sassafras ( Sassafras albidum ) in Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Rabiu Olatinwo; C. Barton; Stephen Fraedrich; W. Johnson; J. Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harrin., Aghayeva & Fraedrich, is a lethal disease that affects members of the laurel family (Lauraceae) including avocado (Persea americana Mill), redbay (Persea borbonia [L.] Spreng., Nees), and sassafras (Sassafras albidum [Nutt.]). The fungus is a symbiont of an exotic ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus...

  19. Glycosylation and immunocytochemistry of binucleate cells in pronghorn (Antilocapra americana, Antilocapridae) show features of both Giraffidae and Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carolyn J P; Silvia, W J; Hamilton, C H; Geary, T W; Zezeski, A L; Wooding, F B P

    2017-09-01

    Although the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) resembles an antelope, its nearest relatives are the giraffe and okapi. In this study we have examined the placentae of 6 pronghorns using lectin- and immunocytochemistry to identify giraffid and bovid features. Binucleate cells (BNC) of the placenta exhibited features intermediate between those of the giraffe and bovine; Dolichos biflorus agglutinin binding - strong in the bovine BNC and absent in the giraffe - was evident in only a subpopulation of BNC while binding to blood vessels, as in the giraffe. Binding of Phytolacca americana agglutinin resembled that of the giraffe and okapi whereas many other glycans were found in all four clades. PAG antigens were similar to bovine and okapi but not giraffe. In summary, although the pronghorn outwardly resembles an antelope, placental BNC show giraffid features. Although each clade has its own individual characteristics, there are far more similarities than differences between them, emphasizing the common ancestry of all four clades. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo effects of ecdysterone on puff formation, and RNA and protein synthesis in the salivary glands of Rhynchosciara americana.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, C A; Winter, C E; Stocker, A J; Pueyo, M T; Lara, F J

    1991-01-01

    1. Fourth-instar larvae of Rhynchosciara americana were injected with the insect molting hormone, ecdysterone, giving final hemolymph concentrations from 4.46 to 223 microM. 2. Induction of the DNA puff, B2b, in the proximal (S1) region of the salivary glands of Rhynchosciara americana by 22.6 microM ecdysterone, was accompanied by the production of an mRNA and a polypeptide with the same characteristics as B2b products produced during normal development. This mRNA and polypeptide were restricted to the proximal region of the gland, as is the B2b puff. 3. Synthesis of other poly(A)+RNAs was also stimulated in S1 by ecdysterone, and other puffs that appear during normal development were induced. However, rRNA production in S1 goes through a pattern of inhibition, followed by recovery when B2b is puffed, and subsequent inhibition. 4. Low molecular weight RNA, with a peak in the region of 4S, is stimulated after ecdysterone administration.

  1. PeaTAR1B: Characterization of a Second Type 1 Tyramine Receptor of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Balfanz, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    The catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine regulate important physiological functions in vertebrates. In insects; these neuroactive substances are functionally replaced by the phenolamines octopamine and tyramine. Phenolamines activate specific guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Type 1 tyramine receptors are better activated by tyramine than by octopamine. In contrast; type 2 tyramine receptors are almost exclusively activated by tyramine. Functionally; activation of type 1 tyramine receptors leads to a decrease in the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP]i) whereas type 2 tyramine receptors can mediate Ca2+ signals or both Ca2+ signals and effects on [cAMP]i. Here; we report that the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) expresses a second type 1 tyramine receptor (PeaTAR1B) in addition to PeaTAR1A (previously called PeaTYR1). When heterologously expressed in flpTM cells; activation of PeaTAR1B by tyramine leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in [cAMP]i. Its activity can be blocked by a series of established antagonists. The functional characterization of two type 1 tyramine receptors from P. americana; PeaTAR1A and PeaTAR1B; which respond to tyramine by changing cAMP levels; is a major step towards understanding the actions of tyramine in cockroach physiology and behavior; particularly in comparison to the effects of octopamine. PMID:29084141

  2. PeaTAR1B: Characterization of a Second Type 1 Tyramine Receptor of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Blenau, Wolfgang; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd

    2017-10-30

    The catecholamines norepinephrine and epinephrine regulate important physiological functions in vertebrates. In insects; these neuroactive substances are functionally replaced by the phenolamines octopamine and tyramine. Phenolamines activate specific guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Type 1 tyramine receptors are better activated by tyramine than by octopamine. In contrast; type 2 tyramine receptors are almost exclusively activated by tyramine. Functionally; activation of type 1 tyramine receptors leads to a decrease in the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP] i ) whereas type 2 tyramine receptors can mediate Ca 2+ signals or both Ca 2+ signals and effects on [cAMP] i . Here; we report that the American cockroach ( Periplaneta americana ) expresses a second type 1 tyramine receptor (PeaTAR1B) in addition to PeaTAR1A (previously called PeaTYR1). When heterologously expressed in flpTM cells; activation of PeaTAR1B by tyramine leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in [cAMP] i . Its activity can be blocked by a series of established antagonists. The functional characterization of two type 1 tyramine receptors from P. americana ; PeaTAR1A and PeaTAR1B; which respond to tyramine by changing cAMP levels; is a major step towards understanding the actions of tyramine in cockroach physiology and behavior; particularly in comparison to the effects of octopamine.

  3. Effects of irradiance on growth and winter bud production by Vallisneria americana and consequences to its abundance and distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, Carl E.; Green, W.L.; Kenow, Kevin P.

    1997-01-01

    Number, total biomass, and individual mass of winter buds of Vallisneria americana was significantly related to the depth of the 1% of surface irradiance (Z) and the photosynthetic photon irradiance calculated for each shading treatment imposed during this study. Between the range of 23.8 and 111.2 cm depth for the 1% Z, total biomass of winterbuds produced ranged from 0.63 to 0.01 g, counts ranged from 3.5 to 0.1, and mass of individual winterbuds ranged from 0.18 to 0.04 g. Total biomass of winter buds produced was reduced when plants were exposed to a 14-day period without irradiance during the middle of the growing season. Applying the results of the culture experiments to conditions found in Navigation Pool 8 of the Upper Mississippi River suggests that irradiance may indeed limit the distribution and abundance of Vallisneria americana by reducing the number and size of winter buds. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. JAK/STAT3 and Smad3 activities are required for the wound healing properties of Periplaneta americana extracts.

    PubMed

    Song, Qin; Xie, Yuxin; Gou, Qiheng; Guo, Xiaoqiang; Yao, Qian; Gou, Xiaojun

    2017-08-01

    Periplaneta americana extracts (PAEs) play a crucial role in skin wound healing. However, their molecular effects and signaling pathways in regenerating tissues and cells are not clear. In this study, we refined the PAE from Periplaneta americana to investigate the mechanisms underlying skin wound healing. The human keratinocyte line HaCaT was selected and a mouse model of deep second-degree thermal burn was established for in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. PAE treatment induced the proliferation and migration of HaCaT cells and wound healing in the burn model. Furthermore, the effects of PAE on wound healing were found to depend on the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) pathway and Smad3 activities, according to western blot analysis and immunohistochemical (IHC) assays in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with a STAT3 inhibitor blocked the cell proliferation and migration induced by PAE. The results indicate the wound-healing function of PAE via enhanced JAK/STAT3 signaling and Smad3 activities. Our studies provide a theoretical basis underlying the role of PAE in cutaneous wound healing.

  5. The effects of captive rearing on the behavior of newly-released whooping cranes (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreger, M.D.; Hatfield, J.S.; Estevez, I.; Gee, G.F.; Clugston, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Rearing treatments used in captivity to prepare animals for reintroduction to the wild may have a profound effect on behavior and, possibly, affect their survival after reintroduction. This study examined the behaviors of captive-reared whooping cranes (Grus americana) upon their release in Florida to determine if rearing treatments may affect the behavior of the birds and how these affect their chances of survival in the wild. Individually tagged birds were observed at the rearing facility, the U.S. Geological Survey Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland, from hatch to 20 weeks of age and at the release site in Central Florida for up to 6 weeks post release. The rearing treatments were parent reared (PR), hand reared (HR), and hand reared with exercise (HRE). Observations at the rearing facility are described in a previous paper. At the release site, each bird was observed for 5 min every morning (0700?1000 h) and late afternoon (1500?1800 h) during the 6-week study period. Our results indicated that most of the time, the n = 34 birds were foraging (46.03 ? 1.48%), followed by nonvigilant (20.89 ? 0.73%), vigilant (19.21 ? 0.72%), or performing comfort behaviors (11.61 ? 1.28%). Data were analyzed using mixed models repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant behavioral differences between HR and HRE birds. PR birds were found in larger groups than HR birds during the first 2 weeks post release and greater than HR and HRE birds afterwards. This may be interpreted as an antipredator strategy for birds that relied on parental guidance during rearing. HR and HRE birds foraged more than PR birds during the first 2 weeks post release and PR birds were more vigilant during the first 2 weeks post release. Across rearing treatments, the percentages of time spent foraging and engaged in vigilant behaviors during rearing were positively correlated with their behavior upon release. If any of these behaviors can be demonstrated to have relevance for the

  6. The rhizome of Reclinomonas americana, Homo sapiens, Pediculus humanus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, Kalliopi; Raoult, Didier

    2011-10-20

    Mitochondria are thought to have evolved from eubacteria-like endosymbionts; however, the origin of the mitochondrion remains a subject of debate. In this study, we investigated the phenomenon of chimerism in mitochondria to shed light on the origin of these organelles by determining which species played a role in their formation. We used the mitochondria of four distinct organisms, Reclinomonas americana, Homo sapiens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and multichromosome Pediculus humanus, and attempted to identify the origin of each mitochondrial gene. Our results suggest that the origin of mitochondrial genes is not limited to the Rickettsiales and that the creation of these genes did not occur in a single event, but through multiple successive events. Some of these events are very old and were followed by events that are more recent and occurred through the addition of elements originating from current species. The points in time that the elements were added and the parental species of each gene in the mitochondrial genome are different to the individual species. These data constitute strong evidence that mitochondria do not have a single common ancestor but likely have numerous ancestors, including proto-Rickettsiales, proto-Rhizobiales and proto-Alphaproteobacteria, as well as current alphaproteobacterial species. The analysis of the multichromosome P. humanus mitochondrion supports this mechanism. The most plausible scenario of the origin of the mitochondrion is that ancestors of Rickettsiales and Rhizobiales merged in a proto-eukaryotic cell approximately one billion years ago. The fusion of the Rickettsiales and Rhizobiales cells was followed by gene loss, genomic rearrangements and the addition of alphaproteobacterial elements through ancient and more recent recombination events. Each gene of each of the four studied mitochondria has a different origin, while in some cases, multichromosomes may allow for enhanced gene exchange. Therefore, the tree of life is not

  7. White ash (Fraxinus americana) health in the Allegheny plateau region, Pennsylvania: Evaluating the relationship between FIA phase 3 crown variables and a categorical rating system

    Treesearch

    Alejandro A. Royo; Kathleen S. Knight; Jamie M. Himes; Ashley N. Will

    2012-01-01

    Following the detection of white ash (Fraxinus americana) decline in the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) of Pennsylvania, we established an intensified white ash monitoring network throughout the ANF. We rated crowns using both a categorical system as well as Forest Inventory and Analyses (FIA) Phase 3 measures of uncompacted live crown ratio,...

  8. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND FOLIAR INJURY RESPONSES OF PRUNUS SEROTINA, FRAXINUS AMERICANA, AND ACER RUBRUM SEEDLINGS TO VARYING SOIL MOISTURE AND OZONE. (R825244)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sixteen black cherry (Prunus serotina, Ehrh.), 10 white ash (Fraxinus americana, L.) and 10 red maple (Acer rubrum, L.) 1-year old seedlings were planted per plot in 1997 on a former nursery bed within 12 open-top chambers and six open plots. Seedlings wer...

  9. EFFECTS OF LIGHT REDUCTION ON GROWTH OF THE SUBMERGED MACROPHYTE VALLISNERIA AMERICANA AND THE COMMUNITY OF ROOT-ASSOCIATED HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A shading experiment was conducted over a growing season to measure the effects of light reduction on Vallisneria americana in Perdido Bay on the Florida-Alabama border, and to determine the response of heterotrophic bacteria in the rhizosphere. Plants subjected to 92% light redu...

  10. A transcriptome-snp-derived linkage map of Apios americana (potato bean) provides insights about genome re-organization and synteny conservation in the phaseolid legumes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apios (Apios americana; “apios”), a tuberous perennial legume in the Phaseoleae tribe, was widely used as a food by Native Americans. Work in the last 40 years has led to several improved breeding lines. Aspects of the pollination biology (complex floral structure and tripping mechanism) have made c...

  11. Physiological and foliar symptom response of Prunus serotina, Fraxinus americana and Acer rubrum canopy trees to ozone under differing site conditions

    Treesearch

    M. Schaub; J.M. Skelly; J.W. Zhang; J.A. Ferdinand; J.E. Savage; R.E. Stevenson; D.D. Davis; K.C. Steiner

    2005-01-01

    The crowns of five canopy dominant black cherry ( Prunus serotina Ehrh.), five white ash ( Fraxinus americana L.), and six red maple ( Acer rubrum L.) trees on naturally differing environmental conditions were accessed with scaffold towers within a mixed hardwood forest stand in central Pennsylvania....

  12. Oral Administration of a Select Mixture of Bacillus Probiotics Affects the Gut Microbiota and Goblet Cell Function following Escherichia coli Challenge in Newly Weaned Pigs of Genotype MUC4 That Are Supposed To Be Enterotoxigenic E. coli F4ab/ac Receptor Negative

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dong; Wu, Qiong; Song, Dan; Dicksved, Johan; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric diseases. Low, moderate, or high doses of a Bacillus licheniformis-B. subtilis mixture (BLS mix) were orally administered to piglets of genotype MUC4 that are supposed to be F4-expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (F4+ ETEC) F4ab/ac receptor negative (i.e., MUC4-resistant piglets) for 1 week before F4+ ETEC challenge. The luminal contents were collected from the mucosa of the colon on day 8 after F4+ ETEC challenge. The BLS mix attenuated E. coli-induced expansion of Bacteroides uniformis, Eubacterium eligens, Acetanaerobacterium, and Sporobacter populations. Clostridium and Turicibacter populations increased following F4+ ETEC challenge in pigs pretreated with low-dose BLS mix. Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius populations increased after administration of BLS mix during E. coli infection. The beneficial effects of BLS mix were due in part to the expansion of certain Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Turicibacter populations, with a corresponding increase in the number of goblet cells in the ileum via upregulated Atoh1 expression, in turn increasing MUC2 production and thus preserving the mucus barrier and enhancing host defenses against enteropathogenic bacteria. However, excessive BLS mix consumption may increase the risk for enteritis, partly through disruption of colonic microbial ecology, characterized by expansion of Proteobacteria and impaired goblet cell function in the ileum. Our findings suggest that oral administration of BLS mix reprograms the gut microbiota and enhances goblet cell function to ameliorate enteritis. IMPORTANCE The present study is important for improving our understanding of the protective role of probiotics against Escherichia coli infection in piglets. Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric

  13. Oral Administration of a Select Mixture of Bacillus Probiotics Affects the Gut Microbiota and Goblet Cell Function following Escherichia coli Challenge in Newly Weaned Pigs of Genotype MUC4 That Are Supposed To Be Enterotoxigenic E. coli F4ab/ac Receptor Negative.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yao-Hong; Zhou, Dong; Wu, Qiong; Song, Dan; Dicksved, Johan; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric diseases. Low, moderate, or high doses of a Bacillus licheniformis-B. subtilis mixture (BLS mix) were orally administered to piglets of genotype MUC4 that are supposed to be F4-expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (F4 + ETEC) F4ab/ac receptor negative (i.e., MUC4-resistant piglets) for 1 week before F4 + ETEC challenge. The luminal contents were collected from the mucosa of the colon on day 8 after F4 + ETEC challenge. The BLS mix attenuated E. coli-induced expansion of Bacteroides uniformis, Eubacterium eligens, Acetanaerobacterium, and Sporobacter populations. Clostridium and Turicibacter populations increased following F4 + ETEC challenge in pigs pretreated with low-dose BLS mix. Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius populations increased after administration of BLS mix during E. coli infection. The beneficial effects of BLS mix were due in part to the expansion of certain Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Turicibacter populations, with a corresponding increase in the number of goblet cells in the ileum via upregulated Atoh1 expression, in turn increasing MUC2 production and thus preserving the mucus barrier and enhancing host defenses against enteropathogenic bacteria. However, excessive BLS mix consumption may increase the risk for enteritis, partly through disruption of colonic microbial ecology, characterized by expansion of Proteobacteria and impaired goblet cell function in the ileum. Our findings suggest that oral administration of BLS mix reprograms the gut microbiota and enhances goblet cell function to ameliorate enteritis. The present study is important for improving our understanding of the protective role of probiotics against Escherichia coli infection in piglets. Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric diseases. In this

  14. Heavy metal and selenium levels in endangered wood storks Mycteria americana from nesting colonies in Florida and Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Rodgers, J A; Gochfeld, M

    1993-05-01

    Colonially-nesting birds often nest in coastal areas, along rivers, or near other bodies of water that also are potentially polluted from industrial, agricultural or urban development. The levels of heavy metals and selenium were examined in the feathers of young wood storks Mycteria americana nesting in Northeastern Florida and from adult and young storks nesting on the Tempisque River on the west coast of Costa Rica. There were no significant yearly differences among the chicks from Costa Rica. Concentration of mercury, cadmium, and lead were significantly higher in the chicks from Florida compared to those from Costa Rica. Adult wood storks at Costa Rica had significantly higher levels of lead, cadmium, selenium, and manganese than young from the same colony.

  15. Female gonadal hormones and reproductive behaviors as key determinants of successful reproductive output of breeding whooping cranes (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Megan E; Converse, Sarah J.; Chandler, Jane N.; Shafer, Charles; Brown, Janine L; Keefer, Carol L; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive success of endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) maintained ex situ is poor. As part of an effort to identify potential causes of poor reproductive success in a captive colony, we used non-invasive endocrine monitoring to assess gonadal and adrenal steroids of bird pairs with various reproductive outcomes and evaluated the relationships of hormones and behaviors to reproductive performance. Overall, reproductively successful (i.e., egg laying) females had significantly higher mean estrogen levels but lower mean progestogen concentrations than did unsuccessful females. Other hormones, including glucocorticoids and androgens, were not significantly different between successful and unsuccessful individuals. Observations of specific behaviors such as unison calling, marching, and the number of copulation attempts, along with overall time spent performing reproductive behaviors, were significantly higher in successful pairs. Our findings indicate that overall reproductive performance of whooping crane pairs is linked to female gonadal hormone excretion and reproductive behaviors, but not to altered adrenal hormone production.

  16. Female gonadal hormones and reproductive behaviors as key determinants of successful reproductive output of breeding whooping cranes (Grus americana).

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan E; Converse, Sarah J; Chandler, Jane N; Shafer, Charles; Brown, Janine L; Keefer, Carol L; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2016-05-01

    Reproductive success of endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) maintained ex situ is poor. As part of an effort to identify potential causes of poor reproductive success in a captive colony, we used non-invasive endocrine monitoring to assess gonadal and adrenal steroids of bird pairs with various reproductive outcomes and evaluated the relationships of hormones and behaviors to reproductive performance. Overall, reproductively successful (i.e., egg laying) females had significantly higher mean estrogen levels but lower mean progestogen concentrations than did unsuccessful females. Other hormones, including glucocorticoids and androgens, were not significantly different between successful and unsuccessful individuals. Observations of specific behaviors such as unison calling, marching, and the number of copulation attempts, along with overall time spent performing reproductive behaviors, were significantly higher in successful pairs. Our findings indicate that overall reproductive performance of whooping crane pairs is linked to female gonadal hormone excretion and reproductive behaviors, but not to altered adrenal hormone production. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Tracking a genetic signal of extinction-recolonization events in a neotropical tree species: Vouacapoua americana Aublet in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Dutech, Cyril; Maggia, Laurent; Tardy, Christophe; Joly, Hélène I; Jarne, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    Drier periods from the late Pleistocene and early Holocene have been hypothesized to have caused the disappearance of various rainforest species over large geographical areas in South America and restricted the extant populations to mesic sites. Subsequent improvement in climatic conditions has been associated with recolonization. Changes in population size associated with these extinction-recolonization events should have affected genetic diversity within species. However, these historical hypotheses and their genetic consequences have rarely been tested in South America. Here, we examine the diversity of the chloroplast and nuclear genomes in a Neotropical rainforest tree species, Vouacapoua americana (Leguminosae, Caesalpinioideae) in French Guiana. The chloroplast diversity was analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (six pairs of primers) in 29 populations distributed over most of French Guiana, and a subset of 17 populations was also analyzed at nine polymorphic microsatellite loci. To determine whether this species has experienced extinction-recolonization, we sampled populations in areas supposedly not or only slightly affected by climatic changes, where the populations would not have experienced frequent extinction, and in areas that appear to have been recently recolonized. In the putatively recolonized areas, we found patches of several thousands of hectares homogeneous for chloroplast variation that can be interpreted as the effect of recolonization processes from several geographical origins. In addition, we observed that, for both chloroplast and nuclear genomes, the populations in newly recolonized areas exhibited a significantly smaller allelic richness than others. Controlling for geographic distance, we also detected a significant correlation between chloroplast and nuclear population differentiation. This result indicates a cytonuclear disequilibrium that can be interpreted as a historical signal

  18. Antifungal Properties of Crude Extracts, Fractions, and Purified Compounds from Bark of Curatella americana L. (Dilleniaceae) against Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Mendes de Toledo, Cleyton Eduardo; Santos, Patrícia Regina; Palazzo de Mello, João Carlos; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia

    2015-01-01

    The ethnomedicinal plant Curatella americana L. (Dilleniaceae) is a common shrub in the Brazilian cerrado, in which crude extract showed antifungal activity in a preliminary study. In this work, the antifungal and cytotoxic properties of the crude extract, fractions, and isolated compounds from C. americana were evaluated against the standard yeast strains Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis, clinical isolates, and fluconazole-resistant strains. The combinatory effects between subfractions and isolated compounds and effects on cell morphology, virulence factors, and exogenous ergosterol were also evaluated. The MIC obtained against the Candida species including fluconazole-resistant strain ranged from 15.3 to 31.3 µg/mL for crude extract, 3.9 to 15.6 µg/mL for ethyl acetate fraction, and 7.8 to 31.3 µg/mL for subfractions. The isolated compounds identified as 4′-O-methyl-catechin, epicatechin-3-O-gallate, and 4′-O-methyl-catechin-3-O-gallate showed lower antifungal activity than the crude extract and fractions (MIC ranging from 31.3 to 125.0 µg/mL). The addition of exogenous ergosterol to yeast culture did not interfere in the antifungal activity of the extract and its fractions. Synergistic antifungal activity was observed between subfractions and isolated compounds. The effects on virulence factors and the different mechanisms of action compared to fluconazole and nystatin suggest that this ethnomedicinal plant may be an effective alternative treatment for candidiasis. PMID:26347790

  19. Brain-midgut short neuropeptide F mechanism that inhibits digestive activity of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana upon starvation.

    PubMed

    Mikani, Azam; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Takeda, Makio

    2012-03-01

    Immunohistochemical reactivity against short neuropeptide F (sNPF) was observed in the brain-corpus cardiacum and midgut paraneurons of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Four weeks of starvation increased the number of sNPF-ir cells in the midgut epithelium but the refeeding decreased the number in 3h. Dramatic rises in sNPF contents in the midgut epithelium and hemolymph of roaches starved for 4 weeks were confirmed by ELISA. Starvation for 4 weeks reduced α-amylase, protease and lipase activities in the midgut of P. americana but refeeding restored these to high levels. Co-incubation of dissected midgut with sNPF at physiological concentrations inhibited α-amylase, protease and lipase activities. sNPF injection into the hemocoel led to a decrease in α-amylase, protease and lipase activities, whereas PBS injection had no effects. The injection of d-(+)-trehalose and l-proline into the hemocoel of decapitated adult male cockroaches that had been starved for 4 weeks had no effect on these digestive enzymes. However, injection into the hemocoel of head-intact starved cockroaches stimulated digestive activity. Injection of d-(+)-trehalose and l-proline into the lumen of decapitated cockroaches that had been starved for 4 weeks increased enzymes activities and suppressed sNPF in the midgut. Our data indicate that sNPF from the midgut paraneurons suppresses α-amylase, protease and lipase activities during starvation. Injection of d-(+)-trehalose/l-proline into the hemocoel of head-intact starved cockroach decreased the hemolymph sNPF content, which suggests that sNPF could be one of the brain factors, demonstrating brain-midgut interplay in the regulation of digestive activities and possibly nutrition-associated behavioral modifications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Specific B-cell Epitope of Per a 1: A Major Allergen of American Cockroach (Periplaneta americana) and Anatomical Localization.

    PubMed

    Sookrung, Nitat; Khetsuphan, Thanyathon; Chaisri, Urai; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Reamtong, Onrapak; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee

    2014-07-01

    Cockroach (CR) is a common source of indoor allergens, and Per a 1 is a major American CR (Periplaneta americana) allergen; however, several attributes of this protein remain unknown. This study identifies a novel specific B cell epitope and anatomical locations of Per a 1.0105. Recombinant Per a 1.0105 (rPer a 1.0105) was used as BALB/c mouse immunogen for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAb). The MAb specific B cell epitope was identified by determining phage mimotopic peptides and pair-wise alignment of the peptides with the rPer a 1.0105 amino acid sequence. Locations of the Per a 1.0105 in P. americana were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The rPer a 1.0105 (~13 kDa) had 100%, 98% and ≥90% identity to Per a 1.0105, Per a 1.0101, and Cr-PII, respectively. The B-cell epitope of the Per a 1.0105 specific-MAb was located at residues(99) QDLLLQLRDKGV(110) contained in all 5 Per a 1.01 isoforms and Per a 1.02. The epitope was analogous to the Bla g 1.02 epitope; however, this B-cell epitope was not an IgE inducer. Per a 1.0105 was found in the midgut and intestinal content of American CR but not in the other organs. The amount of the Per a 1 was ~544 ℃g per gram of feces. The novel Per a 1 B-cell epitope described in this study is a useful target for allergen quantification in samples; however, the specific MAb can be used as an allergen detection reagent. The MAb based-affinity resin can be made for allergen purification, and the so-purified protein can serve as a standard and diagnostic allergen as well as a therapeutic vaccine component. The finding that the Per a 1 is contained in the midgut and feces is useful to increase yield and purity when preparing this allergen.

  1. Specific B-cell Epitope of Per a 1: A Major Allergen of American Cockroach (Periplaneta americana) and Anatomical Localization

    PubMed Central

    Sookrung, Nitat; Khetsuphan, Thanyathon; Chaisri, Urai; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Reamtong, Onrapak; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cockroach (CR) is a common source of indoor allergens, and Per a 1 is a major American CR (Periplaneta americana) allergen; however, several attributes of this protein remain unknown. This study identifies a novel specific B cell epitope and anatomical locations of Per a 1.0105. Methods Recombinant Per a 1.0105 (rPer a 1.0105) was used as BALB/c mouse immunogen for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAb). The MAb specific B cell epitope was identified by determining phage mimotopic peptides and pair-wise alignment of the peptides with the rPer a 1.0105 amino acid sequence. Locations of the Per a 1.0105 in P. americana were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. Results The rPer a 1.0105 (~13 kDa) had 100%, 98% and ≥90% identity to Per a 1.0105, Per a 1.0101, and Cr-PII, respectively. The B-cell epitope of the Per a 1.0105 specific-MAb was located at residues99 QDLLLQLRDKGV110 contained in all 5 Per a 1.01 isoforms and Per a 1.02. The epitope was analogous to the Bla g 1.02 epitope; however, this B-cell epitope was not an IgE inducer. Per a 1.0105 was found in the midgut and intestinal content of American CR but not in the other organs. The amount of the Per a 1 was ~544 ℃g per gram of feces. Conclusions The novel Per a 1 B-cell epitope described in this study is a useful target for allergen quantification in samples; however, the specific MAb can be used as an allergen detection reagent. The MAb based-affinity resin can be made for allergen purification, and the so-purified protein can serve as a standard and diagnostic allergen as well as a therapeutic vaccine component. The finding that the Per a 1 is contained in the midgut and feces is useful to increase yield and purity when preparing this allergen. PMID:24991456

  2. Biological Responses of the American Coot (Fulica americana), in wetlands with contrasting environmental conditions (Basin of México).

    PubMed

    López-Islas, María Eugenia; Ibarra-Meza, Itzel; Ortiz-Ordóñez, Esperanza; Favari, Liliana; Elías Sedeño-Díaz, J; López-López, Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Wetland ecosystems are subject to severe impacts (physical and chemical) and to the input of various xenobiotics that provoke toxicological consequences. Waterbirds are potential sentinel species of these environments. To analyze how habitat conditions affect the health of Fulica americana, early-warning biomarkers, histopathology, somatic indices, and water quality were examined in two wetlands of the Basin of Mexico: Xochimilco, an urban wetland highly eutrophic with a mixture of pollutants, and Tecocomulco (the reference site), a rural wetland with hunting migratory birds in winter, and with some agricultural contaminants. Coots were collected over 1 year, and the birds were aged, eviscerated, and weighed. Liver samples were analyzed biochemically and histologically. Biomarkers revealed that coots displayed higher lipid peroxidation and elevated activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase and alanine aminotransferase, suggesting hepatic damage during autumn and winter. In Tecocomulco, coots during winter has the highest thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (as a measure of oxidative stress), which may be associated with the presence of predators. In Tecocomulco, the higher gonadosomatic index was detected in spring and summer, while in Xochimilco it was elevated in summer, indicating a delayed egg laying and reproduction in coots from the latter study site. In both wetlands, leukocyte infiltration, alone or combined with vasocongestion, reflected alterations in the inflammatory processes in liver throughout the annual cycle and thus potentially altered hepatic function and organism survival. In both wetlands, coots were permanent residents and chronically exposed to different stressors, suggesting damage may be irreversible with potentially adversely reproductive consequences.

  3. Identifying nest predators of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, G.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Takekawa, John Y.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Eadie, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated predation on nests and methods to detect predators using a combination of infrared cameras and plasticine eggs at nests of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, California. Each technique indicated that predation was prevalent; 59% of monitored nests were depredated. Most identifiable predation (n = 49) was caused by mammals (71%) and rates of predation were similar on avocets and stilts. Raccoons (Procyon lotor) and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) each accounted for 16% of predations, whereas gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and avian predators each accounted for 14%. Mammalian predation was mainly nocturnal (mean time, 0051 h ?? 5 h 36 min), whereas most avian predation was in late afternoon (mean time, 1800 h ?? 1 h 26 min). Nests with cameras and plasticine eggs were 1.6 times more likely to be predated than nests where only cameras were used in monitoring. Cameras were associated with lower abandonment of nests and provided definitive identification of predators.

  4. Identifying nest predators of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Takekawa, John Y.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Eadie, John M.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated predation on nests and methods to detect predators using a combination of infrared cameras and plasticine eggs at nests of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, California. Each technique indicated that predation was prevalent; 59% of monitored nests were depredated. Most identifiable predation (n = 49) was caused by mammals (71%) and rates of predation were similar on avocets and stilts. Raccoons (Procyon lotor) and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) each accounted for 16% of predations, whereas gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and avian predators each accounted for 14%. Mammalian predation was mainly nocturnal (mean time, 0051 h +/- 5 h 36 min), whereas most avian predation was in late afternoon (mean time, 1800 h +/- 1 h 26 min). Nests with cameras and plasticine eggs were 1.6 times more likely to be predated than nests where only cameras were used in monitoring. Cameras were associated with lower abandonment of nests and provided definitive identification of predators.

  5. Reproductive Ecology and Habitat Use of Pacific Black Scoters (Melanitta nigra americana) Nesting on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schamber, Jason L.

    2010-01-01

    Abundance indices of Black Scoters (Melanitta nigra. americana) breeding in Alaska indicate a long-term population decline without obvious cause (s). However, few life history data are available for the species in North America. In 2001–2004, information was collected on nesting habitat and reproductive parameters (i.e. components of productivity) from a population of Black Scoters nesting on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska. A total of 157 nests were found over four years. Primarily, nests were among dense vegetation in shrub edge habitat, predominantly dwarf birch (Betula glandulosa) and Alaska spiraea (Spiraea beauverdiana), an average of 58 m from water. Females initiated nests from 11 June and 17 July across years. Clutch size averaged 7.5 eggs and did not vary annually. Nest success was highly variable among years and ranged from 0.01 to 0.37. Duckling survival to 30 days old varied among years, and ranged from 0.09 – 0.35. Nest success was poor in three of four years, likely due to predation by Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes). Black Scoters appear to have low but variable productivity, consistent with life-history patterns of other sea duck species. Information gained will direct future demographic research on Black Scoters, and highlights knowledge gaps impeding management strategies needed for population recovery.

  6. Hindlimb bone maturation during postnatal life in the Greater Rhea (Rhea americana, Aves, Palaeognathae): Implications for palaeobiological and zooarchaeological interpretations.

    PubMed

    Picasso, Mariana B J; Barbeito, Claudio Gustavo

    2018-06-03

    The objective of this study was to study the morphological pattern of bone maturation of the hindlimb bones of Rhea americana and find out how it can affect bone morphology after a taphonomic process. Juvenile specimens (n = 10) ranging from one month old to eight months old were studied. For comparison, bones from adults and juveniles from museum specimens (n = 4 and n = 6, respectively) were studied. In fresh bones, ossification centres were identified in the proximal and distal epiphyses of the tibiotarsi and in the proximal epiphysis of the tarsometatarsi, whereas the distal region of the femora and tarsometatarsi showed abundance of cartilage. The development and extension of the ossification centres of the tibiotarsi were different. In the proximal epiphysis, the centre presented less development with respect to the distal epiphysis. In the dry tibiotarsi, the proximal centre was absent and the distal one was well preserved. Both the fresh and dry juvenile tarsometatarsi presented unfused metatarsals and bulkier and wider aspect than the adult ones. The dry femora presented a noticeable excavation between condyles, whereas the dry tarsometatarsi showed the absence of the proximal epiphysis. The femora, tibiotarsi and tarsometatarsi possessed different traits of immaturity, which differentially affect the morphology of the preserved bones during a taphonomic process. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Haemosporida prevalence and diversity are similar in endangered wild whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sympatric sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis).

    PubMed

    Bertram, Miranda R; Hamer, Gabriel L; Hartup, Barry K; Snowden, Karen F; Medeiros, Matthew C; Hamer, Sarah A

    2017-04-01

    The population growth of endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) is not consistent with species recovery goals, and the impact of parasite infection on whooping crane populations is largely unknown. Disease ecology and epidemiology research of endangered species is often hindered by limited ability to conduct invasive sampling on the target taxa. Accordingly, we hypothesized that sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) would be a useful surrogate species to investigate the health impacts of Haemosporida infection in whooping cranes. Our goal was to compare the prevalence and diversity of Haemosporida infection between whooping cranes and sandhill cranes. We detected an overall infection prevalence of 83·6% (n = 61) in whooping cranes and 59·6% (n = 47) and 63·6 (n = 22) in two sympatric sandhill crane populations captured in Texas. Prevalence was significantly lower in allopatric sandhill cranes captured in New Mexico (12·1%, n = 33). Haemoproteus antigonis was the most abundant haemoparasite in cranes, present in 57·4% of whooping cranes and 39·2% of sandhill cranes; Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon were present at significantly lower levels. The high prevalence of Haemosporida in whooping cranes and sympatric sandhill cranes, with shared parasite lineages between the two species, supports sandhill cranes as a surrogate species for understanding health threats to endangered whooping cranes.

  8. Ecological carryover effects associated with partial migration in white perch (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Brian K.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Secor, David H.

    2018-01-01

    Partial migration in complex life cycles allows environmental conditions experienced during one life-stage to interact with genetic thresholds and produce divergent spatial behaviors in the next stage. We evaluated partial migration over the entire life cycle of white perch, (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary, combining otolith microchemistry, population demographics and environmental data analysis. Ecological carryover effects were used as a framework to test how environmental variation during the larval period influenced migration behaviors and growth characteristics in subsequent life-stages. Two annual cohorts of juveniles were classified based on whether they persisted in natal habitats (freshwater resident contingent) or dispersed into non-natal habitats (brackish water migratory contingent) as juveniles. The migratory contingent tended to hatch earlier and experience cooler temperatures as larvae, while the availability of zooplankton prey during the larval period appeared to influence growth dynamics before and after metamorphosis. Juvenile migration behaviors were reversible but usually persisted into adulthood. As juveniles, the consequences of partial migration on growth appeared to be modified by river flow, as demonstrated by the influence of a large storm event on feeding conditions in one of the study years. Migratory adults grew faster and attained larger maximum sizes, but may also experience higher rates of mortality. The interplay uncovered between life-stage transitions, conditional migration behaviors and habitat productivity throughout the life cycle shapes white perch population dynamics and will likely play an important role in responses to long-term environmental change.

  9. POTENTIAL OF DISCARIA AMERICANA FOR METAL STABILIZATION ON SOILS AMENDED WITH BIOSOLIDS AND ASH-SPIKED BIOSOLIDS.

    PubMed

    Torri, Silvana Irene; Zubillaga, Marta; Cusato, Martha

    2009-02-01

    Biosolids (B) may contain various types of environmental pollutants, which can exert phytotoxic effects in plants. The effect of aqueous extracts on seed germination and the primary root growth of discaria (Discaria americana) obtained from different soil-application rates of B and a mixture of B and incinerated B were investigated. The objective was to evaluate the potential use of discaria for the stabilization of B-amended soils. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was used for comparison. Compared to ryegrass, relative seed germination (RSG) was significantly lower for discaria. RSG of discaria and rye grass was inversely correlated to the electrical conductivity of extracts, although a significant adverse effect was only observed for ryegrass with the highest dose of the mixture of B and incinerated B. This dose also produced a reduction in the germination index of discaria, which could not be correlated with the parameters studied. The B extracts did not exert any significant adverse effect on the relative root growth of both species. An increase in relative root growth and germination index was observed for discaria with a field application rate equivalent of 156 t DW ha -1 of B, suggesting a stimulating effect of the amendment. The results obtained in this study suggest that germinated seedlings of discaria might be used for the stabilization of B-amended soils. However, further greenhouse and field experiments should be performed to confirm these findings.

  10. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  11. Biogenic amines in the nervous system of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana following envenomation by the jewel wasp, Ampulex compressa.

    PubMed

    Banks, Christopher N; Adams, Michael E

    2012-02-01

    The emerald jewel wasp, Ampulex compressa, exploits the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, as a host for its progeny. The wasp subdues the host by stinging directly into the brain and subesophageal ganglion, inducing long-term hypokinesia. The hypokinesic host lacks normal escape behavior and motivation to walk, making it easy for subjugation by the wasp. The mechanism underlying hypokinesia induction is not known, but depletion of monoamines induces behavior resembling venom-induced hypokinesia. To test whether amine depletion occurs in stung animals, we used high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED) to measure quantitatively amine levels in the central nervous system. Our data show clearly that levels of dopamine, serotonin, octopamine and tyramine remain unchanged in stung animals, whereas animals treated with reserpine exhibited marked depletion of all amines sampled. Furthermore, stung animals treated with reserpine show depletion of amines, demonstrating that envenomation also does not interfere with amine release. These results show that hypokinesia induced by Ampulex venom does not result from amine depletion or inability to release monoamines in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Winter activity patterns of American martens (Martes americana): Rejection of the hypothesis of thermal-cost minimization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, Gary S.; Bissonette, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Despite their temperate to subarctic geographic range, American martens (Martes americana) possess a thermally inefficient morphology. The lack of morphological adaptations for reducing thermal costs suggests that marten may use behavioral strategies to optimize thermal budgets. During the winters of 1989–1990 and 1990–1991, we radio-collared and monitored the diel activity of 7 martens. A log-linear model suggested that the presence or absence of light was the only factor associated with marten activity patterns (p < 0.001). A regression of the percentage of active fixes on ambient temperature failed to detect an association (b = −4.45, p = 0.084, n = 12). Contents of marten scats suggested that their activity was consistent with the prey-vulnerability hypothesis. While martens must balance multiple life requisites, their activity patterns suggest that they accept increased thermal costs in order to increase foraging efficiency. However, the nocturnal activity of martens during winter was also consistent with the hypothesis that they may be able to limit their own exposure to predation risk. The nocturnal habits of Newfoundland martens in the winter were consistent with the hypothesis of avoidance of predation risk.

  13. MDA DS COI Spiral 3 - NOA, SILO and ABAC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    agencies. The National Plan to Achieve MDA, a by-product of the Maritime Security Policy, established the national maritime common operating picture...information about vessels determined to be of interest by intelligence and operational organizations and is normally classified or highly sensitive. Exposing...makes it available to its users. For Spiral 3, the Coast Guard team, consisting of CG-26, the Operations Systems Center (OSC), and the Coast Guard

  14. Restoration of wildcelery, Vallisneria americana Michx., in the lower Detroit River of the Lake Huron-Lake Erie Corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, D.W.; Manny, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    American wildcelery (Vallisneria americana Michx.) is a valuable submersed aquatic plant that was negatively affected by pollution and urban runoff in the lower Detroit River for much of the 20th century. Following 25 years of water-pollution and urban-runoff abatement initiated in the early 1970s, we postulated that water clarity had increased and that this would allow restoration of wildcelery in the lower Detroit River. In addition, water clarity increased in the late 1980s due to water filtration and particulate removal by exotic dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis), which could contribute to potential wildcelery restoration. We sampled wildcelery in 1996–97 and compared these data to wildcelery data from 1950–51 and 1984–85. Over the 48-year period of comparison, areal density of wildcelery tubers decreased 72% (from 51.2 million to 14.4 million tubers) between 1950–51 and 1984–85 then increased 251% (from14.4 million to 50.5 million tubers) between 1984–85 and 1996–97. As a result, overall areal abundance was about the same in 1950–51 as in fall 1996–97. However, tuber densities in spring 1996 were similar to historical low abundances in springs of 1984–85. Then between spring and fall 1996, tuber densities increased 333% and remained relatively abundant through October 1997 indicating the beginning of the restoration of wildcelery in the lower Detroit River. In addition, we believe further reductions of turbidity through continued pollution-abatement programs and water filtration by dreissenid mussels combined with habitat protection and active management of wildcelery will contribute even further to the restoration of wildcelery in the Detroit River in the 21st century.

  15. Jagua blue derived from Genipa americana L. fruit: A natural alternative to commonly used blue food colorants?

    PubMed

    Brauch, J E; Zapata-Porras, S P; Buchweitz, M; Aschoff, J K; Carle, R

    2016-11-01

    Due to consumers' increasing health awareness, food industry aims at replacing synthetic dyes by natural counterparts. The substitution of blue synthetic dyes is particularly challenging since current natural alternatives such as phycocyanin (Spirulina) suffer from poor stability. Jagua blue (produced from Genipa americana L. fruit) might represent a potential novel blue pigment source. However, only little is known about its color properties, and application in food systems. Therefore, the blue color and the stability of Jagua blue were assessed for the first time and compared to commonly used colorants, namely, Spirulina, brilliant blue FCF (Blue no. 1), and indigo carmine (Blue no. 2). The reaction rate of Jagua blue was independent of its concentration, confirming thermal degradation to follow first-order kinetics. Between pH 3.6 and 5.0, the color hue of Jagua blue solutions was similar to that of Blue no. 2. However, Jagua blue revealed markedly higher storage stabilities (t 1/2 =86-105days) than Blue no. 2 (t 1 /2 ≤9days) and was less susceptible to acidic pH of 3.6 (t 1 /2 =86days) than Spirulina (t 1 /2 =70days). High negative b* values (blueness) of colored gelatin gels were only obtained for Jagua blue and Spirulina, and the former exhibited higher light stabilities (t 1 /2 =15days) than Spirulina gels (t 1 /2 =4days). Our findings indicate Jagua blue to be a most promising alternative to synthetic dyes, providing relevant information regarding potential food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anticonvulsant and Antioxidant Effects of Tilia americana var. mexicana and Flavonoids Constituents in the Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; González-Trujano, María Eva; Aguirre-Hernández, Eva; Ruíz-García, Matilde; Sampieri, Aristides; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Tilia genus is commonly used around the world for its central nervous system properties; it is prepared as tea and used as tranquilizing, anticonvulsant, and analgesic. In this study, anticonvulsant activity of the Tilia americana var. mexicana inflorescences and leaves was investigated by evaluating organic and aqueous extracts (100, 300, and 600 mg/kg, i.p.) and some flavonoids in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice. Moreover, antioxidant effect of these extracts and flavonoids was examined in an in vitro study by using spectrophotometric technique. Significant activity was observed in the methanol extract from inflorescences. An HPLC analysis of the methanol extract from inflorescences and leaves of Tilia allowed demonstrating the respective presence of some partial responsible flavonoid constituents: quercetin (20.09 ± 1.20 μg/mg and 3.39 ± 0.10 μg/mg), rutin (3.52 ± 0.21 μg/mg and 8.94 ± 0.45 μg/mg), and isoquercitrin (1.74 ± 0.01 μg/mg and 1.24 ± 0.13 μg/mg). In addition, significant but different antioxidant properties were obtained among the flavonoids and the extracts investigated. Our results provide evidence of the anticonvulsant activity of Tilia reinforcing its utility for central nervous system diseases whose mechanism of action might involve partial antioxidant effects due to the presence of flavonoids. PMID:25197430

  17. Diurnal time-activity budgets of redheads (Aythya americana) wintering in seagrass beds and coastal ponds in Louisiana and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michot, T.C.; Woodin, M.C.; Adair, S.E.; Moser, E.B.

    2006-01-01

    Diurnal time-activity budgets were determined for wintering redheads (Aythya americana) from estuarine seagrass beds in Louisiana (Chandeleur Sound) and Texas (Laguna Madre) and from ponds adjacent to the Laguna Madre. Activities differed (p<0.0001) by location, month, and diurnal time period. Resting and feeding were the most frequent activities of redheads at the two estuarine sites, whereas drinking was almost nonexistent. Birds on ponds in Texas engaged most frequently in resting and drinking, but feeding was very infrequent. Redheads from the Louisiana estuarine site rested less than birds in Texas at either the Laguna Madre or freshwater ponds. Redheads in Louisiana fed more than birds in Texas; this was partially because of weather differences (colder temperatures in Louisiana), but the location effect was still significant even when we adjusted the model for weather effects. Redheads in Louisiana showed increased resting and decreased feeding as winter progressed, but redheads in Texas did not exhibit a seasonal pattern in either resting or feeding. In Louisiana, birds maintained a high level of feeding activity during the early morning throughout the winter, whereas afternoon feeding tapered off in mid- to late-winter. Texas birds showed a shift from morning feeding in early winter to afternoon feeding in late winter. Males and females at both Chandeleur Sound and Laguna Madre showed differences in their activities, but because the absolute difference seldom exceeded 2%, biological significance is questionable. Diurnal time-activity budgets of redheads on the wintering grounds are influenced by water salinities and the use of dietary fresh water, as well as by weather conditions, tides, and perhaps vegetation differences between sites. The opportunity to osmoregulate via dietary freshwater, vs. via nasal salt glands, may have a significant effect on behavioral allocations. ?? Springer 2006.

  18. Supplemental feeding for ecotourism reverses diel activity and alters movement patterns and spatial distribution of the southern stingray, Dasyatis americana.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Mark J; Wetherbee, Bradley M; Shivji, Mahmood S; Potenski, Matthew D; Chapman, Demian D; Harvey, Guy M

    2013-01-01

    Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, have been provided supplemental food in ecotourism operations at Stingray City Sandbar (SCS), Grand Cayman since 1986, with this site becoming one of the world's most famous and heavily visited marine wildlife interaction venues. Given expansion of marine wildlife interactive tourism worldwide, there are questions about the effects of such activities on the focal species and their ecosystems. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and tag-recapture efforts to test the hypothesis that human-sourced supplemental feeding has altered stingray activity patterns and habitat use at SCS relative to wild animals at control sites. Secondarily, we also qualitatively estimated the population size of stingrays supporting this major ecotourism venue. Tag-recapture data indicated that a population of at least 164 stingrays, over 80% female, utilized the small area at SCS for prolonged periods of time. Examination of comparative movements of mature female stingrays at SCS and control sites revealed strong differences between the two groups: The fed animals demonstrated a notable inversion of diel activity, being constantly active during the day with little movement at night compared to the nocturnally active wild stingrays; The fed stingrays utilized significantly (p<0.05) smaller 24 hour activity spaces compared to wild conspecifics, staying in close proximity to the ecotourism site; Fed stingrays showed a high degree of overlap in their core activity spaces compared to wild stingrays which were largely solitary in the spaces utilized (72% vs. 3% overlap respectively). Supplemental feeding has strikingly altered movement behavior and spatial distribution of the stingrays, and generated an atypically high density of animals at SCS which could have downstream fitness costs for individuals and potentially broader ecosystem effects. These findings should help environmental managers plan mitigating measures for existing operations, and

  19. Supplemental Feeding for Ecotourism Reverses Diel Activity and Alters Movement Patterns and Spatial Distribution of the Southern Stingray, Dasyatis americana

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Mark J.; Wetherbee, Bradley M.; Shivji, Mahmood S.; Potenski, Matthew D.; Chapman, Demian D.; Harvey, Guy M.

    2013-01-01

    Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, have been provided supplemental food in ecotourism operations at Stingray City Sandbar (SCS), Grand Cayman since 1986, with this site becoming one of the world’s most famous and heavily visited marine wildlife interaction venues. Given expansion of marine wildlife interactive tourism worldwide, there are questions about the effects of such activities on the focal species and their ecosystems. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and tag-recapture efforts to test the hypothesis that human-sourced supplemental feeding has altered stingray activity patterns and habitat use at SCS relative to wild animals at control sites. Secondarily, we also qualitatively estimated the population size of stingrays supporting this major ecotourism venue. Tag-recapture data indicated that a population of at least 164 stingrays, over 80% female, utilized the small area at SCS for prolonged periods of time. Examination of comparative movements of mature female stingrays at SCS and control sites revealed strong differences between the two groups: The fed animals demonstrated a notable inversion of diel activity, being constantly active during the day with little movement at night compared to the nocturnally active wild stingrays; The fed stingrays utilized significantly (p<0.05) smaller 24 hour activity spaces compared to wild conspecifics, staying in close proximity to the ecotourism site; Fed stingrays showed a high degree of overlap in their core activity spaces compared to wild stingrays which were largely solitary in the spaces utilized (72% vs. 3% overlap respectively). Supplemental feeding has strikingly altered movement behavior and spatial distribution of the stingrays, and generated an atypically high density of animals at SCS which could have downstream fitness costs for individuals and potentially broader ecosystem effects. These findings should help environmental managers plan mitigating measures for existing operations, and

  20. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  1. Spirochaeta Americana sp. Nov., A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochaete Isolated from Soda Mona Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microns. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 C (optimum 37 C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 % NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG1(sup T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(sup T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(sup T) revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7 %. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(sup T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC 13AA-392(sup T) = DSM 14872(sup T)).

  2. Molecular and functional characterization of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, Rab5: the first exopterygotan low molecular weight ovarian GTPase during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Elmogy, Mohamed; Mohamed, Amr A; Tufail, Muhammad; Uno, Tomohide; Takeda, Makio

    2017-05-26

    The small Rab GTPases are key regulators of membrane vesicle trafficking. Ovaries of Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus) (Blattodea: Blattidae) have small molecular weight GTP/ATP-binding proteins during early and late vitellogenic periods of oogenesis. However, the identification and characterization of the detected proteins have not been yet reported. Herein, we cloned a cDNA encoding Rab5 from the American cockroach, P. americana, ovaries (PamRab5). It comprises 796 bp, encoding a protein of 213 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 23.5 kDa. PamRab5 exists as a single-copy gene in the P. americana genome, as revealed by Southern blot analysis. An approximate 2.6 kb ovarian mRNA was transcribed especially at high levels in the previtellogenic ovaries, detected by Northern blot analysis. The muscle and head tissues also showed high levels of PamRab5 transcript. PamRab5 protein was localized, via immunofluorescence labeling, to germline-derived cells of the oocytes, very early during oocyte differentiation. Immunoblotting detected a ∼25 kDa signal as a membrane-associated form revealed after application of detergent in the extraction buffer, and 23 kDa as a cytosolic form consistent with the predicted molecular weight from amino acid sequence in different tissues including ovary, muscles and head. The PamRab5 during late vitellogenic periods is required to regulate the endocytotic machinery during oogenesis in this cockroach. This is the first report on Rab5 from a hemimetabolan, and presents an inaugural step in probing the molecular premises of insect oocyte endocytotic trafficking important for oogenesis and embryonic development. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Characterization of Mn-resistant endophytic bacteria from Mn-hyperaccumulator Phytolacca americana and their impact on Mn accumulation of hybrid penisetum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Wei; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Three hundred Mn-resistant endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Mn-hyperaccumulator, Phytolacca americana, grown at different levels of Mn (0, 1, and 10mM) stress. Under no Mn stress, 90%, 92%, and 11% of the bacteria produced indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophore, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, respectively. Under Mn stress, 68-94%, 91-92%, and 21-81% of the bacteria produced IAA, siderophore, and ACC deaminase, respectively. Greater percentages of ACC deaminase-producing bacteria were found in the Mn-treated P. americana. Furthermore, the ratios of IAA- and siderophore-producing bacteria were significantly higher in the Mn treated plant leaves, while the ratio of ACC deaminase-producing bacteria was significantly higher in the Mn treated-roots. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, Mn-resistant bacteria were affiliated with 10 genera. In experiments involving hybrid penisetum grown in soils treated with 0 and 1000mgkg(-1) of Mn, inoculation with strain 1Y31 was found to increase the root (ranging from 6.4% to 18.3%) and above-ground tissue (ranging from 19.3% to 70.2%) mass and total Mn uptake of above-ground tissues (64%) compared to the control. Furthermore, inoculation with strain 1Y31 was found to increase the ratio of IAA-producing bacteria in the rhizosphere and bulk soils of hybrid penisetum grown in Mn-added soils. The results showed the effect of Mn stress on the ratio of the plant growth-promoting factor-producing endophytic bacteria of P. americana and highlighted the potential of endophytic bacterium as an inoculum for enhanced phytoremediation of Mn-polluted soils by hybrid penisetum plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence and Antibiotic Resistance of Gram-Negative Pathogenic Bacteria Species Isolated from Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica in Varanasi, India

    PubMed Central

    Wannigama, D Leshan; Dwivedi, Rishabh; Zahraei-Ramazani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background Cockroaches are among the medically important pests found within the human habitations that cause serious public health problems. They may harbor a number of pathogenic bacteria on the external surface with antibiotic resistance. Hence, they are regarded as major microbial vectors. This study investigates the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria species isolated from Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica in Varanasi, India. Methods: Totally, 203 adult cockroaches were collected form 44 households and 52 food-handling establishments by trapping. Bacteriological examination of external surfaces of Pe. americana and Bl. germanica were carried out using standard method and antibiotics susceptibility profiles of the isolates were determined using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methods. Results: Among the places, we found that 54% had cockroache infestation in households and 77% in food- handling establishments. There was no significant different between the overall bacteria load of the external surface in Pe. americana (64.04%) and Bl. germanica (35.96%). However the predominant bacteria on cockroaches were Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, Kl. pneumoniae and Ps. aeruginosa were the most prevalent, drug-resistant strains were isolated from the cockroaches with 100% resistance to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and ampicillin. For individual strains of bacteria, Escherichia coli was found to have multi-resistance to four antibiotic tested, Citrobacter freundii four, Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis to three. Conclusion: Cockroaches are uniformly distributed in domestic environment, which can be a possible vector for transmission of drug-resistant bacteria and food-borne diseases. PMID:25629061

  5. The taruca (Hippocamelus antisensis) and the red brocket deer (Mazama americana) as intermediate hosts of Taenia hydatigena in Peru, morphological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Pacheco, Joel; Gonzales-Viera, Omar; Lopez-Urbina, Maria T; Gonzalez, Armando E

    2015-09-15

    In the present report metacestodes were collected from the mesentery of a taruca (Hippocamelus antisensis) and from the omentum of a red brocket deer (Mazama americana) in Peru. Various metacestodes parameters, including rostellar hook characteristics, were measured. Molecular analysis was performed to amplify the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene from metacestode isolates. Metacestodes were identified as T. hydatigena by morphology and molecular methods. This constitutes the first molecular detection of T. hydatigena metacestodes in the taruca and the red brocket deer and demonstrates that these animal species are natural intermediate hosts for this parasite. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Epizootic vacuolar myelinopathy of the central nervous system of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and American coots (Fulica americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Meteyer, C.U.; Sileo, L.

    1998-01-01

    Unprecedented mortality occurred in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) at DeGray Lake, Arkansas, during the winters of 1994-1995 and 1996-1997. The first eagles were found dead during November, soon after arrival from fall migration, and deaths continued into January during both episodes. In total, 29 eagles died at or near DeGray Lake in the winter of 1994-1995 and 26 died in the winter of 1996-1997; no eagle mortality was noted during the same months of the intervening winter or in the earlier history of the lake. During the mortality events, sick eagles were observed overflying perches or colliding with rock walls. Signs of incoordination and limb paresis were also observed in American coots (Fulica americana) during the episodes of eagle mortality, but mortality in coots was minimal. No consistent abnormalities were seen on gross necropsy of either species. No microscopic findings in organs other than the central nervous system (CNS) could explain the cause of death. By light microscopy, all 26 eagles examined and 62/77 (81%) coots had striking, diffuse, spongy degeneration of the white matter of the CNS. Vacuolation occurred in all myelinated CNS tissue, including the cerebellar folia and medulla oblongata, but was most prominent in the optic tectum. In the spinal cord, vacuoles were concentrated near the gray matter, and occasional swollen axons were seen. Vacuoles were uniformly present in optic nerves but were not evident in the retina or peripheral or autonomic nerves. Cellular inflammatory response to the lesion was distinctly lacking. Vacuoles were 8-50 microns in diameter and occurred individually, in clusters, or in rows. In sections stained by luxol fast blue/periodic acid-Schiff stain, the vacuoles were delimited and transected by myelin strands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intramyelinic vacuoles formed in the myelin sheaths by splitting of one or more myelin lamellae at the intraperiodic line. This lesion is characteristic of

  7. Health evaluation of pronghorns (Antilocapra americana) on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in southeastern Oregon, 1996-1997.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunbar, Michael R.; Velarde, Roser

    1998-01-01

    One hundred four neonatal (fawns) and 40 adult female (does) pronghorn antelope (pronghorns) (Antilocapra americana) were captured on the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR) in Lake County, southeastern Oregon, between 13 May 1996 and 26 May 1997. Blood and fecal samples were taken for an investigation of low fawn survival that may be due to disease and/or poor nutrition. No abnormalities were found in hematological parameters of adult does (n = 40) or fawns (n = 44 to 67). In general, there were lower serum total proteins (TP) and Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) concentrations in this population than in other populations from Alberta, Canada; Idaho; and Baker City, Oregon. Mean BUN values in does were significantly lower (p < 0.001) in December than March. The duration of this apparently low protein content of the December diet may affect the weight of the newborn and consequent survivability if it should continue into late gestation (March-May). Serum copper (Cu) levels in does (range 0.39 to 0.74 ppm) were considered marginal when compared to domestic animals and some wild ungulates. Fawns had low but apparently normal Cu levels at birth and reached the does' marginal values in about three days. Whole blood and serum Selenium (Se) levels (<100 ng/ml) were considered to be marginal to low in most segments of the pronghorn population in this study. However, serum levels of vitamin E (range 1.98 - 3.27 pg/ml), as determined from the does captured in March, are apparently sufficient to offset any signs of deficiency due to low Se levels. No clinical signs of Cu or Se deficiency were observed. Does captured in December 1996 were tested for neutralizing antibodies to Brucella spp. (n = 20, neg.), Leptospira spp. (n = 20, neg.), bluetongue virus (n = 20, 35% pos.), epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (n = 20, 30% pos.), respiratory syncytial virus (n = 18, neg.), parainfluenza virus type 3 (n = 18, 67% pos.), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (n = 18, neg.), and

  8. Behavioral profiles of the captive juvenile whooping crane (Grus americana) as an indicator of reintroduction behavior and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreger, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Predation by bobcats (Lynx rufus) has been the greatest cause of mortality of whooping cranes (Grus americana) in the reintroduced population in Florida. This study investigated whether the behavior of juvenile cranes during captive rearing and shortly after release can be used to predict their chances of survival once released in the wild. This study also examined differences in behavior based on rearing treatments and whether differences observed during rearing continued at the release site. Experimental rearing treatments were parent reared (PR), hand reared (RR), and hand reared with exercise (HRE). Two annual cycles of cranes were observed from hatch to 20 weeks of age in captivity (n=56 birds). Post-release bebavioral data were collected at the release site for a minimum of two weeks (n=34 birds), with mortality data collected up to one year post release (n=38 birds). Behavioral time budgets were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Logistic regression was used to build a model to identify behaviors that were associated with first-year survival. During rearing, PR birds were the most vigilant. There were no behavioral differences between HR and HRE birds. Generally, rearing treatments had few long-term effects on the post-release behavior of the birds. The main behavioral differences during rearing and after release were the frequency of bouts and the percentage of time spent performing different behaviors. This may be attributed to foraging strategies and adaptation from captive conditions to the wild. Survival was not related to rearing treatment. Fifty-five percent of the birds survived the first year post-release based upon data pooled over two years. During rearing, the frequency of foraging bouts was positively correlated to survival. Survival was negatively correlated to the frequency of walking bouts during rearing, and release weight of the birds. These correlations accounted for 32 percent of the variability in survival. At the release site, 20

  9. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis increases cell wall digestibility, protoplast isolation, and facilitates sustained cell division in American elm (Ulmus americana).

    PubMed

    Jones, A Maxwell P; Chattopadhyay, Abhishek; Shukla, Mukund; Zoń, Jerzy; Saxena, Praveen K

    2012-05-30

    Protoplast technologies offer unique opportunities for fundamental research and to develop novel germplasm through somatic hybridization, organelle transfer, protoclonal variation, and direct insertion of DNA. Applying protoplast technologies to develop Dutch elm disease resistant American elms (Ulmus americana L.) was proposed over 30 years ago, but has not been achieved. A primary factor restricting protoplast technology to American elm is the resistance of the cell walls to enzymatic degradation and a long lag phase prior to cell wall re-synthesis and cell division. This study suggests that resistance to enzymatic degradation in American elm was due to water soluble phenylpropanoids. Incubating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissue, an easily digestible species, in aqueous elm extract inhibits cell wall digestion in a dose dependent manner. This can be mimicked by p-coumaric or ferulic acid, phenylpropanoids known to re-enforce cell walls. Culturing American elm tissue in the presence of 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP; 10-150 μM), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), reduced flavonoid content, decreased tissue browning, and increased isolation rates significantly from 11.8% (±3.27) in controls to 65.3% (±4.60). Protoplasts isolated from callus grown in 100 μM AIP developed cell walls by day 2, had a division rate of 28.5% (±3.59) by day 6, and proliferated into callus by day 14. Heterokaryons were successfully produced using electrofusion and fused protoplasts remained viable when embedded in agarose. This study describes a novel approach of modifying phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to facilitate efficient protoplast isolation which has historically been problematic for American elm. This isolation system has facilitated recovery of viable protoplasts capable of rapid cell wall re-synthesis and sustained cell division to form callus. Further, isolated protoplasts survived electrofusion and viable heterokaryons were produced. Together

  10. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis increases cell wall digestibility, protoplast isolation, and facilitates sustained cell division in American elm (Ulmus americana)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protoplast technologies offer unique opportunities for fundamental research and to develop novel germplasm through somatic hybridization, organelle transfer, protoclonal variation, and direct insertion of DNA. Applying protoplast technologies to develop Dutch elm disease resistant American elms (Ulmus americana L.) was proposed over 30 years ago, but has not been achieved. A primary factor restricting protoplast technology to American elm is the resistance of the cell walls to enzymatic degradation and a long lag phase prior to cell wall re-synthesis and cell division. Results This study suggests that resistance to enzymatic degradation in American elm was due to water soluble phenylpropanoids. Incubating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissue, an easily digestible species, in aqueous elm extract inhibits cell wall digestion in a dose dependent manner. This can be mimicked by p-coumaric or ferulic acid, phenylpropanoids known to re-enforce cell walls. Culturing American elm tissue in the presence of 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP; 10-150 μM), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), reduced flavonoid content, decreased tissue browning, and increased isolation rates significantly from 11.8% (±3.27) in controls to 65.3% (±4.60). Protoplasts isolated from callus grown in 100 μM AIP developed cell walls by day 2, had a division rate of 28.5% (±3.59) by day 6, and proliferated into callus by day 14. Heterokaryons were successfully produced using electrofusion and fused protoplasts remained viable when embedded in agarose. Conclusions This study describes a novel approach of modifying phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to facilitate efficient protoplast isolation which has historically been problematic for American elm. This isolation system has facilitated recovery of viable protoplasts capable of rapid cell wall re-synthesis and sustained cell division to form callus. Further, isolated protoplasts survived electrofusion and viable

  11. First Report of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma trifolii’-Related Strain of 16SrVI-A Phytoplasma Subgroup, Associated with Elm Yellows Disease in American Elm ( Ulmus americana L.) in Ohio, U.S.A

    Treesearch

    C.E. Flower; N. Hayes-Plazolles; J.M. Slavicek; C. Rosa

    2018-01-01

    During the investigation of the sudden and early onset of yellowing and mortality of American elm (Ulmus americana L.) trees at the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station in Delaware, OH, a phytoplasma of the clover proliferation group (16SrVI) was detected as the putative causal agent of the disease outbreak.

  12. Callicarpa americana L.

    Treesearch

    K.F Connor

    2004-01-01

    American beautyberry is a shrub that can reach 2.4 to 2.7 m in height but is typically shorter, averaging 0.9 to 1.8 m. The irregular, spreading bush has an open growth habit and grows as a single plant or in colonies. Bark is brown and raised lenticels are found on older stems. The opposite, short-petioled, simple, deciduous leaves are ovate to elliptic in shape. They...

  13. American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Hartman, C. Alex; Herzog, Mark P.; Takekawa, John Y.; Robinson, Julie A.; Oring, Lewis W.; Skorupa, Joseph P.; Boettcher, Ruth; Poole, A.

    2013-01-01

    This large, striking shorebird with long bluish-gray legs, a long recurved bill, and a black-and-white chevron pattern on its back and wings is one of four Avocet species in the world, the only one with distinct breeding and non-breeding plumages -- its grayish-white head and neck feathers become cinnamon in early spring as birds begin to form pairs and migrate to breeding areas.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  15. Wirkungen biogener Amine auf die Erregungs-Sekretions-Kopplung in der Speicheldrüse von Periplaneta americana (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietdorf, Katja

    2003-07-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit habe ich wichtige Teilmechanismen der Erregungs-Sekretionskopplung in der Speicheldrüse der Schabe Periplaneta americana (L.) untersucht. Die Speicheldrüse ist von dopaminergen und serotonergen Fasern innerviert (Baumann et al., 2002). Beide Transmitter stimulieren eine unterschiedliche Reaktion der Drüse: Dopamin (DA) stimuliert die P-Zellen der Acini und die Ausführgangzellen, während Serotonin (5-HT) die P- und C-Zellen der Acini stimuliert, nicht jedoch die Ausführgangzellen. Der Endspeichel ist nach einer DA-Stimulierung proteinfrei. Dagegen enthält er nach einer 5-HT-Stimulierung Proteine, die von den C-Zellen sezerniert werden (Just & Walz, 1996). Im ersten Teil meiner Arbeit habe ich mittels Kapillarelektrophoretischer Analyse (CE-Analyse) die Elektrolytkonzentrationen im Endspeichel untersucht sowie die Raten der Flüssigkeitssekretion gemessen. Damit wollte ich klären, welche Transporter an der Sekretion des Primärspeichels und an dessen Modifikation beteiligt sind. Ausserdem wollte ich die Rolle der transportaktiven Epithelzellen der Ausführgänge für die Modifikation des Primärspeichels untersuchen. Dafür habe ich einen Vergleich der Elektrolytkonzentrationen im DA- und 5-HT-stimulierten Endspeichel durchgeführt. Der Elektrolytgehalt des DA- und 5-HT-stimulierten Endspeichels unterscheidet sich nicht signifikant voneinander. Er ist nach beiden Stimulierungen hypoosmotisch zum verwendeten Ringer. Die Ausführgangzellen werden durch DA stimuliert und modifizieren den Primärspeichel durch eine netto-Ionenreabsorption. Meine Versuche zeigen jedoch, dass auch die während einer 5-HT-Stimulierung der Drüse unstimulierten Ausführgangzellen den Primärspeichel modifizieren. In einer nachfolgenden Versuchsreihe habe ich den Einfluss von Ouabain, einem Hemmstoff der Na+-K+-ATPase, und Bumetanid, einem Hemmstoff des NKCC, auf die Raten der Flüssigkeitssekretion sowie den Elektrolytgehalt des Endspeichels untersucht. Ich

  16. Growth and cesium uptake responses of Phytolacca americana Linn. and Amaranthus cruentus L. grown on cesium contaminated soil to elevated CO2 or inoculation with a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54, or in combination.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shirong; Liao, Shangqiang; Guo, Junkang; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Ruigang; Zhou, Xiaomin

    2011-12-30

    Growth and cesium uptake responses of plants to elevated CO(2) and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, can be explored for clean-up of contaminated soils, and this induced phytoextraction may be better than the natural process. The present study used open-top chambers to investigate combined effects of Burkholderia sp. D54 inoculation and elevated CO(2) (860 μL L(-1)) on growth and Cs uptake by Phytolacca americana and Amaranthus cruentus grown on soil spiked with various levels of Cs (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Elevated CO(2) and bacterial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomass production with increased magnitude, ranging from 22% to 139% for P. americana, and 14% to 254% for A. cruentus. Total tissue Cs in both plants was significantly greater for bacterial inoculation treatment singly, and combined treatments of bacterial inoculation and elevated CO(2) than for the control treatment in most cases. Regardless of CO(2) concentrations and bacterial inoculation, A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana, but they had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that combined effects of elevated CO(2) and microbial inoculation with regard to plant ability to grow and remove radionuclides from soil can be explored for CO(2)- and microbe-assisted phytoextraction technology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Morphological, molecular and developmental characterization of the thelastomatid nematode Thelastoma bulhoesi (de Magalhães, 1900) (Oxyuridomorpha: Thelastomatidae) parasite of Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus, 1758) (Blattodea: Blattidae) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Sota; Morffe, Jans; Vicente, Cláudia S L; Ikeda, Kenji; Shinya, Ryoji; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    The American cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus, 1758) (Blattodea: Blattidae) has been spreading worldwide by commerce and has successfully adjusted to living with humans. There are many reports of thelastomatid parasitic nematode isolated from P. americana in many countries including USA, Canada, India, Argentina, Bulgaria, but not in Japan. We have investigated the parasitic nematodes in P. americana lab strain and field-captured individuals in Japan and found that Thelastoma bulhoesi (de Magalhães, 1900) (Oxyuridomorpha: Thelastomatidae) parasitizes with high infection rates. We described morphological, molecular, and developmental characters of the parasitic nematode because such information was missing despite it has been discovered more than one hundred years ago. We described morphometrics with DIC microscopy and fine structure of male and female adult with SEM observation. We also reveal the embryonic and postembryonic development of this nematode. This is the first report of a thelastomatid nematode isolated from American cockroach in Japan, and the data showed here is also very useful and fundamental for further analysis of the cockroach and parasite relations.

  18. A highly sensitive search strategy for clinical trials in Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) was developed.

    PubMed

    Manríquez, Juan J

    2008-04-01

    Systematic reviews should include as many articles as possible. However, many systematic reviews use only databases with high English language content as sources of trials. Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) is an underused source of trials, and there is not a validated strategy for searching clinical trials to be used in this database. The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive search strategy for clinical trials in LILACS. An analytical survey was performed. Several single and multiple-term search strategies were tested for their ability to retrieve clinical trials in LILACS. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each single and multiple-term strategy were calculated using the results of a hand-search of 44 Chilean journals as gold standard. After combining the most sensitive, specific, and accurate single and multiple-term search strategy, a strategy with a sensitivity of 97.75% (95% confidence interval [CI]=95.98-99.53) and a specificity of 61.85 (95% CI=61.19-62.51) was obtained. LILACS is a source of trials that could improve systematic reviews. A new highly sensitive search strategy for clinical trials in LILACS has been developed. It is hoped this search strategy will improve and increase the utilization of LILACS in future systematic reviews.

  19. Effect of frozen storage duration and cooking on physical and oxidative changes in M. Gastrocnemius pars interna and M. Iliofiburalis of Rhea americana.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, R S; Gatellier, P; Zambiazi, R C; Santé-Lhoutellier, V

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of frozen storage time (30, 60, 90 or 180 days) and cooking (100 °C, 30 min) on the physical characteristics and oxidative stability of M. Gastrocnemius pars interna (GN) and M. Iliofiburalis (IF) of rhea americana. Physical parameters measured included thawing and cooking loss, colour parameters (L*a*b*), while oxidation was assessed by determining the TBA-RS, carbonyl and aromatic amino acid content. Prolonged frozen storage of rhea meat decreased lightness (L*), yellowness (b*), and increased the discoloration parameter hue angle and redness a*. During storage, muscle IF was more prone to lipid and myoglobin oxidation than muscle GN. Cooking loss declined with the increase of storage time and was higher in GN than in IF muscle. With cooking, TBA-RS, carbonyl content, and aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) were highly affected, but the extent of oxidation ranged according to muscle and duration of frozen storage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a Polyphenol Oxidase Biosensor from Jenipapo Fruit Extract (Genipa americana L.) and Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Textile Industrial Effluents.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Rafael Souza; Ferraz, Denes; Garcia, Luane Ferreira; Thomaz, Douglas Vieira; Luque, Rafael; Lobón, Germán Sanz; Gil, Eric de Souza; Lopes, Flávio Marques

    2018-05-15

    In this work, an innovative polyphenol oxidase biosensor was developed from Jenipapo ( Genipa americana L.) fruit and used to assess phenolic compounds in industrial effluent samples obtained from a textile industry located in Jaraguá-GO, Brasil. The biosensor was prepared and optimized according to: the proportion of crude vegetal extract, pH and overall voltammetric parameters for differential pulse voltammetry. The calibration curve presented a linear interval from 10 to 310 µM (r² = 0.9982) and a limit of detection of 7 µM. Biosensor stability was evaluated throughout 15 days, and it exhibited 88.22% of the initial response. The amount of catechol standard recovered post analysis varied between 87.50% and 96.00%. Moreover, the biosensor was able to detect phenolic compounds in a real sample, and the results were in accordance with standard spectrophotometric assays. Therefore, the innovatively-designed biosensor hereby proposed is a promising tool for phenolic compound detection and quantification when environmental contaminants are concerned.

  1. The effects of grazers and light penetration on the survival of transplants of Vallisneria americana Michs in the tidal Potomac River, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, V.; Rybicki, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    Poor light penetration and grazing are among the factors potentially responsible for the lack of submersed aquatic macrophytes in the tidal Potomac River. Between 1980 and 1983, plugs, springs and tubers of Vallisneria americana Michx were transplanted from the oligohaline Potomac Estuary to six sites in the freshwater tidal Potomac River. Transplants made in 1980 and 1981 were generally successful only when protected by full exclosures which prevented grazing. Grazing resulted in the removal of whole plants or clipping off of plant leaves in unprotected plots. Plants protected in the first year were permanently established, despite the occurrence of grazing in subsequent years, at Elodea Cove and Rosier Bluff, where light penetration was high (average 1% light level was 1.6-1.7 m). Plants were not permanent;y established at Goose Island, where light penetration was lower (average 1% light level was 1.4 m) and grazing occurred, or Neabsco Bay where light penetration was very low (average 1% light level was 1.0 m) and grazing may not have occurred. In 1983, Secchi depth transparencies in the upper tidal river were improved significantly compared to 1978-1981. Both protected and unprotected transplants thrived in 1983. ?? 1985.

  2. Fungal inoculation and elevated CO2 mediate growth of Lolium mutiforum and Phytolacca americana, metal uptake, and metal bioavailability in metal-contaminated soil: evidence from DGT measurement.

    PubMed

    Song, Ningning; Wang, Fangli; Zhang, Changbo; Tang, Shirong; Guo, Junkang; Ju, Xuehai; Smith, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    Fungal inoculation and elevated CO2 may mediate plant growth and uptake of heavy metals, but little evidence from Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films (DGT) measurement has been obtained to characterize the process. Lolium mutiforum and Phytolacca americana were grown at ambient and elevated CO2 on naturally Cd and Pb contaminated soils inoculated with and without Trichoderma asperellum strain C3 or Penicillium chrysogenum strain D4, to investigate plant growth, metal uptake, and metal bioavailability responses. Fungal inoculation increased plant biomass and shoot/root Cd and Pb concentrations. Elevated CO2 significantly increased plants biomass, but decreased Cd and Pb concentrations in shoot/root to various extents, leading to a metal dilution phenomenon. Total Cd and Pb uptake by plants, and DGT-measured Cd and Pb concentrations in rhizosphere soils, were higher in all fungal inoculation and elevated CO2 treatments than control treatments, with the combined treatments having more influence than either treatment alone. Metal dilution phenomenon occurred because the increase in DGT-measured bioavailable metal pools in plant rhizosphere due to elevated CO2 was unable to match the increase in requirement for plant uptake of metals due to plant biomass increase.

  3. Inferences on the evolutionary history of the Drosophila americana polymorphic X/4 fusion from patterns of polymorphism at the X-linked paralytic and elav genes.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Cristina P; Coelho, Paula A; Vieira, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    In Drosophila there is limited evidence on the nature of evolutionary forces affecting chromosomal arrangements other than inversions. The study of the X/4 fusion polymorphism of Drosophila americana is thus of interest. Polymorphism patterns at the paralytic (para) gene, located at the base of the X chromosome, suggest that there is suppressed crossing over in this region between fusion and nonfusion chromosomes but not within fusion and nonfusion chromosomes. These data are thus compatible with previous claims that within fusion chromosomes the amino acid clines found at fused1 (also located at the base of the X chromosome) are likely maintained by local selection. The para data set also suggests a young age of the X/4 fusion. Polymorphism data on para and elav (located at the middle region of the X chromosome) suggest that there is no population structure other than that caused by the X/4 fusion itself. These findings are therefore compatible with previous claims that selection maintains the strong association observed between the methionine/threonine variants at fused1 and the status of the X chromosome as fused or unfused to the fourth chromosome. PMID:12930752

  4. Seasonal Changes in Plasma Levels of Sex Hormones in the Greater Rhea (Rhea americana), a South American Ratite with a Complex Mating System

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Diego J.; Vera Cortez, Marilina; Della Costa, Natalia S.; Lèche, Alvina; Hansen, Cristian; Navarro, Joaquín L.; Martella, Mónica B.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal rhythm in sex hormones has been extensively studied in birds, as well as its relationship with the type of mating system. The Greater Rhea (Rhea americana), a South American ratite species, reproduces seasonally and has a complex mating system: female-defense polygyny and sequential polyandry. The present study aimed at analyzing the endocrine basis of reproduction in this species and its relationship with its mating system. We used HPLC and electrochemiluminescence techniques to identify and measure plasma testosterone and estradiol levels. Annual oscillations in sex hormones, testosterone and estradiol, in adult males and females were observed. Lower levels of these hormones were exhibited during the non reproductive season (February to July), whereas their maximum values were reached in September for males and November-December for females. These fluctuations reflect the seasonal changes in gonadal function. By contrast, no significant sex hormones oscillations were observed in juvenile males and females (negative control of seasonal changes). Greater rheas maintain high testosterone and estradiol levels throughout the reproductive period. The high testosterone levels during incubation and chick rearing did not inhibit parental behavior in males, which appears not to conform to the “Challenge Hypothesis”. In females, the high estradiol levels throughout the reproductive season would be needed to sustain their long egg-laying period. PMID:24837464

  5. Time within reproductive season, but not age or inbreeding coefficient, influences seminal and sperm quality in the whooping crane (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, M.E.; Converse, Sarah J.; Chandler, Jane N.; Crosier, A. L.; Lynch, W.; Wildt, D.E.; Keefer, C. L.; Songsasen, Nucharin

    2017-01-01

    All living whooping cranes (Grus americana) are descended from 16 or fewer birds that remained alive in the early 1940s, a bottleneck that puts the species at potential risk for inbreeding depression. Although AI is commonly used in the management of the captive population of this species, little is known about seminal traits or factors affecting sperm quality in the whooping crane. In the present study, semen samples were collected from 29 adult males (age 3–27 years) during the early (March), mid (April) and late (May) breeding season over 2 consecutive years. The effects of donor age, time within reproductive season and level of inbreeding on seminal characteristics were analysed using regression and information–theoretic model selection. Only time within reproductive season significantly affected seminal traits, with total numbers of spermatozoa and proportions of pleiomorphisms increasing across the season. We conclude that, even with a highly restricted number of founders, there is no discernible influence of inbreeding (at the levels described) on sperm output or quality. Furthermore, although there is variance in seminal quality, the whooping crane produces significant numbers of motile spermatozoa throughout the breeding season, similar to values reported for the greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida).

  6. Chapter 8. Avocado history, biodiversity and production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea Americana Mill.). Avocado has been grown in the neotropics as far back as 10,000 BC. The species are scattered from northern Mexico through the southeastern United States, east through the West Indies and south through Central America, Colombia, Venezuela, Guiana, Brazil, Ecuador, Pe...

  7. Laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola , is detected for the first time outside the southeastern United States

    Treesearch

    R. C. Ploetz; Y. Y. Thant; M. A. Hughes; T. J. Dreaden; J. L. Konkol; A. T. Kyaw; J. A. Smith; C. L. Harmon

    2016-01-01

    In October 2014, a survey for diseases and pests of an emerging fruit crop, avocado (Persea americana) (FAO 2000), was conducted in Southern Shan State of Myanmar (aka Burma). In the Tuanggyi District (1,400 m elevation, 20.5°N 97°E), monocultures of up to 20 ha were observed, whereas...

  8. Vertical distribution and daily flight periodicity of ambrosia beetles associated with laurel wilt affected avocado orchards.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, ambrosia beetles have emerged as significant pests of avocado (Persea americana Mill.; Lauraceae) due to their association with fungal pathogens, in particular, the causal agent of laurel wilt disease, Raffaelea lauricola. The objective of this study was to provide insights into the intera...

  9. Export of commercial 'Hass' avocados from Argentina poses negligible risk of ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) infestation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quarantine restrictions due to the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), prevent Argentina from exporting avocados, Persea americana Miller, cv. Hass, to certain countries. Hass avocado at the hard, mature green stage is potentially a conditional nonhost for C. capitata, which cou...

  10. Biology of two members of the Euwallacea fornicatus species complex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), recently invasive in the U.S.A., reared on an ambrosia beetle artificial diet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1. Diet and rearing protocols were developed for two members of the cryptic Euwallacea fornicatus species complex, polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) and tea shot hole borer (TSHB) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), using sawdust from boxelder Acer negundo and avocado Persea americana. 2. Bio...

  11. Results of the 2009 ASBVd survey of avocado accessions in the national germplasm collection in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presence of Avocado Sunblotch Viroid (ASBVd) infection among the avocado (Persea americana Mill.) accessions in the National Germplasm Repository at Miami (NGR-Mia) was established in previous studies. An ASBVd specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was used t...

  12. Spacial analysis of avocado sunblotch disease in an avocado germplasm collection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The first visual symptoms of Avocado Sunblotch Viroid (ASBVd) were observed in a few plants of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) in the germplasm collection at the National Germplasm Repository at Miami in the early 1980s. However, the extent of the infection was unknown because infected trees can re...

  13. a-Copaene and quercivorol lures: Chemical analysis and efficacy for detection of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive ambrosia beetles in the Euwallacea nr. fornicatus complex vector a fungal pathogen responsible for Fusarium dieback, a disease that impacts avocado (Persea americana) and numerous native trees in the USA, Israel, and other countries. Currently, these pests are detected with quercivorol lure...

  14. Quantitative analysis of contents and volatile emissions from a-copaene and quercivorol lures, and longevity for attraction of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ambrosia beetles in the cryptic species complex Euwallacea nr. fornicatus vector a fungal pathogen responsible for Fusarium dieback, a disease that impacts avocado (Persea americana) and numerous native trees in the USA (California, Florida), Israel, and other countries. Currently, these pests are d...

  15. Vertical Distribution and Daily Flight Periodicity of Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Florida Avocado Orchards Affected by Laurel Wilt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ambrosia beetles have emerged as significant pests of avocado (Persea americana Miller) due to their association with pathogenic fungal symbionts, most notably Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt. We evaluated the interaction of ambrosia beetles with host avocado trees by documentin...

  16. Xyleborus glabratus, X. affinis, and X. ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): Electroantennogram responses to host-based attractants and temporal patterns in host-seeking flight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors the mycopathogen responsible for laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana Mill.). Effective semiochemical-based detection and control p...

  17. Postharvest and sensory evaluation of selected ‘Hass’x‘Bacon’ and ‘Bacon’x ‘Hass’ avocado hybrids grown in East-Central Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a high-value fruit that continues to increase in consumer demand. A population of ‘Hass’-‘Bacon’ hybrids was planted at USDA-ARS, Fort Pierce as part of a study to find selections with good horticultural and postharvest quality traits for Florida. Extensive phenot...

  18. Screening of bacteria for antagonistic activity against phytopathogens of avocados

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteria and fungi were isolated from the bark of the avocado tree (Persea americana) located in southern Florida. The bacterial strains were subsequently assayed for antagonism activity against Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt in avocados. The screen identified no isolates that ...

  19. Fusarium euwallaceae sp. nov.—a symbiotic fungus of Euwallacea sp., an invasive ambrosia beetle in Israel and California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The invasive Asian ambrosia beetle Euwallacea sp. (Coleoptera, Scolytinae, Xyleborini) and a novel Fusarium sp. that it farms in its galleries as a source of nutrition seriously damage over 20 species of live trees and pose a serious threat to avocado production (Persea americana) in Israel and Cali...

  20. Recovery plan for laurel wilt of avocado, caused by Raffaelea lauricola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Executive Summary Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana), an important commercial fruit crop. The disease threatens commercial production in the US and other countries, and currently impacts the avocado industry in Florida. As laurel w...

  1. Recovery plan for laurel wilt of avocado, caused by Raffaelea lauricola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana), an important commercial fruit crop. The disease threatens commercial production in the US and other countries, and currently impacts the avocado industry in Florida. As laurel wilt spreads, the N...

  2. California avocados in Florida? Finding the perfect avocado for production in East-Central Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a high-value fruit where most U.S. consumption is supplied using imported product. Cultivars with good fruit quality and horticultural traits may provide a useful alternative crop in east-central Florida and possibly in other locations throughout the state. A port...

  3. EAG responses to host-based attractants and temporal patterns in host-seeking flight of Xyleborus glabratus, X. affinis, and X. ferrugineus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors the mycopathogen responsible for laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana Mill.). Effective semiochemical-based detection and control p...

  4. Avocado pests in Florida: Not what you expected

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado, Persea americana Mill., is Florida's second most important fruit crop after citrus. Until recently, the complex of spider mite and insect pests that affected avocado in south Florida was under a 20 year Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. The recent invasion of avocado orchards by a...

  5. A pernicious agent affecting avocado in Israel: a novel symbiotic Fusarium sp. associated with the ambrosia beetle Euwallacea fornicatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since first recorded in Israel in 2009, the ambrosia beetle, Euwallacea fornicatus Eichhoff, has been shown to vector a fusarial pathogen of avocado (Persea Americana Miller) in its mandibular mycangia. Multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses indicate the pathogen represents a novel symbiotic Fus...

  6. A new species of Tamarixia Mercet (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae), parasitoid of Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera, Triozidae) in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Yefremova, Zoya; González-Santarosa, Graciela; Lomeli-Flores, J. Refugio; Bautista-Martínez, Néstor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tamarixia aguacatensis Yefremova, sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae) is described from Mexico as a parasitoid of the avocado psyllid, Trioza aguacate Hollis & Martin (Hemiptera: Triozidae). Trioza aguacate is a serious pest of avocado, Persea americana Miller. A key to the species of Tamarixia Mercet in Mexico is given. PMID:24478580

  7. Chemical Control of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of U.S. trees in the family Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and redbay (P. borbonia). It threatens avocado production in Florida by transmitting Raffaelea lauricola, the fungal...

  8. Influence of maturity and ripening on aroma volatiles and flavor in avocado

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Changes in aroma volatiles were determined using solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography in ripe avocados (Persea americana Mill.) throughout an eight-month maturation period and related to the sensory properties of the fruit. As maturation progressed sensory panelists found the li...

  9. Recovery Plan for Laurel Wilt of Avocado

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). The disease threatens commercial avocado production in Florida, as well as the National Germplasm Repository for avocado in Miami (USDA-ARS). Elsewhere in the US, major (California) and minor comm...

  10. Postharvest and sensory evaluation of selected ‘Hass’-‘Bacon’ avocado hybrids grown in East-Central Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is a high-value fruit that continues to increase in consumer demand. A population of ‘Hass’-‘Bacon’ hybrids was planted at USDA-ARS, Fort Pierce as part of a study to find selections with good horticultural and postharvest quality traits for Florida. Extensive pheno...

  11. Laurel wilt: A global threat to avocado production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). The disease threatens commercial avocado production in Florida, as well as the National Germplasm Repository for avocado in Miami (USDA-ARS). Elsewhere in the US, major (California) and minor comm...

  12. The influence of ripening temperature on ‘Hass’ fruit quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous research demonstrated the importance of temperature management during avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruit ripening; however this work was focused on maintaining the fruit at elevated temperatures continuously during the ripening process. We examined the influence of short duration high t...

  13. Recovery plan for laurel wilt of avocado, caused by Raffaelea lauricola

    Treesearch

    R. C . Ploetz; M. A . Hughes; P. E . Kendra; S. W . Fraedrich; D Carrillo; L. L. Stelinski; J. Hulcr; A. E. Mayfield III; Tyler Dreaden; J. H . Crane; E. A. Evans; B. A. Schaffer; J. A. Rollins

    2017-01-01

    Summary. Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). The disease threatens commercial production in the United States and other countries, and currently impacts the avocado industry in Florida. As laurel wilt spreads, the National Germplasm Repository for avocado in Miami (USDA-ARS) and...

  14. Field longevity of a-copaene and quercivorol lures for detection of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus in Florida avocado groves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ambrosia beetles in the Euwallacea nr. fornicatus complex vector a fungal pathogen that causes Fusarium dieback, a disease that impacts avocado (Persea americana), woody ornamentals, and native trees in Florida and California. Currently, these pests are detected with quercivorol lures (containing p-...

  15. Laurel wilt: An unusual and destructive disease of American members of the Lauraceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laurel wilt kills American members of the Lauraceae plant family (Laurales, Magnoliid complex). These include significant components of Coastal Plain forest communities in the SE USA, most importantly redbay (Persea borbonia), as well as the commercial crop avocado (P. americana). Laurel wilt is cau...

  16. QTL mapping for Cold Tolerance and Flower Type in a Reciprocal F1 Florida Avocado Mapping population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) farmers in South Florida have traditionally grown West Indian and Guatemalan x West Indian hybrid cultivars because they are more suitable to prevalent growing conditions. Currently, there is a growing interest in expanding the avocado production to other areas of t...

  17. A new avocado pest in Central America (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) with a key to the Lepidoptera larvae threatening avocados in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cryptaspasma perseana Gilligan & Brown, new species, is described and illustrated from Mexico and Guatemala. The species is a potential pest of fruit of cultivated avocado, Persea americana (Lauraceae). Images of adults, male secondary structures, male and female genitalia, eggs, larvae, and pupae a...

  18. North American Lauraceae: terpenoid emissions, relative attraction and boring preferences of redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Kendra; Wayne S. Montgomery; Jerome Niogret; Grechen E. Pruett; Albert (Bud) Mayfield; Martin MacKenzie; Mark A. Deyrup; Gary R. Bauchan; Randy C. Ploetz

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is the primary vector of Raffaelea lauricola, a symbiotic fungus and the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. This lethal disease has caused severe mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris) trees in the southeastern USA, threatens avocado (P. americana) production in Florida, and has...

  19. ‘Hass’ avocado quality as influenced by temperature and ethylene prior to and during final ripening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocados (Persea americana Mill.) are often held for short periods after harvest at relatively high temperatures both in the field and in storage during preconditioning and prior to ripening with unknown effects on subsequent quality. To address this question, avocados were harvested at five differ...

  20. Distribution, pest status, and fungal associates of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus in Florida avocado groves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Members of a complex of cryptic species, that correspond morphologically to the ambrosia beetle Euwallacea fornicatus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were recently found attacking avocado (Persea americana Mill.) in Israel and California. In 2016, an outbreak of another member of this comple...

  1. Ditribution, pest status and fungal associates of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus in Florda avocado groves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Members of a complex of cryptic species, that correspond morphologically to the Asian ambrosia beetle Euwallacea fornicatus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), were recently found attacking avocado (Persea americana Mill) in Israel and California. Also, early in 2016 an outbreak of a...

  2. A Systems Approach to Mitigate Oriental Fruit Fly Risk in ‘Sharwil’ Avocados Exported From Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avocados, Persea americana Miller, grown in Hawaii cannot be exported to the United States mainland without quarantine treatment for melon fly, oriental fruit fly, and Mediterranean fruit fly. The most widely grown cultivar of avocado in Hawaii is ‘Sharwil’. ‘Sharwil’, like other avocado varieties, ...

  3. Searching the Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) database improves systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Clark, Otavio Augusto Camara; Castro, Aldemar Araujo

    2002-02-01

    An unbiased systematic review (SR) should analyse as many articles as possible in order to provide the best evidence available. However, many SR use only databases with high English-language content as sources for articles. Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) indexes 670 journals from the Latin American and Caribbean health literature but is seldom used in these SR. Our objective is to evaluate if LILACS should be used as a routine source of articles for SR. First we identified SR published in 1997 in five medical journals with a high impact factor. Then we searched LILACS for articles that could match the inclusion criteria of these SR. We also checked if the authors had already identified these articles located in LILACS. In all, 64 SR were identified. Two had already searched LILACS and were excluded. In 39 of 62 (63%) SR a LILACS search identified articles that matched the inclusion criteria. In 5 (8%) our search was inconclusive and in 18 (29%) no articles were found in LILACS. Therefore, in 71% (44/72) of cases, a LILACS search could have been useful to the authors. This proportion remains the same if we consider only the 37 SR that performed a meta-analysis. In only one case had the article identified in LILACS already been located elsewhere by the authors' strategy. LILACS is an under-explored and unique source of articles whose use can improve the quality of systematic reviews. This database should be used as a routine source to identify studies for systematic reviews.

  4. Colour, lipid and protein stability of Rhea americana meat during air- and vacuum-packaged storage: influence of muscle on oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, R S; Gatellier, P; Aubry, L; Thomas, A; Bauchart, D; Durand, D; Zambiazi, R C; Santé-Lhoutellier, V

    2010-11-01

    Physicochemical characteristics and oxidative stability during storage were determined in Gastrocnemius pars interna (GN) and Iliofiburalis (IF) muscles of Rhea americana. Glycolytic potential (GP) and pH decline of muscles were measured within the first 24 h post mortem. Colour, lipid and protein stability were determined during storage of meat, i.e. 5 days under air-packaging at 4°C, or 28 days under vacuum-packaging at 4°C. In parallel, anti-oxidant status of muscles was estimated by measuring α-tocopherol content and anti-oxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase), while pro-oxidant status was evaluated by determining haeminic iron and long chain fatty acids (especially polyunsaturated fatty acids). The ultimate pH was similar in both muscles, but the GP value was significantly higher in IF than in GN muscle. Haeminic iron and alpha-tocopherol content differed between muscles, with 30% more haeminic iron (p<0.05) and 134% more alpha-tocopherol (p<0.001) in IF than GN muscle. The IF muscle presented higher lipid content and lower PUFA/SFA ratio (polyunsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids) than GN muscle. With storage under air-packaging, lipid and protein oxidation of rhea muscles increased up to 275% and 30%, respectively. This increase was more rapidly and marked in IF muscle. The IF also showed high level of metmyoglobin accumulation after 3 days of storage (47%) and was rejected by 1 consumer out of 2 in sensorial analysis. Under vacuum-packaging, both muscles showed a high stability of colour and no oxidation of lipids and proteins. Copyright © 2010 The American Meat Science Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. One antenna, two antennae, big antennae, small: total antennae length, not bilateral symmetry, predicts odor-tracking performance in the American cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Lockey, Jacob K; Willis, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    Determining the location of a particular stimulus is often crucial to an animal's survival. One way to determine the local distribution of an odor is to make simultaneous comparisons across multiple sensors. If the sensors detect differences in the distribution of an odor in space, the animal can then steer toward the source. American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana, have 4 cm long antennae and are thought to track odor plumes using a spatial sampling strategy, comparing the amount of odor detected between these bilateral sensors. However, it is not uncommon for cockroaches to lose parts of their antennae and still track a wind-borne odor to its source. We examined whether bilateral odor input is necessary to locate an odor source in a wind-driven environment and how the loss of increasing lengths of the antennae affects odor tracking. The tracking performances of individuals with two bilaterally symmetrical antennae of decreasing length were compared with antennal length-matched individuals with one antenna. Cockroaches with one antenna were generally able to track an odor plume to its source. In fact, the performances of unilaterally antennectomized individuals were statistically identical to those of their bilaterally symmetrical counterparts when the combined length of both antennae equaled the length of the single antenna of the antennectomized individuals. This suggests that the total length of available antennae influences odor tracking performance more than any specific piece of antenna, and that they may be doing something more complex than a simple bilateral comparison between their antennae. The possibility of an antenna-topic map is discussed. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Elemental contaminants in the livers and ingesta of four subpopulations of the American coot (Fulica americana): An herbivorous winter migrant in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hui, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Water birds with diets high in animal foods in the San Francisco Bay area are exposed to trace elements that are potentially health impairing. Water birds with herbivorous diets have been less thoroughly examined. The concentrations of trace elements in the livers and the esophageal contents of an herbivorous water bird, the American coot (Fulica americana) were measured to compare levels of contaminant exposure among different locations in the Bay system and with other water birds. A total of 39 coots were collected from four sites: Napa River and Mare Island Strait in the north, Berkeley in the middle, and Coyote Creek in the south. Livers of Berkeley samples differed significantly from those of Napa River and Mare Island Strait by their greater concentrations of As and B and lower concentrations of Cu, but they seemed to be within normal ranges for birds. Otherwise the concentrations of trace elements in the livers did not differ among sites. Ingesta samples from Berkeley differed from the other sites because they tended to be higher in Al, V, and Zn. In contrast to waterfowl, livers from the herbivorous coots in San Francisco Bay showed little exposure to Cd, Hg, Pb, or Se. Coot ingesta showed few samples with measurable levels of Cd, Hg, or Se and had low levels of Pb. The herbivorous diet of coots may shield them from exposure to such elements. However, high levels of V were present in coot livers and ingesta from all four sites, suggesting adaptation to this toxic element. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Novel R2R3-MYB transcription factors from Prunus americana regulate differential patterns of anthocyanin accumulation in tobacco and citrus

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Kasturi; Stover, Ed; Oliveira, Maria Luiza; Thomson, James

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The level of anthocyanins in plants vary widely among cultivars, developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Previous studies have reported that the expression of various MYBs regulate anthocyanin pigmentation during growth and development. Here we examine the activity of 3 novel R2R3-MYB transcription factor (TF) genes, PamMybA.1, PamMybA.3 and PamMybA.5 from Prunus americana. The anthocyanin accumulation patterns mediated by CaMV double35S promoter (db35Sp) controlled expression of the TFs in transgenic tobacco were compared with citrus-MoroMybA, Arabidopsis-AtMybA1 and grapevine-VvMybA1 transgenics during their entire growth cycles. The db35Sp-PamMybA.1 and db35Sp-PamMybA.5 constructs induced high levels of anthocyanin accumulation in both transformed tobacco calli and the regenerated plants. The red/purple color pigmentation induced in the PamMybA.1 and PamMybA.5 lines was not uniformly distributed, but appeared as patches in the leaves, whereas the flowers showed intense uniform pigmentation similar to the VvMybA1 expressing lines. MoroMybA and AtMybA1 showed more uniform pink coloration in both vegetative and reproductive tissues. Plant morphology, anthocyanin content, seed viability, and transgene inheritance were examined for the PamMybA.5 transgenic plants and compared with the controls. We conclude that these TFs alone are sufficient for activating anthocyanin production in plants and may be used as visible reporter genes for plant transformation. Evaluating these TFs in a heterologous crop species such as citrus further validated that these genes can be useful for the metabolic engineering of anthocyanin production and cultivar enhancement. PMID:28051907

  8. [Dissemination of German medicine in Spain and Latin America: the "Revista Médica de Hamburgo" and the "Revista Médica Germano-Ibero-Americana" (1920-1933)].

    PubMed

    Sá, Magali Romero; Cândido da Silva, André Felipe

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the development of the journals "Revista Médica de Hamburgo" and "Revista Médica Germano-Ibero-Americana," which were created to promote and disseminate the German science among the medical community in Latin America and Spain between the two World Wars. Shaken by the loss of Germany's colonies in Africa, the difficulties faced due to post-war economy, and the restrictions imposed by the armistice, the Germans sought to restore their cultural and scientific prestige through such initiative.

  9. Fish community dynamics in northeastern Lake Ontario with emphasis on the growth and reproductive success of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and white perch (Morone americana), 1978 to1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Gorman, Robert; Burnett, John A.D.

    2001-01-01

    Fishes were assessed in Guffin, Chaumount, and Black River bays in northeastern Lake Ontario with a 7.9-m (headrope) bottom trawl during late September and early October, 1978 to 1997. Fish density declined in the early 1990s with sharp declines in abundance of spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius), trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus), and johnny darter (Etheostoma nigrum) occurring in 1993 to 1995. Rising numbers of piscivores, walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) and double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), increased predation pressure, presumably acting in concert with oligotrophication to lower fish density, particularly after 1991 when large numbers of adult alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) no longer migrated to the northeast basin in spring. Annual mortality of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from age 2 to 5 rose from 33% in 1980–83 to 65% in 1992–95 and was positively related to piscivore numbers (P = 0.01, r = 0.96, n = 5). Annual mortality of yellow perch from age 0 to 2 also peaked in 1992–95. Abundance of yellow perch YOY in fall varied 40 fold and was not related to water warming in spring (P = 0.45, r = −0.19, n = 18) but was negatively related to the abundance of adult alewives in spring (P = 0.04, r = −0.49, n = 18). Although yellow perch produced moderate to strong year classes each year during 1991–95, stock size failed to increase because of rapidly accelerating mortality. Fully 85% of the variation in mean length of yellow perch YOY was explained by a multiple regression model which included YOY abundance, mean total phosphorus, and cumulative degree days > 13.5°C (P < 0.01, n = 15). Abundance of white perch (Morone americana) YOY varied nearly 200 fold and was not related to water warming or spring alewife abundance (P > 0.15). Variation in mean length of white perch YOY was related to cumulative degree days > 15°C (P < 0.01, r = 0.69).

  10. Phytolacca americana from contaminated and noncontaminated soils of South Korea: Effects of elevated temperature, CO2 and simulated acid rain on plant growth response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Y.-O.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Lee, E.J.; Redman, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical analyses performed on the invasive weed Phytolacca americana (pokeweed) growing in industrially contaminated (Ulsan) and noncontaminated (Suwon) sites in South Korea indicated that the levels of phenolic compounds and various elements that include some heavy metals (Al, As, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) were statistically higher in Ulsan soils compared to Suwon soils with Al being the highest (>1,116 mg/l compared to 432 mg/l). Analysis of metals and nutrients (K, Na, Ca, Mg, Cl, NH4, N, P, S) in plant tissues indicated that accumulation occurred dominantly in plant leaves with Al levels being 33.8 times higher in Ulsan plants (PaU) compared to Suwon plants (PaS). The ability of PaU and PaS to tolerate stress was evaluated under controlled conditions by varying atmospheric CO2 and temperature and soil pH. When grown in pH 6.4 soils, the highest growth rate of PaU and PaS plants occurred at elevated (30??C) and non-elevated (25??C) temperatures, respectively. Both PaU and PaS plants showed the highest and lowest growth rates when exposed to atmospheric CO2 levels of 360 and 650 ppm, respectively. The impact of soil pH (2-6.4) on seed germination rates, plant growth, chlorophyll content, and the accumulation of phenolics were measured to assess the effects of industrial pollution and global-warming-related stresses on plants. The highest seed germination rate and chlorophyll content occurred at pH 2.0 for both PaU and PaS plants. Increased pH from 2-5 correlated to increased phenolic compounds and decreased chlorophyll content. However, at pH 6.4, a marked decrease in phenolic compounds, was observed and chlorophyll content increased. These results suggest that although plants from Ulsan and Suwon sites are the same species, they differ in the ability to deal with various stresses. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  11. Comunicare fisica all'Americana

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    I survey motivations for education and outreach initiatives in the American context and explore the value of communicating physics for physicists and for the wider society. I describe the roles of large institutions, professional organizations, and funding agencies and cite some individual actions, local activities, and coordinated national programs. I note the emergence of transnational enterprises--not only to carry out research, but to communicate physics. A brief appendix collects some useful internet resources.

  12. Assessing the risk of bias in randomized controlled trials in the field of dentistry indexed in the Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) database.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Christiane Alves; Loureiro, Carlos Alfredo Salles; Saconato, Humberto; Atallah, Alvaro Nagib

    2011-03-01

    Well-conducted randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represent the highest level of evidence when the research question relates to the effect of therapeutic or preventive interventions. However, the degree of control over bias between RCTs presents great variability between studies. For this reason, with the increasing interest in and production of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, it has been necessary to develop methodology supported by empirical evidence, so as to encourage and enhance the production of valid RCTs with low risk of bias. The aim here was to conduct a methodological analysis within the field of dentistry, regarding the risk of bias in open-access RCTs available in the Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) database. This was a methodology study conducted at Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp) that assessed the risk of bias in RCTs, using the following dimensions: allocation sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, and data on incomplete outcomes. Out of the 4,503 articles classified, only 10 studies (0.22%) were considered to be true RCTs and, of these, only a single study was classified as presenting low risk of bias. The items that the authors of these RCTs most frequently controlled for were blinding and data on incomplete outcomes. The effective presence of bias seriously weakened the reliability of the results from the dental studies evaluated, such that they would be of little use for clinicians and administrators as support for decision-making processes.

  13. Inhibition of key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes and sodium nitroprusside induced lipid peroxidation in rats' pancreas by phenolic extracts of avocado pear leaves and fruit.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Isaac, Adelusi Temitope; Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacobson; Ajani, Richard Akinlolu

    2014-09-01

    Persea americana fruit and leaves had been known in folk medicine for their anti-diabetic prowess. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the inhibitory effect of phenolic extract from avocado pear (Persea americana) leaves and fruits on some key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase); and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced lipid peroxidation in rats' pancreas in vitro. The phenolic extracts of Persea americana fruit and leaves were extracted using methanol and 1M HCl (1:1 v/v). Thereafter, their inhibitory effects on sodium nitroprusside induced lipid peroxidation and key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) were determined in vitro. The result revealed that the leaves had fruit of avocado pear inhibit both α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities in a dose dependent manner. However, the Peel had the highest α-amylase inhibitory activity while the leaf had the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity as revealed by their IC50 value. Furthermore, incubation of the rat pancreas in the presence of 5 mM SNP caused an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the tissue, however, introduction of the phenolic extracts inhibited MDA produced in a dose dependent manner. The additive and/or synergistic action of major phenolic compounds such as syringic acid, eugenol, vnillic acid, isoeugenol, guaiacol, kaemferol, catechin, ρ-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, apigenin, naringenin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin, lupeol and epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate in avocado pear using gas chromatography (GC) could have contributed to the observed medicinal properties of the plant. Therefore, inhibition of some key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes and prevention of oxidative stress in the pancreas could be some of the possible mechanism by which they exert their anti-diabetic properties.

  14. Inhibition of Key Enzymes Linked to Type 2 Diabetes and Sodium Nitroprusside Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Rats’ Pancreas by Phenolic Extracts of Avocado Pear Leaves and Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Isaac, Adelusi Temitope; Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacobson; Ajani, Richard Akinlolu

    2014-01-01

    Persea americana fruit and leaves had been known in folk medicine for their anti-diabetic prowess. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the inhibitory effect of phenolic extract from avocado pear (Persea americana) leaves and fruits on some key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase); and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced lipid peroxidation in rats’ pancreas in vitro. The phenolic extracts of Persea americana fruit and leaves were extracted using methanol and 1M HCl (1:1 v/v). Thereafter, their inhibitory effects on sodium nitroprusside induced lipid peroxidation and key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) were determined in vitro. The result revealed that the leaves had fruit of avocado pear inhibit both α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities in a dose dependent manner. However, the Peel had the highest α-amylase inhibitory activity while the leaf had the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity as revealed by their IC50 value. Furthermore, incubation of the rat pancreas in the presence of 5 mM SNP caused an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the tissue, however, introduction of the phenolic extracts inhibited MDA produced in a dose dependent manner. The additive and/or synergistic action of major phenolic compounds such as syringic acid, eugenol, vnillic acid, isoeugenol, guaiacol, kaemferol, catechin, ρ-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, apigenin, naringenin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin, lupeol and epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate in avocado pear using gas chromatography (GC) could have contributed to the observed medicinal properties of the plant. Therefore, inhibition of some key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes and prevention of oxidative stress in the pancreas could be some of the possible mechanism by which they exert their anti-diabetic properties PMID:25324703

  15. ANTIFUNGAL POTENTIAL OF PLANT SPECIES FROM BRAZILIAN CAATINGA AGAINST DERMATOPHYTES

    PubMed Central

    BIASI-GARBIN, Renata Perugini; DEMITTO, Fernanda de Oliveira; do AMARAL, Renata Claro Ribeiro; FERREIRA, Magda Rhayanny Assunção; SOARES, Luiz Alberto Lira; SVIDZINSKI, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; BAEZA, Lilian Cristiane; YAMADA-OGATTA, Sueli Fumie

    2016-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex, or Trichophyton spp. are the main etiologic agents of dermatophytosis, whose treatment is limited by the high cost of antifungal treatments, their various side effects, and the emergence of resistance amongst these species. This study evaluated the in vitro antidermatophytic activity of 23 crude extracts from nine plant species of semiarid vegetation (caatinga) found in Brazil. The extracts were tested at concentrations ranging from 1.95 to 1,000.0 mg/mL by broth microdilution assay against the reference strains T. rubrum ATCC 28189 and T. mentagrophytesATCC 11481, and 33 clinical isolates of dermatophytes. All plants showed a fungicidal effect against both fungal species, with MIC/MFC values of the active extracts ranging from 15.6 to 250.0 µg/mL. Selected extracts of Eugenia uniflora (AcE), Libidibia ferrea (AE), and Persea americana (AcE) also exhibited a fungicidal effect against all clinical isolates of T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex. This is the first report of the antifungal activity of Schinus terebinthifolius, Piptadenia colubrina, Parapiptadenia rigida, Mimosa ophthalmocentra, and Persea americana against both dermatophyte species. PMID:27007561

  16. ANTIFUNGAL POTENTIAL OF PLANT SPECIES FROM BRAZILIAN CAATINGA AGAINST DERMATOPHYTES.

    PubMed

    Biasi-Garbin, Renata Perugini; Demitto, Fernanda de Oliveira; Amaral, Renata Claro Ribeiro do; Ferreira, Magda Rhayanny Assunção; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2016-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex, or Trichophyton spp. are the main etiologic agents of dermatophytosis, whose treatment is limited by the high cost of antifungal treatments, their various side effects, and the emergence of resistance amongst these species. This study evaluated the in vitro antidermatophytic activity of 23 crude extracts from nine plant species of semiarid vegetation (caatinga) found in Brazil. The extracts were tested at concentrations ranging from 1.95 to 1,000.0 mg/mL by broth microdilution assay against the reference strains T. rubrum ATCC 28189 and T. mentagrophytes ATCC 11481, and 33 clinical isolates of dermatophytes. All plants showed a fungicidal effect against both fungal species, with MIC/MFC values of the active extracts ranging from 15.6 to 250.0 µg/mL. Selected extracts of Eugenia uniflora (AcE), Libidibia ferrea (AE), and Persea americana (AcE) also exhibited a fungicidal effect against all clinical isolates of T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes complex. This is the first report of the antifungal activity of Schinus terebinthifolius, Piptadenia colubrina, Parapiptadenia rigida, Mimosa ophthalmocentra, and Persea americana against both dermatophyte species.

  17. The role of the embryo and ethylene in avocado fruit mesocarp discoloration.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Vera; Friedman, Haya; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E; Pesis, Edna

    2009-01-01

    Chilling injury (CI) symptoms in avocado (Persea americana Mill.) fruit, expressed as mesocarp discoloration, were found to be associated with embryo growth and ethylene production during cold storage. In cvs Ettinger and Arad most mesocarp discoloration was located close to the base of the seed and was induced by ethylene treatment in seeded avocado fruit. However, ethylene did not increase mesocarp discoloration in seedless fruit stored at 5 degrees C. Application of ethylene to whole fruit induced embryo development inside the seed. It also induced seedling elongation when seeds were imbibed separately. Persea americana ethylene receptor (PaETR) gene expression and polyphenol oxidase activity were highest close to the base of the seed and decreased gradually toward the blossom end. By contrast, expressions of PaETR transcript and polyphenol oxidase activity in seedless avocado fruit were similar throughout the pulp at the base of the fruit. Application of the ethylene inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene, decreased mesocarp browning, embryo development, seedling growth, and ion leakage, and down-regulated polyphenol oxidase activity. The results demonstrate that ethylene-mediated embryo growth in whole fruit is involved in the mesocarp response to ethylene perception and the development of CI disorders.

  18. The role of the embryo and ethylene in avocado fruit mesocarp discoloration

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, Vera; Friedman, Haya; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E.; Pesis, Edna

    2009-01-01

    Chilling injury (CI) symptoms in avocado (Persea americana Mill.) fruit, expressed as mesocarp discoloration, were found to be associated with embryo growth and ethylene production during cold storage. In cvs Ettinger and Arad most mesocarp discoloration was located close to the base of the seed and was induced by ethylene treatment in seeded avocado fruit. However, ethylene did not increase mesocarp discoloration in seedless fruit stored at 5 °C. Application of ethylene to whole fruit induced embryo development inside the seed. It also induced seedling elongation when seeds were imbibed separately. Persea americana ethylene receptor (PaETR) gene expression and polyphenol oxidase activity were highest close to the base of the seed and decreased gradually toward the blossom end. By contrast, expressions of PaETR transcript and polyphenol oxidase activity in seedless avocado fruit were similar throughout the pulp at the base of the fruit. Application of the ethylene inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene, decreased mesocarp browning, embryo development, seedling growth, and ion leakage, and down-regulated polyphenol oxidase activity. The results demonstrate that ethylene-mediated embryo growth in whole fruit is involved in the mesocarp response to ethylene perception and the development of CI disorders. PMID:19196750

  19. Nectar minerals as regulators of flower visitation in stingless bees and nectar hoarding wasps.

    PubMed

    Afik, Ohad; Delaplane, Keith S; Shafir, Sharoni; Moo-Valle, Humberto; Quezada-Euán, J Javier G

    2014-05-01

    Various nectar components have a repellent effect on flower visitors, and their adaptive advantages for the plant are not well understood. Persea americana (avocado) is an example of a plant that secretes nectar with repellent components. It was demonstrated that the mineral constituents of this nectar, mainly potassium and phosphate, are concentrated enough to repel honey bees, Apis mellifera, a pollinator often used for commercial avocado pollination. Honey bees, however, are not the natural pollinator of P. americana, a plant native to Central America. In order to understand the role of nectar minerals in plant-pollinator relationships, it is important to focus on the plant's interactions with its natural pollinators. Two species of stingless bees and one species of social wasp, all native to the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, part of the natural range of P. americana, were tested for their sensitivity to sugar solutions enriched with potassium and phosphate, and compared with the sensitivity of honey bees. In choice tests between control and mineral-enriched solutions, all three native species were indifferent for mineral concentrations lower than those naturally occurring in P. americana nectar. Repellence was expressed at concentrations near or exceeding natural concentrations. The threshold point at which native pollinators showed repellence to increasing levels of minerals was higher than that detected for honey bees. The results do not support the hypothesis that high mineral content is attractive for native Hymenopteran pollinators; nevertheless, nectar mineral composition may still have a role in regulating flower visitors through different levels of repellency.

  20. PAC's Americana: The Threat of Political Action Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Jim

    1983-01-01

    An estimated $80,000,000 of special-interest funds were distributed to candidates in the last Congressional election. A representative democracy accountable to the common concerns of individual citizens cannot be a government where influence is purchasable through substantial campaign contributions. (RM)

  1. Lymphosarcoma associated with Heterobilharzia americana infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Stone, Richard H; Frontera-Acevedo, Karelma; Saba, Corey F; Ambrose, Dana; Moorhead, Andrew R; Brown, Cathy A

    2011-09-01

    Hepatic T-cell lymphosarcoma with involvement of regional lymph nodes and concurrent schistosomiasis were diagnosed in an 11-year-old male neutered mixed-breed dog with a history of chronic weight loss, inappetence, vomiting, and diarrhea. Trematode ova present in the hepatic parenchyma and mesenteric node were surrounded by sheets of neoplastic lymphocytes while those in the intestinal wall were surrounded by large numbers of non-neoplastic lymphocytes. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both the neoplastic and hyperplastic populations were T lymphocytes. The ova were identified by fecal saline sedimentation as Heterobilharzia spp., and fecal ova shedding resolved after praziquantel anthelmintic treatment. The lymphoma progressed despite chemotherapy, and the dog was euthanized after developing neurologic signs and a necropsy was performed. A monomorphic population of neoplastic T cells expanded and replaced normal architecture in the liver and spleen, surrounded nerve roots within the cauda equina, and infiltrated the meninges of the brain. The presence of schistosome ova embedded within neoplastic T-cell infiltrates suggests that, as previously reported in human schistosomiasis, heterobilharziasis may be associated with neoplasia.

  2. Um Olhar sobre "Beleza Americana" (A Look at "American Beauty").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissoto, Maria Luisa

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the film "American Beauty" in light of a reading of Karl Marx. Finds that the film shows the circularity which marks bourgeois society, even though the rhythm of industry and renovation of the society masks it. States that Marx praises the industry, invention, and innovation of the bourgeoisie. (BT)

  3. Avian tuberculosis and salmonellosis in a whooping crane (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroud, R.K.; Thoen, C.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The whooping crane has been the subject of intensive scientific study and management because it is an endangered species and has high public interest. Programs have been developed to identify critical habitat, to increase production through captive breeding, and in recent years, to use sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) as surrogate parents in establishing new populations of wild whooping cranes. Only a few reports describing diseases and parasites in wild whooping cranes appear in the literature because opportunities to secure specimens are limited for this rare, protected bird (for review, see Carpenter and Derrickson, In Proc. International Crane Workshop of 1983, Bharatur, India, in press). Avian tuberculosis and concurrent salmonellosis in a wild whooping crane are described in this case report.

  4. Creating Habitat for the Yellow-Billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americana)

    Treesearch

    Bertin W. Anderson; Stephen A. Laymon

    1989-01-01

    Yellow-billed Cuckoo numbers have decreased alarmingly in recent decades. This is associated with demise of their riparian habitats. Study of habitat along the lower Colorado River and along the South Fork Kern River led to the conclusion that they require dense habitats dominated by cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and willow (Salix...

  5. Recognition and Quantification of Area Damaged by Oligonychus Perseae in Avocado Leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Gloria; Romero, Eduardo; Boyero, Juan R.; Malpica, Norberto

    The measure of leaf damage is a basic tool in plant epidemiology research. Measuring the area of a great number of leaves is subjective and time consuming. We investigate the use of machine learning approaches for the objective segmentation and quantification of leaf area damaged by mites in avocado leaves. After extraction of the leaf veins, pixels are labeled with a look-up table generated using a Support Vector Machine with a polynomial kernel of degree 3, on the chrominance components of YCrCb color space. Spatial information is included in the segmentation process by rating the degree of membership to a certain class and the homogeneity of the classified region. Results are presented on real images with different degrees of damage.

  6. endAFS, a novel family E endoglucanase gene from Fibrobacter succinogenes AR1.

    PubMed Central

    Cavicchioli, R; East, P D; Watson, K

    1991-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of endAFS, an endoglucanase gene isolated from the ruminal anaerobe Fibrobacter succinogenes AR1, was determined. endAFS encodes two overlapping open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), and it was proposed that a -1 ribosomal frameshift was required to allow contiguous synthesis of a 453-amino-acid endoglucanase. A proline- and threonine-rich region at the C terminus of ORF1 and rare codons for arginine and threonine were coincident with the proposed frameshift site. ENDAFS is proposed to be a member of subgroup 1 of family E endoglucanases, of which endoglucanases from Thermomonospora fusca and Persea americana (avocado) are also members. Endoglucanases from Clostridium thermocellum and Pseudomonas fluorescens form subgroup 2. Images PMID:1708767

  7. From ecophysiology to phenomics: some implications of photoprotection and shade–sun acclimation in situ for dynamics of thylakoids in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Shizue; Förster, Britta; Waterman, Melinda; Robinson, Sharon A.; Pogson, Barry J.; Gunning, Brian; Osmond, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Half a century of research into the physiology and biochemistry of sun–shade acclimation in diverse plants has provided reality checks for contemporary understanding of thylakoid membrane dynamics. This paper reviews recent insights into photosynthetic efficiency and photoprotection from studies of two xanthophyll cycles in old shade leaves from the inner canopy of the tropical trees Inga sapindoides and Persea americana (avocado). It then presents new physiological data from avocado on the time frames of the slow coordinated photosynthetic development of sink leaves in sunlight and on the slow renovation of photosynthetic properties in old leaves during sun to shade and shade to sun acclimation. In so doing, it grapples with issues in vivo that seem relevant to our increasingly sophisticated understanding of ΔpH-dependent, xanthophyll-pigment-stabilized non-photochemical quenching in the antenna of PSII in thylakoid membranes in vitro. PMID:23148277

  8. Hydrolytic Enzyme Activities and Protein Pattern of Avocado Fruit Ripened in Air and in Low Oxygen, with and without Ethylene 1

    PubMed Central

    Kanellis, Angelos K.; Solomos, Theophanes; Mattoo, Autar K.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 2.5% O2 atmosphere with and without ethylene on the activities of hydrolytic enzymes associated with cell walls, and total protein profile during ripening of avocado fruits (Persea americana Mill., cv Hass) were investigated. The low 2.5% O2 atmosphere prevented the rise in the activities of cellulase, polygalacturonase, and acid phosphatase in avocado fruits whose ripening was initiated with ethylene. Addition of 100 microliters per liter ethylene to low O2 atmosphere did not alter these suppressive effects of 2.5% O2. Furthermore, 2.5% O2 atmosphere delayed the development of a number of polypeptides that appear during ripening of avocado fruits while at the same time new polypeptides accumulated. The composition of the extraction buffer and its pH greatly affected the recovery of cellulase activity and its total immunoreactive protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:16666746

  9. Effect of harvest date on the nutritional quality and antioxidant capacity in 'Hass' avocado during storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zheng, Yusheng; Khuong, Toan; Lovatt, Carol J

    2012-11-15

    The effect of harvest date on nutritional compounds and antioxidant activity (AOC) in avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit during storage was determined. The fruits were harvested at seven different dates and ripened at 25 °C following 21 or 35 days of cold storage. The results indicated that the phenolic and glutathione contents were increased and the ascorbic acid content was not significantly different in early harvested fruit (January to March), and the phenolic, ascorbic acid and glutathione contents were increased slightly and then decreased on late harvested fruit (April to June). Similar trends were observed in the changes of AOC. Furthermore, AOC in early harvested fruit after storage for 35 days was much higher than that in late harvested fruit after storage for 21 days. Therefore, avocado can be harvested earlier for economic benefits according to the market and can keep high nutritional value for human health benefits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fat Metabolism in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Bruce S.; Jaworski, J. G.; Stumpf, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    Stearyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (EC 1.14.99.6), present in the stroma fraction of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts, rapidly desaturated enzymatically prepared stearyl-acyl carrier protein to oleic acid. No other substrates were desaturated. In addition to stearyl-acyl carrier protein, reduced ferredoxin was an essential component of the system. The electron donor systems were either ascorbate, dichlorophenolindophenol, photosystem I and light, or NADPH and ferredoxin-NADP reductase. The desaturase was more active in extracts prepared from chloroplasts obtained from immature spinach leaves than from mature leaves. Stearyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase also occurs in soluble extracts of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) mesocarp and of developing safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) seeds. PMID:16658913

  11. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of 10 medicinal plants used in northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Molina-Garza, Zinnia Judith; Bazaldúa-Rodríguez, Aldo Fabio; Quintanilla-Licea, Ramiro; Galaviz-Silva, Lucio

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to screen the trypanocidal activity of plants used in traditional Mexican medicine for the treatment of various diseases related to parasitic infections. Cultured Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were incubated for 96h with different concentrations of methanolic extracts obtained from Artemisia mexicana, Castela texana, Cymbopogon citratus, Eryngium heterophyllum, Haematoxylum brasiletto, Lippia graveolens, Marrubium vulgare, Persea americana, Ruta chalepensis and Schinus molle. The inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined for each extract via a colorimetric method. Among the evaluated species, the methanolic extracts of E. heterophyllum, H. brasiletto, M. vulgare and S. molle exhibited the highest trypanocidal activity, showing percentages of growth inhibition between 88 and 100% at a concentration of 150μg/ml. These medicinal plants may represent a valuable source of new bioactive compounds for the therapeutic treatment of trypanosomiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Similarities between the Actions of Ethylene and Cyanide in Initiating the Climacteric and Ripening of Avocados 1

    PubMed Central

    Solomos, Theophanes; Laties, George G.

    1974-01-01

    A continuous exposure of intact avocados (Persea americana) to 400 μl/l of cyanide results in a rapid increase in the rate of respiration, followed by a rise in ethylene production, and eventual ripening. The pattern of changes in the glycolytic intermediates glucose 6-phosphate, fructose diphosphate, 3-phosphoglyceric acid, and phosphoenolpyruvate during the rapid rise in respiration in both ethylene and cyanide-treated fruits is similar to that found in fruits made anaerobic where a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in the rate of glycolysis is observed. It is suggested that both during the climacteric and in response to cyanide, glycolysis is enhanced. It is proposed that cyanide implements the diversion of electrons to the cyanide-resistant electron path through structural alterations which are independent of the simultaneous inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. PMID:16658918

  13. Xyleborus bispinatus Reared on Artificial Media in the Presence or Absence of the Laurel Wilt Pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola)

    PubMed Central

    Menocal, Octavio; Cruz, Luisa F.; Crane, Jonathan H.; Cooperband, Miriam F.; Ploetz, Randy C.; Carrillo, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Like other members of the tribe Xyleborini, Xyleborus bispinatus Eichhoff can cause economic damage in the Neotropics. X. bispinatus has been found to acquire the laurel wilt pathogen Raffaelea lauricola (T. C. Harr., Fraedrich & Aghayeva) when breeding in a host affected by the pathogen. Its role as a potential vector of R. lauricola is under investigation. The main objective of this study was to evaluate three artificial media, containing sawdust of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) and silkbay (Persea humilis Nash.), for rearing X. bispinatus under laboratory conditions. In addition, the media were inoculated with R. lauricola to evaluate its effect on the biology of X. bispinatus. There was a significant interaction between sawdust species and R. lauricola for all media. Two of the media supported the prolific reproduction of X. bispinatus, but the avocado-based medium was generally more effective than the silkbay-based medium, regardless whether or not it was inoculated with R. lauricola. R. lauricola had a neutral or positive effect on beetle reproduction. The pathogen was frequently recovered from beetle galleries, but only from a few individuals which were reared on inoculated media, and showed limited colonization of the beetle’s mycangia. Two media with lower water content were most effective for rearing X. bispinatus. PMID:29495585

  14. Effect of chipping on emergence of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and recovery of the laurel wilt pathogen from infested wood chips.

    PubMed

    Spence, D J; Smith, J A; Ploetz, R; Hulcr, J; Stelinski, L L

    2013-10-01

    Significant mortality ofredbay trees (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng.) in the southeastern United States has been caused by Raffaelea lauricola, T.C. Harr., Fraedrich, & Aghayeva (Harrington et al. 2008), a fungal symbiont of the exotic redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, Eichhoff (Fraedrich et al. 2008). This pathogen causes laurel wilt, which is an irreversible disease that can kill mature trees within a few weeks in summer. R. lauricola has been shown to be lethal to most native species of Lauraceae and cultivated avocado (Persea americana Mill.) in the southeastern United States. In this study, we examined the survival of X. glabratus and R. lauricola in wood chips made from infested trees by using a standard tree chipper over a 10-wk period. After 2 wk, 14 X. glabratus were recovered from wood chips, whereas 339 X. glabratus emerged from nonchipped bolts. R. lauricola was not found 2 d postchipping from wood chips, indicating that the pathogen is not likely to survive for long inside wood chips. In contrast, R. lauricola persisted in dead, standing redbay trees for 14 mo. With large volumes of wood, the potential for infested logs to be moved between states or across U.S. borders is significant. Results demonstrated that chipping wood from laurel wilt-killed trees can significantly reduce the number of X. glabratus and limit the persistence of R. lauricola, which is important for sanitation strategies aimed at limiting the spread of this disease.

  15. Streptococcus mutans Adherence: Presumptive Evidence for Protein-Mediated Attachment Followed by Glucan-Dependent Cellular Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Staat, Robert H.; Langley, Sharon D.; Doyle, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth surfaces has been attributed to the production of sucrose-derived d-glucans. However, several studies indicate that the bacterium will adhere in the absence of sucrose. The present data confirmed that S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads in the absence of sucrose is described by the Langmuir equation. The nature of the sucrose-independent adherence was studied with the Persea americana agglutinin as a selective adherence inhibitor. Pretreatment of the bacterium with P. americana agglutinin caused a 10-fold reduction in adherence, and the inhibition was not reversed with the addition of sucrose. Pretreatment of S. mutans with proteases also reduced adherence, regardless of the sucrose content, whereas periodate oxidation and glucanohydrolase treatment of the bacteria reduced sucrose-mediated adherence to the levels found for sucrose-independent adherence. The P. americana agglutinin, glucanohydrolase, and pepsin pretreatment of the cells did not eliminate sucrose-induced agglutination. Scanning electron microscopy showed that short streptococcal chains were bound to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite crystals in the sucrose-independent system, whereas the presence of sucrose caused larger bacterial clumps to be found. A two-reaction model of S. mutans adherence was developed from these data. It is proposed that one reaction is attachment to the tooth pellicle which is mediated by cell-surface proteins rather than glucans or teichoic acids. The other reaction is cellular accumulation mediated by sucrose-derived d-glucans and cell surface lectins. A series of sequential adherence experiments with P. americana agglutinin as a selective inhibitor provided presumptive evidence for the validity of our model of S. mutans adherence. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7380545

  16. Do cancer cells in human and meristematic cells in plant exhibit similar responses toward plant extracts with cytotoxic activities?

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Noha S; Barakat, Hoda S; Elhallouty, Salwa; Salem, Dina

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of water extracts of Persea americana fruit, and of the leaves of Tabernamontana divericata, Nerium oleander and Annona cherimolia (positive control) on Vicia faba root cells. We had confirmed in our previously published data the cytotoxicity of these plant extracts on four human cancer cell lines: liver (HepG-2), lung (A549), colon (HT-29) and breast (MCF-7). Vicia faba roots were soaked in plant extracts at dilutions of 100, 1,250, 2,500, 5,000, 10,000, 20,000 ppm for 4 and 24 h. All treatments resulted in a significant reduction in the mitotic index in a dose dependant manner. Root cells treated with T. divericata, N. oleander and A. cherimolia exhibited a decrease in prophase cell percentage, increase in micronuclei and chromosomal abnormalities as concentration increased. The P. americana treatment showed the highest cytotoxic effect on cancer cells, prophase cell percentage increased linearly with the applied concentration and no micronuclei were detected. This study shows that root tip assay of beans can be used in initial screening for new plant extracts to validate their use as candidates for containing active cytotoxic agents against malignant cells. This will greatly help in exploring new plant extracts as drugs for cancer treatment.

  17. Ethnomedicines used in Trinidad and Tobago for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lans, Cheryl A

    2006-10-13

    This paper is based on ethnobotanical interviews conducted from 1996-2000 in Trinidad and Tobago with thirty male and female respondents. A non-experimental validation was conducted on the plants used for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus: This is a preliminary step to establish that the plants used are safe or effective, to help direct clinical trials, and to inform Caribbean physicians of the plants' known properties to avoid counter-prescribing. The following plants are used to treat diabetes: Antigonon leptopus, Bidens alba, Bidens pilosa, Bixa orellana, Bontia daphnoides, Carica papaya, Catharanthus roseus, Cocos nucifera, Gomphrena globosa, Laportea aestuans, Momordica charantia, Morus alba, Phyllanthus urinaria and Spiranthes acaulis. Apium graviolens is used as a heart tonic and for low blood pressure. Bixa orellana, Bontia daphnoides, Cuscuta americana and Gomphrena globosa are used for jaundice. The following plants are used for hypertension: Aloe vera, Annona muricata, Artocarpus altilis, Bixa orellana, Bidens alba, Bidens pilosa, Bonta daphnoides, Carica papaya, Cecropia peltata, Citrus paradisi, Cola nitida, Crescentia cujete, Gomphrena globosa, Hibiscus sabdariffa, Kalanchoe pinnata, Morus alba, Nopalea cochinellifera, Ocimum campechianum, Passiflora quadrangularis, Persea americana and Tamarindus indicus. The plants used for kidney problems are Theobroma cacao, Chamaesyce hirta, Flemingia strobilifera, Peperomia rotundifolia, Petiveria alliacea, Nopalea cochinellifera, Apium graveolens, Cynodon dactylon, Eleusine indica, Gomphrena globosa, Pityrogramma calomelanos and Vetiveria zizanioides. Plants are also used for gall stones and for cooling. Chamaesyce hirta, Cissus verticillata, Kalanchoe pinnata, Peperomia spp., Portulaca oleraceae, Scoparia dulcis, and Zea mays have sufficient evidence to support their traditional use for urinary problems, "cooling" and high cholesterol. Eggplant extract as a hypocholesterolemic agent has some support but

  18. Ethnomedicines used in Trinidad and Tobago for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lans, Cheryl A

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper is based on ethnobotanical interviews conducted from 1996–2000 in Trinidad and Tobago with thirty male and female respondents. Methods A non-experimental validation was conducted on the plants used for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus: This is a preliminary step to establish that the plants used are safe or effective, to help direct clinical trials, and to inform Caribbean physicians of the plants' known properties to avoid counter-prescribing. Results The following plants are used to treat diabetes: Antigonon leptopus, Bidens alba, Bidens pilosa, Bixa orellana, Bontia daphnoides, Carica papaya, Catharanthus roseus, Cocos nucifera, Gomphrena globosa, Laportea aestuans, Momordica charantia, Morus alba, Phyllanthus urinaria and Spiranthes acaulis. Apium graviolens is used as a heart tonic and for low blood pressure. Bixa orellana, Bontia daphnoides, Cuscuta americana and Gomphrena globosa are used for jaundice. The following plants are used for hypertension: Aloe vera, Annona muricata, Artocarpus altilis, Bixa orellana, Bidens alba, Bidens pilosa, Bonta daphnoides, Carica papaya, Cecropia peltata, Citrus paradisi, Cola nitida, Crescentia cujete, Gomphrena globosa, Hibiscus sabdariffa, Kalanchoe pinnata, Morus alba, Nopalea cochinellifera, Ocimum campechianum, Passiflora quadrangularis, Persea americana and Tamarindus indicus. The plants used for kidney problems are Theobroma cacao, Chamaesyce hirta, Flemingia strobilifera, Peperomia rotundifolia, Petiveria alliacea, Nopalea cochinellifera, Apium graveolens, Cynodon dactylon, Eleusine indica, Gomphrena globosa, Pityrogramma calomelanos and Vetiveria zizanioides. Plants are also used for gall stones and for cooling. Conclusion Chamaesyce hirta, Cissus verticillata, Kalanchoe pinnata, Peperomia spp., Portulaca oleraceae, Scoparia dulcis, and Zea mays have sufficient evidence to support their traditional use for urinary problems, "cooling" and high cholesterol. Eggplant extract as a

  19. Response of swamp bay, Persea palustris , and redbay, P. borbonia , to Raffaelea spp. isolated from Xyleborus glabratus

    Treesearch

    T. J. Dreaden; A. S. Campbell; C. A. Gonzalez-Benecke; R. C. Ploetz; J. A. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a devastating invasive disease of members of the Lauraceae plant family. It is caused by the fungus Raffaelea lauricola, which is a nutritional symbiont of its ambrosia beetle vector, Xyleborus glabratus. In the United States, six Raffaelea spp., in addition to R. lauricola...

  20. Space lab system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rives, T. B.; Ingels, F. M.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the Automated Booster Assembly Checkout System (ABACS) has been conducted. A computer simulation of the ETHERNET LAN has been written. The simulation allows one to investigate different structures of the ABACS system. The simulation code is in PASCAL and is VAX compatible.

  1. Rearing Xyleborus volvulus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Media Containing Sawdust from Avocado or Silkbay, With or Without Raffaelea lauricola (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae).

    PubMed

    Menocal, Octavio; Cruz, Luisa F; Kendra, Paul E; Crane, Jonathan H; Ploetz, Randy C; Carrillo, Daniel

    2017-12-08

    Like other ambrosia beetles, Xyleborus volvulus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) lives in a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with fungi that serve as food source. Until recently, X. volvulus was not considered a pest, and none of its symbionts were considered plant pathogens. However, recent reports of an association between X. volvulus and Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harr., Fraedrich & Aghayeva (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae), the cause of the laurel wilt disease of avocado (Persea americana Mill. [Laurales: Lauraceae]), and its potential role as vector of the pathogen merit further investigation. The objective of this study was to evaluate three artificial media containing sawdust obtained from avocado or silkbay (Persea humilis Nash) for laboratory rearing of X. volvulus. The effect of R. lauricola in the media on the beetle's reproduction was also evaluated. Of the three media, the one with the lowest content of sawdust and intermediate water content provided the best conditions for rearing X. volvulus. Reproduction on this medium was not affected by the sawdust species or the presence of R. lauricola. On the other two media, there was a significant interaction between sawdust species and R. lauricola. The presence of R. lauricola generally had a negative effect on brood production. There was limited colonization of the mycangia of X. volvulus by R. lauricola on media inoculated with the pathogen. From galleries formed within the best medium, there was 50% recovery of R. lauricola, but recovery was much less from the other two media. Here, we report the best artificial substrate currently known for X. volvulus. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. North American Lauraceae: terpenoid emissions, relative attraction and boring preferences of redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (coleoptera: curculionidae: scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Kendra, Paul E; Montgomery, Wayne S; Niogret, Jerome; Pruett, Grechen E; Mayfield, Albert E; MacKenzie, Martin; Deyrup, Mark A; Bauchan, Gary R; Ploetz, Randy C; Epsky, Nancy D

    2014-01-01

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is the primary vector of Raffaelea lauricola, a symbiotic fungus and the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. This lethal disease has caused severe mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris) trees in the southeastern USA, threatens avocado (P. americana) production in Florida, and has potential to impact additional New World species. To date, all North American hosts of X. glabratus and suscepts of laurel wilt are members of the family Lauraceae. This comparative study combined field tests and laboratory bioassays to evaluate attraction and boring preferences of female X. glabratus using freshly-cut bolts from nine species of Lauraceae: avocado (one cultivar of each botanical race), redbay, swampbay, silkbay (Persea humilis), California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), sassafras (Sassafras albidum), northern spicebush (Lindera benzoin), camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora), and lancewood (Nectandra coriacea). In addition, volatile collections and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were conducted to quantify terpenoid emissions from test bolts, and electroantennography (EAG) was performed to measure olfactory responses of X. glabratus to terpenoids identified by GC-MS. Significant differences were observed among treatments in both field and laboratory tests. Silkbay and camphor tree attracted the highest numbers of the beetle in the field, and lancewood and spicebush the lowest, whereas boring activity was greatest on silkbay, bay laurel, swampbay, and redbay, and lowest on lancewood, spicebush, and camphor tree. The Guatemalan cultivar of avocado was more attractive than those of the other races, but boring response among the three was equivalent. The results suggest that camphor tree may contain a chemical deterrent to boring, and that different cues are associated with host location and host acceptance. Emissions of α-cubebene, α-copaene, α-humulene, and calamenene were

  3. North American Lauraceae: Terpenoid Emissions, Relative Attraction and Boring Preferences of Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    PubMed Central

    Kendra, Paul E.; Montgomery, Wayne S.; Niogret, Jerome; Pruett, Grechen E.; Mayfield, Albert E.; MacKenzie, Martin; Deyrup, Mark A.; Bauchan, Gary R.; Ploetz, Randy C.; Epsky, Nancy D.

    2014-01-01

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is the primary vector of Raffaelea lauricola, a symbiotic fungus and the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. This lethal disease has caused severe mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris) trees in the southeastern USA, threatens avocado (P. americana) production in Florida, and has potential to impact additional New World species. To date, all North American hosts of X. glabratus and suscepts of laurel wilt are members of the family Lauraceae. This comparative study combined field tests and laboratory bioassays to evaluate attraction and boring preferences of female X. glabratus using freshly-cut bolts from nine species of Lauraceae: avocado (one cultivar of each botanical race), redbay, swampbay, silkbay (Persea humilis), California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), sassafras (Sassafras albidum), northern spicebush (Lindera benzoin), camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora), and lancewood (Nectandra coriacea). In addition, volatile collections and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were conducted to quantify terpenoid emissions from test bolts, and electroantennography (EAG) was performed to measure olfactory responses of X. glabratus to terpenoids identified by GC-MS. Significant differences were observed among treatments in both field and laboratory tests. Silkbay and camphor tree attracted the highest numbers of the beetle in the field, and lancewood and spicebush the lowest, whereas boring activity was greatest on silkbay, bay laurel, swampbay, and redbay, and lowest on lancewood, spicebush, and camphor tree. The Guatemalan cultivar of avocado was more attractive than those of the other races, but boring response among the three was equivalent. The results suggest that camphor tree may contain a chemical deterrent to boring, and that different cues are associated with host location and host acceptance. Emissions of α-cubebene, α-copaene, α-humulene, and calamenene were

  4. La Biblioteca Latino Americana: User Survey (San Jose Public Library). Studies in Librarianship No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, James C.; And Others

    To assist a neighborhood committee in applying for federal funding of a bilingual/bicultural library with a distinct Latin American emphasis, a student research group from San Jose State University designed and administered a bilingual questionnaire to a stratified sample of 400 households in the Gardner District of San Jose, California. The…

  5. Competition Between Hydrilla verticillata and Vallisneria americana Under Different Environmental Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    alsei gron i po miturs (, c eg) nd an miturs (, d fh) nde lo liht0 on yield ... per ..... takclultdfo1idvdal(000 ptvle codtos(iue12 ess1 )eentog...34 Physiological plant ecology III: Responses to the chemical and biological environment. 0. L. Lange, P. S. Nobel , C. B. Osmond, and H. Ziegler, ed

  6. Spatiotemporal variation in resource selection: Insights from the American marten (Martes Americana)

    Treesearch

    Andrew J. Shirk; Martin G. Raphael; Samuel A. Cushman

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and genetic adaptations to spatiotemporal variation in habitat conditions allow species to maximize their biogeographic range and persist over time in dynamic environments. An understanding of these local adaptations can be used to guide management and conservation of populations over broad extents encompassing diverse habitats. This understanding is often...

  7. Effects of rearing treatment on the behavior of captive whooping cranes (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreger, M.D.; Estevez, I.; Hatfield, J.S.; Gee, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    Small founder populations of whooping cranes are managed to maximize egg production for the purpose of reintroducing young to the wild. This results in an excessive number of hatched chicks that cannot be naturally reared by parents. Hand-rearing techniques have been developed to raise the additional hatches. However, hand rearing may affect the behavior of the birds and their chances of survival later in life. The objectives of this study were to determine the impact of rearing practices on the behavior of whooping crane chicks. The birds were reared under three commonly used rearing techniques: parent reared (PR), hand reared (HR), and hand reared with exercise (HRE). Fifty-six whooping crane chicks were observed by focal animal sampling from hatch to 20 weeks of age. During these observations, occurrences of comfort behavior, aggression, foraging, nonvigilance, sleep, vigilance, and other types of behavior were collected. Data were analyzed using mixed models repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Behavior was affected by rearing treatment, age, and time of day. PR birds spent more time being vigilant than HR and HRE birds. An inverse correlation was found between percentage of time foraging and vigilant (r = -0.686, P < 0.0001). However, there were no differences in the behavior of birds reared in HR or HRE programs.

  8. Mycosis inhibits cannibalism by Melanoplus sanguinipes, M. differentialis, Schistocerca americana, and Anabrus simplex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cannibalism is common among the Acrididae and the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex, a tettigonid. These behaviors have been proposed as mechanisms for the horizontal transmission of Microsporida and entomopathogenic fungi. After anecdotal observations that Melanoplus sanguinipes and A. simplex did ...

  9. Height preference of Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov, the banded elm bark beetle of American elm, Ulmus americana

    Treesearch

    S. McElwey; J. F. Negron; J. Withrow

    2007-01-01

    Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov, the banded elm bark beetle, was first detected in North America in April 2003 in Colorado and Utah by the Rapid Detection and Response Pilot Project sponsored by APHIS and USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection. It was captured in Lindgren funnel traps baited with a-pinene, ethanol, and the Ips typographus...

  10. Using Seeds to Propagate and Restore Vallisneria americana Michaux (Wild Celery) in the Chesapeake Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    germination studies. In Seeds: Ecology , biogeography, and evolution of dormancy and germination, 5-26. London: Academic Press. Campbell, J. J. 2005...D., and C. W. Boylen. 1989. Eurasian watermilfoil seed ecology from an oligotrophic and eutrophic lake. J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 27:119-121...and S. Wyllie-Echeverria. 2005. Buoy-deployed seeding: Demonstration of a new eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) planting method. Ecological Engineering

  11. EFFECTS OF NUTRIENT PRE-EXPOSURE ON ATRAZINE TOXICITY TO VALLISNERIA AMERICANA MICHX. (WILD CELERY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance of aquatic plants as a valued component of coastal environments is receiving increased attention in the public policy and scientific community. Unfortunately, the fact remains that the effects of anthropogenic contaminants on both emergent (marsh) and submerged aq...

  12. DNA-based approach to aging martens (Martes americana and M. caurina)

    Treesearch

    Jonathan N. Pauli; John P. Whiteman; Bruce G. Marcot; Terry M. McClean; Merav Ben-David

    2011-01-01

    Demographic structure is central to understanding the dynamics of animal populations. However, determining the age of free-ranging mammals is difficult, and currently impossible when sampling with noninvasive, genetic-based approaches. We present a method to estimate age class by combining measures of telomere lengths with other biologically meaningful covariates in a...

  13. Quantitative assessment of pair formation behavior in captive whooping cranes (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.T.; Small, C.R.; Ellis, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    Instantaneous scan sampling for mean distance and synchronous action patterns and all-occurrence sampling for unison call, dance, strut, and hoover-up behaviors were conducted for five potential whooping crane pairs at Patuxent Environmental Science Center, Laurel. Maryland. Dance, strut, and hoover-up differed among pairs, as did total frequency of social behaviors. It was unclear whether or not total frequency of social behaviors during pair formation can be used as an index for potential breeding success. The relative importance of different action patterns should be used as indices of pair compatibility in captive whooping cranes.

  14. PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES OF VALLISNERIA AMERICANA FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO ATRAZINE AT THREE NUTRIENT REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of anthropogenic contaminants on Gulf of Mexico plant communities are poorly understood despite the threatened condition of a number of seagrass communities and wetland habitats. In this study, we focused particular attention on the concern that elevated nutrient
    l...

  15. Spatial scaling and multi-model inference in landscape genetics: Martes americana in northern Idaho

    Treesearch

    Tzeidle N. Wasserman; Samuel A. Cushman; Michael K. Schwartz; David O. Wallin

    2010-01-01

    Individual-based analyses relating landscape structure to genetic distances across complex landscapes enable rigorous evaluation of multiple alternative hypotheses linking landscape structure to gene flow. We utilize two extensions to increase the rigor of the individual-based causal modeling approach to inferring relationships between landscape patterns and gene flow...

  16. Scale dependency of American marten (Martes americana) habitat relations [Chapter 12

    Treesearch

    Andrew J. Shirk; Tzeidle N. Wasserman; Samuel A. Cushman; Martin G. Raphael

    2012-01-01

    Animals select habitat resources at multiple spatial scales; therefore, explicit attention to scale-dependency when modeling habitat relations is critical to understanding how organisms select habitat in complex landscapes. Models that evaluate habitat variables calculated at a single spatial scale (e.g., patch, home range) fail to account for the effects of...

  17. Benjamin Franklin's Commemorative Medal "Libertas Americana": A Study in Rhetorical Iconology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lester C.

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the underlying rhetorical functions of how Benjamin Franklin used the medal to praise the national characters of France and the United States in those two countries, while he also used it to influence government policy in Malta and to vindicate himself from criticism in England. (KEH)

  18. Food consumption and retention time in captive whooping cranes (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.T.; Gee, G.F.; Slack, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Food consumption, digesta retention time, and food preference were measured for captive whooping cranes fed pelleted diets. The basal commercial diet was compared to four mixtures containing 70% basal and 30% of one of four important winter foods for the whooping crane: blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), wolfberry fruit (Lycium carolinianurn), live oak acorn (Quercus virginiana), or common Rangia clam (Rangia cuneata). Because captive birds would not eat whole foods, we were prevented from direct food preference tests. Food passed through the gut rapidly, with almost complete elimination within 7 hr. There was some indication that retention time was shorter for the low fiber and high ash and calcium clam diet. Cranes ate less wolfberry feed (g/day) than the other feeds, and all birds ate less wolfberry feed on the day it was first fed, compared to basal diet the previous day. Birds ate more low energy feed than high energy feed. Due to combined effects of low energy content, lower metabolizable energy coefficients, and reduced feed consumption, less energy was assimilated for study diets than basal diet. Apparent shorter retention times for some diets con-taming whooping crane foods may partly explain lower digestibilities and metabolizable energy of winter whooping crane foods compared to commercial crane diet.

  19. Plant signals during beetle (Scolytus multistriatus) feeding in American elm (Ulmus americana Planch).

    PubMed

    Saremba, Brett M; Tymm, Fiona J M; Baethke, Kathy; Rheault, Mark R; Sherif, Sherif M; Saxena, Praveen K; Murch, Susan J

    2017-05-04

    American Elms were devastated by an outbreak of Dutch Elm Disease is caused by the fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi Brasier that originated in Asia and arrived in the early 1900s. In spite of decades of study, the specific mechanisms and disease resistance in some trees is not well understood. the fungus is spread by several species of bark beetles in the genus Scolytus, during their dispersal and feeding. Our objective was to understand elm responses to beetle feeding in the absence of the fungus to identify potential resistance mechanisms. A colony of Scolytus multistriatus was established from wild-caught beetles and beetles were co-incubated with susceptible or resistant American elm varieties in a controlled environment chamber. Beetles burrowed into the auxillary meristems of the young elm shoots. The trees responded to the beetle damage by a series of spikes in the concentration of plant growth regulating compounds, melatonin, serotonin, and jasmonic acid. Spikes in melatonin and serotonin represented a 7,000-fold increase over resting levels. Spikes in jasmonic acid were about 10-fold higher than resting levels with one very large spike observed. Differences were noted between susceptible and resistant elms that provide new understanding of plant defenses.

  20. Plant signals during beetle (Scolytus multistriatus) feeding in American elm (Ulmus americana Planch)

    PubMed Central

    Saremba, Brett M.; Tymm, Fiona J. M.; Baethke, Kathy; Rheault, Mark R.; Sherif, Sherif M.; Saxena, Praveen K.; Murch, Susan J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT American Elms were devastated by an outbreak of Dutch Elm Disease is caused by the fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi Brasier that originated in Asia and arrived in the early 1900s. In spite of decades of study, the specific mechanisms and disease resistance in some trees is not well understood. the fungus is spread by several species of bark beetles in the genus Scolytus, during their dispersal and feeding. Our objective was to understand elm responses to beetle feeding in the absence of the fungus to identify potential resistance mechanisms. A colony of Scolytus multistriatus was established from wild-caught beetles and beetles were co-incubated with susceptible or resistant American elm varieties in a controlled environment chamber. Beetles burrowed into the auxillary meristems of the young elm shoots. The trees responded to the beetle damage by a series of spikes in the concentration of plant growth regulating compounds, melatonin, serotonin, and jasmonic acid. Spikes in melatonin and serotonin represented a 7,000-fold increase over resting levels. Spikes in jasmonic acid were about 10-fold higher than resting levels with one very large spike observed. Differences were noted between susceptible and resistant elms that provide new understanding of plant defenses. PMID:28448744

  1. Melatonin enhances the recovery of cryopreserved shoot tips of American elm (Ulmus Americana L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Climate change and the global migrations of people and goods have exposed trees to new diseases and abiotic challenges that threaten the survival of species. In vitro germplasm storage via cryopreservation is an effective tool to ensure conservation of tree species, but plant cells and tissues are e...

  2. An Attribute Based Access Control Framework for Healthcare System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Majid; Samet, Saeed; Hu, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, access control is an indispensable part of the Personal Health Record and supplies for its confidentiality by enforcing policies and rules to ensure that only authorized users gain access to requested resources in the system. In other words, the access control means protecting patient privacy in healthcare systems. Attribute-Based Access Control (ABAC) is a new access control model that can be used instead of other traditional types of access control such as Discretionary Access Control, Mandatory Access Control, and Role-Based Access Control. During last five years ABAC has shown some applications in both recent academic fields and industry purposes. ABAC by using user’s attributes and resources, makes a decision according to an access request. In this paper, we propose an ABAC framework for healthcare system. We use the engine of ABAC for rendering and enforcing healthcare policies. Moreover, we handle emergency situations in this framework.

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plants used in Mexican traditional medicine for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; González, Violeta; Jaime-Aguilar, Héctor; Martínez, Gisela; Linares, Edelmira; Bye, Robert; Romero, Irma

    2009-03-18

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiological agent of chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is linked to gastric carcinoma. Treatment to eradicate the bacteria failed in many cases, mainly due to antibiotic resistance, hence the necessity of developing better therapeutic regimens. Mexico has an enormous unexplored potential of medicinal plants. This work evaluates the in vitro anti-H. pylori activity of 53 plants used in Mexican traditional medicine for gastrointestinal disorders. To test the in vitro antibacterial activity, agar dilution and broth dilution methods were used for aqueous and methanolic extracts, respectively. Aqueous extracts of Artemisia ludoviciana subsp. mexicana, Cuphea aequipetala, Ludwigia repens,and Mentha x piperita (MIC 125 to <250 microg/ml) as well as methanolic extracts of Persea americana, Annona cherimola, Guaiacum coulteri, and Moussonia deppeana (MIC <7.5 to 15.6 microg/ml) showed the highest inhibitory effect. The results contribute to understanding the mode of action of the studied medicinal plants and for detecting plants with high anti-Helicobacter pylori activity.

  4. Water relations in culture media influence maturation of avocado somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Martín, Belén; Sesmero, Rafael; Quesada, Miguel A; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Sánchez-Romero, Carolina

    2011-11-15

    Application of transformation and other biotechnological tools in avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is hampered by difficulties in obtaining mature somatic embryos capable of germination at an acceptable rate. In this work, we evaluated the effect of different compounds affecting medium water relations on maturation of avocado somatic embryos. Culture media were characterized with respect to gel strength, water potential and osmotic potential. Improved production of mature somatic embryos was achieved with gelling agent concentrations higher than those considered standard. The osmotic agents such as sorbitol and PEG did not have positive effects on embryo maturation. The number of w-o mature somatic embryos per culture was positively correlated with medium gel strength. Gel strength was significantly affected by gelling agent type as well as by gelling agent and PEG concentration. Medium water potential was influenced by sorbitol concentration; incorporation of PEG to a culture medium did not affect medium water potential. The highest maturation results were achieved on a medium gelled with 10 gl(-1) agar. Moreover, these somatic embryos had improved germination rates. These results corroborate the role of water restriction as a key factor controlling maturation of somatic embryos. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Testing plant use of mobile vs immobile soil water sources using stable isotope experiments.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ana I; Schaffer, Bruce; Yuhong, Li; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo

    2017-07-01

    We tested for isotope exchange between bound (immobile) and mobile soil water, and whether there is isotope fractionation during plant water uptake. These are critical assumptions to the formulation of the 'two water worlds' hypothesis based on isotope profiles of soil water. In two different soil types, soil-bound water in two sets of 19-l pots, each with a 2-yr-old avocado plant (Persea americana), were identically labeled with tap water. After which, one set received isotopically enriched water whereas the other set received tap water as the mobile phase water. After a dry down period, we analyzed plant stem water as a proxy for soil-bound water as well as total soil water by cryogenic distillation. Seventy-five to 95% of the bound water isotopically exchanged with the mobile water phase. In addition, plants discriminated against 18 O and 2 H during water uptake, and this discrimination is a function of the soil water loss and soil type. The present experiment shows that the assumptions for the 'two water worlds' hypothesis are not supported. We propose a novel explanation for the discrepancy between isotope ratios of the soil water profile and other water compartments in the hydrological cycle. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Medicinal plants and their isolated compounds showing anti-Trichomonas vaginalis- activity.

    PubMed

    Mehriardestani, Mozhgan; Aliahmadi, Atousa; Toliat, Tayebeh; Rahimi, Roja

    2017-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a major of non-viral sexually-transmitted infection and an important cause of serious obstetrical and gynecological complications. Treatment options for trichomoniasis are limited to nitroimidazole compounds. The increasing resistance and allergic reactions to nitroimidazole and recurrent trichomoniasis make it essential to identify and develop new drugs against trichomoniasis. Medicinal plants are an important source for discovery of new medications. This review discusses the anti-trichomonas effects of medicinal plants and their chemical constituents to find better options against this pathogenic protozoon. Electronic databases were searched to collect all data from the year 2000 through September 2015 for in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies on the effect of medicinal plants on T. vaginalis. A total of 95 in vitro and clinical studies were identified. Only four human studies were found in this review. The Asteracea, Lamiaceae and Myrtaceae families contained the greatest number of plants with anti-trichomonas activity. Persea americana, Ocimum basilicum and Verbascum thapsus were the most efficacious against T. vaginalis. Plant metabolites containing alkaloids, isoflavonoid glucosides, essential oils, lipids, saponins and sesquiterpene lactones were found to possess anti-trichomonas properties. Assessing the structure-activity of highly-potent anti-trichomonas phytochemicals is suggested for finding natural, semisynthetic and synthetic anti-trichomonas compounds. Further clinical studies are necessary for confirmation of natural anti-trichomonas substances and completion of their safety profiles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Ripening-Related Gene from Avocado Fruit 1

    PubMed Central

    McGarvey, Douglas J.; Sirevåg, Reidun; Christoffersen, Rolf E.

    1992-01-01

    Fruit ripening involves a series of changes in gene expression regulated by the phytohormone ethylene. AVOe3, a ripening-related gene in avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass), was characterized with regard to its ethylene-regulated expression. The AVOe3 mRNA and immunopositive protein were induced in mature fruit within 12 hours of propylene treatment. The AVOe3 mRNA levels reached a maximum 1 to 2 days before the ethylene climacteric, whereas the immunopositive protein continued to accumulate. RNA selected by the pAVOe3 cDNA clone encoded a polypeptide with molecular mass of 34 kilodaltons, corresponding to the molecular mass of the AVOe3 protein determined by immunoblots. The protein was soluble, remaining in solution at 100,000 gravity and eluted as a monomer on gel filtration. Because of its pattern of induction and relationship to an ethylene-related gene of tomato, the possible involvement of AVOe3 in ethylene biosynthesis is discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668676

  8. California Hass Avocado: Profiling of Carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-01-01

    The California Hass avocado (Persea Americana) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July and September 2008 from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego), and analyzed fortotal fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with total fat content (r=0.99, p<0.001) demonstrating a remarkable degree of constancy of carotenoid intake per gram of fat content in the California Hass avocado.. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes. PMID:19813713

  9. Comparing Avocado, Swamp Bay, and Camphortree as Hosts of Raffaelea lauricola Using a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-Labeled Strain of the Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A S; Ploetz, R C; Rollins, J A

    2017-01-01

    Raffaelea lauricola, a fungal symbiont of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus glabratus, causes laurel wilt in members of the Lauraceae plant family. North American species in the family, such as avocado (Persea americana) and swamp bay (P. palustris), are particularly susceptible to laurel wilt, whereas the Asian camphortree (Cinnamomum camphora) is relatively tolerant. To determine whether susceptibility is related to pathogen colonization, a green fluorescent protein-labeled strain of R. lauricola was generated and used to inoculate avocado, swamp bay, and camphortree. Trees were harvested 3, 10, and 30 days after inoculation (DAI), and disease severity was rated on a 1-to-10 scale. By 30 DAI, avocado and swamp bay developed significantly more severe disease than camphortree (mean severities of 6.8 and 5.5 versus 1.6, P < 0.003). The extent of xylem colonization was recorded as the percentage of lumena that were colonized by the pathogen. More xylem was colonized in avocado than camphortree (0.9% versus 0.1%, P < 0.03) but colonization in swamp bay (0.4%) did not differ significantly from either host. Although there were significant correlations between xylem colonization and laurel wilt severity in avocado (r = 0.74), swamp bay (r = 0.82), and camphortree (r = 0.87), even severely affected trees of all species were scarcely colonized by the pathogen.

  10. Pathogenicity of Nectriaceous Fungi on Avocado in Australia.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Louisamarie E; Shivas, Roger G; Dann, Elizabeth K

    2017-12-01

    Black root rot is a severe disease of young avocado trees in Australia causing black necrotic roots, tree stunting, and leaf drop prior to tree death. Nectriaceous fungi (Nectriaceae, Hypocreales), are commonly isolated from symptomatic roots. This research tested the pathogenicity of 19 isolates from Calonectria, Cylindrocladiella, Dactylonectria, Gliocladiopsis, and Ilyonectria, spp. collected from young avocado trees and other hosts. Glasshouse pathogenicity tests with 'Reed' avocado (Persea americana) seedlings confirmed that Calonectria ilicicola is a severe pathogen of avocado, causing stunting, wilting, and seedling death within 5 weeks of inoculation. Isolates of C. ilicicola from peanut, papaya, and custard apple were also shown to be aggressive pathogens of avocado, demonstrating a broad host range. An isolate of a Calonectria sp. from blueberry and avocado isolates of Dactylonectria macrodidyma, D. novozelandica, D. pauciseptata, and D. anthuriicola caused significant root rot but not stunting within 5 to 9 weeks of inoculation. An isolate of an Ilyonectria sp. from grapevine closely related to Ilyonectria liriodendri, and avocado isolates of Cylindrocladiella pseudoinfestans, Gliocladiopsis peggii, and an Ilyonectria sp. were not pathogenic to avocado.

  11. Deep sequencing of the Mexican avocado transcriptome, an ancient angiosperm with a high content of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Pérez-Torres, Claudia Anahí; Albert, Victor A; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Kilaru, Aruna; López-Gómez, Rodolfo; Cervantes-Luevano, Jacob Israel; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2015-08-13

    Avocado (Persea americana) is an economically important tropical fruit considered to be a good source of fatty acids. Despite its importance, the molecular and cellular characterization of biochemical and developmental processes in avocado is limited due to the lack of transcriptome and genomic information. The transcriptomes of seeds, roots, stems, leaves, aerial buds and flowers were determined using different sequencing platforms. Additionally, the transcriptomes of three different stages of fruit ripening (pre-climacteric, climacteric and post-climacteric) were also analyzed. The analysis of the RNAseqatlas presented here reveals strong differences in gene expression patterns between different organs, especially between root and flower, but also reveals similarities among the gene expression patterns in other organs, such as stem, leaves and aerial buds (vegetative organs) or seed and fruit (storage organs). Important regulators, functional categories, and differentially expressed genes involved in avocado fruit ripening were identified. Additionally, to demonstrate the utility of the avocado gene expression atlas, we investigated the expression patterns of genes implicated in fatty acid metabolism and fruit ripening. A description of transcriptomic changes occurring during fruit ripening was obtained in Mexican avocado, contributing to a dynamic view of the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and the fruit ripening process.

  12. De Novo Synthesis and Degradation of Lx and V Cycle Pigments during Shade and Sun Acclimation in Avocado Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Britta; Osmond, C. Barry; Pogson, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    The photoprotective role of the universal violaxanthin cycle that interconverts violaxanthin (V), antheraxanthin (A), and zeaxanthin (Z) is well established, but functions of the analogous conversions of lutein-5,6-epoxide (Lx) and lutein (L) in the selectively occurring Lx cycle are still unclear. We investigated carotenoid pools in Lx-rich leaves of avocado (Persea americana) during sun or shade acclimation at different developmental stages. During sun exposure of mature shade leaves, an unusual decrease in L preceded the deepoxidation of Lx to L and of V to A+Z. In addition to deepoxidation, de novo synthesis increased the L and A+Z pools. Epoxidation of L was exceptionally slow, requiring about 40 d in the shade to restore the Lx pool, and residual A+Z usually persisted overnight. In young shade leaves, the Lx cycle was reversed initially, with Lx accumulating in the sun and declining in the shade. De novo synthesis of xanthophylls did not affect α- and β-carotene pools on the first day, but during long-term acclimation α-carotene pools changed noticeably. Nonetheless, the total change in α- and β-branch carotenoid pools was equal. We discuss the implications for regulation of metabolic flux through the α- and β-branches of carotenoid biosynthesis and potential roles for L in photoprotection and Lx in energy transfer to photosystem II and explore physiological roles of both xanthophyll cycles as determinants of photosystem II efficiency. PMID:19060099

  13. Evaluating the effect of four extracts of avocado fruit on esophageal squamous carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines in comparison with peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Vahedi Larijani, Laleh; Ghasemi, Maryam; AbedianKenari, Saeid; Naghshvar, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with gastrointestinal cancers refer to the health centers at advanced stages of the disease and conventional treatments are not significantly effective for these patients. Therefore, using modern therapeutic approaches with lower toxicity bring higher chance for successful treatment and reduced adverse effects in such patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of avocado fruit extracts on inhibition of the growth of cancer cells in comparison with normal cells. In an experimental study, ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and petroleum extracts of avocado (Persea americana) fruit were prepared. Then, the effects if the extracts on the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines were evaluated in comparison with the control group using the MTT test in the cell culture medium. Effects of the four extracts of avocado fruit on three cells lines of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and colon adenocarcinoma were tested. The results showed that avocado fruit extract is effective in inhibition of cancer cell growth in comparison with normal cells (P<0.05). Avocado fruit is rich in phytochemicals, which play an important role in inhibition of growth of cancer cells. The current study for the first time demonstrates the anti-cancer effect of avocado fruit extracts on two cancers common in Iran. Therefore, it is suggested that the fruit extracts can be considered as appropriate complementary treatments in treatment of esophageal and colon cancers.

  14. Green Synthesis of Formulated Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Chemical Protection of Skin Care and Related Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppolu, Ramya

    Nanomaterials have diversified applications based on the unique properties. These nanoparticles and functionalized nanocomposites have been studied in the health care filed. Nanoparticles are mostly used in sunscreens which are a part of human life. These sunscreens consist of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. Due to the higher band crevices, they help the skin to protect from ultraviolet rays, for instance, ultraviolet B and ultraviolet A. A series of nanostructured zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared by cost-effective chemical and bioinspired methods and variables were optimized. Highly stable and spherical zinc oxide nanoparticles were formulated by aloe vera ( Aloe barbadensis) plant extract and avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruit extract. The state-of-the-art instrumentation was used to characterize the morphology, elemental composition, and particle size distribution. X-ray diffraction data indicated highly crystalline and ultrafine nanoparticles were obtained from the colloidal methods. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed the chemical state of zinc, carbon, and oxygen atoms were well-indexed and are used as fingerprint identification of the elements. Transmission electron microscopy images show the shape of particles were cubic and fiber shape contingent upon the protecting operators and heat treatment conditions. The toxicity studies of zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to cause an increase in nitric oxide, which is protecting against further oxidative stress and appears to be nontoxic.

  15. Population genetic structure of Phytophthora cinnamomi associated with avocado in California and the discovery of a potentially recent introduction of a new clonal lineage.

    PubMed

    Pagliaccia, D; Pond, E; McKee, B; Douhan, G W

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) of avocado (Persea americana), caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, is the most serious disease of avocado worldwide. Previous studies have determined that this pathogen exhibits a primarily clonal reproductive mode but no population level studies have been conducted in the avocado-growing regions of California. Therefore, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism based on 22 polymorphic loci and mating type to investigate pathogen diversity from 138 isolates collected in 2009 to 2010 from 15 groves from the Northern and Southern avocado-growing regions. Additional isolates collected from avocado from 1966 to 2007 as well as isolates from other countries and hosts were also used for comparative purposes. Two distinct clades of A2 mating-type isolates from avocado were found based on neighbor joining analysis; one clade contained both newer and older collections from Northern and Southern California, whereas the other clade only contained isolates collected in 2009 and 2010 from Southern California. A third clade was also found that only contained A1 isolates from various hosts. Within the California population, a total of 16 genotypes were found with only one to four genotypes identified from any one location. The results indicate significant population structure in the California avocado P. cinnamomi population, low genotypic diversity consistent with asexual reproduction, potential evidence for the movement of clonal genotypes between the two growing regions, and a potential introduction of a new clonal lineage into Southern California.

  16. Avocado Seeds: Extraction Optimization and Possible Use as Antioxidant in Food

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Francisco Segovia; Sánchez, Sara Peiró; Gallego Iradi, Maria Gabriela; Mohd Azman, Nurul Aini; Almajano, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of avocado (Persea americana Mill) has increased worldwide in recent years. Part of this food (skin and seed) is lost during processing. However, a high proportion of bioactive substances, such as polyphenols, remain in this residue. The primary objective of this study was to model the extraction of polyphenols from the avocado pits. In addition, a further objective was to use the extract obtained to evaluate the protective power against oxidation in food systems, as for instance oil in water emulsions and meat products. Moreover, the possible synergy between the extracts and egg albumin in the emulsions is discussed. In Response Surface Method (RSM), the variables used are: temperature, time and ethanol concentration. The results are the total polyphenols content (TPC) and the antiradical power measured by Oxygen Radical Antioxidant Capacity (ORAC). In emulsions, the primary oxidation, by Peroxide Value and in fat meat the secondary oxidation, by TBARS (Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), were analyzed. The RSM model has an R2 of 94.69 for TPC and 96.7 for ORAC. In emulsions, the inhibition of the oxidation is about 30% for pure extracts and 60% for the combination of extracts with egg albumin. In the meat burger oxidation, the formation of TBARS is avoided by 90%. PMID:26784880

  17. Effect of Chipping and Solarization on Emergence and Boring Activity of a Recently Introduced Ambrosia Beetle (Euwallacea sp., Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Paine, Timothy D

    2015-08-01

    Polyphagous shot hole borer (Euwallacea sp., Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) has recently invaded southern California. The beetle, along with its associated fungi, Fusarium euwallaceae, Graphium sp., and Acremonium sp., causes branch dieback and tree mortality in a large variety of tree species including avocado (Persea americana Mill.) and box elder (Acer negundo L.). With the spread of the beetle through Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego Counties in California, there is increasing concern that felled trees and pruned branches infested with polyphagous shot hole borer should receive sanitation treatment to reduce the potential spread of the beetle from the movement of untreated wood. We tested two sanitation methods to reduce beetle populations, chipping with a commercial chipper and solarization by covering logs with clear or black plastic in full sun. Both chipping and solarization decreased beetle emergence and boring activity compared to untreated control logs. Chipping was most effective for chip sizes <5 cm. Solarization was most effective using clear polyethylene sheeting during hot summer months, particularly August, when daily maximum temperatures were ≥35°C. Beetles persisted for 2 mo or more when solarization was applied during the spring or fall. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Rapid molecular identification of armored scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) on Mexican 'Hass' avocado.

    PubMed

    Rugman-Jones, Paul F; Morse, Joseph G; Stouthamer, Richard

    2009-10-01

    'Hass' avocado, Persea americana Mill., fruit imported into California from Mexico are infested with high levels of armored scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), constituting several species. The paucity and delicate nature of morphological characters traditionally used to diagnose armored scales often require careful preparation of slide-mounted specimens and expert knowledge of the group, for their accurate identification. Here, we present a simple, quick, and accurate means to identify armored scales on Mexican avocados, based on amplification of the internal transcribed spacer two of ribosomal DNA, by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This region seems to show a high level of intraspecific conformity among scale specimens originating from different localities. A suite of species-specific reverse PCR primers are combined in a single reaction, with a universal forward primer, and produce a PCR product of a unique size, that after standard gel electrophoresis, allows the direct diagnosis of six diaspidid species: Abgrallaspis aguacatae Evans, Watson & Miller; Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret); Hemiberlesia sp. near latania; Hemiberlesia rapax (Comstock); Acutaspis albopicta (Cockerell); and Pinnaspis strachani (Cooley). Two additional species, Diaspis miranda (Cockerell) and Diaspis sp. near miranda, also are separated from the others by using this method and are subsequently diagnosed by secondary digestion of the PCR product with the restriction endonuclease smaI.

  19. Suppression of Cellulase and Polygalacturonase and Induction of Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes in Avocado Fruit Mesocarp Subjected to Low Oxygen Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kanellis, Angelos K.; Solomos, Theophanes; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    1991-01-01

    Expression of polygalacturonase and cellulase, two hydrolytic enzymes of avocado (Persea americana, cv Hass) fruit which are synthesized de novo during ripening, and alcohol dehydrogenase, a known anaerobic protein, were studied under different O2 regimes. Low O2 concentrations (2.5-5.5%) diminished the accumulation of polygalacturonase and cellulase proteins and the expression of their isoenzymes. This pattern of change in cellulase protein was also reflected in the steady-state amount of its mRNA. In contrast, 7.5 and 10% O2 did not alter the changes observed in fruits ripened in air. On the other hand, alcohol dehydrogenase was induced in 2.5, 3.5, and 5.5% O2 but not in 7.5 or 10% O2. The recovery from the hypoxic stress upon returning the fruits back to air for 24 hours, was also a function of O2 tensions under which the fruits were kept. Thus, the synthesis of polygalacturonase and cellulase was directly related to O2 levels, while the activity of the isoenzymes of alcohol dehydrogenase was inversely related to O2 levels. The results indicate that hypoxia exerts both negative and positive effects on the expression of certain genes and that these effects are initiated at the same levels of O2. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:16668163

  20. Identification of a New Class of Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins in Plants1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick J.; James, Christopher N.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Kilaru, Aruna; Dyer, John M.; Mullen, Robert T.; Ohlrogge, John B.; Chapman, Kent D.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies, or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets occur in essentially all plant cell types, many of which may not require oleosin-mediated stabilization. The proteins associated with the surface of nonseed lipid droplets, which are likely to influence the formation, stability, and turnover of this compartment, remain to be elucidated. Here, we have combined lipidomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies of avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp to identify two new lipid droplet-associated proteins, which we named LDAP1 and LDAP2. These proteins are highly similar to each other and also to the small rubber particle proteins that accumulate in rubber-producing plants. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog to LDAP1 and LDAP2, At3g05500, was localized to the surface of lipid droplets after transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells that were induced to accumulate triacylglycerols. We propose that small rubber particle protein-like proteins are involved in the general process of binding and perhaps the stabilization of lipid-rich particles in the cytosol of plant cells and that the avocado and Arabidopsis protein members reveal a new aspect of the cellular machinery that is involved in the packaging of triacylglycerols in plant tissues. PMID:23821652

  1. Traditional treatment of human and animal salmonelloses in Southern Benin: Knowledge of farmers and traditherapists

    PubMed Central

    Dougnon, T. V.; Déguénon, E.; Fah, L.; Lègba, B.; Hounmanou, Y. M. G.; Agbankpè, J.; Amadou, A.; Koudokpon, H.; Fabiyi, K.; Aniambossou, A.; Assogba, P.; Hounsa, E.; de Souza, M.; Avlessi, F.; Dougnon, T. J.; Gbaguidi, F.; Boko, M.; Bankolé, H. S.; Baba-Moussa, L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim:: This study aimed to report medicinal plants that are likely to be used in the control of salmonellosis. Materials and Methods:: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Southern Benin. Semi-structured questionnaires were administered to 150 farmers and 100 traditional therapists in seven high municipalities. This step helped to collect plants that are used in the treatment of animal salmonellosis and typhoid fever in human. Results:: The results revealed a low level of use of medicinal plants among breeders who prefer antibiotics such as oxytetracycline (53.55%), tylosine + sulfadimerazine (15.30%), and alphaceryl (19.13%). However, plants such as Moringa oleifera (leaves), Carica papaya (leaves and seeds), and Vernonia amygdalina (leaves) were mostly used by some farmers. From traditional therapists, 57 plant species of 32 families were identified as typhoid fever cures; among which Leguminosae, Asteraceae, and Euphorbiaceae were predominant. Persea americana (22.72%), V. amygdalina (7.57%), and Corchorus olitorius (7.57%) were the most cited by traditherapists for the treatment of typhoid fever in human. Conclusion:: This study provides a database for further studies on the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of Benin plant species on Salmonella spp. These evaluations will guarantee the availability of new therapeutic solutions for populations. PMID:28717307

  2. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used in the management of diabetes mellitus and hypertension in the Central Region of Togo.

    PubMed

    Karou, Simplice Damintoti; Tchacondo, Tchadjobo; Djikpo Tchibozo, Micheline Agassounon; Abdoul-Rahaman, Saliou; Anani, Kokou; Koudouvo, Koffi; Batawila, Komlan; Agbonon, Amegnona; Simpore, Jacques; de Souza, Comlan

    2011-12-01

    The Tem tribe in the Central Region of Togo is a population with an extensive knowledge of medicinal plants. However, little is known about their medical practices, principally the use of plants in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN). The present study documented the indigenous medicinal plant utilization for the management of DM and HTN in the Togo Central Region. From March to October 2010, 55 traditional healers were interviewed about their knowledge on the use of plants for DM and HTN treatment. The results revealed that 35/55 (63.64%) healers had treated at least one case of DM and/or HTN. They highlighted the use of 64 species belonging to 31 families in the treatment of DM and/or HTN. The most used plants against diabetes were Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae), Khaya senegalensis A. Juss. (Meliaceae), Sarcocephalus latifolius (Sm.) E.A. Bruce (Rubiaceae), Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), Bridelia ferruginea Benth. (Phyllanthaceae), and Securidaca longepedunculata Fresen. (Polygalacae), while Allium sativum L. (Liliaceae) and Parkia biglobosa Benth. (Fabaceae), followed by Khaya senegalensis A. Juss. (Meliaceae), Gardenia ternifolia Schumach. (Rubiaceae), and Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae) were the most commonly cited as antihypertensive. The issue revealed that traditional healers of the above mentioned region have basic knowledge regarding herbal medicine for DM and HTN in comparison with previous published reports. Further pharmacological screening of the identified plants should be conducted to ascertain the effectiveness of these plants.

  3. Traditional treatment of human and animal salmonelloses in Southern Benin: Knowledge of farmers and traditherapists.

    PubMed

    Dougnon, T V; Déguénon, E; Fah, L; Lègba, B; Hounmanou, Y M G; Agbankpè, J; Amadou, A; Koudokpon, H; Fabiyi, K; Aniambossou, A; Assogba, P; Hounsa, E; de Souza, M; Avlessi, F; Dougnon, T J; Gbaguidi, F; Boko, M; Bankolé, H S; Baba-Moussa, L

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to report medicinal plants that are likely to be used in the control of salmonellosis. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Southern Benin. Semi-structured questionnaires were administered to 150 farmers and 100 traditional therapists in seven high municipalities. This step helped to collect plants that are used in the treatment of animal salmonellosis and typhoid fever in human. The results revealed a low level of use of medicinal plants among breeders who prefer antibiotics such as oxytetracycline (53.55%), tylosine + sulfadimerazine (15.30%), and alphaceryl (19.13%). However, plants such as Moringa oleifera (leaves), Carica papaya (leaves and seeds), and Vernonia amygdalina (leaves) were mostly used by some farmers. From traditional therapists, 57 plant species of 32 families were identified as typhoid fever cures; among which Leguminosae, Asteraceae, and Euphorbiaceae were predominant. Persea americana (22.72%), V. amygdalina (7.57%), and Corchorus olitorius (7.57%) were the most cited by traditherapists for the treatment of typhoid fever in human. This study provides a database for further studies on the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of Benin plant species on Salmonella spp . These evaluations will guarantee the availability of new therapeutic solutions for populations.

  4. Bioecology of Stenoma catenifer (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae) and associated larval parasitoids reared from Hass avocados in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Hoddle, Mark S; Hoddle, Christina D

    2008-06-01

    A 10-wk study of the avocado seed-feeding moth Stenoma catenifer Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae), was conducted in a commercial 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana Miller [Lauraceae]) orchard in Guatemala. Up to 45% of fruit in the orchard were damaged by larval S. catenifer. Larval-to-adult survivorship for 1,881 S. catenifer larvae in Hass fruit was 37%, and adult sex ratio was 51% female. Four species of larval parasitoid were reared from field-collected S. catenifer larvae. The most common parasitoid reared was a gregarious Apanteles sp., which parasitized 53% of larvae and produced on average eight to nine cocoons per host. Apanteles sp. sex ratio was 47% female and 87% of parasitoids emerged successfully from cocoons. Apanteles sp. longevity was approximately equal to 1.5 d in the absence of food, and when provisioned with honey, parasitoids survived for 5-7 d. The mean number of cocoons produced by Apanteles sp. per host, and larval parasitism rates were not significantly affected by the number of S. catenifer larvae inhabiting seeds. Oviposition studies conducted with S. catenifer in the laboratory indicated that this moth lays significantly more eggs on the branch to which the fruit pedicel is attached than on avocado fruit. When given a choice between Hass and non-Hass avocados, S. catenifer lays up to 2.69 times more eggs on Hass.

  5. Evidence for a universal pathway of abscisic acid biosynthesis in higher plants from sup 18 O incorporation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Heath, T.G.; Gage, D.A.

    1989-12-01

    Previous labeling studies of abscisic acid (ABA) with {sup 18}O{sub 2} have been mainly conducted with water-stressed leaves. In this study, {sup 18}O incorporation into ABA of stressed leaves of various species was compared with {sup 18}O labeling of ABA of turgid leaves and of fruit tissue in different stages of ripening. In stressed leaves of all six species investigated, avocado (Persea americana), barley (Hordeum vulgare), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium), spinach (Spinacia oleracea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), {sup 18}O was most abundant in the carboxyl group, whereas incorporation of a second and third {sup 18}O in the oxygenmore » atoms on the ring of ABA was much less prominent after 24 h in {sup 18}O{sub 2}. ABA from turgid bean leaves showed significant {sup 18}O incorporation, again with highest {sup 18}O enrichment in the carboxyl group. On the basis of {sup 18}O-labeling patterns observed in ABA from different tissues it is concluded that, despite variations in precusor pool sizes and intermediate turnover rates, there is a universal pathway of ABA biosynthesis in higher plants which involves cleavage of a larger precursor molecule, presumably an oxygenated carotenoid.« less

  6. Fatty acids, sterols, and antioxidant activity in minimally processed avocados during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Lucía; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia; de Ancos, Begoña; Cano, M Pilar

    2009-04-22

    Avocado ( Persea americana Mill.) is a good source of bioactive compounds such as monounsaturated fatty acids and sterols. The impact of minimal processing on its health-promoting attributes was investigated. Avocados cut into slices or halves were packaged in plastic bags under nitrogen, air, or vacuum and stored at 8 degrees C for 13 days. The stabilities of fatty acids and sterols as well as the effect on antioxidant activity were evaluated. The main fatty acid identified and quantified in avocado was oleic acid (about 57% of total content), whereas beta-sitosterol was found to be the major sterol (about 89% of total content). In general, after refrigerated storage, a significant decrease in fatty acid content was observed. Vacuum/halves and air/slices were the samples that maintained better this content. With regard to phytosterols, there were no significant changes during storage. Antioxidant activity showed a slight positive correlation against stearic acid content. At the end of refrigerated storage, a significant increase in antiradical efficiency (AE) was found for vacuum samples. AE values were quite similar among treatments. Hence, minimal processing can be a useful tool to preserve health-related properties of avocado fruit.

  7. Ecological implications of Laurel Wilt infestation on Everglades Tree Islands, southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    , laurel wilt disease also kills other native trees that are members of the laurel family, including swamp bay (Persea palustris), silk bay (Persea borbonia var. humilis), and sassafras (Sassafras albidum), as well as the economically important cultivated avocado (Persea americana) (Fraedrich and others, 2008). This paper is concerned primarily with swamp bay, an important component of Everglades tree islands.The spread of the redbay ambrosia beetle and its fungal symbiont has been very rapid, exceeding model predictions (Koch and Smith, 2008); by 2011, laurel wilt disease was found from the southern coastal plain of North Carolina to southern peninsular Florida. The first redbay ambrosia beetle was trapped in Miami-Dade County in March 2010, and laurel wilt disease was discovered in swamp bays in February 2011 and in commercial avocado groves about a year later (Kendra and others, 2013). By 2013, laurel wilt disease was seen in swamp bays throughout the southern Everglades in Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve, and Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) 3A and 3B (Rodgers and others, 2014).

  8. The need for the use of XACML access control policy in a distributed EHR and some performance considerations.

    PubMed

    Sucurovic, Snezana; Milutinovic, Veljko

    2008-01-01

    The Internet based distributed large scale information systems implements attribute based access control (ABAC) rather than Role Based Access Control (RBAC). The reason is that the Internet is identity less and that ABAC scales better. EXtensible Access Control Markup Language is standardized language for writing access control policies, access control requests and access control responses in ABAC. XACML can provide decentralized administration and credentials distribution. In year 2002 version of CEN ENV 13 606 attributes have been attached to EHCR components and in such a system ABAC and XACML have been easy to implement. This paper presents writing XACML policies in the case when attributes are in hierarchical structure. It is presented two possible solutions to write XACML policy in that case and that the solution when set functions are used is more compact and provides 10% better performances.

  9. Complementation of the Function of Glycoprotein H of Human Herpesvirus 6 Variant A by Glycoprotein H of Variant B in the Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Oyaizu, Hiroko; Tang, Huamin; Ota, Megumi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ozono, Keiichi; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a T-cell-tropic betaherpesvirus. HHV-6 can be classified into two variants, HHV-6 variant A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B, based on genetic, antigenic, and cell tropisms, although the homology of their entire genomic sequences is nearly 90%. The HHV-6A glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gQ1/gQ2 is a viral ligand that binds to the cellular receptor human CD46. Because gH has 94.3% amino acid identity between the variants, here we examined whether gH from one variant could complement its loss in the other. Recently, we successfully reconstituted HHV-6A from its cloned genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) (rHHV-6ABAC). Using this system, we constructed HHV-6ABAC DNA containing the HHV-6B gH (BgH) gene instead of the HHV-6A gH (AgH) gene in Escherichia coli. Recombinant HHV-6ABAC expressing BgH (rHHV-6ABAC-BgH) was successfully reconstituted. In addition, a monoclonal antibody that blocks HHV-6B but not HHV-6A infection neutralized rHHV-6ABAC-BgH but not rHHV-6ABAC. These results indicate that HHV-6B gH can complement the function of HHV-6A gH in the viral infectious cycle. PMID:22647694

  10. Distribution of serotonergic and dopaminergic nerve fibers in the salivary gland complex of the cockroach Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Otto; Dames, Petra; Kühnel, Dana; Walz, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Background The cockroach salivary gland consists of secretory acini with peripheral ion-transporting cells and central protein-producing cells, an extensive duct system, and a pair of reservoirs. Salivation is controled by serotonergic and dopaminergic innervation. Serotonin stimulates the secretion of a protein-rich saliva, dopamine causes the production of a saliva without proteins. These findings suggest a model in which serotonin acts on the central cells and possibly other cell types, and dopamine acts selectively on the ion-transporting cells. To examine this model, we have analyzed the spatial relationship of dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve fibers to the various cell types. Results The acinar tissue is entangled in a meshwork of serotonergic and dopaminergic varicose fibers. Dopaminergic fibers reside only at the surface of the acini next to the peripheral cells. Serotonergic fibers invade the acini and form a dense network between central cells. Salivary duct segments close to the acini are locally associated with dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers, whereas duct segments further downstream have only dopaminergic fibers on their surface and within the epithelium. In addition, the reservoirs have both a dopaminergic and a serotonergic innervation. Conclusion Our results suggest that dopamine is released on the acinar surface, close to peripheral cells, and along the entire duct system. Serotonin is probably released close to peripheral and central cells, and at initial segments of the duct system. Moreover, the presence of serotonergic and dopaminergic fiber terminals on the reservoir indicates that the functions of this structure are also regulated by dopamine and serotonin. PMID:12095424

  11. Distribution of serotonergic and dopaminergic nerve fibers in the salivary gland complex of the cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Otto; Dames, Petra; Kühnel, Dana; Walz, Bernd

    2002-06-24

    The cockroach salivary gland consists of secretory acini with peripheral ion-transporting cells and central protein-producing cells, an extensive duct system, and a pair of reservoirs. Salivation is controlled by serotonergic and dopaminergic innervation. Serotonin stimulates the secretion of a protein-rich saliva, dopamine causes the production of a saliva without proteins. These findings suggest a model in which serotonin acts on the central cells and possibly other cell types, and dopamine acts selectively on the ion-transporting cells. To examine this model, we have analyzed the spatial relationship of dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve fibers to the various cell types. The acinar tissue is entangled in a meshwork of serotonergic and dopaminergic varicose fibers. Dopaminergic fibers reside only at the surface of the acini next to the peripheral cells. Serotonergic fibers invade the acini and form a dense network between central cells. Salivary duct segments close to the acini are locally associated with dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers, whereas duct segments further downstream have only dopaminergic fibers on their surface and within the epithelium. In addition, the reservoirs have both a dopaminergic and a serotonergic innervation. Our results suggest that dopamine is released on the acinar surface, close to peripheral cells, and along the entire duct system. Serotonin is probably released close to peripheral and central cells, and at initial segments of the duct system. Moreover, the presence of serotonergic and dopaminergic fiber terminals on the reservoir indicates that the functions of this structure are also regulated by dopamine and serotonin.

  12. Ultrastructure of cells of Ulmus americana cultured in vitro and exposed to the culture filtrate of Ceratocystis ulmi

    Treesearch

    Paula M. Pijut; R. Daniel Lineberger; Subhash C. Domir; Jann M. Ichida; Charles R. Krause

    1990-01-01

    Calli of American elm susceptible and resistant to Dutch elm disease were exposed to a culture filtrate of a pathogenic isolate of Ceratocystis ulmi. Cells from untreated tissue exhibited typical internal composition associated with healthy, actively growing cells. All cells exposed to culture filtrate showed appreciable ultrastructural changes....

  13. Subcellular Lipid Droplets in Vanilla Leaf Epidermis and Avocado Mesocarp Are Coated with Oleosins of Distinct Phylogenic Lineages1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular lipid droplets (LDs) in diverse plant cells and species are coated with stabilizing oleosins of at least five phylogenic lineages and perform different functions. We examined two types of inadequately studied LDs for coated oleosins and their characteristics. The epidermis but not mesophyll of leaves of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) and most other Asparagales species contained solitary and clustered LDs (<0.5 μm), some previously studied by electron microscopy and speculated to be for cuticle formation. In vanilla leaves, transcripts of oleosins of the U lineage were present in both epidermis and mesophyll, but oleosin occurred only in epidermis. Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the LDs were coated with oleosins. LDs in isolated fractions did not coalesce, and the fractions contained heterogeneous proteins including oleosins and diverse lipids. These findings reflect the in situ structure and possible functions of the LDs. Fruit mesocarp of avocado (Persea americana) and other Lauraceae species possessed large LDs, which likely function in attracting animals for seed dispersal. They contained transcripts of oleosin of a novel M phylogenic lineage. Each avocado mesocarp fatty cell possessed one to several large LDs (5 to 20 μm) and at their periphery, numerous small LDs (<0.5 μm). Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that oleosin was present mostly on the small LDs. LDs in isolated fractions coalesced rapidly, and the fraction contained oleosin and several other proteins and triacylglycerols as the main lipids. These two new types of oleosin-LDs exemplify the evolutionary plasticity of oleosins-LDs in generating novel functions in diverse cell types and species. PMID:27208281

  14. Subcellular Lipid Droplets in Vanilla Leaf Epidermis and Avocado Mesocarp Are Coated with Oleosins of Distinct Phylogenic Lineages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular lipid droplets (LDs) in diverse plant cells and species are coated with stabilizing oleosins of at least five phylogenic lineages and perform different functions. We examined two types of inadequately studied LDs for coated oleosins and their characteristics. The epidermis but not mesophyll of leaves of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) and most other Asparagales species contained solitary and clustered LDs (<0.5 μm), some previously studied by electron microscopy and speculated to be for cuticle formation. In vanilla leaves, transcripts of oleosins of the U lineage were present in both epidermis and mesophyll, but oleosin occurred only in epidermis. Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the LDs were coated with oleosins. LDs in isolated fractions did not coalesce, and the fractions contained heterogeneous proteins including oleosins and diverse lipids. These findings reflect the in situ structure and possible functions of the LDs. Fruit mesocarp of avocado (Persea americana) and other Lauraceae species possessed large LDs, which likely function in attracting animals for seed dispersal. They contained transcripts of oleosin of a novel M phylogenic lineage. Each avocado mesocarp fatty cell possessed one to several large LDs (5 to 20 μm) and at their periphery, numerous small LDs (<0.5 μm). Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that oleosin was present mostly on the small LDs. LDs in isolated fractions coalesced rapidly, and the fraction contained oleosin and several other proteins and triacylglycerols as the main lipids. These two new types of oleosin-LDs exemplify the evolutionary plasticity of oleosins-LDs in generating novel functions in diverse cell types and species. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Vertical Distribution and Daily Flight Periodicity of Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Florida Avocado Orchards Affected by Laurel Wilt.

    PubMed

    Menocal, Octavio; Kendra, Paul E; Montgomery, Wayne S; Crane, Jonathan H; Carrillo, Daniel

    2018-05-28

    Ambrosia beetles have emerged as significant pests of avocado ((Persea americana Mill. [Laurales: Lauraceae])) due to their association with pathogenic fungal symbionts, most notably Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harr., Fraedrich & Aghayeva (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae), the causal agent of the laurel wilt (LW) disease. We evaluated the interaction of ambrosia beetles with host avocado trees by documenting their flight height and daily flight periodicity in Florida orchards with LW. Flight height was assessed passively in three avocado orchards by using ladder-like arrays of unbaited sticky traps arranged at three levels (low: 0-2 m; middle: 2-4 m; high: 4-6 m). In total, 1,306 individuals of 12 Scolytinae species were intercepted, but six accounted for ~95% of the captures: Xyleborus volvulus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Xyleborinus saxesenii Ratzeburg (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Euplatypus parallelus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Xyleborus bispinatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and Hypothenemus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The primary vector of R. lauricola, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was not detected. Females of X. volvulus showed a preference for flight at low levels and X. bispinatus for the low and middle levels; however, captures of all other species were comparable at all heights. At a fourth orchard, a baiting method was used to document flight periodicity. Females of X. saxesenii and Hypothenemus sp. were observed in flight 2-2.5 h prior to sunset; X. bispinatus, X. volvulus, and X. affinis initiated flight at ~1 h before sunset and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) at 30 min prior to sunset. Results suggest that ambrosia beetles in South Florida fly near sunset (when light intensity and wind speed decrease) at much greater heights than previously assumed and have species-specific patterns in host

  16. Soil organic matter and soil biodiversity spots in urban and semi urban soils of southeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Esperanza

    2015-04-01

    We have observed how the constant use of compost or vermicompost has created spots of soil restoration in urban and semiurban soils of Chiapas (Huitepec and Teopisca), increasing soil organic matter amount, soil moisture and soil porosity, and enhancing then the presence of soil biodiversity; for example, in a Milpa with vermicompost (polyculture of Zea mays with Curcubita pepo, and Fasolius vulgaris) we have found a high density of an epigeic earthworm (640 ind.m2), Dichogaster bolahui, not present in the same type of soil just some meters of distance, in an Oak forest, where soil macroinvertebrates abundance decreased drastically. In another ecosystem within a Persea Americana culture, we found how above and below ground soil biodiversity is affected by the use of vermicompost, having clearly different microcosmos with and without vermicompost (30-50% more micro and macro invertebrates with vermicompost). So now in Campeche, within those soils that are classified by the mayas as tzequel, soils not use for agriculture, we have implemented home gardens and school gardens by the use of compost of vermicomposts in urban and semiurban soils. In school gardens (mainly primary schools) students have cultivated several plants with alimentary purposes; teachers have observed how the increase of soil biodiversity by the use of compost or vermicompost has enhanced the curiosity of children, even has promoted a more friendly behavior among students, they have learned how to do compost and how to apply it. Urban and semiurban soils can be modified by the use of compost and vermicompost, and soil biodiversity has extremely increased.

  17. Herbal medicine use and linked suspected adverse drug reactions in a prospective cohort of Ugandan inpatients.

    PubMed

    Kiguba, Ronald; Ononge, Sam; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2016-05-26

    Clinical history-taking can be employed as a standardized approach to elucidate the use of herbal medicines and their linked suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among hospitalized patients. We sought to identify herbal medicines nominated by Ugandan inpatients; compare nomination rates by ward and gender; confirm the herbs' known pharmacological properties from published literature; and identify ADRs linked to pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Prospective cohort of consented adult inpatients designed to assess medication use and ADRs on one gynaecological and three medical wards of 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained on patients' characteristics, including pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Fourteen percent (26/191) of females in Gynaecology nominated at least one specific herbal medicine compared with 20 % (114/571) of inpatients on medical wards [20 % (69/343) of females; 20 % (45/228) of males]. Frequent nominations were Persea americana (30), Mumbwa/multiple-herb clay rods (23), Aloe barbadensis (22), Beta vulgaris (12), Vernonia amygdalina (11), Commelina africana (7), Bidens pilosa (7), Hoslundia opposita (6), Mangifera indica (4), and Dicliptera laxata (4). Four inpatients experienced 10 suspected ADRs linked to pre-admission herbal medicine use including Commelina africana (4), multiple-herb-mumbwa (1), or unspecified local-herbs (5): three ADR-cases were abortion-related and one kidney-related. The named herbal medicines and their nomination rates generally differed by specialized ward, probably guided by local folklore knowledge of their use. Clinical elicitation from inpatients can generate valuable safety data on herbal medicine use. However, larger routine studies might increase the utility of our method to assess herbal medicine use and detect herb-linked ADRs. Future studies should take testable samples of ADR-implicated herbal medicines for further analysis.

  18. Genetic Structure and Selection of a Core Collection for Long Term Conservation of Avocado in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Luis F.; Machida-Hirano, Ryoko; Borrayo, Ernesto; Cortés-Cruz, Moisés; Espíndola-Barquera, María del Carmen; Heredia García, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Mexico, as the center of origin of avocado (Persea americama Mill.), harbors a wide genetic diversity of this species, whose identification may provide the grounds to not only understand its unique population structure and domestication history, but also inform the efforts aimed at its conservation. Although molecular characterization of cultivated avocado germplasm has been studied by several research groups, this had not been the case in Mexico. In order to elucidate the genetic structure of avocado in Mexico and the sustainable use of its genetic resources, 318 avocado accessions conserved in the germplasm collection in the National Avocado Genebank were analyzed using 28 markers [9 expressed sequence tag-Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) and 19 genomic SSRs]. Deviation from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium and high inter-locus linkage disequilibrium were observed especially in drymifolia, and guatemalensis. Total averages of the observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.59 and 0.75, respectively. Although clear genetic differentiation was not observed among 3 botanical races: americana, drymifolia, and guatemalensis, the analyzed Mexican population can be classified into two groups that correspond to two different ecological regions. We developed a core-collection by K-means clustering method. The selected 36 individuals as core-collection successfully represented more than 80% of total alleles and showed heterozygosity values equal to or higher than those of the original collection, despite its constituting slightly more than 10% of the latter. Accessions selected as members of the core collection have now become candidates to be introduced in cryopreservation implying a minimum loss of genetic diversity and a back-up for existing field collections of such important genetic resources. PMID:28286510

  19. Some physicochemical and rheological properties of starch isolated from avocado seeds.

    PubMed

    Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Barbosa-Martín, Enrique; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; González-Mondragón, Edith; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2016-05-01

    Seeds from avocado (Persea americana Miller) fruit are a waste byproduct of fruit processing. Starch from avocado seed is a potential alternative starch source. Two different extraction solvents were used to isolate starch from avocado seeds, functional and rheological characteristics measured for these starches, and comparisons made to maize starch. Avocado seed powder was suspended in a solution containing 2 mM Tris, 7.5 mM NaCl and 80 mM NaHSO3 (solvent A) or sodium bisulphite solution (1500 ppm SO2, solvent B). Solvent type had no influence (p>0.05) on starch properties. Amylose content was 15-16%. Gelatinization temperature range was 56-74 °C, peak temperature was 65.7 °C, and transition enthalpy was 11.4-11.6J/g. At 90 °C, solubility was 19-20%, swelling power 28-30 g water/g starch, and water absorption capacity was 22-24 g water/g starch. Pasting properties were initial temperature 72 °C; maximum viscosity 380-390 BU; breakdown -2 BU; consistency 200 BU; and setback 198 BU. Avocado seed starch dispersions (5% w/v) were characterized as viscoelastic systems, with G'>G″. Avocado seed starch has potential applications as a thickening and gelling agent in food systems, as a vehicle in pharmaceutical systems and an ingredient in biodegradable polymers for food packaging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins. PMID:26232488

  1. Use of plant woody species electrical potential for irrigation scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Ríos-Rojas, Liliana; Morales-Moraga, David; Alcalde, José A; Gurovich, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    The electrical response of plants to environmental stimuli can be measured and quantitatively related to the intensity of several stimulating sources, like temperature, solar radiation, soil water content, evapotranspiration rates, sap flow and dendrometric cycles. These relations can be used to assess the influence of different environmental situations on soil water availability to plants, defined as a steady state condition between leaf transpirative flow and soil water flow to plant roots. A restricted soil water flow due to soil dryness can trigger water stress in plants, if the atmospheric evaporative demand is high, causing partial stomata closure as a physiological response to avoid plant dehydration; water stressed and unstressed plants manifest a differential electrical response. Real time plant electrical response measurements can anticipate actions that prevent the plant reaching actual stress conditions, optimizing stomata gas exchange and photosynthetic rates. An electrophysiological sensor developed in this work, allows remote real-time recording information on plant electrical potential (EP) in the field, which is highly related to EP measurements obtained with a laboratory Keithley voltmeter sensor used in an highly controlled experimental setup. Our electrophysiological sensor is a wireless, autonomous devise, which transmits EP information via Internet to a data server. Using both types of sensors (EP electrodes with a Keithley voltmeter and the electrophysiological sensor), we measured in real time the electrical responses of Persea americana and Prunus domestica plants, to induced water deficits. The differential response for 2 scenarios: irrigation and water restriction is identified by a progressive change in slope on the daily maximal and minimal electric signal values in stressed plants, and a zero-slope for similar signals for well-watered plants. Results show a correspondence between measured signals obtained by our electrophysiological

  2. Decreased photochemical efficiency of photosystem II following sunlight exposure of shade-grown leaves of avocado: because of, or in spite of, two kinetically distinct xanthophyll cycles?

    PubMed

    Jia, Husen; Förster, Britta; Chow, Wah Soon; Pogson, Barry James; Osmond, C Barry

    2013-02-01

    This study resolved correlations between changes in xanthophyll pigments and photosynthetic properties in attached and detached shade-grown avocado (Persea americana) leaves upon sun exposure. Lutein epoxide (Lx) was deepoxidized to lutein (L), increasing the total pool by ΔL over 5 h, whereas violaxanthin (V) conversion to antheraxanthin (A) and zeaxanthin (Z) ceased after 1 h. During subsequent dark or shade recovery, de novo synthesis of L and Z continued, followed by epoxidation of A and Z but not of L. Light-saturated nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) was strongly and linearly correlated with decreasing [Lx] and increasing [L] but showed a biphasic correlation with declining [V] and increasing [A+Z] separated when V deepoxidation ceased. When considering [ΔL+Z], the monophasic linear correlation was restored. Photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem (PSI; deduced from the delivery of electrons to PSI in saturating single-turnover flashes) showed a strong correlation in their continuous decline in sunlight and an increase in NPQ capacity. This decrease was also reflected in the initial reduction of the slope of photosynthetic electron transport versus photon flux density. Generally longer, stronger sun exposures enhanced declines in both slope and maximum photosynthetic electron transport rates as well as photochemical efficiency of PSII and PSII/PSI more severely and prevented full recovery. Interestingly, increased NPQ capacity was accompanied by slower relaxation. This was more prominent in detached leaves with closed stomata, indicating that photorespiratory recycling of CO(2) provided little photoprotection to avocado shade leaves. Sun exposure of these shade leaves initiates a continuum of photoprotection, beyond full engagement of the Lx and V cycle in the antenna, but ultimately photoinactivated PSII reaction centers.

  3. Aliphatic acetogenin constituents of avocado fruits inhibit human oral cancer cell proliferation by targeting the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Steven M; Han, Chunhua; Pan, Li; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Ding, Haiming

    2011-06-10

    Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are consumed as part of the human diet and extracts have shown growth inhibitory effects in various types of human cancer cells, although the effectiveness of individual components and their underlying mechanism are poorly understood. Using activity-guided fractionation of the flesh of avocado fruits, a chloroform-soluble extract (D003) was identified that exhibited high efficacy towards premalignant and malignant human oral cancer cell lines. From this extract, two aliphatic acetogenins of previously known structure were isolated, compounds 1 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] and 2 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate]. In this study, we show for the first time that the growth inhibitory efficacy of this chloroform extract is due to blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR (Tyr1173), c-RAF (Ser338), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) in the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Compounds 1 and 2 both inhibited phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). Compound 2, but not compound 1, prevented EGF-induced activation of the EGFR (Tyr1173). When compounds 1 and 2 were combined they synergistically inhibited c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation, and human oral cancer cell proliferation. The present data suggest that the potential anticancer activity of avocado fruits is due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins that target two key components of the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lutein from deepoxidation of lutein epoxide replaces zeaxanthin to sustain an enhanced capacity for nonphotochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in avocado shade leaves in the dark.

    PubMed

    Förster, Britta; Pogson, Barry James; Osmond, Charles Barry

    2011-05-01

    Leaves of avocado (Persea americana) that develop and persist in deep shade canopies have very low rates of photosynthesis but contain high concentrations of lutein epoxide (Lx) that are partially deepoxidized to lutein (L) after 1 h of exposure to 120 to 350 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), increasing the total L pool by 5% to 10% (ΔL). Deepoxidation of Lx to L was near stoichiometric and similar in kinetics to deepoxidation of violaxanthin (V) to antheraxanthin (A) and zeaxanthin (Z). Although the V pool was restored by epoxidation of A and Z overnight, the Lx pool was not. Depending on leaf age and pretreatment, the pool of ΔL persisted for up to 72 h in the dark. Metabolism of ΔL did not involve epoxidation to Lx. These contrasting kinetics enabled us to differentiate three states of the capacity for nonphotochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (NPQ) in attached and detached leaves: ΔpH dependent (NPQ(ΔpH)) before deepoxidation; after deepoxidation in the presence of ΔL, A, and Z (NPQ(ΔLAZ)); and after epoxidation of A+Z but with residual ΔL (NPQ(ΔL)). The capacity of both NPQ(ΔLAZ) and NPQ(ΔL) was similar and 45% larger than NPQ(ΔpH), but dark relaxation of NPQ(ΔLAZ) was slower. The enhanced capacity for NPQ was lost after metabolism of ΔL. The near equivalence of NPQ(ΔLAZ) and NPQ(ΔL) provides compelling evidence that the small dynamic pool ΔL replaces A+Z in avocado to "lock in" enhanced NPQ. The results are discussed in relation to data obtained with other Lx-rich species and in mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with increased L pools.

  5. Development of a rapid method for the sequential extraction and subsequent quantification of fatty acids and sugars from avocado mesocarp tissue.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marjolaine D; Terry, Leon A

    2008-08-27

    Methods devised for oil extraction from avocado (Persea americana Mill.) mesocarp (e.g., Soxhlet) are usually lengthy and require operation at high temperature. Moreover, methods for extracting sugars from avocado tissue (e.g., 80% ethanol, v/v) do not allow for lipids to be easily measured from the same sample. This study describes a new simple method that enabled sequential extraction and subsequent quantification of both fatty acids and sugars from the same avocado mesocarp tissue sample. Freeze-dried mesocarp samples of avocado cv. Hass fruit of different ripening stages were extracted by homogenization with hexane and the oil extracts quantified for fatty acid composition by GC. The resulting filter residues were readily usable for sugar extraction with methanol (62.5%, v/v). For comparison, oil was also extracted using the standard Soxhlet technique and the resulting thimble residue extracted for sugars as before. An additional experiment was carried out whereby filter residues were also extracted using ethanol. Average oil yield using the Soxhlet technique was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that obtained by homogenization with hexane, although the difference remained very slight, and fatty acid profiles of the oil extracts following both methods were very similar. Oil recovery improved with increasing ripeness of the fruit with minor differences observed in the fatty acid composition during postharvest ripening. After lipid removal, methanolic extraction was superior in recovering sucrose and perseitol as compared to 80% ethanol (v/v), whereas mannoheptulose recovery was not affected by solvent used. The method presented has the benefits of shorter extraction time, lower extraction temperature, and reduced amount of solvent and can be used for sequential extraction of fatty acids and sugars from the same sample.

  6. A colored avocado seed extract as a potential natural colorant.

    PubMed

    Dabas, Deepti; Elias, Ryan J; Lambert, Joshua D; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing consumer demand for and scientific interest in new natural colorants. Avocado (Persea americana) seed when crushed with water develops an orange color (= 480 nm) in a time-dependent manner. Heat treatment of the seed prevented color development, whereas the addition of exogenous polyphenol oxidase (PPO), but not peroxidase restored color development. Color development was also inhibited by the addition of tropolone, an inhibitor of PPO. Color formation resulted in a decrease in the concentration of polyphenols indicating utilization for color formation. The orange color intensified as the pH was adjusted from 2.0 to 11.0, and these changes were only partially reversible when pH was adjusted from 7.5 to 11.0 in the presence of oxygen, but completely reversible when the pH was changed in the absence of oxygen. The color was found to be stable in solution at -18 °C for 2 mo. These results suggest that the avocado seed may be a potential source of natural colorant, and that color development is PPO-dependent. There is growing public and scientific interest in the development of natural alternatives to synthetic colorants in foods. Extracts of turmeric, paprika, and beets are examples of food-derived natural colorants. Avocado seeds, which represent an under-utilized waste stream, form a stable orange color when crushed in the presence of air. Our data indicate that avocado seed represents a potential source of new natural colorants for use in foods. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Expression Profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Gene in Alternate Bearing ‘Hass' Avocado Trees Suggests a Role for PaFT in Avocado Flower Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Dafna; Zviran, Tali; Zezak, Oshrat; Samach, Alon; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2014-01-01

    In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in ‘Hass' avocado (Persea americana). De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded) and off (fruit-lacking) trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s) by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed. PMID:25330324

  8. Ethylene and Wound-Induced Gene Expression in the Preclimacteric Phase of Ripening Avocado Fruit and Mesocarp Discs.

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, D. A.; Laties, G. G.

    1993-01-01

    Whereas intact postharvest avocado (Persea americana Mill.) fruit may take 1 or more weeks to ripen, ripening is hastened by pulsing fruit for 24 h with ethylene or propylene and is initiated promptly by cutting slices, or discs, of mesocarp tissue. Because the preclimacteric lag period constitutes the extended and variable component of the ripening syndrome, we postulated that selective gene expression during the lag period leads to the triggering of the climacteric. Accordingly, we sought to identify genes that are expressed gradually in the course of the lag period in intact fruit, are turned on sooner in response to a pulse, and are induced promptly in response to wounding (i.e. slicing). To this end, a mixed cDNA library was constructed from mRNA from untreated fruit, pulsed fruit, and aged slices, and the library was screened for genes induced by wounding or by pulsing and/or wounding. The time course of induction of genes encoding selected clones was established by probing northern blots of mRNA from tissues variously treated over a period of time. Four previously identified ripening-associated genes encoding cellulase, polygalacturonase (PG), cytochrome P-450 oxidase (P-450), and ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE, or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase), respectively, were studied in the same way. Whereas cellulase, PG, and EFE were ruled out as having a role in the initiation of the climacteric, the time course of P-450 induction, as well as the response of same to pulsing and wounding met the criteria[mdash]together with several clones from the mixed library[mdash]for a gene potentially involved in preclimacteric events leading to the onset of the climacteric. Further, it was established that the continuous presence of ethylene is required for persisting induction, and it is suggested that in selected cases wounding may exert a synergistic effect on ethylene action. PMID:12231929

  9. Lutein from Deepoxidation of Lutein Epoxide Replaces Zeaxanthin to Sustain an Enhanced Capacity for Nonphotochemical Chlorophyll Fluorescence Quenching in Avocado Shade Leaves in the Dark1

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Britta; Pogson, Barry James; Osmond, Charles Barry

    2011-01-01

    Leaves of avocado (Persea americana) that develop and persist in deep shade canopies have very low rates of photosynthesis but contain high concentrations of lutein epoxide (Lx) that are partially deepoxidized to lutein (L) after 1 h of exposure to 120 to 350 μmol photons m−2 s−1, increasing the total L pool by 5% to 10% (ΔL). Deepoxidation of Lx to L was near stoichiometric and similar in kinetics to deepoxidation of violaxanthin (V) to antheraxanthin (A) and zeaxanthin (Z). Although the V pool was restored by epoxidation of A and Z overnight, the Lx pool was not. Depending on leaf age and pretreatment, the pool of ΔL persisted for up to 72 h in the dark. Metabolism of ΔL did not involve epoxidation to Lx. These contrasting kinetics enabled us to differentiate three states of the capacity for nonphotochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (NPQ) in attached and detached leaves: ΔpH dependent (NPQΔpH) before deepoxidation; after deepoxidation in the presence of ΔL, A, and Z (NPQΔLAZ); and after epoxidation of A+Z but with residual ΔL (NPQΔL). The capacity of both NPQΔLAZ and NPQΔL was similar and 45% larger than NPQΔpH, but dark relaxation of NPQΔLAZ was slower. The enhanced capacity for NPQ was lost after metabolism of ΔL. The near equivalence of NPQΔLAZ and NPQΔL provides compelling evidence that the small dynamic pool ΔL replaces A+Z in avocado to “lock in” enhanced NPQ. The results are discussed in relation to data obtained with other Lx-rich species and in mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with increased L pools. PMID:21427278

  10. Aliphatic acetogenin constituents of avocado fruits inhibit human oral cancer cell proliferation by targeting the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosio, Steven M.; Han, Chunhua; Pan, Li; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Ding, Haiming

    2011-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are consumed as part of the human diet and extracts have shown growth inhibitory effects in various types of human cancer cells, although the effectiveness of individual components and their underlying mechanism are poorly understood. Using activity-guided fractionation of the flesh of avocado fruits, a chloroform-soluble extract (D003), was identified that exhibited high efficacy towards premalignant and malignant human oral cancer cell lines. From this extract, two aliphatic acetogenins of previously known structure were isolated, compounds 1 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] and 2 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate]. In this study, we show for the first time that the growth inhibitory efficacy of this chloroform extract is due to blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR (Tyr1173), c-RAF (Ser338), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) in the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Compound 1 and 2 both inhibited phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). Compound 2, but not compound 1, prevented EGF-induced activation of EGFR (Tyr1173). When compounds 1 and 2 were combined they synergistically inhibited c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation, and human oral cancer cell proliferation. The present data suggest that the potential anticancer activity of avocado fruits is due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins that target two key components of the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. PMID:21596018

  11. The Effect of Ethylene and Propylene Pulses on Respiration, Ripening Advancement, Ethylene-Forming Enzyme, and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid Synthase Activity in Avocado Fruit 12

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, David A.; Laties, George G.

    1991-01-01

    When early-season avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) were treated with ethylene or propylene for 24 hours immediately on picking, the time to the onset of the respiratory climacteric, i.e. the lag period, remained unchanged compared with that in untreated fruit. When fruit were pulsed 24 hours after picking, on the other hand, the lag period was shortened. In both cases, however, a 24 hour ethylene or propylene pulse induced a transient increase in respiration, called the pulse-peak, unaccompanied by ethylene production (IL Eaks [1980] Am Soc Hortic Sci 105: 744-747). The pulse also caused a sharp rise in ethylene-forming enzyme activity in both cases, without any increase in the low level of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase activity. Thus, the shortening of the lag period by an ethylene pulse is not due to an effect of ethylene on either of the two key enzymes in ethylene biosynthesis. A comparison of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis polypeptide profiles of in vitro translation products of poly(A+) mRNA from control and ethylene-pulsed fruit showed both up- and down-regulation in response to ethylene pulsing of a number of genes expressed during the ripening syndrome. It is proposed that the pulse-peak or its underlying events reflect an intrinsic element in the ripening process that in late-season or continuously ethylene-treated fruit may be subsumed in the overall climacteric response. A computerized system that allows continuous readout of multiple samples has established that the continued presentation of exogeneous ethylene or propylene to preclimacteric fruit elicits a dual respiration response comprising the merged pulse-peak and climacteric peak in series. The sequential removal of cores from a single fruit has proven an unsatisfactory sampling procedure inasmuch as coring induces wound ethylene, evokes a positive respiration response, and advances ripening. PMID:16668073

  12. Metabolically Driven Self-Restoration of Energy-Linked Functions by Avocado Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Shar; Romani, Roger J.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the restorative capacity of isolated avocado (Persea americana) fruit mitochondria, the organelles were first aged in the absence of an energy source at 25°C for several hours until respiratory control and oxidative phosphorylation were greatly diminished or totally lost. Energy-linked functions were then gradually restored over a period of several hours after the addition of substrate. Restoration of respiratory control resulted from both an increase in state 3 and a decrease in state 4 respiratory rates. Either α-ketoglutarate or succinate served as restorants, each with distinctive rates of recovery in state 3 and state 4 respiration. ATP also served as a restorative agent but not as effectively as metabolizable substrate. ATP synthase activity was modulated by stress and restoration but neither the extent nor the rate of change was sufficient to constrain state 3 rates. Orthophosphate was released from the mitochondria during substrate-deprived stress. Restoration of phosphorylation preceded that of RC with phosphate uptake and phosphorylation being evident immediately upon the addition of substrate. During restoration [32P]orthophosphate was incorporated into several organic fractions: phospholipid, ATP, a trichloroacetic acid-precipitable mitochondrial fraction, and an organophosphate that accumulated in the medium in relatively large amounts. The organophosphate was tentatively identified as a hexosephosphate. Incorporation into ATP and the putative hexosephosphate continued unabated beyond the point of maximum restoration. Phosphate metabolism thus appears to be a necessary but not sufficient precondition for mitochondrial restoration and maintenance. Based on the recovery kinetics of the various phosphorylated components, the mitochondrial-bound fraction appears to be most directly linked with restoration. Results are discussed with reference to specific characteristics and components of self-restoration and to possible underlying mechanisms

  13. Combined Treatments Reduce Chilling Injury and Maintain Fruit Quality in Avocado Fruit during Cold Quarantine.

    PubMed

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Feygenberg, Oleg; Maorer, Dalia; Zaaroor, Merav; Fallik, Elazar; Alkan, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Quarantine treatment enables export of avocado fruit (Persea americana) to parts of the world that enforce quarantine against fruit fly. The recommended cold-based quarantine treatment (storage at 1.1°C for 14 days) was studied with two commercial avocado cultivars 'Hass' and 'Ettinger' for 2 years. Chilling injuries (CIs) are prevalent in the avocado fruit after cold-quarantine treatment. Hence, we examined the effect of integrating several treatments: modified atmosphere (MA; fruit covered with perforated polyethylene bags), methyl jasmonate (MJ; fruit dipped in 2.5 μM MJ for Hass or 10 μM MJ for Ettinger for 30 s), 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP; fruit treated with 300 ppb 1-MCP for 18 h) and low-temperature conditioning (LTC; a gradual decrease in temperature over 3 days) on CI reduction during cold quarantine. Avocado fruit stored at 1°C suffered from severe CI, lipid peroxidation, and increased expression of chilling-responsive genes of fruit peel. The combined therapeutic treatments alleviated CI in cold-quarantined fruit to the level in fruit stored at commercial temperature (5°C). A successful therapeutic treatment was developed to protect 'Hass' and 'Ettinger' avocado fruit during cold quarantine against fruit fly, while maintaining fruit quality. Subsequently, treated fruit stored at 1°C had a longer shelf life and less decay than the fruit stored at 5°C. This therapeutic treatment could potentially enable the export of avocado fruit to all quarantine-enforcing countries. Similar methods might be applicable to other types of fruit that require cold quarantine.

  14. Distribution, Pest Status and Fungal Associates of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus in Florida Avocado Groves

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Daniel; Cruz, Luisa F.; Kendra, Paul E.; Narvaez, Teresa I.; Montgomery, Wayne S.; Monterroso, Armando; De Grave, Charlotte; Cooperband, Miriam F.

    2016-01-01

    Members of a complex of cryptic species, that correspond morphologically to the ambrosia beetle Euwallacea fornicatus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), were recently found attacking avocado (Persea americana Mill.) in Israel and California. In early 2016, an outbreak of another member of this species complex was detected infesting approximately 1500 avocado trees in an avocado orchard at Homestead, Florida. An area-wide survey was conducted in commercial avocado groves of Miami-Dade County, Florida to determine the distribution and abundance of E. nr. fornicatus, to identify different populations of E. nr. fornicatus and their fungal associates, and to assess the extent of damage to avocado trees. Ewallacea nr. fornicatus were captured in 31 of the 33 sampled sites. A sample of 35 beetles from six different locations was identified as E. nr. fornicatus sp. #2, which is genetically distinct from the species causing damage in California and Israel. Eleven fungal associates were identified: an unknown Fusarium sp., AF-8, AF-6, Graphium euwallaceae, Acremonium sp. Acremonium morum, Acremonium masseei, Elaphocordyceps sp. and three yeast species. The unknown Fusarium isolates were the most abundant and frequently found fungus species associated with adult beetles and lesions surrounding the beetle galleries. In addition to fungal associates, three bacteria species were found associated with adult E. nr. fornicatus. Visual inspections detected significant damage in only two orchards. A large number of beetles were captured in locations with no apparent damage on the avocado trees suggesting that E. nr. fornicatus are associated with other host(s) outside the groves or with dead trees or branches inside the groves. More research is needed to determine the potential threat E. nr. fornicatus and its fungal associates pose to the avocado industry and agricultural and natural ecosystems in Florida. PMID:27754408

  15. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in wood-producing avocado seedlings: Biological constraints to paleoclimatic interpretations of δD values in tree ring cellulose nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terwilliger, Valery J.; Deniro, Michael J.

    1995-12-01

    Climatic reconstructions from the δD values of wood cellulose nitrate have been compromised because it is unclear whether the isotopic ratios are affected only by temperature or by temperature and humidity. To quantify the effect of humidity on the δD values of leaf and wood cellulose nitrate, we grew avocados (Persea americana Mill. cv. Mexican) from seed at high and low humidities until they set wood. The source water for seed production was isotopically the same as the source water for seedling propagation. The δD values of leaf cellulose nitrate were related to those of leaf water, which were, in turn, influenced by humidity ( P < 0.01). The δD values of wood cellulose nitrate were unrelated to those of leaf water or any other indicator of humidity, but were related to the δD values of water in wood ( P ⩽ 0.05). The δD values of wood cellulose nitrate were identical in three out of five pairs of low and high humidity treatments. These results suggest humidity cannot be reliably inferred from δD values in wood cellulose nitrate. The δD values of cellulose nitrate in both leaves and wood appear to have been influenced by the incorporation of stored metabolites into cellulose. Trees, like avocado seedlings, have considerable post-photosynthetic organic reserves that can be tapped for growth. Conditions that stimulate use of post-photosynthetic carbon reserves are varied for trees. Significant contributions from these reserves could lead to erroneous temperature inferences from δD values of wood cellulose nitrate.

  16. Expression profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene in alternate bearing 'Hass' avocado trees suggests a role for PaFT in avocado flower induction.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Dafna; Zviran, Tali; Zezak, Oshrat; Samach, Alon; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2014-01-01

    In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana). De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded) and off (fruit-lacking) trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s) by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed.

  17. High levels of exotic armored scales on imported avocados raise concerns regarding USDA-APHIS' phytosanitary risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Morse, J G; Rugman-Jones, P F; Watson, G W; Robinson, L J; Bi, J L; Stouthamer, R

    2009-06-01

    Between 1914 and 2007, a quarantine protected California avocado, Persea americana Mill., groves from pests that might be introduced into the state along with fresh, imported avocados. Soon after Mexican avocados were first allowed entry on 1 February 2007, live specimens of several species of armored scales (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) not believed to be present in California were detected on 'Hass' avocados entering the state from Mexico. Initially, the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) prevented avocados infested with these scales from entering the state or required that they be fumigated with an approved treatment such as methyl bromide. After a Science Advisory Panel meeting in May 2007, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) reaffirmed its position that armored scales on shipments of fruit for consumption (including avocados) pose a "low risk" for pest establishment. In compliance with APHIS protocols, as of 18 July 2007, CDFA altered its policy to allow shipments of scale-infested avocados into the state without treatment. Here, we report on sampling Mexican avocados over an 8-mo period, September 2007-April 2008. An estimated 67 million Mexican Hass avocados entered California over this period. Based on samples from 140 trucks containing approximately 15.6% of this volume of fruit, we estimate that approximately 47.6 million live, sessile armored scales and an additional 20.1 million live eggs and crawlers were imported. We found eight probable species of armored scales in the samples, seven of these are not believed to occur in California; 89.3% of the live scales were Abgrallaspis aguacatae Evans, Watson and Miller, a recently described species. In contrast to the USDA-APHIS opinion, we believe the volume of shipments and levels of live scales they contain present a significant risk to California's US$300 million avocado industry and to other crops that might become infested by one or more of

  18. Electrophysiological assessment of water stress in fruit-bearing woody plants.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Rojas, Liliana; Tapia, Franco; Gurovich, Luis A

    2014-06-15

    Development and evaluation of a real-time plant water stress sensor, based on the electrophysiological behavior of fruit-bearing woody plants is presented. Continuous electric potentials are measured in tree trunks for different irrigation schedules, inducing variable water stress conditions; results are discussed in relation to soil water content and micro-atmospheric evaporative demand, determined continuously by conventional sensors, correlating this information with tree electric potential measurements. Systematic and differentiable patterns of electric potentials for water-stressed and no-stressed trees in 2 fruit species are presented. Early detection and recovery dynamics of water stress conditions can also be monitored with these electrophysiology sensors, which enable continuous and non-destructive measurements for efficient irrigation scheduling throughout the year. The experiment is developed under controlled conditions, in Faraday cages located at a greenhouse area, both in Persea americana and Prunus domestica plants. Soil moisture evolution is controlled using capacitance sensors and solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity and direction are continuously registered with accurate weather sensors, in a micro-agrometeorological automatic station located at the experimental site. The electrophysiological sensor has two stainless steel electrodes (measuring/reference), inserted on the stem; a high precision Keithley 2701 digital multimeter is used to measure plant electrical signals; an algorithm written in MatLab(®), allows correlating the signal to environmental variables. An electric cyclic behavior is observed (circadian cycle) in the experimental plants. For non-irrigated plants, the electrical signal shows a time positive slope and then, a negative slope after restarting irrigation throughout a rather extended recovery process, before reaching a stable electrical signal with zero slope. Well-watered plants presented a

  19. Management of Fruit Species in Urban Home Gardens of Argentina Atlantic Forest as an Influence for Landscape Domestication.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Violeta; Pochettino, María L; Hilgert, Norma I

    2017-01-01

    Home gardens are considered germplasm repositories and places for experimentation, thus they are key sites for the domestication of plants. Domestication is considered a constant process that occurs along a continuum from wild to managed to domesticated populations. Management may lead to the modification of populations and in other cases to their distribution, changing population structure in a landscape. Our objective is focused on the management received in home gardens by perennial species of fruits. For this, the management practices applied to native and exotic perennial fruits species by a group of 20 women in the periurban zone of Iguazú, Argentina, were analyzed. In-depth interviews were conducted, as well as guided tours for the recognition and collection of specimens of species and ethnovarieties. Sixty-six fruit species managed in the home gardens were recorded. The predominant families are Rutaceae, Myrtaceae, and Rosaceae. The fruit species with the highest number of associated management practices are pitanga ( Eugenia uniflora ) and pindó ( Syagrus rommanzoffiana ). The 10 species with the highest management intensity are (in decreasing order of intensity) banana ( Musa x paradisiaca ), palta ( Persea americana ), pitanga ( E. uniflora ), mango ( Mangifera indica ), cocú ( Allophylus edulis ), mamón ( Carica papaya ), guayaba ( Psidium guajava ), limón mandarina ( Citrus x taitensis ), güembé ( Philodendron bipinnatifidum ), and mandarina ( Citrus reticulata ). Among the families with the greatest modifications in their distribution, abundance and presence of ethnovarieties in domestic gardens, are the native Myrtaceae and the exotic Rutaceae. The main management practices involved are cultivation, tolerance, transplant and enhancement in decreasing order. It can be concluded that in Iguazú, fruit species management shows both in plant germplasm as in environment a continuum that through tolerance, transplant and cultivation latu sensu has

  20. Selection and breeding of honey bees for higher or lower collection of avocado nectar.

    PubMed

    Afik, Ohad; Dag, Arnon; Yeselson, Yelena; Schaffer, Arthur; Shafir, Sharoni

    2010-04-01

    Intensive activity of honey bees, Apis mellifera L., is essential for high fruit set in avocado, Persea americana Mill., orchards, but even when hives are located inside the orchard, many bees still search for alternative blooms. We tested for a possible genetic component for a preference of avocado bloom relative to competing bloom. The honey from each hive was extracted at the end of the avocado bloom and the concentration of perseitol, a carbohydrate that is unique to avocado, was analyzed as a measure for avocado foraging. During the first year, five bee strains were compared in three different sites in Israel. Significant differences were found between strains in honey perseitol concentrations, suggesting differences in their efficiency as avocado pollinators, although these differences were site dependent. At two sites, colonies with the highest and lowest perseitol concentrations were selected as parental "high" and "low" lines. Queens were raised from the selected colonies and were instrumentally inseminated by drones from other colonies of this line. During the second and third years, colonies with inseminated queens were introduced to the avocado orchards, together with the selected colonies still surviving from the previous year. Colonies of the high line had greater perseitol concentrations than those of the low line. Selected colonies that survived from the previous year performed consistently vis-à-vis perseitol concentration, in the second year of testing. Heritability value of 0.22 was estimated based on regression of offspring on midparent. The results reveal a heritable component for willingness of honey bees to collect avocado nectar.