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Sample records for abandoned limestone quarry

  1. Geophysical void detection at the site of an abandoned limestone quarry and underground mine in southwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, K.K.; Trevits, M.A. . Pittsburgh Research Center)

    1992-01-01

    Locating underground voids, tunnels, and buried collapse structures continues to present a difficult problem for engineering geoscientists charged with this responsibility for a multitude of different studies. Solutions used and tested for void detection have run the gamut of surface geophysical and remote sensing techniques, to invasive trenching and drilling on closely-spaced centers. No where is the problem of locating underground voids more ubiquitous than in abandoned mined lands, and the U.S. Bureau of Mines continues to investigate this problem for areas overlying abandoned coal, metal, and nonmetal mines. Because of the great diversity of resources mined, the problem of void detection is compounded by the myriad of geologic conditions which exist for abandoned mined lands. At a control study site in southwestern Pennsylvania at the Bureau's Lake Lynn Laboratory, surface geophysical techniques, including seismic and other methods, were tested as a means to detect underground mine voids in the rather simple geologic environment of flat-lying sedimentary strata. The study site is underlain by an abandoned underground limestone mine developed in the Wymps Gap Limestone member of the Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation. Portals or entrances into the mine, lead to drifts or tunnels driven into the limestone; these entries provided access to the limestone where it was extracted by the room-and-pillar method. The workings lie less than 300 ft from the surface, and survey lines or grids were positioned over the tunnels, the room-and-pillar zones, and the areas not mined. Results from these geophysical investigations are compared and contrasted. The application of this control study to abandoned mine void detection is apparent, but due to the carbonate terrain of the study site, the results may also have significance to sinkhole detection in karst topography.

  2. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY PIT ("THE OLD PIT") WITH LEDGE PREPARED FOR LIMESTONE EXTRACTION. AN ELEVEN-HOLE SHOT WILL DISLODGE APPROXIMATELY 25,000 TONS OF LIMESTONE WHICH, AFTER LOADING AND CRUSHING, WILL BE USED FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION. THE CALERA QUARRY IS ONE OF FOUR ACTIVE VULCAN MATERIALS COMPANY QUARRIES IN THE DISTRICT. VULCAN MATERIALS, A FORTUNE 500 FIRM, ESTABLISHED IN BIRMINGHAM IN 1906 AS BIRMINGHAM SLAG COMPANY, VULCAN MATERIALS IS THE NATION'S FOREMOST PRODUCER OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATE AND A LEADING CHEMICALS MANUFACTURER - Vulcan Material Company, Calera Quarry, 1614 Highway 84, Calera, Shelby County, AL

  3. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY PIT ('THE OLD PIT') WITH LEDGE PREPARED FOR LIMESTONE EXTRACTION. AN ELEVEN-HOLE SHOT WILL DISLODGE APPROXIMATELY 25,000 TONS OF LIMESTONE WHICH, AFTER LOADING AND CRUSHING, WILL BE USED FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION. THE CALERA QUARRY IS ONE OF FOUR ACTIVE VULCAN MATERIALS COMPANY QUARRIES IN THE DISTRICT. VULCAN MATERIALS, A FORTUNE 500 FIRM, ESTABLISHED IN BIRMINGHAM IN 1906 AS BIRMINGHAM SLAG COMPANY, VULCAN MATERIALS IS THE NATION'S FOREMOST PRODUCER OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATE AND A LEADING CHEMICALS MANUFACTURER. - Vulcan Material Company, Calera Quarry, 1614 Highway 84, Calera, Shelby County, AL

  4. A procedure to evaluate environmental rehabilitation in limestone quarries.

    PubMed

    Neri, Ana Claudia; Sánchez, Luis Enrique

    2010-11-01

    A procedure to evaluate mine rehabilitation practices during the operational phase was developed and validated. It is based on a comparison of actually observed or documented practices with internationally recommended best practices (BP). A set of 150 BP statements was derived from international guides in order to establish the benchmark. The statements are arranged in six rehabilitation programs under three categories: (1) planning (2) operational and (3) management, corresponding to the adoption of the plan-do-check-act management systems model to mine rehabilitation. The procedure consists of (i) performing technical inspections guided by a series of field forms containing BP statements; (ii) classifying evidences in five categories; and (iii) calculating conformity indexes and levels. For testing and calibration purposes, the procedure was applied to nine limestone quarries and conformity indexes were calculated for the rehabilitation programs in each quarry. Most quarries featured poor planning practices, operational practices reached high conformity levels in 50% of the cases and management practices scored moderate conformity. Despite all quarries being ISO 14001 certified, their management systems pay low attention to issues pertaining to land rehabilitation and biodiversity. The best results were achieved by a quarry whose expansion was recently submitted to the environmental impact assessment process, suggesting that public scrutiny may play a positive role in enhancing rehabilitation practices. Conformity indexes and levels can be used to chart the evolution of rehabilitation practices at regular intervals, to establish corporate goals and for communication with stakeholders. PMID:20630648

  5. An Uncertainty Method for Probabilistic Analysis of Buildings Impacted by Rockfall in a Limestone Quarry in Fengshan, Southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Bo; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Ao; Du, Juan; Su, Hongrui; Yi, Hongqing

    2015-09-01

    Rockfall is a common occurrence in open-pit mines in China, and seriously threatens lives and buildings. The damage to buildings includes many uncertainty factors, such as the occurrence of rockfall, runout trajectory, and impact energy. A uncertainty method was used to assess the probability of rockfall impacting buildings. The process includes four steps: (A) Calculating the probability of rockfall occurrence. (B) Probability analysis of the rockfall reaching the building and its energy. (C) Calculation of the building's vulnerability to rockfall impact. (D) Probability assessment of the building collapse. (E) Design options for protecting the building from rockfall damage. The method is applied in an abandoned limestone quarry in Fengshan, southwestern China. The results indicate that rockfalls have two kinds of failure modes: slide and topple, whose failure probability is 0-0.488 in the different quarry zones. The probabilities of three buildings located at the bottom of the quarry of collapsing from rockfall impact are 0.188, 0.006, and 0.002. A rockfall platform and vegetation planting at the bottom of the quarry could prevent rockfall from reaching the buildings.

  6. Analytic hierarchy process helps select site for limestone quarry expansion in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Dey, Prasanta Kumar; Ramcharan, Eugene K

    2008-09-01

    Site selection is a key activity for quarry expansion to support cement production, and is governed by factors such as resource availability, logistics, costs, and socio-economic-environmental factors. Adequate consideration of all the factors facilitates both industrial productivity and sustainable economic growth. This study illustrates the site selection process that was undertaken for the expansion of limestone quarry operations to support cement production in Barbados. First, alternate sites with adequate resources to support a 25-year development horizon were identified. Second, technical and socio-economic-environmental factors were then identified. Third, a database was developed for each site with respect to each factor. Fourth, a hierarchical model in analytic hierarchy process (AHP) framework was then developed. Fifth, the relative ranking of the alternate sites was then derived through pair wise comparison in all the levels and through subsequent synthesizing of the results across the hierarchy through computer software (Expert Choice). The study reveals that an integrated framework using the AHP can help select a site for the quarry expansion project in Barbados. PMID:17854976

  7. Block volume estimation from the discontinuity spacing measurements of mesozoic limestone quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J(v)) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V(b)), the mean volumetric joint count (J(vb)) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V(in)) and volumetric joint count (J(vi)) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  8. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (Jv) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (Vb), the mean volumetric joint count (Jvb) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (Vin) and volumetric joint count (Jvi) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  9. Importance of Radius of Influence and its Estimation in a Limestone Quarry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, A. K.; Sahoo, L. K.; Ghosh, U. K.; Khond, M. V.

    2015-04-01

    Limestone mining at Lanjiberna limestone and dolomite quarry has created positive as well negative impacts on ground water. With further deepening of the mine, drawdown trend (negative effect) is observed and at the same time ground water recharge of the order of 4,527.48 m3/day, through mine pits (positive impact) is noticed. The aquifer present in the area is unconfined and mainly consists of weathered quartzite, phyllites, limestone and dolomite. To know the cumulative impact of mining on surroundings, the effective radius of influence (Re) for excavated mine area is calculated as 1,059 m. Here, it may be noted that three `concentric working pits' (Pit No. 2 & 6; Pit no 1 & 3 and Pit No 4 & 5) produces limestone at this mine and the pit-wise radius of influence (Ro) is estimated. Value of Ro for Pit-2 & 6 is 612.14 m; Pit-1 & 3 is 475 m and Pit-4 & 5 is 384.15 m. Its average i.e., Ro (for all three pits, cumulative) is estimated as 490 m. From this typical case study and estimation of Ro and Re values, it is concluded that the maximum and minimum value of overall impact/influence lies in between 0.49 and 1.05 km. These estimated values of `area of influence' are less compared to the whole mine lease area values. Local aquifer, which lies at shallower as well as at deeper depth had behaved consistently with respect to recharge and drawdown conditions. Thus, assessment of Ro and Re is extremely helpful for `integrated mine planning' to achieve targeted production, economically with minimum interruptions.

  10. Effect of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. The limestone quarries of Bedford, Indiana, revisited.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W; Wasserman, D; Behrens, V; Reynolds, D; Samueloff, S

    1984-08-01

    In the limestone quarries of Indiana, USA, pneumatic percussive hammers replaced the mallet and hammer around 1900. By 1917 the air hammer was being used exclusively for periods of eight to ten hours a shift. In 1918 Alice Hamilton investigated an unusual "disease" in these stonecutters of Bedford, Indiana, who complained of "attacks of numbness and blanching of the fingers coming on suddenly under the influence of cold and then disappearing." The prevalence of vibration induced white finger (VWF) found in this population of 38 stonecutters was 89%, with decreased light touch, pain, and temperature appreciation in advanced cases. In 1978 a VWF research team revisited these limestone quarries. During the 60 year interval the stonecutting industry had contracted from 4000 workers in 40 quarries in 1918 to 3-400 in 10 quarries in 1978, with only 50 employees remaining in the Bedford area. In a population of 30 stonecutters the prevalence of VWF in 1978 was 80%, with similar sensory loss in light touch, pain, and temperature appreciation. Between 1918 and 1978 no change had taken place in the design of the air hammers used for stonecutting. Vibration levels of 4859 metres/s2 on the chisel, and 2010 metres/s2 on the barrel were measured over a frequency range 6.3 to 1000 Hz. The fundamental frequency was 75 Hz. These measured vibration levels are outside the ISO/DIS/5349 (1979) recommended limits for human exposure to vibration transmitted to the hand. The VWF data presented in this paper, and those originally reported by Hamilton in 1918, call for an immediate redesign of stonecutting pneumatic hammers in order to remove one cause of Raynaud's phenomenon of occupational origin. PMID:6378250

  11. Response of the soil physical properties to restoration techniques in limestone quarries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Vignozzi, Nadia; Solé-Benet, Albert

    2016-04-01

    The devastating effects of soil erosion in mining areas from arid/semiarid environments have prompted efforts geared toward an improvement of the soil physical conditions for a fast establishment of vegetal cover. Restoration practices that increase soil moisture content are essential in drylands where rainfall is irregular or insufficient in order to accelerate ecological restoration. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of organic amendments and mulches on the soil porosity as well as their impact on infiltration, five years after the beginning of an experimental restoration from limestone quarries in Sierra de Gádor (Almería, SE Spain). Nine plots 15 x 5 m were prepared at the site in a completely randomized 2 x 3 factorial design. The first factor, organic amendment, had three levels: sewage sludge (SA), compost from domestic organic residues (CA) and no amendment (NA). The second factor, mulches, also had three levels: gravel (GM), woodchip (WM) and no mulch (NM). In each experimental plot 75 native plants (Macrochloa tenacissima, Anthyllis terniflora and Anthyllis cytisoides) were planted. Infiltration was determined from rainfall simulations and soil porosity was assessed by image analysis of soil thin sections. Total porosity and pores distribution were measured according to pore shape (regular, irregular and elongated) and size (transmission pores [50-500 μm] and fissures [>500 μm]). Natural undisturbed soils around the mine area were used as a reference soil (RS). Restoration treatments showed higher total porosity, fissures and elongated pores than RS and we observed the highest values in treatments with WM. This fact is due to the disruption caused by the application of treatments rather that a good soil structure. Each combination exhibited different values of transmission pores, being greater in the combinations of NA-GM, SA-NM and CA-WM. Infiltration increased with the increase of the total porosity, fissures and elongated pores

  12. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  13. Influence of quarry mining dust on PM2.5 in a city adjacent to a limestone quarry: Seasonal characteristics and source contributions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing; Shi, Guo-Liang; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Jia-Yuan; Shi, Xu-Rong; Xu, Jiao; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2016-04-15

    To understand the influence of quarry mining dust on particulate matter, ambient PM2.5 and quarry mining dust source samples were collected in a city near quarry facilities during 2013-2014. Samples were subject to chemical analysis for dust-related species (Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ti), tracer metals, carbon components and water-soluble ions. Seasonal variations of PM2.5 and its main chemical components were investigated. Distinctive seasonal variations of PM2.5 were observed, with the highest PM2.5 concentrations (112.42μgm(-3)) in fall and lowest concentrations in summer (45.64μgm(-3)). For dust-related species, mass fractions of Si and Al did not show obvious seasonal variations, whereas Ca presented higher fractions in spring and summer and lower fractions in fall and winter. A combined receptor model (PMF-CMB) was applied to quantify the quarry mining dust contribution to PM2.5. Seven sources were identified, including quarry mining dust, soil dust, cement dust, coal combustion vehicles, secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate. On a yearly average basis, the contribution of quarry mining dust to PM2.5 was 6%. The contribution of soil dust to PM2.5 was comparable with cement dust (13% and 13%, respectively). Other identified sources included vehicle, secondary sulfate, secondary nitrate and coal combustion, which contributed 23, 15, 9 and 18% of the total mass, respectively. Air mass residence time (AMRT) analysis showed that northeast and southeast regions might be the major PM2.5 source during the sampling campaign. The findings of this study can be used to understand the characteristics of quarry mining dust and control strategies for PM2.5. PMID:26851880

  14. Total organic carbon and humus fractions in restored soils from limestone quarries in semiarid climate, SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Ángel Domene Ruiz, Miguel; Solé Benet, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Mining activities generate erosion and loss of plant cover and soil organic matter (SOM), especially in arid and semiarid Mediterranean regions. A precondition for ecosystem restoration in such highly disturbed areas is the development of functional soils with sufficient organic matter. But the SOM quality is also important to long-term C stabilization. The resistance to biodegradation of recalcitrant organic matter fractions has been reported to depend on some intrinsic structural factors of humic acid substances and formation of amorphous organo-mineral recalcitrant complexes. In an experimental soil restoration in limestone quarries in the Sierra de Gádor (Almería), SE Spain, several combinations of organic amendments (sewage sludge and compost from domestic organic waste) and mulches (gravel and woodchip) were added in experimental plots using a factorial design. In each plot, 75 native plants (Anthyllis cytisoides, A. terniflora and Macrochloa tenacissima) were planted and five years after the start of the experiment total organic carbon (TOC), physico-chemical soil properties and organic C fractions (particulate organic matter, H3PO4-fulvic fraction, fulvic acids (FA), humic acids (HA) and humin) were analyzed. We observed significant differences between treatments related to the TOC content and the HA/FA ratio. Compost amendments increased the TOC, HA content and HA/FA ratio, even higher than in natural undisturbed soils, indicating an effective clay humus-complex pointing to progressively increasing organic matter quality. Soils with sewage sludge showed the lowest TOC and HA/FA ratio and accumulated a lower HA proportion indicating poorer organic matter quality and comparatively lower resilience than in natural soils and soils amended with compost.

  15. Source and depositional processes of coarse-grained limestone event beds in Frasnian slope deposits (Kostomłoty-Mogiłki quarry, Holy Cross Mountains, Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierek, Aleksandra

    2010-10-01

    The Kostomłoty-Mogiłki succession is situated in the Kostomłoty transitional zone between the shallow-water Kielce stromatoporoid-coral platform and the deeper Łysogóry basin. In the Kostomłoty-Mogiłki quarry, the upper part of the Szydłówek Beds and Kostomłoty Beds are exposed. The Middle-Upper Frasnian Kostomłoty Beds are composed of shales, micritic and nodular limestones with abundant intercalations of detrital limestones. The dark shales and the micritic and nodular limestones record background sedimentation. The interbedded laminated and detrital limestones reflect high-energy deposition (= event beds). These event beds comprise laminated calcisiltites, fine-grained calcarenites, coarse-grained grain-supported calcirudites fabrics, and matrix-supported calcirudites. The material of these event beds was supplied by both erosion of the carbonate-platform margin and cannibalistic erosion of penecontemporaneous detrital limestones building the slope of this platform. Storms and the tectonic activity were likely the main causes of erosion. Combined and gravity flows were the transporting mechanisms involved in the reworking and redeposition.

  16. Environmental risk evaluation of the use of mine spoils and treated sewage sludge in the ecological restoration of limestone quarries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, M. M.; Pina, S.; García-Orenes, F.; Almendro-Candel, M. B.; García-Sánchez, E.

    2008-07-01

    The ecologic restoration criteria in areas degraded from extraction activities require making use of their mine spoils. These materials do not meet fertility conditions to guarantee restoration success and therefore, need the incorporation of organic amendments to obtain efficient substratum. Reducing the deficiencies in the organic material and restoration material nutrients with the contribution of treated sewage sludge is proposed in this work. This experiment was based on a controlled study using columns. The work was conducted with two mine spoils, both very rich in calcium carbonate. The first mineral, of poor quality, came from the formation of aggregates of crushed limestone ( Z). The other residual material examined originated in limestone extraction, formed by the levels of interspersed non-limestone materials and the remains of stripped soils ( D). Two treatments were undertaken (30,000 and 90,000 kg/ha of sewage sludge), in addition to a control treatment. The water contribution was carried out with a device that simulated either short-duration rain or a flooding irrigation system in order to cover the surface and then percolate through the soil. The collection of leached water took place 24 h after the applications. Different parameters of the leached water were determined, including pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate anions, ammonium, phosphates, sulphates and chlorides. The values obtained for each irrigation application are discussed, and the nitrate values obtained were very elevated.

  17. Effects of limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations on runoff and sediment yields in the Upper Permanente Creek basin, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Hill, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    High sediment loads below headwater areas of the Permanente Creek drainage basin, Santa Clara County, California, have caused flood-control problems in downstream lowland areas. Measured sediment yields in Permanente Creek, which drains areas affected by limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations, were 14 times greater than yields from the West Fork Permanente Creek, which primarily drains parkland. Part of this large disparity in yields is the result of higher runoff/unit of drainage area in the Permanente Creek Basin. Results of rainfall-runoff modeling indicate that the tendency for higher runoff from Permanente Creek results from natural differences in basin physiography. Runoff during periods of high streamflow (when most sediment is transported) is dominated by subsurface flow, which is not affected by human activities. Although artificial features created by human activities seem to have had only minor effects on runoff, they apparently have had major effects on sediment availability. Artificial features accounted for 273 acres (89%) of the 307 acres of active erosional landforms mapped in 1984. Increased availability of sediment in the Permanente Creek basin appears to be indicated by elevated intercepts of sediment-transport curves. A comparison of sediment-transport curves for the West Fork Permanente Creek with similar curves for the Permanente Creek basin under natural conditions suggests that the sediment yield from Permanente Creek is about 3.5 times higher than it would be under natural basin conditions. The increased yield apparently is due to an increase in sediment availability rather than an increase in runoff. (USGS)

  18. Sinkhole development induced by underground quarrying, and the related hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, M.; Delle Rose, M.

    2009-04-01

    Sinkholes are extremely widespread in Apulia, a very flat and carbonate region, that acted as the foreland during the phases of building up of the Southern Apenninic Chain in Miocene time. This is due to the presence of soluble rocks throughout the region, that highly predispose the area to this very subtle natural hazard. In addition to the natural setting, which favours their development, sinkholes may also be induced by anthropogenic activities. In the latter sense, underground quarrying represents one of the most dangerous activities in karst areas. Apulia has a long history of quarrying. Since the roman time, the local rocks, from the Cretaceous micritic limestones to the Quaternary calcarenites, have been intensely quarried and used as building and ornamental materials. In several settings of the region, the rocks with the best petrographic characteristics are located at depths ranging from a few to some tens of meters. This caused the opening of many underground quarries, and the development of a complex network of subterranean galleries. Underground quarrying had a great impulse at the turn between the XIX and the XX century, when a large number of quarries was opened. Later on, after the Second World War, most of the quarries were progressively abandoned, even because of the first signs of instability, both underground and at the ground surface. With time, the memory of the presence and development of the underground quarries was progressively lost, with severe repercussions on the safety of the land above the excavated areas. Lack of knowledge of the subterranean pattern of galleries, combined with the expansion of the built-up areas at the surface, resulted in increasing significantly the vulnerability of exposed elements at risk. Events such as the 29 March, 2007, at Gallipoli only by chance did not result in any casualties, when a 15-mt wide and 5-mt deep sinkhole opened in a few hours at a road crossing, above the site of an old underground quarry

  19. The impact of pumped water from a de-watered Magnesian limestone quarry on an adjacent wetland: Thrislington, County Durham, UK.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Large, A R G; Younger, P L

    2005-12-01

    Although quarrying is often cited as a potential threat to wetland systems, there is a lack of relevant, quantitative case studies in the literature. The impact of pumped groundwater discharged from a quarry into a wetland area was assessed relative to reference conditions in an adjacent fen wetland that receives only natural runoff. Analysis of vegetation patterns at the quarry wetland site, using Detrended Correspondence Analysis and the species indicator values of Ellenberg, revealed a clear disparity between community transitions in the quarry wetland and the reference site. Limited establishment of moisture-sensitive taxa, the preferential proliferation of robust wetland species and an overall shift towards lower species diversity in the quarry wetland were explicable primarily by the physico-chemical environment created by quarry dewatering. This encompassed high pH (up to 12.8), sediment-rich effluent creating a nutrient-poor substrate with poor moisture retention in the quarry wetland, and large fluctuations in water levels. PMID:15993994

  20. Natural contamination by As and heavy metals in soil, their bio-accumulation and potential sources: the case of a travertine limestone quarry, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampouroglou, Evdokia E.; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The first mineralogical and geochemical investigation of the travertine limestone, soil and corresponding plants associated with the Neogene basin of Varnavas, NE Attica, revealed a significant enrichment in the metalloid As. The total concentrations of As ranged from 61 to 210 ppm in limestone and 33 to 430 ppm in the associated soil demonstrating a wide variation of values. Calcite is a common authigenic mineral within travertine limestone, forming fine uniform micritic aggregates, having As and Mg concentrations lower than detection limits of EDS analysis. Clastic dominated minerals are quartz (both fine- and coarse-grained), muscovite, clinochlore, illite, pyrite, galena, arsenides, rutile, sphene, zircon, REE-minerals and albite. Goethite and Fe-Mn-oxides occur between calcite grains. The presence of fossilized micro organisms, resembling foraminifera, in travertine limestone combined with hydrous Fe-Mn-oxides, suggests a possible marine transgression during the evolution of the basin. The As content in plants ranges from 1.1 to 28 ppm As in shoots, and 0.8 to 114 ppm As in roots. The translocation factor, which is defined as the ratio of metal concentration in the shoots to the roots, is relatively low (average 0.33%) suggesting that the internal transport of metals from the roots to shoots was restricted. The bioaccumulation factor, which is defined as the ratio of metal concentration in the plants to that in soil, exhibits a wide range from relatively low (5.2-9.0% for As, Fe, Cr, Ni and Pb), much higher (56-67% for Cu and Zn) and exceptionally high (160% for Mo). A significant correlation between the translocation factors for Fe and As may confirm that Fe-Mn oxides/hydroxides represent the major sorbing agents for As in soils. The presented data, due to As contamination in travertine limestone, soil and plants, suggest a potential environmental risk not only for that part of Greece but in general for similar depositional environments.

  1. Ecological filtering and plant traits variation across quarry geomorphological surfaces: implication for restoration.

    PubMed

    Gilardelli, Federica; Sgorbati, Sergio; Armiraglio, Stefano; Citterio, Sandra; Gentili, Rodolfo

    2015-05-01

    Revegetation patterns after quarry abandonment have been widely studied from several ecological points of view, but a trait-based approach is still lacking. The aim of this study was to characterise the plant species assemblages and the associated functional traits filtered on different geomorphological surfaces in abandoned limestone quarry areas: artificial cliffs, embankments, and platforms. We then verified if species with certain traits were better able to overcome the dispersal and environmental filters necessary for establishment. To this aim, we analyzed 113 vegetation plots and collected data on 25 morphological, ecological, and dispersal traits to detect species adaptaions across these man-made environments. As a case study, we investigated the extraction basin of Botticino (Lombardy, Italy), the second largest in Italy. The results obtained by SIMPER and CCA analyses showed that rockiness, stoniness, slope, elevation, and time of surfaces are the main filters that varied across quarries and affected plant assemblages at the macro-scale level. Across the three geomorphological surfaces (meso-scale) of quarries, more specific abiotic filters selecting species were found. In turn, traits differentiation according to the three main geomorphological surfaces of quarry emphasized that further filters acting at the micro-scale imply differences in dispersal mechanisms and resource availability. This work highlighted the utility to study species assemblages and environmental filters to address quarry restoration according to the type of geomorphological surface. The investigation of some traits (chorological form, life forms, seed dispersal,s and plant height) can furnish some interesting indications for practice individuating further abiotic filters acting at the micro-scale. PMID:25662933

  2. Ecological Filtering and Plant Traits Variation Across Quarry Geomorphological Surfaces: Implication for Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardelli, Federica; Sgorbati, Sergio; Armiraglio, Stefano; Citterio, Sandra; Gentili, Rodolfo

    2015-05-01

    Revegetation patterns after quarry abandonment have been widely studied from several ecological points of view, but a trait-based approach is still lacking. The aim of this study was to characterise the plant species assemblages and the associated functional traits filtered on different geomorphological surfaces in abandoned limestone quarry areas: artificial cliffs, embankments, and platforms. We then verified if species with certain traits were better able to overcome the dispersal and environmental filters necessary for establishment. To this aim, we analyzed 113 vegetation plots and collected data on 25 morphological, ecological, and dispersal traits to detect species adaptaions across these man-made environments. As a case study, we investigated the extraction basin of Botticino (Lombardy, Italy), the second largest in Italy. The results obtained by SIMPER and CCA analyses showed that rockiness, stoniness, slope, elevation, and time of surfaces are the main filters that varied across quarries and affected plant assemblages at the macro-scale level. Across the three geomorphological surfaces (meso-scale) of quarries, more specific abiotic filters selecting species were found. In turn, traits differentiation according to the three main geomorphological surfaces of quarry emphasized that further filters acting at the micro-scale imply differences in dispersal mechanisms and resource availability. This work highlighted the utility to study species assemblages and environmental filters to address quarry restoration according to the type of geomorphological surface. The investigation of some traits (chorological form, life forms, seed dispersal,s and plant height) can furnish some interesting indications for practice individuating further abiotic filters acting at the micro-scale.

  3. The Ançã limestones, Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinta-Ferreira, Mário; Gil Catarino, Lídia; Delgado Rodrigues, José

    2016-04-01

    . Most of the traditional quarries are abandoned and those still in activity are mainly used to produce crushed aggregates, limestone blocks for paving produced in a quite artisanal way, and more rarely for sculpture. The identification and characterization of the variability of the Ançã limestones, as well as the inventory of the existing quarries and outcrops are necessary to preserve this unique resource, important for the preservation and rehabilitation of several monuments and artwork, in Coimbra, classified as UNESCO Word Heritage, where Ançã limestones, including the Pedra de Ançã, were extensively used.

  4. The Significance of Podpe limestone in the Cultural Heritage of Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Sabina; Bedjanič, Mojca; Mirtič, Breda; Mladenović, Ana; Rožič, Boštjan; Skaberne, Dragomir; Zupančič, Nina

    2013-04-01

    Podpeč limestone is characterized by its dark grey, or nearly black colour, with white fossil shells of the Lithiotis. These beds, which have been dated as Lower Jurassic, occur in southern and south-western Slovenia, and are particularly common in areas southwest of Ljubljana. The main quarry, which is not active, is located next to the village of Podpeč near Ljubljana, and has been declared as a geological natural value of national importance; as such, it is officially protected as a natural monument. In the close vicinity of the village there are some other smaller quarries, but all of them have been abandoned. With its very low porosity (0.9%) and water absorption (0.13 - 0.30 % by mass), but relatively high compressive strength (185 MPa), this limestone is quite durable, although its colouring becomes somewhat bleached when situated outdoors. The use of Podpeč limestone was first documented in the case of the Roman period in Slovenia, when it was used for funerary stelae, votive altars, boundary stones, and other artefacts. At the end of the 5th Century AD, with the fall of the Roman Empire, stone-cutting ceased at Podpeč for the next few centuries. Before 1850 Podpeč limestone had no special value. Only very few portals or pilasters made of this stone are known, and no evidence has been found in churches. However, towards the end of the 19th Century Podpeč limestone became better-known, although before the first half of the 20th Century there were no significant stonecutting workshops in Podpeč. After this, stone was supplied progressively from the main quarry. Large numbers of buildings in Ljubljana and central Slovenia have sills, lintels and jambs made of Podpeč limestone. Production stopped in 1967. The internationally renowned Slovenian architect Jože Plečnik (1872-1957) used Podpeč limestone in various Slovenian buildings - the central stadium in Ljubljana, the National University Library, many altars and churches (Bogojina, the Ši\\vska and

  5. Mardels, natural subsidence basins or abandoned quarries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Jan; Slotboom, Ruud

    2015-04-01

    Coversands (chemical poor Late-glacial aeolian sand deposits) dominate the surface geology of an extensive area in northwestern Europe. Plaggic Anthrosols occur in cultural landscapes, developed on coversands. They are the characteristic soils that developed on ancient fertilized arable fields. Plaggic Anthrosols have a complex genesis. They are records of aspects environmental and agricultural history. In previous studies information of the soil records was unlocked by application of pollen analysis, 14C and OSL dating. In this study we applied biomarker analysis to unlock additional information about the applied organic sources in the production of plaggic manure. Radiocarbon dating suggested the start of sedentary agriculture (after a period, characterized by shifting cultivation and Celtic fields) between 3000 and 2000 BP. In previous studies is assumed that farmers applied organic sods, dug on forest soils and heath to produce organic stable manure to fertilize the fields. The mineral fraction of the sods was supposed to be responsible for the development of the plaggic horizon and the raise of the land surface. Optically stimulated Luminescence dating however suggested that plaggic deposition on the fields started relatively late, in the 18th century. The use of ectorganic matter from the forest soils must have been ended in the 10th-12th century, due to commercial forest clear cuttings as recorded in archived documents. These deforestations resulted in the first extension of sand drifting and famers had to protect the valuable heath against this 'environmental catastrophe'. The use of heath for sheep grazing and other purposes as honey production could continue till the 18th century, as recorded in archived documents. In the course of the 18th century, the population growth resulted in increasing demand for food. The deep stable economy was introduced and the booming demand for manure resulted in intensive sod digging on the heath. This caused heath degradation, resulting in the second extension of sand drifting. To improve our knowledge about the evolution of plaggen soils we can combine data of pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of plaggic deposits. Species, present in pollen spectra of plaggic deposits, can have three sources: 1. Pollen, already present in sods, used in the stable to produce manure. 2. Pollen, originating from flowering crop species. 3. Pollen, originating from flowering species in the surroundings. Species, present in biomarker spectra, can have three sources: 1. Biomarkers from tissues, present in sods, used for manure production. 2. Biomarkers from decomposed roots of crop species. 3. Biomarkers from straw of crop species, used in the stable for manure production. Comparison pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of a regular Anthrosol (Posteles, NE-Netherlands) and a Buried (Nabbegat, SE-Netherlands, buried around 1800 AD) Plaggic Anthrosol yielded some interesting features: a. The biomarker spectra of the 2Ap horizons (agricultural layer below the plaggic deposits) are dominated by biomarkers of deciduous trees (dominated by Quercus), indicating the use of organic litter from the forests. These trees are also present in the pollen spectra. b. The biomarker spectra of the plaggic deposits are dominated by crop species (Avena, Secale, Fagpyrum), Calluna is absent in most of the spectra. This is different from pollen spectra where Calluna is present, together with crop species and transported pollen of other species. Only the biomarker spectra of the upper 10 cm of the plaggic horizons are dominated by Calluna. c. Comparison of the spectra of the buried and regular Plaggic Anthrosols show the contribution of biomarkers of roots of Zea mais (introduced around 1950 AD), suppressing the other species. The negligible percentages of Calluna in biomarker spectra of plaggic deposits suggest an overestimating of the use of heath sods in the traditional interpretation of the genesis of plaggic horizons, the dominance of crop species in biomarker spectra of plaggic deposits suggests underestimating of the use of straw as source material for the production of organic stable manure to fertilize ancient arable fields. While the results of biomarker analyses seem to indicate compelling new insights in the practices of plaggen agriculture in The Netherlands, we wish to stress that the biomarker method using VERHIB is still in the early stages of its development and some care must be taken with the interpretation of the results. References: 1. van Mourik, J.M., Slotboom, R.T., Wallinga, J., 2011. Chronology of plaggic deposits; palynology, radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating of the Posteles (NE-Netherlands). Catena 84, 54-60. 2. Van Mourik, J.M., Seijmonsbergen, A.C., Slotboom, R.T. and Wallinga, J, (2011a). The impact of human land use on soils and landforms in cultural landscapes on aeolian sandy substrates (Maashorst, SE Netherlands). Quaternary International 265 (2012) 74-89.

  6. Mardels, natural subsidence basins or abandoned quarries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mourik, Jan; Slotboom, Ruud

    2015-04-01

    Coversands (chemical poor Late-glacial aeolian sand deposits) dominate the surface geology of an extensive area in northwestern Europe. Plaggic Anthrosols occur in cultural landscapes, developed on coversands. They are the characteristic soils that developed on ancient fertilized arable fields. Plaggic Anthrosols have a complex genesis. They are records of aspects environmental and agricultural history. In previous studies information of the soil records was unlocked by application of pollen analysis, 14C and OSL dating. In this study we applied biomarker analysis to unlock additional information about the applied organic sources in the production of plaggic manure. Radiocarbon dating suggested the start of sedentary agriculture (after a period, characterized by shifting cultivation and Celtic fields) between 3000 and 2000 BP. In previous studies is assumed that farmers applied organic sods, dug on forest soils and heath to produce organic stable manure to fertilize the fields. The mineral fraction of the sods was supposed to be responsible for the development of the plaggic horizon and the raise of the land surface. Optically stimulated Luminescence dating however suggested that plaggic deposition on the fields started relatively late, in the 18th century. The use of ectorganic matter from the forest soils must have been ended in the 10th-12th century, due to commercial forest clear cuttings as recorded in archived documents. These deforestations resulted in the first extension of sand drifting and famers had to protect the valuable heath against this 'environmental catastrophe'. The use of heath for sheep grazing and other purposes as honey production could continue till the 18th century, as recorded in archived documents. In the course of the 18th century, the population growth resulted in increasing demand for food. The deep stable economy was introduced and the booming demand for manure resulted in intensive sod digging on the heath. This caused heath degradation, resulting in the second extension of sand drifting. To improve our knowledge about the evolution of plaggen soils we can combine data of pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of plaggic deposits. Species, present in pollen spectra of plaggic deposits, can have three sources: 1. Pollen, already present in sods, used in the stable to produce manure. 2. Pollen, originating from flowering crop species. 3. Pollen, originating from flowering species in the surroundings. Species, present in biomarker spectra, can have three sources: 1. Biomarkers from tissues, present in sods, used for manure production. 2. Biomarkers from decomposed roots of crop species. 3. Biomarkers from straw of crop species, used in the stable for manure production. Comparison pollen and biomarker spectra of samples of a regular Anthrosol (Posteles, NE-Netherlands) and a Buried (Nabbegat, SE-Netherlands, buried around 1800 AD) Plaggic Anthrosol yielded some interesting features: a. The biomarker spectra of the 2Ap horizons (agricultural layer below the plaggic deposits) are dominated by biomarkers of deciduous trees (dominated by Quercus), indicating the use of organic litter from the forests. These trees are also present in the pollen spectra. b. The biomarker spectra of the plaggic deposits are dominated by crop species (Avena, Secale, Fagpyrum), Calluna is absent in most of the spectra. This is different from pollen spectra where Calluna is present, together with crop species and transported pollen of other species. Only the biomarker spectra of the upper 10 cm of the plaggic horizons are dominated by Calluna. c. Comparison of the spectra of the buried and regular Plaggic Anthrosols show the contribution of biomarkers of roots of Zea mais (introduced around 1950 AD), suppressing the other species. The negligible percentages of Calluna in biomarker spectra of plaggic deposits suggest an overestimating of the use of heath sods in the traditional interpretation of the genesis of plaggic horizons, the dominance of crop species in biomarker spectra of plaggic deposits suggests underestimati

  7. [Analysis of trace elements in limestone for archeological functions

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the Paris Basin provided stone for the building and the decoration of monuments from antiquity to the present. To determine the origin of stone used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 samples. Petrographic and paleontologic examination of thin sections allows geologists to distinguish Lutetian limestones from Jurassic and Cretaceous limestones. Geologists also seek to formulate hypotheses regarding the origin of Lutetian limestones used for building and sculpture in the Paris region. In the search for the sources of building and sculptural stone, the analytical methods of geologists are limited because often several quarries produce the same lithofacies. A new tool is now available, however, to attack questions of provenance raised by art historians. Because limestones from different sources have distinctive patterns of trace-element concentrations, compositional analysis by neutron activation allows one to compare building or sculptural stone from one monument with stone from quarries or other monuments. This analytical method subjects a powdered limestone sample to standard neutron activation analysis procedures at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the help of computer programs, the compositional fingerprints of Lutetian limestones can be determined and stored in a database. The limestone database contains data for approximately 2,100 samples from monuments, sculptures and quarries. It is particularly rich in samples from the Paris Basin.

  8. Limestone types used from the classic Karst region in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Sabina; Mirtič, Breda; Mladenović, Ana; Rožič, Boštjan; Bedjanič, Mojca; Kortnik, Jože; Šmuc, Andrej

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a variety of limestones from the Karst Region that is one of the most interesting areas containing reserves of natural stones in Slovenia. The region is mainly composed of Cretaceous shallow-water limestone, with the most common type currently excavated being the rudist limestone of the Lipica Formation, which dates to the Santonian to Campanian. Limestones of this formation are mainly represented by a light grey, thick-bedded to massive Lipica limestone rich in (largely fragmented) rudists. Rudist shells can be either relatively well preserved (such as in Lipica Fiorito quarried limestone) or almost completely disintegrated and intensively endolitised (Lipica Unito quarried limestone). Beside the Lipica Formation, natural stone types have been excavated from two other formations or members in the Karst region: the Repen Formation (Repen and Kopriva limestones), and the Tomaj Limestone (dark, laminated limestone within the Lipica Formation). As documented, the region has been associated with the quarrying and processing of stone at least for over two thousand years, i.e. since the Roman period. Although a large number of quarries in all mentioned formations are documented in the Karst region, many are inactive nowadays. Some of the quarries are declared as geological monuments of national importance or officially protected as a natural monument. Karst limestones are considered the highest quality calcareous natural stones in Slovenia. They are characterised by high density, low water absorption and low open porosity; consequently they also exhibit high frost and salt resistance as well as high compressive and flexural strength. Besides in the Karst region and other parts of Slovenia, the Karst limestones were used in the construction of several important buildings and monuments in many other European Countries, and worldwide. Nowadays, they are most commonly used in the construction of façade cladding, pavements, window sills, staircases, indoor

  9. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TO THE POWER PLANT OF THE HISTORIC THOMAS COKEWORKS SITE. - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Overall view of quarry from quarry wall, facing north, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of quarry from quarry wall, facing north, showing work areas in background - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  11. OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING EAST WITH WESTERN QUARRY WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING EAST WITH WESTERN QUARRY WALL IN FOREGROUND - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 1, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  12. Quarries as educational resources - a research with students of a secondary school of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipe, Fernanda; Henriques, Maria Helena

    2015-04-01

    This work describes the results obtained in a research on science education involving 18 students of Biology and Geology of the 10th grade (15 years old) of the Secondary School of Figueiró dos Vinhos (Central Portugal). Framed on the curricular topic "Earth, a very special planet", the research included the conception, implementation and evaluation of an educational intervention aiming to answer the question: "How to stimulate meaningful and relevant learning about sustainable exploitation of geological resources, namely limestone?" The intervention occurred along 8 classes of 90 minutes each, which included practical work developed in small groups (3 students/each), and several activities both in the field and in the classroom (prior and after the fieldtrip). From the methodological point of view, this research is qualitative in nature, a study-case type, with data resulting from direct observation and content analysis of the answers presented by students to questionnaires (diagnostic and intervention assessment) and to worksheets, expressly created for the research. The main goal of the intervention was that the students, by developing practical activities centered upon a field trip to an abandoned limestone quarry located close to their homes, could learn to recognize the geological impacts arising from the exploitation of geological resources and acquire skills for collecting and processing relevant information about existing rules that control the operations in quarries, in order to develop critical thinking about the nature of exploitation of these types of resources, which may hinder the promotion of sustainable development. Concerning the intervention assessment, results reinforced the idea that quarries can provide an educational resource of great value for promoting substantive knowledge on geosciences, urgently needed and consistent with the development of critical and intervenient citizens, able to decide, at the right moment, how to behave

  13. LUTETIAN LIMESTONES IN THE PARIS REGION: PETROGRAPHIC AND COMPOSITIONAL EXAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BLANC,A.; HOLMES,L.L.; HARBOTTLE,G.

    1998-06-11

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific-stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemist whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  14. Lutetian limestones in the Paris region: Petrographic and compositional examination

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists have investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemistry whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  15. The Solnhofen Limestone: A stony heritage of many uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kölbl-Ebert, Martina; Kramar, Sabina; Cooper, Barry J.

    2016-04-01

    High above the valley of the River Altmühl (Bavaria, Germany), between Solnhofen to the west and Kelheim to the east, numerous quarries give access to thinly plated limestone from the Upper Jurassic, some 150 million years before the present. The main quarry areas lie around the town of Eichstätt and between the villages of Solnhofen, Langenaltheim and Mörnsheim. Here limestone slabs have been quarried for several hundred years, some even in Roman times. Solnhofen Limestone is famous worldwide; not only because it is a beautiful building stone of high quality, but also because of the exceptionally well-preserved fossils it contains -among them the early bird Archaeopteryx. The quarry industry between Solnhofen and Eichstätt has shaped a cultural landscape, with old and new quarries sunk into the plain and numerous spoil heaps rising above it, for the rock is not all economically useful. But many of the spoil heaps and the old quarries are environmentally protected as they provide a habitat for some rare plants and animals. It is not necessary to cut the Solnhofen Limestone with a saw: it is split by hand into thin and even slabs or sheets which are used for flagstones and wall covers, which since centuries are sold world-wide. Locally it also serves as roof tiles for traditional houses. Thick slabs of especially fine quality may be found near Solnhofen and Mörnsheim and are used for lithography printing.

  16. Norwegian millstone quarry landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldal, Tom; Meyer, Gurli; Grenne, Tor

    2013-04-01

    Rotary querns and millstones were used in Norway since just after the Roman Period until the last millstone was made in the 1930s. Throughout all this time millstone mining was fundamental for daily life: millstones were needed to grind grain, our most important food source. We can find millstone quarries in many places in the country from coast to mountain. Some of them cover many square kilometers and count hundreds of quarries as physical testimonies of a long and great production history. Other quarries are small and hardly visible. Some of this history is known through written and oral tradition, but most of it is hidden and must be reconstructed from the traces we can find in the landscape today. The Millstone project has put these quarry landscapes on the map, and conducted a range of case studies, including characterization of archaeological features connected to the quarrying, interpretation of quarrying techniques and evolution of such and establishing distribution and trade patterns by the aid of geological provenance. The project also turned out to be a successful cooperation between different disciplines, in particular geology and archaeology.

  17. Limestone Caverns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  18. Limestone geomorphology

    SciTech Connect

    Trudgill, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book focuses on recent work on geomorphological processes and relates them to established theories of landform development. Special attention is paid to soil processes, marine geomorphology, chemical processes and future work on process-form relationships in the context of dated sequences of cave deposits. There are discussions of limestone landforms and other carbonate rocks, caves, hydrological networks, features of karst, morphometry, and coastal landforms and solution chemistry of limestones.

  19. Natural recovery of different areas of a deserted quarry in South China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenjun; Ren, Hai; Fu, Shenglei; Wang, Jun; Yang, Long; Zhang, Jinping

    2008-01-01

    A quarry is a surface mining operated place, which produces enormous quantities of gravel, limestone, and other materials for industrial and construction applications. Restoration and revegetation of deserted quarries are becoming increasingly important. Three areas of a typical quarry in South China: terrace for crushed materials (terrace), spoiled mound, and remaining side slope, were investigated, to compare the existing plant species and to study the relationship between environmental factors and revegetation. The plant species composition of these three areas was found to differ significantly after eight years of natural recovery. The typical plant communities found over them were composed of gramineous herbs, ferns, and shrubs. Soil organic matter, soil moisture, and soil bulk density were considered to be the major determining factors for vegetation succession. There existed abiotic and biotic thresholds during quarrying restoration. Suggestions had been presented that could have accelerated the process of natural recovery in quarries. PMID:18575134

  20. STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION RESEARCH FOR DNAPL IN FRACTURED ROCK, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, LIMESTONE, MAINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details a research project on Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) for the recovery of volatile organic compounds from fractured limestone that was carried out at the Quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine. This project was carried out by USEPA, Ma...

  1. Contribution in support of a Global Heritage Stone designation for the Leitha Limestone s.l. of eastern Austria because of its use in Roman times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, Beatrix; Rohatsch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The Leitha Limestone s.l., which has been proposed for Global Heritage Stone listing, comprises the red algae dominated sediments of shallow water carbonate platforms distributed around the Leitha Mountains, the Ruster Hills and other parts of the Vienna Basin. In our sense it comprehends the Leithakalk faciostratotype of the Badenian regional stage along with its lateral equivalents of near shore calcareous sandstones, breccias and conglomerates. It also includes the so called detrital Leithakalk, an informal name for calcareous algae sandstones of the Sarmatian regional stage that is perhaps comparable with the Skalica Formation and finally it covers the algae strata known from the Pannonian regional stage. Thus the Leitha Limestone s.l. belongs to the middle and upper part of the Miocene, i.e. ranging from about 16 to 10 my BP. The geoscientific focus of this multidisciplinary research is on deciphering the petrological types and carbonate facies of stone monuments and building stones and on comparing them with the successions of the strata outcropping in abandoned quarries. We are recording distinguishing lithological features and collecting appropriate field samples for microscopic, petrophysical, and geochemical analysis. The results of these analyses will be used to characterise the different varieties of Leitha Limestone s.l. of the investigated stone objects, with a view to setting up a catalogue based on lithological types that could be of considerable value for restoration and conservation too. Carnuntum was the regional metropolis of the Roman province Pannonia Superior and one of the legionary camps along the Danube Limes from about 40 AD to the end of the 5th century. It is situated about 40 km east of Vienna city centre, in the present-day market-town of Petronell-Carnuntum. Most of the stone objects from Carnuntum are made of the local quarried Leitha Limestone s.l. from the Hainburg Mountains and from ancient quarries in the Leitha Mountains

  2. Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brezinski, D.K.; Kollar, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

  3. Analysis of medieval limestone sculpture from southwestern France and the Paris Basin by NAA

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, L.; Harbottle, G.

    1994-12-31

    Compositional characterization of limestone from sources known to medieval craftsmen and from the monuments they built can be used in conjunction with stylistic and iconographic criteria to infer geographic origin of sculptures that have lost their histories. Limestone from 47 quarrying locations in France and from numerous medieval monuments have been subjected to neutron activation analysis (NAA) to form the nucleus of the Brookhaven Limestone Database. Even though the method and techniques of NAA are well established, this paper briefly summarizes the parameters and experimental conditions useful for determining those concentration variables for which limestone from different sources exhibits significant and reproducible differences.

  4. Probabilistic prediction models for aggregate quarry siting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.R., Jr.; Larkins, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Weights-of-evidence (WofE) and logistic regression techniques were used in a GIS framework to predict the spatial likelihood (prospectivity) of crushed-stone aggregate quarry development. The joint conditional probability models, based on geology, transportation network, and population density variables, were defined using quarry location and time of development data for the New England States, North Carolina, and South Carolina, USA. The Quarry Operation models describe the distribution of active aggregate quarries, independent of the date of opening. The New Quarry models describe the distribution of aggregate quarries when they open. Because of the small number of new quarries developed in the study areas during the last decade, independent New Quarry models have low parameter estimate reliability. The performance of parameter estimates derived for Quarry Operation models, defined by a larger number of active quarries in the study areas, were tested and evaluated to predict the spatial likelihood of new quarry development. Population density conditions at the time of new quarry development were used to modify the population density variable in the Quarry Operation models to apply to new quarry development sites. The Quarry Operation parameters derived for the New England study area, Carolina study area, and the combined New England and Carolina study areas were all similar in magnitude and relative strength. The Quarry Operation model parameters, using the modified population density variables, were found to be a good predictor of new quarry locations. Both the aggregate industry and the land management community can use the model approach to target areas for more detailed site evaluation for quarry location. The models can be revised easily to reflect actual or anticipated changes in transportation and population features. ?? International Association for Mathematical Geology 2007.

  5. Limestone - A Crucial and Versatile Industrial Mineral Commodity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, James D.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Orris, Greta J.

    2008-01-01

    Limestone, as used by the minerals industry, is any rock composed mostly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Although limestone is common in many parts of the United States, it is critically absent from some. Limestone is used to produce Portland cement, as aggregate in concrete and asphalt, and in an enormous array of other products, making it a truly versatile commodity. Portland cement is essential to the building industry, but despite our Nation's abundance of limestone, there have been cement shortages in recent years. These have been caused in part by a need to find new areas suitable for quarrying operations. To help manage our Nation's resources of such essential mineral commodities, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides crucial data and scientific information to industry, policymakers, and the public.

  6. National conference on agricultural limestone. Bulletin Y-166

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Twenty-three papers were presented on various facets of the agricultural limestone (aglime) industry - from the quarry to the farmers. They are organized under the following section headings: introduction and overview; status of current use and need; agronomic situation; a total approach to marketing aglime, producing aglime; and a look to the future. Panel discussions were held on the topics, responding to the seasonal nature of aglime use and regional reviews of the status and opportunities for aglime use. (JGB)

  7. Multidisciplinary studies on ancient sandstone quarries of Western Sardinia (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, Silvana Maria; Del Vais, Carla; Naitza, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    , Oristano, Santa Giusta). They are prevailing fine-medium grained carbonate sandstones, and subordinate coarse sandstones and micro-conglomerates, variably cemented. In the studied areas, stratigraphic sequences grade from coarser facies of marine environment to fine-grained aeolian deposits, marked by cross-stratification. The Quaternary sedimentary sequence rests on Miocene limestones and clays, and on Plio-Pleistocene basalts. On optical microscopy, sandstones show grain-supported texture, with abundant carbonate bioclasts, intraclasts and algal nodules, with quartz, feldspars and fragments of granitoids, quartzites, volcanics. Grainsize in sandstone sequences progressively decreases towards the top, corresponding to an increase of fine bioclastic components. Terrigenous components change from the northernmost outcrops (Is Arutas quarries), where clasts of granitoid origin are dominant, to the southern outcrops (San Giovanni di Sinis quarries), which show a more marked compositional heterogeneity, with frequent volcanic feldspars and lithoclasts. The calcitic cement also shows distinct variations, both along the stratigraphic sequence and at areal scale, between the sparitic type and the micro/cryptocrystalline type. First evidences on samples from Tharros city walls indicate that sandstone blocks may come, almost in part, from the quarries of San Giovanni di Sinis that, consequently, could have started to work during the Punic age. Other evidences in the area, however, indicate that quarrying activities in Sinis continued well over the Ancient times, presumably including all the Middle Ages.

  8. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  9. Biocalcifying Bacillus subtilis cells effectively consolidate deteriorated Globigerina limestone.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Roderick; Vella, Daniel; Sinagra, Emmanuel; Zammit, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Microbially induced calcite precipitation occurs naturally on ancient limestone surfaces in Maltese hypogea. We exploited this phenomenon and treated deteriorated limestone with biocalcifying bacteria. The limestone was subjected to various mechanical and physical tests to present a statistically robust data set to prove that treatment was indeed effective. Bacillus subtilis conferred uniform bioconsolidation to a depth of 30 mm. Drilling resistance values were similar to those obtained for freshly quarried limestone (9 N) and increased up to 15 N. Treatment resulted in a high resistance to salt deterioration and a slow rate of water absorption. The overall percentage porosity of treated limestone varied by ±6 %, thus the pore network was preserved. We report an eco-friendly treatment that closely resembles the mineral composition of limestone and that penetrates into the porous structure without affecting the limestones' natural properties. The treatment is of industrial relevance since it compares well with stone consolidants available commercially. PMID:27072564

  10. Processing Gold Quarry refractory ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausen, D. M.

    1989-04-01

    The Gold Quarry deposit is the largest sediment-hosted gold deposit yet discovered on the Carlin trend in northern Nevada. However, despite the locale's vast reserves, the gold is difficult to extract from portions of the deposit. Detailed, ongoing mineralogical analyses assure proper treatment of the ore.

  11. The effects of quarry mining on the epidemiology of Schistosoma haematobium in schoolchildren, in Ishiagu, south-eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nduka, F O; Etusim, P E; Nwaugo, V O; Oguariri, R M

    2006-03-01

    Over the last two decades there has been a noticeable increase in the activities of quarry-mining companies in the Ishiagu area of south-eastern Nigeria. These activities have produced an ever-growing number of abandoned quarry pits that usually quickly fill with water and appear to become suitable habitats for the freshwater snails that may act as intermediate hosts of Schistosoma haematobium. To examine the potential role of quarry mining on the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis caused by S. haematobium, urine samples were collected from 1819 schoolchildren in northern Ishiagu (an area with intense mining activities and many quarry pits) and from 252 schoolchildren in southern Ishiagu (an area with no mining activity or quarry pits). When these 2071 samples were checked for schistosome eggs, 1005 (48.5%) were found positive and 252 (25.1%) of the infected children showed visible haematuria. The children from northern Ishiagu were much more likely to be infected than the children from the south (53.3% v. 13.9%; P<0.001). Curiously, only the children from northern Ishiagu showed a gender-related difference in prevalence that was statistically significant, with boys more likely to be infected than girls (60.9% v. 38.5%; P<0.001). Although the 'children' investigated varied in age from 5 to 20 years, no statistically significant increase or decrease in prevalence with age was apparent. Four species of snails (Bulinus globosus, B. rohlfsi, B. forskalii and B. senegalensis) were found in the overall study area but B. globosus was only found in the quarry pits in northern Ishiagu and never in the water bodies of southern Ishiagu. It does appear that quarry-mining activity in the Ishiagu area is a factor in the local epidemiology of urinary schistosomiasis, with the water bodies that form in the abandoned quarry pits serving as the principal foci of transmission. PMID:16492363

  12. Quarry Haul Road Ecological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This biological survey was performed to document the summer flora and fauna found along the haul road constructed as part of the remedial action for the quarry bulk waste. State and Federal species listed as threatened or endangered were noted if encountered while surveying. Sampling locations were equally spaced along the quarry haul road, and a survey for vegetation and birds conducted at each location. Bird observations were conducted as breeding bird surveys once in June of 1991, and again in June of 1992. Each year's survey includes two observations in the early morning and one late in the evening. Vegetation surveys were conducted in 1991 using quadrants and transects. mammal, reptile, and amphibian sightings were noted as encountered.

  13. A methodological framework to assess the socio-economic impact of underground quarries: A case study from Belgian Limburg.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, A; Poesen, J; Duchateau, P; Vranken, L

    2016-01-15

    This study developed a methodology to assess the socio-economic impact of the presence and collapse of underground limestone quarries. For this we rely on case study evidence from Riemst, a village located in Eastern Belgium and use both secondary and primary data sources. A sinkhole inventory as well as data about the prevention costs provided by the municipality was used. To estimate the recreational values of the quarries, visitor data was obtained from the tourist office of Riemst. Next, two surveys were conducted among inhabitants and four real estate agents and one notary. The direct and indirect damages were assessed using respectively the repair cost and production and real estate value losses. The total yearly direct and indirect damage equals €415000 (±€85000) and more than half of it can be attributed to the depreciation of real estate (€230000). The quarries have recreational, cultural-historical and ecological values and thus generate societal benefits. The yearly recreational value was at least €613000 in 2012 values. The ecological and cultural-historical values augment to €180000 per year (in 2012 values). Further, our study indicates that the gains from filling up the quarries below the houses located above an underground limestone quarry outweigh the costs in the case study area. The net gain from filling up the underground quarry ranges €38700 to €101700 per house. This is only the lower bound of the net gain from filling up these underground quarries since preventive filling makes future collapses less likely so that future direct repair costs will be most likely smaller. PMID:26439649

  14. Landscape evolution by subglacial quarrying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugelvig, Sofie V.; Egholm, David L.; Iverson, Neal R.

    2014-05-01

    In glacial landscape evolution models, subglacial erosion rates are often related to basal sliding or ice discharge by a power-law. This relation can be justified for bedrock abrasion because rock debris transported in the basal ice drives the erosion. However, a simple relation between rates of sliding and erosion is not well supported when considering models for quarrying of rock blocks from the bed. Iverson (2012) introduced a new subglacial quarrying model that operates from the theory of adhesive wear. The model is based on the fact that cavities, with a high level of bedrock differential stress, form along the lee side of bed obstacles when the sliding velocity is to high to allow for the ice to creep around the obstacles. The erosion rate is quantified by considering the likelihood of rock fracturing on topographic bumps. The model includes a statistical treatment of the bedrock weakness: larger rock bodies have lower strengths since they have greater possibility of containing a large flaw [Jaeger and Cook, 1979]. Inclusion of this effect strongly influences the erosion rates and questions the dominant role of sliding rate in standard models for subglacial erosion. Effective pressure, average bedslope, and bedrock fracture density are primary factors that, in addition to sliding rate, influence the erosion rate of this new quarrying model [Iverson, 2012]. We have implemented the quarrying model in a depth-integrated higher-order ice-sheet model [Egholm et al. 2011], coupled to a model for glacial hydrology. In order to also include the effects of cavitation on the subglacial sliding rate, we use a sliding law proposed by Schoof (2005), which includes an upper limit for the stress that can be supported at the bed. Computational experiments show that the combined influence of pressure, sliding rate and bed slope leads to realistically looking landforms such as U-shaped valleys, cirques, hanging valleys and overdeepenings. Compared to model results using a

  15. OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTH, WITH UNQUARRIED GRANITE OUTCROP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTH, WITH UN-QUARRIED GRANITE OUTCROP IN BACKGROUND - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  16. OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING NORTHERN SECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTHWEST, SHOWING NORTHERN SECTION OF QUARRY - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  17. OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTH, SHOWING NORTHERN SECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTH, SHOWING NORTHERN SECTION OF QUARRY - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  18. OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTHERN SECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF QUARRY, FACING NORTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTHERN SECTION OF QUARRY - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  19. VIEW OF SMALL QUARRY FACE AND WORK AREA IN MIDDLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SMALL QUARRY FACE AND WORK AREA IN MIDDLE OF QUARRY, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  20. A remote underwater closure of Kerr Hollow Quarry

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the totally remote clean closure of Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) on the Department of Energy Y-12 site in Oak Ridge, TN. KHQ is a flooded limestone quarry, used for the treatment of shock sensitive, water reactive, explosive, and compressed gas materials from 1960 until 1988 at which time it was closed and identified as a RCRA site. The treatment process left some 4000 containers on the bottom of KHQ. Most containers are empty; however, the remote possibility of existing unreacted materials coupled with the explosive nature of the materials themselves, dictated that KHQ be clean closed by totally remote means. The closure activity involved the use of a combination of commercially available remote underwater water equipment and the use of specially designed prototype equipment. The total cost and schedule duration will be close to the cost and schedule for an in-situ closure. This is the only totally remote RCRA closure, clean, or in-situ, ever performed. 2 figs.

  1. Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Maps showing mines, quarries, oil and gas activity, and sample localities in and near the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mory, P.C.; Behum, P.T.; Ross, R.B. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, William B. Bankhead National Forest, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama. The survey includes: limestone quarrying, coal mining, and oil and gas activity. 7 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Hydrogeological and hydrochemical investigation for below-sea-level quarrying at cement raw material site (Kocaeli-Darica, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Doyuran, Vedat; Karahanoğlu, Nurkan; Camur, Zeki; Topal, Tamer; Süzen, M Lütfi; Yeşilnacar, Ertan

    2003-08-01

    A research has been carried out to investigate the effects of below sea level mining on the cement raw material quality of a limestone quarry located adjacent to the shoreline near Darica-Kocaeli-Turkey. Field studies involved rock mass characterization through discontinuity surveys performed at the working benches of the quarry as well as on the core samples, monitoring of groundwater levels, performance of water pressure tests, and in-situ hydrochemical measurements. Hydrogeological data suggest that the carbonate sequence forms a poor unconfined aquifer having hydraulic conductivity values ranging between 10(-6) m/s and 10(-8) m/s. In the quarry, water seepages can only be observed at the shear zones. Electrical conductivity profiles taken from the boreholes located at various distances from the shore line indicated the present position of the salt water wedge. PMID:12929797

  4. Identification of quarries rehabilitation scenarios: a case study within the metropolitan area of Bari (Italy).

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Pasquale; Ottolino, Maria Antonella; Caliandro, Lucia Patrizia

    2012-06-01

    This paper addresses quarries rehabilitation issue within a Metropolitan Area. Areas where mining activity is carried out have been subjected to physical and environmental degradation linked both to pursue the building materials extraction and to the city expansion continuously asking for new areas to be developed with residential and service functions. These changes also occurred where environmental and landscape values are present. It has been therefore pointed out the issue of such areas redevelopment that, to be functionally reintegrated, must be consistently linked to the activities and the territorial local contexts characteristics. In this paper the quarries reuse issue is carried out through parameters identification able to define the quarries relationship with the neighboring towns and with their surroundings besides to identify their physical, environmental and landscaping characteristics. Quarry reuse alternatives have been identified among those consistent with the rehabilitation goals, as defined by the planning sector and internationally approved, while their selection is derived from the application of a two-step methodology: a multi-criteria analysis related to punctual parameters at a "site-specific" level, followed by a further territorial indicators checking over the wide area. This application has led to socially accepted results identifying the examined quarries for reuses ranging from agricultural-forestry and urban to functional or naturalistic. The proposed method has also proved to be suitable to address the abandoned quarries reuse problem with a systemic and consultative approach, as it is able to correlate the many variables present in the social and spatial complexity of the Metropolitan Areas. PMID:22481597

  5. Drenov Grič black limestone as a heritage stone from Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Sabina; Rožič, Boštjan; Žbona, Nina; Bedjanič, Mojca; Mladenović, Ana

    2016-04-01

    The limestone known as Drenov Grič black limestone is considered one of the most beautiful Slovenian natural stones due to its homogenous black colour interwoven with white veins. Over the centuries it has been exploited from three major quarries west of Ljubljana, with the main quarry at Drenov Grič playing the primary role in supplying building material for the central parts of Slovenia. All the quarries are currently not active. In the area of Drenov grič, one locality of black limestone is protected - Kuclerjev kamnolom quarry. It has the status of 'valuable natural feature of national importance' and is protected as a natural monument. This well-stratified micritic limestone of Triassic (Carnian) age occurs in 10-80 cm thick beds, with thin marl interlayers. The stone contains abundant fossil bivalves and ostracods. Apart from calcite as the main component, dolomite, quartz, illite/muscovite and pyrite are also present. The limestone is relatively rich in carbonaceous and bituminous organic matter, which is responsible for the black colour of the stone. This component does not have any adverse effect on mechanical and physical characteristics. As the lime¬stone is dense, thus facilitating a good polish, it has been commercially considered as marble. The stone has been widely used in Slovenian monuments, not only in Ljubljana but also in other regions of Slovenia. Many inner and outdoor architectural elements were made of this limestone, particularly in the baroque period, which was known for the extensive use of black limestones also in other European countries. The most significant use of this limestone has been recorded in sculptured portals and altars. Some of the important buildings decorated utilising this stone, are the Ljubljana Cathedral, the St. James's Parish Church, and the Franciscan Church of the Annunciation, all of which are located in Ljubljana, some of them having been declared as cultural monuments of local or national importance. When

  6. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  7. Characterizing the microbial colonization of a dolostone quarry: implications for stone biodeterioration and response to biocide treatments.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Beatriz; De los Ríos, Asuncion; Urizal, Marta; de Buergo, Mónica Alvarez; Varas, Maria Jose; Fort, Rafael; Ascaso, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    This study examines the microbial colonization of three fronts of an abandoned dolostone quarry (Redueña, Madrid, Spain) exposed to atmospheric conditions for different time periods since Roman times to the present. Through scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE), endolithic colonization was predominantly detected in the most recently exposed front, while in the longer exposed quarry fronts, epilithic forms of growth were most often observed. These observations were confirmed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. Based on the distribution pattern of microbial colonization in the different quarry fronts, we then established a sequence of colonization events that took place over this long time frame. Bioalteration processes related to this sequential colonization were also identified. Characterizing these sequential processes can be useful for interpreting biodeterioration processes in historic dolostone monuments, especially those affecting constructions in the area of the Redueña stone quarry. In a second experimental stage, different biocide treatments were tested on this quarry rock to find the best way to avoid the microbial colonization effects identified. Through combined SEM-BSE/DGGE analysis, the efficacy of several biocides against the microorganisms inhabiting the dolostones was assessed after 4 and 16 months treatment. In general, all treatments were effective at reducing around 80% of the lichen cover, although effects on endolithic lithobiontic communities were dependent on how well the rock surface had been mechanically cleaned prior to treatment and gradually disappeared over time. PMID:21359558

  8. Looking northwest, first floor, South Wing, Paleontology Lab. The quarry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northwest, first floor, South Wing, Paleontology Lab. The quarry wall can be seen through the window - Quarry Visitor Center, U.S. Highway 40, 8 miles north of Jensen, Jensen, Uintah County, UT

  9. VIEW FACING NORTH OF WEST QUARRY WALL, WITH METAL MOUNTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FACING NORTH OF WEST QUARRY WALL, WITH METAL MOUNTING BOLT FOR DERRICK VISIBLE - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 1, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  10. VIEW OF SOUTHERN QUARRY, FACING SOUTH, WITH ROCK PILES IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHERN QUARRY, FACING SOUTH, WITH ROCK PILES IN FOREGROUND - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  11. VIEW OF NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, OVERGROWN WITH VEGETATION, FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, OVERGROWN WITH VEGETATION, FACING WEST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  12. View of southern quarry wall, facing west, showing multiple drill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of southern quarry wall, facing west, showing multiple drill holes on face - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  13. View of quarry work area, facing east, with broken lintel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of quarry work area, facing east, with broken lintel in foreground - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  14. View of four large bore holes on top of quarry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of four large bore holes on top of quarry wall, facing northeast - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  15. View facing east of top of quarry wall with forge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing east of top of quarry wall with forge site in foreground - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  16. Use of limestone obtained from waste of the mussel cannery industry for the production of mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Paloma; Marmol, Isabel; Morales, Julian; Sanchez, Luis . E-mail: luis-sanchez@uco.es

    2007-04-15

    Various types of cement-SiO{sub 2}-CaCO{sub 3} mortar were prepared by replacing quarry limestone aggregate with limestone obtained as a by-product from waste of the mussel cannery industry. The CaCO{sub 3} aggregate consists mainly of elongated prismatic particles less than 4 {mu}m long rather than of the rounded particles of smaller size (2-6 {mu}m) obtained with quarry limestone. The mechanical and structural properties of the mortars were found to be influenced by aggregate morphology. Setting of the different types of mortar after variable curing times was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) techniques. Mortars with a high content in mussel shell limestone exhibited a more packed microstructure, which facilitates setting of cement and results in improved mortar strength. The enhanced mechanical properties of the new mortars allow the cement content in the final mortar composition to be decreased and production costs to be reduced as a result.

  17. 30 CFR 56.3131 - Pit or quarry wall perimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pit or quarry wall perimeter. 56.3131 Section... Mining Methods § 56.3131 Pit or quarry wall perimeter. In places where persons work or travel in... stripped back for at least 10 feet from the top of the pit or quarry wall. Other conditions at or near...

  18. 30 CFR 56.3131 - Pit or quarry wall perimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pit or quarry wall perimeter. 56.3131 Section... Mining Methods § 56.3131 Pit or quarry wall perimeter. In places where persons work or travel in... stripped back for at least 10 feet from the top of the pit or quarry wall. Other conditions at or near...

  19. 30 CFR 56.3131 - Pit or quarry wall perimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pit or quarry wall perimeter. 56.3131 Section... Mining Methods § 56.3131 Pit or quarry wall perimeter. In places where persons work or travel in... stripped back for at least 10 feet from the top of the pit or quarry wall. Other conditions at or near...

  20. 30 CFR 56.3131 - Pit or quarry wall perimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pit or quarry wall perimeter. 56.3131 Section... Mining Methods § 56.3131 Pit or quarry wall perimeter. In places where persons work or travel in... stripped back for at least 10 feet from the top of the pit or quarry wall. Other conditions at or near...

  1. 30 CFR 56.3131 - Pit or quarry wall perimeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pit or quarry wall perimeter. 56.3131 Section... Mining Methods § 56.3131 Pit or quarry wall perimeter. In places where persons work or travel in... stripped back for at least 10 feet from the top of the pit or quarry wall. Other conditions at or near...

  2. Use of Borehole-Radar Methods to Monitor a Steam-Enhanced Remediation Pilot Study at a Quarry at the Former Loring Air Force Base, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, Colette; Joesten, Peter K.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2007-01-01

    Single-hole radar reflection and crosshole radar tomography surveys were used in conjunction with conventional borehole-geophysical methods to evaluate the effectiveness of borehole-radar methods for monitoring the movement of steam and heat through fractured bedrock. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), conducted surveys in an abandoned limestone quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base during a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation (SER) pilot project conducted by the USEPA, the U.S. Air Force, and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection to study the viability of SER to remediate non-aqueous phase liquid contamination in fractured bedrock. Numerical modeling and field experiments indicate that borehole-radar methods have the potential to monitor the presence of steam and to measure large temperature changes in the limestone matrix during SER operations. Based on modeling results, the replacement of water by steam in fractures should produce a decrease in radar reflectivity (amplitude of the reflected wave) by a factor of 10 and a change in reflection polarity. In addition, heating the limestone matrix should increase the bulk electrical conductivity and decrease the bulk dielectric permittivity. These changes result in an increase in radar attenuation and an increase in radar-wave propagation velocity, respectively. Single-hole radar reflection and crosshole radar tomography data were collected in two boreholes using 100-megahertz antennas before the start of steam injection, about 10 days after the steam injection began, and 2 months later, near the end of the injection. Fluid temperature logs show that the temperature of the fluid in the boreholes increased by 10?C (degrees Celsius) in one borehole and 40?C in the other; maximum temperatures were measured near the bottom of the boreholes. The results of the numerical modeling were used to interpret the borehole-radar data. Analyses of the

  3. Comparative study of porous limestones used in heritage structures in Cyprus and in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoridou, Magdalini; Ioannou, Ioannis; Rozgonyi-Boissinot, Nikoletta; Török, Ákos

    2015-04-01

    Porous limestone is widely used as construction material in the monuments of Cyprus and Hungary. The present study compares the physical properties of a bioclastic limestone from Cyprus and an oolitic limestone from Hungary. Petra Gerolakkou is a Pliocene limestone from Cyprus that originates from the district of Nicosia, the island's capital. It has been extensively used throughout the years in construction and restoration projects, particularly in the Nicosia area. Distinctive examples of its use can be found in the majority of the most important historic monuments in Nicosia, such as the Venetian walls and fortifications, churches (e.g. the Agia Sofia Cathedral), the archbishop and presidential palaces and a high number of other traditional buildings. The studied Miocene limestone from Hungary was exploited from Sóskút quarry (15-20 km W-SW to Budapest). The quarry provided stone for emblematic monuments of the capital of Hungary such as the Parliament building, Mathias Church, the Opera House and Citadella. In this study, mechanical parameters for both aforementioned stones, such as uniaxial compressive and tensile strengths, were tested under laboratory conditions. Their density, porosity and water absorption were also compared. The studied limestone from Cyprus exhibits porosity values within the range of 48-51%, apparent density between 1340 and 1400 kg/m3 and strength values under uniaxial compressive load between 1.2 and 2.8 MPa. This lithotype is also considered susceptible to salt decay, since an approximate mass loss of 12.5% is noted after 15 salt crystallization artificial weathering cycles. The porosity of the Hungarian limestone is in the order of 16-35%, the bulk density is 1600-1950 kg/m3, while the compressive strength is 2.5-15 MPa. Durability tests indicate that even after 10 freeze-thaw cycles the loss in strength is dramatic. Test results indicate that use of porous limestone in both countries is common and fabric strongly controls the

  4. Anthropogenic sinkholes in the Marsala area (western Sicily) linked to underground quarries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamini, M.; Di Maggio, C.; Lollino, P.; Madonia, G.; Parise, M.; Vattano, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marsala territory (western Sicily) is characterized by the presence of a Lower Pleistocene (Calabrian) calcarenite succession (Marsala Calcarenite Fm). It can be divided into three lithofacies that show the regressive evolution of the depositional system: a) coarse to fine yellow bio- and lithoclastic calcarenites, b) sands, and c) gray sandy clays. At least 80 m-thick, this succession gently dips (5-10°) towards the south and the south-west. At some locations the Marsala Calcarenite is covered by Middle and Upper Pleistocene marine terraced deposits. Since the Roman period, due to the great abundance of calcarenite rocks, and to the facility of extraction, the Marsala area has been characterized by a high number of quarries for the extraction of this building materials. Many of them were excavated underground, at depth varying from a few meters to about 25 m, and are arranged in one or two levels, following the galleries and pillars excavation technique. With time, the underground quarries have been progressively abandoned for the decay of the physical and mechanical properties of the calcarenite rock mass, the interaction with the groundwater, the high costs of extraction, and the dangers and difficulties encountered in working underground. Since the 1960's the quarries have been affected by instability processes, visible through collapses and deformations of vaults and pillars. These phenomena often propagate upward reaching the topographic surface and forming sinkholes which affect and severely damage the built-up area. In particular, two case studies of sinkholes related to different underground quarries will be analyzed in this paper. The aim is to provide a description of the most significant processes and factors responsible of the instability processes based on field surveys, as well as to understand the generation mechanisms of these anthropogenic sinkholes by means of numerical modeling, based on rock laboratory testing data, that represents in these

  5. Ground-water flow and ground- and surface-water interaction at the Weldon Spring quarry, St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Imes, J.L.; Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Ground-water-level measurements to support remedial actions were made in 37 piezometers and 19 monitoring wells during a 19-month period to assess the potential for ground-water flow from an abandoned quarry to the nearby St. Charles County well field, which withdraws water from the base of the alluvial aquifer. From 1957 to 1966, low-level radioactive waste products from the Weldon Spring chemical plant were placed in the quarry a few hundred feet north of the Missouri River alluvial plain. Uranium-based contaminants subsequently were detected in alluvial ground water south of the quarry. During all but flood conditions, lateral ground-water flow in the bedrock from the quarry, as interpreted from water-table maps, generally is southwest toward Little Femme Osage Creek or south into the alluvial aquifer. After entering the alluvial aquifer, the ground water flows southeast to east toward a ground-water depression presumably produced by pumping at the St. Charles County well field. The depression position varies depending on the Missouri River stage and probably the number and location of active wells in the St. Charles County well field.

  6. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  7. Evaluation of the physical properties, bulk density and aggregate stability of potential substrates in quarry restoration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, M.; Garcia-Orenes, F.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Garcia-Sanchez, E.

    2012-04-01

    Quarrying activity entails significant environmental impact affecting the soil, water, plants, landscape, etc. One of the most important impacts is the loss of the productive layer of the soil and its vegetation cover. However, mining activities are absolutely necessary for human development; keeping them sustainable implicates looking for viable solutions for the restoration of these areas to prevent degradation during and after the exploitation period. The aim of this study was to evaluate different substrates obtained from different mixes of sewage sludge and different mine spoils, to check how they are effective in quarry restoration, and to establish good practises in mining restoration. Also, the study tried to approach two refuses, one deriving from mining activity, as are the mine spoils that need to be reused for their valorisation, and the other, sewage sludge, obtained in the water depuration process to acquire a cheap substrate for soil rehabilitation. This preliminary work, which is included in a larger study, shows the results obtained from two physical properties studied, bulk density and aggregate stability, as key properties in the substrate structure for use in mining area restoration. Two doses of composted sewage sludge (30 and 90 Tm/Ha), both very rich in calcium carbonate, were applied to two different mine spoils under lab conditions. The first material, of poor quality, originated from the acquisition of arid particles in crushed limestone (Z). It is characterized by stable ''coarse elements'' predominance (up to 75% of its weight), and by the presence of elevated percentages of sand. The other waste material tested comes from limestone extraction (basically formed by the levels of interspersed non-limestone materials and the remains of stripped soils (D)). The results show that the high dose of sewage sludge applied to a mix of the two mine spoils significantly increased the percentage of stable aggregates by more than 50% than the control

  8. Use Of limestone resources in flue-gas desulfurization power plants in the Ohio River Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foose, M.P.; Barsotti, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, more than 41 of the approximately 160 coal-fired, electrical- power plants within the six-state Ohio River Valley region used flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) units to desulfurize their emissions, an approximately 100% increase over the number of plants using FGD units in 1989. This increase represents a trend that may continue with greater efforts to meet Federal Clean Air Act standards. Abundant limestone resources exist in the Ohio River Valley and are accessed by approximately 975 quarries. However, only 35 of these are believed to have supplied limestone for FGD electrical generating facilities. The locations of these limestone suppliers do not show a simple spatial correlation with FGD facilities, and the closest quarries are not being used in most cases. Thus, reduction in transportation costs may be possible in some cases. Most waste generated by FGD electrical-generating plants is not recycled. However, many FGD sites are relatively close to gypsum wallboard producers that may be able to process some of their waste.

  9. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  10. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF THE HISTORIC THOMAS FURNACES WITH ACTIVE DOLOMITE EXTRACTION ONGOING IN THE FOREGROUND. FURNACE FOUNDATION RUINS ARE PICTURED ON THE TOP LEDGE (CENTER LEFT) OF THE QUARRY. ALSO PICTURED IS THE HISTORIC THOMAS COKEWORKERS WITH (LEFT TO RIGHT) THE POWER PLANT, BOILER HOUSE, AND COKEWORKS. JUST SOUTH OF THE COKEWORKS, IS AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE CRUSHING, SIZING, AND SCREENING PLANT - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  11. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF THE HISTORIC THOMAS FURNACES WITH ACTIVE DOLOMITE EXTRACTION ONGOING IN THE FOREGROUND. FURNACE FOUNDATION RUINS ARE PICTURED ON THE TOP LEDGE (CENTER LEFT) OF THE QUARRY. ALSO PICTURED IS THE HISTORIC THOMAS COKEWORKS WITH (LEFT TO RIGHT) THE POWER PLANT, BOILER HOUSE, AND COKEWORKS. JUST SOUTH OF THE COKEWORKS IS AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE CRUSHING, SIZING, AND SCREENING PLANT. - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Cretaceous planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the Calera Limestone, Northern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, W.V.

    1999-01-01

    The Calera Limestone is the largest, most stratigraphically extensive limestone unit of oceanic character included in the Franciscan Complex of northern California. The aim of this paper is to place the Calera Limestone at its type locality (Rockaway Beach, Pacifica) in a high-resolution biostratigraphy utilizing planktic foraminifers studied in thin section. A section, about 110 m-thick, was measured from the middle thrust slice exposed by quarrying on the southwest side of Calera Hill at Pacifica Quarry. Lithologically, the section is divided in two units; a lower unit with 73 m of black to dark-grey limestone, black chert and tuff, and an upper unit with 36.8 m of light-grey limestone and medium-grey chert. Two prominent black-shale layers rich in organic carbon occur 11 m below the top of the lower black unit and at the boundary with overlying light-grey unit, yielding a total organic content (TOC) of 4.7% and 1.8% t.w., respectively. The fossiliferous Calera Limestone section measured at Pacifica Quarry, from the lower black shale, contains eleven zones and three subzones that span approximately 26 m.y. from the early Aptian to the late Cenomanian. The zones indentified range from the Globigerinelloides blowi Zone to the Dicarinella algeriana Subzone of the Rotalipora cushmani Zone. Within this biostratigraphic interval, the Ticinella bejaouaensis and Hedbergella planispira Zones at the Aptian/Albian boundary are missing as are the Rotalipora subticinensis Subzone of the Biticinella breggiensis Zone and the overlying Rotalipora ticinensis Zone in the late Albian owing both to low-angle thrust faulting and to unconformities. The abundance and preservation of planktic foraminifers are poor in the lower part and improve only within the upper G. algerianus Zone. The faunal relationship indicate that the lower black shale occurs in the upper part of the G. blowi Zone and correlates with the Selli Event recognized at global scale in the early Aptian. The upper black

  13. 5. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST. WEST DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION, QUARRIES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST. WEST DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION, QUARRIES TO LEFT MIDDLE GROUND OF PICTURE. - Eastside Reservoir, Diamond & Domenigoni Valleys, southwest of Hemet, Hemet, Riverside County, CA

  14. Potential of Hazardous Waste Encapsulation in Concrete Compound Combination with Coal Ash and Quarry Fine Additives.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Roy Nir; Anker, Yaakov; Font, Oriol; Querol, Xavier; Mastai, Yitzhak; Knop, Yaniv; Cohen, Haim

    2015-12-15

    Coal power plants are producing huge amounts of coal ash that may be applied to a variety of secondary uses. Class F fly ash may act as an excellent scrubber and fixation reagent for highly acidic wastes, which might also contain several toxic trace elements. This paper evaluates the potential of using Class F fly ashes (<20% CaO), in combination with excessive fines from the limestone quarry industry as a fixation reagent. The analysis included leaching experiments (EN12457-2) and several analytical techniques (ICP, SEM, XRD, etc.), which were used in order to investigate the fixation procedure. The fine sludge is used as a partial substitute in concrete that can be used in civil engineering projects, as it an environmentally safe product. PMID:26510011

  15. Characterizing and modelling 'ghost-rock' weathered limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Caroline; Goderniaux, Pascal; Deceuster, John; Poulain, Angélique; Kaufmann, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    'Ghost-rock' karst aquifer has recently been highlighted. In this particular type of aquifer, the karst is not expressed as open conduits but consists in zones where the limestone is weathered. The in-situ weathering of limestone leaves a soft porous material called 'alterite'. The hydro-mechanical properties of this material differs significantly from those of the host rock: the weathering enhances the storage capacity and the conductivity of the rock. This type of weathered karst aquifer has never been studied from a hydrogeological point of view. In this study, we present the hydraulic characterization of such weathered zones. We also present a modelling approach derived from the common Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM) approach, but including the spatial distribution of hydrogeological properties through the weathered features, from the hard rock to the alterite, according to a weathering index. Unlike the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) approaches, which enable to take into account a limited number of fractures, this new approach allows creating models including thousands of weathered features. As the properties of the alterite have to be considered at a centimeter scale, it is necessary to upscale these properties to carry out simulations over large areas. Therefore, an upscaling method was developed, taking into account the anisotropy of the weathered features. Synthetic models are built, upscaled and different hydrogeological simulations are run to validate the method. This methodology is finally tested on a real case study: the modelling of the dewatering drainage flow of an exploited quarry in a weathered karst aquifer in Belgium.

  16. The analysis of ground vibrations induced by bench blasting at Akyol quarry and practical blasting charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Umit; Kahriman, Ali; Aksoy, Mehmet; Adiguzel, Deniz; Karadogan, Abdulkadir

    2008-04-01

    Ground vibrations arising from excavation with blasting is one of the fundamental problems in the mining industry. Therefore, the prediction of ground vibration components plays an important role in the minimization of environmental complaints. In this study, 582 events were recorded during limestone production at a quarry (Akyol Quarry) during a period of time. The blasting parameters of these shots were also carefully recorded. During the statistical analysis of the collected data, three predictor equations proposed by the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM), Ambraseys Hendron and Langefors Kihlstrom were used to establish a relationship between peak particle velocity and scaled distance described by these prediction equations. As a result of this analysis, the most powerful relationship was determined and proposed to be used in this site. And also, this equation was used in the derivation of the practical blasting charts specific to this site as a practical way of predicting the peak particle velocity and maximum charge amount per delay for future blasting.

  17. 7 CFR 330.301 - Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry...

  18. 7 CFR 330.301 - Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry...

  19. 7 CFR 330.301 - Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry...

  20. 7 CFR 330.301 - Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry...

  1. 7 CFR 330.301 - Stone and quarry products from certain areas in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Soil, Stone, And Quarry...

  2. Scaling on a limestone flooring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Quiroga, P. M.; Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    2012-04-01

    Natural stone can be use on nearly every surface, inside and outside buildings, but decay is more commonly reported from the ones exposed to outdoor aggressively conditions. This study instead, is an example of limestone weathering of uncertain origin in the interior of a residential building. The stone, used as flooring, started to exhibit loss of material in the form of scaling. These damages were observed before the building, localized in the South of Spain (Málaga), was inhabited. Moreover, according to the company the limestone satisfies the following European standards UNE-EN 1341: 2002, UNE-EN 1343: 2003; UNE-EN 12058: 2004 for floorings. Under these circumstances the main objective of this study was to assess the causes of this phenomenon. For this reason the composition of the mortar was determined and the stone was characterized from a mineralogical and petrological point of view. The last material, which is a fossiliferous limestone from Egypt with natural fissure lines, is mainly composed of calcite, being quartz, kaolinite and apatite minor phases. Moreover, under different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques (FTIR, micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, etc) samples of the weathered, taken directly from the buildings, and unweathered limestone tiles were examined and a new mineralogical phase, trona, was identified at scaled areas which are connected with the natural veins of the stone. In fact, through BSE-mapping the presence of sodium has been detected in these veins. This soluble sodium carbonate would was dissolved in the natural waters from which limestone was precipitated and would migrate with the ascendant capilar humidity and crystallized near the surface of the stone starting the scaling phenomenon which in historic masonry could be very damaging. Therefore, the weathering of the limestone would be related with the hygroscopic behaviour of this salt, but not with the constructive methods used. This makes the limestone unable to be used on restoration

  3. Stationary and transient thermal states of barometric pumping in the access pit of an underground quarry.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Frédéric; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-15

    The transition zone between free and underground atmospheres hosts spectacular phenomena, as demonstrated by temperature measurements performed in the 4.6m diameter and 20m deep vertical access pit of an abandoned underground quarry located in Vincennes, near Paris. In summer, a stable stratification of the atmosphere is maintained, with coherent temperature variations associated with atmospheric pressure changes, with a barometric tide S2 larger than 0.1°C peak to peak. When the winter regime of turbulent cold air avalanches is initiated, stratification with pressure induced signals can be restored transiently in the upper part of the pit, while the lower part remains fully mixed and insensitive to pressure variations. The amplitude of the pressure to temperature transfer function increases with frequency below 5×10(-4)Hz, with values at 3×10(-5)Hz varying from 0.1°C·hPa(-1) at the bottom up to 2°C·hPa(-1) towards the top of the pit. These temperature variations are accounted for by cave breathing, which is pressure induced motion of air amplified by the large volume of the quarry. This understanding is supported by a numerical model including advective heat transport, heat diffusion, and heat exchange with the pit walls. Mean lifetime in the pit is of the order of 9 to 13h, and barometric pumping results in an effective ventilation rate of the quarry of the order of 10(-7)s(-1). This study illustrates the important role of barometric pumping in heat and matter transport between atmosphere and lithosphere. The resulting stationary and transient states, revealed in this pit, are probably a general feature of functioning interface systems, and therefore are an important aspect to consider in problems of contaminant transport, or the preservation of precious heritage such as rare ecosystems or painted caves. PMID:26855357

  4. Mobile laboratory “Explosive destruction of natural materials”: Investigation of the behavior of ice and limestone under explosive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Orlova, Yu N.; Tolkachev, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    In the paper, the behavior of ice and natural limestone under explosion condition was investigated. The objects of study were the river ice and natural limestone quarry on Siberia. The practical significance of research due to the need to increase production of oil and gas in permafrost regions, the fight against ice jams, etc. We organized a mobile laboratory ’’Explosive destruction of the natural materials” at the National Research Tomsk State University. The main purpose of the laboratory is express analyzing of explosive destruction of natural materials. The diameters and depths of explosive craters in the limestone and explosive lane in the ice were obtained. The results can be used to test new models and numerical methods for calculating shock and explosive loading of different materials, including ice.

  5. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING WEST. IN THE FOREGROUND ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING WEST. IN THE FOREGROUND ON THE FIRST BENCH, POWDER HILLS ARE PRIMED FOR DOLOMITE EXTRACTION. ON THE SECOND BENCH, THE DRILL TEAM IS LAYING OUT THE NEXT SHOTS. - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Nomination of the Globigerina Limestone of the Maltese Islands as a "Global Heritage Stone Resource"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassar, JoAnn

    2016-04-01

    The Maltese Islands consist of two main islands, Malta and Gozo, as well as a small number of islets, and lie in the central Mediterranean Sea approximately 90 km south of Sicily. Although only 316 square kilometres in size, the Islands contain a rich concentration of archaeological sites and historic buildings, as well as vernacular architecture and modern buildings, for the most part built of the local Globigerina Limestone, which is one of the few natural resources of the Islands. This stone can be described as a typical "soft limestone", very easy to carve and shape. It forms part of the large family of Oligo-Miocene "soft limestones" widely diffused in the Mediterranean Basin. The Maltese Globigerina Limestone Formation is one of five main Formations, and varies in thickness from 20 to over 200 m. The material used for building is located stratigraphically in the lower part of the Globigerina Limestone Formation, called the Lower Globigerina Limestone. This Formation is stratified into thick beds at outcrop. Sections where bioturbation is concentrated often also occur. This limestone is fine-grained, yellow to pale grey in colour, almost wholly composed of the tests of globigerinid planktonic foraminifera. Petrographically, Globigerina Limestone can be described as a bioclastic packstone, with bioclastic wackestones also occurring. This limestone has always been used as the predominant building material in the Islands. The Maltese prehistoric Temples, which were constructed approximately 6000 years ago, bear testimony to this. Between 1530 and 1798 the Order of the Knights of St John built kilometres of fortifications in this same material to protect the Island from the expanding Ottoman Empire. Fortifications, impressive churches, auberges and palaces were built of this stone during this period. The capital city of Valletta, a rich and dense manifestation of Baroque architecture in Globigerina Limestone, is included on the UNESCO World Heritage List, as are

  7. Colmenar limestone as a resource for built heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Rafael; Álvarez de Buergo, Mónica; Varas-Muriel, MªJosé; Mercedes Pérez-Monserrat, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The Colmenar stone (or Colmenar limestone) has been used in the construction of significant builidings of the Central area of Spain, such as the Royal Palace of Aranjuez (16th -18th centuries) or the Royal Palace of Madrid (18th century). Nowadays this building stone is still widely used, both for new construction and restoration works, as well as for the indoor ornamentation of emblematic buildings such as the Royal Theater of Madrid (20th century). There are many quarries from where this stone was exploited, being the most prestigious ones those located in Colmenar de Oreja, at 50 km Southeast the city of Madrid. The high quality of the stone in these quarries, its whiteness and pureness, made this locality the most relevant in these stonés extractive activities, concentrating the most relevant exploitations and providing the stone the denomination of the municipality (Colmenar). It was an underground mining extraction until the 20th century in order to reach the highest quality level of the mine, the so called "Banco Gordo" (Thick Bank). Generically known as moorland limestone, this rock belongs to the fluvial-lacustrine carbonates of the Upper Miocene Unit of the Tertiary Madrid's Basin. Its tonality mainly ranges from white to cream and even light grey. Under a petrographic point of view, this limestone is constituted by 40% of bioclasts (characea, ostracods and gasteropods), 20-30% of micritic matrix and 30-40% of sparitic cement. Therefore, it can be classified as a biomicrite/biosparite limestone or as a bioclastic packstone. Some particularities of these limestones regarding their appearance are related to some karstic processes they underwent linked to some dissolution phenomena during the Pliocene. All of this resulted on an abundance of cavities with terra rossa fillings, a non-soluble clayey residue, iron enriched, which is the responsible for the reddish and pinkish color that the Colmenar stone sometimes shows. These petrographic characteristics

  8. Demonstration of a hydration process for reactivating partially sulfated limestone sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.W.; Hajicek, D.R.; Myles, K.M.; Goblirsch, G.M.; Mowry, R.W.; Teats, F.G.

    1981-10-01

    The utilization of limestione sorbent for the removal of SO/sub 2/ in coal combustion in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) can be markedly increased by reactivating the partially sulfated limestone for reuse in the combustor. Such reuse would reduce costs and the environmental impact of quarrying and disposing of large quantities of limestone. The reactivation process consists of hydrating the partially sulfated limestone by treatment with water. A demonstration of the hydration process and the reuse of the reactivated limestone were carried out at Grand Forks Energy Technology Center (GFETC) in cooperation with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The data obtained in the GFETC 0.2-m/sup 2/ AFBC are compared with those obtained earlier in the ANL 0.02-m/sup 2/ AFBC. Marked enhancement of calcium utilization was achieved in both studies, but differences were noted in the degree of enhancement and in the Ca/S mole ratios required to maintain SO/sub 2/ in the off-gas at an acceptable level.

  9. The stratigraphy and palaeoenvironment of the Bathonian "Great Oolite Group" of Woodeaton Quarry, Oxfordshire.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, Ronald; Stukins, Stephen; Raub, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Woodeaton Quarry, Oxfordshire, represents the most continuously exposed section of the Upper Bathonian 'Great Oolite Group' in the United Kingdom. Like most of the British Bathonian, it is lacking in reliable ammonite zonation from which to define a chronostratigraphy. The sedimentology of the succession can be broken up into two broad facies types: A clay rich, brackish lagoonal environment with intermixed freshwater-influenced flora and fauna; A marginal marine calcareous succession of an oolitic nature with periodic mud-drape intervals. The marginal marine depositional setting, the completeness of the Upper Bathonian stratigraphy and lack of biostratigraphically important macrofauna has motivated this study into the micropalaeontology of Woodeaton. The primary aims of this study are to use foraminifera and ostracods to reconstruct the palaeoenvironments and to refine the biostratigraphy of the Upper Bathonian. The studied succession commences at the top of the Taynton Limestone Formation, which fines upwards into the clay-rich Rutland Formation. Several species of marine ostracods known from the Mid-Upper Bathonian are recovered from the base of the Rutland Formation, such as Praeschuleridea confossa and Angliaecytherldea calvata, as well as fragments of fish scales and elasmobranch teeth. Freshwater influence is evident further up the Rutland Formation where freshwater charophytes, nested bivalves and ostracods of the genus Bisulcocypris have been found. The progression from the Rutland Formation's marine base into the freshwater influenced clays is clear from the varied micropalaeontological fauna. A return to marine conditions in the overlying White Limestone Formation can be observed through the increasing number of benthic foraminiferal taxa - with Spirillina and Lenticulina the most abundant - compared to the Rutland Formation. Within the Shipton and Ardley Members there are also indicative marine ostracod taxa present (including Acanthocythere

  10. Maximal expiratory flow volume curve in quarry workers.

    PubMed

    Subhashini, Arcot Sadagopa; Satchidhanandam, Natesa

    2002-01-01

    Maximal Expiratory Flow Volume (MEFV) curves were recorded with a computerized Spirometer (Med Spiror). Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volumes (FEV), mean and maximal flow rates were obtained in 25 quarry workers who were free from respiratory disorders and 20 healthy control subjects. All the functional values are lower in quarry workers than in the control subject, the largest reduction in quarry workers with a work duration of over 15 years, especially for FEF75. The effects are probably due to smoking rather than dust exposure. PMID:12024961

  11. Modelling long-term landscape evolution by subglacial quarrying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vej Ugelvig, Sofie; Lundbek Egholm, David; Iverson, Neal R.

    2016-04-01

    Glacial landscape-evolution models are useful tools when studying the mechanisms and long-term effects of glacial erosion. However, the difficulty of implementing the small-scale physics of abrasion and quarrying in large-scale landscape models has necessitated use of semi-empirical erosion laws, where sliding speed or total ice flux are the main parameters scaling the rate of erosion. Factors such as bed slope, effective pressure, and pre-existing fracture-density are known to also be of importance, however, especially for the mechanics of quarrying (Iverson, 2012). The objective of our study was to improve links between large-scale landscape models and the physics of subglacial quarrying. We used the quarrying model presented by Iverson (2012) to calculate the average efficiency of quarrying across many topographic steps. The computations were repeated for one million combinations of bed slope, effective pressure, and basal sliding speed. We then performed a power-law fit to the many resulting erosion rates in order to quantify the overall influence of the regional parameters (effective pressure, bed slope, and sliding rate). Based on these results we suggest a quarrying rule where, in addition to the strong influence of bedrock fracture-density, erosion rate scales with sliding speed to a power of 1, with bed slope to a power of 2, and with effective pressure to a power of 3. The high sensitivity to effective pressure implies a strong influence of meltwater hydrology on subglacial landscape evolution. To study this influence we implemented the new quarrying rule in a higher-order ice-sheet model coupled to a cavity-channel model for glacial hydrology. Computational experiments using steady-state hydrology predict that a well-drained glacier focuses quarrying in the upper parts of the glaciated catchment where water flux is small and slopes are steep, and in areas where ice is thick and the effective pressure high. Decreasing the hydraulic conductivity of

  12. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, L.A.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900{degree}C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO{sub 3} to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO{sub 3} calcination point (899{degree}C at 1.03 bar CO{sub 2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900{degree}C if CO{sub 2} is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO{sub 3} grains that greatly hinders more H{sub 2}S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H{sub 2}S through the CaS layer, possibly by S{sup 2{minus}} ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  13. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  14. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  15. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  16. The age of the Ocala limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooke, Charles Wythe

    1916-01-01

    In 1881 Eugene A. Smith announced the presence, underlying large areas in both western and peninsular Florida, of limestone which he correlated with the Vicksburg limestone of Mississippi and Alabama and designated by the term Vicksburg limestone. Among the localities he mentioned specifically are Marianna, in Jackson County, and Ocala, in Marion County.

  17. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  18. 7. WEST DAM STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. QUARRIES AT BOTTOM; OUTLET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. WEST DAM STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. QUARRIES AT BOTTOM; OUTLET STRUCTURE UNDER CONSTRUCTION CUTTING INTO HILL AT TOP OF PICTURE. - Eastside Reservoir, Diamond & Domenigoni Valleys, southwest of Hemet, Hemet, Riverside County, CA

  19. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING WEST. IN THE FOREGROUND ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING WEST. IN THE FOREGROUND ON THE FIRST BENCH, POWDER HILLS ARE PRIMED FOR DOLOMITE EXTRACTION. ON THE SECOND BENCH, THE DRILL TEAM IS LAYING OUT THE NEXT SHOTS. ON THE TOP BENCH, A 245 CATERPILLAR LOADER FILLS A 55-TON CATERPILLAR ROCK TRUCK WITH EXTRACTED DOLOMITE FOR TRANSPORT TO THE DOLOMITE CRUSHING AND SCREENING PLANT. - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  20. The Abandonment of Social Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Bryant

    1991-01-01

    Addresses the question of whether the social studies should be abandoned. Discusses Kieran Egan's analysis of the importance of storytelling and Egan's proposal to abandon the social studies curriculum in favor of a pedagogy more consistent with the way children think. Critiques Egan's view and examines implications for educators. (SG)

  1. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    The climate and environmental impacts of the current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. A discussion on CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering covers limestone and seawater availability and cost; reaction rates and densities; effectiveness in CO2 sequestration; and environmental impacts and benefits.

  2. Investigating the Variable Durability of Malta's Lower Globigerina Limestone to Soluble-Salt Damage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Tano; Cassar, JoAnn

    2014-05-01

    Investigating the Variable Durability of Malta's Lower Globigerina Limestone to Soluble-Salt Damage. Tano Zammit, JoAnn Cassar Department of the Built Heritage, Faculty for the Built Environment. University of Malta. The millenary use of Lower Globigerina Limestone (LGL) as a building stone in the Maltese Islands, and its export to other Mediterranean countries in the past, is confirmation of its validity. Notwithstanding the diminishing economic importance of this once principal resource of the local building industry, the ever growing need for conservation of Malta's rich patrimony of archaeological/historical buildings and structures built of this stone, emphasise the need for on-going research particularly that investigating its variable durability. The research under discussion here forms part of a wider research programme on the characterisation of this locally very important resource. In this investigation the durability of the LGL is considered in terms of two main climatic features, namely a temperate Mediterranean climate involving i) a salt-laden marine environment together with ii) relatively short spans of heavy precipitations alternating with longer periods of virtual drought. It is virtually impossible to all but the quarry owners to identify 'good' from 'bad' quality stone simply through the visual observation, as LGL is a fine-grained, white to yellow, homogenous limestone. On the other hand, it is empirically known that LGL is a moderately weak limestone, characterized by the predominance of the mineral calcite (86 - 99%) and by a high total porosity (up to 40%) of which, over 85%, is microporosity below 5µm. In theory, these physical properties should render such stone-type particularly susceptible to deterioration involving a) mechanisms of capillary salt-laden moisture accumulation and movement together with, b) thermodynamic changes of soluble-salts during dissolution and crystallization cycles. The adopted research methodology investigating

  3. 25 CFR 248.8 - Abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abandoned property. 248.8 Section 248.8 Indians BUREAU OF... SITES § 248.8 Abandoned property. No vehicle, trailer, boat, or other personal property shall be abandoned on the sites. Property abandoned in violation of the regulations in this part may be...

  4. 18 CFR 157.216 - Abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... facilities to be abandoned. (5) For any abandonment resulting in earth disturbance, a USGS 71/2-minute-series... abandoned; (3) The accounting treatment of the facilities abandoned; and (4) The date earth disturbance, if... the agreements obtained pursuant to § 157.206(b)(3), if earth disturbance was involved....

  5. 18 CFR 157.216 - Abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... facilities to be abandoned. (5) For any abandonment resulting in earth disturbance, a USGS 71/2-minute-series... abandoned; (3) The accounting treatment of the facilities abandoned; and (4) The date earth disturbance, if... the agreements obtained pursuant to § 157.206(b)(3), if earth disturbance was involved....

  6. 18 CFR 157.216 - Abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities to be abandoned. (5) For any abandonment resulting in earth disturbance, a USGS 71/2-minute-series... abandoned; (3) The accounting treatment of the facilities abandoned; and (4) The date earth disturbance, if... the agreements obtained pursuant to § 157.206(b)(3), if earth disturbance was involved....

  7. 18 CFR 157.216 - Abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... facilities to be abandoned. (5) For any abandonment resulting in earth disturbance, a USGS 71/2-minute-series... abandoned; (3) The accounting treatment of the facilities abandoned; and (4) The date earth disturbance, if... the agreements obtained pursuant to § 157.206(b)(3), if earth disturbance was involved....

  8. 18 CFR 157.216 - Abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... facilities to be abandoned. (5) For any abandonment resulting in earth disturbance, a USGS 71/2-minute-series... abandoned; (3) The accounting treatment of the facilities abandoned; and (4) The date earth disturbance, if... the agreements obtained pursuant to § 157.206(b)(3), if earth disturbance was involved....

  9. Blast assessment and optimization for high quarry face-blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, F.; O`Meara, R.

    1996-12-01

    Where applicable, high production benches can improve efficiency in quarrying. Quality control, geological, cost or other considerations might result in the development of quarry benches higher than 30 m and sometimes up to 60 m. Production blasts on high quarry faces require a confident blast design with respect to safety, cost efficiency and minimized environmental effects. Careful pre-blast assessment of the design parameters, blast monitoring of the product performance and the environmental effects and post-blast assessment of the overall blast performance are essential for the successful implementation of the blast design. The blast geometry for high quarry faces and a blast design that often includes multiple explosive charges in a blasthole, make a reliable assessment of the blast parameters difficult. Assessment techniques, their applications and limitations are described and discussed. This will include such methods as blast surveying using laser profiling and borehole deviation measurements, blast monitoring using continuous velocity of detonation measurement systems, high speed photography and seismographs for blast performance and environmental effects. Observations of low frequency airblast and high standard deviations in ground vibration measurements are described and discussed against a background of timing assessment and frequency spectra analysis. Approaches where an optimized design was implemented based on the blast parameter assessment and modeling are presented. An improvement in blast efficiency lies in the combination of blast assessment and blast modeling, whilst adequate documentation supports the process of designing and implementing successful blasts.

  10. Abandoned mined land reclamation on the Wayne National Forest - an interdisciplinary approach

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, R.G.

    1982-12-01

    The Wayne National Forest contains several thousand acres of abandoned surface-mined lands, many of which are in need of reclamation. The Forest Service has developed a systematic interdisciplinary approach to planning and implementing reclamation projects. An environmental assessment report is prepared before the project is designed which provides decision makers the information needed to select a preferred reclamation alternative. A case study known as the Yost II Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation Project is presented. The abandoned mine, basically a double contour configuration, presented designers with a difficult mosaic of barren, toxic areas, well-revegetated areas, and acid ponds. The reclamation technique employed utilized burial of toxic soil, pond underdrains, crushed limestone filter strips, and topsoiling.

  11. An Unusual Process of Accelerated Weathering of a Marly Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, L.; Rizzo, G.; Algozzini, G.

    2003-04-01

    This work deals with a singular case of stone deterioration, which occurred during the restoration of the Cathedral of Cefalù. In particular, a significant process of stone decohesion started after a consolidation treatment on ashlars of the external face of the cloister portico. A study was carried out to characterize the stone and to investigate the deterioration process. Petrographical, chemical and physical analyses were performed on samples taken from the wall. The results indicate that the medieval monument was built using a Pliocene marly limestone, called "trubo", quarried from outcrops of the environs of Cefalù. The rock is soft and uniformely cemented. The carbonatic fraction of the rock is due to foraminifera shells; the rock also contains detritic quartz, feldspate and glauconite. The clay minerals, mainly illite and montmorillonite, are widespread in the rock in the form of thin layers. The use of such a stone in a building of relevant artistic value is definitely unusual. In fact, the "trubo" is a rock subjected to natural decay because of its mineralogical composition and fabric; as effect of natural weathering, in the outcrops the rock disaggregates uniformely, producing silt. In the cloister this effect was magnified by extreme environmental conditions (marine spray, severe excursions of both relative humidity and temperature). Furthermore, after soluble salts removing and subsequent consolidation with ethyl silicate, a significant acceleration of the decay process was observed, producing friable scales detach for a depth of about 3 cm into the ashlars. The stone appeared corroded and uneven. Experimental tests were performed in laboratory in order to evidence any origin of incompatibility between such stone composition and the treatments carried out, which on the other hand are the most generally adopted in restoration interventions.

  12. Overdeepening development in a glacial landscape evolution model with quarrying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugelvig, S. V.; Egholm, D. L.; Brædstrup, C. F.; Iverson, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    In glacial landscape evolution models, subglacial erosion rates are often related to basal sliding or ice discharge by a power-law. This relation can be justified when considering bed abrasion, where rock debris transported in the basal ice drives erosion. However, the relation is not well supported when considering models for quarrying of rock blocks from the bed. Field observations indicate that the principal mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying, which emphasize the importance of a better way of implementing erosion by quarrying in glacial landscape evolution models. Iverson (2012) introduced a new model for subglacial erosion by quarrying that operates from the theory of adhesive wear. The model is based on the fact that cavities, with a high level of bedrock differential stress, form in the lee of bed obstacles when the sliding velocity is too high to allow for the ice to creep around the obstacles. The erosion rate is quantified by considering the likelihood of rock fracturing on topographic bumps. The model includes a statistical treatment of the bedrock weakness, which is neglected in previous quarrying models. Sliding rate, effective pressure, and average bedslope are the primary factors influencing the erosion rate of this new quarrying model [Iverson, 2012]. We have implemented the quarrying model in a depth-integrated higher-order ice-sheet model [Egholm et al. 2011], coupled to a model for glacial hydrology. In order to also include the effects of cavitation on the subglacial sliding rate, we use a sliding law proposed by Schoof (2005), which includes an upper limit for the stress that can be supported at the bed. Computational experiments show that the combined influence of pressure, sliding rate and bed slope leads to realistically looking landforms such as U-shaped valleys, cirques, hanging valleys and overdeepenings. The influence of the effective pressure leads naturally to overdeepenings. However, in contrast to previously used erosion models

  13. The Öland limestone - A Swedish stone used for more than one thousand years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouenborg, Björn; Wickström, Linda; Mikaelsson, Jan

    2016-04-01

    landic limestone was intense even during Hanseatic times (14th to 17th centuries) and it can for example be found as floorings, mantel pieces, baptismal fonts in many German castles and manors. The literature tells us that export to Denmark, Poland and even southern Germany was intense during late medieval ages. This is because a lot of churches were built in Northern Europe at that time. However, the modern industrialised production had to wait until the early 20th century. Today, three companies quarry and process the limestones on a regular basis. They are primarily used for flooring, stairs, crazy stones for gardens, table tops, kitchen tops and, in some cases, also external cladding and paving. The latter only with more durable layers free of clay and open stylolites, so called "core stone" (direct translation). The presentation will show that the Öland limestone covers all aspects and requirements for being a Global heritage resource.

  14. An integrated study of limestone behavior during calcination and hydration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontakianakos, George; Baziotis, Ioannis; Kiousis, George; Giavis, Dimitrios; Tsimas, Stamatios

    2010-05-01

    One of the most important processes in industrial scale, represents the dissociation of carbonates to lime and CO2. This process, called calcination, occur at relative high temperatures (>9000C). Lime rapidly reacts with the water, liberating high amounts of heat producing Ca(OH)2. For the purpose of the present study five samples of different limestones from different quarries from Greece were collected. The aim of the study was to analyze the behavior of the limestones during calcination and test the hydraulic properties of the quick lime. Limestone particles (1.6-2 cm) were reacted in a pre-heated oven at three different temperatures (900, 1050 and 1200oC) for 30 min in order to produce quick lime. Petrographic features of studied limestones were done using secondary electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometry and Raman micro-spectroscopy were applied in order to identify the carbonate phases (calcite and dolomite) in the studied limestones. Chemical composition of limestones and limes were determined by Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) method. 25 gr of the produced lime were hydrated by adding 100 ml distilled water having a room temperature (~250C) to produce Ca(OH)2 through the exothermic reaction CaO(s) + H2O(l)-Ca(OH)2(aq). We measured the temperature difference in the water until a maximum value is reached; this value represents the reactivity of the produced slaked lime. Chemical composition and reactivity estimation were done following European Standards EN-459-2. The reactivity of quick lime depends on various factors with the most important being the internal structure of the limestone, calcination temperature/duration applied to the limestone, the admixtures such as the MgO content, hard-burned phenomena etc. The treatment of the experimental results suggests the following: i) The (CaO+MgO)Lime value have similar variation for both samples calcined at temperatures of 1050oC (58-90 wt%) and 1200oC (57-94 wt%); whereas the samples calcined at

  15. LIMESTONE SCRUBBER SLURRY AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report utilizes current understanding of limestone scrubbers for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to develop an effort into the optimization of automatic control for the recirculating slurry processes. The acknowledged methods of mathematical modeling, computer simulation, and ...

  16. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated weathering of limestone (AWL: CO22+ + CaCO3 + H2O ??? Ca2+ + 2HCO3- as a low-tech, inexpensive, high-capacity, environmentally-friendly CO2 capture and sequestration technology was evaluated. With access to seawater and limestone being essential to this approach, significant limestone resources were close to most CO2-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Waste fines, representing > 20% of current US crushed limestone production (> 109 tons/yr), could be used as an inexpensive source of AWL carbonate. AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean would significantly reduce effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct atmospheric or ocean CO2 disposal. Indeed, the increase in ocean Ca2+ and bicarbonate offered by AWL should enhance growth of corals and other calcifying marine organisms.

  17. Land abandonment, fire recurrence and soil carbon content in the Macizo del Caroig, Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá, A.; González Peñaloza, F.; Santín, C.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last 50 years two main forces have driven the fate of Mediterranean landscapes: land abandonment and forest fires (MacDonald et al., 2000; Moreira et al., 2001). Due to the economical changes suffered by the of the Mediterranean countries after the Second World War, the population migrated from the rural to the urban areas, and from South to North Europe. The land abandonment allowed the vegetation to recover and, as a consequence, an increase in forest fire took place. The soils of the abandoned land recovered the vegetation and litter layers, and consequently changes in soil properties have being found. One of these changes is the increase of soil carbon content, which is due both to vegetation recovery and to fire occurrence that increases the ash and pyrogenic carbon content in soils. Twenty plots were selected in the Macizo del Caroig in Eastern Spain on soils developed on limestone. The period of abandonment and the forest fires that had affected each plot were determined by interviews with the owners, farmers and shepherds. In addition, six (three + three) plots were selected as forest (no plough) and cultivated control plots. Each plot was sampled (10 random samples) and the organic carbon content determined. The results show that the cultivated plots have organic matter contents of 1.02 %, and the forest (Quercus ilex sp.) plots reach the highest value: 14.98 %. Within those we found values that range from 2.34 %, in the recently abandoned plots (10 year abandonment), to values of 8.23 % in the 50 year old abandoned fields.The results demonstrate that there is a recovery of the organic carbon in abandoned soils and that the forest fires do no affect this trend. The increase of soil organic matter after abandonment is a result of the recovery of vegetation(Debussche et al., 2001), which is the consequence of the end of the disturbance of forest that have affected the Mediterranean for millennia (Barbero et al., 1990). The colonization of the

  18. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage in down-flow limestone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.

    1997-12-31

    Passive down-flow systems, consisting of compost and/or limestone layers, may be well suited for treatment of acidic mine drainage containing ferric iron and/or aluminum. Two columns were constructed and operated in the laboratory. The first column simulated a downward, vertical-flow anaerobic wetland, also referred to as successive alkalinity-producing systems (SAPS), and has received mine drainage for 97 weeks. The 0.16-m diameter column was vertically oriented and (from bottom to top) consisted of a 0.30-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost, and 0.91 m of free standing water. Water flowed vertically downward through the system. A second column, filled with only limestone, received water from the same source as the first column. This limestone column contained a 1.06-m thick layer of limestone and 0.91 m of free standing water and has received water for 55 weeks. Actual acid mine drainage (pH = 3.1, acidity = 200 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 600 mg/L, Total Fe = 10 mg/L, Mn = 14 mg/L, and Al = 18 mg/L) was collected every two weeks from a nearby abandoned deep mine and applied to these columns at a rate of 3.8 mL/min. For the compost/limestone column, effluent pH remained above 6.2 (6.2-7.9); however, pH at a depth of 0.38 m in the compost (halfway) dropped to < 4 after 28 weeks (net acidic). At the bottom of the compost pH remained > 4.5 for all 97 weeks. Alkalinity was generated by a combination of limestone dissolution and sulfate reduction. Over the 97 week period, the column generated an average of 330 mg/L of alkalinity, mostly due to limestone dissolution. Bacterial sulfate reduction displayed an ever decreasing trend, initially accounting for more than 200 mg/L of alkalinity and after 40 weeks only accounting for about 50 mg/L.

  19. Hydration of spent limestone and dolomite to enhance sulfation in fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, J.A.; Smith, G.W.; Moulton, D.S.; Turner, C.B.; Myles, K.M.; Johnson, I.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization of CaO in fluidized bed combustion can be markedly increased to reduce the cost and environmental impact of quarrying and disposing of large quantities of solid waste. A new method of treatment of spent bed material to reactivate its SO/sub 2/ capturing ability has been found. Partially sulfated spent overflow material from a fluidized-bed combustor is treated with water and then reintroduced to the combustor as renewed feed that further reacts with SO/sub 2/. This material has sufficient physical integrity, due to the outer layer of CaSO/sub 4/, and high reactivity to make it suitable as a sorbent feedstock. The work reported here details observations on a number of limestones and dolomites reacted in laboratory furnaces under simulated combustion conditions as well as verification of the effectiveness of the method in a 15-cm-ID process development unit scale atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustor. Initial kinetic studies have also been made on the hydration reaction of partially sulfated limestone. A proposed mechanism of interaction is discussed to explain the enhanced reactivity. Changes in total porosity and pore size distribution in the partially sulfated material due to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ formation and its dehydration serve to open up the particle interior and its residual CaO to further reaction with SO/sub 2/. Almost complete utilization of the available CaO can be achieved by successive applications of this promising new technique.

  20. Quarry monitoring using GPS measurements and UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Argyropoulos, NIkolaos; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this work is to indicate a monitoring methodology in order to survey the present state of the quarry sites and their evolution in time, which are the basic data needed to implement an adequate land reclamation project. The land monitoring has been realised by UAV photogrammetry and GPS measurements supported by a Geographic Information System. A six-rotor aircraft with a total weight of 6 kg carrying two small cameras has been used. Very accurate digital airphotos have been used in order to create orthophotos mosaic and DSM from the quarry planes. DGPS measurements and the data captured from the UAV are combined in GIS and the results are presented in the current study.

  1. The effect of limestone treatments on the rate of acid generation from pyritic mine gangue.

    PubMed

    Burt, R A; Caruccio, F T

    1986-09-01

    Surface water enters the Haile Gold Mine, Lancaster County, South Carolina by means of a small stream and is ponded behind a dam and in an abandoned pit. This water is affected by acidic drainage. In spite of the large exposures of potentially acid producing pyritic rock, the flux of acid to the water is relatively low. Nevertheless, the resulting pH values of the mine water are low (around 3.5) due to negligible buffering capacity. In view of the observed low release of acidity, the potential for acid drainage abatement by limestone ameliorants appears feasible.This study investigated the effects of limestone treatment on acid generation rates of the Haile mine pyritic rocks through a series of leaching experiments. Below a critical alkalinity threshold value, solutions of dissolved limestone were found consistently to accelerate the rate of pyrite oxidation by varying degrees. The oxidation rates were further accelerated by admixing solid limestone with the pyritic rock. However, after a period of about a month, the pyrite oxidation rate of the admixed samples declined to a level lower than that of untreated pyrite. Leachates produced by the pyrite and limestone mixtures contained little if any iron. Further, in the mixtures, an alteration of the pyrite surface was apparent.The observed behaviour of the treated pyrite appears to be related to the immersion of the pyrite grains within a high alkalinity/high pH environment. The high pH increases the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron which results in a higher concentration of ferric iron at the pyrite surface. This, in turn, increases the rate of pyrite oxidation. Above a threshold alkalinity value, the precipitation of hydrous iron oxides at the pyrite surface eventually outpaces acid generation and coats the pyrite surface, retarding the rate of pyrite oxidation. PMID:24214013

  2. 55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED THE CUTTERS INTO SLABS OF CLAY, LIFTED THEM ONTO DRYING BOARDS AND PRESSED THE PLUNGERS TO RELEASE THE CUT TILES. REPRODUCTIONS CUTTERS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. WOODEN FORMS FOR PRODUCING CLAY SLABS WITH ROLLING PINS REST AGAINST THE WALL. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  3. Monitoring a quarry using high resolution data and GIS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Tsombos, P. I.; Vaiopoulos, A. D.

    2010-10-01

    Active quarries near to urban centers are at the same time a necessity but also a source of pollution. Necessity as they supply to the construction companies the necessary aggregates and source of pollution as they affect biodiversity, vegetation cover and threaten water resources. The objective of this work is to indicate a monitoring methodology in order to survey the present state of the quarry sites and their evolution in time, which are the basic data needed to implement an adequate land reclamation project. The land monitoring has been realised both by using remote sensing techniques, supported by a Geographic Information System of the studied area, and by in situ surveying. The in situ surveying was able to assess the capability of the remote sensing model to describe the state of each site. High resolution satellite data from different sensors were used for the monitoring of an active quarry. More especially, Ikonos Quickbird, and Worldiew data were orthorectified and inserted in a GIS database in order to quantify the changes.

  4. Bearing the risk of abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Attanasio, Donna M.

    2010-05-15

    In Order Nos. 679 and 679-A, FERC adopted a policy of authorizing rate incentives for new transmission early in the development process to encourage transmission investment. The abandoned-plant cost recovery incentive creates a tension between ratepayer and investor interests, which is increasingly reflected in FERC's orders. (author)

  5. 32 CFR 636.31 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... vehicle which has been left unattended or abandoned on a street, road, highway, parking lot, or any other... impoundment procedures. (d) Civilian vehicles left abandoned on the reservation will be towed to...

  6. 32 CFR 636.31 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vehicle which has been left unattended or abandoned on a street, road, highway, parking lot, or any other... impoundment procedures. (d) Civilian vehicles left abandoned on the reservation will be towed to...

  7. Geohydrology of the Gallup's Quarry area, Plainfield, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melvin, R.L.; Stone, J.R.; Craft, P.A.; Lane, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The geohydrology of the Gallup's Quarry area in Plainfield, Connecticut was characterized by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to provide a preliminary framework for future remedial efforts. Gallup's Quarry, an inactive sand and gravel pit, was the site of unregulated disposal of an unknown volume of chemical wastes from at least the summer of 1977 until January 1978. Existing information collected for the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection during 1978-82 showed that ground water beneath Gallup's Quarry and adjacent land to the northwest was contaminated by organic and inorganic compounds. There is also some evidence for contamination of Mill Brook, which is located north and northwest of the disposal areas. Geologic mapping and subsurface data show that unconsolidated surficial materials up to 90 feet thick overlie fractured crystalline bedrock in most of the Gallup's Quarry area. The surficial materials consist primarily of stratified drift and till. Texture changes vertically and laterally within the stratified drift; grain size ranges from very coarse to fine. Till blankets the bedrock surface beneath the stratified drift and is a few feet to as much as 25 feet thick. Bedrock is exposed at land surface in a hill in the southeastern part of the quarry and slopes to depths of up to 90 feet beneath the area west and north of the disposal sites. The bedrock is a dark, fine-grained, fractured and jointed blastomylonite and hornblende gneiss of the Quinebaug Formation. It is likely that a west- northwest-trending fault is present in the bedrock beneath Gallup's Quarry; this fault, if present, may provide a preferential pathway for ground-water flow and contaminant transport. The principal horizontal direction of ground-water flow and movement of dissolved contaminants in the stratified drift was to the northwest of the waste-disposal areas toward Mill Brook in 1978. Estimates of average annual

  8. Seismic monitoring of rockfalls at Spitz quarry (NÖ, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Puy Papí Isaba, María; Brückl, Ewald; Roncat, Andreas; Schweigl, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    In the recent past, significant rockfalls, which pose a danger to persons, railways and roads, occurred in the quarry of Spitz (NÖ-Austria). An existing seismic warning system did not fulfill the expected efficiency and reliability standards since the ratio of well-detected events to undetected events or false alarms was not satisfactory. Our aim was to analyze how a seismic warning system must be designed in order to overcome these deficiencies. A small-scale seismic network was deployed in the Spitz quarry to evaluate the possibility of improving the early-warning rockfall monitoring network by means of seismic observations. A new methodology based on seismic methods, which enables the detection and location of rockfalls above a critical size, was developed. In order to perform this task, a small-scale (200x200 m2) passive seismic network comprised of 7 monitoring seismic stations acquiring data in continuous mode was established in the quarry of Spitz so that it covered the rockfall hazard area. On the 2nd of October 2015, an induced rockfall experiment was performed. It began at 09:00 a.m (local time, 07:00 UTC) and lasted about 1.5 hours. The entire data set was analyzed using the pSysmon software. In order to locate the impact point of the rock falls, we used a procedure based on the back-projection of the maximum resultant amplitude recorded at each station of the network within a time window to every grid-point covering the whole area of interest. In order to verify the performance of the employed algorithm for detection and localization, we performed man-induced rock falls. We also used a terrestrial laser scanner and a camera, not only to draw the rockfall block trajectories, but also to determine the volume of rock lost or gained in the different areas of the quarry. This allowed us to relate the lost mass with the strength of the collision (Pseudo-magnitude) of the rockfall, and draw and rebuild their associated trajectory. The location test performed

  9. Crystalline marble beats limestone for fluegas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    NovaCon Energy Systems, Inc. (Bedford, NY) has developed an alternative to conventional limestone sorbents. The new process uses a class of marble, selected with a proprietary model. Recent pilot- and full-scale demonstrations in pulverized-coal (PC) and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers suggest that these patented sorbents outperform conventional limestone for the simultaneous control of SOx, NOx, and particulates during the combustion of coal and sulfur-rich fuels, such as oil, mixed municipal waste and used tires. Dubbed thermally active marbles (TAMs), these sorbents are chemically identical to grainy limestone (whose main constituent is calcium carbonate or calcite). However, thanks to the increased pressures and temperatures experienced during their geologic history, these metamorphic minerals have a regular crystalline structure that offers some advantages in the combustion zone. TAMs, on the other hand, enjoy better calcium-utilization rates because upon heating, they cleave along inter- and intra-crystalline faces, continuously exposing fresh surfaces. By minimizing the self-extinguishment suffered by limestone sorbents, TAMs are effective over operating temperatures from 1,200 F to 2,800 F, which is 400 F higher than other calcium-based sorbents. This allows them to be injected closer to the burner or combustion grate to maximize residence time in the unit.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1409 - Ground limestone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 173, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ground limestone. 184.1409 Section 184.1409 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  11. Evolution of flow properties in homogeneously altered limestone specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinsmeister, L.; Dautriat, J.; Dimanov, A.; Raphanel, J.; Bornert, M.; Gland, N.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers is a way to limit the anthropogenic part of the greenhouse effect. The injection of supercritical CO2 in aquifer leads to geochemical reactions with the host rock, resulting for instance in dissolution and precipitation processes. These phenomena impact the flow properties of the porous network. To study this impact, we make use of thermally activated retarded acid. This treatment allows us to realize an homogeneous alteration. The materiel is an oolitic limestone from the Lavoux quarry in the Paris basin. We analyse the evolution of flow properties using porosity and permeability measurements in connection with the micro-structural evolution, studied with mercury porosimetry, NMR, medical scanner, laser diffraction, SEM and thin section analyses. A particular attention has been paid to the permeability evolution and the distribution of fines. Intact samples show a bimodal porosity distribution, with a micro-porosity ranging from 0.5µm to 3µm, a macro-porosity ranging from 10µm to 100µm, and a total porosity exceeding 20%. Permeability is about 100mD. Porosity increases by 0.4% per alteration cycle together with the proportion of micro pore throats and the size of the macro pore throat, as evidenced by mercury porosimetry. The permeability is measured using a differential pressure sensor before and after alteration, back and forth in the axis direction of the plug. The results show that while the alteration in general results in an increase of the permeability, some complex non monotoneous behaviour can be observed. We infer that fines are mobilized in the porous network, clogging some pore throats. We also analyse the outgoing fluids after alteration with laser diffraction. A familly of particles ranging from 3µm to 10µm is detected, suggesting that bigger fines remain stuck in the porosity. These larger particles can be observed using comparative µ-CT imaging. Thin sections and SEM analyses do not show any evidence of

  12. Seismic source mechanisms for quarry blasts: modelling observed Rayleigh and Love wave radiation patterns from a Texas quarry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Keith L.; Bonner, Jessie L.; Barker, Terrance

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical understanding of the mechanisms by which quarry blasts excite seismic waves is useful in understanding how quarry blast discriminants may be transported from one region to another. An experiment in Texas with well-placed seismic stations and a cooperative blasting engineer has shed light on some of the physical mechanisms of seismic excitation at short periods (0.1-3 Hz). Azimuthal radiation patterns of the 0.2-3 Hz Rayleigh and Love waves are diagnostic of two proposed mechanisms for non-isotropic radiation from quarry blasts. Observations show that the Love and Rayleigh wave radiation patterns depend upon the orientation of the quarry benches. Two possible mechanisms for non-isotropic radiation are (1) the lateral throw of spalled material and (2) the presence of the topographic bench in the quarry. The spall of material can be modelled by vertical and horizontal forces applied to the free surface with time functions proportional to the derivative of the momentum of the spalled material. We use wavenumber integration synthetics to model the explosion plus spall represented by seismic moment tensor sources plus point forces. The resulting synthetics demonstrate that the magnitude of the SH (Love) compared with the SV (fundamental Rayleigh or Rg) in the short period band (0.5-3 Hz) may be explained by the spall mechanism. Nearly all of the available mass must participate in the spall with an average velocity of 2-5 m s-1 to provide sufficient impulse to generate the observed Love waves. Love wave radiation patterns from such a mechanism are consistent with the spall mechanism. We modelled the effects of the topographic bench using 3-D linear finite-difference calculations to compute progressive elastic wavefields from explosion sources behind the quarry bench. These 3-D calculations show SH radiation patterns consistent with observations while the SV radiation patterns are not consistent with observations. We find that the radiation patterns from the

  13. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: CRUSHED LIMESTONE, STATE OF THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a study of atmospheric emissions from the crushed limestone industry. Crushed limestone plants emit particulates from drilling, blasting, transport on unpaved roads, crushing, screening, conveying, and stockpiling. The emission factor for total particulate f...

  14. Suitability of two types of organic wastes for the growth of sclerophyllous shrubs on limestone debris: a mesocosm trial.

    PubMed

    Maisto, G; De Marco, A; De Nicola, F; Arena, C; Vitale, L; Virzo De Santo, A

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated whether overlaying organic wastes directly on limestone debris allowed the growth of sclerophyllous shrubs; the aim was to explore the feasibility of rehabilitation of sites destroyed by quarrying activity. In an open air mesocosm experiment two types of organic material were compared: compost from municipal wastes (C) and a mixture of compost and poultry manure added with wheat husk (C-PW). Mesocosms were pots (1m diameter, 60cm height) containing limestone debris covered by the organic material. Seven mesocosms with C and seven mesocosms with C-PW were planted with sclerophyllous shrubs (Laurus nobilis L., Phillyrea angustifolia L. and Quercus ilex L.). The substrates were characterised in terms of chemical and physical parameters, microbial activity and biomass, and total and active fungal biomass. Shrub photosynthetic performance and growth were evaluated. Over the whole experimental period, organic matter mineralization was higher in C-PW. Microbial biomass and respiration were higher in C-PW than in C but after one year no statistically significant difference between the two substrates occurred. Fungal mycelium was a minor fraction of the microbial community in both types of substrates and decreased dramatically after setting up the mesocosms. The metabolic quotient was higher in C suggesting more stressful conditions as compared to C-PW. Both substrates allowed shrub growth; however photosynthetic rates and the increase of plant size were higher on C-PW than on C. The results demonstrated that, as compared to only compost, the mixture of compost and poultry manure added with wheat husk is a substrate more suitable to both microbial processes and plant growth. Therefore a plan to revegetate quarries based on the use of organic wastes as a substrate for sclerophyllous shrubs could be feasible and, what is more, helpful to mitigate the environmental impact of organic wastes disposal. PMID:20092872

  15. Acidic stream mitigation by limestone sand addition

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, D.L.; Marich, A.J. Jr.; Largent, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Town Line Run watershed comprises an area of 3,600 wooded acres. The tributaries feeding the stream consist of sandstone springs that do not contribute alkalinity to the watershed, leaving the stream susceptible to acid precipitation. This has a negative affect on Iser`s Run, a native brook trout fishery above the confluence with Town Line Run. The objective in stream liming is to improve water chemistry by increasing pH, alkalinity, and reducing acidity, aluminum, and iron. Introducing crushed limestone directly into a stream from a dump truck is an inexpensive but temporary solution to accomplish this objective. In this type of liming operation, a bed of limestone is spread down the stream channel by the momentum of the stream from the introduction point, rather than manually. Water moving across this bed dissolves the limestone, increasing the pH, alkalinity, and calcium while decreasing the acidity, iron, and aluminum concentrations of the water. The size of the limestone particles is important for this purpose because particles that are too small (<150 microns) will carried away, while particles that are too large (>1000 microns) will remain at the introduction point. Our study placed 80 tons of sand-sized limestone (85% calcite) in the stream channel at a single point. Water samples were collected monthly at the following sites (1) directly upstream of the addition site, (2) 100 yards downstream of the site, and (3) 2500 yards downstream of the site. Other sample locations include (4) upstream and (5) downstream of the Town Line Run- Iser`s Run confluence and the Casselman River upstream (6) and downstream (7) of Town Line Run. The samples were analyzed for pH. Specific conductivity, Alkalinity, Acidity, Iron, Manganese, Aluminum, and Sulfate.

  16. Mineralogical characterization of the Shelburne marble and the Salem limestone

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Shelburne marble and Salem limestone were selected to represent marbles and limestones used in buildings and monuments. The Royal variety of Shelburne marble is a white marble predominantly composed of calcite but has heterogeneously distributed gray inclusions. The select buff Salem limestone is a beige, homogeneous, fossiliferous limestone, predominantly composed of fragments of echinoderms and bryozoans. The author reports that both samples are appropriate test stones for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program stone exposure studies.

  17. Quarry geotechnical report for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report has been prepared for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which is MK-Ferguson Company (MK-Ferguson) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as its designated subcontractor. The Weldon Spring site (WSS) comprises the Weldon Spring quarry area and the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pit areas. This report presents the results of geotechnical investigations conducted during 1989--1990 at the proposed Weldon Spring quarry staging and water treatment facilities in the quarry area. The facilities are intended for treatment of water removed from the quarry area. An access road and a decontamination pad will be necessary for handling and transportation of bulk waste. Results of previous geotechnical investigations performed by other geoscience and environmental engineering firms in the quarry area, were reviewed, summarized and incorporated into this report. Well logging, stratigraphy data, piezometer data, elevations, and soil characteristics are also included.

  18. Environmental management of quarries as waste disposal facilities.

    PubMed

    El-Fadel, M; Sadek, S; Chahine, W

    2001-04-01

    Problems associated with the disposal of municipal solid waste have become a source of public concern worldwide as awareness of potential adverse environmental impacts and health threats from solid waste has increased. Communities are concerned about the generation and management of solid waste to the extent of refusing to allow new disposal facilities near their homes, often after witnessing the legacy of existing facilities. Under these conditions, the development of national policies for the management of solid waste becomes highly political, all while requiring appropriate technical solutions that ensure environmental protection and proper management plans that support an acceptable solution for the disposal of municipal solid waste. In some locations, the conversion of old quarries into well-engineered and controlled landfills appears as a promising solution to a continuously increasing problem, at least for many decades to come. This paper describes the environmental impacts associated with solid waste disposal in a converted quarry site and the mitigation measures that can be adopted to alleviate potential adverse impacts. Environmental management and monitoring plans are also discussed in the context of ensuring adequate environmental protection during and after the conversion process. PMID:11289451

  19. Laser removal of graffiti from Pink Morelia Quarry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Comesaña, R.; del Val, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2013-11-01

    Morelia is an important city sited in Mexico. Its historical center reflects most of their culture and history, especially of the colonial period; in fact, it was appointed World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Sadly, there is a serious problem with graffiti in Morelia and its historical center is the worst affected since its delicate charming is definitely damaged. Hitherto, the conventional methods employed to remove graffiti from Pink Morelia Quarry (the most used building stone in Morelia) are quite aggressive to the appearance of the monuments, so actually, they are not a very good solution. In this work, we performed a study on the removal of graffiti from Pink Morelia Quarry by high power diode laser. We carried out an extensive experimental study looking for the optimal processing parameters, and compared a single-pass with a multi-pass method. Indeed, we achieved an effective cleaning without producing serious side effects in the stone. In conclusion, the multi-pass method emitting in continuous wave was revealed as the more effective operating modes to remove the graffiti.

  20. Physicochemical characterizations of limestone for fluidized-bed coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Yoos, T.R. III; Walia, D.S.

    1981-05-01

    This study is an investigation of the physicochemical characteristics of three limestone samples, Quincy limestone (-20 + 60), Franklin limestone (-12 + 30), and Franklin limestone (-6 + 16), currently being tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in a fluidized-bed coal combustion unit. By correlating the chemistry, mineralogy, and surface area of these samples with empirical data obtained at Argonne National Laboratory, the sulfur capture ability and performance of these limestones can be loosely predicted. X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis revealed a very high calcium content and very low concentrations of other elements in the three samples. X-ray diffraction patterns and petrographic examination of the limestone grains detected essentially no dolomite in the Quincy limestone or the fine Franklin limestone samples. The coarse Franklin limestone sample showed dolomite to be present in varying amounts up to maximum of 2.75%. Limited surface chemistry investigations of the samples were undertaken. Limestone and dolostone resources of the Tennessee Valley Authority region are widespread and abundant, and judged sufficient to meet industrial demand for many years. No problems are anticipated in securing limestone or dolostone supplies for a commercial fluidized-bed combustion plant in the Tennessee Valley Authority region. Transportation facilities and costs for limestone or dolostone will influence the siting of such a commercial fluidized-bed combustion plant. The most promising location in the Tennessee Valley Authority region at this time is Paducah, Kentucky.

  1. Multiple factors drive regional agricultural abandonment.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Takeshi; Kohyama, Kazunori; Mitsuhashi, Hiromune

    2016-01-15

    An understanding of land-use change and its drivers in agroecosystems is important when developing adaptations to future environmental and socioeconomic pressures. Agricultural abandonment occurs worldwide with multiple potentially positive and negative consequences; however, the main factors causing agricultural abandonment in a country i.e., at the macro scale, have not been identified. We hypothesized that socio-environmental factors driving agricultural abandonment could be summarized comprehensively into two, namely "natural" and "social", and the relative importance of these differs among regions. To test this postulate, we analyzed the factors currently leading to agricultural abandonment considering ten natural environment variables (e.g., temperature) and five social variables (e.g., number of farmers) using the random forest machine learning method after dividing Japan into eight regions. Our results showed that agricultural abandonment was driven by various socio-environmental factors, and the main factors leading to agricultural abandonment differed among regions, especially in Hokkaido in northern Japan. Hokkaido has a relatively large area of concentrated farmland, and abandonment might have resulted from the effectiveness of cultivation under specific climate factors, whereas the other regions have relatively small areas of farmland with many elderly part-time farmers. In such regions, abandonment might have been caused by the decreasing numbers of potential farmers. Thus, two different drivers of agricultural abandonment were found: inefficient cultivation and decreasing numbers of farmers. Therefore, agricultural abandonment cannot be prevented by adopting a single method or policy. Agricultural abandonment is a significant problem not only for food production but also for several ecosystem services. Governments and decision-makers should develop effective strategies to prevent further abandonment to ensure sustainable future management of agro

  2. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  3. Kinematic hardening of a porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheatham, J. B.; Allen, M. B.; Celle, C. C.

    1984-10-01

    A concept for a kinematic hardening yield surface in stress space for Cordova Cream limestone (Austin Chalk) developed by Celle and Cheatham (1981) has been improved using Ziegler's modification of Prager's hardening rule (Ziegler, 1959). Data to date agree with the formulated concepts. It is shown how kinematic hardening can be used to approximate the yield surface for a wide range of stress states past the initial yield surface. The particular difficulty of identifying the yield surface under conditions of unloading or extension is noted. A yield condition and hardening rule which account for the strain induced anisotropy in Cordova Cream Limestone were developed. Although the actual yield surface appears to involve some change of size and shape, it is concluded that true kinematic hardening provides a basis for engineering calculations.

  4. Simulation of Hypervelocity Penetration in Limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T; Glenn, L; Walton, O; Goldstein, P; Lomov, I; Liu, B

    2005-05-31

    A parameter study was performed to examine the (shock) damage obtained with long-rod and spherical mono-material penetrators impacting two varieties of limestone. In all cases, the impacts were assumed to be normal to the plane of the rock and at zero angle of attack (in the case of the rods). Impact velocities ranged to 15 km/s but most calculations were performed at 4 and 6 km/s and the penetrator mass was fixed at 1000 kg. For unlined underground structures, incipient damage was defined to occur when the peak stress, {sigma}{sub pk}, exceeds 1 kb (100 MPa) and the applied impulse per unit area, I{sub pk}, exceeds 1 ktap (1 kb-{micro}s). Severe damage was assumed to occur when {sigma}{sub pk} exceeds 1 kb and I{sub pk} exceeds 1000 ktaps. Using the latter definition it was found that severe damage in hard, non-porous limestone with spherical impactors extended to a depth of 9 m on-axis for an impact velocity of 4 km/s and 12 m at 6 km/s. Cylinders with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 8.75 achieved depth to severe damage of 23 m and 40 m, respectively under the same conditions. For a limestone medium with 2% initial gas porosity, the latter numbers were reduced to 12 m and 18 m.

  5. Environmental rehabilitation of dismissed quarry areas in the Emilia Apennines (Italy) based on the exploitation of geosites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Mauro; Coratza, Paola; Vandelli, Vittoria

    2016-04-01

    The landscape modifications induced by human activity in the past 50 years, due to quarrying in the catchment of Rio della Rocca (Province of Reggio Emilia, northern Italy) and plans for its environmental rehabilitation, are illustrated. The study area is located in the northern Apennines margin, specifically in the municipality of Castellarano, and is characterised by a great variety of abiotic environments and high biodiversity. As regards the geological aspects of the area, the main lithological outcrops consists of yellow sandstones belonging to the Epi-Ligurian Sequence (Upper Eocene - Lower Oligocene) and grey clays (Lower Pliocene - Lower Pleistocene) of the marine units of the Apennine margin. From a geomorphological viewpoint, the landscape evolution of this valley has been deeply influenced by the presence of rocks with different mechanical behaviour, gravitational and rainwash processes and, more recently, human activities. The latter have played a fundamental role in modelling the physical landscape of the area in recent times. In the Sassuolo area (Province of Modena), very close to the study area, there is the largest tile making district in the world, which was developed during the '60s and '70s of the 20th century, partly thanks to the wide availability of clayey raw materials with suitable technological properties. Since the mid-1950s the study area has been affected by intense quarrying activities which have largely modified its environmental and, in particular, geomorphological features. In the 1970s, three clay pits and four sandstone quarries were active in the area. The clay pits were used for tile production whereas the sandstone materials were utilised in large part for the building industry. This production scenario has radically changed during the past twenty years, with the progressive abandonment of quarries due to the introduction of ever-more restrictive environmental policies, imposing rigorous planning on mining activities

  6. Geoarchaeology at Gilman Falls: An Archaic Quarry and Manufacturing Site in Central Maine, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanger, D.; Kelley, A.R.; Berry, H.N., IV

    2001-01-01

    Interdisciplinary investigations at the Milford Reservoir, central Maine, resulted in excavation and analysis of a Middle Archaic quarry and manufacturing site at Gilman Falls, dated to between 7300 and 6300 yr B.P. Lithological analysis indicates that the majority of the artifacts came from very local outcrops, providing low-grade metamorphic rocks. Native Americans used a specialized technique to reduce the granofels and other rocks to long rods, artifacts commonly placed in local cemeteries. The Gilman Falls site was largely abandoned once these artifacts were no longer in vogue. Therefore, access to particular bedrock outcrops seems to have played an important role in site selection. Gilman Falls and other early to middle Holocene sites are preserved where bedrock sill dams ponded water that deposited fine sand. Early site sedimentation history is paralleled by a drainage change in the headwaters of the Penobscot River. Evidence for lower mid-Holocene lake levels and a period of higher temperatures and lower precipitation may correlate with the sedimentation history. ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Sedimentology, stratigraphy, and depositional environment of the Crystal Geyser Dinosaur Quarry, east-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez, M.B.; Suarez, C.A.; Kirkland, J.I.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Grandstaff, D.E.; Terry, D.O., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The Crystal Geyser Dinosaur Quarry, near Green River, Utah, is located at the base of the Lower Cretaceous (Barremian) Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation. The quarry preserves a nearly monospecific accumulation of a new basal therizinosauroid, Falcarius utahensis. We used field descriptions and petrographic analysis to determine the depositional environment and development of the quarry strata. Results of these analyses suggest that the quarry represents multiple episodes of bone accumulation buried by spring and overbank flood deposits. Evidence for these previously undescribed spring deposits includes calcite macroscopic structures within the quarry strata - such as pisolites and travertine fragments - and calcite micromorphologies - including radial-fibrous, feather, and scandulitic dendrite morphologies and tufa clasts. At least two episodes of bone incorporation are preserved in the quarry based on their stratigraphic position and lithologic associations. The unique depositional setting in and around the Crystal Geyser Dinosaur Quarry appears to have been favorable for the preservation of vertebrate fossils and provides insight into early Cretaceous environments in North America. Copyright ?? 2007, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  8. Post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry at the Y-12 plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) is located on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) property at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. Until 1992, the primary mission of the Y-12 Plant was the production and fabrication of nuclear weapons components. Activities associated with these functions included production of lithium compounds, recovery of enriched uranium from scrap material, and fabrication of uranium and other materials into finished parts for assemblies. The Kerr Hollow Quarry was used for waste disposal of a variety of materials including water-reactive and shock-sensitive chemicals and compressed gas cylinders. These materials were packaged in various containers and sank under the water in the quarry due to their great weight. Disposal activities were terminated in November, 1988 due to a determination by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation that the quarry was subject to regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1993. Methods of closure for the quarry were reviewed, and actions were initiated to close the quarry in accordance with closure requirements for interim status surface impoundments specified in Tennessee Rules 1200-1-11-.05(7) and 1200-1-11-.05(11). As part of these actions, efforts were made to characterize the physical and chemical nature of wastes that had been disposed of in the quarry, and to remove any containers or debris that were put into the quarry during waste disposal activities. Closure certification reports (Fraser et al. 1993 and Dames and Moore 1993) document closure activities in detail. This report contains the post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry site.

  9. John Tyndall's Vertical Physics: From Rock Quarries to Icy Peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, Michael S.

    2010-06-01

    I analyze, through the work of the Irish physicist John Tyndall (1820-1893), the close relationship formed in the mid-nineteenth century between advances in the physical sciences and the rise of mountaineering as a sport. Along with groundbreaking experimental research in the physical sciences, Tyndall worked throughout his career to define and popularize the study of physics. He also was a pioneering mountaineer during the golden age of mountaineering. As he practiced his science, from rock quarries to the study of the blue sky, Tyndall’s interests in the fundamental forces of Nature brought him to the summits of mountains. His sojourns to the mountains, in turn, affected the manner in which he approached his researches. His science and mountaineering were tellingly mixed, and worked in unison to shape public perceptions of what physicists did during a period of increasing specialization and popularization of the field.

  10. 7 CFR 767.51 - Property abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... jeopardy, the Agency will take the above actions prior to completing servicing actions contained in 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Property abandonment. 767.51 Section 767.51... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INVENTORY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Property Abandonment and Personal Property...

  11. 7 CFR 767.51 - Property abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... jeopardy, the Agency will take the above actions prior to completing servicing actions contained in 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Property abandonment. 767.51 Section 767.51... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INVENTORY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Property Abandonment and Personal Property...

  12. 25 CFR 248.8 - Abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abandoned property. 248.8 Section 248.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER INDIAN IN-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.8 Abandoned property. No vehicle, trailer, boat, or other personal property shall...

  13. 25 CFR 248.8 - Abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Abandoned property. 248.8 Section 248.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER INDIAN IN-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.8 Abandoned property. No vehicle, trailer, boat, or other personal property shall...

  14. 25 CFR 248.8 - Abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abandoned property. 248.8 Section 248.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER INDIAN IN-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.8 Abandoned property. No vehicle, trailer, boat, or other personal property shall...

  15. 25 CFR 248.8 - Abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abandoned property. 248.8 Section 248.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER INDIAN IN-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.8 Abandoned property. No vehicle, trailer, boat, or other personal property shall...

  16. 19 CFR 147.47 - Mandatory abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.47 Mandatory abandonment. Any article entered for a fair, and not disposed of under the provisions of this subpart prior to the expiration of 3 months after the close of the fair shall be regarded as abandoned to the Government,...

  17. 19 CFR 147.47 - Mandatory abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.47 Mandatory abandonment. Any article entered for a fair, and not disposed of under the provisions of this subpart prior to the expiration of 3 months after the close of the fair shall be regarded as abandoned to the Government,...

  18. 19 CFR 147.47 - Mandatory abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.47 Mandatory abandonment. Any article entered for a fair, and not disposed of under the provisions of this subpart prior to the expiration of 3 months after the close of the fair shall be regarded as abandoned to the Government,...

  19. 19 CFR 147.47 - Mandatory abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.47 Mandatory abandonment. Any article entered for a fair, and not disposed of under the provisions of this subpart prior to the expiration of 3 months after the close of the fair shall be regarded as abandoned to the Government,...

  20. 32 CFR 636.31 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abandoned vehicles. 636.31 Section 636.31... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.31 Abandoned vehicles. (a) Any MP or DOD police officer who finds or has knowledge of a...

  1. A proposed method for remote area mass quarrying

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, P.; Daniels, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Current practice in establishing quarries in remote areas with hilly or mountainous terrain tends to the use of airtracs (or similar pioneering units) drilling horizontal holes to establish a face, followed by bench development with light excavating equipment. The authors propose the use of a hybrid coyote blast design that incorporates long-round tunneling techniques. This method would, in effect, use down-the-hole (DTH) drills to advance the drift cut to the final depth, allowing longer and more rapid drift advances, and replace the cross-cut drifts with clusters of DTH holes to achieve the same explosives distribution. In cases where back wall control is a concern, the cross-cut could be augmented or even completely replaced with fan rings of DTH holes. Further, in cases where highly uniform material is required, these fan rings could be distributed throughout the rock mass. The primary advantage to this approach is a significant reduction in capital equipment and the support systems required for developing relatively large volumes of quarry material. Although drill factors will be lower than with conventional practice, explosives consumption should remain much the same. A single compressor capable of running high pressure air to operate the DTH hammer would double, at lower pressure, as the driver for pusher leg drills. A simple jack-bar system could be used for the DTH set-up, or a more elaborate mount could be designed to be attached to the mucking equipment. It is anticipated that a three man crew could easily handle the entire operation.

  2. Evolution of abandoned underground hardrock mine closures by the Texas abandoned mine land reclamation program

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The Texas Abandoned Mine Land (AML) Reclamation program began investigating, designing and implementing hard rock abandoned underground mine closures, after a young boy fell to his death in an abandoned mine opening in 1982. This paper discusses the evolution of abandoned hard rock mine closures in west Texas, by the Texas AML program in response to the development of abandoned underground mine resource information. Case histories are presented of the Texas AML program`s efforts in west Texas including: mine history summaries; site characterization, environmental assessment; design and construction planning considerations, and construction cost information.

  3. Effects of organic amendments and mulches on soil microbial communities in quarry restoration under semiarid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Pastorelli, Roberta; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Fabiani, Arturo; Bastida López, Felipe; Hernández Fernández, María Teresa; García Izquierdo, Carlos; Solé Benet, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Mining activities generate loss of the quality of the environment and landscape specially in arid and semiarid Mediterranean regions. A precondition for ecosystem reclamation in such highly disturbed mining areas is the development of functional soils with appropriate levels of organic matter. In an experimental soil restoration in limestone quarries from Sierra de Gádor (Almería), SE Spain, 9 plots 15 x 5 m were prepared to test organic amendments (compost from solid urban residues-DOW-, sludge from urban water treatment-SS-, control-NA-) and different mulches (fine gravel-GM-, wood chips-WM-, control-NM-) with the aim to improve soil/substrate properties and to reduce evaporation and erosion. In each experimental plot, 75 native plants (Macrochloa tenacissima, Anthyllis terniflora and Anthyllis cytisoides) were planted. After 5 years from the start of the experiment, we evaluated how microbial community composition responded to the organic amendments and mulches. Microbial community composition of both bacteria and fungi was determined by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprinting. The results of the two-way ANOVA showed that PLFAs were significantly affected by organic amendments but not by the mulches or interaction of both factors. Experimental plots with DOW showed significantly higher level of fungal PLFAs than those with SS and NA, even higher than the reference undisturbed soil. However, any plot with organic amendments did not reach the content of bacterial PLFAs of the reference soils. The bacterial diversity (evaluated by diversity indices calculated from DGGE profiles) was greater in soil samples taken under NA and GM. Comparing these indices in fungal DGGE, we found greater values for soil samples taken under DOW and without mulches. Results from UPGMA analysis showed significant differences in the structure of soil bacterial communities from the different treatments

  4. Micromechanics of inelastic compaction in two allochemical limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdova, Veronika; Baud, Patrick; Wu, Lily; Wong, Teng-fong

    2012-10-01

    To investigate inelastic compaction in limestone we deformed in conventional triaxial configuration samples of two allochemical limestones: Indiana and Majella limestone with porosity of 14-16% and 30%, respectively. We described the microstructures associated with the damage evolution. Inelastic compaction in both limestones was associated with pore collapse that seemed to initiate from stress concentrations at the surface of a pore. Cataclasis appeared to develop preferentially around the macropores, in agreement with a recent study on a micritic limestone. Our new observations however showed that the spatial distribution of damage in the allochemical limestones can be complicated by its uneven partitioning among the allochems, micrite and sparite. In Indiana limestone, many allochems remain relatively intact even after the cement has undergone significant microcracking, with the implication that significant strength contrast exists between the allochems and cement. In Majella limestone, the asymmetry in damage intensity is not as pronounced, suggesting a less pronounced mechanical contrast between allochems and cement. In both limestones, significant mechanical twinning was observed in samples deformed to relatively high level of strain. We applied to our data a model, that treats a limestone as a dual porosity medium, with the total porosity partitioned between macroporosity and microporosity.

  5. Application Of Immobilized Sulfate Reducing Bacteria For Permeable Reactive Barriers In Abandoned Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Hur, W.; Choi, S.; Min, K.; Baek, H.

    2006-05-01

    The decline of the Korean coal industry has been drastic in production and consumption. This has been resulted mainly from the environmental concern and the collapse of commercial viability, which has eventually necessitated the government to implement the coal industry rationalization policies to reduce coal production and close down uneconomical mines. The overall drainage rates from abandoned coal mines reaches up to 80,000 ton/day. As a measure of controlling the acid mine drainage from abandoned coal mines, reactive materials in the pathways of drainage, designed to intercept and to transform the contaminants into environmentally acceptable forms can be applied at mines with small drainage rates. The main objective of this study is to design a permeable reactive barrier(PRB) to treat low flow and/or low contaminant loads of acid mine drainage. The PRB is comprised of immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria in hard beads and limestone to remove heavy metals and to raise the pH of AMD. A laboratory reactor was used to prepare a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria. The microbes were separated and mixed with biodegradable matrix to form spherical beads. In order to maintain the viability of micro-organisms for a prolonged period, substrates such as saw dust, polysaccharide or glycerol was supplemented for the beads preparation. The strength of beads fortified by powered limestone to control the permeability of PRB. Different mixtures of limestone and the immobilized beads were tested to determine hydraulic conductivity and AMD treatment capacities. The characteristics of the spherical beads at various pH of AMD was investigated.

  6. An ichnofabric approach to the depositional interpretation of the intensely burrowed Bateig Limestone, Miocene, SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gibert, Jordi M.; Goldring, Roland

    2007-01-01

    The foraminiferal-rich pelagic Bateig Limestone forms several varieties of the important building stones quarried at Bateig Hill in southeastern Spain. Three principal ichnofabrics ( Bichordites, mottled- Palaeophycus and mottled- Ophiomorpha) are recognized, which are present in at least two (possibly up to four) repeated successions (cycles). Each succession begins with an erosional event. The Bichordites ichnofabric represents a new type of facies, formed as thin turbidity/grain flow, stratiform units derived from sediment slips off a fault into deep water. Each slipped unit became almost completely bioturbated by infaunal echinoids, colonizing by lateral migration. Because of the thinness of the units, successive colonizations tended to truncate the underlying burrows giving rise to a pseudo-stratification. As the Bichordites ichnofabric accumulated on the fault apron, thus reducing the effective height of the fault scarp, the substrate gradually came under the influence of currents traversing the shelf. This led to a change in hydraulic regime, and to the mottled- Palaeophycus and mottled- Ophiomorpha ichnofabrics in sediment deposited under bed load transport, and associated with laminar and cross-stratified beds and local muddy intervals. Reactivation of the fault triggered erosion and channeling and a return to grain flow sedimentation, and to the Bichordites ichnofabric of the succeeding cycle. The highest unit of the Bateig Limestone is formed entirely of cross-stratified calcarenites with occasional Ophiomorpha ( Ophiomorpha-primary lamination ichnofabric) and is similar to many shallow marine facies but they still bear a significant content of pelagic foraminifera. The sedimentary setting bears resemblance with that described for the Pleistocene Monte Torre Paleostrait and the modern Strait of Messina (Italy), where the narrow morphology of the depositional area enhanced tidal currents and allowed for high-energy sandy deposition in relatively deep

  7. Proposed plan for remedial action at the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This proposed plan addresses the management of contamination present in various components of the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) of the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri. The QROU consists of (1) residual waste at the quarry proper; (2) the Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of the slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of the evaluations for this operable unit. Remedial activities for the QROU will be conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process required for the QROU under CERCLA, three major evaluation documents have been prepared to support cleanup decisions for this operable unit.

  8. Two new Bent-toed Geckos of the Cyrtodactylus pulchellus complex from Peninsular Malaysia and multiple instances of convergent adaptation to limestone forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Grismer, L Lee; Wood, Perry L; Anuar, Shahrul; Grismer, Marta S; Quah, Evan S H; Murdoch, Matthew L; Muin, Mohd Abdul; Davis, Hayden R; Aguilar, César; Klabacka, Randy; Cobos, Anthony J; Aowphol, Anchalee; Sites, Jack W

    2016-01-01

    A new species of limestone cave-adapted gecko of the Cyrtodactylus pulchellus complex, C. hidupselamanya sp. nov., is described from an isolated karst formation at Felda Chiku 7, Kelantan, Peninsular Malaysia. This formation is scheduled to be completely quarried for its mineral content. From what we know about the life history of C. hidupselamanya sp. nov., this will result in its extinction. A new limestone forest-adapted species, C. lenggongensis sp. nov., from the Lenggong Valley, Perak was previously considered to be conspecific with C. bintangrendah but a re-evaluation of morphological, color pattern, molecular, and habitat preference indicates that it too is a unique lineage worthy of specific recognition. Fortunately C. lenggongensis sp. nov. is not facing extinction because its habitat is protected by the UNESCO Archaeological Heritage of the Lenggong Valley due to the archaeological significance of that region. Both new species can be distinguished from all other species of Cyrtodactylus based on molecular evidence from the mitochondrial gene ND2 and its flanking tRNAs as well as having unique combinations of morphological and color pattern characteristics. Using a time-calibrated BEAST analysis we inferred that the evolution of a limestone habitat preference and its apparently attendant morphological and color pattern adaptations evolved independently at least four times in the C. pulchellus complex between 26.1 and 0.78 mya. PMID:27394789

  9. CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

    2004-02-27

    The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

  10. Remediation of abandoned mine discharges in the Loyalhanna Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, C.L.; Fish, D.H.

    1999-07-01

    Abandoned deep mine discharges were responsible for high iron loadings into several streams in the Loyalhanna Creek watershed. A total of seven discharges with flow rates from 20 to 1240 gal/min were flowing into Four Mile Run near Latrobe, PA. The iron concentrations in these discharges averaged near 80 ppm. The pH, however, was near neutral due to contact with underground limestone deposits. The high iron concentrations had severely degraded the habitat of the streams including 22 miles of Loyalhanna Creek. Benthic macroinvertebrates are especially vulnerable to the deposition of iron in these streams. In 1993, the Loyalhanna Mine Drainage Coalition was formed to oversee the remediation of the AMD discharges affecting Loyalhanna Creek. During this time monthly monitoring of the discharges began. Then using the chemistry and flow data, passive wetland treatment systems were designed to remediate the mine drainage. The remediation process precipitates and collects the iron oxide in the wetlands, thus eliminating the iron precipitation from the stream. In 1997 and 1998 three wetland treatment systems were constructed. The three wetlands capture the flow from the seven discharges and during low flow periods remove 95--100% of the iron from these discharges. The affected streams have shown a significant decrease in the iron concentrations and a subsequent improvement in the habitat quality of the streams. Fish and macroinvertebrates have been found in the most polluted stream which was void of life before the treatment systems were in operation.

  11. Discrimination of earthquakes and quarry blasts in the eastern Black Sea region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Şeyda; Bayrak, Yusuf; Çınar, Hakan

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, a large number of quarry blasts have been detonated in the eastern Black Sea region. When these blasts are recorded by seismic stations, they contaminate the regional earthquake catalog. It is necessary to discriminate quarry blast records from the earthquake catalogs in order to determine the real seismicity of the region. Earthquakes and quarry blasts can be separated through different methods. These methods should be applied concurrently in order to safely distinguish these events. In this study, we discriminated quarry blasts from earthquakes in the eastern Black Sea region of Turkey. We used 186 seismic events recorded by the Karadeniz Technical University and Bogaziçi University Kandilli Observatory Earthquake Research Institute stations which are Trabzon, Espiye, Pazar, Borçka, Aydıntepe, and Gümüşhane between years of 2002 and 2010. For the discrimination of quarry blasts from earthquakes, we used both, statistical methods (calculation of the maximum ratio of S to P waves (S/P), complexity ( C)) and spectral methods (spectrogram calculation). These methods included measuring the maximum amplitude S/P, C, spectral ratio, and time-frequency analysis. We especially relied on two-dimensional time-frequency analysis methods to discriminate quarry blasts from earthquakes in Turkey. As a result of this study, 68 % of the examined seismic events were determined to be quarry blasts and 32 % to be earthquakes. The earthquakes occurring on land are related to small faults and the blasts are concentrated in large quarries. Nearly 40 % of the earthquakes occurred in the Black Sea, most of them are related to the Black Sea thrust belt, where the largest earthquake was observed in the time period studied. The areas with the largest earthquake potential in the eastern Black Sea region are in the sea.

  12. Abandoned Channel Fill Sequences in Tidal Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, A. B.; Pasternack, G. B.; Goni, M. A.; Watson, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    This study proposes a modification of the current model for abandoned channel fill stratigraphy produced in unidirectional flow river reaches to incorporate seasonal tidal deposition. Evidence supporting this concept came from a study of two consecutive channel abandonment sequences in Ropers Slough of the lower Eel River Estuary in northern California. Aerial photographs showed that Ropers Slough was abandoned around 1943, reoccupied after the 1964 flood, and abandoned again in 1974 with fill continuing to the present. Planform geomorphic characteristics derived from these images were used in conjunction with sub-cm resolution stratigraphic analyses to describe the depositional environment processes and their resultant sedimentary deposits. Results showed that both abandonment sequences recorded quasi-annual scale fluvial/tidal deposition couplets. In both cases tidal deposits contained very little sand, and were higher in organic and inorganic carbon content than the sandier fluvial through-flow deposits. However, the two abandonment fills differed significantly in terms of the temporal progression of channel narrowing and fluvial sediment deposition characteristics. The first abandonment sequence led to a more rapid narrowing of Ropers Slough and produced deposits with a positive relationship between grain size/deposit thickness and discharge. The second abandonment resulted in a much slower narrowing of Ropers Slough and generally thinner fluvial deposits with no clear relationship between grain size/deposit thickness and discharge. The δ13C values and organic nitrogen to organic carbon ratios of deposits from the first phase overlapped with Eel River suspended sediment characteristics found for low flows (1-5 times mean discharge), while those of the second phase were consistent suspended sediment from higher flows (7-10 times mean discharge). The abandoned channel fill sequences appeared to differ due to the topographic steering of bed sediment transport and

  13. Lung Function Impact from Working in the Pre-Revolution Libyan Quarry Industry

    PubMed Central

    Draid, Marwan M.; Ben-Elhaj, Khaled M.; Ali, Ashraf M.; Schmid, Kendra K.; Gibbs, Shawn G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the lung impact from working within the Libyan quarry industry, and if the length of work impacted the degree of degradation. Eighty three workers from eight silica quarries in the Nafusa Mountains of Libya opted to participate. These quarries were working the upper cretaceous geological structure. Eighty-five individuals who lived in Gharyan City with no affiliation to quarry operations participated as controls. Spirometry variables evaluated were Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume at 1.0 second (FEV1), FVC/FEV1 and Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF). Control and exposed groups had no differences in terms of height, weight, or smoking status (p = 0.18, 0.20, 0.98, respectively). Prior to adjustment for other variables, FVC, FEV1, and PEF are all significantly lower in the exposed group (p = 0.003, 0.009, 0.03, respectively). After adjustment for age, height, weight, and smoking status, there remain significant differences between the control and exposed groups for FVC, FEV1, and PEF. This analysis demonstrated that exposure to quarry dust has a detrimental effect on lung function, and that pre-revolution Libyan quarry workers were being exposed. This study shows that any exposure is harmful, as the reduction in lung function was not significantly associated with years of exposure. PMID:25961801

  14. Some Positive and Negative Aspects of Mine Abandonment and Their Implications on Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Laurance; Bell, Fred; Culshaw, Martin

    Many urban and greenfield environments throughout the United Kingdom are located in regions where mining has occurred. Mining dates back to pre-Roman times and includes metalliferous minerals (such as gold, copper, lead & zinc), bulk minerals (such as sand-stone, limestone, gypsum & halite) and coal, the latter being the most important mineral mined both quantitatively and in terms of value. Due to this long mining history, this had resulted in a legacy of mining relics and hazards (such as mine entries, abandoned workings and contaminated land), with presumably many of these sites remaining, as yet, unknown. However, the mechanisms of failure and ground deformation, in general, are appreciated. Over the past few decades the British coal mining industry has experienced a gradual decline. However, individual closed and abandoned mines, as well as entire coalfields can, under appropriate investigations and a favourable economic climate, offer alternative energy resources. These include for instance, for coal bed methane (CBM), coal mine methane (CMM), underground coal gasification (UCG). The objectives of this paper are to draw attention to some less well-documented positive aspects of mine closures and coalfield abandonment.

  15. Comparison of deformation mechanics for two different carbonates: oolitic limestone and laminites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zihms, Stephanie; Lewis, Helen; Couples, Gary; Hall, Stephen; Somerville, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate rocks form under a range of conditions which leads to a diverse rock group. Even though carbonates are overall mineralogically simple, the solid-space distribution ranges from simple compositions such as oolitic limestones to highly complex networks of pores and solids as seen in coquinas. Their fundamental mechanical behaviour has been identified to be like clastic rocks (Vajdova 2004, Brantut, Heap et al. 2014). However it is very likely that this observation is not true for more complex carbonates. Triaxial tests were performed on cylindrical samples of two different carbonates; a) oolitic limestone (Bicqueley quarry, France) and b) laminite (Ariripe basin, Brazil). The samples were deformed under confining pressures of 8, 12 and 20MPa, and 20, 30 and 40MPa, respectively. All tests were stopped as soon as peak load was observed to preserve as many deformation characteristics as possible. Photographs of the samples were taken before and after deformation to allow surface analysis of deformation features. Additionally, samples were analysed post-deformation with X-ray tomography (XRT) (using the Zeiss XRadia XRM 520 at the 4D Imaging Lab at Lund University). The 3D tomography images represent the post-deformation samples' density distribution, allowing detailed, non-destructive, 3D analysis of the deformation features that developed in the triaxial testing, including the complex geometries and interactions of fractures, deformation bands and sedimentary layering. They also provide an insight into the complexity of deformation features produced due to the carbonate response. Initial results show that the oolitic limestone forms single shear bands almost the length of the sample, exhibiting similar characteristics to sandstones deformed under similar conditions. These features are observed for all three applied loads. The laminate sample deformed at the lowest confining pressure exhibits compactive features. However, the laminite samples deformed at the

  16. Continued distress among abandoned dogs in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2012-01-01

    In Fukushima, Japan, a prolonged refugee situation caused by a major nuclear incident after the earthquake of March 11, 2011 has led to the unintentional abandonment of many pets. We received stray or abandoned dogs from rescue centers in Fukushima Prefecture. During re-socialization training and health care, we accessed the behavioral characteristics and the urine cortisol level of each dog and compared them with those of other abandoned dogs not involved in this earthquake. The dogs from Fukushima showed significantly lower aggression toward unfamiliar people, trainability, and attachment to their caretakers; also, urine cortisol levels in the dogs from Fukushima were 5-10-fold higher than those in abandoned dogs from another area of Japan. These results suggested that the dogs from Fukushima suffered through an extremely stressful crisis. PMID:23061007

  17. Weyl's Abandonment of Unified Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieroka, Norman

    2015-01-01

    In 1918, Hermann Weyl proposed a generalisation of Riemannian geometry, in order to unify general relativity and electrodynamics. This paper investigates the physical, mathematical and philosophical reasons for his subsequent abandonment of any such attempt towards a unified field theory.

  18. 7 CFR 767.51 - Property abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... jeopardy, the Agency will take the above actions prior to completing servicing actions contained in 7 CFR..., manage, and operate the abandoned security property, including marketing perishable security property...

  19. Influence of grazing practices on cow milk quality: a case study on the Comarnic-Poieni bauxite quarry, Romania.

    PubMed

    Lorinţ, Csaba; Rădulescu, Monica; Buia, Grigore

    2012-04-01

    The current study represents a preliminary investigation made into the influence of cattle grazing in the area of a bauxite quarry (Comarnic-Poieni, Romania) on the cow milk chemistry. Weathering and surface runoff in the bauxite quarry contaminate the local chemistry of the soil, vegetation and water. During cattle transhumance, cyclic feeding patterns occur, with grazing alternating between clean pastures and the area of the quarry. Soil and water samples were collected from the contaminated area of the quarry. Raw milk samples were collected during two stages, corresponding to the periods of grazing on clean pasture and the quarry area, respectively. Based on the obtained data, the relationship between cattle grazing and the composition of milk was interpreted. Preliminary results indicated a direct correlation of increased concentration of Al in the milk, following grazing in the bauxite quarry. PMID:21986677

  20. Comparison of the occupational safety applications in marble quarries of Carrara (Italy) and Iscehisar (Turkey) by using Elmeri method.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Metin; Yesilkaya, Liyaddin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary is given about marble quarries in Carrara (Italy) and Iscehisar (Turkey), the Elmeri method is introduced, work accidents that can happen in marble quarries and their causes besides work safety behaviours in fields are explained, and the Elmeri monitoring method is applied and analysed. For this reason, marble quarries are divided into seven in terms of working conditions and active six quarries both in Carrara and Iscehisar areas, and work safety behaviours are analysed. Analysis process is based on True-False method; there are 18 items in total under six main topics; three items on each topic. The safety index for each section and the main topics are also calculated. According to the calculated safety indexes, Carrara area marble quarries (65.08%) are safer than Iscehisar area marble quarries (46.01%). PMID:25358899

  1. Geological-Technical and Geo-engineering Aspects of Dimensional Stone Underground Quarrying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Mauro; Lovera, Enrico

    Underground exploitation of dimensional stones is not a novelty, being long since practised, as proved by a number of historical documents and by a certain number of ancient quarrying voids throughout the world. Anyway, so far, open cast quarrying has been the most adopted practice for the excavation of dimensional stones. One primary reason that led to this situation is of course connected to the lower production costs of an open cast exploitation compared to an underground one. This cheapness has been supported by geological and technical motives: on the one hand, the relative availability of surface deposits and, on the other, the development of technologies, which often can be used only outdoor. But, nowadays, general costs of quarrying activities should be re-evaluated because new, and often proper, restrictions have been strongly rising during recent years. As a consequence of both environmental and technical restrictions, pressure will more and more arise to reduce open cast quarrying and to promote underground exploitations. The trend is already well marked for weak rocks - for instance in the extractive basin of Carrara, where about one hundred quarries are active, 30 per cent is working underground, but also in Spain, Portugal and Greece the number of underground marble quarries is increasing - but not yet for hard rock quarrying, where only few quarries are working underground all around the world. One reason has to be found in cutting technologies traditionally used. In weak rocks, diamond wire saw and chain cutter are usable, with few adaptations, in underground spaces, while drilling and blasting, the traditional exploitation method for hard stone, is not easily usable in a confined space, where often only one free face is available. Many technicians and researchers agree that two technologies will probably open the door to underground quarrying in hard rocks: diamond wire and water jet. The first one is already available; the second should still be

  2. Abandoned oil fields of Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1984-04-01

    One nonconventional oil target in Texas is the oil that remains in abandoned fields, defined as those fields that had no oil or gas production in 1977 and 1982. This target includes oil that has not been tapped by conventional field development because of reservoir heterogeneity and oil in reservoirs that have not been subjected to any secondary or tertiary recovery efforts. A total of 138 abandoned oil fields having individual cumulative production greater than 500,000 bbl are located in the Texas Gulf Coast (railroad Commission of Texas Districts 2, 3, and 4). These 138 onshore fields produced 276 million barrels of oil before being abandoned. Nongiant fields in the Texas Gulf Coast average about 40% ultimate recovery, so these fields probably originally contained about 700 million bbl of oil in place. Therefore, about 424 million bbl of oil remain unrecovered. Reservoirs in these abandoned fields are Tertiary sandstones. The 44 abandoned fields in the upper Texas Gulf Coast (District 3) produced from a wide range of plays; those plays with the largest number of abandoned fields are Yegua and Frio deep-seated domes, Eocene deltaic sandstone, and Frio barrier/strand-plain sandstone. The 19 abandoned fields in the middle Texas Gulf Coast (District 2) produced mainly from Wilcox and Frio fluvial/deltaic sandstones and from Frio and Jackson-Yegua barrier/strand-plain sandstones. The lower Texas Gulf Coast (District 4) contains 75 abandoned fields that produced from Frio fluvial/deltaic and barrier/strand-plain sandstones and from Jackson-Yegua barrier/strand-plain sandstones.

  3. Devonian Terrestrial Revolution: the palaeoenvironment of the oldest known tetrapod tracks, Zachełmie Quarry, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedźwiedzki, G.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous trackways and isolated prints with digit impressions, which are similar to the foot anatomy of early tetrapods such as Ichthyostega, were found on the three dolomite bed-surfaces in the lower part of the Wojciechowice Formation exposed in the Zachełmie Quarry in the Holy Cross Mountains (south-central Poland), (Niedźwiedzki et al., 2010). The age of the tetrapod track-bearing strata is well-constrained, but the detailed sedimentology of the lower section with tetrapod ichnites is still under study. The Wojciechowice Formation represent one of the first carbonate stages of a transgressive succession that begins with Early Devonian continental to marginal marine clastics and culminates in the development of a Givetian coral-stromatoporoid carbonate platform. The tetrapod track-bearing complex is composed of grey to reddish, thin- to medium-bedded dolomitic shales and marly dolomite mudstones. These deposits from the tetrapod track-bearing horizon lack definitive marine body fossils, and may have formed in a marginal marine environment, e.g. around a coastal lagoon. Mudcracks, columnar peds, root traces, and microbially induced sedimentary structures were found in three distinct pedotypes of very weakly to weakly developed paleosols (Retallack, 2011). Conodonts of the costatus zone (mid-Eifelian) were found 20 m above the uppermost surface with tetrapod tracks in limestones of the upper Wojciechowice Formation, which contain also brachiopod and crinoidal debris. The overlying Kowala Formation is a marine coral limestone and dolostone. The parts of profile with tetrapod ichnites and invertebrate and conodont fossils contain also records of invertebrate traces. Seven ichnotaxa are distributed among four recognized ichnoassemblages. The recognized ichnocoenoses are typical for the shallow-marine (Cruziana ichnofacies) and land-water transitional (Skolithos/Psilonichnus ichnofacies) carbonate depositional environments. The ichnocoenoses are dominated by trace

  4. Quarry detection monitoring wells completion report WP-166

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the activities undertaken during implementation of Work Package 166, Quarry Detection Monitoring Wells, for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial action project, Weldon Spring, Missouri. The subcontract specifications should be consulted for specific details regarding this work effort. Analytical parameters for soil samples collected for all but one borehole were analyzed for uranium, thorium, cyanide, nitroaromatics, and all Hazardous Substance List parameters including volatiles, semivolatiles, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals. No soil samples were collected at other borehole as per specifications. With Z exceptions, uranium results for all boreholes sampled were at background levels. Nitroaromatics and cyanide were not detected in any of the samples collected. Volatile and semivolatile organics were not detected in the soil samples collected from the boreholes, with the exception of common lab contaminants such as methylene chloride, toluene, acetone, and pathalates. All metals results were either within their natural background ranges or below the detection limit of the instrument. PCB's were not detected within any of the boreholes. Pesticides detected (aldrin and methoxychlor) at one borehole near the surface may be attributed to previous spraying of pesticides on the highway right-of-way. In conclusion, the analytical results show that only uranium was detected in significant quantities; all other results were below the detection limit, very near the detection limit, or within natural background ranges. 1 fig.

  5. The rail abandonment process: A southern perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    One factor in evaluating the desirability of rail transport for high-level radioactive wastes or spent fuels is the frequency, or lack thereof, with which railroad and railroad lines have been, and are, abandoned. If DOE makes a decision to use the rail option and a line is subsequently abandoned, the choice results in increased cost, time delays and possibly safety problems: Information is therefore needed prior to the decision-making process to evaluate the desirability of the rail shipping option. One result of the abandonments mentioned herein, as well as other later abandonments, is the creation of a US rail system undergoing an evolutionary process in the 1980s as far-reaching as the changes that occurred when the industry was in its infancy a century and-a-half ago. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors leading to some of these changes by tracing the historical development of the rail abandonment process, with particular emphasis on the rise of regional railroads, their problems in the modern era and current trends in rail abandonments as well as their effects on the southeastern United States.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Flash Weakening in Limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Tisato, N.; Quaresimin, M.; de Rossi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Frictional properties of limestone and dolostone are crucial to understand earthquake mechanics where seismic ruptures nucleate and propagate in carbonate rocks (e.g., Mw 6.3 L’Aquila 2009 earthquake). We performed 27 rock friction experiments in a compression-torsion apparatus on ring-shaped (50/60 and 70/80 mm int/ext diameter) 100% CaCO3-samples at sub-seismic to seismic slip rates (0.05 to 350 mm/s), small displacements (50-60 mm) and under normal stresses of 3-8 MPa. The experiments involved four steps: 1) loading step to apply the normal stress, 2) “low-speed” step to verify the low-speed behavior, 3) “high-speed” step to determine the velocity dependence and, 4) final deceleration step to stop the experiment. The friction coefficient gradually increased during the low-speed step (0.05 mm/s and 7 mm displacement) from 0 to 0.7-0.8, a typical value for friction in limestone. During the high-speed step, slip rate was abruptly (< 0.04 s) increased in about 5 mm of slip to 250 mm/s (for 30 mm displacement, samples 50/60 mm in diameter) and to 350 mm/s (for 40 mm displacement, samples 70/80 mm in diameter). All experiments show a dramatic decrease, up to 60%, in friction for slip rates > 100 mm/s. During the final deceleration step (< 7 mm of slip in < 0.04 s), the friction coefficient recovered its initial value (0.7). A possible weakening mechanism is flash heating-induced thermal decomposition of calcite (CaCO3 -> CaO + CO2) at asperity contacts. In the experiments, weakening was contemporaneous with a peripheral temperature increase of 60-170°C measured with an infrared camera. This temperature range yields a lower limit to the temperature achieved in the slipping zone and at the asperity contacts. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy equipped with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), X-Ray powder diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy analyses did not detect decarbonation products (CaO, Ca(OH)2) in the slipping zone. Instead, FE

  7. Mitigation of adverse effects at the Lezama-Leguizamon abandoned open-pit mine (Bilbao, northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz de Omeñaca, J.; Ereño, I.; Atxabal, K.; Azurmendi, I.

    1993-09-01

    Solid fills arranged in 1-m-thick layers were prepared with stone blocks and pebbles of a drainage bed every 8 m. Runoff gathering in a well and the use of silts and mud lands for bordering and sealing the limestones are the main techniques employed for minimizing unfavorable effects at the Lezama-Leguizamon abandoned open-pit mine. Since there were waste disposal problems in the area, the rate of disposal has made the activity profitable. No significant faults have been detected by control studies, and the objectives are being achieved without problems.

  8. STEAM INJECTION INTO FRACTURED LIMESTONE AT LORING AIR FORCE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research project on steam injection for the remediation of spent chlorinated solvents from fractured limestone was recently undertaken at the former Loring AFB in Limestone, ME. Participants in the project include the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, EPA Region I,...

  9. REACTION OF H2S AND SULFUR WITH LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the direct-displacement reaction of limestone with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) over the temperature range 570-850 C in a differential reactor. It is one of several possible mechanisms of sulfur capture in limestone-injection multistage burners whi...

  10. LOW NOX COMBUSTION SYSTEMS WITH SO2 CONTROL USING LIMESTONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes EPA work on low NOx combustion systems with SO2 control using limestone. Although SO2 control in low NOx systems for both stoker and pulverized-coal-fired furnaces is under investigation at EPA, most of the current work is with pulverized coal. EPA's Limestone...

  11. Microfacies and diagenesis of the reefal limestone, Callovian Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone Formation, central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Almadani, Sattam A.; Al-Dabbagh, Mohammad E.

    2016-03-01

    In order to document the microfacies and diagenesis of the reefal limestone in the uppermost part of the Callovian Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone Formation at Khashm Al-Qaddiyah area, central Saudi Arabia, scleractinian corals and rock samples were collected and thin sections were prepared. Coral framestone, coral floatstone, pelloidal packstone, bioclastic packstone, bioclastic wacke/packstone, algal wackestone and bioclastic foraminiferal wacke/packstone were the recorded microfacies types. Cementation, recrystallization, silicification and dolomitization are the main diagenetic alterations affected the aragonitic skeletons of scleractinian corals. All coral skeletons were recrystallized, while some ones were dolomitized and silicified. Microfacies types, as well as the fossil content of sclearctinian corals, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods and foraminifera indicated a deposition in environments ranging from shelf lagoon with open circulation in quiet water below wave base to shallow reef flank and organic build up for the uppermost reefal part of the Tuwaiq Formation in the study area.

  12. Field trial of a pulsed limestone diversion well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Denholm, C.; Dunn, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The use of limestone diversion wells to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) is well-known, but in many cases, acid neutralization is not as complete as would be desired. Reasons for this include channeling of the water through the limestone bed, and the slow reaction rate of the limestone gravel. A new approach to improve the performance of the diversion well was tested in the field at the Jennings Environmental Education Center, near Slippery Rock, PA. In this approach, a finer size distribution of limestone was used so as to allow fluidization of the limestone bed, thus eliminating channeling and increasing particle surface area for faster reaction rates. Also, water flow was regulated through the use of a dosing siphon, so that consistent fluidization of the limestone sand could be achieved. Testing began late in the summer of 2010, and continued through November of 2011. Initial system performance during the 2010 field season was good, with the production of net alkaline water, but hydraulic problems involving air release and limestone sand retention were observed. In the summer of 2011, a finer size of limestone sand was procured for use in the system. This material fluidized more readily, but acid neutralization tapered off after several days. Subsequent observations indicated that the hydraulics of the system was compromised by the formation of iron oxides in the pipe leading to the limestone bed, which affected water distribution and flow through the bed. Although results from the field trial were mixed, it is believed that without the formation of iron oxides and plugging of the pipe, better acid neutralization and treatment would have occurred. Further tests are being considered using a different hydraulic configuration for the limestone sand fluidized bed.

  13. Faunas of Mississippian oolitic limestones: Evidence from Salem Limestone, southern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, H.R. )

    1989-08-01

    In the Salem Limestone of southern Indiana, a correlation exists between the faunal assemblage and abundance of grains with superficial oolitic coatings in grainstones. Coarse, poorly sorted fossiliferous grainstones are dominated by an echinoderm-bryozoan-brachiopod assemblage of fossils with few mollusks. The presence of large whole fossils, such as articulated crinoid calyces, suggest limited transport of skeletal components. Grainstones, dominated by grains with superficial coatings, and foraminifers tend to contain a diverse mollusk-dominated assemblage of gastropods, bivalves, rostroconchs, chitins, and scaphopods. These fossils are disarticulated, but generally are not fragmented even though many of them are thin and delicate. Echinoderms, brachiopods, and bryozoans are repsented in the mollusk-domdinated assemblage almost exclusively by well-rounded and coated fragments, suggesting that they are not in situ. The presence of similar molluscan assemblages in other Mississippian coated-grain grainstones from Alabama (the Monteagle Limestone) and Oklahoma (an unnamed limestone) indicates that the assemblage may have been wide-spread. Mississippian grainstones dominated by oolites (which are not prominent in the Salem) generally have very few fossils.

  14. Noise Exposure and Hearing Capabilities of Quarry Workers in Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Gyamfi, Charles Kwame R; Amankwaa, Isaac; Owusu Sekyere, Frank; Boateng, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Although quarry operations have high economic significance, the effects they cause to the workers in terms of excessive noise production cannot be overlooked. This cross-sectional study assessed the extent of noise exposure and its influence on hearing capabilities among quarry workers in Ashanti region. Methods. The study involved 400 workers randomly selected from five quarries in Ashanti region from April to June 2012. Data was collected using structured questionnaires, physical examination, and audiological assessments. A logistic regression model was fitted to assess independent predictors of hearing loss. Results. All the machines used at the various quarries produced noise that exceeded the minimum threshold with levels ranging from 85.5 dBA to 102.7 dBA. 176 (44%) of study respondents had hearing threshold higher than 25 dBA. 18% and 2% of these were moderately (41-55 dBA) and severely (71-90 dBA) impaired, respectively. Age, duration of work, and use of earplugs independently predicted the development of hearing loss. Use of earplugs showed a protective effect on the development of hearing loss (OR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.25, 0.84). Conclusion. This study provides empirical evidence on the extent of damage caused to quarry workers as a result of excessive noise exposure. This will support the institution of appropriate protective measures to minimize this threat. PMID:26904137

  15. Noise Exposure and Hearing Capabilities of Quarry Workers in Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gyamfi, Charles Kwame R.; Amankwaa, Isaac; Owusu Sekyere, Frank; Boateng, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Although quarry operations have high economic significance, the effects they cause to the workers in terms of excessive noise production cannot be overlooked. This cross-sectional study assessed the extent of noise exposure and its influence on hearing capabilities among quarry workers in Ashanti region. Methods. The study involved 400 workers randomly selected from five quarries in Ashanti region from April to June 2012. Data was collected using structured questionnaires, physical examination, and audiological assessments. A logistic regression model was fitted to assess independent predictors of hearing loss. Results. All the machines used at the various quarries produced noise that exceeded the minimum threshold with levels ranging from 85.5 dBA to 102.7 dBA. 176 (44%) of study respondents had hearing threshold higher than 25 dBA. 18% and 2% of these were moderately (41–55 dBA) and severely (71–90 dBA) impaired, respectively. Age, duration of work, and use of earplugs independently predicted the development of hearing loss. Use of earplugs showed a protective effect on the development of hearing loss (OR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.25, 0.84). Conclusion. This study provides empirical evidence on the extent of damage caused to quarry workers as a result of excessive noise exposure. This will support the institution of appropriate protective measures to minimize this threat. PMID:26904137

  16. Discrimination of quarry blasts and earthquakes in the vicinity of Istanbul using soft computing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Eray; Gülbağ, Ali; Horasan, Gündüz; Doğan, Emrah

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the use of feedforward neural networks (FFNNs), adaptive neural fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), and probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) to discriminate between earthquakes and quarry blasts in Istanbul and vicinity (the Marmara region). The tectonically active Marmara region is affected by the Thrace-Eskişehir fault zone and especially the North Anatolian fault zone (NAFZ). Local MARNET stations, which were established in 1976 and are operated by the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI), record not only earthquakes that occur in the region, but also quarry blasts. There are a few quarry-blasting areas in the Gaziosmanpaşa, Çatalca, Ömerli, and Hereke regions. Analytical methods were applied to a set of 175 seismic events (2001-2004) recorded by the stations of the local seismic network (ISK, HRT, and CTT stations) operated by the KOERI National Earthquake Monitoring Center (NEMC). Out of a total of 175 records, 148 are related to quarry blasts and 27 to earthquakes. The data sets were divided into training and testing sets for each region. In all the models developed, the input vectors consist of the peak amplitude ratio (S/P ratio) and the complexity value, and the output is a determination of either earthquake or quarry blast. The success of the developed models on regional test data varies between 97.67% and 100%.

  17. Natural radioactivity measurements in the granite rock of quarry sites, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Laili, Z.; Omar, M.; Hamzah, S.; Idi, Bello. Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides in the granite rocks of selected quarry sites in Johor state, Malaysia and their possible radiological effects. The activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K in the areas of study indicated varying values of 238U, 232Th and 40K. The highest values of 238U and 232Th concentrations (67±1 and 85±2 Bq kg-1, respectively) were observed at Kamad Quarry (IJM), whereas the highest value of 40K concentration (722±18 Bq kg-1) was detected in Kim Seng Quarry, while the values of activity concentration are lower in Hanson Quarry Products (Kulai) (25±0.5 for 238U, 24±0.5 for 232Th and 429±11 for 40K). Overall, 40K has the highest concentration in the granite rocks of the quarry sites, followed by 232Th and the least for 238U. The radium equivalent activity concentration was found in the range between 94 and 239 Bq kg-1, the absorbed dose rate was found to be in the range between 47 and 112 nGy h-1, and effective dose ranged from 58 to 137 μSv h-1. Moreover, the internal and external hazard index values were given in results lower than unity.

  18. United Arab Emirates limestones: impact of petrography on thermal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaabed, Sulaiman; Soltan, Abdel Monem; Abdelghany, Osman; Amin, Bahaa Eldin Mahmoud; El Tokhi, Mohamed; Khaleel, Abbas; Musalim, Abdullah

    2014-12-01

    The thermal behavior of selected limestones from representative localities of the United Arab Emirates is investigated for their suitability for soft-burnt lime production. The limestone samples were collected from the Ghalilah, Musandam, Shauiba, Muthaymimah, Dammam and Asmari formations. The samples were characterized for petrography, mineral and chemical composition, together with physico-mechanical characteristics. Investigative methods included transmitted light microscopy (TLM), cathodoluminescence (CLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as X-ray micro-tomography (μ-CT), XRD, XRF and Archimedes method. The limestone samples were fired in an electrical muffle furnace for 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 hours at 800, 900, 1,000 and 1,100 °C. After firing the lime grains were tested to determine their hydration rate and microfabric. The Ghalilah and Musandam limes show the lowest and highest maximum hydration rates, respectively, due mainly to the impure nature of the former, and the smaller lime crystallites and dominance of post-calcination micro-cracks of the latter. The Dammam and Asmari limes preserve a "ghost" microfabric of the original limestone. Higher allochem contents impose lower activation energy requirements for calcination, which implies earlier calcination of the allochems. The Musandam, Shauiba and Muthaymimah limestones may be useful for the production of reactive soft-burnt lime under the applied firing conditions, however, the Dammam and Asmari limestones need more advanced calcination conditions than the applied ones. The Ghalilah limestone was found to be unsuitable for the production of lime.

  19. Limestone dissolution in flue gas scrubbing: Effect of sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, C.L.; Rochelle, G.T. )

    1992-07-01

    Batch limestone dissolution experiments were carried out in a pH stat apparatus at 55 C with CO{sub 2} sparging and dissolved sulfite. Particle size distribution, utilization, sulfite in solution, limestone type, and the approach to calcite equilibrium were all found to contribute to the limestone reactivity. In the absence of sulfite, limestone dissolution was controlled solely by mass transfer. For a given stone under mass transfer control, film thickness was found to be independent of pH. The dissolution rate in the presence of sulfite was controlled by a combined surface kinetics/mass transfer regime. SEM micrographs supported this conclusion. A surface rate correlation was developed which accounted for observed inhibition by an inverse dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone surface. While the form of the rate expression was applicable to all stones, the surface rate constant was stone dependent. A computer code which accounted for mass transfer with surface kinetics was tested against experimental observations of four limestone types. Changes in pH and the concentrations of calcium, carbonate, sulfite, sulfate, and adipic acid were accurately modeled.

  20. "Petit Granit": a Belgian limestone used in heritage, construction and sculpture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Dolores; Touneur, Francis; Bernáldez, Lorenzo; García Blázguez, Ana

    2014-05-01

    "Petit Granit" is a Lower Carboniferous (Tournaisian) grey-bluish crinoidal limestone that becomes shiny black when polished. The rock is known under several other names like Pierre Bleue (Blue Stone), but at the same time it should not be confused with other natural stones having a similar commercial name (e.g. Chinese Bluestone or Irish Bluestone) which are superficially similar limestones. It consists of around 96% microcrystalline calcite and a high proportion of fossils, mainly crinoids. In addition some dolomite, quartz, pyrite, marcasite and fluorite are present. Around fifteen quarries are active these days, employing almost one thousand people and thus is an important part of the natural stone economy in Belgium. "Petit Granit" has an Appellation d'Origine Locale (Local Appellation of Origin) designation since 1999. It has been extracted in several regions of South Belgium since the Middle Ages. In a sense the name is misleading because it is not an igneous rock and therefore not a true granite, but it derives from the profusion of numerous white fossil fragments in a dark carbonaceous matrix which look similar to feldspar crystals in a granitic background. The stone characterizes many façades of the urban architecture of Brussels and other Belgian cities, and since the second half of the 19th century it has been used in various countries in Europe and overseas. Its high density and uniformity mean that it takes an excellent polish and thus has versatile use as a dimension stone. "Petit Granit" has also been used widely in sculpture and architecture by several well known artists (e.g. Mateo Hernández, Michel Smolders, Tom Blatt, Elise Delbrassinne, Benoît Luyckx, Santiago Calatrava, among others). However, deterioration has been observed when it has been used for exterior purposes, and appropriate measures need to be taken to prevent this. This stone can be considered as Global Heritage Stone Resource in Europe, for both its use in construction and for

  1. Infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Razali, Salmi; Kirkman, Maggie; Ahmad, S Hassan; Fisher, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Infant abandonment and infanticide are poorly understood in Malaysia. The information available in the public arena comes predominantly from anecdotal sources. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia and to estimate annual rates for the most recent decade. Summaries of data about infanticide and illegal infant abandonment were gathered from police records; the annual number of live births was ascertained from the national registry. The estimated inferred infanticide rates for Malaysia were compared with the infanticide rates among countries of very high, high, medium, and low rankings on the Human Development, Gender Inequality, and Gini indices. From 1999 to 2011, 1,069 cases of illegal infant abandonment were recorded and 1,147 people were arrested as suspected perpetrators. The estimated inferred infanticide rate fluctuated between 4.82 and 9.11 per 100,000 live births, a moderate rate relative to the infanticide rates of other countries. There are substantial missing data, with details undocumented for about 78-87% of cases and suspected perpetrators. Of the documented cases, it appeared that more boys than girls were victims and that suspected perpetrators were predominantly Malays who were women, usually mothers of the victim; the possibility of arrest bias must be acknowledged. Economic and social inequality, particularly gender inequality, might contribute to the phenomena of infanticide and abandonment. Strategies to reduce rates of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia will require strengthening of the surveillance system and attention to the gender-based inequalities that underpin human development. PMID:25048164

  2. Reclamation of abandoned surface coal mined land using flue gas desulfurization products

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Kost, D.; Dick, W.A.

    2009-07-01

    Details are given of a field-scale research project where the Fleming site, in Ohio, of highly degraded and acid-forming abandoned surface coal-mined land, was reclaimed using a dry flue gas desulfurization product from an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion burner at a General Motors plant Pontiac, MI, which burned eastern Ohio coal and used dolomitic limestone for desulfurization. Plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses, wheat and clover, in 1994 and soil and water samples were analysed in 1995 and in 2009. It was found that FGD-treated plots promoted good regenerative growth, similar to that in plots using more concentrated re-soil material. The FGD treatment also greatly improved overall water quality. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Chrysotile asbestos in serpentinite quarries: a case study in Valmalenco, Central Alps, Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Alessandro; Rimoldi, Bianca

    2013-07-01

    The Valmalenco serpentinite (Central Alps, Northern Italy) is marketed worldwide as dimension and decorative stone. However, the same area was once subject to chrysotile asbestos mining, from the XIX century until 1975. Asbestos is a well-known carcinogen, and there is the possibility of releasing fibres during quarrying, subsequently exposing workers. From 2004 to 2011, extensive sampling and monitoring of quarry fronts, asbestos veins, commercial stones and airborne asbestos was carried out. Massive rock and vein samples were analyzed by a combined use of optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and quantitative electron microscopy (SEM). Asbestos is concentrated almost exclusively in discrete horizons, that coincide with the main discontinuities of the rock mass. Commercial stones without fractures and veins are practically asbestos free, whereas there is a slight contamination (sometimes exceeding the 1000 ppm threshold) close to hydrothermal selvages. Quarry floors were always quite contaminated by chrysotile "beards" detached from the surface of the blocks. The airborne asbestos concentrations (PCM and SEM) were distributed over a wide range, mostly below the occupational exposure limit of 0.1 f ml(-1). Concentrations at the quarry property border or at the closest villages were always below the environmental exposure limit of 0.002 f ml(-1). The extreme thinness of chrysotile fibrils produced during quarrying activities, and the abundance of pseudo-fibrous antigorite cleavage fragments proved the SEM-EDS analytical procedure to be the most suitable. It is of crucial importance to avoid the interception of veins during quarrying and to remove all visible asbestos from the extracted blocks, before any further processing. PMID:23770928

  4. Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

    2001-02-13

    This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

  5. Recycling of quarry waste as part of sustainable aggregate production: Norwegian and Italian point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonella Dino, Giovanna; Willy Danielsen, Svein; Chiappino, Claudia; Primavori, Piero; Engelsen, Christian John

    2016-04-01

    Resource preservation is one of the main challenges in Europe, together with waste management and recycling; recently several researchers are interested in the recovering of critical raw materials and secondary raw materials from landfill. Aggregate supply, even if it is not "critical" sensus stricto (s.s.), is one of the European priorities (low value but high volume needs). On the other side, the management of quarry waste , mainly from dimension stones, but also as fines from aggregate crushing, is still a matter of concern. Such materials are managed in different ways both locally and nationwide, and often they are landfilled, because of an unclear legislation and a general lack of data. Most of time the local authorities adopt the maximum precaution principle or the enterprises find it little profitable to recover them, so that the sustainable recycling of such material is not valued. Several studies have shown, depending on the material specific characteristics, the viability of recycling quarry waste into new raw materials used in glass and ceramic industries, precast concrete production, infrastructures etc. (Loudes et al. 2012, Dino&Marian 2015, Bozzola et al 2012, Dino et al. 2012, etc.). Thus, aggregate production may be one of the profitable ways to use quarry waste and is falling under the priority of EU (aggregate supply). Positive economic and environmental effects are likely to be achieved by systematic recycling of quarry waste planned by industries (industrial planning) and public authorities (national and local planning of aggregate exploitation). Today, the recycling level varies to a great extent and systematic recovery is not common among European Countries. In Italy and Norway no significant incentives on recycling or systematic approaches for local aggregate exploitation exist. The environmental consequences can be overexploitation of the natural resources, land take for the landfills, environmental contamination and landscape alteration by

  6. The conservation of Britain's limestone cave resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, P.; Gunn, J.

    1996-10-01

    Limestone caves are an important scientific and recreational resource in Britain. During the mid- to late 1970s, cavers and statutory conservation bodies cooperated in a review of cave resources which resulted in the designation of 48 caves or cave areas as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). During the same period, the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 was introduced to provide more effective planning controls on activities such as agriculture carried out within SSSI boundaries. In one case, at Priddy in the Mendip Hills of Somerset, landowners prevented access to a number of caves in protest over the new, tougher restrictions on agriculture. Faced with the closure, and perceiving that their recreational use of caves might also be controlled, local cavers joined the landowners in opposing the proposals for SSSI designation. As a result the proposals were reviewed, three caves were excluded from the site and controls on the remaining area were relaxed. The case emphasized a need for an effective system to take account of all factors affecting cave conservation, a need which has led to a more constructive dialogue between nature conservation bodies, caver organizations and other interested parties.

  7. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    PubMed

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers. PMID:23167314

  8. Acid mine treatment with open limestone channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Brant, D.L.; Skousen, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is often associated with mining of pyritic coal and metal deposits. Typical AMD associated with coal mines in the eastern US can have acidity and iron concentrations ranging from the teens to the thousands of mg/l. Aluminum and manganese can be present in concentrations ranging from zero to the low hundreds of mg/l. Much attention has been devoted to developing inexpensive, limestone (LS)-based systems for treating AMID with little or no maintenance. However, LS tends to coat with metal hydroxides when exposed to AMID in an oxidized state, a process known as {open_quotes}armoring{close_quotes}. It is generally assumed that once armored, LS ceases to neutralize acid. Another problem is that the hydroxides tend to settle into plug the pore spaces in LS beds forcing water to move around rather than through the LS. While both are caused by the precipitation of metal hydroxides, armoring and plugging are two different problems. Plugging of LS pores can be avoided by maintaining a high flushing rate through the LS bed. Armoring, however, occurs regardless of water velocity. This study investigated the influence of armoring on LS solubility and the implications of armoring and plugging on the construction of open (oxidizing) LS channels for treating AMD. We evaluated the AMID treatment performance of armored and unarmored LS in oxidizing environments both in laboratory and field studies.

  9. Analysis of noise pollution in an andesite quarry with the use of simulation studies and evaluation indices.

    PubMed

    Kosała, Krzysztof; Stępień, Bartłomiej

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the verification of two partial indices proposed for the evaluation of continuous and impulse noise pollution in quarries. These indices, together with the sound power of machines index and the noise hazard index at the workstation, are components of the global index of assessment of noise hazard in the working environment of a quarry. This paper shows the results of acoustic tests carried out in an andesite quarry. Noise generated by machines and from performed blasting works was investigated. On the basis of acoustic measurements carried out in real conditions, the sound power levels of machines and the phenomenon of explosion were determined and, based on the results, three-dimensional models of acoustic noise propagation in the quarry were developed. To assess the degree of noise pollution in the area of the quarry, the continuous and impulse noise indices were used. PMID:26652503

  10. LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SCRUBBERS: USER'S HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The handbook, intended for use of utility project managers and project engineers, provides guidance in selection, installation, and operation of a limestone FGD system, covering all phases from inception of the project through design, procurement, operation, and maintenance of th...

  11. High temperature H{sub 2}S removal using limestones

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.; Lynn, S.

    1995-12-31

    This project is exploring the technical and economic feasibility of using limestone in a high determine process for cleaning coal gas prior to combustion in a gas turbine. In one version of the process the coal gas would pass counter-currently through a nearly-isothermal, moving bed of limestone that would serve to remove particulates (by filtration), and hydrogen sulfide (by chemisorption), and ammonia (by catalysis). Alternative process configurations include the use of limestone in a cocurrently moving bed, in a fluidized bed, or in an entrained flow sorption system. The objectives of this research have been to define the range of temperatures at which these goals can best be realized at a given pressure, to determine the effect of the magnesium content of the limestone on sulfidation kinetics and calcium utilization, to use the kinetic data to model the various types of sorption systems, and to develop a process for converting calcium sulfide to elemental sulfur and calcium carbonate.

  12. Micromechanics of inelastic compaction in micritic and allochemical limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdova, Veronika; Baud, Patrick; Zhu, Wei; Wu, Lily; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies on the transition from brittle faulting to cataclastic flow in carbonate rocks revealed that while compact carbonate rocks display appreciable dilatancy when undergoing cataclastic flow, inelastic compaction was observed in their more porous counterparts. In their compactive behavior the porous carbonate rocks are more akin to porous siliciclastic rocks such as sandstone. Whilst for sandstone the micromechanics of inelastic compaction and cataclastic flow have been studied extensively, little is known about these processes in porous limestone. To fill this gap we performed experiments on Tavel, Indiana and Majella limestones with respective porosities 10-14%, 16-18% and 31%. Tavel limestone is a micritic limestone with a small number of sparry grains embedded in a microcrystalline matrix. Indiana and Majella limestones are allochemical limestones. In Indiana limestone allochems (fossils, ooids and peloids) form some 65% of bulk volume. In Majella limestone the allochems (represented by rudist fragments) have grain size somewhat smaller than that in Indiana limestone and form about half of the bulk volume. Samples of the three rocks were deformed in a conventional triaxial apparatus at confining pressures up to 150 MPa. Samples were loaded to various stages of deformation and microstructures associated with the damage evolution were investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy. For a reference, a study on an intact sample and a sample deformed under hydrostatic conditions was also performed on each rock. Despite the phenomenological similarities between cataclastic flow in siliciclastic rocks and porous carbonate rocks, we showed that the micromechanics can be very different. In a clastic rock such as sandstone, inelastic compaction derives primarily from grain crushing initiated by stress concentrations at grain contacts that induce cracks to radiate in a conical pattern towards the interior of the impinging grains. In contrast

  13. Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at North corner of Administration Building site - Huey P. Long Bridge, Administration Building, 5100 Jefferson Highway, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  14. VIEW OF LIMESTONE BAS RELIEF "PROMOTE THE GENERAL WELFARE" ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LIMESTONE BAS RELIEF "PROMOTE THE GENERAL WELFARE" ON SOUTH ELEVATION. RESHOOT OF MD-979-13 AFTER REMOVAL OF RAILING. - Greenbelt Community Building, 15 Crescent Road, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  15. 1. SOUTH FACADE. CONSTRUCTED (ca. 1895) OF INDIGENOUS LIMESTONE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTH FACADE. CONSTRUCTED (ca. 1895) OF INDIGENOUS LIMESTONE AND USED AS LOCKPORTS CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL FOR MORE THAN SIXTY YEARS. - Lockport Historic District, Central High School, Lockport, Will County, IL

  16. The use of PFA: Cement pastes in the stabilization of abandoned mineworkings

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, S.T.; Brooks, T.G.

    1996-12-31

    A project to treat abandoned limestone workings in the West Midlands has led to the development of low-cost PFA/cement bulk infilling materials (or pastes) using cement contents of as little as 2%. The use of mixtures of PFA, cement and water is well established and the technology involved in producing a relatively high cement and water content mix to produce low-viscosity grouts with rapid strength gain is well understood. However, the large volumes required to infill limestone mines sometimes as much as 20 m high and several hectares in area would make traditional grouts prohibitively expensive. This paper describes studies carried out to identify suitable PFA sources and the case histories of two treatment projects at Castlefields Mine in Dudley and Cow Pasture Mine in Sandwell. The design criteria, plant used, quality control testing carried out and the injection and verification processes are described. The relationship between cement content, moisture content, flowability and strength is examined. The paper also discusses a third case history where the low viscosity/rapid strength gain characteristics of a higher cement content mix paste were used to infill part of the 14 m high Stores Cavern in Dudley using no permanent containment works.

  17. 23 CFR 752.10 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abandoned vehicles. 752.10 Section 752.10 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND..., or enhancement of scenic beauty as seen from the traveled way of the highway as a landscape...

  18. 23 CFR 752.10 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abandoned vehicles. 752.10 Section 752.10 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND..., or enhancement of scenic beauty as seen from the traveled way of the highway as a landscape...

  19. 23 CFR 752.10 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Abandoned vehicles. 752.10 Section 752.10 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND..., or enhancement of scenic beauty as seen from the traveled way of the highway as a landscape...

  20. 23 CFR 752.10 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abandoned vehicles. 752.10 Section 752.10 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND..., or enhancement of scenic beauty as seen from the traveled way of the highway as a landscape...

  1. LOCATION OF ABANDONED WELLS WITH GEOPHYSICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abandoned wells are sometimes an important element in the contamination of fresh underground water supplies. If a well is not properly plugged and the casing is leaky, it may serve as a conduit for brines or other pollutants to reach a fresh water aquifer. This study was made to ...

  2. 36 CFR 13.122 - Abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 13.122 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Cabins General Provisions § 13.122 Abandonment. (a) An existing cabin or... portion of a cabin or other structure and its contents from a park area, to the extent of his or...

  3. 36 CFR 13.122 - Abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 13.122 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Cabins General Provisions § 13.122 Abandonment. (a) An existing cabin or... portion of a cabin or other structure and its contents from a park area, to the extent of his or...

  4. 37 CFR 1.138 - Express abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1.138 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Time for Reply by... Patent and Trademark Office. Express abandonment of the application may not be recognized by the...

  5. 32 CFR 636.31 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Abandoned vehicles. 636.31 Section 636.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart,...

  6. 23 CFR 752.10 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abandoned vehicles. 752.10 Section 752.10 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND..., or enhancement of scenic beauty as seen from the traveled way of the highway as a landscape...

  7. 32 CFR 636.31 - Abandoned vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 636.31 Abandoned vehicles. (a) Any MP or DOD police officer who finds or has knowledge of a motor... MP or DOD police officer who, under the provisions of this section, causes any motor vehicle to be... motor vehicle by any MP or DOD police officer should not be within the scope of either that...

  8. 4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT TROUGH FLOOR AND UNFINISHED GRANITE ROOF. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Abandoned Tunnel, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Limestone Road Superfund Site, operable unit 2, Cumberland, MD, June 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Record of Decision (`ROD`) presents the final remedial action selected for Operable Unit 2 (`OU2`) of the Limestone Road Superfund Site (`Site`), located in Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland. The selected remedy for the Site consists of the installation of a waterline and ancillary equipment (a pumping station and fire hydrants) to service residents in the vicinity of the Site. Implementation of deed restrictions on the previously capped areas of the Site to prevent use of such areas in such a manner as would cause disturbance of the caps; Implementation of a ground water management program to prevent installation of drinking water wells in the vicinity of the Site; Continuation of the long term ground water, surface water, and sediment monitoring plans currently being implemented pursuant to OU1; and Abandonment of existing residential water supply well.

  10. A computational study of particulate emissions from an open pit quarry under neutral atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvester, S. A.; Lowndes, I. S.; Hargreaves, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The extraction of minerals from surface mines and quarries can produce significant fugitive dust emissions as a result of site activities such as blasting, road haulage, loading, crushing and stockpiling. If uncontrolled, these emissions can present serious environmental, health, safety and operational issues impacting both site personnel and the wider community. The dispersion of pollutant emissions within the atmosphere is principally determined by the background wind systems characterized by the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This paper presents an overview of the construction and solution of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to replicate the development of the internal ventilation regime within a surface quarry excavation due to the presence of a neutral ABL above this excavation. This model was then used to study the dispersion and deposition of fugitive mineral dust particles generated during rock blasting operations. The paths of the mineral particles were modelled using Lagrangian particle tracking. Particles of four size fractions were released from five blast locations for eight different wind directions. The study concluded that dependent on the location of the bench blast within the quarry and the direction of the wind, a mass fraction of between 0.3 and 0.6 of the emitted mineral particles was retained within the quarry. The retention was largest when the distance from the blast location to the downwind pit boundary was greatest.

  11. A comparative analysis of abandoned street children and formerly abandoned street children in La Paz, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C; Barreda, P; Mendoza, V; Guzman, L; Gilbert, P

    2004-01-01

    Aims and Methods: A comparative study of abandoned street children and formerly abandoned street children was conducted in La Paz, Bolivia, representing the first such comparative assessment. Between August and December 1997, all abandoned street children in La Paz, Bolivia, who were willing to participate (n = 124) were interviewed repeatedly at night using standardised questionnaires to collect information on family history, demographics, socioeconomics, drug use, and physical/sexual abuse. The same questionnaires were administered to all former abandoned street children who chose to enter a local orphanage (n = 35). Results: The persistent street children differed greatly from those who entered the orphanage, most markedly in their higher risk of police abuse (95% versus 38%), absence from school (84% versus 19%), engagement in robbery (26% versus 4%), paint thinner use (88% versus 41%), alcohol use (58% versus 12%), and a serious medical problem (53% versus 20%). The risks for street children increased rapidly with age. Conclusions: A cascade of adverse outcomes afflicts the vast majority of abandoned street children in La Paz, which cumulate with age and diminish the likelihood of successful rehabilitation through lasting placement in an orphanage or residential home. Informed by these findings, the investigators operate a home for abandoned street children in La Paz. PMID:15321856

  12. Risk of groundwater inrush in subterranean gypsum quarries: the case study of Moncalvo near Asti (North Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzato, Cinzia; Fiorucci, Adriano; Gianotti, Alberto; de Waele, Jo; Vigna, Bartolomeo

    2010-05-01

    During the realisation of underground excavations in gypsum bedrock there is a possibility of intercepting large karst voids that can be completely filled with water under a considerable hydraulic pressure. The casual breaching of such voids can cause sudden and abundant water inrushes with consequences concerning safety of the excavation area and flooding of the tunnels. The presence of air-filled caves of great dimensions can also cause problems related to collapse of walls, ceilings and floors. In the subterranean quarry of Moncalvo d'Asti (Central Piedmont, Italy) in January 2005 an important inrush (60,000 m3 overnight) occurred causing damage to machinery and the flooding of several kilometres of underground tunnels. This inrush was caused by the breaching of a thin diaphragm of rock that separated the quarry from a large water-filled cave with water pressure of around 300 kPa along the front of the excavation. The rapid emptying of this void has caused a partial collapse of the roof of one of the largest cave chambers with the formation at the surface of a 20 metre wide sinkhole. To prevent similar phenomena to happen in the future a hydrogeological study concerning the entire gypsum mass was carried out. These investigations included monitoring of water levels intercepted by a series of boreholes, measurements of flow rates of water veins encountered by the excavations and chemical analysis of the different types of water coming from several points. This study has evidenced the presence of different drainage networks and the existence of a main karst circuit fed by diffused infiltration and recharge from the overlying marly-silty deposits and from adjacent minor less karstified systems in particularly fractured sectors of the gypsum. The waters coming from the main karst circuit are chemically very different from the waters deriving from deeper pathways. To be able to continue the excavation of gypsum in safe conditions the water levels were lowered for a

  13. Working Models about Mother-Child Relationships in Abandoned Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Torres, Belen; Guerrero, Pilar Garcia-Calvo

    2000-01-01

    Sixty abandoned and 36 non-abandoned school-aged children were told six short stories about mother-child relationships. Abandoned children showed less positive affect attribution to the mother, more compliant behavior in the child, and more justification of the mother when her behaviors were unfair. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  14. 30 CFR 56.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 56.4011 Section 56.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Control § 56.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be deenergized...

  15. 30 CFR 57.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 57.4011 Section 57.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be...

  16. 30 CFR 57.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 57.4011 Section 57.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 56.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 56.4011 Section 56.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Control § 56.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be deenergized...

  18. 30 CFR 56.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 56.4011 Section 56.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Control § 56.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be deenergized...

  19. 30 CFR 56.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 56.4011 Section 56.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Control § 56.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be deenergized...

  20. 30 CFR 56.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 56.4011 Section 56.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Control § 56.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be deenergized...

  1. 30 CFR 57.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 57.4011 Section 57.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 57.4011 Section 57.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4011 - Abandoned electric circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abandoned electric circuits. 57.4011 Section 57.4011 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4011 Abandoned electric circuits. Abandoned electric circuits shall be...

  4. Non-Abandonment as a Foundation for Inclusive School Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razer, Michal; Friedman, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this article describe an essential feature of inclusive educational practice: "non-abandonment". When students' needs and difficult behavior are overwhelming, teachers may abandon them emotionally as a defensive reaction to their own experience of emotional distress and helplessness. Non-abandonment represents a…

  5. 30 CFR 256.56 - Lease-specific abandonment accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lease-specific abandonment accounts. 256.56... OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Bonding § 256.56 Lease-specific abandonment accounts. (a) The Regional Director may authorize you to establish a lease-specific abandonment account...

  6. 30 CFR 900.14 - Abandoned mine land programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abandoned mine land programs. 900.14 Section 900.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Abandoned mine land programs. Programs for reclamation of abandoned mine lands are codified under...

  7. 30 CFR 900.14 - Abandoned mine land programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abandoned mine land programs. 900.14 Section 900.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Abandoned mine land programs. Programs for reclamation of abandoned mine lands are codified under...

  8. 30 CFR 900.14 - Abandoned mine land programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abandoned mine land programs. 900.14 Section 900.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Abandoned mine land programs. Programs for reclamation of abandoned mine lands are codified under...

  9. 25 CFR 214.29 - Prospecting; abandonment of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prospecting; abandonment of mines. 214.29 Section 214.29... RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.29 Prospecting; abandonment of mines. All prospecting or mining operations or the abandonment of a well or mine shall be subject to the approval of...

  10. 25 CFR 214.29 - Prospecting; abandonment of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Prospecting; abandonment of mines. 214.29 Section 214.29... RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.29 Prospecting; abandonment of mines. All prospecting or mining operations or the abandonment of a well or mine shall be subject to the approval of...

  11. 25 CFR 214.29 - Prospecting; abandonment of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prospecting; abandonment of mines. 214.29 Section 214.29... RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.29 Prospecting; abandonment of mines. All prospecting or mining operations or the abandonment of a well or mine shall be subject to the approval of...

  12. 30 CFR 900.14 - Abandoned mine land programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abandoned mine land programs. 900.14 Section 900.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Abandoned mine land programs. Programs for reclamation of abandoned mine lands are codified under...

  13. 30 CFR 900.14 - Abandoned mine land programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abandoned mine land programs. 900.14 Section 900.14 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Abandoned mine land programs. Programs for reclamation of abandoned mine lands are codified under...

  14. 25 CFR 214.29 - Prospecting; abandonment of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prospecting; abandonment of mines. 214.29 Section 214.29... RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.29 Prospecting; abandonment of mines. All prospecting or mining operations or the abandonment of a well or mine shall be subject to the approval of...

  15. 25 CFR 214.29 - Prospecting; abandonment of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prospecting; abandonment of mines. 214.29 Section 214.29... RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING, EXCEPT OIL AND GAS § 214.29 Prospecting; abandonment of mines. All prospecting or mining operations or the abandonment of a well or mine shall be subject to the approval of...

  16. Isotope characterisation of historical alabaster quarries in Western Europe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Leroux, Lise; Bromblet, Philippe; Cooper, Anthony H.; Nestler, Angela; Guerrot, Catherine; Montech, Anne-Thérèse; Worley, Noel

    2015-04-01

    ranging from the 14th to 16th century from the Louvre Museum, Cleveland Museum of Fine Arts, the Petit Palais Museum in Avignon and several regional collections and monuments. Burke W. H., Denison R. E., Hetherington E. A., Koepnick R. B., Nelson H. F., and Otto J. B. (1982) Variation of seawater 87Sr/86Sr throughout Phanerozoic time. Geology 10, 516-519. Claypool G. E., Holser W. T., Kaplan I. R., Sakai H., and Zak I. (1980) The age curves of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in marine sulfate and their mutual interpretation. Chem. Geol. 28, 199-260. Denison R. E., Kirkland D. W., and Evans R. (1998) Using strontium isotopes to determine the age and origin of gypsum and anhydrite beds. J. Geol. 106, 1-17. Kloppmann W., Leroux L., Bromblet P., Guerrot C., Proust E., Cooper A. H., Worley N., Smeds S. A., and Bengtsson H. (2014) Tracing Medieval and Renaissance Alabaster Works of Art Back to Quarries: A Multi-Isotope (Sr, S, O) Approach. Archaeometry 56, 203-219.

  17. Respiratory symptoms and ventilatory functions among quarry workers in Edo state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isara, Alphonsus Rukevwe; Adam, Vincent Yakubu; Aigbokhaode, Adesuwa Queen; Alenoghena, Innocent Osi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Workers in the quarry industries are exposed to hazards resulting from the inhalation of air borne particulates. The study determined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and assessed ventilatory functions among quarry workers in Edo state, Nigeria. Methods Quarry workers (site workers and office workers) were interviewed using structured questionnaire. FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC and PEFR were measured using a KoKo Legend spirometer. Results A total of 113 quarry workers (76 exposure and 37 controls) were studied. The exposure group had significantly higher occurrence of chest tightness (35.5%) compared with 16.2% of the controls (p < 0.05). The occurrence of cough (23.7% versus 13.5%), sputum (21.1% versus 16.2%), and dyspnoea (7.9% versus 5.4%), were higher in exposure groups while wheeze (10.8% versus 10.5%) and nasal congestion (27.0% and 25.0%) were higher in the control groups. The mean (SD) FEV1, and FVC were significantly lower among the exposure compared with the control group; 2.77L (0.73) versus 3.14L (0.78), p < 0.05, and 3.48L (0.84) versus 3.89L (0.92), p < 0.05. In both groups, smokers had significantly lower mean (SD) FEV1, FVC and PEFR compared with non-smokers; 2.91L (0.77) versus 3.39L (0.69), p = 0.01, 3.61L (0.91) versus 4.26L (0.74), p < 0.05 and 6.56L (2.43) versus 7.98L (1.67), p < 0.05. Conclusion Chronic exposure to quarry dust is associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function indices among quarry workers. The enforcement of the use of PPEs and periodic evaluation the lung function status of quarry workers is advocated. PMID:27347301

  18. Local seismic characteristics of the quarry blasts on the Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M.; Hahm, I.; Ryoo, Y.; Park, S.; Jeon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Most explosion events occurred by chemical blast in order to get aggregate stone on Korean peninsula.The vibrations generated by the explosions are recorded at seismic stations operated by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA), contaminating seismic data.To study the accurate seismic activities, source discrimination between explosion and earthquake is important to study the accurate seismic activities. In this study, we installed the portable seismometers around the quarry blast sites to understand the characteristics of seismic waveforms of quarry blasts and natural earthquakes. We collected the quarry blasting seismic data in local distance in Yeoncheon and Hoengseong regions. Then we analyzed the epicenter of magnitude, and P/S amplitude ratio of the blasts. For the analysis, we used seismic data recorded at KMA seismic network and temporary stations with portable seismographs. We precisely determined the locations using Hypoellipse and Genloc programs in order to compare the relocation results along the station azimuth and epicentral distance. The results showed high accuracy of hypocenter and improved reliability of the focal depth, that may be due to the close temporary stations. Comparison results between magnitude of this study and KMA's seismic analysis program (Antelope) shows magnitude differences of about 0.5 ~ 0.7. These differences may be due to the usage of different data set and magnitude scale. P/S amplitude spectral ratio of explosion is expected to have much higher ratio than that of earthquake (Walter et al., 1995; Zhao et al., 2008). P/S amplitude spectral ratio for each station was analyzed after we selected four micro earthquakes near the quarry blast site of Yeoncheon and Hoengseong regions. Although the spectral ratios appear to be scattered, the variation gets smaller as the epicentral distance becomes large. Study results indicate smoothly calculated P/S ratio in frequency domain and classified P/S ratio into two groups. The

  19. Behavior and Release of Nitrogen at Mines and Quarries in Nordic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Teemu; Neitola, Raisa; Jermakka, Johannes; Merta, Elina; Mroueh, Ulla-Maija

    2015-04-01

    The increased extraction of mineral resources and mining activities creates added pressure on the environmental issues and a proper water management in mining areas in Finland. Among others, nitrogen compounds released from explosives or from mining processes can have a detrimental effect on the environment. Thus, this project aimed at comprehensive understanding on the nitrogen issue in the extractive industry. The project collected essential data on nitrogen compounds present in the environments of mines and quarries, and generated better understanding of the discharge and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in mining areas. The sources and balances of explosives-originated nitrogen compounds at mines and quarries of different sizes were investigated and compared. Additionally, the focus was in 'nitrogen smudging' problem of waste rocks and the intensity, as well as evolution and chemical characteristics of their nitrogen contamination. According to the results, the total load of potential nitrogen to the environment depends on the scale and type of the activity as well as the type of explosives used. The main emission sources of nitrogen are process and dewatering waters. A lysimeter study showed that the explosives originated nitrogen content of left over stones from natural stone quarrying is relatively low and ca. half of the nitrogen is leached within the first weeks after detonation. The "nitrogen smudging" of natural stone quarrying left over stones is relatively low to begin with and enhanced by the rapid flushing by rainwater, thus the residues of explosives should not be considered to prevent the utilization of otherwise mineralogically inert waste rocks of good technical quality. The overall nitrogen management should take into account the background concentrations and sensitivity of the local ecosystem. The research project "Solution for Control of Nitrogen Discharges at Mines and Quarries, (MINIMAN)" was realized during years 2012-2014 as a cooperative

  20. Attrition of limestone by impact loading in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrizio Scala; Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino

    2007-09-15

    The present study addresses limestone attrition and fragmentation associated with impact loading, a process which may occur extensively in various regions of fluidized bed (FB) combustors/gasifiers, primarily the jetting region of the bottom bed, the exit region of the riser, and the cyclone. An experimental protocol for the characterization of the propensity of limestone to undergo attrition/fragmentation by impact loading is reported. The application of the protocol is demonstrated with reference to an Italian limestone whose primary fragmentation and attrition by surface wear have already been characterized in previous studies. The experimental procedure is based on the characterization of the amount and particle size distribution of the debris generated upon the impact of samples of sorbent particles against a target. Experiments were carried out at a range of particle impact velocities between 10 and 45 m/s, consistent with jet velocities corresponding to typical pressure drops across FB gas distributors. The protocol has been applied to either raw or preprocessed limestone samples. In particular, the effect of calcination, sulfation, and calcination/recarbonation cycles on the impact damage suffered by sorbent particles has been assessed. The measurement of particle voidage and pore size distribution by mercury intrusion was also accomplished to correlate fragmentation with the structural properties of the sorbent samples. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestone is significant. Lime displays the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by the sorbent sulfated to exhaustion, the recarbonated sorbent, and the raw limestone. Fragmentation of the raw limestone and of the sulfated lime follows a pattern typical of the failure of brittle materials. The fragmentation behavior of lime and recarbonated lime better conforms to a disintegration failure mode, with an extensive generation of very fine fragments. 27 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab.

  1. Genesis of Upper Cretaceous marl-limestone bedding, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.T. Jr. )

    1990-09-01

    In Alabama, marl-limestone bedding couplets and correlative coeval prograding clastic barrier-shoreline facies occur in the upper 20 m of a high-stand systems tract within the lower Campanian Mooreville-Demopolis depositional sequence. The Mooreville-Demopolis depositional sequence is terminated by a type-2 unconformity biostratigraphically dated at about 80 million years before present. Based on estimates using long-term sedimentation rate, the average periodicity of the marl-limestone couplets is approximately 100,000 years. Taken at face value, the apparent 100,000-year periodicity would suggest a climate-forced (or Milankovitch) origin of the marl-limestone couplets owing to cycles of productivity and dilution. However, significant variations in marl-limestone couplet thickness (ranging from less than 1 m to several meters) both within and between couplets suggests that average periodicity is not a meaningful figure with respect to these couplets. Further, climate-forcing is not favored because coarse clastic material fines upward in the marl beds and the petrography of the beds shows that the primary mode of biochemical deposition switched from pelagic nannofossils (in the marl) to benthic algal calcispheres (in the limestone). In order to adequately explain the petrographic and thickness observations, changing relative sea level is suggested as a viable hypothesis. Tectonic effects related directly to early stages of the Laramide orogeny (about 80 million years before present) may have affected relative sea level as far east as the Gulf Coastal Plain, thus producing the marl-limestone sequences. Marl-limestone sequences may reflect either short-term buildup and relaxation of intraplate stresses or short-term eustatic changes that resulted from slight variations in Farallon spreading rates.

  2. A Study on the Thermal Characteristics of Space Abandoned Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaohua, Zhang

    Abstract: Influenced by the limited space resources and the increased space debris, it is very exigent to clean the orbital abandoned satellite. The thermal characteristic of the abandoned satellite is a key parameter for the infrared radiation study, and it is also an important gist to estimate whether or not the satellite can be worked correctly. And this paper researched on the thermal analysis of the LEO and GEO abandoned satellite, and has been acquired the temperature variety law for the the space abandoned target, which is very significant for apperceiving the space situation and cleaning the space abandoned satellites and other debris initiatively.    

  3. The Energy-Efficient Quarry: Towards improved understanding and optimisation of energy use and minimisation of CO2 generation in the aggregates industry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ian; White, Toby; Owen, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Extraction and processing of rock materials to produce aggregates is carried out at some 20,000 quarries across the EU. All stages of the processing and transport of hard and dense materials inevitably consume high levels of energy and have consequent significant carbon footprints. The FP7 project "the Energy Efficient Quarry" (EE-Quarry) has been addressing this problem and has devised strategies, supported by modelling software, to assist the quarrying industry to assess and optimise its energy use, and to minimise its carbon footprint. Aggregate quarries across Europe vary enormously in the scale of the quarrying operations, the nature of the worked mineral, and the processing to produce a final market product. Nevertheless most quarries involve most or all of a series of essential stages; deposit assessment, drilling and blasting, loading and hauling, and crushing and screening. The process of determining the energy-efficiency of each stage is complex, but is broadly understood in principle and there are numerous sources of information and guidance available in the literature and on-line. More complex still is the interaction between each of these stages. For example, using a little more energy in blasting to increase fragmentation may save much greater energy in later crushing and screening, but also generate more fines material which is discarded as waste and the embedded energy in this material is lost. Thus the calculation of the embedded energy in the waste material becomes an input to the determination of the blasting strategy. Such feedback loops abound in the overall quarry optimisation. The project has involved research and demonstration operations at a number of quarries distributed across Europe carried out by all partners in the EE-Quarry project, working in collaboration with many of the major quarrying companies operating in the EU. The EE-Quarry project is developing a sophisticated modelling tool, the "EE-Quarry Model" available to the quarrying

  4. Abandoned metal mine stability risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bétournay, Marc C

    2009-10-01

    The abandoned mine legacy is critical in many countries around the world, where mine cave-ins and surface subsidence disruptions are perpetual risks that can affect the population, infrastructure, historical legacies, land use, and the environment. This article establishes abandoned metal mine failure risk evaluation approaches and quantification techniques based on the Canadian mining experience. These utilize clear geomechanics considerations such as failure mechanisms, which are dependent on well-defined rock mass parameters. Quantified risk is computed using probability of failure (probabilistics using limit-equilibrium factors of safety or applicable numerical modeling factor of safety quantifications) times a consequence impact value. Semi-quantified risk can be based on failure-case-study-based empirical data used in calculating probability of failure, and personal experience can provide qualified hazard and impact consequence assessments. The article provides outlines for land use and selection of remediation measures based on risk. PMID:19645755

  5. Explosives remain preferred methods for platform abandonment

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, A.; Daniel, W. IV; Kiesler, J.E.; Mackey, V. III

    1996-05-06

    Economics and safety concerns indicate that methods involving explosives remain the most practical and cost-effective means for abandoning oil and gas structures in the Gulf of Mexico. A decade has passed since 51 dead sea turtles, many endangered Kemp`s Ridleys, washed ashore on the Texas coast shortly after explosives helped remove several offshore platforms. Although no relationship between the explosions and the dead turtles was ever established, in response to widespread public concern, the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) implemented regulations limiting the size and timing of explosive charges. Also, more importantly, they required that operators pay for observers to survey waters surrounding platforms scheduled for removal for 48 hr before any detonations. If observers spot sea turtles or marine mammals within the danger zone, the platform abandonment is delayed until the turtles leave or are removed. However, concern about the effects of explosives on marine life remains.

  6. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  7. Effect of flooding waves on a removal of pollutants from underwater quarries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoly; Parshakova, Yanina; Tiunov, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    A characteristic feature of the effects of large-scale sandy gravel extruction from water bodies is the formation of a considerable underwater quarries, that strongly changes the hydrodynamical regimes of these water bodies. Traditionally, to estimate the consequences of the formation of the quarries researchers focus on lowering of the water level at limiting hydrological regimes which have fundamental importance for ensuring the sustainability of the different water intakes. Additionally, the changes in the velocity regimes of water body are estimated from the viewpoint of minimizing the possible erosion processes. There is the Verkhnekamskoye potassium and magnesium salts deposit (the largest in Russia and the second in the world) on Kama river (Kama Reservoir) within Berezniki-Solikamsk-industrial unit. For this deposit the consideration of the formation of quarries is much more complicated because of the presence of significant natural and technogenic output of brines into the Kama reservoir. In this case it is necessary to analyze the problem of estimating the accumulation of the brines in these underwater quarries and to calculate the intensity of the removal of pollutants at their washing due to the changes in the hydrological regime of the water body. The problem of changing the hydrodynamic regime, first of all the lowering of the water level and the calculation of the flow velocity can be solved very successfully in two-and even in one-dimensional approach and the problem of washing the underwater quarries is essentially three-dimensional. In this paper we simulate the removal of contaminants from the underwater quarry. The problem is solved in the framework of unsteady approach. The calculations show that in the flow near the bottom of quarry the vortex is formed whose direction is such that the front edge of the quarry is eroded. The computations and field observations show that, the upper, rather thin (<1 m) water layer in the quarry is washed during

  8. Detecting abandoned objects using interacting multiple models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Stefan; Münch, David; Kieritz, Hilke; Hübner, Wolfgang; Arens, Michael

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the wide use of video surveillance systems has caused an enormous increase in the amount of data that has to be stored, monitored, and processed. As a consequence, it is crucial to support human operators with automated surveillance applications. Towards this end an intelligent video analysis module for real-time alerting in case of abandoned objects in public spaces is proposed. The overall processing pipeline consists of two major parts. First, person motion is modeled using an Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter. The IMM filter estimates the state of a person according to a finite-state, discrete-time Markov chain. Second, the location of persons that stay at a fixed position defines a region of interest, in which a nonparametric background model with dynamic per-pixel state variables identifies abandoned objects. In case of a detected abandoned object, an alarm event is triggered. The effectiveness of the proposed system is evaluated on the PETS 2006 dataset and the i-Lids dataset, both reflecting prototypical surveillance scenarios.

  9. Leaching of clay minerals in a limestone environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1959-01-01

    Water saturated with CO2 at about 25??C was percolated through mixed beds of limestone or marble fragments and montmorillonite, "illite" and kaolinite in polyethylene tubes for six and fortyfive complete runs. The leachates were analysed for SiO2, A12O3 and Fe2O3, but only SiO2 was found. The minerals lost SiO2 in this order: montmorillonite > kaolinite > "illite". The differential removal of SiO2 during the short period of these experiments suggests a mechanism for the accumulation of bauxite deposits associated with limestones. ?? 1959.

  10. Limestone calcination with CO{sub 2} capture (III): characteristics of coal combustion during limestone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Wang; Shiying Lin; Yoshizo Suzuki

    2009-05-15

    In this study, the combustion characteristics of coal in CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmospheres were investigated during limestone decomposition in a continuously operating fluidized bed reactor for CO{sub 2} capture. The results show that the variations and concentrations of CO, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} in the exhaust gas of the reactor in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere were smaller than those in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. Because of steam dilution, the CO{sub 2} concentration in the bed was lower in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere than that in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere, and the effect of differential pressure variation on limestone decomposition in the fluidized bed was less pronounced in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere than that in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. Additionally, N{sub 2}O emission was detected only in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere, and the conversion of N to NO in the steam dilution atmosphere was of a smaller magnitude than that observed in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. We also found that the conversion of S to SO{sub 2} in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere was lower than that observed in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. The contents of sulfur, SiO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were much higher in solid samples located in the cyclone than in the overflow holder in both steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmospheres. Finally, the hydration and carbonation reactivities of CaO produced in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere were better than those produced in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. 13 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Quarry Haul Road Ecological Survey. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This biological survey was performed to document the summer flora and fauna found along the haul road constructed as part of the remedial action for the quarry bulk waste. State and Federal species listed as threatened or endangered were noted if encountered while surveying. Sampling locations were equally spaced along the quarry haul road, and a survey for vegetation and birds conducted at each location. Bird observations were conducted as breeding bird surveys once in June of 1991, and again in June of 1992. Each year`s survey includes two observations in the early morning and one late in the evening. Vegetation surveys were conducted in 1991 using quadrants and transects. mammal, reptile, and amphibian sightings were noted as encountered.

  12. Hydrogeological features conditioning trophic levels of quarry lakes in western Po plain (north-western Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Domenico Antonio; Castagna, Sara; Lasagna, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    Quarry lakes occur in plains areas due to the extraction of alluvial sand and gravel used for grout and concrete in the construction industry. Excavation depths can reach and intersect the groundwater surface, thus creating a lake. Because of the need to optimize efficiency, the number of active open pit mines has increased in recent years; consequently, the global number of pit lakes will increase in coming decades (Castendyk and Eary 2009; Klapper and Geller 2001; Castro and Moore 2000). Similar to natural lakes, pit lakes are subject to eutrophication process, both during and after quarrying activity; during mining activity, the eutrophic level is strongly controlled by the excavation method. In the Piedmont territory (north-western Italy) there are 70 active quarry lakes, corresponding to approximately 0.1% of the entire plain area. Quarry lakes, located primarily along the main rivers occur in alluvial deposits of the plain area and have average depths between 20 and 30 m (maximum of 60 m deep) and surface areas between 3 and 30 hectares (Castagna 2008). The present study describes the trophic status of 23 active quarry lakes in the Piedmont plain that were evaluated by applying classifications from scientific literature. Currently, the majority of the studied quarry lakes may be defined as mesotrophic or eutrophic according to the trophic state classifications. Based on historic data, lake trophic levels have increased over time, during active mining. At the end of mining activity, further deterioration of water quality was expected, especially for smaller lakes with minimal oxygen stratification and higher levels of nutrients and algal growth. In addition, the paper focuses on the pit lake water quality and pit dimension; From an environmental perspective the excavation of quarry lakes with an appreciable size will likely result in a better safeguard of water quality and enhanced possibilities for lake end use after the cessation of mining. Piedmont quarry

  13. Removal of graffiti from quarry stone by high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Comesaña, R.; del Val, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2013-04-01

    The integrity of architectural monuments in urban areas is threatened by numerous attacks, among which the graffiti is sometimes one of the most important. Particularly, Morelia's historic center (Mexico) (appointed World Heritage Site by UNESCO) suffers, for some years, a high number of graffiti. Most of these monuments in Morelia were built using a local stone called Pink Morelia Quarry. In this paper, we present the results of a study on the feasibility to remove the graffiti from Pink Morelia Quarry using a high power diode laser treatment. An extensive experimental analysis of the operating conditions has been carried out leading to successful results. The optimal parameters to achieve a total removal of graffiti have been determined. We concluded that continuous wave regime leads to better results than modulated wave regime, additionally, a two laser passes process demonstrated a high performance.

  14. The results of palaeontological excavations in the Sadowa Góra quarry (2012-14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmik, Dawid; Skreczko, Sylwia; Wolny, Mateusz

    2014-09-01

    Palaeontological fieldwork (2012-14) in the Sadowa Góra quarry carried out under the auspices of the University of Silesia, within the framework of a research project supported by the National Science Centre, helped to document the taxonomic diversity of Middle Triassic marine vertebrates from the Cracow-Silesia region. Accumulations of fossil bones are correlated with storm deposition and are time-averaged

  15. GPR data processing for 3D fracture mapping in a marble quarry (Thassos, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, G.; Gourry, J. C.

    1996-11-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been successfully applied to detect and map fractures in marble quarries. The aim was to distinguish quickly intact marketable marble areas from fractured ones in order to improve quarry management. The GPR profiling method was chosen because it is non destructive and quickly provides a detailed image of the subsurface. It was performed in domains corresponding to future working areas in real quarry-exploitation conditions. Field surveying and data processing were adapted to the local characteristics of the fractures: E-W orientation, sub-vertical dip, and karst features. After the GPR profiles had been processed, using methods adapted from seismics (amplitude compensation, filtering and Fourier migration), the interpreted fractures from a 12 × 24 × 15 m zone were incorporated into a 3D model. Due to the low electrical conductivity of the marble, GPR provides penetration depths of about 8 and 15 m, and resolutions of about 1 and 5 cm for frequencies of 900 and 300 MHz respectively. The detection power thus seems to be sufficient to recommend use of this method. As requested by the quarriers, the 3D representation can be used directly by themselves to locate high- or low-quality marble areas. Comparison between the observed surface fractures and the fractures detected using GPR showed reasonable correlation.

  16. The effects of a perturbed source on contaminant transport near the Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.

    1989-03-01

    The effects of a perturbed contamination source at the Weldon Spring quarry in St. Charles County, Missouri, on downstream solute concentrations were investigated using one-dimensional analytical solutions to an advection-dispersion equation developed for both constant-strength and multiple-stepped source functions. A sensitivity study using parameter base-case values and ranges consistent with the geologic conceptualization of the quarry area indicates that the parameters having the greatest effect on predicted concentrations are the distance from the quarry to the point of interest, the average linear groundwater velocity, the contaminant retardation coefficient, and the amplitude and duration of the source perturbation caused by response action activities. Use of base-case parameter value and realistic values for the amplitude and duration of the source perturbation produced a small effect on solute concentrations near the western extremity of the nearby municipal well field, as well as small uncertainties in the predicted results for the assumed model. The effect of simplifying assumptions made in deriving the analytic solution is unknown: use of a multidimensional flow and transport model and additional field work are needed to validate the model. 13 refs., 18 figs.

  17. The role of risk assessment in project planning at the Weldon Spring Quarry, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Haroun, L.A.; Peterson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology used to prepare a baseline risk evaluation of the bulk wastes at the quarry. The DOE is proposing to remove these bulk wastes and transport them approximately 6.4 km (4 mi) to a temporary storage facility at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site. The DOE has responsibility for cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). A baseline risk evaluation is an evaluation of the potential impacts on human health and the environment that may result from exposure to releases of contaminants from a site in the absence of site remediation. This evaluation is a key component of the remedial investigation (RI) process, as identified in guidance from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that addresses sites subject to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. Response actions at the Weldon Spring quarry are subject to CERCLA requirements because the quarry is listed on the EPA's National Priorities List (NPL).

  18. Evaluation of reclaimed abandoned bentonite mine lands

    SciTech Connect

    Edinger, K.D.; Schuman, G.E.; Vance, G.F.

    1999-07-01

    In 1985, the Abandoned Mined Land Division of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality began reclamation of 4,148 ha of abandoned bentonite mined lands. Calcium amendments and sawmill wood wastes were applied to the regraded spoils to enhance water infiltration, displacement of Na on the clay spoil, and leaching of the displaced Na and other soluble salts. Revegetation of these lands was generally successful, but after several years small areas (0.1--0.2 ha) began to show signs of vegetation die-back and to prescribe corrective treatment options. A randomized block design was imposed on study areas near Upton, Colony, and Greybull, Wyoming to characterize spoil chemical properties of good, moderate, and dead vegetation zones, which were subjectively delineated by visual vegetation cover and density differences. Spoil analyses indicated exchangeable-sodium (Na) concentrations were high and the dead vegetation zones exhibited exchangeable-sodium-percentages (ESP) above 50%, while surrounding good vegetation zones exhibited ESP values <10%. This coupled with low soluble-Na concentrations (<2 cmol/kg) suggests insufficient calcium (Ca) amendments were initially applied to ameliorate the sodic conditions of the spoil. The sampling design used to determine Ca amendment rates, which consisted of a composite of 5 spoil cores taken from each 0.8 ha area, was apparently insufficient to account for the highly heterogeneous spoil material that occurred throughout these abandoned bentonite reclamation sites. To revegetate these small degraded sites, additional Ca amendment would be necessary and reseeding would be required. However, the authors recommend further monitoring of the affected sites to determine if unfavorable conditions continue to degrade the reclaimed landscape before any attempt is made to rehabilitate the affected sites. If the degraded sites are stable, further Remediation efforts are not warranted because small areas of little or no vegetation are

  19. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARDS JONES VALLEY FROM THE CREST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARDS JONES VALLEY FROM THE CREST OF RED (CALLED RUFFNER) MOUNTAIN AND THE CITY OF BIRMINGHAM (TOP), WITH ABANDONED SLOSS CO. LIMESTONE QUARRIES (CENTER) AND RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE L. & N. BIRMINGHAM MINERAL RAILROAD (LEFT CENTER TO BOTTOM RIGHT). - Ruffner Red Ore Mine, North of I-20 at Madrid Exit, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. CALCINATION KINETICS AND SURFACE AREA OF DISPERSED LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measurements of the rates of calcination of two types of limestones, ranging in particle size from 1 to 90 micrometers, and over the temperature range of 516 to 1000 C. A kinetic model, based on the B.E.T. (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of the Ca...

  1. The influence of additives on rheological properties of limestone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska, B.; Bartosik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Limestone slurry appears in the lime production process as the result of rinsing the processed material. It consists of particles with diameter smaller than 2 mm and the water that is a carrier of solid fraction. Slurry is directed to the settling tank, where the solid phase sediments and the excess water through the transfer system is recovered for re-circulation. Collected at the bottom of the tank sludge is deposited in a landfill located on the premises. Rheological properties of limestone slurry hinder its further free transport in the pipeline due to generated flow resistance. To improve this state of affairs, chemical treatment of drilling fluid, could be applied, of which the main task is to give the slurry properties suitable for the conditions encountered in hydrotransport. This treatment consists of applying chemical additives to slurry in sufficient quantity. Such additives are called as deflocculants or thinners or dispersants, and are chemical compounds which added to aqueous solution are intended to push away suspended particles from each other. The paper presents the results of research allowing reduction of shear stress in limestone slurry. Results demonstrate rheological properties of limestone slurry with and without the addition of modified substances which causes decrease of slurry viscosity, and as a consequence slurry shear stress for adopted shear rate. Achieving the desired effects increases the degree of dispersion of the solid phase suspended in the carrier liquid and improving its ability to smooth flow with decreased friction.

  2. LIMESTONE AND LIME NEUTRALIZATION OF FERROUS IRON ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted a 2-yr study on hydrated lime and rock-dust limestone neutralization of acid mine drainage containing ferrous iron at the EPA Crown Mine Drainage Control Field Site near Rivesville, West Virginia. The study investigated optimizat...

  3. DEVELOPMENTS IN LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the most recent results from the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) program, results from the wall-fired demonstration. Tests were conducted to determine the efficacy of commercial calcium hydroxide--Ca(OH)2--supplied by Marblehead Lime Co. and of ca...

  4. GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  5. EVALUATION OF GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  6. View of the main entrance with basrelief limestone panel designed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the main entrance with bas-relief limestone panel designed by C. Paul Jennwein upon which is inscribed "Lege Atque Ordine Omnia Fiunt" (translated as by law and order all is accomplished) - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. LABORATORY STUDY OF LIMESTONE REGENERATION IN DUAL ALKALI SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of open- and closed-loop laboratory bench scale experiments which were carried out to study parameters which affect the reaction of limestone with dual alkali flue gas desulfurization system process liquors. It gives details of several sets of operat...

  8. Detail view to show one of the limestone relief panels ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to show one of the limestone relief panels depicting one of the agencies of the Commerce Department, here the Lighthouse Service - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Soil respiration patterns and controls in limestone cedar glades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Hui, Dafeng

    2015-01-01

    Soil depth, SOM, and vegetation cover were important drivers of Rs in limestone cedar glades. Seasonal Rs patterns reflected those for mesic temperate grasslands more than for semi-arid ecosystems, in that Rs primarily tracked temperature for most of the year.

  10. Curved limestone wall at east end of rail yard. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Curved limestone wall at east end of rail yard. Note cut off valves at base of stump in right foreground, and utility tunnel in middle distance, superindent's house at right, looking NW. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  11. Radial flow permeability testing of an argillaceous limestone.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, A P S; Jenner, L

    2013-01-01

    Argillaceous Lindsay limestone is the geologic storage formation that will be encountered at the site for the construction of a deep ground repository in Ontario, Canada, for the storage of low to intermediate level nuclear waste. The permeability of the Lindsay limestone is a key parameter that will influence the long-term movement of radionuclides from the repository to the geosphere. This paper describes the use of both steady-state and transient radial flow laboratory tests to determine the permeability of this argillaceous limestone. The interpretation of the tests is carried out using both analytical results and computational models of flow problems that exhibit radial symmetry. The results obtained from this research investigation are compared with the data available in the literature for similar argillaceous limestones mainly found in the Lindsay (Cobourg) formation. The experiments give permeabilities in the range of 1.0 × 10(-22) to 1.68 × 10(-19) m(2) for radial flows that are oriented along bedding planes under zero axial stress. The factors influencing transient pulse tests in particular and the interpretation of the results are discussed. PMID:22489872

  12. COMPUTERIZED SHAWNEE LIME/LIMESTONE SCRUBBING MODEL USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual gives a general description of a computerized model for estimating design and cost of lime or limestone scrubber systems for flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It supplements PB80-123037 by extending the number of scrubber options which can be evaluated. It includes spray...

  13. Crimes and misdemeanours: the case of child abandonment

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, S

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, a child was abandoned in a Burger King restaurant in Amsterdam by a Chinese woman, who hoped that the baby would be picked up by someone able to give the child a better life. She was convicted for child abandonment and imprisoned. Whereas some forms of child abandonment are criminalised, others are socially accepted and not even on the ethics agenda. This paper is an invitation to reflect on the inconsistency in the ways in which we prosecute, punish or try to correct some forms of child abandonment and yet make allowances for others. PMID:17209107

  14. Crimes and misdemeanours: the case of child abandonment.

    PubMed

    Giordano, S

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, a child was abandoned in a Burger King restaurant in Amsterdam by a Chinese woman, who hoped that the baby would be picked up by someone able to give the child a better life. She was convicted for child abandonment and imprisoned. Whereas some forms of child abandonment are criminalised, others are socially accepted and not even on the ethics agenda. This paper is an invitation to reflect on the inconsistency in the ways in which we prosecute, punish or try to correct some forms of child abandonment and yet make allowances for others. PMID:17209107

  15. APPLICATION OF LIMB TO PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS - A SYSTEMS ANALYSIS: LIMESTONE FEED AND BOILER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a systems analysis of the application of Limestone Injection Multistaged Burner (LIMB) technology to pulverized-coal boilers. It evaluates alternative limestone handling, preparation, and injection methods and boiler system impacts associated with LIMB...

  16. Importance of granulometry on phase evolution and phase-to-phase relationships of experimentally burned impure limestones intended for production of hydraulic lime and/or natural cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to modern ordinary Portland cement production from finely ground raw material blends, ancient burning of hydraulic lime was conducted by burning larger pieces of natural raw material. Due to natural variability of raw material composition, exploitation of different beds from even one formation can result the product with significantly different composition and/or properties. Prague basin (Neoproterozoic to pre-Variscan Palaeozoic of the central part of the Bohemian Massif - the so-called Barrandian area, Czech Republic) represents a classical example of the limestone-rich region with long-term history of limestone burning for quick lime and/or various types of hydraulic binders. Due to the fact that burning of natural hydraulic lime has been abandoned in this region at the turn of 19th/20th c., significant gap in knowledge on the behavior of various limestone types and on the influence of minor variance in composition on the quality of burned product is encountered. Moreover, the importance of employment of larger pieces of raw material for burning for the development of proper phase-to-phase relationships (i.e. development of hydraulic phases below sintering temperature at mutual contacts of minerals) has not been examined before. To fill this gap, a representative specimens of major limestone types from the Prague basin have been selected for experimental study: Upper Silurian limestone types (Přídolí and Kopanina Lms.), and Lower Devonian limestones (Radotín, Kotýs, Řeporyje, Dvorce-Prokop, and Zlíchov Lms.). Petrographic character of the experimental material was examined by polarizing microscopy, cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of insoluble residue. Based on the data from wet silicate analyses, modal composition of studied impure limestones was computed. Experimental raw material was burned in laboratory electric furnace at 1000 and 1200°C for 3

  17. Limestone: high-throughput candidate phenotype generation via tensor factorization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joyce C; Ghosh, Joydeep; Steinhubl, Steve R; Stewart, Walter F; Denny, Joshua C; Malin, Bradley A; Sun, Jimeng

    2014-12-01

    The rapidly increasing availability of electronic health records (EHRs) from multiple heterogeneous sources has spearheaded the adoption of data-driven approaches for improved clinical research, decision making, prognosis, and patient management. Unfortunately, EHR data do not always directly and reliably map to medical concepts that clinical researchers need or use. Some recent studies have focused on EHR-derived phenotyping, which aims at mapping the EHR data to specific medical concepts; however, most of these approaches require labor intensive supervision from experienced clinical professionals. Furthermore, existing approaches are often disease-centric and specialized to the idiosyncrasies of the information technology and/or business practices of a single healthcare organization. In this paper, we propose Limestone, a nonnegative tensor factorization method to derive phenotype candidates with virtually no human supervision. Limestone represents the data source interactions naturally using tensors (a generalization of matrices). In particular, we investigate the interaction of diagnoses and medications among patients. The resulting tensor factors are reported as phenotype candidates that automatically reveal patient clusters on specific diagnoses and medications. Using the proposed method, multiple phenotypes can be identified simultaneously from data. We demonstrate the capability of Limestone on a cohort of 31,815 patient records from the Geisinger Health System. The dataset spans 7years of longitudinal patient records and was initially constructed for a heart failure onset prediction study. Our experiments demonstrate the robustness, stability, and the conciseness of Limestone-derived phenotypes. Our results show that using only 40 phenotypes, we can outperform the original 640 features (169 diagnosis categories and 471 medication types) to achieve an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.720 (95% CI 0.715 to 0.725). Moreover, in

  18. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  19. Outcrop Analogue Studies in Geothermal Exploration - Characterization of fault zones in Triassic Muschelkalk limestones of the Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, S.; Bauer, J. F.; Philipp, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of fault zones is of particular importance in geothermal reservoirs since there may be great effects on fluid flow. Fault zones generally consist of two major hydromechanical units: the fault core and the damage zone, surrounded by the host rock. To improve predictions of fracture system parameters for each unit and resulting estimations of reservoir permeabilities at depths we perform outcrop analogue studies. We analyze Middle Triassic Muschelkalk limestones that form one geothermal reservoir formation in the Upper Rhine Graben (southwest Germany) in quarries on its eastern graben shoulder. We measure the orientations and displacements of various fault zones and characterize the fracture systems within the fault zone units and in the host rock. Our studies show that damage zones are well developed even in smaller fault zones. Their fault cores, however, are narrow compared with that of fault zones with large displacements and comprise brecciated material, clay smear, host rock lenses or zones of mineralization. Based on the field data we use analytical models to estimate the permeabilities of the analyzed fracture systems. Results show increased fracture frequencies in the fault zone damage zones and larger fracture apertures parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike that lead to enhanced permeability compared with other orientations. Mineralized fractures accumulated in this direction in the 'Nussloch'-quarry indicate that these fractures were pathways for fault zone parallel fluid flow in the past. This shows that open fractures with orientations parallel to fault zones may be pathways for fault zone parallel fluid flow in geothermal reservoirs. By contrast, well-developed fault cores may be potential barriers for fluid flow in inactive fault zones. To build numerical models to analyze local stress fields and effects on fracture propagation for different fault zone types and geometries information on rock mechanical properties is

  20. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO2 in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity = 1000 mg/l CaCO3). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to 6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). The ???30% of the residual grains in the pulsed flow reactor that are armored have thicker (50- to 100-??m), more aluminous coatings and lack the gypsum rind that develops in the constant flow experiment. Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Origin and Age of the Yemi Limestone Breccia, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KOH, Hee Jae

    2015-04-01

    The Yemi Limestone Breccia (YLB), which has been argued for its age and depositional origin, occurs sporadically in the upper part of the Cambro-Ordovician Chosun Supergroup (CS) in Korean Peninsula. The YLB is characterized by a carbonate breccia with calcareous and carbonaceous shale matrix. Based on occurrence and composition of breccia and matrix, the YLB can be classified into Type-I and Type-II carbonate breccia. Type-I carbonate breccia comprises dark gray to light gray limestone and lime-mudstone breccia with calcareous matrix and is commonly constrained within the upper part of the CS as a lens-shaped zonal occurrence. The Type-I carbonate breccia results in syn-depositional solution-collapsed brecciation through karstification during intermittent subareal exposure of platform carbonate in Middle Ordovician. Type-II carbonate breccia mainly occurs in the uppermost part of the CS showing an irregular-shaped distribution rather than sheet-like layering parallel to bedding. Type-II carbonate breccia consists of gray to dark gray limestone and lime-mudstone breccia and shale matrix. Matrix is typically purple to reddish and gray to dark gray shale with minor amount of sandstone, and partly carbonaceous indicating organic origin. Most of Type-II carbonate breccia is morphologically classified into chaotic breccia. Matrix and breccia display considerable difference of composition and deformational structures. Breccia preserves various penetrative ductile to brittle deformation structures such as cleavage superimposing bedding, minor fold structure, minor faults crosscutting both dolomite and calcite veins, and fracture zones filled in calcite. However, these deformational structures of breccia do not continuously extended into matrix. Especially Type-II carbonate breccia is well observed in limestone of the lower part of unconformity between CS and clastic rocks of the Jurassic Bansong Group (BS). Fractured and solution zones of brecciated limestone of the CS

  2. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494 Section 644.494 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be...

  3. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494 Section 644.494 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be...

  4. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494 Section 644.494 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be...

  5. 37 CFR 2.135 - Abandonment of application or mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mark. 2.135 Section 2.135 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Abandonment of application or mark. After the commencement of an opposition, concurrent use, or interference proceeding, if the applicant files a written abandonment of the application or of the mark without...

  6. 37 CFR 2.135 - Abandonment of application or mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mark. 2.135 Section 2.135 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Abandonment of application or mark. After the commencement of an opposition, concurrent use, or interference proceeding, if the applicant files a written abandonment of the application or of the mark without...

  7. 37 CFR 2.135 - Abandonment of application or mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mark. 2.135 Section 2.135 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Abandonment of application or mark. After the commencement of an opposition, concurrent use, or interference proceeding, if the applicant files a written abandonment of the application or of the mark without...

  8. 37 CFR 2.135 - Abandonment of application or mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mark. 2.135 Section 2.135 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Abandonment of application or mark. After the commencement of an opposition, concurrent use, or interference proceeding, if the applicant files a written abandonment of the application or of the mark without...

  9. 37 CFR 2.135 - Abandonment of application or mark.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mark. 2.135 Section 2.135 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Abandonment of application or mark. After the commencement of an opposition, concurrent use, or interference proceeding, if the applicant files a written abandonment of the application or of the mark without...

  10. 21 CFR 1315.27 - Abandonment of quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Abandonment of quota. 1315.27 Section 1315.27 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.27 Abandonment...

  11. 21 CFR 1315.27 - Abandonment of quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abandonment of quota. 1315.27 Section 1315.27 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.27 Abandonment...

  12. 21 CFR 1315.27 - Abandonment of quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abandonment of quota. 1315.27 Section 1315.27 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.27 Abandonment...

  13. 21 CFR 1315.27 - Abandonment of quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abandonment of quota. 1315.27 Section 1315.27 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.27 Abandonment...

  14. 21 CFR 1315.27 - Abandonment of quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abandonment of quota. 1315.27 Section 1315.27 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMPORTATION AND PRODUCTION QUOTAS FOR EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.27 Abandonment...

  15. 36 CFR 13.45 - Unattended or abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unattended or abandoned property. 13.45 Section 13.45 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA General Provisions § 13.45 Unattended or abandoned...

  16. 36 CFR 13.45 - Unattended or abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unattended or abandoned property. 13.45 Section 13.45 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA General Provisions § 13.45 Unattended or abandoned...

  17. 36 CFR 13.45 - Unattended or abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unattended or abandoned property. 13.45 Section 13.45 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA General Provisions § 13.45 Unattended or abandoned property. (a) This section applies to all...

  18. 49 CFR 195.59 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....phmsa.dot.gov or contact the NPMS National Repository at 703-317-3073. A digital data format is... abandonment, and certification that, to the best of the operator's knowledge, all of the reasonably available information requested was provided and, to the best of the operator's knowledge, the abandonment was...

  19. 42 CFR 498.69 - Dismissal for abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dismissal for abandonment. 498.69 Section 498.69 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... IN THE MEDICAID PROGRAM Hearings § 498.69 Dismissal for abandonment. (a) The ALJ may dismiss...

  20. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494 Section 644.494 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Buildings and Other Improvements (without the Related Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment...

  1. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... persons other than those authorized by the operator. (2) A mechanical device or fitting that will prevent... abandonment, diameter, method of abandonment, and certification that, to the best of the operator's knowledge, all of the reasonably available information requested was provided and, to the best of the...

  2. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... persons other than those authorized by the operator. (2) A mechanical device or fitting that will prevent... abandonment, diameter, method of abandonment, and certification that, to the best of the operator's knowledge, all of the reasonably available information requested was provided and, to the best of the...

  3. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... persons other than those authorized by the operator. (2) A mechanical device or fitting that will prevent... abandonment, diameter, method of abandonment, and certification that, to the best of the operator's knowledge, all of the reasonably available information requested was provided and, to the best of the...

  4. 28 CFR 104.35 - Claims deemed abandoned by claimants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Claims deemed abandoned by claimants. 104.35 Section 104.35 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.35 Claims deemed abandoned by...

  5. 28 CFR 104.35 - Claims deemed abandoned by claimants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims deemed abandoned by claimants. 104.35 Section 104.35 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.35 Claims deemed abandoned by...

  6. 28 CFR 104.35 - Claims deemed abandoned by claimants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Claims deemed abandoned by claimants. 104.35 Section 104.35 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND OF 2001 Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.35 Claims deemed abandoned...

  7. 28 CFR 104.35 - Claims deemed abandoned by claimants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claims deemed abandoned by claimants. 104.35 Section 104.35 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.35 Claims deemed abandoned by...

  8. 28 CFR 104.35 - Claims deemed abandoned by claimants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims deemed abandoned by claimants. 104.35 Section 104.35 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND OF 2001 Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.35 Claims deemed abandoned...

  9. 17 CFR 230.155 - Integration of abandoned offerings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Integration of abandoned... GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.155 Integration of abandoned offerings... from integration of private and registered offerings. Because of the objectives of Rule 155 and...

  10. 17 CFR 230.155 - Integration of abandoned offerings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Integration of abandoned... GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.155 Integration of abandoned offerings. Compliance with paragraph (b) or (c) of this section provides a non-exclusive safe harbor from integration...

  11. 17 CFR 230.155 - Integration of abandoned offerings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Integration of abandoned... GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.155 Integration of abandoned offerings... from integration of private and registered offerings. Because of the objectives of Rule 155 and...

  12. 17 CFR 230.155 - Integration of abandoned offerings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Integration of abandoned... GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.155 Integration of abandoned offerings... from integration of private and registered offerings. Because of the objectives of Rule 155 and...

  13. 17 CFR 230.155 - Integration of abandoned offerings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Integration of abandoned... GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 General § 230.155 Integration of abandoned offerings... from integration of private and registered offerings. Because of the objectives of Rule 155 and...

  14. 37 CFR 2.66 - Revival of abandoned applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revival of abandoned applications. 2.66 Section 2.66 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Applicants § 2.66 Revival of abandoned applications. (a) The applicant may file a petition to revive...

  15. 37 CFR 2.66 - Revival of abandoned applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Revival of abandoned applications. 2.66 Section 2.66 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Applicants § 2.66 Revival of abandoned applications. (a) The applicant may file a petition to revive...

  16. Book review: old fields: dynamics and restoration of abandoned farmland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2007 volume, “Old Fields: Dynamics and Restoration of Abandoned Farmland”, edited by VA Cramer and RJ Hobbs and published by the Society for Ecological Restoration International (Island Press), is a valuable attempt to synthesize a dozen case studies on agricultural abandonment from all of the ...

  17. Volume Computation of a Stockpile - a Study Case Comparing GPS and Uav Measurements in AN Open Pit Quarry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeva, P. L.; Filipova, S. L.; Filipov, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    The following paper aims to test and evaluate the accuracy of UAV data for volumetric measurements to the conventional GNSS techniques. For this purpose, an appropriate open pit quarry has been chosen. Two sets of measurements were performed. Firstly, a stockpile was measured by GNSS technologies and later other terrestrial GNSS measurements for modelling the berms of the quarry were taken. Secondly, the area of the whole quarry including the stockpile site was mapped by a UAV flight. Having considered how dynamic our world is, new techniques and methods should be presented in numerous fields. For instance, the management of an open pit quarry requires gaining, processing and storing a large amount of information which is constantly changing with time. Fast and precise acquisition of measurements regarding the process taking place in a quarry is the key to an effective and stable maintenance. In other words, this means getting an objective evaluations of the processes, using up-to-date technologies and reliable accuracy of the results. Often legislations concerning mine engineering state that the volumetric calculations are to present ±3% accuracy of the whole amount. On one hand, extremely precise measurements could be performed by GNSS technologies, however, it could be really time consuming. On the other hand, UAV photogrammetry presents a fast, accurate method for mapping large areas and calculating stockpiles volumes. The study case was performed as a part of a master thesis.

  18. Quarry blasts assessment and their environmental impacts on the nearby oil pipelines, southeast of Helwan City, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Adel M. E.; Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.

    2013-06-01

    Ground vibrations induced by blasting in the cement quarries are one of the fundamental problems in the quarrying industry and may cause severe damage to the nearby utilities and pipelines. Therefore, a vibration control study plays an important role in the minimization of environmental effects of blasting in quarries. The current paper presents the influence of the quarry blasts at the National Cement Company (NCC) on the two oil pipelines of SUMED Company southeast of Helwan City, by measuring the ground vibrations in terms of Peak Particle Velocity (PPV). The seismic refraction for compressional waves deduced from the shallow seismic survey and the shear wave velocity obtained from the Multi channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) technique are used to evaluate the closest site of the two pipelines to the quarry blasts. The results demonstrate that, the closest site of the two pipelines is of class B, according to the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) classification and the safe distance to avoid any environmental effects is 650 m, following the deduced Peak Particle Velocity (PPV) and scaled distance (SD) relationship (PPV = 700.08 × SD-1.225) in mm/s and the Air over Pressure (air blast) formula (air blast = 170.23 × SD-0.071) in dB. In the light of prediction analysis, the maximum allowable charge weight per delay was found to be 591 kg with damage criterion of 12.5 mm/s at the closest site of the SUMED pipelines.

  19. Toward strict liability for abandoned mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    This note examines ways to impose responsibility for abating the pollution caused by mine drainage. It describes coal mine drainage and control techniques, then examines abatement responsibility under the common law doctrine of public nuisance, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. More statutory and regulatory controls will probably be devised in the near future, given the serious problem such drainage poses and the lack of existing controls. It is also likely, given the trend apparent in the statutes and cases, that such controls will adopt rules of strict liability for abandoned mine drainage based on mere ownership of property. 175 references.

  20. A 12-year cavern abandonment test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérest, P.; Brouard, B.; Hévin, G.

    2010-06-01

    In 1997-1998, an abandonment test was performed in a 950-m deep, 8000-m3 salt cavern operated by GDF SUEZ at Etrez, France. In this relatively small brine-filled cavern, which had been kept idle for 15 years before the test, thermal equilibrium was reached. A special system was designed to monitor leaks, which proved to be exceedingly small. In these conditions, brine permeation and cavern creep closure are the only factors to play significant roles in pressure evolution. This test strongly suggested that obtaining an equilibrium pressure such that the effects of these two factors were exactly equal would be reached in the long term. Four years later, pressure monitoring in the closed cavern resumed. Pressure evolution during the 2002-2009 period confirmed that cavern brine pressure will remain constant and significantly smaller than geostatic pressure in the long term, precluding any risk of fracturing and brine seepage to the overburden layers.

  1. Ventures: Conoco abandons Iranian oil deal

    SciTech Connect

    Westervelt, R.

    1995-03-22

    Conoco (Houston), the oil and gas subsidiary of DuPont, has backed out of a deal to develop offshore oil fields for Iran as a result of a week of intense pressure from the Clinton Administration. Under the agreement, Conoco Iran, a Netherlands-based affiliate, would have developed two oil fields in the Persian Gulf. The deal, valued at $1 billion, would have been the first between Iran and a U.S. company since Washington severed relations with Teheran in 1980. Conoco says it operated within the law and with the knowledge of the U.S. government in the three years the deal was being negotiated. President Clinton announced an executive order barring such deals last Tuesday, after Conoco executives informed the Administration that the deal would be abandoned if an order was issued.

  2. Preliminary characterization of abandoned septic tank systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report documents the activities and findings of the Phase I Preliminary Characterization of Abandoned Septic Tank Systems. The purpose of the preliminary characterization activity was to investigate the Tiger Team abandoned septic systems (tanks and associated leachfields) for the purpose of identifying waste streams for closure at a later date. The work performed was not to fully characterize or remediate the sites. The abandoned systems potentially received wastes or effluent from buildings which could have discharged non-domestic, petroleum hydrocarbons, hazardous, radioactive and/or mixed wastes. A total of 20 sites were investigated for the preliminary characterization of identified abandoned septic systems. Of the 20 sites, 19 were located and characterized through samples collected from each tank(s) and, where applicable, associated leachfields. The abandoned septic tank systems are located in Areas 5, 12, 15, 25, and 26 on the Nevada Test Site.

  3. Abandoning pipelines working group regulatory issues

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The history of hydrocarbon development in Louisiana and off its coast is one of the interdependence of technological innovation, entrepreneurial risk-taking, resource management, judicial decisions, legislation, marketing, employee good will, infrastructure and support services, coupled with favorable geologic structures that made early exploration and development relatively easy. Mariners sailing off the coast of Louisiana and Texas in the 1600`s recorded one of the earliest known natural oil seeps. They shrugged it off as unimportant, as there was no market for the substance they witnessed. The seepage, however, provided a tiny clue to the vast storehouse of hydrocarbons trapped in the earth`s crust extending from the uplands, through Louisiana`s swamps and marshes, and into the subaqueous habitats of the Gulf of Mexico-the world`s ninth largest body of water. In all cases, each move into a new geographic province required considerable change in operation philosophy and in the science supporting the exploration and development activity. As technology changed, or was developed to meet the industry`s needs, new frontiers were explored. However, with time-as is the case with any nonrenewable resource-fields and wells lost their productive life. They had to be abandoned. In fact, the Minerals Management Service suggests that within the next 10 years the offshore industry will remove 150 platforms per year, or nearly half of the current number of production units. The industry will be asked to dispose of nearly one unit every 2.4 days. If this is the case, abandonment issues are going to continue to surface.

  4. Cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, M.; Rossen, J.; Martirena, F.; Scrivener, K.

    2012-12-15

    This study investigates the coupled substitution of metakaolin and limestone in Portland cement (PC). The mechanical properties were studied in mortars and the microstructural development in pastes by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and isothermal calorimetry. We show that 45% of substitution by 30% of metakaolin and 15% of limestone gives better mechanical properties at 7 and 28 days than the 100% PC reference. Our results show that calcium carbonate reacts with alumina from the metakaolin, forming supplementary AFm phases and stabilizing ettringite. Using simple mass balance calculations derived from thermogravimetry results, we also present the thermodynamic simulation for the system, which agrees fairly well with the experimental observations. It is shown that gypsum addition should be carefully balanced when using calcined clays because it considerably influences the early age strength by controlling the very rapid reaction of aluminates.

  5. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel A; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO(2) emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from 'breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO(2)/H(2)O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation. PMID:23198088

  6. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from `breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation.

  7. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from ‘breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation. PMID:23198088

  8. Remanent magnetization of a Pliensbachian limestone sequence at Bakonycsernye (Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, E.; Márton, P.; Heller, F.

    1980-06-01

    Remanent coercivity spectra derived from IRM acquisition curves and thermal demagnetization of the IRM indicate that magnetite, haematite and minor amounts of goethite determine the magnetic properties of the Pliensbachian limestones at Bakonycsernye. These limestones have been sampled at approximately 7-cm intervals along a 10-m stratigraphic section which covers the whole Pliensbachian stage (Lower Jurassic) without any recognizable break in sedimentation. The primary natural remanent magnetization (NRM) is carried by detrital particles of magnetite and haematite, but it is seriously overprinted by a normal magnetization which originates from secondary haematite with a wide range of blocking temperatures. This haematite is believed to have formed diagenetically during one of the Mesozoic periods of normal polarity. However, the reversal pattern obtained after NRM thermal demagnetization at temperatures ≥450°C is thought to be characteristic of the Pliensbachian stage.

  9. Full-scale results for TAM limestone injection

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, S.

    1996-12-31

    Information is outlined on the use of thermally active marble (TAM) sorbents in boilers. Data are presented on: the comparison of TAM to limestone; NOVACON process development history; CFB test history; CFB pilot scale test; full-scale CFB trial; August, 1996 CFB demonstration; Foster Wheeler Mount Carmel sorbent feed rate comparison and Ca:S comparison; unburned carbon is ash; and advantages and savings in CFB boilers.

  10. Thickness of the Tertiary limestone aquifer system, southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, James A.

    1982-01-01

    The Tertiary limestone aquifer system of the southeastern United States is a thick sequence of carbonate rocks that vary in age and that are hydraulically connected in varying degrees. A map is presented that shows the thickness of the aquifer system. Several types of geologic structures have had an effect on the thickness of the system. The magnitude of this effect varies with the type and size of the structure. (USGS)

  11. Dolomitization of Quaternary reef limestones, Aitutaki, Cook Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Gray, S.C.; Richmond, B.M.; White, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    The primary reef framework is considered to have been deposited during several highstands of sea level. Following partial to local recrystallization of the limestone, a signle episode of dolomitization occurred. Both tidal and thermal pumping drove large quantities of seawater through the porous rocks and perhaps maintained a wide mixing zone. However, the isotopic, geochemical and petrographic data do not clearly indicate the extent of seawater mixing. -from Authors

  12. Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Shale, Correll C.; Cross, William G.

    1976-08-24

    A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

  13. Initial tree establishment on blocky quarry waste ameliorated with hydrogel or slate processing fines.

    PubMed

    Rowe, E C; Williamson, J C; Jones, D L; Holliman, P; Healey, J R

    2005-01-01

    Pocket planting reclamation techniques developed in the 1970s for revegetating blocky quarrying waste have met with very limited success, often because the low water-holding capacity of the waste and limited root development within a small volume of planting pocket material result in severe drought mortality. We tested pocket planting approaches for waste tip reclamation at Europe's largest slate quarry, and compared materials for enhancing the continuity of water- and nutrient-holding down into the interior of the waste tip. When small compost-filled pocket planting bags were placed above slate processing fines (SPF) or water absorbent cross-linked polyacrylamide gel ("hydrogel"), tree growth rates increased in comparison with pocket planting bags alone. The SPF significantly improved tree survival especially during severe drought, but survival was not enhanced by the use of hydrogel. The sorption characteristics of hydrogel indicated that its presence may help to reduce nutrient leaching, but that it may have a negative effect on nitrogen availability. A more likely explanation for the poor performance of pure hydrogel is that it did not maintain sufficient available water, because of discontinuities caused by shrinkage and movement of the hydrogel, and/or degradation of water-holding capacity with environmental exposure. However, the root growth observed in the hydrogel treatments suggests that this technique, if adapted to reduce the effects of hydrogel shrinkage by using finer-grade hydrogel, mixing it with other soil-forming material, and reducing its exposure to extremes of temperature or sunlight, might have the potential to improve the growth and survival of trees planted on sites where delivery of heavy materials such as SPF is impractical. Fine mineral processing waste is freely available at active quarries and should be seen as a key resource for reclamation schemes. PMID:15888885

  14. Role of transient water pressure in quarrying: A subglacial experiment using acoustic emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Hooyer, T.S.; Iverson, N.R.; Thomason, J.F.; Jackson, M.

    2006-01-01

    Probably the most important mechanism of glacial erosion is quarrying: the growth and coalescence of cracks in subglacial bedrock and dislodgement of resultant rock fragments. Although evidence indicates that erosion rates depend on sliding speed, rates of crack growth in bedrock may be enhanced by changing stresses on the bed caused by fluctuating basal water pressure in zones of ice-bed separation. To study quarrying in real time, a granite step, 12 cm high with a crack in its stoss surface, was installed at the bed of Engabreen, Norway. Acoustic emission sensors monitored crack growth events in the step as ice slid over it. Vertical stresses, water pressure, and cavity height in the lee of the step were also measured. Water was pumped to the lee of the step several times over 8 days. Pumping initially caused opening of a leeward cavity, which then closed after pumping was stopped and water pressure decreased. During cavity closure, acoustic emissions emanating mostly from the vicinity of the base of the crack in the step increased dramatically. With repeated pump tests this crack grew with time until the step's lee surface was quarried. Our experiments indicate that fluctuating water pressure caused stress thresholds required for crack growth to be exceeded. Natural basal water pressure fluctuations should also concentrate stresses on rock steps, increasing rates of crack growth. Stress changes on the bed due to water pressure fluctuations will increase in magnitude and duration with cavity size, which may help explain the effect of sliding speed on erosion rates. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Mechanism of CaO sulfation in boiler limestone injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, M.R.; Yoon, H.; Burke, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Pilot and industrial-scale tests of boiler limestone injection (BLI) have demonstrated flue gas SO/sub 2/ reductions of around 50% at sorbent utilization efficiencies of 15-20%. The objective of the laboratory research program described in this paper was to improve BLI sorbent utilization through an understanding of the limestone calcination and CaO sulfation reaction mechanisms. This paper describes the laboratory sulfation studies. The laboratory work used a differential reactor operated at 700-1000/degree/C and lab-produced calcines from limestones, dolomites, and hydrated limes, having particle sizes in a range applicable to BLI. The lab work determined the intrinsic sulfation reaction rate and rate-controlling steps over this temperature range. The intrinsic rate increased with the square of calcine surface area and was rate controlling only at temperatures below 800/degree/C. At the higher temperatures more applicable to BLI, the sulfation rate was limited by pore diffusion of SO/sub 2/ and pore plugging by the sulfate product. Therefore, the reaction rate and the saturated sorbent efficiency depended strongly on particle size and calcine pore structure. The lab data indicate that an optimum calcine pore structure can be obtained by appropriately evaluating sorbents, controlling calcination conditions and incorporating alkali additives in the sorbent.

  16. Development of gypsum alteration on marble and limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Blackened alteration crusts of gypsum plus particulates that form on sheltered areas on marble and limestone buildings pose a challenge for rehabilitation and cleaning. Fresh marble and limestone samples exposed at monitored exposure sites present conditions of simple geometry and well-documented exposures but have short exposure histories (one to five years). The gypsum alteration crusts that develop on these samples provide insight into the early stages and rate of alteration crust formation. Alteration crusts from buildings give a longer, but less well known exposure history and present much more complex surfaces for gypsum accumulation. Integrated observations and measurements of alteration crusts from exposure samples and from buildings identify four factors that are important in the formation and development of alteration crusts on marble and limestone: (1) pollution levels, (2) exposure to rain or washing, (3) geometry of exposure of the stone surface, and (4) permeability of the stone. The combination of these factors contributes to both the distribution and the physical characteristics of the gypsum crusts which may affect cleaning decisions.

  17. Stratigraphy of the Upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    The upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone is probably the most stratigraphically-complex formation in the Cenozoic of Florida. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Ft. Thompson Formation to the west in southeast Palm Beach County (west of I-95); to the west in Broward County (west of the Turnpike); and to the north in south Broward County (along U.S. 27). The Miami overlies and very locally vertically grades into the Ft. Thompson in all of Dade County. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Anastasia Formation to the north and east in southeast Palm Beach County (east of I-95), and to the northeast in east Broward County (east of the Turnpike). The Miami laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Key Largo Limestone to the southeast in extreme southeast Dade County, and overlies and locally vertically grades into the Key Largo in the Lower Keys, south Monroe County. The Miami unconformably overlies the Pliocene Tamiami Formation and pinches out to the west in northeast mainland Monroe and southeast Collier Counties, and also pinches out to the north in east-central Palm Beach County. In all areas, the Miami Limestone is either overlain unconformably by very discontinuous undifferentiated surficial sediments or forms land surface.

  18. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  19. Specification aggregate quarry expansion: a case study demonstrating sustainable management of natural aggregate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Tucker, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Many countries, provinces, territories, or states in the European Union, Australia, Canada, the United States, and elsewhere have begun implementing sustainability programs, but most of those programs stop short of sustainable management of aggregate resources. Sustainable practices do not always have to be conducted under the title of sustainability. This case study describes how Lafarge, a large multinational construction materials supplier, implemented the principles of sustainability even though there was an absence of existing local government policies or procedures addressing sustainable resource management. Jefferson County, Colorado, USA, is one of three counties in the six-county Denver, Colorado, region that has potentially available sources of crushed stone. Crushed stone comprises 30 percent of the aggregate produced in the area and plays a major role in regional aggregate resource needs. Jefferson County is home to four of the five crushed stone operations in the Denver region. Lafarge operates one of those four quarries. Lafarge recently proposed to expand its reserves by exchanging company-owned land for existing dedicated open space land adjacent to their quarry but owned by Jefferson County. A similar proposal submitted about 10 years earlier had been denied. Contrary to the earlier proposal, which was predicated on public relations, the new proposal was predicated on public trust. Although not explicitly managed under the moniker of sustainability, Lafarge used basic management principles that embody the tenets of sustainability. To achieve the goals of sustainable aggregate management where no governmental policies existed, Lafarge not only assumed their role of being a responsible corporate and environmental member of the community, but also assumed the role of facilitator to encourage and enable other stakeholders to responsibly resolve legitimate concerns regarding the Lafarge quarry proposal. Lafarge successfully presented an enlightened

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Republic Steel Quarry Site, Elyria, Ohio (first remedial action), September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Republic Steel Quarry site is located in the City of Elyria in Lorain County, Ohio, southwest of Cleveland. From 1950 to 1972, approximately 200,000 gallons of waste pickle liquor (acid wastes used in steel processing) were discharged to a ditch located on the east side of the steel plant, which flowed north into the quarry. From 1972 to 1975 the ditch was used for disposing of rinse water from pickling operations. The primary contaminants of concern affecting surface water, sediments, and soil are VOCs including toluene, and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes: excavation and offsite disposal an a RCRA landfill of approximately 100 cu yds of contaminated surface soil from the pickle-liquor discharge ditch and from along the southern end of the quarry; and implementation of a five-year monitoring plan including a fish-species survey.

  1. Thermo-poroelastic response of an argillaceous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Najari, Meysam

    2016-04-01

    Argillaceous limestones are now being considered by many countries that intend to develop deep geologic storage facilities for siting both high-level and intermediate- to low-level nuclear fuel wastes. In deep geologic settings for high level nuclear wastes, the heating due to radioactive decay is transmitted through an engineered barrier, which consists of the waste container and an engineered geologic barrier, which consists of an encapsulating compacted bentonite. The heat transfer process therefore leads to heating of the rock mass where the temperature of the rock is substantially lower than the surface temperature of the waste container. This permits the use of mathematical theories of poroelastic media where phase transformations, involving conversion of water to a vapour form are absent. While the thermo-poroelastic responses of geologic media such as granite and porous tuff have been investigated in the literature, the investigation of thermo-poroelastic responses of argillaceous limestones is relatively new. Argillaceous limestones are considered to be suitable candidates for siting deep geologic repositories owing to the ability to accommodate stress states with generation of severe defects that can influence their transmissivity characteristics. Also the clay fraction in such rocks can contribute to long term healing type phenomena, which is a considerable advantage. This research presents the results of a laboratory investigation and computational modelling of the same that examines the applicability of the theory of thermo-poroelasticity, which extend Biot's classical theory of poroelasticity to include uncoupled heat conduction. The experimental configuration involves the boundary heating of a cylinder of the Cobourg Limestone from southern Ontario, Canada. The cylinder measuring 150 mm in diameter and 278 mm in length contains an axisymmetric fluid-filled cylindrical cavity measuring 26 mm in diameter and 139 mm in length. Thermo-poroelastic effects

  2. Structural characterization of a karstified limestone formation using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, D.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB) at Rustrel - Pays d'Apt, France, is an Inter-disciplinary Underground Science and Technology Laboratory buried in a karstified limestone formation. A multidisciplinary program focused on water circulation monitoring is presently performed inside the tunnels. This program comprises the investigation of faults, fractures, karstification and stratigraphy ofthe limestone massif using GPR. We present the main results obtained from these data. The tunnel has been dug in lower cretaceous limestone which is characterized by a low clay content, high electrical resistivity which results in generally very low attenuation of electro-magnetic waves. 90% of the tunnels floor are made of concrete whereas other are made of bare limestone. This experimental site offers a unique opportunity of perfoming measurements within an unweathered limestone massif. The whole 3km long tunnel has been investigated using single offset shielded 250 MHz antennas in May 2009. Processing includes : DC and very low frequency removal, amplitude compensation preserving lateral variations, migration and time to depth conversion. When necessary predictive deconvolution has been applied to remove ringing effects. These data sets are characterized by good signal to noise ratio and a signal penetration down to 18 meters. These data allow us to accurately map the stratigraphy of the surrounding rocks across the concrete walls of the tunnel. Some 20 m deep vertical wells have been drilled inside the tunnel through observed reflectors. This is a strong validation of the GPR images. The estimated resolution is centimetric to decimetric and matches the required geologic accuracy. The GPR data set allows to extend previous geological results in depth, particularly in the concrete coated parts of the tunnel where conventional geological surveying is impossible. Thanks to the processing which preserves lateral amplitude variations, GPR sections exhibit prominent

  3. Responsiveness summary for the remedial investigation/feasibility study for management of the bulk wastes at the Weldon Spring quarry, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1990-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program. The site consists of a quarry and a chemical plant area located about 6.4 km (4 mi) northeast of the quarry. The quarry is surrounded by the Weldon Spring Wildfire Area and is near an alluvial well field that constitutes a major source of potable water for St. Charles County; the nearest supply well is located about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) southeast of the quarry. From 1942 to 1969, the quarry was used for the disposal of various radioactively and chemically contaminated materials. Bulk wastes in the quarry consist of contaminated soils and sediments, rubble, metal debris, and equipment. As part of overall site remediation, DOE is proposing to conduct an interim remedial action at the quarry to manage the radioactively and chemically contaminated bulk wastes contained therein. Potential remedial action alternatives for managing the quarry bulk wastes have been evaluated consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting remedial actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. The contents of these documents were developed in consultation with EPA Region VII and the state of Missouri and reflect the focused scope defined for this interim remedial action. 9 refs.

  4. Feasibility study for remedial action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis (Figure 1.1). Cleanup of the Weldon Spring site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the following areas and/or media that constitute the QROU: (1) the residual material (soil and sediment) remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the bulk waste (about 11 million L [3 million gal] of uranium-contaminated ponded water was also addressed previous to bulk waste removal); (2) other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough and several creeks; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of Femme Osage Slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of QROU RI/FS evaluations. For remedial action sites, it is DOE policy to integrate values associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into the CERCLA decision-making process. The analyses contained herein address NEPA values as appropriate to the actions being considered for the QROU. A work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing conceptual site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in January 1994. The RI and baseline risk assessment (BRA) reports have been completed. The RI discusses in detail the nature and extent and the fate and transport of contamination at the quarry area.

  5. Abandonment of the name Elephant Canyon Formation in southeastern Utah: Physical and temporal implications

    SciTech Connect

    Loope, D.B. ); Sanderson, G.A. ); Verville, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    At its type locality near the confluence of the Green and Colorado rivers, the Elephant Canyon Formation consists of about 1,000 ft (310 m) of cyclically interbedded sandstones, limestones, and shales. The base of the formation was previously interpreted as an angular unconformity, with Wolfcampian (Lower Permian) strata resting directly on a Missourian (lower Upper Pennsylvanian) sequence composed of similar-appearing strata called the Honaker Trail Formation. The authors however, have traced individual strata within the lower Elephant Canyon and upper Honaker Trail and have found no evidence of the angular unconformity that supposedly defines their contact. After recollecting the type section of the Elephant Canyon, they found faunal evidence indicating that the lower 450 ft (138 m) of the formation is uppermost Pennsylvanian (Virgilian) in age rather than Permian (Wolfcampian). Owing to the illusory nature of the angular unconformity and the lack of biostratigraphic evidence for a major stratigraphic break at the base of the type section, they are here abandoning Elephant Canyon Formation and reinstating the pre-1962, lithostratigraphically-based terminology. Until better physical correlations between the type locality of the Rico Formation and the Canyonlands area are available, they recommend the informal term lower Cutler beds rather than Rico Formation for the rocks below the Cedar Mesa Sandstone and above the upper member of the Hermosa Formation. In addition, interpretations of the origin and history of the Meander Anticline based on the existence of an angular unconformity within the upper Paleozoic strata of the study area must be modified.

  6. Magnitude of Treatment Abandonment in Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Paola; Lam, Catherine G.; Itriago, Elena; Perez, Rafael; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Arora, Ramandeep S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment abandonment (TxA) is recognized as a leading cause of treatment failure for children with cancer in low-and-middle-income countries (LMC). However, its global frequency and burden have remained elusive due to lack of global data. This study aimed to obtain an estimate using survey and population data. Methods Childhood cancer clinicians (medical oncologists, surgeons, and radiation therapists), nurses, social workers, and psychologists involved in care of children with cancer were approached through an online survey February-May 2012. Incidence and population data were obtained from public sources. Descriptive, univariable, and multivariable analyses were conducted. Results 602 responses from 101 countries were obtained from physicians (84%), practicing pediatric hematology/oncology (83%) in general or children’s hospitals (79%). Results suggested, 23,854 (15%) of 155,088 children <15 years old newly diagnosed with cancer annually in the countries analyzed, abandon therapy. Importantly, 83% of new childhood cancer cases and 99% of TxA were attributable to LMC. The annual number of cases of TxA expected in LMC worldwide (26,166) was nearly equivalent to the annual number of cancer cases in children <15 years expected in HIC (26,368). Approximately two thirds of LMC had median TxA≥6%, but TxA ≥6% was reported in high- (9%), upper-middle- (41%), lower-middle- (80%), and low-income countries (90%, p<0.001). Most LMC centers reporting TxA>6% were outside the capital. Lower national income category, higher reliance on out-of-pocket payments, and high prevalence of economic hardship at the center were independent contextual predictors for TxA ≥6% (p<0.001). Global survival data available for more developed and less developed regions suggests TxA may account for at least a third of the survival gap between HIC and LMC. Conclusion Results show TxA is prevalent (compromising cancer survival for 1 in 7 children globally), confirm the suspected

  7. Middle Triassic shallow-water limestones from the Upper Muschelkalk of eastern France: the origin and depositional environment of some early Mesozoic fine-grained limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duringer, Philippe; Vecsei, Adam

    1998-10-01

    We have analyzed the sedimentary structures, depositional geometries, and petrography of a Middle Triassic fine-grained limestone succession from the Upper Muschelkalk in the intracratonic Germanic Basin. The limestones occur in a unit, several metres thick, that extends over an area of at least 2500 km 2 in eastern France. The geometry of specific wave ripples and small channels filled by lateral-accretion bedded limestones, and the cyclic sedimentation of the Upper Muschelkalk in eastern France indicate deposition on a very shallow subtidal shelf, commonly under the influence of relatively strong currents. The limestones mostly consist of microspar with a few skeletal grains. The formation of current ripples in the fine-grained limestones appear to be incompatible with an originally muddy grain size. The major part of the microsparite may thus have originated from the recrystallization of silt-size carbonate grains, e.g., calcispheres or peloids.

  8. Open quarry monitoring using gap-filled LANDSAT 7 ETM SLC-OFF imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Raptis, Ilias

    2014-10-01

    Open quarries are at the same time a necessity but also a source of pollution. Necessity as they supply the necessary fuel for energy production and source of pollution as they affect biodiversity, vegetation cover and threaten water resources. The objective of this work is to indicate a monitoring methodology using Landsat ETM SLC off imagery. On May 31, 2003, the Scan Line Corrector (SLC), which compensates for the forward motion of Landsat 7, failed. Without an operating SLC, the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) line of sight now traces a zig-zag pattern along the satellite ground track. As a result, imaged area is duplicated, with width that increases towards the scene edge. An estimated twenty-two percent of any given scene is lost because of the SLC failure. The maximum width of the data gaps along the edge of the image would be equivalent to one full scan line, or approximately 390 to 450 meters. The precise location of the missing scan lines will vary from scene to scene. In this study a gap filling technique for Landsat ETM SLC off imagery is evaluated. Different Landsat 7 ETM+ images SLC off were restored and then compared to historical data and data from other sensors. The restored images have been used in order to monitor the expansion of an open quarry in western Peloponnese and the results are presented.

  9. Dispersion of TSP and PM(10) emissions from quarries in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, Dmitry; Stern, Eli; Broday, David M

    2016-01-15

    This study evaluates AERMOD and CALPUFF dispersion calculations of particulate matter emissions from stone quarries in two mountainous regions against TSP and PM10 measurements, using both observational and WRF-modeled meteorological data. Due to different model parameterization, AERMOD dispersion predictions were in better agreement with the measured concentrations than those obtained by CALPUFF. As expected, the smaller the distance between the meteorological station, the source (quarry) and the receptors, the better the predictions of both AERMOD and CALPUFF. In contrast, using in-situ wind field obtained by runs of the WRF meteorological model for the complex terrain study area provided, in general, less accurate dispersion estimates than when using (even remote) meteorological observations. In particular, using the three-dimensional WRF-modeled wind field within CALPUFF did not provide any advantage over using the two-dimensional wind field, which is the common procedure of AERMOD and CALPUFF. Dry deposition was more significant for ambient concentration estimation in AERMOD than in CALPUFF. PMID:26562341

  10. Fault zones in Triassic Muschelkalk limestones of the Upper Rhine Graben: Infrastructure characterization and permeability structure analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2014-05-01

    The characterization of fault zones is of particular importance in geothermal reservoirs since there may be great effects on fluid flow. Fault zones generally consist of two major hydromechanical units: the fault core and the damage zone, surrounded by the unaffected host rock. To improve predictions of fracture system parameters for each unit and resulting estimations of reservoir permeabilities at depths, we perform outcrop analogue studies. We analyze Middle Triassic Muschelkalk limestones that form one potential geothermal reservoir formation in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG), in quarries on its eastern graben shoulder. We measure the orientations and displacements of various fault zones and characterize the fracture systems within the fault zone units and the host rock. Important features in terms of reservoir permeability are the fracture aperture, the fracture connectivity and the fracture vertical extension. Fractures have to be connected to create a hydraulically relevant flow path and non-stratabound fractures could create a hydraulic connectivity between multiple layers. We observed a decreasing fracture length with increasing distance to the fault core but a better connectivity between shorter fractures in the well-developed damage zones. Our studies show, however, that the differing mechanical properties in the analyzed limestone-marl alternations are significant for the fracture propagation, even in the fault zones. Based on the field data we use analytical models to estimate the permeabilities of the analyzed fracture systems. Results show increased fracture frequencies in the fault zone damage zones and larger fracture apertures parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike and to the URG that lead to enhanced permeabilities compared with other fracture orientations. Mineralized fractures accumulated in directions parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike as well as observed mineralizations in some fault cores indicate a fluid flow along the fault

  11. Inelastic compaction of a quartz-rich limestone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Schubnel, A.; rolland, A.; Heap, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of deformation and failure in many sedimentary settings hinges upon a fundamental understanding of inelastic behavior and failure mode of porous carbonate rocks. Previous studies on porous carbonate focused primarily on relatively pure limestone (composed in majority of calcite). Inelastic compaction in these carbonates was reported to be associated to cataclastic pore collapse and in most cases homogeneous cataclastic flow. Recent experimental results however revealed the development of compaction localization in the more porous end-members. The analysis of strain localization and complex failure modes in limestone has proved to be significantly more challenging than in sandstone because acoustic emissions (AE) cannot usually be used to guide systematic microstructural analysis. Recent studies have therefore relied on X-ray Computed Tomography, a technique that can to date only be used in situ in relatively limited systems. In this study we investigated the development of inelastic damage in a quartz-rich limestone with two main objectives: (1) quantify the impact of a secondary mineral such as quartz on the strength and strain localization in porous carbonate, (2) try to follow the development of inelastic damage using AE in such a quartz-rich rock. Saint-Maximin limestone of 37% porosity and composed of 80% calcite and 20% quartz was selected for this study. Two series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed in parallel at room temperature, constant strain rate in both nominally dry and wet conditions at confining pressures between 3 and 50 MPa. Wet experiments were carried out with water in drained conditions at 10 MPa of pore pressure. The first series of experiments were performed at IPG Strasbourg on relatively small samples. The failure modes and spatial distribution of damage were studied systematically in these samples. The second series of experiments were performed on larger samples at ENS Paris. Acoustic emission activity was

  12. Use of borehole radar reflection logging to monitor steam-enhanced remediation in fractured limestone-results of numerical modelling and a field experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, C.; Joesten, P.K.; Lane, J.W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar is an efficient geophysical method for the detection and location of fractures and fracture zones in electrically resistive rocks. In this study, the use of down-hole (borehole) radar reflection logs to monitor the injection of steam in fractured rocks was tested as part of a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation pilot study conducted at a fractured limestone quarry contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons at the former Loring Air Force Base, Limestone, Maine, USA. In support of the pilot study, borehole radar reflection logs were collected three times (before, during, and near the end of steam injection) using broadband 100 MHz electric dipole antennas. Numerical modelling was performed to predict the effect of heating on radar-frequency electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity, attenuation, and fracture reflectivity. The modelling results indicate that EM wave velocity and attenuation change substantially if heating increases the electrical conductivity of the limestone matrix. Furthermore, the net effect of heat-induced variations in fracture-fluid dielectric properties on average medium velocity is insignificant because the expected total fracture porosity is low. In contrast, changes in fracture fluid electrical conductivity can have a significant effect on EM wave attenuation and fracture reflectivity. Total replacement of water by steam in a fracture decreases fracture reflectivity of a factor of 10 and induces a change in reflected wave polarity. Based on the numerical modelling results, a reflection amplitude analysis method was developed to delineate fractures where steam has displaced water. Radar reflection logs collected during the three acquisition periods were analysed in the frequency domain to determine if steam had replaced water in the fractures (after normalizing the logs to compensate for differences in antenna performance between logging runs). Analysis of the radar reflection logs from a borehole where the temperature

  13. General view of north portals showing three abandoned roadbeds. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of north portals showing three abandoned roadbeds. View south - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. 67. View of old, abandoned vehicular bridge near entrance to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. View of old, abandoned vehicular bridge near entrance to Lake Trapps. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  15. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.46... fair any article entered for a fair may be abandoned to the Government or destroyed under...

  16. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.46... fair any article entered for a fair may be abandoned to the Government or destroyed under...

  17. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.46... fair any article entered for a fair may be abandoned to the Government or destroyed under...

  18. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Disposition of Articles Entered for Fairs § 147.46... fair any article entered for a fair may be abandoned to the Government or destroyed under...

  19. 11. Remains of Douglasfir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Remains of Douglas-fir cordwood abandoned when kilns ceased operation, looking northeast. - Warren King Charcoal Kilns, 5 miles west of Idaho Highway 28, Targhee National Forest, Leadore, Lemhi County, ID

  20. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., destroyed or donated to a public body, upon a finding in writing by the DE (but in no event shall such... justify the decision to donate, abandon, or destroy the property proposed, without outside reference....

  1. 7 CFR 97.104 - Application or certificate abandoned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 97.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY... abandoned certificates shall be published in the Official Journal, indicating that the variety has...

  2. 6. ANGLE VIEW OF ABANDONED INCINERATOR, INTERIOR OF BUILDING, 499 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ANGLE VIEW OF ABANDONED INCINERATOR, INTERIOR OF BUILDING, 499 FACING NORTHWEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Fleet Accounting & Dispersing Center, 178 Main Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR, ABANDONED SUGAR BIN IN CENTER. IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR, ABANDONED SUGAR BIN IN CENTER. IN BACKGROUND, THE ELEVATOR AND STAIRS GOING UP. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Lihue Plantation Company, Sugar Mill Building, Haleko Road, Lihue, Kauai County, HI

  4. 7 CFR 97.104 - Application or certificate abandoned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... abandoned certificates shall be published in the Official Journal, indicating that the variety has become... of such notice, the Commissioner shall publish a notice in the Official Journal that the variety...

  5. View of abandoned Yosemite Valley Railroad track grade and trestle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of abandoned Yosemite Valley Railroad track grade and trestle remain. Seen from same camera location as HAER CA-150-39. Looking northwest - All Year Highway, Between Arch Rock & Yosemite Valley, El Portal, Mariposa County, CA

  6. Penetration into limestone targets with ogive-nose steel projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, D.J.; Green, M.L.; Forrestal, M.J.; Hanchak, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments into limestone targets with 3.0 caliber-radius-head, 4340 Rc 45 steel projectiles. Powder guns launched two projectiles with length-to-diameter ratios of ten to striking velocities between 0.4 and 1.5 km/s. Projectiles had diameters and masses of 12.7 mm, 0. 117 kg and 25.4 mm, 0.610 kg. Based on data sets with these two projectile scales, we proposed an empirical penetration equation that described the target by its density and an empirical strength constant determined from penetration depth versus striking velocity data.

  7. Elucidation of denitrification mechanism in karstic Ryukyu limestone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijikawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in public water supplies have risen above acceptable levels in many areas of the world including Japan, largely as a result of contamination by human and animal waste and overuse of fertilizers. A previous study has characterized nitrate concentrations in groundwater in this area is a higher than the upper value (44mgL-1) of environmental quality criteria on one hands. On the other hand, there exists points where the concentration of nitric acid is not detected, which suggests the possibility of denitrification. During early 2000, a new analytical procedure for nitrate isotopic measurement, termed the "denitrifier method", was established. With the development of the nitrate isotope tracer method, much research has been reported detailing sources of groundwater nitrate and denitrification mechanisms. This study presents a pilot case study (in the southern part of Okinawa Main Island, Japan, where Ryukyu limestone is extensively distributed) using the combined stable isotope ratios of major elements (C, N and S) as net recorders of the biogeochemical reactions with the aim of elucidation of denitrification mechanism in Ryukyu limestone aquifer. As a result, significant decreases in nitrate concentrations due to denitrification were observed in groundwater at some locations, which induced increases in isotope ratios up to 59.7‰ for δ15NNO3. These points of groundwater were located above the cutoff wall of the underground dam and near the fault. It is considered that the residence time of the groundwater is longer than the other points at these denitrification points, and that reduction condition tends to be formed in the groundwater. However, the rapid rise of the groundwater level due to rainfall is likely to occur in the Ryukyu limestone aquifer, where the ground water was found to have changed dynamically from the reduction condition to the oxidation condition which a denitrification (has not occured)does not occur. Moreover, the

  8. Water transport in limestone by X-ray CAT scanning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossoti, Victor G.; Castanier, Louis M.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of water through the interior of Salem limestone test briquettes can be dynamically monitored by computer aided tomography (commonly called CAT scanning in medical diagnostics). Most significantly, unless evaporation from a particular face of the briquette is accelerated by forced air flow (wind simulation), the distribution of water in the interior of the briquette remains more or less uniform throughout the complete drying cycle. Moreover, simulated solar illumination of the test briquette does not result in the production of significant water gradients in the briquette under steady-state drying conditions.

  9. Southern hemisphere origin of the Cretaceous Laytonville Limestone of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarduno, J.A.; McWilliams, M.; Sliter, W.V.; Cook, H.E.; Blake, M.C., Jr.; Premoli-Silva, I.

    1986-01-01

    New paleomagnetic, paleontologic, and stratigraphic data from outcrops of the Laytonville Limestone (101 to 88 million years old) support a Southern Hemisphere orgin. A paleomagnetic megaconglomerate test is statistically significant and suggests magnetization at 14?? ?? 5?? south, predating Late Cretaceous to Eocene (70 to 50 million years ago) accretion. Rapid Kula plate movement or the existence and demise of a now vanished oceanic plate (or both) are required to accommodate the greater than 50?? of poleward displacement implied by the paleomagnetic data. This rapid motion brings into question the validity of a "speed limit" for absolute plate velocity based on present-day plate motions.

  10. Effect of water treatment chemicals on limestone/sulfur dioxide reaction in flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    A simple laboratory test has been developed which simulates the reaction between limestone/water and sulfur dioxide in flue gas desulfurization systems. By adding various chemicals, in differing concentrations, to the limestone/water mixture, the quantitative impact on the sulfur dioxide/limestone reaction can be qualified and quantified. This paper will present the impact of several water treatment chemicals on the reaction of limestone and sulfur dioxide. An attempt has been made to predict the effect through mathematical correlations. All of the additive chemicals tend to decrease the rate of dissolution of limestone to various degrees. Some of the chemicals retard crystal growth thus adversely impacting solids separation in the thickener. The physical appearance of the crystal growth retarded limestone absorber slurry approaches a colloidal suspension.

  11. Simultaneous removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by natural limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdiri, Ali; Higashi, Teruo

    2013-03-01

    Two natural limestone samples, collected from the Campanian-Maastrichtian limestones, Tunisia, were used as adsorbents for the removal of toxic metals in aqueous systems. The results indicated that high removal efficiency could be achieved by the present natural limestones. Among the metal ions studied, Pb2+ was the most preferably removed cation because of its high affinity to calcite surface. In binary system, the presence of Cu2+ effectively depressed the sorption of Cd2+ and Zn2+. Similarly Cu2+ strongly competed with Pb2+ to limestone surface. In ternary system, the removal further decreased, but considerable amount of Pb2+ and Cu2+ still occurred regardless of the limestone sample. The same behavior was observed in quadruple system, where the selectivity sequence was Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+. From these results, it was concluded that the studied limestones have the required technical specifications to be used for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters.

  12. Nurses' Attitudes and Knowledge of Their Roles in Newborn Abandonment

    PubMed Central

    Cesario, Sandra K.

    2003-01-01

    The practice of abandoning newborns shortly after birth has always existed. Occurring in primitive and contemporary societies, the motivations for newborn abandonment are varied and dependent upon the social norms of a specific geographic region at a given point in time. Because the desire to abandon an infant has had no support system in American society, such unwanted infants have been abandoned in a manner leading to their deaths. In response, many states have passed safe-haven legislation to save the lives of unwanted newborns. The laws typically specify a mother's ability to “abandon” her child to a medical service provider. However, judgmental attitudes and a lack of accurate information may impede a health care provider's ability to carry out a safe-haven law. The study described here examines a sample of nurses in a state with a safe-haven law. The study revealed no significant correlation between a nurse's knowledge, attitude, and self-perception of preparedness to manage a newborn abandonment event. owever, the outcomes highlight the negative attitudes and lack of knowledge many nurses possess regarding newborn abandonment and the women who commit this act. Educational programs for all health care providers and the community are essential to the efficacy of the legislation that currently exists. Continued multidisciplinary strategizing and general awareness are needed to serve as catalysts to build supports for unwanted newborns and their safe assimilation into the community. PMID:17273338

  13. Abandoned floodplain plant communities along a regulated dryland river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, L. V.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; House, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Rivers and their floodplains worldwide have changed dramatically over the last century because of regulation by dams, flow diversions and channel stabilization. Floodplains no longer inundated by river flows following dam-induced flood reduction comprise large areas of bottomland habitat, but the effects of abandonment on plant communities are not well understood. Using a hydraulic flow model, geomorphic mapping and field surveys, we addressed the following questions along the Bill Williams River, Arizona: (i) What per cent of the bottomland do abandoned floodplains comprise? and (ii) Are abandoned floodplains quantitatively different from adjacent xeric and riparian surfaces in terms of vegetation composition and surface sediment? We found that nearly 70% of active channel and floodplain area was abandoned following dam installation. Abandoned floodplains along the Bill Williams River tend to be similar to each other yet distinct from neighbouring habitats: they have been altered physically from their historic state, leading to distinct combinations of surface sediments, hydrology and plant communities. Abandoned floodplains may transition to xeric communities over time but are likely to retain some riparian qualities as long as there is access to relatively shallow ground water. With expected increases in water demand and drying climatic conditions in many regions, these surfaces and associated vegetation will continue to be extensive in riparian landscapes worldwide

  14. 30 CFR 934.20 - Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan... DAKOTA § 934.20 Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan. The North Dakota Abandoned Mine Plan as... 82601-1918; Telephone: (307) 261-5776. North Dakota Public Service Commission, Abandoned Mine...

  15. 30 CFR 934.20 - Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan... DAKOTA § 934.20 Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan. The North Dakota Abandoned Mine Plan as... 82601-1918; Telephone: (307) 261-5776. North Dakota Public Service Commission, Abandoned Mine...

  16. 30 CFR 934.20 - Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan... DAKOTA § 934.20 Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan. The North Dakota Abandoned Mine Plan as... 82601-1918; Telephone: (307) 261-5776. North Dakota Public Service Commission, Abandoned Mine...

  17. 30 CFR 934.20 - Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan... DAKOTA § 934.20 Approval of North Dakota abandoned mine plan. The North Dakota Abandoned Mine Plan as... 82601-1918; Telephone: (307) 261-5776. North Dakota Public Service Commission, Abandoned Mine...

  18. Lidar applications for the detection of movements in a cave: the example of the soapstone quarry of Bocheresse, Wallis, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchamp, Céline; Carrea, Dario; Baillfard, François Joseph; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The quarry of Bocheresse is located in the Val de Bagnes, in the Valais County (Switzerland) and was quarried for the soapstone used for the production of ovens. As the operation of the quarry is stopped nowadays, it is now a place of historical interest. Before its opening to visitors, a detailed study for the stability and movement detections was provided. This study was done by comparison of different TLS acquisitions. In such case, a Lidar Leica ScanStation 2 was used because it has the ability to make a 360° acquisition, including the roof of the cave. Three campaigns of Lidar data acquisition were provided (2008, 2009 and 2012) resulting into high resolution point clouds of the quarry. By comparison of the different datasets with PolyWorks software, four main rockfalls have been highlighted with volumes varying between 0.04 and 0.12 m3 and also blocks that have been purged and reworked materiel are clearly identified. It appears that, in 3 years, one of the wall of the cave moved forward of 1.5 cm with a maxima of 2 cm at the top. This wall presents a lot of fractures with important opening and also displacement along these fractures. In this case, Lidar shows to be a powerful tool that can be used in areas with reduced accessibility (like the roof of the cave) and were visibility is limited.

  19. Use of the McQuarrie equation for the computation of shear viscosity via equilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    1991-04-01

    To date, the calculation of shear viscosity for soft-core fluids via equilibrium molecular dynamics has been done almost exclusively using the Green-Kubo formalism. The alternative mean-squared displacement approach has not been used, except for hard-sphere fluids, in which case the expression proposed by Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] has invariably been selected. When written in the form given by McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1976), Chap. 21], however, the mean-squared displacement approach offers significant computational advantages over both its Green-Kubo and Helfand counterparts. In order to achieve comparable statistical significance, the number of experiments needed when using the Green-Kubo or Helfand formalisms is more than an order of magnitude higher than for the McQuarrie expression. For pairwise-additive systems with zero linear momentum, the McQuarrie method yields frame-independent shear viscosities. The hitherto unexplored McQuarrie implementation of the mean-squared displacement approach to shear-viscosity calculation thus appears superior to alternative methods currently in use.

  20. An Assessment of Spontaneous Vegetation Recovery in Aggregate Quarries in Coastal Sand Dunes in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Montoni, María Victoria; Fernández Honaine, Mariana; del Río, Julio Luis

    2014-08-01

    Sand dune quarries are a location of common aggregate mining activity developed in coastal areas, especially in the southeast Buenos Aires province, Argentina. In this article, spontaneous plant development after extraction activity ceased was evaluated. Five areas (three quarried and two natural/conservation areas) were sampled for plant cover and composition as well as sediment characterization. Different indexes, principal component analysis, and cluster analyses were applied to compare the areas. The dominant families observed in four of the five areas were Asteraceae, Poaceae, and Cyperaceae, and most of the species are commonly found in sandy and humid soils and/or modified/anthropized ones. Percentages of plant cover increased with time because of the cessation of active aggregate extraction. Indexes and multivariate analyses showed that it was possible to distinguish quarried and natural areas based on composition and vegetation cover. The distribution of plant species among the four areas responded to the presence of mining activity, but it also responded to the topographical position and consequently the depth of the groundwater level. Besides these differences, the four areas shared many native species. The results might indicate that once the activity has ceased, quarried areas may spontaneously and quickly develop a plant community with some similarities to those present in the nonquarried areas. However, given that the extracting activity involves the removal of the soil, revegetation of this type of environment depends on the presence of natural areas in the surroundings, which can serve as a source of seeds and propagules for plant regeneration.

  1. Floodplain/wetlands assessment for the interceptor trench field study near the Weldon Spring Quarry, Weldon Spring Site, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A.

    1999-12-15

    The US Department of Energy proposes to construct a groundwater interceptor trench near the Weldon Spring Quarry at the Weldon Spring Site in Missouri. The trench would be located near two palustrine wetland areas. Impacts to wetland hydrology and biotic communities are expected to be negligible. No long-term adverse impacts to floodplains are expected.

  2. Soil-gas radon concentration monitoring in an active granite quarry from Central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luís.; Barbosa, Susana; Pereira, Alcides; Aumento, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    This study was carried out in an active quarry located nearby the town of Nelas (Central Portugal), with the primary objective of assessing the effect of regular explosions on soil-gas radon concentrations. Here, a late-orogenic Hercynian porphyritic biotite granite occurs and is exploited for the production of high quality aggregates for different building purposes. This granite is part of the Beiras batholiths, being a geochemically moderately evolved rock, slightly peraluminous, and widely known by the frequent occurrence of associated uranium mineralizations. In fact, more than 4000t of U3O8 was produced from 60 mines of the Beiras region in the last century, over a wide area of more than 10.000 km2, and thousands of anomalies related with the local accumulation of uranium in fault filling materials, metasedimentary enclaves and doleritic veins were recognized during prospecting works. The heterogeneity of uranium distribution in this rock is reflected at the test site; indeed, a gamma ray survey shows that some of the faults that occur in the quarry are slightly mineralized. A total of 7 radon monitoring stations were implemented in the quarry, at a typical depth comprised between 1 and 2 meters, in holes drilled for the purpose. Aware RM-70 pancake GM detectors were used, sensitive to alpha, beta and gamma/X-rays above 10 keV, connected to palmtop computers for data registration (1 minute interval) and power supplied by batteries. Monitoring was carried out during 6 months, in Spring/Summer conditions and the exact time of each explosion was registered manually. Several problems of data loss and power supply affected the stations during the experiment, leading to discontinuities in the records. Still the available data showed important differences in the soil-gas radon concentrations between stations, which can be explained by the heterogeneity of uranium distribution in the rock and increased local permeability. Furthermore, all stations showed a clear daily

  3. Relation of historical quarrying, material utilization and performance on buildings in Eastern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luodes, Nike M.; Pirinen, Heikki

    2016-04-01

    Finland might seem to have lower stone heritage compared to other southern European countries, but it has been the main exporter of dimension stone to the majestic buildings that made St.Petersburg a recognized cultural heritage. In Finland, though, the stone seems undervalued. The only dramatic and predominant stone buildings are those of agencies and administrations located in the towns, where the stone has been used to impress and symbolize value. Romantic style used massive bossy stone in building's full height and created fine traditional carvings. Otherwise the communities have mainly built settlements in contact with the nature, with materials easily available and of low cost, following architectonical trends of the periods and producing interesting stone details. During the past years, research has been conducted on historical buildings interconnecting scientific and artistic approach to evaluate material durability and cultural relevance of the artifacts. Generally until mid 20th century the stone has been traditionally used massive for basements and walls. The materials still present good mechanical characteristics and most often the weathering level after hundreds of years of exposure had reached only the first millimeters from the curst. Instead the old methodology for deposit exploitation has left visible signs on the buildings. Some examples are visible from Kuopio. The exploitation of small, easy-to-reach surface deposits, even if planned by local experts, has affected quality and appearance of historical buildings. As an example the excavation of shallow quarries where also weathered crop was kept as a product has characterized the basement of the Niirala school that presents change in colors due to original material more than to weathering on site. Fissuring is also visible on a couple of blocks while marks on the rocks depict the old excavation method. Most often the deposits had been in the vicinities, frequently hidden by further construction

  4. Limestones of western Newfoundland that magnetized before Devonian folding but after Middle Ordovician lithification

    SciTech Connect

    Hodych, J.P. )

    1989-01-01

    A positive fold test and a negative conglomerate test help determine when and how stable remanence was acquired in the Middle Ordovician Table Head Group limestones of the Port au Port Peninsula of Newfoundland. The limestones magnetized after lithification and incorporation as clasts into a Middle Ordovician breccia. Hence, the limestones do not carry a detrital or other primary remanence despite their very low conodont color alteration index. The remanence may be thermoviscous or diagenetic and was acquired before Devonian folding. This suggests the need for caution in interpreting paleomagnetic results from other early Paleozoic limestones whose remanence resides in magnetite of blocking temperature lower than 400C.

  5. Enhancement of indirect sulphation of limestone by steam addition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael C; Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J; Macchi, Arturo

    2010-11-15

    The effect of water (H₂O(g)) on in situ SO₂ capture using limestone injection under (FBC) conditions was studied using a thermobalance and tube furnace. The indirect sulphation reaction was found to be greatly enhanced in the presence of H₂O(g). Stoichiometric conversion of samples occurred when sulphated with a synthetic flue gas containing 15% H₂O(g) in under 10 h, which is equivalent to a 45% increase in conversion as compared to sulphation without H₂O(g). Using gas pycnometry and nitrogen adsorption methods, it was shown that limestone samples sulphated in the presence of H₂O(g) undergo increased particle densification without any significant changes to pore area or volume. The microstructural changes and observed increase in conversion were attributed to enhanced solid-state diffusion in CaO/CaSO₄ in the presence of H₂O(g). Given steam has been shown to have such a strong influence on sulphation, whereas it had been previously regarded as inert, may prompt a revisiting of the classically accepted sulphation models and phenomena. These findings also suggest that steam injection may be used to enhance sulfur capture performance in fluidized beds firing low-moisture fuels such as petroleum coke. PMID:20958025

  6. Hydrogeology of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2000-01-01

    Results from 35 new test coreholes and aquifer-test, water-level, and water-quality data were combined with existing hydrogeologic data to define the extent, thickness, hydraulic properties, and degree of confinement of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida. This aquifer, previously known to be present only in southeastern Florida (Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties) below, and to the west of, the Biscayne aquifer, extends over most of central-south Florida, including eastern and central Collier County and southern Hendry County; it is the same as the lower Tamiami aquifer to the north, and it becomes the water-table aquifer and the upper limestone part of the lower Tamiami aquifer to the west. The aquifer generally is composed of gray, shelly, lightly to moderately cemented limestone with abundant shell fragments or carbonate sand, abundant skeletal moldic porosity, and minor quartz sand. The gray limestone aquifer comprises the Ochopee Limestone of the Tamiami Formation, and, in some areas, the uppermost permeable part of an unnamed formation principally composed of quartz sand. Underlying the unnamed formation is the Peace River Formation of the upper Hawthorn Group, the top of which is the base of the surficial aquifer system. Overlying the aquifer and providing confinement in much of the area is the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The thickness of the aquifer is comparatively uniform, generally ranging from 30 to 100 feet. The unnamed formation part of the aquifer is up to 20 feet thick. The Ochopee Limestone accumulated in a carbonate ramp depositional system and contains a heterozoan carbonate-particle association. The principal rock types of the aquifer are pelecypod lime rudstones and floatstones and permeable quartz sands and sandstones. The pore types are mainly intergrain and separate vug (skeletal-moldic) pore spaces. The rock fabric and associated primary and secondary pore spaces combine to form a dual diffuse

  7. Bird species diversity in the padawan limestone area, sarawak.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Mohammad Saiful; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Koon, Lim Chan; Rahman, Mustafa Abdul

    2011-12-01

    Bird surveys were conducted in the Padawan Limestone Area for seven days at each of two study sites, Giam and Danu, from August to December 2008. The purpose of the study was to compare the area's bird species richness and abundance of bird species in other limestone areas and in other forest types. The study also compared the species richness and relative abundance of birds in undisturbed and disturbed areas at both study sites. Twenty mist nets were deployed for 12 hours daily. During this study period, direct observations of birds were also made. In all, 80 species from 34 families were recorded at both sites. At Giam, 120 birds were mist-netted. These birds represented 31 species from 16 families. The direct observations at Giam recorded 13 species from 11 families. In the undisturbed area, 21 species from 13 families were mist-netted, whereas in the disturbed area, 21 species from 10 families were mist-netted. In Danu, a total of 48 birds, representing 25 species from 12 families, were mist-netted. The observations at Danu recorded 34 species from 19 families. Twelve species from 7 families were mist-netted in the undisturbed area, whereas 18 species from 11 families were mist-netted in the disturbed area. Statistical analysis showed that the species diversity index differed significantly between undisturbed and disturbed areas. PMID:24575218

  8. Bird Species Diversity in the Padawan Limestone Area, Sarawak

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Mohammad Saiful; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Koon, Lim Chan; Rahman, Mustafa Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Bird surveys were conducted in the Padawan Limestone Area for seven days at each of two study sites, Giam and Danu, from August to December 2008. The purpose of the study was to compare the area’s bird species richness and abundance of bird species in other limestone areas and in other forest types. The study also compared the species richness and relative abundance of birds in undisturbed and disturbed areas at both study sites. Twenty mist nets were deployed for 12 hours daily. During this study period, direct observations of birds were also made. In all, 80 species from 34 families were recorded at both sites. At Giam, 120 birds were mist-netted. These birds represented 31 species from 16 families. The direct observations at Giam recorded 13 species from 11 families. In the undisturbed area, 21 species from 13 families were mist-netted, whereas in the disturbed area, 21 species from 10 families were mist-netted. In Danu, a total of 48 birds, representing 25 species from 12 families, were mist-netted. The observations at Danu recorded 34 species from 19 families. Twelve species from 7 families were mist-netted in the undisturbed area, whereas 18 species from 11 families were mist-netted in the disturbed area. Statistical analysis showed that the species diversity index differed significantly between undisturbed and disturbed areas. PMID:24575218

  9. Treatment of mining acidic leachates with indigenous limestone, Zimapan Mexico.

    PubMed

    Labastida, I; Armienta, M A; Lara-Castro, R H; Aguayo, A; Cruz, O; Ceniceros, N

    2013-11-15

    An experimental study to evaluate the potential of using indigenous limestones in a passive system to treat acid mine drainage, at a mining zone of Mexico was carried out. Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of four types of native rocks (KIT1, KIT2, KSS, QZ) showed distinct CaCO3 contents. Synthetic aqueous leachates from an old tailings impoundment had a pH of 2.18, 34 mg/L As, 705 mg/L Fetotal, and 3975 mg/L SO4(2-). To evaluate dissolution behavior of rocks, kinetic batch experiments with an acid Fe-rich solution were performed. Decaying kinetic constants adjusting H(+) concentration to a first order exponential process were: KIT1 (k = 2.89), KIT2 (k = 0.89) and KSS (k = 0.47). Infrared spectrum and XRD of precipitates showed schwertmannite formation. To determine As and heavy metals (Fe, Cd, Zn, Al) removal from the synthetic leachates, batch experiments using KIT1 were developed. Arsenic decreased from 34.00 mg/L to 0.04 mg/L, Fe and Al were totally removed, and concentrations of Zn and Cd decreased 88% and 91% respectively. Analyses by IR and SEM-EDS indicate that co-precipitation with Fe-Hydroxides formed upon leachate interaction with limestone is the main As removal process. Chamosite, identified by XRD may participate in the removal of Al, SiO2 and a fraction of Fe. PMID:22819958

  10. GPR investigations in galleries buried inside a karstified limestone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, D.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-04-01

    A large scientific program of geophysical investigations is presently performed inside the Low-Noise Underground Laboratory (Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit / LSBB, Rustrel, France) which is an decomissioned underground missile control center, buried in a karstified limestone formation. One of the goals of this project is the understanding of the water circulation inside the structure. This experimental site offers a unique opportunity of perfoming measurements within an unweathered limestone massif. The tunnel has been dug in lower cretaceous limestone which is characterized by a low clay content, high electrical resistivity. The dip is around 25 degrees and vertical faults locally affect the structure. The studied zone is located in south-eastern France (Provence) and is characterized by a mediterranean climate with long dry periods and strong, short events of rain. This phenomenon induces large variations of water content within the karstified limestone from dry to saturated conditions. Analysis of the spatial and temporal variations of the water flow in a karstified limestones needs to define the geological context and the adequate geophysical methods. GPR offers a good tradeoff between resolution and ease of use on one hand and investigation depth on the other hand. We present some GPR profiles which have been acquired in April 2008 after a quite long and strong period of rain, inducing a complete water saturation inside the karstified massif. We used several RAMAC shielded antennas from 100 to 500 MHz. The longest profile is around 600 m long, with a 20 cm spacing, running from a raw to a concrete gallery. These data sets are characterized by a very good signal to noise ratio and a signal penetration, up to 18 meters. Signal processing includes very low frequency filtering, amplitude compensation, keeping lateral relative attenuation and ringing suppression. Final sections includes migration and time to depth conversion or depth migration. The estimated

  11. Mortality from stomach cancer in United States cement plant and quarry workers, 1950-80.

    PubMed Central

    Amandus, H E

    1986-01-01

    In 1978 a study of the mortality of United States cement plant and quarry workers was initiated. The vital status of a cohort of 5292 men who had been employed for at least five years in a cement plant between 1950 and 1980 was traced to 1 January 1980. The mortality experience was evaluated for 4231 white men for whom complete work histories and demographic information were available. Deaths from stomach cancer were significantly increased during 1965-9 but not over the entire follow up period (1950-80). Additionally, stomach cancer mortality was not significantly associated with tenure under separate control for age at follow up, latency, nativity, or year of birth. Evidence from this and other epidemiological studies has not confirmed an association between the constituents of cement plant dust exposure and death from stomach cancer. PMID:3637114

  12. Floating bioplato for purification of waste quarry waters from mineral nitrogen compounds in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Evdokimova, Galina A; Ivanova, Lyubov A; Mozgova, Natalia P; Myazin, Vladimir A; Fokina, Nadezhda V

    2016-08-23

    A bioplato was organized at Kirovogorskiy pond-settling of OLKON Company (the city of Olenegorsk, in Murmansk region) to reduce the content of nitrogen mineral compounds in water which come into the pond with the quarry waters after blasting operations using nitrogen compounds. The assortment of aboriginal plants was selected, a method of fixing and growing them on the water surface was developed, and observations of their vegetation were carried out. The dynamics of nitrogen compounds was determined in the laboratory and with full-scale tests. The coverage area pond by plants for the effective reduction of mineral nitrogen compounds was calculated. The use of floating bioplato helped to reduce content of ammonium and nitrite to maximum permissible levels or even lower in pond water. Also there was a tendency towards reduction of nitrate concentrations in water. The developmental technology can be used in any climatic zone with a specific assortment of plants-ameliorants. PMID:27220259

  13. Remediation of a uranium-contaminated quarry utilizing submersible, remotely operated vehicles. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.N.

    1992-10-22

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) Disposal Site on the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation was previously used to treat and dispose of pyrophoric and water-reactive wastes contaminated with small quantities of radioactive materials (almost exclusively uranium and uranium daughters) from processes at the Department of Energy-owned, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper describes remediation techniques utilizing a small, remotely operated submarine with an attached camera to visually locate waste containers, determine whether containers have been breached, transport small containers, and direct a larger remotely operated grappling machine to move larger waste for shredding operations. Most of the solid waste is reduced under water by a metal shredder. Non-shreddable items (e. g. , gas cylinders and larger structures) are mechanically breached under water to allow the contents to fully react. The waste is then removed from the water, monitored, the material is segregated, and transported to a temporary waste storage area until disposal.

  14. Remediation of a uranium-contaminated quarry utilizing submersible, remotely operated vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.N.

    1992-10-22

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) Disposal Site on the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation was previously used to treat and dispose of pyrophoric and water-reactive wastes contaminated with small quantities of radioactive materials (almost exclusively uranium and uranium daughters) from processes at the Department of Energy-owned, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper describes remediation techniques utilizing a small, remotely operated submarine with an attached camera to visually locate waste containers, determine whether containers have been breached, transport small containers, and direct a larger remotely operated grappling machine to move larger waste for shredding operations. Most of the solid waste is reduced under water by a metal shredder. Non-shreddable items (e. g. , gas cylinders and larger structures) are mechanically breached under water to allow the contents to fully react. The waste is then removed from the water, monitored, the material is segregated, and transported to a temporary waste storage area until disposal.

  15. D Modelling and Accuracy Assessment of Granite Quarry Using Unmmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Aguilera, D.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Mancera-Taboada, J.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, P.; Hernández-López, D.; Felipe-García, B.; Gozalo-Sanz, I.; Arias-Perez, B.

    2012-07-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are automated systems whose main characteristic is that can be remotely piloted. This property is especially interesting in those civil engineering works in which the accuracy of the model is not reachable by common aerial or satellite systems, there is a difficult accessibility to the infrastructure due to location and geometry aspects, and the economic resources are limited. This paper aims to show the research, development and application of a UAV that will generate georeferenced spatial information at low cost, high quality, and high availability. In particular, a 3D modelling and accuracy assessment of granite quarry using UAV is applied. With regard to the image-based modelling pipeline, an automatic approach supported by open source tools is performed. The process encloses the well-known image-based modelling steps: calibration, extraction and matching of features; relative and absolute orientation of images and point cloud and surface generation. Beside this, an assessment of the final model accuracy is carried out by means of terrestrial laser scanner (TLS), imaging total station (ITS) and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) in order to ensure its validity. This step follows a twofold approach: (i) firstly, using singular check points to provide a dimensional control of the model and (ii) secondly, analyzing the level of agreement between the realitybased 3D model obtained from UAV and the generated with TLS. The main goal is to establish and validate an image-based modelling workflow using UAV technology which can be applied in the surveying and monitoring of different quarries.

  16. Ecotoxicological risk assessment linked to infilling quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments.

    PubMed

    Perrodin, Yves; Donguy, Gilles; Bazin, Christine; Volatier, Laurence; Durrieu, Claude; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain; Abdelghafour, Mohammed; Moretto, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The dredged sediments of polluted seaports now raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. This results in the need to manage them on land, raising other types of technical, economic and environmental problems. Regarding the technical and economic dimensions, traditional waste treatment methods have proved to be poorly adapted, due to very high costs and low absorbable volumes. In this context, filling quarries in coastal areas with treated sediments could represent an interesting alternative for these materials. Nevertheless, for the environmental dimension, it is necessary to demonstrate that this possibility is harmless to inland ecosystems. Consequently, a specific ecotoxicological risk assessment methodology has been formulated and tested on three sediments taken from seaboards of France, in view to providing an operational and usable tool for the prior validation of any operation to fill quarries with treated seaport sediments. This method incorporates the formulation of a global conceptual model of the scenario studied and the definition of protocols for each of its steps: the characterisation of exposures (based on a simulation of sediment deposit), the characterisation of effects (via the study of sediments ecotoxicity), and the final ecotoxicological risk assessment performed as a calculation of a risk quotient. It includes the implementation in parallel of two types of complementary approach: the "substances" approach derived from the European methodology for assessing new substances placed on the market, and the "matrix" approach which is similar to methods developed in France to assess ecological risks in other domains (waste management, polluted site management, …). The application of this dual approach to the three sediments tested led to conclude with reliability that the project to deposit sediments "1" and "2" presented a low risk for the peripheral aquatic ecosystems while sediment "3

  17. Implications of a quarrying theory for glacial landscape evolution models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, N. R.; Egholm, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Models of glacial landscape evolution generally contain process descriptions that are conspicuously mismatched. In these models, descriptions of glacier flow are increasingly sophisticated, with clear derivation from mass, momentum and energy balances and well-known constitutive properties of ice. In contrast, bedrock erosion rules of these models are exceedingly heuristic. Erosion rate is commonly assumed to depend simply on the product of a bedrock erodibility coefficient and one of three variables: sliding velocity, ice discharge, or glacier power. A theoretical model of quarrying--thought to be the dominant process of glacial erosion--provides an explicit connection between bedrock erosion rates and glacier and bedrock characteristics. The model differs from past treatments of quarrying in that the dependence on sliding velocity arises from a treatment parallel to that used in the well-established theory of adhesive wear. Moreover, bedrock strength heterogeneity resulting from pre-glacial fractures is included using an experimentally-based Weibull distribution of rock strength. This strength distribution is predicated on the observation that larger rock bodies have lower strengths because they have a greater probability of containing a large fracture. Bedrock erosion rates increase with sliding velocity, but nonlinearity can be substantial and depends on the distribution of rock strength. Thus, bedrock susceptibility to erosion controls the form of the velocity dependence and cannot be adequately expressed with a coefficient. Perhaps more importantly, erosion rates generally increase with increasing effective pressure because diminished ice-bed separation in the lees of rock steps increases the probability of the glacier exploiting a major bedrock weakness. Erosion rates increase with increasing effective pressure even if the inverse dependence of sliding speed on effective pressure from glacier sliding rules is used in the theory. This dependence on effective

  18. Implications of a quarrying theory for glacial landscape evolution models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, N. R.; Egholm, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Models of glacial landscape evolution generally contain process descriptions that are conspicuously mismatched. In these models, descriptions of glacier flow are increasingly sophisticated, with clear derivation from mass, momentum and energy balances and well-known constitutive properties of ice. In contrast, bedrock erosion rules of these models are exceedingly heuristic. Erosion rate is commonly assumed to depend simply on the product of a bedrock erodibility coefficient and one of three variables: sliding velocity, ice discharge, or glacier power. A theoretical model of quarrying--thought to be the dominant process of glacial erosion--provides an explicit connection between bedrock erosion rates and glacier and bedrock characteristics. The model differs from past treatments of quarrying in that the dependence on sliding velocity arises from a treatment parallel to that used in the well-established theory of adhesive wear. Moreover, bedrock strength heterogeneity resulting from pre-glacial fractures is included using an experimentally-based Weibull distribution of rock strength. This strength distribution is predicated on the observation that larger rock bodies have lower strengths because they have a greater probability of containing a large fracture. Bedrock erosion rates increase with sliding velocity, but nonlinearity can be substantial and depends on the distribution of rock strength. Thus, bedrock susceptibility to erosion controls the form of the velocity dependence and cannot be adequately expressed with a coefficient. Perhaps more importantly, erosion rates generally increase with increasing effective pressure because diminished ice-bed separation in the lees of rock steps increases the probability of the glacier exploiting a major bedrock weakness. Erosion rates increase with increasing effective pressure even if the inverse dependence of sliding speed on effective pressure from glacier sliding rules is used in the theory. This dependence on effective

  19. Who Says There Is No Life after Abandonment? A Grounded Theory on the Coping of Abandoned Filipino Elderly in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Lacorte, Jeremy C.; Lacsamana, Andrea Keith G.; Lagac, Mark Lawrence M.; Laguador, Jobel M.; Lapid, Jazminn Jessica R.; Lee, Lyndcie Miriele C.

    2012-01-01

    Cases of abandoned elderly are increasing worldwide. By and large, this group struggles with the sudden change in living arrangement as well as abandonment by their families. Consequently, many elderly are forced into living in nursing homes for the remainder of their lives. Abandonment among these elderly negatively affects how they view…

  20. Crystallographic transformation of limestone during calcination under CO2.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Jose Manuel; Medina, Santiago

    2015-09-14

    The calcination reaction of limestone (CaCO3) to yield lime (CaO) is at the heart of many industrial applications as well as natural processes. In the recently emerged calcium-looping technology, CO2 capture is accomplished by the carbonation of CaO in a gas-solid reactor (carbonator). CaO is derived by the calcination of limestone in a calciner reactor under necessarily high CO2 partial pressure and high temperature. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been employed in this work to gain further insight into the crystallographic transformation that takes place during the calcination of limestone under CO2, at partial pressures (P) close to the equilibrium pressure (Peq) and at high temperature. Calcination under these conditions becomes extremely slow. The in situ XRD analysis presented here suggests the presence of an intermediate metastable CaO* phase stemming from the parent CaCO3 structure. According to the reaction mechanism proposed elsewhere, the exothermicity of the CaO* → CaO transformation and high values of P/Peq inhibit the nucleation of CaO at high temperatures. The wt% of CaO* remains at a relatively high level during slow calcination. Two diverse stages have been identified in the evolution of CaO crystallite size, L. Initially, L increases with CaCO3 conversion, following a logarithmic law. Slow calcination allows the crystallite size to grow up from a few nanometers at nucleation up to around 100 nm near the end of conversion. Otherwise, quick calcination at relatively lower CO2 concentrations limits CaO crystallite growth. Once calcination reaches an advanced state, the presence of CaO* drops to zero and the rate of increase of the CaO crystallite size is significantly hindered. Arguably, the first stage in CaO crystallite growth is driven by aggregation of the metastable CaO* nanocrystals, due to surface attractive forces, whereas the second one is consistent with sintering of the aggregated CaO crystals, and persists with time after full

  1. Seasonal energy storage using bioenergy production from abandoned croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Elliott; Lobell, David B.; Genova, Robert C.; Zumkehr, Andrew; Field, Christopher B.

    2013-09-01

    Bioenergy has the unique potential to provide a dispatchable and carbon-negative component to renewable energy portfolios. However, the sustainability, spatial distribution, and capacity for bioenergy are critically dependent on highly uncertain land-use impacts of biomass agriculture. Biomass cultivation on abandoned agriculture lands is thought to reduce land-use impacts relative to biomass production on currently used croplands. While coarse global estimates of abandoned agriculture lands have been used for large-scale bioenergy assessments, more practical technological and policy applications will require regional, high-resolution information on land availability. Here, we present US county-level estimates of the magnitude and distribution of abandoned cropland and potential bioenergy production on this land using remote sensing data, agriculture inventories, and land-use modeling. These abandoned land estimates are 61% larger than previous estimates for the US, mainly due to the coarse resolution of data applied in previous studies. We apply the land availability results to consider the capacity of biomass electricity to meet the seasonal energy storage requirement in a national energy system that is dominated by wind and solar electricity production. Bioenergy from abandoned croplands can supply most of the seasonal storage needs for a range of energy production scenarios, regions, and biomass yield estimates. These data provide the basis for further down-scaling using models of spatially gridded land-use areas as well as a range of applications for the exploration of bioenergy sustainability.

  2. Abandoned pastoral settlements provide concentrations of resources for savanna birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderström, Bo; Reid, Robin S.

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge is poor of how fertilization affects birds in grasslands. We investigated the impact on birds of abandoned pastoral settlements that historically received very high levels of livestock dung. A total of 28 abandoned settlements and 74 landscape controls - in Koyake Group Ranch and Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya - were surveyed for birds during the wet and/or dry season. Our results showed that bird species richness and total abundance increased within 200 m of abandoned pastoral settlements, particularly during the dry season when foraging resources on the savanna are limited. The high concentrations of nutrients inside abandoned settlements favoured the abundance of Diptera and Coleoptera, as shown by invertebrate surveys performed during the dry season on a subset of 32 sites. Both total numbers and dry biomass of these two invertebrate orders were higher on abandoned settlements in comparison with the surrounding landscape. We conclude that higher fertilization levels cause a temporal and spatial redistribution of birds on the savanna. Livestock fertilization and bird abundance are probably linked through an increase in abundance of invertebrate food upon which birds feed in an opportunistic fashion.

  3. EVALUATION OF THE LIMESTONE DUAL ALKALI PROTOTYPE SYSTEM PLANT SCHOLZ: SYSTEM DESIGN AND PROGRAM PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the (Phase I) design of both a limestone dual alkali system at Gulf Power Co.'s Scholz steam plant and a related test program. The limestone dual alkali process will be tested at an existing 20 MWe prototype facility at the Scholz plant. The intent of the pro...

  4. LIMESTONE BED CONTACTORS FOR CONTROL OF CORROSION AT SMALL WATER UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion control by use of limestone contactors was evaluated both in the laboratory and at a field installation. As water is transported through a packed bed of limestone, calcium carbonate dissolves and the pH, calcium ion concentration, and alkalinity increase. A mathematical...

  5. Adsorption and desorption of phosphate on limestone in experiments simulating seawater intrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The absorption and desorption of phosphorus on a large block of limestone was investigated using deionized water (DIW) and seawater. The limestone had a high affinity to adsorb phosphorus in DIW. Phosphate adsorption was significantly less in seawater, and more phosphorus was desorbed in the seawate...

  6. 76 FR 35396 - Black Hills National Forest, Mystic Ranger District, South Dakota, Section 30 Limestone Mining...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... Mining Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Corrected Notice of intent to prepare an... the purpose of mining for chemical grade limestone within mining claims on National Forest System land... publication dates. A Notice of Availability for the Section 30 Limestone Mining Project Draft EIS...

  7. EFFECT OF LIMESTONE TYPE AND GRIND ON S02 SCRUBBER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the effect of limestone type and grind on SO2 scrubber performance. It gives results of a comparison of the amount of limestone feed required as a function of particle size, to obtain a given SO2 removal efficiency and, thus, to verify the relative magnitude o...

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF A PULSED LIMESTONE BED REACTOR AT THE ARGO TUNNEL IN IDAHO SPRINGS, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) is an unintended consequence of coal and metal mining that adversely affects thousands of miles of streams both in the eastern and western regions of the U.S. A novel AMD treatment process based on limestone based on limestone neutralization has been dev...

  9. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF A SODIUM/LIMESTONE DOUBLE-ALKALI FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a comparison of results from a recent forced-oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process evaluation and those from a conceptual design and economic evaluation of a sodium/limestone double-alkali FGD process, based on recent EPA-sponsored...

  10. Identification of Calcium Sulphoaluminate Formation between Alunite and Limestone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Seok; Han, Gi-Chun; Ahn, Ji-Whan; Cho, Kye-Hong; Cho, Hee-Chan

    2009-01-01

    This study was carried out to identify the conditions of formation of calcium sulphoaluminate (3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4) by the sintering of a limestone (CaCO3) and alunite [K2SO4·Al2(SO4)3·4Al(OH)3] mixture with the following reagents: K2SO4, CaCO3, Al(OH)3, CaSO4·2H2O, and SiO2. When K2SO4, CaCO3, Al(OH)3, CaSO4·2H2O were mixed in molar ratios of 1:3:6:3 and sintered at 1,200∼1,300 °C, only 3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4 and calcium langbeinite (2CaSO4·K2SO4) were generated. With an amount of CaO that is less than the stoichiometric molar ratio, 3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4 was formed and anhydrite (CaSO4) did not react and remained behind. With the amount of CaSO4 that is less than the stoichiometric molar ratio, the amounts of 3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4 and 2CaSO4·K2SO4 decreased, and that of CaO·Al2O3 increased. In the K2SO4-CaO-Al2O3-CaSO4-SiO2 system, to stabilize the formation of 3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4, 2CaSO4·K2SO4, and β-2CaO·SiO2, the molar ratios of CaO: Al2O3: CaSO4 must be kept at 3:3:1 and that of CaO/SiO2, over 2.0; otherwise, the generated amount of 3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4 decreased and that of gehlenite (2CaO·Al2O3·SiO2) with no hydration increased quantitatively. Therefore, if all SO3(g) generated by the thermal decomposition of alunite reacts with CaCO3 (or CaO, the thermal decomposition product of limestone) to form CaSO4 in an alunite- limestone system, 1 mol of pure alunite reacts with 6 mol of limestone to form 1 mol of 3CaO·3Al2O3·CaSO4 and 1 mol of 2CaSO4·K2SO4. PMID:22346687

  11. Toxicity of acid mine pit lake water remediated with limestone and phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, L.L.; McCullough, C.D.; Lund, M.A.; Evans, L.H.; Tsvetnenko, Y.

    2009-11-15

    Pit lakes are increasingly common worldwide and have potential to provide many benefits. However, lake water toxicity may require remediation before beneficial end uses can be realised. Three treatments to remediate AMD (pH similar to 4.8) pit lake water containing elevated concentrations of Al and Zn from Collie, Western Australia were tested in mesocosms. Treatments were: (a) limestone neutralisation (L), (b) phosphorus amendment (P), and c) combined limestone neutralisation and phosphorus amendment (L+P). Laboratory bioassays with Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia, Chlorella protothecoides and Tetrahymena thermophila assessed remediation. Limestone neutralisation increased pH and reduced heavy metal concentrations by 98% (Al) to 14% (Mg), removing toxicity to the three test species within 2 months. Phosphorus amendment removed toxicity after 6 months of treatment. However, phosphorus amendment to prior limestone neutralisation failed to reduce toxicity more than limestone neutralisation alone. Low concentrations of both phosphorus and nitrogen appear to limit phytoplankton population growth in all treatments.

  12. Hydration mechanisms of ternary Portland cements containing limestone powder and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    De Weerdt, K.; Haha, M. Ben; Le Saout, G.; Kjellsen, K.O.; Justnes, H.; Lothenbach, B.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of minor additions of limestone powder on the properties of fly ash blended cements was investigated in this study using isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and pore solution analysis. The presence of limestone powder led to the formation of hemi- and monocarbonate and to a stabilisation of ettringite compared to the limestone-free cements, where a part of the ettringite converted to monosulphate. Thus, the presence of 5% of limestone led to an increase of the volume of the hydrates, as visible in the increase in chemical shrinkage, and an increase in compressive strength. This effect was amplified for the fly ash/limestone blended cements due to the additional alumina provided by the fly ash reaction.

  13. Thermal strengthening of limestone: monument preservation during fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Lavallee, Yan; Benson, Philip; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald

    2010-05-01

    The use of natural rocks in the construction of buildings and monuments predates the use of commercially engineered materials such as concrete. Such building material can be subject to elevated temperatures in the misfortunate event of a fire. In civil engineering, it is generally appreciated that the strength of rock is decreased when it is or has been exposed to elevated temperatures. This is due the formation of thermal microcracks, a result of the thermal expansion mismatch between different minerals in the rock. Even today, fire is by no means an uncommon occurrence and approximately one historic building is lost to fire in the European Union every day (COST C17 2001). A large number of historically significant buildings and monuments are constructed from carbonate material. However, could the paradigm of thermal weakening of limestone construction material be in part, a paradox? We report new findings on the thermal strengthening of the Solnhofen limestone (Solnhofen, Germany), a carbonate rock traditionally used in construction of building and statues in central Europe. Two types of deformation experiments were performed to investigate: (1) the strength of samples at elevated temperatures (i.e. during fire) and (2) the strength of samples at room temperature after heat-treatment (i.e. after fire). During experimentation, microcracking was monitored by the output of acoustic emissions (AE). Thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis was also undertaken to measure the mass loss during heating. For the experiments ‘during fire', samples were heated to temperatures of 25°, 200°, 400°, 500°, 600°, 650° and 800°C at a controlled rate of 5°C/min and deformed until failure in a uniaxial press at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1. For the experiments ‘after fire', samples were heat-treated to each 100°C increment up to 800°C, they were then cooled at the same rate and their strength tested at room temperature. The mechanical data demonstrate that, during fire

  14. Geophysical methods for locating abandoned wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frischknecht, Frank C.; Muth, L.; Grette, R.; Buckley, T.; Kornegay, B.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary study of the feasibility of using geophysical exploration methods to locate abandoned wells containing steel casing indicated that magnetic methods promise to be effective and that some electrical techniques might be useful as auxiliary methods. Ground magnetic measurements made in the vicinity of several known cased wells yielded total field anomalies with peak values ranging from about 1,500 to 6,000 gammas. The anomalies measured on the ground are very narrow and, considering noise due to other cultural and geologic sources, a line spacing on the order of 50 feet (15.2 m) would be necessary to locate all casings in the test area. The mathematical model used to represent a casing was a set of magnetic pole pairs. By use of a non-linear least squares curve fitting (inversion) program, model parameters which characterize each test casing were determined. The position and strength of the uppermost pole was usually well resolved. The parameters of lower poles were not as well resolved but it appears that the results are adequate for predicting the anomalies which would be observed at aircraft altitudes. Modeling based on the parameters determined from the ground data indicates that all of the test casings could be detected by airborne measurements made at heights of 150 to 200 feet (45.7-61.0 m) above the ground, provided lines spaced as closely as 330 feet (100 m) were used and provided noise due to other cultural and geologic sources is not very large. Given the noise levels of currently available equipment and assuming very low magnetic gradients due to geologic sources, the detection range for total field measurements is greater than that for measurements of the horizontal or vertical gradient of the total intensity. Electrical self-potential anomalies were found to be associated with most of the casings where measurements were made. However, the anomalies tend to be very narrow and, in several cases, they are comparable in magnitude to other small

  15. Shallow-water limestones within the Paleogene forearc basin of California: Unique paleogeographic indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Whidden, K.J.; Bottjer, D.J.; Lund, S.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A number of shallow-water limestones have recently been documented in late Mesozoic/Paleogene forearc strata of the Cordilleran continental arc. These limestones occur on two different tectonic blocks which were both developed within the forearc basin and subsequently moved relative to one another due to oblique convergence since Late Cretaceous time. Faunal evidence suggests that these limestones were deposited within the photic zone, at shelfal depths. Each limestone represents part or all of the basal Paleogene sequence; they are intercalated with or overlain by deeper-water strata. One region of outcrops in the western Santa Monica Mountains is latest Paleocene in age, while the other region, in the eastern Santa Ynez Mountains and Wheeler Gorge area, is early Eocene in age. These shallow-water limestones may be used as paleogeographic indicators, as they represent relative topographic highs within the basin. The microplate tectonic reconstruction of Hornafius (1985) suggests that the limestones occur on opposite sides of a north-south trending trough within the overall forearc basin. The Paleocene limestones, which occur along the eastern margin of the trough, are intercalated with marine shales and may represent small fluctuations in relative sea level and/or sediment supply on a topographic high. The Eocene limestones, which occur along the western side of the trough, are always the basal Paleogene unit deposited on tilted Cretaceous strata or Franciscan rocks and overlain by deeper-water shales. The occurrence of Franciscan as basement for limestone deposition implies localized tectonic uplift within the forearc. Each of these limestones probably represents initiation of a single period of relative sea level rise, as the basal shallow-water carbonates were eventually overwhelmed by deeper-water shales. Thus two episodes of carbonate deposition allow for the delineation of two topographic highs within the Paleogene forearc basin.

  16. Abandoned Mine Detection in Western Pennsylvania Using Surface Wave Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abandoned mines throughout the Appalachian region of the United States have been recognized as problematic. Resource extraction from these mines has long ceased and few, if any, documents pertaining to these operations exist. Over time support structures internal to the mines may collapse and lead to subsidence, potentially damaging surface structures. A non-invasive, surface deployed seismic method to detect undisclosed, abandoned near-surface mines would be beneficial as a first step to remediation. The use of seismic surface waves to analyze the upper several tens of meters of the subsurface has become an important technique for near-surface investigations and may provide a method for detection of near-surface, abandoned mine shafts. While there are many undocumented abandoned mines throughout the Appalachians one known example exists within Butler County, Pennsylvania. Although little is known about the overall operation there is limited documentation which provides information as to the location of the mine tunnels. Currently there is no recognized surface subsidence associated with the mine however documents indicate that the abandoned mining operations have an estimated depth ranging from twenty to fifty feet. To assist with acquisition a seismic land streamer was constructed. Use of a land streamer increases the speed, ease and efficiency required to perform a seismic survey. Additionally the land streamer allows for the acquisition of seismic surface waves which were analyzed using the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method. Data were acquired by conducting multiple, adjacent surveys perpendicular to the suspected location of abandoned mine tunnels. Throughout the survey area to a depth of approximately 15 meters, shear wave velocities range between approximately 200-1200 m/s. Based upon shear wave velocity changes within the profile anomalies have been identified corresponding to the contrast between the suspected mined, and unmined, areas.

  17. Relationship between McQuarrie and Helfand equations for the determination of shear viscosity from equilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Cummings, Peter T.; Evans, Denis J.

    1993-03-01

    A proof of the validity of the Chialvo-Debenedetti conjecture [Phys. Rev. A 43, 4289 (1991)], the crucial element to achieve an equivalence between the McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1976)] and Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] shear-viscosity equations, is presented here. Some theoretical consequences of that validity are also discussed, such as the unification of most shear-viscosity expressions into one given by Andrews for first-order transport coefficients [J. Chem. Phys. 47, 3161 (1967)]. The system-size dependence of the McQuarrie shear-viscosity values is analyzed and an extrapolation method is proposed and tested to determine the asymptotic values.

  18. Comment on ``Relationship between McQuarrie and Helfand equations for the determination of shear viscosity from equilibrium molecular dynamics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael P.

    1994-10-01

    In a recent paper, Chialvo, Cummings, and Evans [Phys. Rev. E 47, 1702 (1993)] attempt to relate single-particle and collective expressions, due, respectively, to McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper and Row, New York, 1976)] and Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] for the calculation of shear viscosities in molecular dynamics simulations. We point out that their analysis does not correspond to the simulation algorithm they actually use, that the system-size dependence they derive and the extrapolation procedure they propose are incorrect, and that they have established no relation between their analysis and the shear viscosity. Our own analysis explains the simulation results in terms of the artificial way that periodic box boundary crossings are handled. We find no support for a link between the McQuarrie formula and any valid statistical mechanical expression for the shear viscosity.

  19. Asbestos exposure during quarrying and processing of serpentinites: a case study in Valmalenco, Central Alps, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, A.; Rimoldi, B.

    2012-04-01

    Serpentinites are metamorphic rocks derived from ultramafics such as peridotites (lherzolites and/or harzburgites), with a typical mineralogical assemblage of antigorite, olivine, diopside and minor magnetite, chlorite and chrysotile. If the rock mass has good geotechnical properties, these stones are quarried because of their wide variety of green shades and outstanding technical properties. Excellent stones are produced in the Malenco Valley, Central Alps (northern Italy, Sondrio): here the geological set-up is dominated by the ultramafic Malenco massif (lower crust-mantle complex), exposed at the Penninic to Austroalpine boundary zone. Different processing operations give origin to valuable products like stoves, funeral monuments, design home appliances; important building element as roof slabs, tiles for floor and wall coverings constitute the main commercial line of production. In this area, good quality long fibre chrysotile asbestos was mined since the XIX century, till the seventies. The asbestos fissures (mostly slip-fiber) are well known in Valmalenco, associated to an important ENE-WSW striking fracture and hydrothermal vein system. Some actual serpentinite quarries "cross" at times tunnels of the old asbestos mines, because the fracture and vein system "guides" the extraction. At present time, this area represents an excellent example of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA). For these reasons, workers' exposure to asbestos during quarrying and processing cannot be ruled out, and must be assessed according to national laws. From 2004 to nowadays, the INAIL Regional Management of Lombardia, with the collaboration of University of Milan-Bicocca, carried out extensive monitoring campaigns both in quarries and in processing laboratories. More than 300 massive samples (rocks and veins) and 250 airborne dust samples were collected during the surveys. One of the main problems in the study of massive serpentinites is the accurate identification of the different

  20. Field-scale tests for determining mixing patterns associated with coarse-bubble air diffuser configurations, Egan Quarry, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornewer, N.J.; Johnson, G.P.; Robertson, D.M.; Hondzo, Miki

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District did field-scale tests in August-September 1996 to determine mixing patterns associated with different configurations of coarse-bubble air diffusers. The tests were done in an approximately 13-meter deep quarry near Chicago, Ill. Three-dimensional velocity, water-temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and specific-conductivity profiles were collected from locations between approximately 2 to 30 meters from the diffusers for two sets of five test configurations; one set for stratified and one set for destratified conditions in the quarry. The data-collection methods and instrumentation used to characterize mixing patterns and interactions of coarse-bubble diffusers were successful. An extensive data set was collected and is available to calibrate and verify aeration and stratification models, and to characterize basic features of bubble-plume interaction.

  1. Landscape Alteration by Pre-Pottery Neolithic Communities in the Southern Levant – The Kaizer Hilltop Quarry, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Grosman, Leore; Goren-Inbar, Naama

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on Kaizer Hill, a quarry site located in the vicinity of the city of Modiin where remains of a single prehistoric cultural entity assigned to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A were discovered. A systematic survey revealed that large-scale quarrying activities have left damage markings on the bedrock of the Hilltop and its slopes. We aim to present here our findings from the Hilltop, which are concerned with the human impact on rock surfaces and the lithic artifacts retrieved during the survey. It is evident that the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A inhabitants of the area changed their landscape forever, “stripping” the caliche surface and penetrating it in search of flint bedded in the bedrock. PMID:26960156

  2. Landscape Alteration by Pre-Pottery Neolithic Communities in the Southern Levant - The Kaizer Hilltop Quarry, Israel.

    PubMed

    Grosman, Leore; Goren-Inbar, Naama

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on Kaizer Hill, a quarry site located in the vicinity of the city of Modiin where remains of a single prehistoric cultural entity assigned to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A were discovered. A systematic survey revealed that large-scale quarrying activities have left damage markings on the bedrock of the Hilltop and its slopes. We aim to present here our findings from the Hilltop, which are concerned with the human impact on rock surfaces and the lithic artifacts retrieved during the survey. It is evident that the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A inhabitants of the area changed their landscape forever, "stripping" the caliche surface and penetrating it in search of flint bedded in the bedrock. PMID:26960156

  3. Application of an integrated geotechnical and topographic monitoring system in the Lorano marble quarry (Apuan Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, Riccardo; Vanneschi, Claudio; Riccucci, Silvia; Francioni, Mirko; Gullì, Domenico

    2015-07-01

    Accurate slope stability analysis is essential for human activity in high-risk geological contexts. This may, however, not be enough in the case of quarrying where the dynamic and evolving environment also requires effective monitoring. A well-designed monitoring system requires the acquisition of a huge dataset over time, improving knowledge of the study area and helping to refine prediction from stability analysis. This paper reports the implementation of an integrated monitoring system in a marble quarry in the Apuan Alps (Italy) and some of the results obtained. The equipment consists of a traditional geotechnical monitoring system (extensometers, crackmeters and clinometers) and two modern topographic monitoring systems (a terrestrial interferometer and a robotic total station). This work aims to provide in-depth knowledge of the large scale rock mass behaviour as a result of marble exploitation, thereby allowing continuous excavation. The results highlight the importance of integrating different monitoring systems.

  4. Chrysotile asbestos quantification in serpentinite quarries: a case study in Valmalenco, central Alps, northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Outcrops of serpentinites are usually strongly fractured and cataclastic, and the rock can only be used as ballast. However, in rare cases, like in Valmalenco (Central Alps, Northern Italy), fractures are regular and well spaced, and the rock mass has good geotechnical quality, ideal conditions for the extraction of dimension stone blocks. The Valmalenco Serpentinite is marketed worldwide as dimension and decorative stone, with remarkable mechanical properties and pleasing colours and textures. However, the same area was once subject to chrysotile asbestos mining, in the form of discrete veins along the main discontinuities of the rock mass. For this reason, airborne asbestos contamination can occur during the extraction and processing cycle of the rocks, therefore it is essential to locate and quantify asbestos in the rock mass, to reduce as much as possible the exposure risk. The first step was a detailed geostructural survey of each quarry, in order to characterize the main discontinuities (orientation, spacing, linear persistence, opening, filling), with special attention to the identification of fibrous minerals. The surveys was followed by extensive sampling of massive rocks, mineralized veins and fillings of fractures, and the cutting sludge derived from diamond wire cutting. Preliminary qualitative XRPD was performed on all samples, while quantitative analysis was carried out on the most representative samples of the main rock mass discontinuities. On the other hand, XRPD is not effective in the identification of asbestos percentages of less than 2% by weight, and the accurate distinction among the various serpentine polymorphs (antigorite, lizardite, chrysotile) is very difficult (if not impossible) when they are simultaneously present, due to their very similar basic structure and the strong structural disorder. The same samples were then analyzed by SEM-EDS (fiber counting after filtration on a polycarbonate filter), for a better distinction between

  5. Comment on ``Use of the McQuarrie equation for the computation of shear viscosity via equilibrium molecular dynamics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael P.; Brown, David; Masters, Andrew J.

    1994-03-01

    In a recent paper, Chialvo and Debenedetti [Phys. Rev. A 43, 4289 (1991)] consider single-particle and collective expressions due, respectively, to McQuarrie [Statistical Mechanics (Harper and Row, New York, 1976)] and Helfand [Phys. Rev. 119, 1 (1960)] for the calculation of shear viscosities in molecular-dynamics simulations. We point out an error in the discussion of origin independence in this paper, and show that the prescriptions set out in it are not related to the shear viscosity.

  6. Landing and Oviposition Responses of Rhagoletis indifferens (Dipt., Tephritidae) on Sweet Cherry Treated with Kaolin- and Limestone-Based Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kaolin- and limestone-based products were compared for their effects on landing and oviposition on sweet cherry by Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Dipt., Tephritidae). Surround (95% calcined kaolin), Cocoon (100% hydrous kaolin), Eclipse (>97% limestone), and Purshade (62.5% limestone) were studied....

  7. Einstein-Kubo-Helfand and McQuarrie relations for transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, Jerome J.

    1995-05-01

    The formal equivalence of the Green-Kubo and Einstein-Kubo-Helfand (EKH) expressions for transport coefficients is well known. For finite systems subject to periodic boundary conditions, the EKH relations are ambiguous as to whether the toroidal or infinite-checkerboard descriptions should be used for the coordinates. We first describe qualitatively the application of both descriptions to the calculation of the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients. We then show that the calculation of the self-diffusion coefficient using the infinite-checkerboard EKH relation is equivalent to the Green-Kubo calculation, while the toroidal calculation is not. For shear viscosity, we find that neither the toroidal nor infinite-checkerboard calculation from the EKH relation is equivalent to the Green-Kubo calculation, even though the formal theory presumably suggests that each is correct when the long-time limit is taken after the limit of large-system size. An alternative relation for the shear viscosity of finite periodic systems is derived from the Green-Kubo formula, consisting of the infinite-checkerboard expression plus correction terms having a fundamentally more complicated dependence on the coordinates and momenta. A simple qualitative analysis of the system-size dependence of the difference between the time-dependent Green-Kubo and the infinite-checkerboard EKH shear viscosities [η(tN) and η(C)E(tN), respectively] shows this difference to be of O(N1/3) (N being the number of particles) at early times. Monte Carlo molecular dynamics calculations of η(C)E(tN) for an equimolar binary mixture of hard spheres (diameter ratio of 0.4 and mass ratio of 0.03) confirm these large differences at a few mean free times, but suggest a long-time plateau value having the magnitude of the Green-Kubo result, but the values at 70 mean free times do not approach η(tN) with increasing N. Finally, we consider the one-particle, EKH-like, McQuarrie expression for shear viscosity

  8. Dissemination of acrylamide monomer from polyacrylamide-based flocculant use--sand and gravel quarry case study.

    PubMed

    Touzé, Solene; Guerin, Valérie; Guezennec, Anne-Gwenaëlle; Binet, Stéphane; Togola, Anne

    2015-05-01

    Aggregate quarries play a major role in land settlement. However, like all industrial operations, they can have impacts on the environment, notably due to the use of polyacrylamide (PAM)-based flocculants, which contain residual acrylamide (AMD), a carcinogenic, mutagenic, and reprotoxic monomer. In this study, the dissemination of AMD throughout the environment has been investigated in a French quarry. The presence of AMD has been determined in the process water and in the sludge, as well as in the surrounding surface water and groundwater. From the results of several sampling campaigns carried out on this case study, we can (a) confirm that the AMD contained in the commercial product is found in the quarry's water circuit (0.41 to 5.66 μg/l); (b) show that AMD is transported to the surrounding environment, as confirmed by the contamination of a pond near the installation (0.07 to 0.08 μg/l) and the presence of AMD in groundwater (0.01 to 0.02 μg/l); and (c) show that the sludge in both the current and former settling basins contains AMD (between 4 and 26 μg/kg of dry sludge). Therefore, we demonstrated in this case study that using PAM-based flocculants leads to the release of AMD to the environment beyond the treatment plant and creates a reserve of AMD in sludge basins. PMID:25182426

  9. Quarry identification of historical building materials by means of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and chemometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colao, F.; Fantoni, R.; Ortiz, P.; Vazquez, M. A.; Martin, J. M.; Ortiz, R.; Idris, N.

    2010-08-01

    To characterize historical building materials according to the geographic origin of the quarries from which they have been mined, the relative content of major and trace elements were determined by means of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) techniques. 48 different specimens were studied and the entire samples' set was divided in two different groups: the first, used as reference set, was composed by samples mined from eight different quarries located in Seville province; the second group was composed by specimens of unknown provenance collected in several historical buildings and churches in the city of Seville. Data reduction and analysis on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence measurements was performed using multivariate statistical approach, namely the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA). A clear separation among reference sample materials mined from different quarries was observed in Principal Components (PC) score plots, then a supervised soft independent modeling of class analogy classification was trained and run, aiming to assess the provenance of unknown samples according to their elemental content. The obtained results were compared with the provenance assignments made on the basis of petrographical description. This work gives experimental evidence that laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements on a relatively small set of elements is a fast and effective method for the purpose of origin identification.

  10. Contamination of seismicity catalogs by quarry blasts: An example from İstanbul and its vicinity, northwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horasan, Gündüz; Boztepe Güney, Aysun; Küsmezer, Ayşegül; Bekler, Feyza; Öğütçü, Zafer; Musaoğlu, Nebiye

    2009-01-01

    Scientists have proposed two fault systems of different ages in the Sea of Marmara: the Thrace-Eskişehir Fault Zone of Early Miocene-Early Pliocene age and the North Anatolian Fault Zone of Late Pliocene-Recent age. Different seismicity rates and extensions of these faults onto land near İstanbul have been suggested. One of the reasons for these differences is the contamination of seismicity catalogs by seismic events from quarries operated in İstanbul and its vicinity, including Gaziosmanpaşa (Cebeci and Kemerburgaz), Çatalca, Ömerli, Gebze, and Hereke. In this study, we investigated waveforms of 179 seismic events (1.8 < Md < 3.0) from the KOERI, NEMC digital database. We determined differences between earthquakes and quarry blasts based on time- and frequency-domain analyses of their seismograms (amplitude peak ratio, power ratio, and spectral amplitude ratio) and used these differences as discriminants. The results of this study indicate that 15% and 85% of the investigated seismic events are earthquakes and quarry blasts, respectively.

  11. Preliminary microfacies analysis and cyclicity of the Wahoo Limestone, Lisburne Field, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, S.K.; Watts, K.F.

    1995-05-01

    A well from the Lisburne field near Prudhoe Bay was examined in core, thin section, and on well logs for comparison with Wahoo Limestone in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Carbonate cycles (parasequences) are well developed in both areas but the greater abundance of terrigenous sediment and associated carbonate facies indicate that the study well is located in a more landward position on the Wahoo carbonate ramp, closer to a source of terrigenous sediment. This report presents the preliminary results of microfacies analyses that have been conducted on 424 of a total 1,115 thin sections from the study well. The stratigraphic nomenclature extended from ANWR (the type locality of the Wahoo Limestone) is different that the terminology previously used for the subsurface Lisburne Group near Prudhoe Bay. We distinguish informal lower and upper members within the Mississippian to Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone which overlies the Mississippian Alapah Limestone. Our upper Alapah corresponds to the middle Alapah of previous workers. Our lower Wahoo Limestone member corresponds to the upper Alapah of previous workers. Our upper Wahoo Limestone member corresponds to the previous Wahoo Limestone and is the major hydrocarbon reservoir at the Lisburne field, which is characterized by well-developed carbonate cycles (parasequences).

  12. A novel application of the ESR method: dating of insular phosphorites and reef limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Brumby, S.; Jacobson, G.; Beckwith, A. L. J.; Polach, H. A.

    Samples composed of cemented coral conglomerate, reef limestone, and phosphorite have been obtained from outcrops and two drillholes on Nauru Island, central Pacific Ocean. They have been used to test the ESR dating method as applied to insular phosphorite and reef limestone, up to several million years in age. The following time framework for the diagenesis and recrystallisation of the deposits was obtained: 0.08-0.10 Ma for superficial phosphatic crust; 0.18-0.22 Ma for massive phosphorite with nodules and replaced coral; 0.50-0.60 Ma for uppermost reef limestone; 1.00-2.00 Ma for reef limestone at a depth of about 15 m; 3.00-5.00 Ma for reef limestone under the modern reef flat, perhaps extending to the interior upland at a depth of about 70-80 m. These ages are consistent with the stratigraphic positions and geological estimations, thus demonstrating that both phosphatic deposits and reef limestone are suitable for ESR dating. The age limination for reef limestone specimens may be more than 3-4 million years.

  13. PARTIAL VIEW OF NORTH SIDE, SHOWING ENCLOSED CONVEYOR AND ABANDONED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PARTIAL VIEW OF NORTH SIDE, SHOWING ENCLOSED CONVEYOR AND ABANDONED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE TO THE FORMER THIRD FLOOR. VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Aviation Storehouse, Vincennes Avenue at Simms Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chism, Kahlil

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (Freedmen's Bureau), which was established by the Congress on March 3, 1865, to assist former slaves in acquiring land, securing employment, legalizing marriages, and pursuing education. After the bureau's abolition through an act of Congress approved on June 10, 1872,…

  15. 20 CFR 802.402 - Dismissal by abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....402 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Completion of Board Review Dismissals § 802.402 Dismissal by abandonment. (a) Upon motion by any party or... an appeal if neither the party nor his representative participates significantly in the...

  16. 90. View of east facade of powerhouse, and abandoned lightning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. View of east facade of powerhouse, and abandoned lightning arrester houses on hillside above powerhouse; looking west. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  17. Should the US abandon efforts to develop commercial fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, W.D.; Kinter, E.E.

    1993-01-22

    This article presents viewpoints and rationale for continuing and disbanding the US efforts to develop commercial fusion power. The views of W.D. Kay, an assistant professor of political science at Northeastern University, are presented regarding - yes, abandon efforts. Meanwhile, the views of Edwin Keutes, former director of the Magnetic Fusion Program for DOE, are presented for continued development.

  18. 30 CFR 256.56 - Lease-specific abandonment accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lease-specific abandonment accounts. 256.56 Section 256.56 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT... separate trust account. You may obtain a copy of the current Treasury Circular No. 154 from the Surety...

  19. Artesian Well Abandonment at Launch Complex 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Lindsay; Johansen, Deda

    2015-01-01

    The artesian well tasked for abandonment was located on the LOX side (northwest area) of the launch complex. The exact date of well installation is unknown. The well was no longer in use at the time of the abandonment request, but was previously utilized under St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) consumptive use permit (No. 50054) for the Floridian Aquifer. The exact construction details of the LOX artesian well were also unknown; however, a similar-type artesian well was previously located on the LH2 side of the site, which was abandoned in 2012. Based on discussions with the NASA RPM and review of the LH2 artesian well abandonment completion report, the LH2 artesian well was reported to be an 8-inch diameter, 330-foot deep well. The NASA RPM communicated that the LOX artesian well was likely to be an 8-inch diameter, 380-foot deep well. This information was used for scoping, and was subsequently confirmed to be substantially accurate. No additional information could be found for the LOX artesian well using the NASA Remediation Information System (RIS).

  20. 11. An abandoned electrical system was found under the pressedsteel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. An abandoned electrical system was found under the pressed-steel ceiling. For some undetermined reason the pattern of the ceiling panels has 'photographed' onto the cardboard substrate. Two different panel designs were utilized in a checkerboard pattern. One panel of each design remains in place. Credit GADA/MRM. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 78 FR 9803 - Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    .... See 49 FR 15496. On May 16, 1984, the State repealed most of the Tennessee Coal Surface Mining Law of.... See 47 FR 34753. Withdrawal of Tennessee's Regulatory Program: As a result of Tennessee's failure to... program in full, effective October 1, 1984. See 49 FR 38874. Abandoned Mine Lands Program (Title...

  2. 77 FR 5740 - Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    .... See 49 FR 15496. On May 16, 1984, the State repealed most of the Tennessee Coal Surface Mining Law of..., 1982. See 47 FR 34753. Withdrawal of Tennessee's Regulatory Program: Because of the State's failure to... program in full, effective October 1, 1984. See 49 FR 38874. Abandoned Mine Lands Program (Title...

  3. 7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. NOTE CANTILEVERED DECKING. SOUTH FORK OF EEL RIVER AT LEFT. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  4. 36 CFR 13.45 - Unattended or abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of fuel if the property contains fuel. This information must be— (i) Labeled on the property; or (ii... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unattended or abandoned property. 13.45 Section 13.45 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 36 CFR 13.45 - Unattended or abandoned property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of fuel if the property contains fuel. This information must be— (i) Labeled on the property; or (ii... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unattended or abandoned property. 13.45 Section 13.45 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. 42 CFR 476.150 - Abandoned complaints and reopening rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Abandoned complaints and reopening rights. 476.150 Section 476.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and...

  7. 42 CFR 476.150 - Abandoned complaints and reopening rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Abandoned complaints and reopening rights. 476.150 Section 476.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Quality...

  8. 7. ALIGNMENT OF ABANDONED COULTERVILLE ROAD IN FORESTA AT FALLEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ALIGNMENT OF ABANDONED COULTERVILLE ROAD IN FORESTA AT FALLEN TREE IN CENTER REAR. FOREGROUND MARKS TURN OF NEW ROAD FROM FORESTA TO HIGHWAY 120. LOOKING E. GIS: N-37 42 16.6 / W-119 44 00.3 - Coulterville Road, Between Foresta & All-Weather Highway, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  9. 49 CFR 192.727 - Abandonment or deactivation of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Abandonment or deactivation of facilities. 192.727 Section 192.727 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS...

  10. 1. ABANDONED TURNOUT (CALLED CAPTAIN WHEEL) TO SAN TAN INDIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ABANDONED TURN-OUT (CALLED CAPTAIN WHEEL) TO SAN TAN INDIAN CANAL OFF OF SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER CANAL, T4S, R6E, S11/12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - San Carlos Irrigation Project, San Tan Indian Canal, North of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  11. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DAM AND BRIDGE WITH ABANDONED SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER HEADGATE IN FOREGROUND. TAKEN FROM NORTH END OF DAM - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Sacaton Dam & Bridge, Gila River, T4S R6E S12/13, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  12. 50 CFR 27.93 - Abandonment of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Abandonment of property. 27.93 Section 27.93 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations §...

  13. 50 CFR 27.93 - Abandonment of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Abandonment of property. 27.93 Section 27.93 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations §...

  14. 50 CFR 27.93 - Abandonment of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Abandonment of property. 27.93 Section 27.93 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations §...

  15. 50 CFR 27.93 - Abandonment of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Abandonment of property. 27.93 Section 27.93 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations §...

  16. 50 CFR 27.93 - Abandonment of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Abandonment of property. 27.93 Section 27.93 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations §...

  17. 30 CFR 57.20021 - Abandoned mine openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abandoned mine openings. 57.20021 Section 57.20021 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22223 - Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines). 57.22223 Section 57.22223 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND...

  19. 30 CFR 57.20021 - Abandoned mine openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abandoned mine openings. 57.20021 Section 57.20021 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22223 - Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crosscuts before abandonment (III mines). 57.22223 Section 57.22223 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND...