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Sample records for abasic site analog

  1. The chemical stability of abasic RNA compared to abasic DNA.

    PubMed

    Küpfer, Pascal A; Leumann, Christian J

    2007-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of an abasic RNA phosphoramidite carrying a photocleavable 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) group at the anomeric center and a triisopropylsilyloxymethyl (TOM) group as 2'-O-protecting group together with the analogous DNA and the 2'-OMe RNA abasic building blocks. These units were incorporated into RNA-, 2'-OMe-RNA- and DNA for the purpose of studying their chemical stabilities towards backbone cleavage in a comparative way. Stability measurements were performed under basic conditions (0.1 M NaOH) and in the presence of aniline (pH 4.6) at 37 degrees C. The kinetics and mechanisms of strand cleavage were followed by High pressure liquid chromotography and ESI-MS. Under basic conditions, strand cleavage at abasic RNA sites can occur via beta,delta-elimination and 2',3'-cyclophosphate formation. We found that beta,delta-elimination was 154-fold slower compared to the same mechanism in abasic DNA. Overall strand cleavage of abasic RNA (including cyclophosphate formation) was still 16.8 times slower compared to abasic DNA. In the presence of aniline at pH 4.6, where only beta,delta-elimination contributes to strand cleavage, a 15-fold reduced cleavage rate at the RNA abasic site was observed. Thus abasic RNA is significantly more stable than abasic DNA. The higher stability of abasic RNA is discussed in the context of its potential biological role.

  2. The chemical stability of abasic RNA compared to abasic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Küpfer, Pascal A.; Leumann, Christian J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of an abasic RNA phosphoramidite carrying a photocleavable 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) group at the anomeric center and a triisopropylsilyloxymethyl (TOM) group as 2′-O-protecting group together with the analogous DNA and the 2′-OMe RNA abasic building blocks. These units were incorporated into RNA-, 2′-OMe-RNA- and DNA for the purpose of studying their chemical stabilities towards backbone cleavage in a comparative way. Stability measurements were performed under basic conditions (0.1 M NaOH) and in the presence of aniline (pH 4.6) at 37°C. The kinetics and mechanisms of strand cleavage were followed by High pressure liquid chromotography and ESI-MS. Under basic conditions, strand cleavage at abasic RNA sites can occur via β,δ-elimination and 2′,3′-cyclophosphate formation. We found that β,δ-elimination was 154-fold slower compared to the same mechanism in abasic DNA. Overall strand cleavage of abasic RNA (including cyclophosphate formation) was still 16.8 times slower compared to abasic DNA. In the presence of aniline at pH 4.6, where only β,δ-elimination contributes to strand cleavage, a 15-fold reduced cleavage rate at the RNA abasic site was observed. Thus abasic RNA is significantly more stable than abasic DNA. The higher stability of abasic RNA is discussed in the context of its potential biological role. PMID:17151071

  3. Kinetic analysis of bypass of abasic site by the catalytic core of yeast DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juntang; Wang, Rong; Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Zhong, Mengyu; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Huidong

    2015-09-01

    Abasic sites (Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites), produced ∼ 50,000 times/cell/day, are very blocking and miscoding. To better understand miscoding mechanisms of abasic site for yeast DNA polymerase η, pre-steady-state nucleotide incorporation and LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension product were studied using pol η(core) (catalytic core, residues 1-513), which can completely eliminate the potential effects of the C-terminal C2H2 motif of pol η on dNTP incorporation. The extension beyond the abasic site was very inefficient. Compared with incorporation of dCTP opposite G, the incorporation efficiencies opposite abasic site were greatly reduced according to the order of dGTP > dATP > dCTP and dTTP. Pol η(core) showed no fast burst phase for any incorporation opposite G or abasic site, suggesting that the catalytic step is not faster than the dissociation of polymerase from DNA. LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension products showed that 53% products were dGTP misincorporation, 33% were dATP and 14% were -1 frameshift, indicating that Pol η(core) bypasses abasic site by a combined G-rule, A-rule and -1 frameshift deletions. Compared with full-length pol η, pol η(core) relatively reduced the efficiency of incorporation of dCTP opposite G, increased the efficiencies of dNTP incorporation opposite abasic site and the exclusive incorporation of dGTP opposite abasic site, but inhibited the extension beyond abasic site, and increased the priority in extension of A: abasic site relative to G: abasic site. This study provides further understanding in the mutation mechanism of abasic sites for yeast DNA polymerase η.

  4. Quadruplexes of human telomere dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} sequences containing guanine abasic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Skolakova, Petra; Bednarova, Klara; Vorlickova, Michaela; Sagi, Janos

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of a guanine base does not hinder the formation of G-quadruplex of human telomere sequence. {yields} Each depurination strongly destabilizes the quadruplex of dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} in NaCl and KCl. {yields} Conformational change of the abasic analogs of dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} is inhibited in KCl. {yields} The effects abasic sites may affect telomere-end structures in vivo. -- Abstract: This study was performed to evaluate how the loss of a guanine base affects the structure and stability of the three-tetrad G-quadruplex of 5'-dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3}, the basic quadruplex-forming unit of the human telomere DNA. None of the 12 possible abasic sites hindered the formation of quadruplexes, but all reduced the thermodynamic stability of the parent quadruplex in both NaCl and KCl. The base loss did not change the Na{sup +}-stabilized intramolecular antiparallel architecture, based on CD spectra, but held up the conformational change induced in dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} in physiological concentration of KCl. The reduced stability and the inhibited conformational transitions observed here in vitro for the first time may predict that unrepaired abasic sites in G-quadruplexes could lead to changes in the chromosome's terminal protection in vivo.

  5. Biotinylation of Deoxyguanosine at the Abasic Site in Double-Stranded Oligodeoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biotinylation of deoxyguanosine at an abasic site in double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. The biotinylation of deoxyguanosine is achieved by copper-catalyzed click reaction after the conjugation of the oligodeoxynucleotide with 2-oxohex-5-ynal. The biotinylation enables visualization of the biotinylated oligodeoxynucleotides by chemiluminescence on a nylon membrane. In order to investigate the biotinylated site, the biotinylated oligodeoxynucleotides were amplified by the DNA polymerase chain reaction. Replacement of guanine opposing the abasic site with adenine generated by the activity of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase of DNA polymerase was detected by DNA sequencing analysis and restriction endonuclease digestion. This study suggests that 2-oxohex-5-ynal may be useful for the detection of the unpaired deoxyguanosine endogenously generated at abasic sites in genomic DNA. PMID:27818833

  6. Effect of an abasic site on strand slippage in DNA primer-templates.

    PubMed

    Au, Ring Yan; Ng, Kui Sang; Chi, Lai Man; Lam, Sik Lok

    2012-12-27

    An abasic site is the most common lesion in DNA. It is also an intermediate product formed during base excision repair. Previously, we demonstrated that strand slippage can occur in primer-template model systems containing any kind of natural templating bases, suggesting deletion and expansion errors are possible in any kind of sequences during DNA replication. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigations have been performed to study the intrinsic effect of a templating abasic residue on strand slippage in primer-template models. A DNA hairpin model system containing an abasic site and a 5'-overhang region was used to mimic the situation that a dNTP has just been incorporated opposite the abasic site. Our results show that, after dNTP incorporation, strand slippage occurs regardless of the type of terminal base pair formed. Compared to natural templating bases, abasic sites possess a higher slippage propensity, implicating a higher chance of expansion or deletion errors during DNA replication.

  7. An expedient biocatalytic procedure for abasic site precursors useful in oligonucleotide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montero, Saúl; Fernández, Susana; Sanghvi, Yogesh S; Gotor, Vicente; Ferrero, Miguel

    2011-09-07

    Preparation of abasic site precursors through a divergent chemoenzymatic synthesis has been accomplished. Several biocatalysts and acylating agents were studied furnishing a practical and scalable green method useful for industrial applications. Highly regioselective acylation and deacylation reactions with 1,2-dideoxy-D-ribose are described resulting in excellent yield. A fast, atom-efficient and convenient synthesis of 3-, and 5-O-DMTr-1,2-dideoxyribose 17 and 19 has been achieved. These compounds are useful precursors for the preparation of phosphoramidites required for the assembly of oligonucleotides containing the tetrahydrofuran abasic lesions.

  8. A new strategy for site-specific alkylation of DNA using oligonucleotides containing an abasic site and alkylating probes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Tsuji, Genichiro; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Usami, Akira; Moki, Takuma; Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Yamada, Ken; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2015-10-14

    Selective chemical reactions with DNA, such as its labelling, are very useful in many applications. In this paper, we discuss a new strategy for the selective alkylation of DNA using an oligonucleotide containing an abasic site and alkylating probes. We designed three probes consisting of 2-AVP as a reactive moiety and three kinds of binding moiety with high affinity to duplex DNA. Among these probes, Hoechst-AVP probe exhibited high selectivity and efficient reactivity to thymine bases at the site opposite an abasic site in DNA. Our method is potentially useful for inducing site-directed reactions aimed at inhibiting polymerase reactions.

  9. Effects of Abasic Sites on Triple Helix Formation Characterized by Affinity Cleaving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    DNA . The influence of abasic sites in Watson - Crick double helical DNA has been characterized by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. (9-12) Two...alter- nate strands of duplex DNA by triple- helix formation (7). the detign ,-f rnmillm ra bases for completion of the triplet code, and the incorporation...prepared in order to compare the relative stabilities of triple helix formation 3 with 30-bp DNA duplexes containing the 15 base pair target sites d

  10. Novel reagents for chemical cleavage at abasic sites and UV photoproducts in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, P J; Knowland, J

    1995-01-01

    Hot piperidine is often used to cleave abasic and UV-irradiated DNA at the sites of damage. It can inflict non-specific damage on DNA, probably because it is a strong base and creates significant concentrations of hydroxyl ions which can attack purines and pyrimidines. We show that several other amines can cleave abasic DNA at or near neutral pH without non-specific damage. One diamine, N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, efficiently cleaves abasic DNA at pH 7.4 by either beta- or beta,delta-elimination, depending on temperature. Using end-labelled oligonucleotides we show that cleavage depends mainly on elimination reactions, but that 4',5'-cyclization is also significant. This reagent also cleaves at photoproducts induced by UVC and UVB, producing the same overall pattern as piperidine, but with no non-specific damage. It should prove valuable in locating low levels of photoproducts in DNA, such as those induced by natural sunlight. Images PMID:7784169

  11. A versatile new tool to quantify abasic sites in DNA and inhibit base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shanqiao; Shalhout, Sophia; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2015-03-01

    A number of endogenous and exogenous agents, and cellular processes create abasic (AP) sites in DNA. If unrepaired, AP sites cause mutations, strand breaks and cell death. Aldehyde-reactive agent methoxyamine reacts with AP sites and blocks their repair. Another alkoxyamine, ARP, tags AP sites with a biotin and is used to quantify these sites. We have combined both these abilities into one alkoxyamine, AA3, which reacts with AP sites with a better pH profile and reactivity than ARP. Additionally, AA3 contains an alkyne functionality for bioorthogonal click chemistry that can be used to link a wide variety of biochemical tags to AP sites. We used click chemistry to tag AP sites with biotin and a fluorescent molecule without the use of proteins or enzymes. AA3 has a better reactivity profile than ARP and gives much higher product yields at physiological pH than ARP. It is simpler to use than ARP and its use results in lower background and greater sensitivity for AP site detection. We also show that AA3 inhibits the first enzyme in the repair of abasic sites, APE-1, to about the same extent as methoxyamine. Furthermore, AA3 enhances the ability of an alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, to kill human cells and is more effective in such combination chemotherapy than methoxyamine.

  12. Synthesis, thermal stability and reactivity towards 9-aminoellipticine of double-stranded oligonucleotides containing a true abasic site.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J R; Vasseur, J J; Rayner, B; Imbach, J L; Paoletti, J; Paoletti, C; Malvy, C

    1989-01-01

    A 13 mers abasic oligonucleotide was synthetized. It was therefore possible to compare thermal stability and reactivity of duplex oligonucleotides either with an apurinic/apyrimidinic site or without any lesion. An important decrease in the melting temperature appeared for duplexes with an abasic site. The chemical reaction of these modified oligonucleotides with the intercalating agent 9-aminoellipticine was studied by gel electrophoresis and by fluorescence. The formation of a Schiff base between 9-aminoellipticine and abasic sites was rapid and complete with duplexes at 11 degrees C. Schiff base related fluorescence and beta-elimination cleavage were more important with the apyrimidinic sites than with the apurinic ones. When compared to previous results obtained with the model d(TprpT) some unexpected behaviours appeared with longer and duplex oligonucleotides. For instance only partial beta-elimination cleavage was observed. It is likely that stacking parameters in the double helix play a great role in the studied reaction. Images PMID:2602153

  13. Induction of double-strand breaks by S1 nuclease, mung bean nuclease and nuclease P1 in DNA containing abasic sites and nicks.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M A; Weinfeld, M

    1995-01-01

    Defined DNA substrates containing discrete abasic sites or paired abasic sites set 1, 3, 5 and 7 bases apart on opposite strands were constructed to examine the reactivity of S1, mung bean and P1 nucleases towards abasic sites. None of the enzymes acted on the substrate containing discrete abasic sites. Under conditions where little or no non-specific DNA degradation was observed, all three nucleases were able to generate double-strand breaks when the bistranded abasic sites were 1 and 3 base pairs apart. However, when the abasic sites were further apart, the enzymes again failed to cleave the DNA. These results indicate that single abasic sites do not cause sufficient denaturation of the DNA to allow incision by these single-strand specific endonucleases. The reactivity of these enzymes was also investigated on DNA substrates that were nicked by DNasel or more site-specifically by endonuclease III incision at the discrete abasic sites. The three nucleases readily induced a strand break opposite such nicks. Images PMID:7479020

  14. Probing Enhanced Double-Strand Break Formation at Abasic Sites within Clustered Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakraborty, Supratim; Jacinto, Marco Paolo; Paul, Michael D; Balster, Morgan V; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-01-10

    DNA is rapidly cleaved under mild alkaline conditions at apyrimidinic/apurinic sites, but the half-life is several weeks in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). However, abasic sites are ∼100-fold more reactive within nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Histone proteins catalyze the strand scission, and at superhelical location 1.5, the histone H4 tail is largely responsible for the accelerated cleavage. The rate constant for strand scission at an abasic site is enhanced further in a nucleosome core particle when it is part of a bistranded lesion containing a proximal strand break. Cleavage of this form results in a highly deleterious double-strand break. This acceleration is dependent upon the position of the abasic lesion in the NCP and its structure. The enhancement in cleavage rate at an apurinic/apyrimidinic site rapidly drops off as the distance between the strand break and abasic site increases and is negligible once the two forms of damage are separated by 7 bp. However, the enhancement of the rate of double-strand break formation increases when the size of the gap is increased from one to two nucleotides. In contrast, the cleavage rate enhancement at 2-deoxyribonolactone within bistranded lesions is more modest, and it is similar in free DNA and nucleosome core particles. We postulate that the enhanced rate of double-strand break formation at bistranded lesions containing apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within nucleosome core particles is a general phenomenon and is due to increased DNA flexibility.

  15. DNA abasic site-directed formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters for selective nucleobase recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Wu, Fei; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Yong

    2011-07-01

    DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has attracted much attention due to mutation related diseases. Various methods for SNP detection have been proposed and many are already in use. Here, we find that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can be developed as a capping scaffold for the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). As a proof of concept, the DNA sequences from fragments near codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53 were used as a model for SNP detection by in situ formed Ag NCs. The formation of fluorescent Ag NCs in the AP site-containing DNA duplex is highly selective for cytosine facing the AP site and guanines flanking the site and can be employed in situ as readout for SNP detection. The fluorescent signal-on sensing for SNP based on this inorganic fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously reported signal-off responses using low-molecular-weight organic ligands. The strong dependence of fluorescent Ag NC formation on the sequences surrounding the AP site was successfully used to identify mutations in codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53. We anticipate that this approach will be employed to develop a practical SNP detection method by locating an AP site toward the midway cytosine in a target strand containing more than three consecutive cytosines.

  16. Quantification of DNA strand breaks and abasic sites by oxime derivatization and accelerator mass spectrometry: application to gamma-radiation and peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinfeng; Liberman, Rosa G; Skipper, Paul L; Margolin, Yelena; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Dedon, Peter C

    2005-08-01

    We report a highly sensitive method to quantify abasic sites and deoxyribose oxidation products arising in damaged DNA. The method exploits the reaction of aldehyde- and ketone-containing deoxyribose oxidation products and abasic sites with [(14)C]methoxyamine to form stable oxime derivatives, as originally described by Talpaert-Borle and Liuzzi [Reaction of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites with [(14)C]methoxyamine. A method for the quantitative assay of AP sites in DNA, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 740 (1983) 410-416]. The sensitivity of the method was dramatically improved by the application of accelerator mass spectrometry to quantify the (14)C, with a limit of detection of 1 lesion in 10(6) nucleotides in 1 microg of DNA. The method was validated using DNA containing a defined quantity of abasic sites, with a >0.95 correlation between the quantities of abasic sites and those of methoxyamine labels. The original applications of this and similar oxyamine derivatization methods have assumed that abasic sites are the only aldehyde-containing DNA damage products. However, deoxyribose oxidation produces strand breaks and abasic sites containing a variety of degradation products with aldehyde and ketone moieties. To assess the utility of methoxyamine labeling for quantifying strand breaks and abasic sites, the method was applied to plasmid DNA treated with gamma-radiation and peroxynitrite. For gamma-radiation, there was a 0.99 correlation between the quantity of methoxyamine labels and the quantity of strand breaks and abasic sites determined by a plasmid nicking assay; the abasic sites comprised less than 10% of the radiation-induced DNA damage. Studies with peroxynitrite demonstrate that the method, in conjunction with DNA repair enzymes that remove damaged bases to produce aldehydic sugar residues or abasic sites, is also applicable to quantifying nucleobase lesions in addition to strand break products. Compared to other abasic site quantification techniques, the modified

  17. Recognition of DNA abasic site nanocavity by fluorophore-switched probe: Suitable for all sequence environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Yuehua; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Lihua; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Xiaoshun; Shao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Removal of a damaged base in DNA produces an abasic site (AP site) nanocavity. If left un-repaired in vivo by the specific enzyme, this nanocavity will result in nucleotide mutation in the following DNA replication. Therefore, selective recognition of AP site nanocavity by small molecules is important for identification of such DNA damage and development of genetic drugs. In this work, we investigate the fluorescence behavior of isoquinoline alkaloids including palmatine (PAL), berberine (BER), epiberberine (EPI), jatrorrhizine (JAT), coptisine (COP), coralyne (COR), worenine (WOR), berberrubine (BEU), sanguinarine (SAN), chelerythrine (CHE), and nitidine (NIT) upon binding with the AP nanocavity. PAL is screened out as the most efficient fluorophore-switched probe to recognize the AP nanocavity over the fully matched DNA. Its fluorescence enhancement occurs for all of the AP nanocavity sequence environments, which has not been achieved by the previously used probes. The bridged π conjugation effect should partially contribute to the AP nanocavity-specific fluorescence, as opposed to the solvent effect. Due to the strong binding with the AP nanocavity, PAL will find wide applications in the DNA damage recognition and sensor development.

  18. Crown ether–electrolyte interactions permit nanopore detection of individual DNA abasic sites in single molecules

    PubMed Central

    An, Na; Fleming, Aaron M.; White, Henry S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2012-01-01

    DNA abasic (AP) sites are one of the most frequent lesions in the genome and have a high mutagenic potential if unrepaired. After selective attachment of 2-aminomethyl-18-crown-6 (18c6), individual AP lesions are detected during electrophoretic translocation through the bacterial protein ion channel α-hemolysin (α-HL) embedded in a lipid bilayer. Interactions between 18c6 and Na+ produce characteristic pulse-like current amplitude signatures that allow the identification of individual AP sites in single molecules of homopolymeric or heteropolymeric DNA sequences. The bulky 18c6-cation complexes also dramatically slow the DNA motion to more easily recordable levels. Further, the behaviors of the AP-18c6 adduct are different with respect to the directionalities of DNA entering the protein channel, and they can be precisely manipulated by altering the cation (Li+, Na+ or K+) of the electrolyte. This method permits detection of multiple AP lesions per strand, which is unprecedented in other work. Additionally, insights into the thermodynamics and kinetics of 18c6-cation interactions at a single-molecule level are provided by the nanopore measurement. PMID:22711805

  19. Covalent Adduct Formation between the Antihypertensive Drug Hydralazine and Abasic Sites in Double- and Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydralazine (4) is an antihypertensive agent that displays both mutagenic and epigenetic properties. Here, gel electrophoretic, mass spectroscopic, and chemical kinetics methods were used to provide evidence that medicinally relevant concentrations of 4 rapidly form covalent adducts with abasic sites in double- and single-stranded DNA under physiological conditions. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that the genotoxic properties of this clinically used drug arise via reactions with an endogenous DNA lesion rather than with the canonical structure of DNA. PMID:25405892

  20. Shape-selective recognition of DNA abasic sites by metallohelices: inhibition of human AP endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Malina, Jaroslav; Scott, Peter; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-06-23

    Loss of a base in DNA leading to creation of an abasic (AP) site leaving a deoxyribose residue in the strand, is a frequent lesion that may occur spontaneously or under the action of various physical and chemical agents. Progress in the understanding of the chemistry and enzymology of abasic DNA largely relies upon the study of AP sites in synthetic duplexes. We report here on interactions of diastereomerically pure metallo-helical 'flexicate' complexes, bimetallic triple-stranded ferro-helicates [Fe2(NN-NN)3](4+) incorporating the common NN-NN bis(bidentate) helicand, with short DNA duplexes containing AP sites in different sequence contexts. The results show that the flexicates bind to AP sites in DNA duplexes in a shape-selective manner. They preferentially bind to AP sites flanked by purines on both sides and their binding is enhanced when a pyrimidine is placed in opposite orientation to the lesion. Notably, the Λ-enantiomer binds to all tested AP sites with higher affinity than the Δ-enantiomer. In addition, the binding of the flexicates to AP sites inhibits the activity of human AP endonuclease 1, which is as a valid anticancer drug target. Hence, this finding indicates the potential of utilizing well-defined metallo-helical complexes for cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Mutagenic effects of abasic and oxidized abasic lesions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Yoke W.; Bao, Gaobin; Minesinger, Brenda; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Siede, Wolfram; Jiang, Yu Lin; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2005-01-01

    2-Deoxyribonolactone (L) and 2-deoxyribose (AP) are abasic sites that are produced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and a variety of DNA damaging agents. The biological processing of the AP site has been examined in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, nothing is known about how L is processed in this organism. We determined the bypass and mutagenic specificity of DNA containing an abasic site (AP and L) or the AP analog tetrahydrofuran (F) using an oligonucleotide transformation assay. The tetrahydrofuran analog and L were bypassed at 10-fold higher frequencies than the AP lesions. Bypass frequencies of lesions were greatly reduced in the absence of Rev1 or Polζ (rev3 mutant), but were only marginally reduced in the absence of Polη (rad30 mutant). Deoxycytidine was the preferred nucleotide inserted opposite an AP site whereas dA and dC were inserted at equal frequencies opposite F and L sites. In the rev1 and rev3 strains, dA was the predominant nucleotide inserted opposite these lesions. Overall, we conclude that both Rev1 and Polζ are required for the efficient bypass of abasic sites in yeast. PMID:16257982

  2. Target-controlled formation of silver nanoclusters in abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA for label-free fluorescence detection of theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ki Soo; Oh, Seung Soo; Soh, H. Tom; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-08-01

    A novel, label-free, fluorescence based sensor for theophylline has been developed. In the new sensor system, an abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA probe serves as both a pocket for recognition of theophylline and a template for the preparation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The strategy relies on theophylline-controlled formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters from abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA. When theophylline is not present, silver ions interact with the cytosine groups opposite to the abasic site in duplex DNA. This interaction leads to efficient formation of intensely red fluorescent silver nanoclusters. In contrast, when theophylline is bound at the abasic site through pseudo base-pairing with appropriately positioned cytosines, silver ion binding to the cytosine nucleobase is prevented. Consequently, fluorescent silver nanoclusters are not formed causing a significant reduction of the fluorescence signal. By employing this new sensor, theophylline can be highly selectively detected at a concentration as low as 1.8 μM. Finally, the diagnostic capability and practical application of this sensor were demonstrated by its use in detecting theophylline in human blood serum.A novel, label-free, fluorescence based sensor for theophylline has been developed. In the new sensor system, an abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA probe serves as both a pocket for recognition of theophylline and a template for the preparation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The strategy relies on theophylline-controlled formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters from abasic site-incorporated duplex DNA. When theophylline is not present, silver ions interact with the cytosine groups opposite to the abasic site in duplex DNA. This interaction leads to efficient formation of intensely red fluorescent silver nanoclusters. In contrast, when theophylline is bound at the abasic site through pseudo base-pairing with appropriately positioned cytosines, silver ion binding to

  3. Synthesis and photophysical characterisation of a fluorescent nucleoside analogue that signals the presence of an abasic site in RNA.

    PubMed

    Tanpure, Arun A; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2012-11-05

    The synthesis and site-specific incorporation of an environment-sensitive fluorescent nucleoside analogue (2), based on a 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)pyrimidine core, into DNA oligonucleotides (ONs), and its photophysical properties within these ONs are described. Interestingly and unlike 2-aminopurine (a widely used nucleoside analogue probe), when incorporated into an ON and hybridised with a complementary ON, the emissive nucleoside 2 displays significantly higher emission intensity than the free nucleoside. Furthermore, photophysical characterisation shows that the fluorescence properties of the nucleoside analogue within ONs are significantly influenced by flanking bases, especially by guanosine. By utilising the responsiveness of the nucleoside to changes in base environment, a DNA ON reporter labelled with the emissive nucleoside 2 was constructed; this signalled the presence of an abasic site in a model depurinated sarcin/ricin RNA motif of a eukaryotic 28S rRNA.

  4. Contribution of partial charge interactions and base stacking to the efficiency of primer extension at and beyond abasic sites in DNA.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shuangluo; Vashishtha, Ashwani; Bulkley, David; Eom, Soo Hyun; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H

    2012-06-19

    During DNA synthesis, base stacking and Watson-Crick (WC) hydrogen bonding increase the stability of nascent base pairs when they are in a ternary complex. To evaluate the contribution of base stacking to the incorporation efficiency of dNTPs when a DNA polymerase encounters an abasic site, we varied the penultimate base pairs (PBs) adjacent to the abasic site using all 16 possible combinations. We then determined pre-steady-state kinetic parameters with an RB69 DNA polymerase variant and solved nine structures of the corresponding ternary complexes. The efficiency of incorporation for incoming dNTPs opposite an abasic site varied between 2- and 210-fold depending on the identity of the PB. We propose that the A rule can be extended to encompass the fact that DNA polymerase can bypass dA/abasic sites more efficiently than other dN/abasic sites. Crystal structures of the ternary complexes show that the surface of the incoming base was stacked against the PB's interface and that the kinetic parameters for dNMP incorporation were consistent with specific features of base stacking, such as surface area and partial charge-charge interactions between the incoming base and the PB. Without a templating nucleotide residue, an incoming dNTP has no base with which it can hydrogen bond and cannot be desolvated, so that these surrounding water molecules become ordered and remain on the PB's surface in the ternary complex. When these water molecules are on top of a hydrophobic patch on the PB, they destabilize the ternary complex, and the incorporation efficiency of incoming dNTPs is reduced.

  5. Contribution of Partial Charge Interactions and Base Stacking to the Efficiency of Primer Extension at and beyond Abasic Sites in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Vashishtha, Ashwani; Bulkley, David; Eom, Soo Hyun; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H.

    2012-08-31

    During DNA synthesis, base stacking and Watson-Crick (WC) hydrogen bonding increase the stability of nascent base pairs when they are in a ternary complex. To evaluate the contribution of base stacking to the incorporation efficiency of dNTPs when a DNA polymerase encounters an abasic site, we varied the penultimate base pairs (PBs) adjacent to the abasic site using all 16 possible combinations. We then determined pre-steady-state kinetic parameters with an RB69 DNA polymerase variant and solved nine structures of the corresponding ternary complexes. The efficiency of incorporation for incoming dNTPs opposite an abasic site varied between 2- and 210-fold depending on the identity of the PB. We propose that the A rule can be extended to encompass the fact that DNA polymerase can bypass dA/abasic sites more efficiently than other dN/abasic sites. Crystal structures of the ternary complexes show that the surface of the incoming base was stacked against the PB's interface and that the kinetic parameters for dNMP incorporation were consistent with specific features of base stacking, such as surface area and partial charge-charge interactions between the incoming base and the PB. Without a templating nucleotide residue, an incoming dNTP has no base with which it can hydrogen bond and cannot be desolvated, so that these surrounding water molecules become ordered and remain on the PB's surface in the ternary complex. When these water molecules are on top of a hydrophobic patch on the PB, they destabilize the ternary complex, and the incorporation efficiency of incoming dNTPs is reduced.

  6. Selective amyloid β oligomer assay based on abasic site-containing molecular beacon and enzyme-free amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linling; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Ya; Lu, Linlin; Feng, Chongchong; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2016-04-15

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers are highly toxic species in the process of Aβ aggregation and are regarded as potent therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, a label-free molecular beacon (MB) system integrated with enzyme-free amplification strategy was developed for simple and highly selective assay of Aβ oligomers. The MB system was constructed with abasic site (AP site)-containing stem-loop DNA and a fluorescent ligand 2-amino-5,6,7-trimethyl-1,8-naphyridine (ATMND), of which the fluorescence was quenched upon binding to the AP site in DNA stem. Enzyme-free amplification was realized by target-triggered continuous opening of two delicately designed MBs (MB1 and MB2). Target DNA hybridization with MB1 and then MB2 resulted in the release of two ATMND molecules in one binding event. Subsequent target recycling could greatly amplify the detection sensitivity due to the greatly enhanced turn-on emission of ATMND fluorescence. Combining with Aβ oligomers aptamers, the strategy was applied to analyze Aβ oligomers and the results showed that it could quantify Aβ oligomers with high selectivity and monitor the Aβ aggregation process. This novel method may be conducive to improve the diagnosis and pathogenic study of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Resistance to Nucleotide Excision Repair of Bulky Guanine Adducts Opposite Abasic Sites in DNA Duplexes and Relationships between Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Kropachev, Konstantin; Jia, Lei; Lei, Jia; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair of certain bulky DNA lesions is abrogated in some specific non-canonical DNA base sequence contexts, while the removal of the same lesions by the nucleotide excision repair mechanism is efficient in duplexes in which all base pairs are complementary. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair activity in human cell extracts is moderate-to-high in the case of two stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from the pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (cis- and trans-B[a]P-N2-dG adducts) in a normal DNA duplex. By contrast, the nucleotide excision repair activity is completely abrogated when the canonical cytosine base opposite the B[a]P-dG adducts is replaced by an abasic site in duplex DNA. However, base excision repair of the abasic site persists. In order to understand the structural origins of these striking phenomena, we used NMR and molecular spectroscopy techniques to evaluate the conformational features of 11mer DNA duplexes containing these B[a]P-dG lesions opposite abasic sites. Our results show that in these duplexes containing the clustered lesions, both B[a]P-dG adducts adopt base-displaced intercalated conformations, with the B[a]P aromatic rings intercalated into the DNA helix. To explain the persistence of base excision repair in the face of the opposed bulky B[a]P ring system, molecular modeling results suggest how the APE1 base excision repair endonuclease, that excises abasic lesions, can bind productively even with the trans-B[a]P-dG positioned opposite the abasic site. We hypothesize that the nucleotide excision repair resistance is fostered by local B[a]P residue-DNA base stacking interactions at the abasic sites, that are facilitated by the absence of the cytosine partner base in the complementary strand. More broadly, this study sets the stage for elucidating the interplay between base excision and nucleotide excision repair in processing different types of clustered DNA lesions that are substrates of nucleotide excision

  8. Resistance to Nucleotide Excision Repair of Bulky Guanine Adducts Opposite Abasic Sites in DNA Duplexes and Relationships between Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Kropachev, Konstantin; Lei, Jia; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair of certain bulky DNA lesions is abrogated in some specific non-canonical DNA base sequence contexts, while the removal of the same lesions by the nucleotide excision repair mechanism is efficient in duplexes in which all base pairs are complementary. Here we show that the nucleotide excision repair activity in human cell extracts is moderate-to-high in the case of two stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from the pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (cis- and trans-B[a]P-N2-dG adducts) in a normal DNA duplex. By contrast, the nucleotide excision repair activity is completely abrogated when the canonical cytosine base opposite the B[a]P-dG adducts is replaced by an abasic site in duplex DNA. However, base excision repair of the abasic site persists. In order to understand the structural origins of these striking phenomena, we used NMR and molecular spectroscopy techniques to evaluate the conformational features of 11mer DNA duplexes containing these B[a]P-dG lesions opposite abasic sites. Our results show that in these duplexes containing the clustered lesions, both B[a]P-dG adducts adopt base-displaced intercalated conformations, with the B[a]P aromatic rings intercalated into the DNA helix. To explain the persistence of base excision repair in the face of the opposed bulky B[a]P ring system, molecular modeling results suggest how the APE1 base excision repair endonuclease, that excises abasic lesions, can bind productively even with the trans-B[a]P-dG positioned opposite the abasic site. We hypothesize that the nucleotide excision repair resistance is fostered by local B[a]P residue—DNA base stacking interactions at the abasic sites, that are facilitated by the absence of the cytosine partner base in the complementary strand. More broadly, this study sets the stage for elucidating the interplay between base excision and nucleotide excision repair in processing different types of clustered DNA lesions that are substrates of nucleotide

  9. Comparative study of affinity and selectivity of ligands targeting abasic and mismatch sites in DNA using a fluorescence-melting assay.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Naoko; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several families of small-molecule ligands have been developed to selectively target DNA pairing defects, such as abasic sites and mismatched base pairs, with the aim to interfere with the DNA repair and the template function of the DNA. However, the affinity and selectivity (with respect to well-matched DNA) of these ligands has barely been evaluated in a systematic way. Herein, we report a comparative study of binding affinity and selectivity of a representative panel of 16 ligands targeting abasic sites and a T-T mismatch in DNA, using a fluorescence-monitored melting assay. We demonstrate that bisintercalator-type macrocyclic ligands are characterized by moderate affinity but exceptionally high selectivity with respect to well-matched DNA, whereas other reported ligands show either modest selectivity or rather low affinity in identical conditions.

  10. A microenvironment-sensitive fluorescent pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogue: synthesis, enzymatic incorporation, and fluorescence detection of a DNA abasic site.

    PubMed

    Tanpure, Arun A; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2011-11-04

    Base-modified fluorescent ribonucleoside-analogue probes are valuable tools in monitoring RNA structure and function because they closely resemble the structure of natural nucleobases. Especially, 2-aminopurine, a highly environment-sensitive adenosine analogue, is the most extensively utilized fluorescent nucleoside analogue. However, only a few isosteric pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogues that are suitable for probing the structure and recognition properties of RNA molecules are available. Herein, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of a small series of base-modified pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogues derived from tagging indole, N-methylindole, and benzofuran onto the 5-position of uracil. One of the analogues, based on a 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)pyrimidine core, shows emission in the visible region with a reasonable quantum yield and, importantly, displays excellent solvatochromism. The corresponding triphosphate substrate is effectively incorporated into oligoribonucleotides by T7 RNA polymerase to produce fluorescent oligoribonucleotide constructs. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic studies with fluorescent oligoribonucleotide constructs demonstrate that the fluorescent ribonucleoside photophysically responds to subtle changes in its environment brought about by the interaction of the chromophore with neighboring bases. In particular, the emissive ribonucleoside, if incorporated into an oligoribonucleotide, positively reports the presence of a DNA abasic site with an appreciable enhancement in fluorescence intensity. The straightforward synthesis, amicability to enzymatic incorporation, and sensitivity to changes in the microenvironment highlight the potential of the benzofuran-conjugated pyrimidine ribonucleoside as an efficient fluorescent probe to investigate nucleic acid structure, dynamics, and recognition events.

  11. Accessory proteins assist exonuclease-deficient bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase in replicating past an abasic site

    PubMed Central

    Blanca, Giuseppina; Delagoutte, Emmanuelle; Tanguy le gac, Nicolas; Johnson, Neil P.; Baldacci, Giuseppe; Villani, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Replicative DNA polymerases, such as T4 polymerase, possess both elongation and 3′–5′ exonuclease proofreading catalytic activities. They arrest at the base preceding DNA damage on the coding DNA strand and specialized DNA polymerases have evolved to replicate across the lesion by a process known as TLS (translesion DNA synthesis). TLS is considered to take place in two steps that often require different enzymes, insertion of a nucleotide opposite the damaged template base followed by extension from the inserted nucleotide. We and others have observed that inactivation of the 3′–5′ exonuclease function of T4 polymerase enables TLS across a single site-specific abasic [AP (apurinic/apyrimidinic)] lesion. In the present study we report a role for auxiliary replicative factors in this reaction. When replication is performed with a large excess of DNA template over DNA polymerase in the absence of auxiliary factors, the exo− polymerase (T4 DNA polymerase deficient in the 3′–5′ exonuclease activity) inserts one nucleotide opposite the AP site but does not extend past the lesion. Addition of the clamp processivity factor and the clamp loader complex restores primer extension across an AP lesion on a circular AP-containing DNA substrate by the exo− polymerase, but has no effect on the wild-type enzyme. Hence T4 DNA polymerase exhibits a variety of responses to DNA damage. It can behave as a replicative polymerase or (in the absence of proofreading activity) as a specialized DNA polymerase and carry out TLS. As a specialized polymerase it can function either as an inserter or (with the help of accessory proteins) as an extender. The capacity to separate these distinct functions in a single DNA polymerase provides insight into the biochemical requirements for translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:17064253

  12. Mutagenesis of 8-oxoguanine adjacent to an abasic site in simian kidney cells: tandem mutations and enhancement of G-->T transversions.

    PubMed

    Kalam, M Abul; Basu, Ashis K

    2005-08-01

    Clustered DNA damages are well-established characteristics of ionizing radiation. As a model clustered lesion in the same strand of DNA, we have evaluated the mutagenic potential of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adjacent to a uracil in simian kidney cells using a phagemid vector. The uracil residue would be excised by the enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase in vivo generating an abasic site (AP site). A solitary uracil in either GUGTC or GTGUC sequence context provided >60% progeny containing GTGTC indicating that dAMP incorporation opposite the AP site or uracil occurred, but a >30% population showed replacement of U by A, C, or G, which suggests that dTMP, dGMP, or dCMP incorporation also occurred, respectively, opposite the AP site. While the preference for targeted base substitutions at the GUG site was T > C > A > G, the same at the GUC site was T > A > C > G. We conclude that base incorporation opposite an AP site is sequence-dependent. For 8-oxoG, as compared to 23-24% G-->T mutants from a single 8-oxoG in a TG(8-oxo)T sequence context, the tandem lesions UG(8-oxo)T and TG(8-oxo)U generated approximately 60 and >85% progeny, respectively, that did not contain the TGT sequence. A significant fraction of tandem mutations were detected when uracil was adjacent to 8-oxoG. What we found most interesting is that the total targeted G(8-oxo)-->T transversions that included both single and tandem mutations at the TG(8-oxo)U site was nearly 60% relative to about 30% at the UG(8-oxo)T site. A higher mutational frequency at the TG(8-oxo)U sequence may arise from a change in DNA polymerase that is more error prone. Thermal melting experiments showed that the Tm for the 8-oxoG:C pair in the TG(8-oxo)(AP*) sequence in a 12-mer was lower than the same in a (AP*)G(8-oxo)T 12-mer with deltadeltaG 0.8 kcal/mol (where AP* represents tetrahydrofuran, the model abasic site). When the 8-oxoG:C pair in each sequence was compared with a 8-oxoG:A pair, the former was found to be more stable than

  13. Chemical structure and properties of interstrand cross-links formed by reaction of guanine residues with abasic sites in duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Michael J; Liu, Shuo; Andersen, Nisana; Yang, Zhiyu; Johnson, Kevin M; Price, Nathan E; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S

    2015-03-25

    A new type of interstrand cross-link resulting from the reaction of a DNA abasic site with a guanine residue on the opposing strand of the double helix was recently identified, but the chemical connectivity of the cross-link was not rigorously established. The work described here was designed to characterize the chemical structure and properties of dG-AP cross-links generated in duplex DNA. The approach involved characterization of the nucleoside cross-link "remnant" released by enzymatic digestion of DNA duplexes containing the dG-AP cross-link. We first carried out a chemical synthesis and complete spectroscopic structure determination of the putative cross-link remnant 9b composed of a 2-deoxyribose adduct attached to the exocyclic N(2)-amino group of dG. A reduced analogue of the cross-link remnant was also prepared (11b). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed that the retention times and mass spectral properties of synthetic standards 9b and 11b matched those of the authentic cross-link remnants released by enzymatic digestion of duplexes containing the native and reduced dG-AP cross-link, respectively. These results establish the chemical connectivity of the dG-AP cross-link released from duplex DNA and provide a foundation for detection of this lesion in biological samples. The dG-AP cross-link in duplex DNA was remarkably stable, decomposing with a half-life of 22 days at pH 7 and 23 °C. The intrinsic chemical stability of the dG-AP cross-link suggests that this lesion in duplex DNA may have the power to block DNA-processing enzymes involved in transcription and replication.

  14. Identification of the C4'-oxidized abasic site as the most abundant 2-deoxyribose lesion in radiation-damaged DNA using a novel HPLC-based approach.

    PubMed

    Roginskaya, Marina; Mohseni, Reza; Moore, Terence J; Bernhard, William A; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy

    2014-02-01

    A novel analytical high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method of quantification of the yields of C4'-oxidized abasic sites, 1, in oxidatively damaged DNA has been elaborated. This new approach is based on efficient conversion of 1 into N-substituted 5-methylene-Δ(3)-pyrrolin-2-ones, 2, upon treatment of damaged DNA with primary amines in neutral or slightly acidic solutions with subsequent quantification of 2 by HPLC. The absolute and relative radiation-chemical yields of 1 in irradiated DNA solutions were re-evaluated using this method. The yields were compared with those of other 2-deoxyribose degradation products including 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone, malondialdehyde, and furfural resulting from the C1', C4' and C5'-oxidations, respectively. The yield of free base release (FBR) determined in the same systems was employed as an internal measure of the total oxidative damage to the 2-deoxyribose moiety. Application of this technique identifies 1 as the most abundant sugar lesion in double-stranded (ds) DNA irradiated under air in solution (36% FBR). In single-stranded (ss) DNA this product is second by abundance (33% FBR) after 2-deoxyribonolactones (C1'-oxidation; 43% FBR). The production of nucleoside-5'-aldehydes (C5'-oxidation; 14% and 5% FBR in dsDNA and ssDNA, respectively) is in the third place. Taken together with the parallel reaction channel that converts C4'-radicals into malondialdehyde and 3'-phosphoglycolates, our results identify the C4'-oxidation as a prevalent pathway of oxidative damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone (50% or more of all 2-deoxyribose damages) in indirectly damaged DNA.

  15. Nonpolar nucleobase analogs illuminate requirements for site-specific DNA cleavage by vaccinia topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Lai, Jacob; Kool, Eric T; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-11-24

    Vaccinia DNA topoisomerase forms a covalent DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate at a specific target site 5'-C(+5)C(+4)C(+3)T(+2)T(+1)p downward arrow N(-1) in duplex DNA. Here we study the effects of nonpolar pyrimidine isosteres difluorotoluene (F) and monofluorotoluene (D) and the nonpolar purine analog indole at individual positions of the scissile and nonscissile strands on the rate of single-turnover DNA transesterification and the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Comparison of the effects of nonpolar base substitution to the effects of abasic lesions reported previously allowed us to surmise the relative contributions of base-stacking and polar edge interactions to the DNA transesterification reactions. For example, the deleterious effects of eliminating the +2T base on the scissile strand were rectified by introducing the nonpolar F isostere, whereas the requirement for the +1T base was not elided by F substitution. We impute a role for +1T in recruiting the catalytic residue Lys-167 to the active site. Topoisomerase is especially sensitive to suppression of DNA cleavage upon elimination of the +4G and +3G bases of the nonscissile strand. Indole provided little or no gain of function relative to abasic lesions. Inosine substitutions for +4G and +3G had no effect on transesterification rate, implying that the guanine exocyclic amine is not a critical determinant of DNA cleavage. Prior studies of 2-aminopurine and 7-deazaguanine effects had shown that the O6 and N7 of guanine were also not critical. These findings suggest that either the topoisomerase makes functionally redundant contacts with polar atoms (likely via Tyr-136, a residue important for precleavage active site assembly) or that it relies on contacts to N1 or N3 of the purine ring. The cleavage-religation equilibrium is strongly skewed toward trapping of the covalent intermediate by elimination of the +1A base of the nonscissile strand; the reaction equilibrium is restored by +1 indole

  16. Dynamical signature of abasic damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Furse, Kristina E; Corcelli, Steven A

    2011-02-02

    Time-dependent Stokes shift (TDSS) responses in proteins and DNA exhibit a broad range of long time scales (>10 ps) that are not present in bulk aqueous solution. The physical interpretation of the long TDSS time scales in biomolecular systems is a matter of considerable debate because of the many different components present in the sample (water, biomolecule, counterions), which have highly correlated motions and intrinsically different abilities to adapt to local perturbations. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that the surprisingly slow (∼10 ns) TDSS response of coumarin 102 (C102), a base pair replacement, reflects a distinct dynamical signature for DNA damage. When the C102 molecule is covalently incorporated into DNA, an abasic site is created on the strand opposite the C102 probe. The abasic sugar exhibits a reversible interchange between intra- and extrahelical conformations that are kinetically stable on a nanosecond time scale. This conformational change, only possible in damaged DNA, was found to be responsible for the long time scales in the measured TDSS response. For the first time, a TDSS measurement has been attributed to a specific biomolecular motion. This finding directly contradicts the prevailing notion that the TDSS response in biomolecular contexts is dominated by hydration dynamics. It also suggests that TDSS experiments can be used to study ultrafast biomolecular dynamics that are inaccessible to other techniques.

  17. A New Cross-Link for an Old Cross-Linking Drug: The Nitrogen Mustard Anticancer Agent Mechlorethamine Generates Cross-Links Derived from Abasic Sites in Addition to the Expected Drug-Bridged Cross-Links.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Maryam Imani; Johnson, Kevin M; Price, Nathan E; Gates, Kent S

    2016-12-20

    Nitrogen mustard anticancer drugs generate highly reactive aziridinium ions that alkylate DNA. Monoadducts arising from reaction with position N7 of guanine residues are the major DNA adducts generated by these agents. Interstrand cross-links in which the drug bridges position N7 of two guanine residues are formed in low yields relative to those of the monoadducts but are generally thought to be central to medicinal activity. The N7-alkylguanine residues generated by nitrogen mustards are depurinated to yield abasic (Ap) sites in duplex DNA. Here, we show that Ap sites generated by the nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine lead to interstrand cross-links of a type not previously associated with this drug. Gel electrophoretic data were consistent with early evolution of the expected drug-bridged cross-links, followed by the appearance of Ap-derived cross-links. The evidence is further consistent with a reaction pathway involving alkylation of a guanine residue in a 5'-GT sequence, followed by depurination to generate the Ap site, and cross-link formation via reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the opposing adenine residue at this site [Price, N. E., Johnson, K. M., Wang, J., Fekry, M. I., Wang, Y., and Gates, K. S. (2014) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 3483-3490]. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agents 2-chloro-N,N-diethylethanamine 5, (2-chloroethyl)ethylsulfide 6, and natural product leinamycin similarly were found to induce the formation of Ap-derived cross-links in duplex DNA. This work provides the first characterization of Ap-derived cross-links at sequences in which a cytosine residue is located directly opposing the Ap site. Cross-linking processes of this type could be relevant in medicine and biology because Ap sites with directly opposing cytosine residues occur frequently in genomic DNA via spontaneous or enzymatic depurination of guanine and N7-alkylguanine residues.

  18. Salient Characteristics for Terrestrial Analog Engineering Test Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J.K.; Blaisdell, G. L.

    2000-01-01

    The use of terrestrial analog sites is an essential component of the development process for systems that are planned for lunar and planetary surfaces. These sites can also be valuable for training personnel who are expected to operate those systems. The fact that the site is an integral element, capable of influencing data and impacting test results, must not be overlooked. For tests performed in analog environments to be truly valid it is essential that the relevant characteristics of the employed sites be thoroughly understood. It is also critical that a comparative evaluation be made to assess the similarity of the analog sites to target planetary sites. Examples of relevant characteristics include terrain, soil properties, meteorology, geologic features, biological history, and remoteness. The importance of each of the characteristics varies with the type of extraterrestrial activity to be conducted. As a result, a site that is ideal for one purpose may be totally inadequate for another. It may also be appropriate to utilize multiple sites of increasing fidelity as the development process evolves. For example, early in the development process, the use of lower-fidelity sites may be elected - especially if they are available for a lower cost. Later, it may be necessary to employ higher-fidelity sites to capture greater realism, even if there is an associated increased cost. Finally, when interpreting the results of field tests, it is necessary to understand the sensitivity of the results to the relevant conditions. Knowledge of characteristics and sensitivity of results is particularly important when using field test results to validate analytical model predictions. This is especially true for activities that involve physical interaction with the site. Examples would include tests of rovers or other vehicles and associated trafficability modeling, spacesuit mobility tests, and tests associated with system deployment operations.

  19. Mutagenesis by peroxy radical is dominated by transversions at deoxyguanosine: evidence for the lack of involvement of 8-oxo-dG1 and/or abasic site formation.

    PubMed

    Valentine, M R; Rodriguez, H; Termini, J

    1998-05-12

    Oxidative damage of DNA by endogenously generated oxygen radicals contributes to the mutagenic process. Hydroxy, alkoxy, and peroxy radicals all have the potential to react with DNA, giving rise to strand breaks and potentially mutagenic oxidative base damage. Although reactions of the hydroxy radical with DNA have been well studied, far less is known about the reactivities of these other radicals with DNA and their mutation-inducing potential. Frequencies of DNA base modifications and strand break densities caused by peroxy radical (ROO*) oxidation were measured by glyoxal gel electrophoretic analysis. We report the spectrum of mutations induced in Escherichia coli upon transfection with peroxy radical treated DNA carrying the lacZ alpha gene as a reporter. Transfection of DNA exposed to micromolar amounts of peroxy radical resulted in a 30-fold increase in mutation frequency in non-SOS-inducible cells. Sequencing analysis of DNA isolated from mutants showed that among base substitution mutants 88% consisted of transversions at G, with a nearly equal number of G --> C and G --> T mutants. Transition mutations were rarely detected, in contrast to control experiments. Electrophoretic analysis of peroxy radical treated DNA exposed to NaOH, Nth, and Fpg proteins demonstrated that abasic sites are not formed to any detectable degree. The oxidative G lesions are sensitive to digestion by the Fpg protein. We were unable to detect the formation of 8-oxo-dG by HPLC/electrochemical analysis of peroxy radical oxidation of dG, suggesting that the G --> T transversions were not caused by this base lesion.

  20. On the Formation and Properties of Interstrand DNA-DNA Cross-links Forged by Reaction of an Abasic Site With the Opposing Guanine Residue of 5′-CAp Sequences in Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Price, Nathan E.; Wang, Jin; Fekry, Mostafa I.; Dutta, Sanjay; Seiner, Derrick R.; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the aldehyde residue of an abasic (Ap) site in duplex DNA can generate an interstrand cross-link via reaction with a guanine residue on the opposing strand. This finding is intriguing because the highly deleterious nature of interstrand cross-links suggests that even small amounts of Ap-derived cross-links could make a significant contribution to the biological consequences stemming from the generation of Ap sites in cellular DNA. Incubation of 21-bp duplexes containing a central 5′-CAp sequence under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3, pH 5.2) generated much higher yields of cross-linked DNA than reported previously. At pH 7, in the absence of reducing agents, these Ap-containing duplexes also produced cross-linked duplexes that were readily detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Cross-link formation was not highly sensitive to reaction conditions and, once formed, the cross-link was stable to a variety of work-up conditions. Results of multiple experiments including MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, gel mobility, methoxyamine capping of the Ap aldehyde, inosine-for-guanine replacement, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and LCMS/MS were consistent with a cross-linking mechanism involving reversible reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the N2-amino group of the opposing guanine residue in 5′-CAp sequences to generate hemiaminal, imine, or cyclic hemiaminal cross-links (7-10) that were irreversibly converted under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3/pH 5.2) to a stable amine linkage. Further support for the importance of the exocyclic N2-amino group in this reaction was provided by an experiment showing that installation of a 2-aminopurine-thymine base pair at the cross-linking site produced high yields (15-30%) of a cross-linked duplex at neutral pH, in the absence of NaCNBH3. PMID:23215239

  1. Drilling Automation Tests At A Lunar/Mars Analog Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B.; Cannon, H.; Hanagud, S.; Lee, P.; Paulsen, G.

    2006-01-01

    Future in-situ lunar/martian resource utilization and characterization, as well as the scientific search for life on Mars, will require access to the subsurface and hence drilling. Drilling on Earth is hard - an art form more than an engineering discipline. The limited mass, energy and manpower in planetary drilling situations makes application of terrestrial drilling techniques problematic. The Drilling Automation for Mars Exploration (DAME) project is developing drilling automation and robotics for projected use in missions to the Moon and Mars in the 2011-15 period. This has been tested recently, drilling in permafrost at a lunar/martian analog site (Haughton Crater, Devon Island, Canada).

  2. The Nevada Test Site as a Lunar Analog Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon Freid

    2007-02-13

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a large (1,350 square miles) secure site currently operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy and was established in 1951 to provide a venue for testing nuclear weapons. Three areas with a variety of elevation and geological parameters were used for testing, but the largest number of tests was in Yucca Flat. The Yucca Flat area is approximately 5 miles wide and 20 miles long and approximately 460 subsidence craters resulted from testing in this area. The Sedan crater displaced approximately 12 million tons of earth and is the largest of these craters at 1,280 feet across and 320 feet deep. The profiles of Sedan and the other craters offer a wide variety of shapes and depths that are ideally suited for lunar analog testing.

  3. Analog site for fractured rock characterization. Annual report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.C.S.; Loughty, C.; Faybishenko, B.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the accomplishments of the Analog Site for Fracture Rock Characterization Project during fiscal year 1995. This project is designed to address the problem of characterizing contaminated fractured rock. In order to locate contaminant plumes, develop monitoring schemes, and predict future fate and transport, the project will address the following questions: What parts of the system control flow-geometry of a fracture network? What physical processes control flow and transport? What are the limits on measurements to determine the above? What instrumentation should be used? How should it be designed and implemented? How can field tests be designed to provide information for predicting behavior? What numerical models are good predictors of the behavior of the system? The answers to these question can be used to help plan drilling programs that are likely to intersect plumes and provide effective monitoring of plume movement. The work is done at an {open_quotes}analogue{close_quotes} site, i.e., a site that is not contaminated, but has similar geology to sites that are contaminated, in order to develop tools and techniques without the financial, time and legal burdens of a contaminated site. The idea is to develop conceptual models and investigations tools and methodology that will apply to the contaminated sites in the same geologic regimes. The Box Canyon site, chosen for most of this work represents a unique opportunity because the Canyon walls allow us to see a vertical plane through the rock. The work represents a collaboration between the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL), Stanford University (Stanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Parsons Environmental Engineering (Parsons). LBL and Stanford bring extensive experience in research in fractured rock systems. INEL and Parsons bring significant experience with the contamination problem at INEL.

  4. Direct observation of preferential processing of clustered abasic DNA damages with APE1 in TATA box and CpG island by reaction kinetics and fluorescence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vandana; Kumari, Bhavini; Maity, Banibrata; Seth, Debabrata; Das, Prolay

    2014-01-01

    Sequences like the core element of TATA box and CpG island are frequently encountered in the genome and related to transcription. The fate of repair of clustered abasic sites in such sequences of genomic importance is largely unknown. This prompted us to investigate the sequence dependence of cleavage efficiency of APE1 enzyme at abasic sites within the core sequences of TATA box and CpG island using fluorescence dynamics and reaction kinetics. Simultaneous molecular dynamics study through steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy using unique ethidium bromide dye release assay confirmed an elevated amount of abasic site cleavage of the TATA box sequence as compared to the core CpG island. Reaction kinetics showed that catalytic efficiency of APE1 for abasic site cleavage of core CpG island sequence was ∼4 times lower as compared to that of the TATA box. Higher value of Km was obtained from the core CpG island sequence than the TATA box sequence. This suggests a greater binding effect of APE1 enzyme on TATA sequence that signifies a prominent role of the sequence context of the DNA substrate. Evidently, a faster response from APE1 was obtained for clustered abasic damage repair of TATA box core sequences than CpG island consensus sequences. The neighboring bases of the abasic sites in the complementary DNA strand were found to have significant contribution in addition to the flanking bases in modulating APE1 activity. The repair refractivity of the bistranded clustered abasic sites arise from the slow processing of the second abasic site, consequently resulting in decreased overall production of potentially lethal double strand breaks.

  5. Use of Hawaii Analog Sites for Lunar Science and In-Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, G. B.; Larson, W. E.; Picard, M.; Hamilton, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) and lunar science share similar objectives with respect to analyzing and characterizing the physical, mineral, and volatile materials and resources at sites of robotic and human exploration. To help mature and stress instruments, technologies, and hardware and to evaluate operations and procedures, space agencies have utilized demonstrations at analog sites on Earth before use in future missions. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and the German Space Agency (DLR) have utilized an analog site on the slope of Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii to test ISRU and lunar science hardware and operations in two previously held analog field tests. NASA and CSA are currently planning on a 3rd analog field test to be held in June, 2012 in Hawaii that will expand upon the successes from the previous two field tests.

  6. The effect of Pot1 binding on the repair of thymine analogs in a telomeric DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Theruvathu, Jacob A; Darwanto, Agus; Hsu, Chia Wei; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2014-08-01

    Telomeric DNA can form duplex regions or single-stranded loops that bind multiple proteins, preventing it from being processed as a DNA repair intermediate. The bases within these regions are susceptible to damage; however, mechanisms for the repair of telomere damage are as yet poorly understood. We have examined the effect of three thymine (T) analogs including uracil (U), 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5hmU) on DNA-protein interactions and DNA repair within the GGTTAC telomeric sequence. The replacement of T with U or 5FU interferes with Pot1 (Pot1pN protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe) binding. Surprisingly, 5hmU substitution only modestly diminishes Pot1 binding suggesting that hydrophobicity of the T-methyl group likely plays a minor role in protein binding. In the GGTTAC sequence, all three analogs can be cleaved by DNA glycosylases; however, glycosylase activity is blocked if Pot1 binds. An abasic site at the G or T positions is cleaved by the endonuclease APE1 when in a duplex but not when single-stranded. Abasic site formation thermally destabilizes the duplex that could push a damaged DNA segment into a single-stranded loop. The inability to enzymatically cleave abasic sites in single-stranded telomere regions would block completion of the base excision repair cycle potentially causing telomere attrition.

  7. Basalt weathering in an Arctic Mars-analog site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesavage, Tiffany; Thompson, Aaron; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-07-01

    possible that cyclic adsorption of water onto basaltic rocks in this dry climate may result in high physical spalling rates that in turn promote chemical leaching. Many observations at Sverrefjell are similar to inferences from Mars: the presence of SRO phases, Si-rich coatings, and/or Si-rich allophane, as well as the persistence of olivine. Given these similarities, it is inferred that Sverrefjell volcano is a good analog for martian weathering and that other processes operating at Sverrefjell may also have occurred on Mars, including Na leaching, surface spalling, and precipitation of Si-rich layers. Such processes could have occurred on Mars wherever basalts were exposed to water at circumneutral pH for thousands to tens of thousands of years.

  8. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  9. Correlation of bistranded clustered abasic DNA lesion processing with structural and dynamic DNA helix distortion

    PubMed Central

    Bignon, Emmanuelle; Gattuso, Hugo; Morell, Christophe; Dehez, François; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Monari, Antonio; Dumont, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Clustered apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP; abasic) DNA lesions produced by ionizing radiation are by far more cytotoxic than isolated AP lesion entities. The structure and dynamics of a series of seven 23-bp oligonucleotides featuring simple bistranded clustered damage sites, comprising of two AP sites, zero, one, three or five bases 3′ or 5′ apart from each other, were investigated through 400 ns explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. They provide representative structures of synthetically engineered multiply damage sites-containing oligonucleotides whose repair was investigated experimentally (Nucl. Acids Res. 2004, 32:5609-5620; Nucl. Acids Res. 2002, 30: 2800–2808). The inspection of extrahelical positioning of the AP sites, bulge and non Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding corroborates the experimental measurements of repair efficiencies by bacterial or human AP endonucleases Nfo and APE1, respectively. This study provides unprecedented knowledge into the structure and dynamics of clustered abasic DNA lesions, notably rationalizing the non-symmetry with respect to 3′ to 5′ position. In addition, it provides strong mechanistic insights and basis for future studies on the effects of clustered DNA damage on the recognition and processing of these lesions by bacterial or human DNA repair enzymes specialized in the processing of such lesions. PMID:27587587

  10. Simulation analysis of formycin 5?-monophosphate analog substrates in the ricin A-chain active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mark A.; Scovill, John P.; Hack, Dallas C.

    1995-06-01

    Ricin is an RNA N-glycosidase that hydrolyzes a single adenine base from a conserved loop of 28S ribosomal RNA, thus inactivating protein synthesis. Molecular-dynamics simulation methods are used to analyze the structural interactions and thermodynamics that govern the binding of formycin 5'-monophosphate (FMP) and several of its analogs to the active site of ricin A-chain. Simulations are carried out initiated from the X-ray crystal structure of the ricin-FMP complex with the ligand modeled as a dianion, monoanion and zwitterion. Relative changes in binding free energies are estimated for FMP analogs constructed from amino substitutions at the 2- and 2'-positions, and from hydroxyl substitution at the 2'-position.

  11. Strategy for identifying natural analogs of the long-term performance of low-level waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chatters, J.C.; Waugh, W.J.; Foley, M.G.; Kincaid, C.T.

    1990-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Program has asked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to explore the feasibility of using natural analogs of anticipated waste site and conditions to help validate predictions of the performance of LLW disposal sites. Current regulations require LLW facilities to control the spread of hazardous substances into the environment for at least the next 500 years. Natural analog studies can provide information about processes affecting waste containment that cannot be fully explored through laboratory experimentation and modeling because of the extended period of required performance. For LLW applications, natural analogs include geochemical systems, pedogenic (soil formation) indicators, proxy climate data, and ecological and archaeological settings that portray long-term changes in disposal site environments and the survivability of proposed waste containment materials and structures. Analog data consist of estimates of performance assessment (PA) model input parameters that define possible future environmental states of waste sites, validation parameters that can be predicted by PA models, and descriptive information that can build public confidence in waste disposal practices. This document describes PNL's overall stategy for identifying analogs for LLW disposal systems, reviews lessons learned from past analogs work, outlines the findings of the workshop, and presents examples of analog studies that workshop participants found to be applicable to LLW performance assessment. The lessons from the high-level waste analogs experience and workshop discussions will be used to develop detailed study plans during FY 1990. 39 refs.

  12. Mutagenicity, Stable DNA Adducts, and Abasic Sites Induced in Salmonella by Phananthro[3,4-b]- and Phenanthro[4,3-b]thiophenes, Sulfur Analogs of Benzo[c]phenanthrene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfur-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (thia-PAHs or thiaarenes) are common constituents of air pollution and cigarette smoke, yet little is known of the biological significance of exposure to these compounds. Some are mutagenic and carcinogenic, but only a few have ...

  13. The Mojave Desert: A Martian Analog Site for Future Astrobiology Themed Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, E.; Abbey, W.; Bhartia, R.; Beegle, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    Astrobiological interest in Mars is highlighted by evidence that Mars was once warm enough to have liquid water present on its surface long enough to create geologic formations that could only exist in the presense of extended fluvial periods. These periods existed at the same time life on Earth arose. If life began on Mars as well during this period, it is reasonable to assume it may have adapted to the subsurface as environments at the surface changed into the inhospitable state we find today. If the next series of Mars missions (Mars Science Laboratory, the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter proposed for launch in 2016, and potential near surface sample return) fail to discover either extinct or extant life on Mars, a subsurface mission would be necessary to attempt to "close the book" on the existence of martian life. Mars is much colder and drier than Earth, with a very low pressure CO2 environment and no obvious habitats. Terrestrial regions with limited precipitation, and hence reduced active biota, are some of the best martian low to mid latitude analogs to be found on Earth, be they the Antarctic dry valleys, the Atacama or Mojave Deserts. The Mojave Desert/Death Valley region is considered a Mars analog site by the Terrestrial Analogs Panel of the NSF-sponsored decadal survey; a field guide was even developed and a workshop was held on its applicability as a Mars analog. This region has received a great deal of attention due to its accessibility and the variety of landforms and processes observed relevant to martian studies.

  14. Icebreaker-3 Drill Integration and Testing at Two Mars-Analog Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B.; Bergman, D.; Yaggi, B.; Dave, A.; Zacny, K.

    2016-01-01

    A decade of evolutionary development of integrated automated drilling and sample handling at analog sites and in test chambers has made it possible to go 1 meter through hard rocks and ice layers on Mars. The latest Icebreaker-3 drill has been field tested in 2014 at the Haughton Crater Marsanalog site in the Arctic and in 2015 with a Mars lander mockup in Rio Tinto, Spain, (with sample transfer arm and with a prototype life-detection instrument). Tests in Rio Tinto in 2015 successfully demonstrated that the drill sample (cuttings) was handed-off from the drill to the sample transfer arm and thence to the on-deck instrument inlet where it was taken in and analyzed ("dirt-to-data").

  15. Probing the ATP site of GRP78 with nucleotide triphosphate analogs

    DOE PAGES

    Hughes, Scott J.; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; ...

    2016-05-04

    the bound nucleotide flipped out of the active site, explaining the low affinity binding to GRP78 and suggesting that the 2'-OH group is essential for the high affinity binding to GRP78. Altogether, our results demonstrate that GRP78ATPase possesses nucleotide specificity more relaxed than previously anticipated and can tolerate certain modifications to the nucleobase 7-position and, to a lesser extent, the beta-gamma bridging atom, thereby providing a possible atomic mechanism underlying the transmembrane transport of the ATP analogs.« less

  16. Imaging focal sites of bacterial infection in rats with indium-111-labeled chemotactic peptide analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Pike, M.C.; Kroon, D.; Fucello, A.J.; Rexinger, D.; ten Kate, C.; Wilkinson, R.; Rubin, R.H.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Four DTPA-derivatized chemotactic peptide analogs: ForNleLFNleYK-DTPA (P1), ForMLFNH(CH2)6NH-DTPA (P2), ForNleLFK(NH2)-DTPA (P3), and ForNleLFK-DTPA (P4), were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro bioactivity and receptor binding. The peptides were radiolabeled with 111In by transchelation and their biodistribution determined in rats at 5, 30, 60 and 120 min after injection. Localization at sites of infection was determined by scintillation camera imaging in animals with deep-thigh infection due to Escherichia coli. Images were recorded from 5 min to 2 hr after injection. All peptides maintained biologic activity (EC50 for O2-production by human PMN's: 3-150 nM) and the ability to bind to the oligopeptide chemoattractant receptor on human PMN's (EC50 for binding: 7.5-50 nM); biologic activity and receptor binding were highly correlated (r = 0.99). For all the peptides, blood clearance was rapid (half-lives: 21.5, 33.1, 31.6, and 28.7 min for P1, P2, P3, and P4, respectively). Biodistributions of the individual peptides were similar with low levels of accumulation in the heart, lung, liver, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract. In the kidney, P1 had much greater accumulation than other organs. All peptides yielded high quality images of the infection sites within 1 hr of injection. This study demonstrates that 111In-labeled chemotactic peptide analogs were effective agents for the external imaging of focal sites of infection.

  17. Construction and characterization of an azurin analog for the purple copper site in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hay, M; Richards, J H; Lu, Y

    1996-01-09

    A protein analog of a purple copper center has been constructed from a recombinant blue copper protein (Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin) by replacing the loop containing the three ligands to the blue copper center with the corresponding loop of the CuA center in cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from Paracoccus denitrificans. The electronic absorption in the UV and visible region (UV-vis) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of this analog are remarkably similar to those of the native CuA center in COX from Paracoccus denitrificans. The above spectra can be obtained upon addition of a mixture of Cu2+ and Cu+. Addition of Cu2+ only results in a UV-vis spectrum consisting of absorptions from both a purple copper center and a blue copper center. This spectrum can be converted to the spectrum of a pure purple copper by a prolonged incubation in the air, or by addition of excess ascorbate. The azurin mutant reported here is an example of an engineered purple copper center with the A480/A530 ratio greater than 1 and with no detectable hyperfines, similar to those of the CuA sites in COX of bovine heart and of Paracoccus denitrificans.

  18. Exobiology site selection for future Mars missions: Martian paleolake sediments and terrestrial analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Robert A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This research was conducted to establish the scientific framework for the exobiological study of sediments on Mars and to encourage the selection of these sedimentary deposits as sampling sites for future Mars missions. A study was completed on the Antarctic Dry Valley Lakes (terrestrial analogs of the purported Martian paleolakes) and their sediments that allowed the development of quantitative models relating environmental factors to the nature of the biological community and sediment forming processes. The publications presented include: (1) Diversity of micro-fungi isolated in an Antarctic dry valley; (2) Lake Hoare, Antarctica--sedimentation through a thick perennial ice cover; (3) The possibility of life on Mars during a water-rich past; (4) An Antarctic research outpost as a model for planetary exploration; (5) Early Martian environments--the Antarctic and other terrestrial analogs; (6) Lipophilic pigments from the benthos of a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake; and (7) Perennially ice-covered Lake Hoare, Antarctica--physical environment, biology, and sedimentation.

  19. Abasic pivot substitution harnesses target specificity of RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Sook; Seok, Heeyoung; Lee, Dong Ha; Ham, Juyoung; Lee, Wooje; Youm, Emilia Moonkyung; Yoo, Jin Seon; Lee, Yong-Seung; Jang, Eun-Sook; Chi, Sung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Gene silencing via RNA interference inadvertently represses hundreds of off-target transcripts. Because small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can function as microRNAs, avoiding miRNA-like off-target repression is a major challenge. Functional miRNA–target interactions are known to pre-require transitional nucleation, base pairs from position 2 to the pivot (position 6). Here, by substituting nucleotide in pivot with abasic spacers, which prevent base pairing and alleviate steric hindrance, we eliminate miRNA-like off-target repression while preserving on-target activity at ∼80–100%. Specifically, miR-124 containing dSpacer pivot substitution (6pi) loses seed-mediated transcriptome-wide target interactions, repression activity and biological function, whereas other conventional modifications are ineffective. Application of 6pi allows PCSK9 siRNA to efficiently lower plasma cholesterol concentration in vivo, and abolish potentially deleterious off-target phenotypes. The smallest spacer, C3, also shows the same improvement in target specificity. Abasic pivot substitution serves as a general means to harness the specificity of siRNA experiments and therapeutic applications. PMID:26679372

  20. Abasic pivot substitution harnesses target specificity of RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Sook; Seok, Heeyoung; Lee, Dong Ha; Ham, Juyoung; Lee, Wooje; Youm, Emilia Moonkyung; Yoo, Jin Seon; Lee, Yong-Seung; Jang, Eun-Sook; Chi, Sung Wook

    2015-12-18

    Gene silencing via RNA interference inadvertently represses hundreds of off-target transcripts. Because small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can function as microRNAs, avoiding miRNA-like off-target repression is a major challenge. Functional miRNA-target interactions are known to pre-require transitional nucleation, base pairs from position 2 to the pivot (position 6). Here, by substituting nucleotide in pivot with abasic spacers, which prevent base pairing and alleviate steric hindrance, we eliminate miRNA-like off-target repression while preserving on-target activity at ∼ 80-100%. Specifically, miR-124 containing dSpacer pivot substitution (6pi) loses seed-mediated transcriptome-wide target interactions, repression activity and biological function, whereas other conventional modifications are ineffective. Application of 6pi allows PCSK9 siRNA to efficiently lower plasma cholesterol concentration in vivo, and abolish potentially deleterious off-target phenotypes. The smallest spacer, C3, also shows the same improvement in target specificity. Abasic pivot substitution serves as a general means to harness the specificity of siRNA experiments and therapeutic applications.

  1. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  2. The mechanism of human tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 in the cleavage of AP site and its synthetic analogs.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Natalia A; Rechkunova, Nadejda I; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Saparbaev, Murat; Lavrik, Olga I

    2013-12-01

    The mechanism of hydrolysis of the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site and its synthetic analogs by using tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (Tdp1) was analyzed. Tdp1 catalyzes the cleavage of AP site and the synthetic analog of the AP site, 3-hydroxy-2(hydroxymethyl)-tetrahydrofuran (THF), in DNA by hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond between the substituent and 5' adjacent phosphate. The product of Tdp1 cleavage in the case of the AP site is unstable and is hydrolyzed with the formation of 3'- and 5'-margin phosphates. The following repair demands the ordered action of polynucleotide kinase phosphorylase, with XRCC1, DNA polymerase β, and DNA ligase. In the case of THF, Tdp1 generates break with the 5'-THF and the 3'-phosphate termini. Tdp1 is also able to effectively cleave non-nucleotide insertions in DNA, decanediol and diethyleneglycol moieties by the same mechanism as in the case of THF cleavage. The efficiency of Tdp1 catalyzed hydrolysis of AP-site analog correlates with the DNA helix distortion induced by the substituent. The following repair of 5'-THF and other AP-site analogs can be processed by the long-patch base excision repair pathway.

  3. Probing the ATP site of GRP78 with nucleotide triphosphate analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Scott J.; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C.; Park, Hee -Won

    2016-05-04

    nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the bound nucleotide flipped out of the active site, explaining the low affinity binding to GRP78 and suggesting that the 2'-OH group is essential for the high affinity binding to GRP78. Altogether, our results demonstrate that GRP78ATPase possesses nucleotide specificity more relaxed than previously anticipated and can tolerate certain modifications to the nucleobase 7-position and, to a lesser extent, the beta-gamma bridging atom, thereby providing a possible atomic mechanism underlying the transmembrane transport of the ATP analogs.

  4. Measurements of CO2 Carbon Stable Isotopes at Artificial and Natural Analog Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, S. D.; Clegg, S. M.; Rahn, T.; Fessenden, J. E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.; McLing, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    day, as the subsequent seepage was measured. There was a similar release, but at a flow rate of 0.15 tons/day, in July 2010. Stable isotope measurements have also been made at several natural analog sites. Two places of interest are the Valles Caldera National Preserve in NM and Soda Springs, ID. The Valle traps CO2 at night and can have very large swings in concentrations that test the instrument range. Soda Springs, ID has many carbonated natural springs and carbon isotope information from this site can provide information regarding CO2 from the deep subsurface, useful for future MVA work.

  5. Crew/Robot Coordinated Planetary EVA Operations at a Lunar Base Analog Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Delgado, F. J.; Herrera, E.; Kosmo, J. J.; Janoiko, B. A.; Wilcox, B. H.; Townsend, J. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Fong, T. W.; Bualat, M. G.; Lee, S. Y.; Dorsey, J. T.; Doggett, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Under the direction of NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program, robots and space suited subjects from several NASA centers recently completed a very successful demonstration of coordinated activities indicative of base camp operations on the lunar surface. For these activities, NASA chose a site near Meteor Crater, Arizona close to where Apollo Astronauts previously trained. The main scenario demonstrated crew returning from a planetary EVA (extra-vehicular activity) to a temporary base camp and entering a pressurized rover compartment while robots performed tasks in preparation for the next EVA. Scenario tasks included: rover operations under direct human control and autonomous modes, crew ingress and egress activities, autonomous robotic payload removal and stowage operations under both local control and remote control from Houston, and autonomous robotic navigation and inspection. In addition to the main scenario, participants had an opportunity to explore additional robotic operations: hill climbing, maneuvering heaving loads, gathering geo-logical samples, drilling, and tether operations. In this analog environment, the suited subjects and robots experienced high levels of dust, rough terrain, and harsh lighting.

  6. An unnatural hydrophobic base pair system: site-specific incorporation of nucleotide analogs into DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Fujiwara, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Rie; Sato, Akira; Harada, Yoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2006-09-01

    Methods for the site-specific incorporation of extra components into nucleic acids can be powerful tools for creating DNA and RNA molecules with increased functionality. We present an unnatural base pair system in which DNA containing an unnatural base pair can be amplified and function as a template for the site-specific incorporation of base analog substrates into RNA via transcription. The unnatural base pair is formed by specific hydrophobic shape complementation between the bases, but lacks hydrogen bonding interactions. In replication, this unnatural base pair exhibits high selectivity in combination with the usual triphosphates and modified triphosphates, gamma-amidotriphosphates, as substrates of 3' to 5' exonuclease-proficient DNA polymerases, allowing PCR amplification. In transcription, the unnatural base pair complementarity mediates the incorporation of these base substrates and their analogs, such as a biotinylated substrate, into RNA by T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP). With this system, functional components can be site-specifically incorporated into a large RNA molecule.

  7. Hints of Habitable Environments on Mars Challenge Our Studies of Mars-Analog Sites on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desMarais, David J

    2009-01-01

    Life as we know it requires water with a chemical activity (alpha) >or approx.0.6 and sources of nutrients and useful energy. Some biota can survive even if favorable conditions occur only intermittently, but the minimum required frequency of occurrences is poorly understood. Recent discoveries have vindicated the Mars exploration strategy to follow the water. Mars Global Surveyor s Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) found coarse-grained hematite at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity rover confirmed this and also found evidence of ancient sulfate-rich playa lakes and near-surface groundwater. Elsewhere, TES found evidence of evaporitic halides in topographic depressions. But alpha might not have approached 0.6 in these evaporitic sulfate- and halide-bearing waters. Mars Express (MEX) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) found extensive sulfate evaporites in Meridiani and Valles Marineris. MEX found phyllosilicates at several sites, most notably Mawrth Valles and Nili Fossae. MRO's CRISM near-IR mapper extended the known diversity and geographic distribution of phyllosilicates to include numerous Noachian craters. Phyllosilicates typically occur at the base of exposed ancient rock sections or in sediments in early Hesperian craters. It is uncertain whether the phyllosilicates developed in surface or subsurface aqueous environments and how long aqueous conditions persisted. Spirit rover found remarkably pure ferric sulfate, indicating oxidation and transport of Fe and S, perhaps in fumaroles or hot springs. Spirit also found opaline silica, consistent with hydrothermal activity. CRISM mapped extensive silica deposits in the Valles Marineris region, consistent with aqueous weathering and deposition. CRISM also found ultramafic rocks and magnesite at Nili Fossae, consistent with serpentinization, a process that can sustain habitable environments on Earth. The report of atmospheric methane implies subsurface aqueous conditions. A working hypothesis is that aqueous

  8. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, William M.

    2007-07-01

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  9. Auxin transport sites are visualized in planta using fluorescent auxin analogs.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Nakamura, Shouichi; Fukunaga, Shiho; Nishimura, Takeshi; Jenness, Mark K; Murphy, Angus S; Motose, Hiroyasu; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Furutani, Masahiko; Aoyama, Takashi

    2014-08-05

    The plant hormone auxin is a key morphogenetic signal that controls many aspects of plant growth and development. Cellular auxin levels are coordinately regulated by multiple processes, including auxin biosynthesis and the polar transport and metabolic pathways. The auxin concentration gradient determines plant organ positioning and growth responses to environmental cues. Auxin transport systems play crucial roles in the spatiotemporal regulation of the auxin gradient. This auxin gradient has been analyzed using SCF-type E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex-based auxin biosensors in synthetic auxin-responsive reporter lines. However, the contributions of auxin biosynthesis and metabolism to the auxin gradient have been largely elusive. Additionally, the available information on subcellular auxin localization is still limited. Here we designed fluorescently labeled auxin analogs that remain active for auxin transport but are inactive for auxin signaling and metabolism. Fluorescent auxin analogs enable the selective visualization of the distribution of auxin by the auxin transport system. Together with auxin biosynthesis inhibitors and an auxin biosensor, these analogs indicated a substantial contribution of local auxin biosynthesis to the formation of auxin maxima at the root apex. Moreover, fluorescent auxin analogs mainly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in cultured cells and roots, implying the presence of a subcellular auxin gradient in the cells. Our work not only provides a useful tool for the plant chemical biology field but also demonstrates a new strategy for imaging the distribution of small-molecule hormones.

  10. U-Series Transport Studies at the Pena Blanca, Mexico Natural Analog Site

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Simmons; M. T. Murrell

    2001-05-31

    Natural analogs provide a line of evidence that supports the understanding of how natural and engineered processes would occur over long time frames and large spatial scales at a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Studies of U-series disequilibria within and around uranium deposits can provide valuable information on the timing of actinide mobility and hence the stability of a potential repository over geologic time scales. The Nopal I uranium deposit at Pena Blanca, Mexico, is situated in unsaturated tuff that is similar in composition to the Topopah Spring Tuff of Yucca Mountain and closely matches other evaluation criteria for suitable natural analogs. By modeling the observed radioactive isotope disequilibria at Nopal I, we can estimate the rates of sorption-desorption and dissolution-precipitation of the radionuclides over time. Such information is vital to the testing or validation of performance assessment models for geologic nuclear waste disposal.

  11. Sulfates on Mars as Markers of Aqueous Processes: An Integrated Multidisciplinary Study of Minerals, Mars Analog sites and Recent Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Dyar, M. D.; Brown, A. J.; Parente, M.

    2006-01-01

    Our analyses of sulfate minerals, analog sites, and Martian spectra and spectral images is focused on characterization of the Martian surface and in particular identification of aqueous processes there.

  12. Natural analog study of engineered protective barriers at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, B.N.; Teel, S.S.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate surficial sedimentary deposits formed in the Pasco Basin over the geologic past as analogs for engineered protective barriers. Evidence for likely changes to be expected in an engineered barrier are preserved in geologically recent deposits. Although the design life of the engineered bonier is only 1,000 years, soils and sediments of this age are uncommon in the Pasco Basin. The evidence of and probability for the following natural processes that could adversely affect the long-term stability of an engineered protective barrier reviewed in this report are deflation by wind, soil compaction, soil eluviation/illuviation, bioturbation, and cryoturbation.

  13. Analog earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  14. Pyrrolidine analogs of lobelane: Relationship of affinity for the dihydrotetrabenazine binding site with function of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2)

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Ashish P.; Nickell, Justin R.; Chagkutip, Jaturaporn; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Ring size reduction of the central piperidine ring of lobelane yielded pyrrolidine analogs that showed marked inconsistencies in their ability to bind to the dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) binding site on the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) and their ability to inhibit VMAT2 function. The structure activity relationships indicate that structural modification within the pyrrolidine series resulted in analogs that interact with two different sites, i.e., the DTBZ binding site and an alternative site on VMAT2 to inhibit transporter function. PMID:19691331

  15. Ab initio molecular dynamics studies on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase triphosphate binding site: implications for nucleoside-analog drug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Alber, F.; Carloni, P.

    2000-01-01

    Quantum-chemical methods are used to shed light on the functional role of residues involved in the resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase against nucleoside-analog drugs. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for models representing the adduct between the triphosphate substrate and the nucleoside binding site. The triphosphate is considered either deprotonated or protonated at the gamma-position. Although the protonated form already experiences large rearrangements in the ps time scale, the fully deprotonated state exhibits a previously unrecognized low-barrier hydrogen bond between Lys65 and gamma-phosphate. Absence of this interaction in Lys65-->Arg HIV-1 RT might play a prominent role in the resistance of this mutant for nucleoside analogs (Gu Z et al., 1994b, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:275-281; Zhang D et al., 1994, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:282-287). Water molecules present in the active site, not detected in the X-ray structure, form a complex H-bond network. Among these waters, one may be crucial for substrate recognition as it bridges Gln151 and Arg72 with the beta-phosphate. Absence of this stabilizing interaction in Gln151-->Met HIV-1 RT mutant may be a key factor for the known drug resistance of this mutant toward dideoxy-type drugs and AZT (Shirasaka T et al., 1995, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 92:2398-2402: Iversen AK et al., 1996, J Virol 70:1086-1090). PMID:11206075

  16. An alkaline spring system within the Del Puerto ophiolite (California USA): A Mars analog site

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.G.; Green, S.; Blake, D.; Valley, J.; Kita, N.; Treiman, A.; Dobson, P.F.

    2008-10-01

    Mars appears to have experienced little compositional differentiation of primitive lithosphere, and thus much of the surface of Mars is covered by mafic lavas. On Earth, mafic and ultramafic rocks present in ophiolites, oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been obducted onto land, are therefore good analogs for Mars. The characteristic mineralogy, aqueous geochemistry, and microbial communities of cold-water alkaline springs associated with these mafic and ultramafic rocks represent a particularly compelling analog for potential life-bearing systems. Serpentinization, the reaction of water with mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene, yields fluids with unusual chemistry (Mg-OH and Ca-OH waters with pH values up to {approx}12), as well as heat and hydrogen gas that can sustain subsurface, chemosynthetic ecosystems. The recent observation of seeps from pole-facing crater and canyon walls in the higher Martian latitudes supports the hypothesis that even present conditions might allow for a rockhosted chemosynthetic biosphere in near-surface regions of the Martian crust. The generation of methane within a zone of active serpentinization, through either abiogenic or biogenic processes, could account for the presence of methane detected in the Martian atmosphere. For all of these reasons, studies of terrestrial alkaline springs associated with mafic and ultramafic rocks are particularly timely. This study focuses on the alkaline Adobe Springs, emanating from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the California Coast Range, where a community of novel bacteria is associated with the precipitation of Mg-Ca carbonate cements. The carbonates may serve as a biosignature that could be used in the search for evidence of life on Mars.

  17. Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Alaska: A Terrestrial Analog Site for Polar, Topographically Confined Martian Dune Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Hooper, D. M.; Michaels, T. I.; McGinnis, R. N.; Stillman, D.; Bjella, K.; Stothoff, S.; Walter, G. R.; Necsoiu, M.; Grimm, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Martian dune systems belong to two broad categories: (i) the sprawling north polar erg, rich in and immobilized by seasonal and perennial volatiles; and (ii) isolated low- to high-latitude dune fields confined by topography. While modern dune migration on Mars is nearly imperceptibly slow, recent studies are producing robust evidence for aeolian activity, including bedform modification. Cold-climate terrestrial dunes containing volatile reservoirs provide an important analog to Martian polar dunes because permafrost and seasonal cycles of CO2 and H2O frost mantling are thought to partially decouple Martian polar dunes from atmospheric forcing. The 67°N latitude, 62 km2 Great Kobuk Sand Dunes (GKSD) are a terrestrial analog for polar, intercrater dune fields on Mars. Formative winds affected by complex topography and the presence of volatiles and intercalated snow within the GKSD have direct analogy to factors that impede migration of Martian polar dunes. This system offers the opportunity to study cold-climate, noncoastal, topographically constrained, climbing and reversing barchanoid, transverse, longitudinal, and star dunes. The Kobuk Valley climate is subarctic and semiarid with long, cold winters and brief, warm summers. Niveoaeolian sedimentation occurs within west-facing lee slope catchments. In March 2010, we found the seasonally frozen layer to range in thickness from 1.5 to 4.0 m, and no evidence for shallow permafrost. Instead, using GPR and boreholes, we found a system-wide groundwater aquifer that nearly parallels topography and cuts across steeply dipping bedforms. GPR cannot uniquely detect ice and water; however, a similar analysis of rover-based GPR might be used to detect volatiles in Martian dunes. The perennial volatile reservoir is liquid because of mean annual air temperature, intense solar heating before, during, and after 38 days of continuous summer daylight, high dry sand thermal conductivity, higher wet sand thermal conductivity

  18. Comparative neuroprotective properties of stilbene and catechin analogs: action via a plasma membrane receptor site?

    PubMed

    Bastianetto, Stéphane; Dumont, Yvan; Han, Yingshan; Quirion, Rémi

    2009-01-01

    Various studies have reported on the neuroprotective effects of polyphenols, widely present in food, beverages, and natural products. For example, we have shown that resveratrol, a polyphenol enriched in red wine and other foods such as peanuts, protects hippocampal cells against beta-amyloid (Abeta)-induced toxicity, a key protein involved in the neuropathology of Alzheimer disease. This effect involves, at least in part, the capacity of resveratrol to activate the phosphorylation of delta isoform of protein kinase C (PKC-delta). The neuroprotective action of resveratrol is shared by piceatannol, a stilbene derivative, as well as by tea-derived catechin gallate esters. The thioflavin T assay indicated that all these polyphenols inhibited the formation of Abeta fibrils, suggesting that this action likely also contributes to their neuroprotective effects. Binding and autoradiographic studies revealed that the effects of polyphenols might involve specific binding sites that are particularly enriched in the choroid plexus in the rat brain. Interestingly, the choroid plexus secretes transthyretin, a protein that has been shown to modulate Abeta aggregation and that may be critical to the maintenance of normal learning capacities in aging. Taken together, these data suggest that polyphenols target multiple enzymes/proteins, leading to their neuroprotective actions, possibly through action via specific plasma membrane binding sites.

  19. Terrestrial Analogs to Wind-Related Features at the Viking and Pathfinder Landing Sites on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Bridges, Nathan T.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Laity, Julie E.

    2002-01-01

    Features in the Mojave Desert and Iceland provide insight into the characteristics and origin of Martian wind-related landforms seen by the Viking and Pathfinder landers. The terrestrial sites were chosen because they exhibit diverse wind features that are generally well understood. These features have morphologies comparable to those on Mars and include origins by deposition and erosion, with erosional processes modifying both soils and rocks. Duneforms and drifts are the most common depositional features seen at the Martian landing sites and indicate supplies of sand-sized particles blown by generally unidirectional winds. Erosional features include lag deposits, moat-like depressions around some rocks, and exhumed soil horizons. They indicate that wind can deflate at least some sediments and that this process is particularly effective where the wind interacts with rocks. The formation of ripples and wind tails involves a combination of depositional and erosional processes. Rock erosional features, or ventifacts, are recognized by their overall shapes, erosional flutes, and characteristic surface textures resulting from abrasion by windblown particles. The physics of saltation requires that particles in ripples and duneforms are predominantly sand-sized (60-2000 microns). The orientations of duneforms, wind tails, moats, and ventifacts are correlated with surface winds above particle threshold. Such winds are influenced by local topography and are correlated with winds at higher altitudes predicted by atmospheric models.

  20. The Future Through the Past: The Use of Analog Sites for Design Criteria and Long Term Performance Assessment of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; Young, M. H.; Edwards, S. C.; Rawlinson, S. E.

    2002-02-26

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. At the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers are the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. The project is funded through the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area of the U.S. Department of Energy. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two sites are relatively recently disturbed (within the last 50 years) and have been selected to evaluate processes and changes on ET covers for the early period after active cover maintenance is discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end of the compliance period (1,000 years or more); both surfaces are abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites are being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified, and the mode of disturbance to help set baseline conditions. Similar to other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time.

  1. The future through the past: The use of analog sites for design criteria and long-term performance assessment of evapotranspiration landfill covers.

    SciTech Connect

    David Shafer; Julianne Miller; Susan Edwards; Stuart Rawlinson

    2001-10-18

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. For the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers is the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two are relatively recently disturbed sites (within the last 50 years) and have been selected for the evaluation of processes and changes on ET covers for the early period of post-institutional controls when cover maintenance would be discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end (1,000 years or more) of the compliance period. The late to mid-Holocene surfaces are both abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits, dated by thermoluminescence analysis. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites is being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified and the mode of disturbance, to help set baseline conditions. Similar to the other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water-balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time. Results of analog site work and resultant modifications to design, monitoring and maintenance of ET covers on the NTS will be compared with results of a similar study being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), where ET cover closures are planned as well. The comparison will

  2. Natural CO2 accumulations in the western Williston Basin: A mineralogical analog for CO2 injection at the Weyburn site

    DOE PAGES

    Ryerson, F. J.; Lake, John; Whittaker, Steven; ...

    2013-01-17

    The Devonian carbonates of the Duperow Formation on the western flank of the Williston Basin in southwest Saskatchewan contain natural accumulations of CO2, and may have done so for as long as 50 million years. These carbonate sediments are characterized by a succession of carbonate cycles capped by anhydrite-rich evaporites that are thought to act as seals to fluid migration. The Weyburn CO2 injection site lies 400 km to the east in a series of Mississippian carbonates that were deposited in a similar depositional environment. That long-term isolation of natural CO2 can be accomplished within carbonate strata has motivated themore » investigation of the Duperow rocks as a potential natural analog for storage of anthropogenic CO2 in carbonate lithologies. For the Duperow strata to represent a legitimate analog for Midale injection and storage, the similarity in lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineral compositions and porosity with the Midale Beds must be established. Here we compare lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineralogy and mineral compositions from both locales. The major mineral phases at both locales are calcite, dolomite and anhydrite. In addition, accessory pyrite, fluorite, quartz and celestine (strontium sulfate) are also observed. Dawsonite, a potential CO2-trapping mineral, is not observed within the CO2-bearing horizons of the Duperow Formation, however. The distribution of porosity in the Midale Vuggy units is similar to that of the Duperow Formation, but the Marly units of the Midale have significantly higher porosity. The Duperow Formation is topped by the Dinesmore evaporite that is rich in anhydrite, and often contains authigenic K-feldspar. The chemistry of dolomite and calcite from the two localities also overlaps. Silicate minerals are in low abundance (<3%) within the analyzed Duperow samples, with quartz and K-feldspar the only silicates observed petrographically or in X-ray diffraction patterns. The Midale Beds contain

  3. Investigation of the Role of the Histidine-Aspartate Pair in the Human Exonuclease III-like Abasic Endonuclease, Ape1

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, David F. ); Hoyt, David W. ); Khazi, Fayaz A.; Bagu, John R. ); Lindsey, Andrea G.; Wilson, David M.

    2003-05-30

    Hydrogen bonded histidine-aspartate (His-Asp) pairs are critical constituents in several key enzymatic reactions. To date, the role that these pairs play in catalysis is best understood in serine and trypsin-like proteases, where structural and biochemical NMR studies have revealed important pKa values and hydrogen-bonding patterns within the catalytic pocket. However, the role of the His-Asp pair in metal-assisted catalysis is less clear. Here, we apply liquid state NMR to investigate the role of a critical histidine of apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1), a human DNA repair enzyme that cleaves adjacent to abasic sites in DNA using one or more divalent cations and an active site His-Asp pair. The studies within suggest that the Ape1 His- Asp pair functions as neither a general base catalyst nor a metal ligand. Rather, the pair likely stabilizes the pentavalent transition state necessary for phospho-transfer.

  4. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on denitrifying and nitrifying popualtions at terrestrial CO2 leakeage analogous sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christine, Dictor Marie; Catherine, Joulian; Valerie, Laperche; Stephanie, Coulon; Dominique, Breeze

    2010-05-01

    CO2 capture and geological storage (CCS) is recognized to be an important option for carbon abatement in Europe. One of the risks of CCS is the leakage from storage site. A laboratory was conducted on soil samples sampled near-surface from a CO2 leakage analogous site (Latera, Italy) in order to evaluate the impact of an elevated soil CO2 concentration on terrestrial bacterial ecosystems form near surface terrestrial environments and to determine a potential bacterial indicator of CO2 leakage from storage site. Surveys were conducted along a 50m long transect across the vent centre, providing a spectrum of CO2 flux rates, soil gas concentrations and compositions (Beaubien et al., 2007). A bacterial diversity studies, performed by CE-SSCP technique, on a soil profile with increasing CO2 soil concentrations (from 0.3% to 100%) showed that a change on bacterial diversity was noted when CO2 concentration was above 50 % of CO2. From this result, 3 soil samples were taken at 70 cm depth in 3 distinct zones (background soil CO2 content, soil CO2 content of 20% and soil CO2 content of 50%). Then theses soil samples were incubated under closed jars flushed with different air atmospheres (20, 50 and 90 % of CO2) during 18 months. At initial, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months, some soil samples were collected in order to estimate the denitrifying, nitrifying activities as a function of CO2 concentration content and times. Theses enzymatic activities were chosen because one occurs under anaerobic conditions (denitrification) and the other occurs under aerobic conditions (nitrification). Both of them were involved in the nitrogen cycle and are major actors of soil function and groundwater quality preservation. Metabolic diversity using BIOLOG Ecoplates was determined on every soil samples. Physico-chemical parameters (e.g. pH, bulk chemistry, mineralogy) were analyzed to have some information about the evolution of the soil during the incubation with increasing soil CO2 concentrations

  5. Using large Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Sites as Analogs to Study the Mechanical Behavior of Large CO2 Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, A.; Sullivan, E. C.; Heggy, E.; Dermond, J.; Sweeney, M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the main issues in the sequestration of large volumes of anthropogenic CO2 in the deep subsurface is to determine the field-scale induced displacements of fluids (mainly saline water) and their consequences on the mechanical behavior of the reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of that displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost effective and repeatable geophysical techniques of microgravity and INSAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar INterferometry). The determination of the density distribution of materials in the subsurface and its evolution with time potentially provides a cost effective monitoring technique to determine field-scale displacements of reservoir fluids induced by injection of liquid or gas. At the same time, the accurate measurement of temporal ground deformation reflects geomechanical responses and spatial changes. With micro-gravimeters and DGPS, very small gravity anomalies can now be mapped as well as their evolution with time. Displacements of the ground surface can also be measured very precisely through satellite radar interferometry (INSAR). Each of these methods has been implemented on a few occasions on active storage fields (natural gas storage or CO2 pilot sites) and recently with success for INSAR Techniques at the commercial CO2 sequestration site at In Salah, Algeria. However, these technologies are largely uncalibrated for diverse environmental settings like vegetated or urban areas for example. We propose to field test and evaluate these techniques in an active large volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project where sufficient geological data and documented time series exist to create realistic models of mass distribution and surface motion displacement for comparison with gravity and radar interferometry observations. The results will be used as analogs to CO2 storage sites with the appropriate scaling in volume and physical properties for CO2 injection, as well as direct examples of sites where CO

  6. Probing the cyclic nucleotide binding sites of cAMP-dependent protein kinases I and II with analogs of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic phosphorothioates.

    PubMed

    Dostmann, W R; Taylor, S S; Genieser, H G; Jastorff, B; Døskeland, S O; Ogreid, D

    1990-06-25

    A set of cAMP analogs were synthesized that combined exocyclic sulfur substitutions in the equatorial (Rp) or the axial (Sp) position of the cyclophosphate ring with modifications in the adenine base of cAMP. The potency of these compounds to inhibit the binding of [3H]cAMP to sites A and B from type I (rabbit skeletal muscle) and type II (bovine myocardium) cAMP-dependent protein kinase was determined quantitatively. On the average, the Sp isomers had a 5-fold lower affinity for site A and a 30-fold lower affinity for site B of isozyme I than their cyclophosphate homolog. The mean reduction in affinities for the equivalent sites of isozyme II were 20- and 4-fold, respectively. The Rp isomers showed a decrease in affinity of approximately 400-fold and 200-fold for site A and B, respectively, of isozyme I, against 200-fold and 45-fold for site A and B of isozyme II. The Sp substitutions therefore increased the relative preference for site A of isozyme I and site B of isozyme II. The Rp substitution, on the other hand, increased the relative preference for site B of both isozymes. These data show that the Rp and Sp substitutions are tolerated differently by the two intrachain sites of isozymes I and II. They also support the hypothesis that it is the axial, and not the previously proposed equatorial oxygen that contributes the negative charge for the ionic interaction with an invariant arginine in all four binding sites. In addition, they demonstrate that combined modifications in the adenine ring and the cyclic phosphate ring of cAMP can enhance the ability to discriminate between site A and B of one isozyme as well as to discriminate between isozyme I and II. Since Rp analogs of cAMP are known to inhibit activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, the findings of the present study have implications for the synthesis of analogs having a very high selectivity for isozyme I or II.

  7. Do Cross-circle Designs, the Mayan World Tree, Chitto Tustenuggee's, and Miami's Tequesta, Sites have Analogs in Brazil as they have in Peru, Europe, and Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataide, Jade; Mc Leod, Roger; Mc Leod, David

    2007-04-01

    Florida's Miami Tequesta site conveys information about potential tornadoes, hurricanes, and even earthquakes. It is visually analogous to cross-circle designs, like other equivalent sites we have located, as in Maine, New Hampshire, in Medicine Wheels, and elsewhere. We focus on the detectable effects of time-and-place dependent electromagnetic signals. Non-technologic societies, and individuals, still find and use them, even today, especially in places like Cuzco, Peru. Modes of detection involve senses, such as sensitive, observant eyesight, and electromagnetically induced nerve signals interpreted as tinnitus, as traditionally indicated by ``Kokopelli's'' flute-playing, ``pins and needles,'' or even odor sensations. Recorded events show that youthful children are sometimes involved, as by Pacal's Classic-Mayan-era son, who became Kan Balum, Serpent Jaguar. Our intent is to check whether similar signals can be technologically identified in Brazil and New England. Site information investigated by us seems to be driven by the electromagnetic field. Enigmatic Brazilian locations should be technologically investigated with site correlations to other possible analogs, such as Florida's Chitto Tustenuggee site at Miramar. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.6

  8. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shore, Joel D; Thurston, George M

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (pH-pK,W) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of pH-pK and W, and 1/W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √74 lattice constants), first validating simulations through

  9. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel D.; Thurston, George M.

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (p H-p K ,W ) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of p H-p K and W , and 1 /W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √{74 } lattice constants), first validating simulations

  10. Lunar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2009-01-01

    In this viewgraph presentation, a ground-based lunar analog is developed for the return of manned space flight to the Moon. The contents include: 1) Digital Astronaut; 2) Bed Design; 3) Lunar Analog Feasibility Study; 4) Preliminary Data; 5) Pre-pilot Study; 6) Selection of Stockings; 7) Lunar Analog Pilot Study; 8) Bed Design for Lunar Analog Pilot.

  11. Synthetic inositol phosphate analogs reveal that PPIP5K2 has a surface-mounted substrate capture site that is a target for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanchen; Godage, Himali Y; Riley, Andrew M; Weaver, Jeremy D; Shears, Stephen B; Potter, Barry V L

    2014-05-22

    Diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate kinase 2 (PPIP5K2) is one of the mammalian PPIP5K isoforms responsible for synthesis of diphosphoinositol polyphosphates (inositol pyrophosphates; PP-InsPs), regulatory molecules that function at the interface of cell signaling and organismic homeostasis. The development of drugs that inhibit PPIP5K2 could have both experimental and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe a synthetic strategy for producing naturally occurring 5-PP-InsP4, as well as several inositol polyphosphate analogs, and we study their interactions with PPIP5K2 using biochemical and structural approaches. These experiments uncover an additional ligand-binding site on the surface of PPIP5K2, adjacent to the catalytic pocket. This site facilitates substrate capture from the bulk phase, prior to transfer into the catalytic pocket. In addition to demonstrating a "catch-and-pass" reaction mechanism in a small molecule kinase, we demonstrate that binding of our analogs to the substrate capture site inhibits PPIP5K2. This work suggests that the substrate-binding site offers new opportunities for targeted drug design.

  12. Induction of Abasic Sites by the Drinking-Water Mutagen MX in Salmonella TA100

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagen X (MX) is a chlorinated furanone that accounts for more of the mutagenic activity of drinking water than any other disinfection by-product. It is one of the most potent base-substitution mutagens in the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, producing primarily GC to TA mu...

  13. Location of protein S1 of Escherichia coli ribosomes at the 'A'-site of the codon binding site. Affinity labeling studies with a 3'-modified A-U-G analog.

    PubMed Central

    Pongs, O; Stöffler, G; Bald, R W

    1976-01-01

    An affinity analog with a 5-bromoacetamido uridine 5'-phosphate moiety bonded to the 3' end of A-U-G has been prepared with the aid of polynucleotide phosphorylase. This 3'-modified, chemically reactive A-U-G analog was used to probe the ribosomal codon binding site. The yield of the reaction depended strongly on the ribosomal source and was sensitive to salt-washing ribosomes. The major crosslinking product was identified to be protein S1. Since the reaction of this 3'-modified A-U-G programmed ribosomes for Met-tRNA-Met-M binding, it is concluded that protein S1 is located at or near the 3'-side of the ribosomal codon binding site. Images PMID:823527

  14. Geologic analyses of LANDSAT-1 multispectral imagery of a possible power plant site employing digital and analog image processing. [in Pennsylvania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovegreen, J. R.; Prosser, W. J.; Millet, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A site in the Great Valley subsection of the Valley and Ridge physiographic province in eastern Pennsylvania was studied to evaluate the use of digital and analog image processing for geologic investigations. Ground truth at the site was obtained by a field mapping program, a subsurface exploration investigation and a review of available published and unpublished literature. Remote sensing data were analyzed using standard manual techniques. LANDSAT-1 imagery was analyzed using digital image processing employing the multispectral Image 100 system and using analog color processing employing the VP-8 image analyzer. This study deals primarily with linears identified employing image processing and correlation of these linears with known structural features and with linears identified manual interpretation; and the identification of rock outcrops in areas of extensive vegetative cover employing image processing. The results of this study indicate that image processing can be a cost-effective tool for evaluating geologic and linear features for regional studies encompassing large areas such as for power plant siting. Digital image processing can be an effective tool for identifying rock outcrops in areas of heavy vegetative cover.

  15. Influence of C-5 substituted cytosine and related nucleoside analogs on the formation of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-dG adducts at CG base pairs of DNA.

    PubMed

    Guza, Rebecca; Kotandeniya, Delshanee; Murphy, Kristopher; Dissanayake, Thakshila; Lin, Chen; Giambasu, George Madalin; Lad, Rahul R; Wojciechowski, Filip; Amin, Shantu; Sturla, Shana J; Hudson, Robert H E; York, Darrin M; Jankowiak, Ryszard; Jones, Roger; Tretyakova, Natalia Y

    2011-05-01

    Endogenous 5-methylcytosine ((Me)C) residues are found at all CG dinucleotides of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, including the mutational 'hotspots' for smoking induced lung cancer. (Me)C enhances the reactivity of its base paired guanine towards carcinogenic diolepoxide metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in cigarette smoke. In the present study, the structural basis for these effects was investigated using a series of unnatural nucleoside analogs and a representative PAH diolepoxide, benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE). Synthetic DNA duplexes derived from a frequently mutated region of the p53 gene (5'-CCCGGCACCC GC[(15)N(3),(13)C(1)-G]TCCGCG-3', + strand) were prepared containing [(15)N(3), (13)C(1)]-guanine opposite unsubstituted cytosine, (Me)C, abasic site, or unnatural nucleobase analogs. Following BPDE treatment and hydrolysis of the modified DNA to 2'-deoxynucleosides, N(2)-BPDE-dG adducts formed at the [(15)N(3), (13)C(1)]-labeled guanine and elsewhere in the sequence were quantified by mass spectrometry. We found that C-5 alkylcytosines and related structural analogs specifically enhance the reactivity of the base paired guanine towards BPDE and modify the diastereomeric composition of N(2)-BPDE-dG adducts. Fluorescence and molecular docking studies revealed that 5-alkylcytosines and unnatural nucleobase analogs with extended aromatic systems facilitate the formation of intercalative BPDE-DNA complexes, placing BPDE in a favorable orientation for nucleophilic attack by the N(2) position of guanine.

  16. Aggregation of human platelets by endotoxic glycolipid-bearing Salmonella minnesota Re595 is prevented by synthetic peptide analogs of cell adhesion sites of fibrinogen and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Timmons, S.; Grabarek, J.; Kloczewiak, M.; Hawiger, J.

    1986-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia often accompanies sepsis due to endotoxin producing gram-negative bacteria. The authors have observed that mutant Re595 of S. minnesota induced aggregation of human platelets separated from plasma fibrinogen (Theta) and other proteins. This aggregation is dependent on ADP secreted from storage granules in response to mutant Re595. Platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 was prevented by simultaneously added EDTA and EGTA (5mM), whereas secretion of /sup 14/C-serotonin was maintained. Preincubation of platelets with chelators (1 hr, 37/sup 0/C), known to dissociate irreversibly the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb x IIIa complex, abolished aggregation while serotonin secretion was decreased by only one fourth. Since the GPIIb x IIIa complex constitutes the receptor for Theta, its role was examined using synthetic peptide analogs of sites on gamma and alpha chains of Theta. Gamma 400-411 (225 ..mu..M) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 while serotonin secretion was unaffected. Alpha 572-575 (RGDS; 100 ..mu..M), analogous to cell adhesion site of fibronectin, also prevented aggregation induced by mutant Re595. Thus, mutant Re595 causes platelet aggregation which is divalent cation-dependent and proceeds via receptor pathway for secreted adhesive macromolecules.

  17. Piv site-specific invertase requires a DEDD motif analogous to the catalytic center of the RuvC Holliday junction resolvases.

    PubMed

    Buchner, John M; Robertson, Anne E; Poynter, David J; Denniston, Shelby S; Karls, Anna C

    2005-05-01

    Piv, a unique prokaryotic site-specific DNA invertase, is related to transposases of the insertion elements from the IS110/IS492 family and shows no similarity to the site-specific recombinases of the tyrosine- or serine-recombinase families. Piv tertiary structure is predicted to include the RNase H-like fold that typically encompasses the catalytic site of the recombinases or nucleases of the retroviral integrase superfamily, including transposases and RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvases. Analogous to the DDE and DEDD catalytic motifs of transposases and RuvC, respectively, four Piv acidic residues D9, E59, D101, and D104 appear to be positioned appropriately within the RNase H fold to coordinate two divalent metal cations. This suggests mechanistic similarity between site-specific inversion mediated by Piv and transposition or endonucleolytic reactions catalyzed by enzymes of the retroviral integrase superfamily. The role of the DEDD motif in Piv catalytic activity was addressed using Piv variants that are substituted individually or multiply at these acidic residues and assaying for in vivo inversion, intermolecular recombination, and DNA binding activities. The results indicate that all four residues of the DEDD motif are required for Piv catalytic activity. The DEDD residues are not essential for inv recombination site recognition and binding, but this acidic tetrad does appear to contribute to the stability of Piv-inv interactions. On the basis of these results, a working model for Piv-mediated inversion that includes resolution of a Holliday junction is presented.

  18. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J. William; Pawar, Rajesh; Guthrie, George D.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactive transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be

  19. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    DOE PAGES

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; ...

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactivemore » transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be relatively small, yet persistent over 100 a.« less

  20. Vegetation-derived insights on the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides from the Nopal I natural analog site, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, B.W.; Pickett, D.A.; Pearcy, E.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico is a source term and contaminant transport natural analog to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In an attempt to characterize the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone at the Nopal I deposit, vegetation growing on ore piles was analyzed for {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 232}Th decay-series isotopes. Specimens of Phacelia robusta growing on high-grade piles of U ore were collected and analyzed by alpha autoradiography, and by alpha and gamma spectrometry. Activities for U, thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) isotopes (Bq/kg dried plant) were 300, 1,000, and 7,000 for {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 226}Ra, respectively. The {sup 226}Ra activities in these specimens are among the highest ever measured for plants; furthermore, the plant-to-soil {sup 226}Ra concentration ratio is higher than expected. These results demonstrate the large mobility and bio-availability of Ra in the Nopal I environment, and support previous indications of recent loss of {sup 226}Ra from the ore body. Comparison between the activities of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th decay-chain Th isotopes in the plants and in the ore substrate indicate that relative mobilization into pore solutions of {sup 228}Th > {sup 230}Th > {sup 232}Th, in a ratio of about 50--25:4:1, respectively. The similarity of the plant's {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio ({approximately}1.2) to that of a caliche deposit that formed adjacent to the Nopal ore body around 54 ka suggests the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio of U released from the ore is approximately 1.2. The U and {sup 226}Ra isotope activities of the plants and ore substrate, and solubility considerations, are used to assess a source term model of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. These results suggest the use of a natural analog source term model in performance assessments may be non-conservative.

  1. The impact of CO2 on shallow groundwater chemistry: observations at a natural analog site and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Elizabeth; Fessenden, Julianna; Kanjorski, Nancy; Koning, Dan; Pawar, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    In a natural analog study of risks associated with carbon sequestration, impacts of CO{sub 2} on shallow groundwater quality have been measured in a sandstone aquifer in New Mexico, USA. Despite relatively high levels of dissolved CO{sub 2}, originating from depth and producing geysering at one well, pH depression and consequent trace element mobility are relatively minor effects due to the buffering capacity of the aquifer. However, local contamination due to influx of saline waters in a subset of wells is significant. Geochemical modeling of major ion concentrations suggests that high alkalinity and carbonate mineral dissolution buffers pH changes due to CO{sub 2} influx. Analysis oftrends in dissolved trace elements, chloride, and CO2 reveal no evidence of in-situ trace element mobilization. There is clear evidence, however, that As, U, and Pb are locally co-transported into the aquifer with CO{sub 2}-rich saline water. This study illustrates the role that local geochemical conditions will play in determining the effectiveness of monitoring strategies for CO{sub 2} leakage. For example, if buffering is significant, pH monitoring may not effectively detect CO2 leakage. This study also highlights potential complications that CO{sub 2}carrier fluids, such as saline waters, pose in monitoring impacts ofgeologic sequestration.

  2. Computational and Biochemical Docking of the Irreversible Cocaine Analog RTI 82 Directly Demonstrates Ligand Positioning in the Dopamine Transporter Central Substrate-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D.; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4′-azido-3′-iodophenylethyl ester ([125I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [125I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  3. Computational and biochemical docking of the irreversible cocaine analog RTI 82 directly demonstrates ligand positioning in the dopamine transporter central substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith

    2014-10-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4'-azido-3'-iodophenylethyl ester ([(125)I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [(125)I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors.

  4. In vivo brain dopaminergic receptor site mapping using /sup 75/Se-labeled pergolide analogs: the effects of various dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1986-01-01

    Perogolide mesylate is a new synthetic ergoline derivative which is reported to possess agonistic activity at central dopamine receptor sites in the brain. The authors have synthesized a (/sup 75/Se)-radiolabeled pergolide mesylate derivative, (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate, which, after i.v. administration to mature male rats, showed a time course differentiation in the uptake of this radiolabeled compound in isolated peripheral and central (brain) tissues that are known to be rich in dopamine receptor sites. Further studies were conducted in which the animals were preexposed to the dopamine receptor agonist SKF-38393, as well as the dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, (-)-butaclamol, (+/-)-butaclamol and (-)-chloroethylnorapomorphine, to substantiate the specific peripheral and central localization patterns of (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate. Further investigations were also conducted in which the animals received an i.v. administration of N-isopropyl-l-123-p-iodoamphetamine ((/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine). However, (/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine did not demonstrate a specific affinity for any type of receptor site in the brain. These investigations further substantiated the fact that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate does cross the blood-brain barrier is quickly localized at specific dopamine receptor sites in the intact rat brain and that this localization pattern can be affected by preexposure to different dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Therefore, these investigations provided further evidence that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate and other radiolabeled ergoline analogs might be useful as brain dopamine receptor localization radiopharmaceuticals.

  5. Mutagenic analysis of a receptor contact site on interleukin-2: preparation of an IL-2 analog with increased potency.

    PubMed

    Berndt, W G; Chang, D Z; Smith, K A; Ciardelli, T L

    1994-05-31

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a 133 amino acid alpha-helical protein secreted by activated T-cells. Combinatorial cassette mutagenesis was used to investigate the functional role of a continuous five amino acid region of IL-2 suspected to interact with the intermediate-affinity IL-2 receptor. A limited random library of IL-2 mutants was constructed in which residues 17-21 (Leu-Leu-Leu-Asp-Leu) were simultaneously mutated. The proteins were produced in an Escherichia coli expression system and screened in a biological assay for their ability to mediate the proliferation of a murine IL-2-dependent cell line. From the over 2600 clones examined, only 42 exhibited significant activity, confirming the functional importance of this region. Selected clones were purified and further characterized by biological and receptor binding assays. Viewed in the context of the recently revised 2.5-A crystal structure for IL-2, these results suggest the following conclusions: both Asp20 and Leu21, as shown by their sensitivity to mutation, are the functionally more important residues in this region, but for different reasons. Asp20 is solvent-accessible and likely plays a direct receptor contact role as previous studies have indicated. Leu21, in contrast, is completely buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Substitutions at this position, even a conservative Leu-->Val substitution, were found to perturb the precise hydrophobic packing arrangements that are critical for activity, resulting in a significant loss of function. In addition, one of the analogs identified in the screen was found to be 2-3 times more potent than the wild-type protein.

  6. Testing of the Prototype Mars Drill and Sample Acquisition System in the Mars Analog Site of the Antarctica's Dry Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Paulsen, G.; McKay, C.; Glass, B. J.; Marinova, M.; Davila, A. F.; Pollard, W. H.; Jackson, A.

    2011-12-01

    We report on the testing of the one meter class prototype Mars drill and cuttings sampling system, called the IceBreaker in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The drill consists of a rotary-percussive drill head, a sampling auger with a bit at the end having an integrated temperature sensor, a Z-stage for advancing the auger into the ground, and a sampling station for moving the augered ice shavings or soil cuttings into a sample cup. In November/December of 2010, the IceBreaker drill was tested in the Uni-versity Valley (within the Beacon Valley region of the Antarctic Dry Valleys). University Valley is a good analog to the Northern Polar Regions of Mars because a layer of dry soil lies on top of either ice-cemeted ground or massive ice (depending on the location within the valley). That is exactly what the 2007 Phoenix mission discovered on Mars. The drill demonstrated drilling in ice-cemented ground and in massive ice at the 1-1-100-100 level; that is the drill reached 1 meter in 1 hour with 100 Watts of power and 100 Newton Weight on Bit. This corresponds to an average energy of 100 Whr. At the same time, the bit temperature measured by the bit thermocouple did not exceed more than 10 °C above the formation temperature. The temperature also never exceeded freezing, which minimizes chances of getting stuck and also of altering the materials that are being sampled and analyzed. The samples in the forms of cuttings were acquired every 10 cm intervals into sterile bags. These tests have shown that drilling on Mars, in ice cemented ground with limited power, energy and Weight on Bit, and collecting samples in discrete depth intervals is possible within the given mass, power, and energy levels of a Phoenix-size lander and within the duration of a Phoenix-like mission.

  7. Size-frequency distributions of rocks on Mars and Earth analog sites: Implications for future landed missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M.; Rapp, D.

    The size-frequency distribution of rocks at the Viking landing sites and a variety of rocky locations on the Earth that formed from a number of geologic processes all have the general shape of simple exponential curves, which have been combined with remote sensing data and models on rock abundance to predict the frequency of boulders potentially hazardous to future Mars landers and rovers. Rock data from the near field of the Viking landers where dimensions can be measured accurately in stereo images and estimates from the far field of Viking 1 have convex up curved shapes on log-log graphs of cumulative frequency per square meter or cumulative fractional area versus diameter. The rock data show a sharp drop-off at large diameters and a progressive approach to a plateau with decreasing diameter (approaching the total rock coverage), which can be fit well with simple exponential functions. Similar shaped size-frequency distributions of rocks are found at a wide variety of rocky surfaces on the Earth and can be fit well with simple exponential functions. This distribution is compatible with fracture and fragmentation theory, which provides a physical basis for its wide application. A combined fit to rock area data at both Viking sites was made with a general exponential function, in which the pre-exponential is the total area covered by rocks. Simple linear height versus diameter relationships were also derived from height-diameter ratios at the Viking sites, which suggest that rockier areas on Mars have higher standing rocks than less rocky areas. Height was then substituted into the general exponential function derived for diameter, yielding the cumulative fractional area of rocks versus height for any given total rock coverage on Mars. Results indicate that most of Mars is rather benign with regard to hazards from landing on large rocks. For total rock coverage of 8%, equivalent to modal rock coverage on Mars and the Viking 1 site without the outcrops, about 1% of

  8. A Hybrid Approach for Precipitation Simulation Using the Multi-site Neyman-Scott Rainfall Pulse Model and the Analog Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaheil, Y. H.; Lohmann, D.; Goteti, G.; Katz, B. G.; RMS Model Dev Team

    2011-12-01

    The Multi-site Neyman-Scott Rainfall Pulse model (MNSRP) was previously implemented in many studies over different climate zones and is known for its capability to accurately capture the statistical and the geostatistical properties of the precipitation process up to the third moment, which is a key factor in extreme precipitation analysis. However, due to the purely stochastic nature of the model, larger spatial precipitation patterns cannot be captured, especially when the model is implemented over large regions. The Analog Method (AM) uses observed precipitation EOFs to accurately simulate precipitation spatially. The quality of the AM simulations suffers in arid and semi-arid regions where the statistical properties of the precipitation process are harder to capture. The Hybrid Approach (HA) uses the AM simulations to locally rank the MNSRP simulations for each month. Case studies in different climatic regions in the US show that the new approach compares favorably to each individual model.

  9. RUNX3 expression is associated with sensitivity to pheophorbide a-based photodynamic therapy in keloids.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhenlong; Zhu, Lianhua; Zhang, Xianglan; Li, Lianhua; Moon, Sook; Roh, Mi Ryung; Jin, Zhehu

    2015-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) has recently been reported to be a possible predictor of sensitivity of cancer cells for photodynamic therapy (PDT), a promising therapeutic modality for keloids. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the implications of RUNX3 for keloid pathogenesis and sensitivity to pheophorbide a-based PDT (Pa-PDT). RUNX3 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression were examined in 6 normal skin samples and 32 keloid tissue samples by immunohistochemistry. We found that RUNX3 expression was detected more often in keloid tissues than in dermis of normal skin. In keloid tissues, RUNX3 expression was significantly increased in patients presenting with symptoms of pain or pruritus, and was also significantly related to PCNA expression. The therapeutic effect of Pa-PDT was comparatively investigated in keloid fibroblasts (KFs) with and without RUNX3 expression. Significant differences were found after Pa-PDT between KFs with and without RUNX3 expression in cell viability, proliferative ability, type I collagen expression, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptotic cell death. In addition, RUNX3 expression was significantly decreased after Pa-PDT in KFs, and KFs with downregulation of RUNX3 showed significantly increased cell viability after Pa-PDT. Pa-PDT may be a potential therapeutic modality for keloids, and RUNX3, as a possible contributor to keloid pathogenesis, may improve sensitivity to Pa-PDT in KFs.

  10. Analysis of the interferences in quantitation of a site-specifically PEGylated exendin-4 analog by the Bradford method.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongxia; Hu, Xiaojing; Tian, Hong; Guo, Linfeng; Shen, Qingliang; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2014-11-15

    Protein modification has been found to affect the estimation of protein concentration in some of the traditional dye-based absorbance measurements. In this work, a distinct reduction in A595 was observed during the quantitation of a PEGylated exendin-4 analogue (Ex4C) by the Bradford method and the PEGylation process was found to interfere with the measurement. Lys(12), Arg(20), and Lys(27) were further proved to be the major amino acids that functioned as dye-binding sites. The shielding effect produced by the large polymer was demonstrated to depend on the length of PEG that was used for modification.

  11. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  12. Transient-state kinetics of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 acting on an authentic AP site and commonly used substrate analogs: the effect of diverse metal ions and base mismatches.

    PubMed

    Schermerhorn, Kelly M; Delaney, Sarah

    2013-10-29

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is an Mg²⁺-dependent enzyme responsible for incising the DNA backbone 5' to an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Here, we use rapid quench flow (RQF) techniques to provide a comprehensive kinetic analysis of the strand-incision activity (k(chemistry)) of APE1 acting on an authentic AP site along with two widely used analogs, a reduced AP site and a tetrahydrofuran (THF) site. In the presence of biologically relevant Mg²⁺, APE1 incises all three substrates at a rate faster than the resolution of the RQF, ≥700 s⁻¹. To obtain quantitative values of k(chemistry) and to facilitate a comparison of the authentic substrate versus the substrate analogs, we replaced Mg²⁺ with Mn²⁺ or Ni²⁺ or introduced a mismatch 5' to the lesion site. Both strategies were sufficient to slow k(chemistry) and resulted in rates within the resolution of the RQF. In all cases where quantitative rates were obtained, k(chemistry) for the reduced AP site is indistinguishable from the authentic AP site. Notably, there is a small decrease, ~1.5-fold, in k(chemistry) for the THF site relative to the authentic AP site. These results highlight a role in strand incision for the C1' oxygen of the AP site and warrant consideration when designing experiments using substrate analogs.

  13. Pathfinder Landing Site: Alternatives to Catastrophic Floods and An Antarctic Ice-Flow Analog for Outflow Channels on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchitta, B. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Pathfinder spacecraft landed successfully at the mouth of the outflow channels Ares and Tiu Valles, returning a wealth of information about the surrounding landscape. One goal of the mission was to ascertain that catastrophic floods formed the outflow channels, the prevailing hypothesis for their origin. The follow-up reports on the mission proclaim that observations are "consistent" with an origin by catastrophic flood; no alternative mechanisms for channel origin are considered. Thus, the impression is given that the problem of channel origin has been solved. Yet none of the observations are diagnostic of origin by catastrophic floods. Other origins are possible but have been ignored, for instance origin as liquefaction mudflows, debris flows, mass flows, or ice flows. Here I will examine landing site observations that have been used to infer origin by catastrophic flooding and suggest alternative origins. Finally, I will highlight some new observation from Antarctica that make an ice-flow mechanism plausible for the origin of some of the outflow channels.

  14. Anti-idiotypic protein domains selected from protein A-based affibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Malin; Axelsson, Lars; Uhlén, Mathias; Nygren, Per-Ake

    2002-08-15

    Three pairs of small protein domains showing binding behavior in analogy with anti-idiotypic antibodies have been selected using phage display technology. From an affibody protein library constructed by combinatorial variegation of the Fc binding surface of the 58 residue staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-derived domain Z, affibody variants have been selected to the parental SPA scaffold and to two earlier identified SPA-derived affibodies. One selected affibody (Z(SPA-1)) was shown to recognize each of the five domains of wild-type SPA with dissociation constants (K(D)) in the micromolar range. The binding of the Z(SPA-1) affibody to its parental structure was shown to involve the Fc binding site of SPA, while the Fab-binding site was not involved. Similarly, affibodies showing anti-idiotypic binding characteristics were also obtained when affibodies previously selected for binding to Taq DNA polymerase and human IgA, respectively, were used as targets for selections. The potential applications for these types of affinity pairs were exemplified by one-step protein recovery using affinity chromatography employing the specific interactions between the respective protein pair members. These experiments included the purification of the Z(SPA-1) affibody from a total Escherichia coli cell lysate using protein A-Sepharose, suggesting that this protein A/antiprotein A affinity pair could provide a basis for novel affinity gene fusion systems. The use of this type of small, robust, and easily expressed anti-idiotypic affibody pair for affinity technology applications, including self-assembled protein networks, is discussed.

  15. Bupropion Binds to Two Sites in the Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Transmembrane Domain: A Photoaffinity Labeling Study with the Bupropion Analog [125I]-SADU-3-72

    PubMed Central

    Pandhare, Akash; Hamouda, Ayman K.; Staggs, Brandon; Aggarwal, Shaili; Duddempudi, Phaneendra K.; Lever, John R.; Lapinsky, David J.; Jansen, Michaela; Cohen, Jonathan B.; Blanton, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Bupropion, a clinically-used antidepressant and smoking-cessation drug, acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To identify its binding site(s) in nAChRs, we developed a photoreactive bupropion analog, (±)-2-(N-tert-butylamino)-3′-[125I]-iodo-4′-azidopropiophenone (SADU-3-72). Based upon inhibition of [125I]SADU-3-72 binding, SADU-3-72 binds with high affinity (IC50 = 0.8 μM) to the Torpedo nAChR in the resting (closed channel) state and in the agonist-induced desensitized state, and bupropion binds to that site with three-fold higher affinity in the desensitized (IC50 = 1.2 μM) than in the resting state. Photolabeling of Torpedo nAChRs with [125I]SADU-3-72 followed by limited in-gel digestion of nAChR subunits with endoproteinase Glu-C established the presence of [125I]SADU-3-72 photoincorporation within nAChR subunit fragments containing M1-M2-M3 helices (αV8-20K, βV8-22/23K and γV8-24K) or M1-M2 helices (δV8-14). Photolabeling within βV8-22/23K, γV8-24K and δV8-14 was reduced in the desensitized state and inhibited by ion channel blockers selective for the resting (tetracaine) or desensitized (thienycyclohexylpiperidine (TCP)) state, and this pharmacologically specific photolabeling was localized to the M2-9 leucine ring (δLeu265, βLeu257) within the ion channel. In contrast, photolabeling within the αV8-20K was enhanced in the desensitized state and not inhibited by TCP, but was inhibited by bupropion. This agonist-enhanced photolabeling was localized to αTyr213 in αM1. These results establish the presence of two distinct bupropion binding sites within the Torpedo nAChR transmembrane domain: a high affinity site at the middle (M2-9) of the ion channel and a second site near the extracellular end of αM1 within a previously described halothane (general anesthetic) binding pocket. PMID:22394379

  16. Natural CO2 accumulations in the western Williston Basin: A mineralogical analog for CO2 injection at the Weyburn site

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F. J.; Lake, John; Whittaker, Steven; Johnson, James W.

    2013-01-17

    The Devonian carbonates of the Duperow Formation on the western flank of the Williston Basin in southwest Saskatchewan contain natural accumulations of CO2, and may have done so for as long as 50 million years. These carbonate sediments are characterized by a succession of carbonate cycles capped by anhydrite-rich evaporites that are thought to act as seals to fluid migration. The Weyburn CO2 injection site lies 400 km to the east in a series of Mississippian carbonates that were deposited in a similar depositional environment. That long-term isolation of natural CO2 can be accomplished within carbonate strata has motivated the investigation of the Duperow rocks as a potential natural analog for storage of anthropogenic CO2 in carbonate lithologies. For the Duperow strata to represent a legitimate analog for Midale injection and storage, the similarity in lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineral compositions and porosity with the Midale Beds must be established. Here we compare lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineralogy and mineral compositions from both locales. The major mineral phases at both locales are calcite, dolomite and anhydrite. In addition, accessory pyrite, fluorite, quartz and celestine (strontium sulfate) are also observed. Dawsonite, a potential CO2-trapping mineral, is not observed within the CO2-bearing horizons of the Duperow Formation, however. The distribution of porosity in the Midale Vuggy units is similar to that of the Duperow Formation, but the Marly units of the Midale have significantly higher porosity. The Duperow Formation is topped by the Dinesmore evaporite that is rich in anhydrite, and often contains authigenic K-feldspar. The chemistry of dolomite and calcite from the two localities also overlaps. Silicate minerals are in low abundance (<3%) within the analyzed Duperow samples, with quartz and K-feldspar the only silicates observed petrographically or in

  17. X-ray structure based evaluation of analogs of citalopram: Compounds with increased affinity and selectivity compared with R-citalopram for the allosteric site (S2) on hSERT.

    PubMed

    Topiol, Sid; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Sanchez, Connie; Plenge, Per; Loland, Claus J; Juhl, Karsten; Larsen, Krestian; Bregnedal, Peter; Bøgesø, Klaus P

    2017-02-01

    The recent publication of X-ray structures of SERT includes structures with the potent antidepressant S-Citalopram (S-Cit). Earlier predictions of ligand binding at both a primary (S1) and an allosteric modulator site (S2), were confirmed. We provide herein examples of a series of Citalopram analogs, showing distinct structure-activity relationship (SAR) at both sites that is independent of the SAR at the other site. Analogs with a higher affinity and selectivity than benchmark R-Citalopram (R-Cit) for the S2 versus the S1 site were identified. We deploy structural and computational analyses to explain this SAR and demonstrate the potential utility of the newly emerging X-ray structures within the neurotransmitter:sodium Symporter family for drug design.

  18. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

  19. Triptycene analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy (Inventor); Perchellet, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention provides analogs of triptycene which are useful as anticancer drugs, as well as for other uses. The potency of these compounds is in a similar magnitude as daunomycin, a currently used anticancer drug. Each compound of the invention produces one or more desired effects (blocking nucleoside transport, inhibiting nucleic acid or protein syntheses, decreasing the proliferation and viability of cancer cells, inducing DNA fragmentation or retaining their effectiveness against multidrug-resistant tumor cells).

  20. Cyber Analogies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-28

    including the time for reviewing instructions , searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing... CONTENTS 1 Introduction Emily O. Goldman & John Arquilla 7 The Cyber Pearl Harbor James J. Wirtz 15 Applying the Historical Lessons of Surprise Attack...As H.G. Wells put it, “History is a race between education and catastrophe.” SURPRISE ATTACK The primarily history- based analogies contained herein

  1. Profiling base excision repair glycosylases with synthesized transition state analogs.

    PubMed

    Chu, Aurea M; Fettinger, James C; David, Sheila S

    2011-09-01

    Two base excision repair glycosylase (BER) transition state (TS) mimics, (3R,4R)-1-benzyl (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidin-3-ol (1NBn) and (3R,4R)-(hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidin-3-ol (1N), were synthesized using an improved method. Several BER glycosylases that repair oxidized DNA bases, bacterial formamidopyrimdine glycosylase (Fpg), human OG glycosylase (hOGG1) and human Nei-like glycosylase 1 (hNEIL1) exhibit exceptionally high affinity (K(d)∼pM) with DNA duplexes containing the 1NBn and 1N nucleotide. Notably, comparison of the K(d) values of both TS mimics relative to an abasic analog (THF) in duplex contexts paired opposite C or A suggest that these DNA repair enzymes use distinctly different mechanisms for damaged base recognition and catalysis despite having overlapping substrate specificities.

  2. Searching for Clues to the Processes and Conditions of Past Martian Environments: The Roles of Episodic Solutions, Analog Sites and Fe-O(-H) Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. L.; De Deckker, P.

    2012-12-01

    On Mars, limited solutions (water/brine) were likely present episodically. Gradients in solution abundance may have caused salt precipitation and re-solution, brine reflux, pH gradients, and cycling of anions and cations; we provide an example of such processes in a playa lake. We propose that on Mars, the limited, episodic solutions, pH and abundant Fe-O(-H) phases are significant factors in salt precipitation and in promoting adsorption/desorption of anions and cations. FACTORS LEADING TO EPISODIC SOLUTIONS: Episodic movement of solutions may be driven by punctuated processes that 1) remove surface materials (e.g., impact and sedimentary mass wasting and deflation); 2) add surface materials (e.g., impact, volcanic and sedimentary processes); and 3) increase temperature and/or decrease atmospheric pressure (e.g., seasons, diurnal cycles, variation in obliquity). Removal and addition of surface materials results in topographic gradients that change pressure gradients of any potential groundwater, films, or buried ground ice. For example, episodic fluid flow and salt precipitation/re-solution may occur at topographic discontinuities like craters/basins, channel walls, mounds and dunes. Such areas provide the opportunity to sample multiple fluid sources (with different pH, Eh and total dissolved solids, TDS) and they may be the foci of subsurface solution flow and surface transport. EARTH ANALOG: Interplay of the three processes above is seen in Lake Tyrrell (playa), western Victoria, Australia (McCumber, P, 1991 http://vro.dpi.vic.gov.au). During wetter periods, springs from the regional groundwater (low pH, oxidized, mod-high TDS) mix with lake waters and saline 'reflux' brines (mod. pH, reduced, high TDS) at the lake edge at the base of higher ground. The Br/Cl of the reflux brines indicates mineral re-solution. Gypsum and Fe-O(-H) phases precipitate near the lake edge. During hot, dry climate episodes the lake precipitates gypsum and carbonate, efflorescent salts

  3. Studies of the biogenic amine transporters. IV. Demonstration of a multiplicity of binding sites in rat caudate membranes for the cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R B; Cadet, J L; Akunne, H C; Silverthorn, M L; Baumann, M H; Carroll, F I; Rice, K C; de Costa, B R; Partilla, J S; Wang, J B

    1994-07-01

    The drug 3 beta-[4'-iodophenyl]tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester (RTI-55) is a cocaine congener with high affinity for the dopamine transporter (Kd < 1 nM). The present study characterized [125I]RTI-55 binding to membranes prepared from rat, monkey and human caudates and COS cells transiently expressing the cloned rat dopamine (DA) transporter. Using the method of binding surface analysis, two binding sites were resolved in rat caudate: a high-capacity binding site (site 1, Bmax = 11,900 fmol/mg of protein) and a low-capacity site (site 2, Bmax = 846 fmol/mg of protein). The Kd (or Ki) values of selected drugs at the two sites were as follows: (Ki for high-capacity site and Ki for low-capacity site, respectively): RTI-55 (0.76 and 0.21 nM), 1-[2-diphenyl-methoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (0.79 and 358 nM), mazindol (37.6 and 631 nM), 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (45.0 and 540 nM) and cocaine (341 and 129 nM). Nisoxetine, a selective noradrenergic uptake blocker, had low affinity for both sites. Serotonergic uptake blockers had a high degree of selectivity and high affinity for the low-capacity binding site (Ki of citalopram = 0.38 nM; Ki of paroxetine = 0.033 nM). The i.c.v. administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine to rats pretreated with nomifensine (to protect dopaminergic and noradrenergic nerve terminals) selectively decreased the Bmax of site 2, strongly supporting the idea that site 2 is a binding site on the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. This serotonergic lesion also increased the affinity of [125I]RTI-55 for the DA transporter by 10-fold. The ligand selectivity of the caudate 5-HT transporter was different from the [I125]RTI-55 binding site on the 5-HT transporter present in membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus caudate. The [125I]RTI-55 binding to the DA transporter was further resolved into two components, termed sites 1a and 1b, by using human and monkey (Macaca mulatta) caudate membranes but not the

  4. Natural analogs for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.

    1995-11-01

    High-level radioactive waste in the US, spent fuels from commercial reactors and nuclear materials generated by defense activities, will remain potentially hazardous for thousands of years. Demonstrable long-term stability of certain geologic and geochemical systems motivates and sustains the concept that high-level waste can be safely isolated in geologic repositories for requisite periods of time. Each geologic repository is unique in its properties and performance with reguard to isolation of nuclear wastes. Studies of processes analogous to waste-form alteration and radioelement transport in environments analogous to Yucca Mountain are being conducted at two sites, described in this article to illustrate uses of natural analog data: the Nopal I uranium deposit in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico, and the Akrotiri archaeological site on the island of Santorini, Greece.

  5. Archaeological mounds as analogs of engineered covers for waste disposal sites: Literature review and progress report. [Appendix contains bibliography and data on archaeological mounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chatters, J C; Gard, H A

    1991-09-01

    Closure caps for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities are typically designed as layered earthen structures, the composition of which is intended to prevent the infiltration of water and the intrusion of the public into waste forms. Federal regulations require that closure caps perform these functions well enough that minimum exposure guidelines will be met for at least 500 years. Short-term experimentation cannot mimic the conditions that will affect closure caps on the scale of centuries, and therefore cannot provide data on the performance of cap designs over long periods of time. Archaeological mounds hundreds to thousands of years old which are closely analogous to closure caps in form, construction details, and intent can be studied to obtain the necessary understanding of design performance. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a review and analysis of archaeological literature on ancient human-made mounds to determine the quality and potential applicability of this information base to assessments of waste facility design performance. A bibliography of over 200 English-language references was assembled on mound structures from the Americas, Europe, and Asia. A sample of these texts was read for data on variables including environmental and geographic setting, condition, design features, construction. Detailed information was obtained on all variables except those relating to physical and hydrological characteristics of the mound matrix, which few texts presented. It is concluded that an extensive amount of literature and data are available on structures closely analogous to closure caps and that this information is a valuable source of data on the long-term performance of mounded structures. Additional study is recommended, including an expanded analysis of design features reported in the literature and field studies of the physical and hydraulic characteristics of different mound designs. 23 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Analog current mode analog/digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadidi, Khayrollah (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An improved subranging or comparator circuit is provided for an analog-to-digital converter. As a subranging circuit, the circuit produces a residual signal representing the difference between an analog input signal and an analog of a digital representation. This is achieved by subdividing the digital representation into two or more parts and subtracting from the analog input signal analogs of each of the individual digital portions. In another aspect of the present invention, the subranging circuit comprises two sets of differential input pairs in which the transconductance of one differential input pair is scaled relative to the transconductance of the other differential input pair. As a consequence, the same resistor string may be used for two different digital-to-analog converters of the subranging circuit.

  7. Selection and Characterization of Terrestrial Analogs to the Martian Crust: Field Sites in the U.S. Desert Southwest for Testing Radar Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Stamatakos, J. A.; Gonzalez, S. H.; Grimm, R. E.; McKague, H. L.; Browning, L. B.; Ferrill, D. A.

    2004-05-01

    Ideal terrestrial analogues to Mars combine features such as an arid environment, cold climate, a relatively deep water table, saline pore waters, and bedrock dominated by basalt (although more acidic volcanic strata may also be acceptable). The growing evidence for extensive eolian and fluvial sedimentary deposits on Mars demonstrates that investigation of terrestrial analogues for these environments is also needed. Because of large crustal magnetic anomalies in the southern hemisphere of Mars, highly magnetic terrestrial analogues may also be important, especially for some geophysical applications. Terrestrial analogues best suited for calibrating a suite of geophysical instruments, especially radar sounders, need to be sufficiently characterized to provide an accurate understanding of the local geologic context. During site selection, preference should be given to sites that possess a range of physical properties, stratigraphic complexity, and environmental conditions anticipated for Mars. Accessibility, local infrastructure, and cost (travel expenses, etc.) are also important site selection considerations. A number of favorable analogue sites with locations in the U.S. Desert Southwest were recommended in the 2001 National Research Council Decadal Study report on Terrestrial Analogues to Mars as potentially offering a substantial amount of scientific and technical return. Many of these analogues, however, lack sufficient characterization for prompt testing and calibration of Martian radar sounding devices. In this study, we explore new analogue sites, including sites where extensive geological, geophysical, geochemical, hydrogeological, and climate data already exist. While not cold, these sites are relatively arid with deep water tables and offer complex stratigraphy, including highly magnetic basalts, pyroclastic ashflow tuffs, and alluvium. To support current (i.e., MARSIS) and future subsurface radar-sounding missions to Mars planned for the next decade, we

  8. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  9. Learning by Analogy: Discriminating between Potential Analogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richland, Lindsey E.; McDonough, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to successfully discriminate between multiple potentially relevant source analogs when solving new problems is crucial to proficiency in a mathematics domain. Experimental findings in two different mathematical contexts demonstrate that providing cues to support comparative reasoning during an initial instructional analogy, relative to…

  10. [Natural organic compounds that affect to microtubule functions: syntheses and structure-activity relationships of combretastatins, curacin A and their analogs as the colchicine-site ligands on tubulin].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, S; Shirai, R

    2000-10-01

    Microtubules (MT) are cylindrical polymers of the protein tubulin (TN) alpha, beta-heterodimer, and are known to be the main component of spindles in mitotic apparatus of eucaryotic cells. MT are also involved in many other basic and essential cell functions. There are a number of natural and synthetic compounds that interfere with MT function to cause the mitotic arrest of eucaryotic cells. Such antimitotic agents show a broad biological activity, and can be used for medicinal and agrochemical purposes. On the other hand, they are important also as the biochemical tools for understanding the dynamics of MT network. Most of such antimitotic agents, with a few exceptions, bind to beta-TN. Among them, colchicine (CLC), vinblastine and taxol have played major roles in practical uses as well as in biochemical studies of MT functions. They all bind to beta-TN but their binding sites are different. We have worked on a variety of antimitotic agents that bind to either of colchicine-site, vinblastine-site and taxol-site, in discovery, structures, biological actions and/or interactions with TN. In this paper, the results of our studies on CLC-site ligands were summarized; (1) synthetic analogs of combretastatin A-4 (CBS A-4), isolated as a cytotoxic compound produced by a species of South African tree Combretum caffrum, (2) curacin A (CU-A), a cytotoxic metabolite of a marine cyanobacteria Lyngbya majuscula, and its related compounds. Interactions of these compounds with TN were studied and structure-activity relationships of these two classes of compounds were discussed.

  11. Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO[subscript 2] sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Hari; Dai, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Zheng, Liange; Gutherie, George D.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2012-10-24

    Migration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration. A CO{sub 2} leak may cause mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO{sub 2} from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO{sub 2} is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO{sub 2} causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO{sub 2} was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in

  12. International Alligator Rivers Analog Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bichard, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the U.K. Department of the Environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are participating under the aegis of the Nuclear Energy Agency in the International Alligator Rivers Analog Project. The project has a duration of 3 yr, starting in 1988. The project has grown out of a research program on uranium ore bodies as analogs of high-level waste (HLW) repositories undertaken by ANSTO supported by the NRC. A primary objective of the project is to develop an approach to radionuclide transport model validation that may be used by the participants to support assessments of the safety of radioactive waste repositories. The approach involves integrating mathematical and physical modeling with hydrological and geochemical field and laboratory investigations of the analog site. The Koongarra uranium ore body has been chosen as the analog site because it has a secondary ore body that has formed over the past million years as a result of leaching by groundwater flowing through fractures in the primary ore body.

  13. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  14. The Analogical Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyoak, Keith J.; Thagard, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The use of analogy in human thinking is examined from the perspective of a multiconstraint theory that postulates similarity, structure, and purpose as three kinds of constraints. The theory has been implemented in computational simulations of the analogical human mind using the Analogical Mapping by Constraint Satisfaction (ACME) model. (SLD)

  15. Antimicrobial/cytolytic peptides from the venom of the North African scorpion, Androctonus amoreuxi: biochemical and functional characterization of natural peptides and a single site-substituted analog.

    PubMed

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Walker, Brian; Shaw, Chris

    2012-06-01

    The venoms of scorpions are complex cocktails of polypeptide toxins that fall into two structural categories: those that contain cysteinyl residues with associated disulfide bridges and those that do not. As the majority of lethal toxins acting upon ion channels fall into the first category, most research has been focused there. Here we report the identification and structural characterization of two novel 18-mer antimicrobial peptides from the venom of the North African scorpion, Androctonus amoreuxi. Named AamAP1 and AamAP2, both peptides are C-terminally amidated and differ in primary structure at just two sites: Leu-->Pro at position 2 and Phe-->Ile at position 17. Synthetic replicates of both peptides exhibited a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium (Staphylococcus aureus), a Gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli) and a yeast (Candida albicans), at concentrations ranging between 20 μM and 150 μM. In this concentration range, both peptides produced significant degrees of hemolysis. A synthetic replicate of AamAP1 containing a single substitution (His-->Lys) at position 8, generated a peptide (AamAP-S1) with enhanced antimicrobial potency (3-5 μM) against the three test organisms and within this concentration range, hemolytic effects were negligible. In addition, this His-->Lys variant exhibited potent growth inhibitory activity (ID(50) 25-40 μm) against several human cancer cell lines and endothelial cells that was absent in both natural peptides. Natural bioactive peptide libraries, such as those that occur in scorpion venoms, thus constitute a unique source of novel lead compounds with drug development potential whose biological properties can be readily manipulated by simple synthetic chemical means.

  16. Analog without fear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delagrange, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    Analog circuitry, also referred to as Linear, has been nearly run over by the digital/computer bandwagon. This is unfortunate because tremendous advances are being made in the field of analog integrated circuitry. Each year's progress raises the state-of-the-art, bringing achievements not possible even the year before. Many of the traditional prejudices against analog circuitry are no longer valid. This report attempts to summarize what is available now and what can (and can't) be done with analog integrated circuitry.

  17. Analog synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarpeshkar, R

    2014-03-28

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA-protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations.

  18. Nonvolatile Analog Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nonvolatile analog memory uses pairs of ferroelectric field effect transistors (FFETs). Each pair is defined by a first FFET and a second FFET. When an analog value is to be stored in one of the pairs, the first FFET has a saturation voltage applied thereto, and the second FFET has a storage voltage applied thereto that is indicative of the analog value. The saturation and storage voltages decay over time in accordance with a known decay function that is used to recover the original analog value when the pair of FFETs is read.

  19. Probing the function of nucleotides in the catalytic cores of the 8-17 and 10-23 DNAzymes by abasic nucleotide and C3 spacer substitutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Cao, Liqiang; Chiuman, William; Li, Yingfu; Xi, Zhen

    2010-09-07

    8-17 and 10-23 are the two most comprehensively studied RNA-cleaving DNAzymes to date and have the ability to carry out sequence-specific cleavage of both all-RNA or chimeric RNA/DNA substrates. Mutagenesis studies of 8-17 and 10-23 DNAzymes using alternative natural nucleotides to substitute a given nucleotide in the DNAzyme sequence have found that both DNAzymes are able to tolerate a variety of alterations at many sequence locations. Chemical modification studies employing nucleotides containing nonnatural nucleobases have led to findings that some specific entities of selected nucleobases are irreplaceable by other functional groups. In this work, we set out to carry out a mutagenesis study on both 8-17 and 10-23 by substituting individual nucleotides in their catalytic cores with a baseless (abasic) nucleotide or a baseless/sugarless nucleotide containing only acyclic C3 spacer. We observed that the substitution with an abasic nucleotide or C3 spacer at many locations within the catalytic core of both 8-17 and 10-23 was still able to support a significant level of catalytic activity of each DNAzyme, suggesting that both DNAzymes have considerable structural plasticity to maintain their catalytic functions. We also observed that almost all nucleobases in the catalytic core of each DNAzyme appeared to make either an absolutely essential contribution to the function of each DNAzyme or exhibit a "chaperone-like" activity that is important for the optimal function of each DNAzyme; in contrast, only one sugar ring in 8-17 and four in 10-23 were inferred to make some contribution to the optimal function of the relevant DNAzyme. Finally, our study also raised a possibility that the 10-23 DNAzyme might be a special structural variant of the larger 8-17 DNAzyme family.

  20. Commercial PCV2a-based vaccines are effective in protecting naturally PCV2b-infected finisher pigs against experimental challenge with a 2012 mutant PCV2.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Halbur, Patrick G; Matzinger, Shannon R; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-07-23

    Current commercial PCV2 vaccines are all based on PCV2a and have been shown to be effective in reducing PCV2a and PCV2b viremia and PCV2-associated lesions and disease. The recent emergence of novel mutant PCV2 (mPCV2) strains and linkage of mPCV2 with cases of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) in vaccinated herds have raised concerns over emergence of vaccine-escape mutants and reduced efficacy of PCV2a-based vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of three commercial PCV2a-based vaccines administered in the presence of an ongoing PCV2b infection and passively-acquired anti-PCV2 antibodies to protect conventional pigs against experimental challenge with mPCV2 at 11 weeks of age. Fifty naturally PCV2b-infected 2-week-old pigs were divided into five treatment groups with 10 pigs each. Pigs were unvaccinated (positive and negative controls) or vaccinated at 3 (VAC-A, VAC-B, VAC-C) and at 5 weeks of age (VAC-C). At 11 weeks of age, all pigs except the negative controls were challenged with a 2012 U.S. strain of mPCV2. The experiment was terminated 21 days after challenge. Under the conditions of this study, vaccinated pigs were protected against PCV2 viremia and lesions whereas non-vaccinated pigs were not. Moreover, concurrent PCV2b and mPCV2 infection was demonstrated in all positive controls and 3/10 had microscopic lesions consistent with PCVAD while negative controls infected with PCV2b alone did not develop PCVAD. The results indicate that concurrent PCV2b/mPCV2 infection can trigger PCVAD development and that commercial vaccines are effective in protecting conventional pigs against emerging mPCV2 strains.

  1. Challenges in Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2011-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same…

  2. Analogies for Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poskozim, Paul S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews analogies used to try to capture the concept of the magnitude of Avogadro's number, including analogies related to small/tiny objects, counting, people, water, and money. Also presents several new ones which are based on modern computers and printers. (JN)

  3. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding. According to Iding, analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning…

  4. Analog pulse processor

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Kemper, Dale A.

    2003-06-03

    A very low power analog pulse processing system implemented as an ASIC useful for processing signals from radiation detectors, among other things. The system incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaping amplifier, a peak sample and hold circuit, and, optionally, an analog to digital converter and associated drivers.

  5. Meat analog: a review.

    PubMed

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers.

  6. Fostering Multilateral Involvement in Analog Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2015-01-01

    International collaboration in space flight research is an effective means for conducting investigations and utilizing limited resources to the fullest extent. Through these multilateral collaborations mutual research questions can be investigated and resources contributed by each international partner to maximize the scientific benefits to all parties. Recently the international partners embraced this approach to initiate collaborations in ground-based space flight analog environments. In 2011, the International Analog Research Working Group was established, and later named the International Human Space Flight Analog Research Coordination Group (HANA). Among the goals of this working group are to 1) establish a framework to coordinate research campaigns, as appropriate, to minimize duplication of effort and enhance synergy; 2) define what analogs are best to use for collaborative interests; and 3) facilitate interaction between discipline experts in order to have the full benefit of international expertise. To accomplish these goals, HANA is currently engaged in developing international research campaigns in ground-based analogs. Plans are being made for an international solicitation for proposals to address research of common interest to all international partners. This solicitation with identify an analog environment that will best accommodate the types of investigations requested. Once selected, studies will be integrated into a campaign and implemented at the analog site. Through these combined efforts, research beneficial to all partners will be conducted efficiently to further address human risks of space exploration.

  7. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  8. Challenges in Using Analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2011-11-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features.1-7 One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same physics principle is involved but that is more difficult to handle. Here, we examine introductory physics students' ability to use analogies in solving problems involving Newton's second law. Students enrolled in an algebra-based introductory physics course were given a solved problem involving tension in a rope and were then asked to solve another problem for which the physics is very similar but involved a frictional force. They were asked to point out the similarities between the two problems and then use the analogy to solve the friction problem.

  9. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O [Gaithersburg, MD; Pena, Louis A [Poquott, NY; Lin, Xinhua [Plainview, NY; Takahashi, Kazuyuki [Germantown, MD

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  10. NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone

    SciTech Connect

    A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

    2000-03-08

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

  11. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  12. Dosimetric Comparison between Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided and Conventional Two-Dimensional Point A-Based Intracavitary Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Juan; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Ruihua; Wang, Qiuping; Li, Yi; Xue, Chaofan; Yan, Yanli; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Liu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to comprehensively compare the 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided and conventional 2-dimensional (2D) point A-based intracavitary brachytherapy (BT) planning for cervical cancer with regard to target dose coverage and dosages to adjacent organs-at risk (OARs). Methods A total of 79 patients with cervical cancer were enrolled to receive 2D point A-based BT planning and then immediately to receive 3D planning between October 2011 and April 2013 at the First Hospital Affiliated to Xi’an Jiao Tong University (Xi’an, China). The dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IR-CTV) and OARs were compared between the 2D and 3D planning. Results In small tumors, there was no significant difference in most of the DVHs between 2D and 3D planning (all p>0.05). While in big tumors, 3D BT planning significantly increased the DVHs for most of the GTV, HR-CTV and IR-CTV, and some OARs compared with 2D planning (all P<0.05). In 3D planning, DVHs for GTV, HR-CTV, IR-CTV and some OARs were significantly higher in big tumors than in small tumors (all p<0.05). In contrast, in 2D planning, DVHs for almost all of the HR-CTV and IR-CTV were significantly lower in big tumors (all p<0.05). In eccentric tumors, 3D planning significantly increased dose coverage but decreased dosages to OARs compared with 2D planning (p<0.05). In tumors invading adjacent tissues, the target dose coverage in 3D planning was generally significantly higher than in 2D planning (P<0.05); the dosages to the adjacent rectum and bladder were significantly higher but those to sigmoid colon were lower in 3D planning (all P<0.05). Conclusions 3D MRI image-guided BT planning exhibits advantages over 2D planning in a complex way, generally showing advantages for the treatment of cervical cancer except small tumors. PMID:27611853

  13. Digital and analog communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugam, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    The book presents an introductory treatment of digital and analog communication systems with emphasis on digital systems. Attention is given to the following topics: systems and signal analysis, random signal theory, information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, analog signal transmission, noise in analog communication systems, digital carrier modulation schemes, error control coding, and the digital transmission of analog signals.

  14. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  15. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  16. Analog Optical Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles H., III

    2004-05-01

    Unlike books that focus on the devices used in links, such as lasers and photodiodes, among others, this text focuses on the next level. It covers the collection of devices that form a link, how the individual device performance affects the link performance, or the reverse. Analog links are used for the distribution of cable TV signals, and in conveying the signals to and from antennas (so called antenna remoting). The design of analog links differs significantly from digital links which are primarily used in telecommunications.

  17. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  18. Reasoning through Instructional Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; diSessa, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to account for students' assessments of the plausibility and applicability of analogical explanations, and individual differences in these assessments, by analyzing properties of students' underlying knowledge systems. We developed a model of explanation and change in explanation focusing on knowledge elements that provide a…

  19. An Interesting Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacheco, Jose M.; Fernandez, Isabel

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this note is to give some insight into the formal unity of a very applicable area of mathematics by showing an interesting analogy between the weak part of the Rouche-Frobenius theorem and the existence result for the initial value problem for the general first-order linear two-dimensional PDE.

  20. Analogy, explanation, and proof.

    PubMed

    Hummel, John E; Licato, John; Bringsjord, Selmer

    2014-01-01

    People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic) whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof). What do the cognitive operations underlying the inference that the milk is sour have in common with the proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This seemingly small difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning to understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence.

  1. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  2. Are Scientific Analogies Metaphors?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    psychospiritual processes. A more modern example of unclarified analogy is Freud’s (1973; reprinted from 1955) discussion of anal- eroticism , in which...299-304. Freud, S. On transformations of instinct as exemplified in anal eroticism . In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard 37 edition of the complete

  3. Analogy, explanation, and proof

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, John E.; Licato, John; Bringsjord, Selmer

    2014-01-01

    People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic) whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof). What do the cognitive operations underlying the inference that the milk is sour have in common with the proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This seemingly small difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning to understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence. PMID:25414655

  4. Prostacyclin analogs inhibit fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tadashi; Liu, Xiangde; Kim, Hui Jung; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Ertl, Ronald F; Wen, Fu-Qiang; Takizawa, Hajime; Rennard, Stephen I

    2002-08-01

    The controlled accumulation of fibroblasts to sites of inflammation is crucial to effective tissue repair after injury. Either inadequate or excessive accumulation of fibroblasts could result in abnormal tissue function. Prostacyclin (PGI(2)) is a potent mediator in the coagulation and inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PGI(2) on chemotaxis of human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1). Using the blind well chamber technique, we found that the PGI(2) analog carbaprostacyclin (10(-6) M) inhibited HFL-1 chemotaxis to human plasma fibronectin (20 microg/ml) 58.0 +/- 13.2% (P < 0.05) and to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (10 ng/ml) 48.7 +/- 4.6% (P < 0.05). Checkerboard analysis demonstrated that carbaprostacyclin inhibits both directed and undirected migration. The inhibitory effect of the carbaprostacyclin was concentration dependent and blocked by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720, suggesting that a cAMP-PKA pathway may be involved in the process. Two other PGI(2) analogs, ciprostene and dehydro-15-cyclohexyl carbaprostacyclin (both 10(-6) M), significantly inhibited fibroblast migration to fibronectin. In summary, PGI(2) appears to inhibit fibroblast chemotaxis to fibronectin and PDGF-BB. Such an effect may contribute to the regulation of fibroblasts in wound healing and could contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by abnormal tissue repair remodeling.

  5. Analogy Construction versus Analogy Solution, and Their Influence on Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz-Itay, Yifat; Kaniel, Shlomo; Ben-Amram, Einat

    2006-01-01

    This study compares transfer performed by subjects trained to solve verbal analogies, with transfer by subjects trained to construct them. The first group (n = 57) received instruction in a strategy to solve verbal analogies and the second group (n = 66) was trained in strategies for constructing such analogies. Before and after intervention, all…

  6. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  7. VIIP Bedrest Analog Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, Jennifer D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to define successive bed rest campaigns leading to a potential VIIP (Vision Impairment and Intracranial Pressure) countermeasure. To determine if the analog is successful, changes need to occur in the following outcome measures (dependent variables): Intracranial pressure; Retinal nerve fiber layer; Choroidal engorgement; Globe flattening; Axial biometry; Optic nerve sheath diameter distention; Cycloplegic refraction; Visual acuity. Study parameters (independent variables) to include: CO2; Sodium; Exercise (resistive & aerobic); Strict tilt angle.

  8. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J. T.; Larsen, R. S.; Shapiro, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

  9. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  10. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  11. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  12. Neural Analog Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    1982-07-01

    Neural Analog Information Processing (NAIP) is an effort to develop general purpose pattern classification architectures based upon biological information processing principles. This paper gives an overview of NAIP and its relationship to the previous work in neural modeling from which its fundamental principles are derived. It also presents a theorem concerning the stability of response of a slab (a two dimensional array of identical simple processing units) to time-invariant (spatial) patterns. An experiment (via computer emulation) demonstrating classification of a spatial pattern by a simple, but complete NAIP architecture is described. A concept for hardware implementation of NAIP architectures is briefly discussed.

  13. Analogical Processes in Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-15

    CLASSICATMN OF ThIS PA5UrSfie Dule gIt.,.d ANALOGICAL PROCESSES IN LEARNING David E . Rumelhart & Donald A. Norman Program in Cognitive Science Center...for Human Information Processing University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California 92093 Copyright Q) 1980 David E . Rumelhart & Donald A. Norman...4) SEARS 7 E Ilamnp C5P Tota $.600 Aprovd.L. Figure 1. Stimuli for the two conditions of D’Andrade’s reasoning * experiment. The left panel shows the

  14. Antarctic Space Analog Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, E. K. Eric; Johnson, Jeffrey C.; Holland, Albert W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary aim of this project was to examine group dynamics and individual performance in extreme, isolated environments and identify human factors requirements for long-duration space missions using data collected in an analog environment. Specifically, we wished to determine: 1) the characteristics of social relations in small groups of individuals living and working together in extreme, isolated environments, and 2) the environmental, social and psychological determinants of performance effectiveness in such groups. These two issues were examined in six interrelated studies using data collected in small, isolated research stations in Antarctica from 1963 to the present. Results from these six studies indicated that behavior and performance on long-duration space flights is likely to be seasonal or cyclical, situational, social, and salutogenic in nature. The project responded to two NASA program emphases for FY 1997 as described in the NRA: 1) the primary emphasis of the Behavior and Performance Program on determining long-term individual and group performance responses to space, identifying critical factors affecting those responses and understanding underlying mechanisms involved in behavior and performance, and developing and using ground-based models and analogs for studying space-related behavior and performance; and 2) the emphasis of the Data Analysis Program on extended data analysis. Results from the study were used to develop recommendations for the design and development of pre-flight crew training and in-flight psychological countermeasures for long-duration manned space missions.

  15. Mars inflatable greenhouse analog.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Philip D; Giacomelli, Gene A

    2002-01-01

    Light intensities on the Martian surface can possibly support a bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) utilizing natural sunlight for hydroponic crop production, if a suitable controlled environment can be provided. Inflatable clear membrane structures offer low mass, are more easily transported than a rigid structure, and are good candidates for providing a suitable controlled environment for crop production. Cable culture is one hydroponic growing system that can take advantage of the beneficial attributes of the inflatable structure. An analog of a Mars inflatable greenhouse can provide researchers data on issues such as crew time requirements for operation, productivity for BLSS, human factors, and much more at a reasonable cost. This is a description of one such design.

  16. Female analogies to perversion.

    PubMed

    Beier, K M

    2000-01-01

    Unlike the intrapsychic mechanism for self-esteem regulation in males as a basic component of perversion--extrapsychically (compensationally) culminating in an output of sexual impulses--a functional stabilization of the female self-concept seems more likely if conflict drives were to be focused on reproductional aspects and not on sexuality. It therefore seems more suitable to use a new expression in linguistic analogy to perversion: "reproversion." The case history gives an example of a clinical manifestation of "reproverse" symptom formation. The general survey describes the main points of view in regard to clinically oriented differentiation, i.e., intensity, ego-proximity in the personality structure, and one's own self-acceptance within "reproverse" symptom formation. Underlying personality disturbances are also discussed. The significance of reproversion is relevant to many different specialized medical fields. This is explained in conclusion, using the examples of denied pregnancy and infanticide at birth based on initial empirical results.

  17. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10-1000 μmol dm(-3)) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid.

  18. Exploration of the molecular architecture of the orthosteric binding site in the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with analogs of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) and 1-(pyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane.

    PubMed

    Bach, Tinna B; Jensen, Anders A; Petersen, Jette G; Sørensen, Troels E; Della Volpe, Serena; Liu, Jun; Blaazer, Antoni R; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E; Balle, Thomas; Frølund, Bente

    2015-09-18

    X-ray crystal structures of acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) have revealed two different possible extensions to the classical ligand binding pocket known to accommodate various nicotinic agonists. One of the pockets is limited in size while the other is of considerable dimensions and protrudes along the interfacial cleft between subunits. To probe these putative extensions in functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), elongated analogs of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) and 1-(pyridine-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane were prepared and characterized pharmacologically at neuronal heteromeric nAChRs. Although the new analogs, relative to parent compounds, displayed lower binding affinities, functional characterization of selected compounds revealed that they had retained partial α4β2 nAChR agonist activity. The structure-activity relationship data did not indicate an upper limit to the size of substituents as would have been expected if the ligand was bound in the smaller pocket. The data were better in agreement with a binding mode in which substituents protrude along the interfacial cleft of the receptor. This was further supported by docking into a homology model of the α4-β2 nAChR interface and by surface plasmon resonance biosensor analysis of binding of the compounds to acetylcholine-binding proteins, where they exhibit preference for Lymnaea stagnalis ACh binding protein (Ls-AChBP) over the Aplysia california ACh binding protein (Ac-AChBP). These results suggest new opportunities for expanding chemical space in the development of partial agonist and may be of interest in relation to development of novel smoking cessation aids.

  19. Mathematical problem solving by analogy.

    PubMed

    Novick, L R; Holyoak, K J

    1991-05-01

    We report the results of 2 experiments and a verbal protocol study examining the component processes of solving mathematical word problems by analogy. College students first studied a problem and its solution, which provided a potential source for analogical transfer. Then they attempted to solve several analogous problems. For some problems, subjects received one of a variety of hints designed to reduce or eliminate the difficulty of some of the major processes hypothesized to be involved in analogical transfer. Our studies yielded 4 major findings. First, the process of mapping the features of the source and target problems and the process of adapting the source solution procedure for use in solving the target problem were clearly distinguished: (a) Successful mapping was found to be insufficient for successful transfer and (b) adaptation was found to be a major source of transfer difficulty. Second, we obtained direct evidence that schema induction is a natural consequence of analogical transfer. The schema was found to co-exist with the problems from which it was induced, and both the schema and the individual problems facilitated later transfer. Third, for our multiple-solution problems, the relation between analogical transfer and solution accuracy was mediated by the degree of time pressure exerted for the test problems. Finally, mathematical expertise was a significant predictor of analogical transfer, but general analogical reasoning ability was not. The implications of the results for models of analogical transfer and for instruction were considered.

  20. [Analogies and analogy research in technical biology and bionics].

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The procedural approaches of Technical Biology and Bionics are characterized, and analogy research is identified as their common basis. The actual creative aspect in bionical research lies in recognizing and exploiting technically oriented analogies underlying a specific biological prototype to indicate a specific technical application.

  1. Conjecturing via Reconceived Classical Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyeong-Hwa; Sriraman, Bharath

    2011-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is believed to be an efficient means of problem solving and construction of knowledge during the search for and the analysis of new mathematical objects. However, there is growing concern that despite everyday usage, learners are unable to transfer analogical reasoning to learning situations. This study aims at facilitating…

  2. Drawing Analogies in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affifi, Ramsey

    2014-01-01

    Reconsidering the origin, process, and outcomes of analogy-making suggests practices for environmental educators who strive to disengage humans from the isolating illusions of dichotomizing frameworks. We can view analogies as outcomes of developmental processes within which human subjectivity is but an element, threading our sense of self back…

  3. Cannabinoid properties of methylfluorophosphonate analogs.

    PubMed

    Martin, B R; Beletskaya, I; Patrick, G; Jefferson, R; Winckler, R; Deutsch, D G; Di Marzo, V; Dasse, O; Mahadevan, A; Razdan, R K

    2000-09-01

    Methylarachidonylfluorophosphonate (MAFP) and related analogs have been shown to inhibit fatty acid amidohydrolase activity (FAAH), the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the endogenous cannabinoid ligand anandamide. To fully characterize this class of compounds, methylfluorophosphonate compounds with saturated alkyl chains ranging from C8 to C20 along with C20 unsaturated derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to interact with the CB1 receptor, inhibit FAAH, and produce in vivo pharmacological effects. These analogs demonstrated widely varying affinities for the CB1 receptor. Of the saturated compounds, C8:0 was incapable of displacing [(3)H]CP 55,940 binding, whereas C12:0 exhibited high affinity (2.5 nM). The C20:0 saturated analog had low affinity (900 nM), but the introduction of unsaturation into the C20 analogs restored receptor affinity. However, none of the analogs were capable of fully displacing [(3)H]CP 55,940 binding. On the other hand, all compounds were able to completely inhibit FAAH enzyme activity, with the C20:0 analog being the least potent. The most potent FAAH inhibitor was the short-chained saturated C12:0, whereas the other analogs were 15- to 30-fold less potent. In vivo, the C8:0 and C12:0 analogs were highly potent and fully efficacious in producing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-like effects, whereas the other analogs were either inactive or acted as partial agonists. None was capable of attenuating the agonist effects of THC. Conversely, the C20:0 analog potentiated the effects of anandamide but not those of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol and THC. The high in vivo potency of the novel short-chain saturated MAFP derivatives (C8:0 and C12:0) underscores the complexity of manipulating the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  4. Distributed Episodic and Analogical Reasoning (DEAR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    ends analysis Carbonell 1983 Modeling of Analogy Making Structure Mapping Theory (SMT) Gentner 1984 Agent based approach to analogy making...Mapping Engine (SME) Forbus 1990 Learning by analogy with larger domains Prodigy/Analogy Veloso and Carbonell 1991 Analogical Retrieval Engine MAC/FAC

  5. Studies of the biogenic amine transporters. V. Demonstration of two binding sites for the cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55 associated with the 5-HT transporter in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, M L; Dersch, C M; Baumann, M H; Cadet, J L; Partilla, J S; Rice, K C; Carroll, F I; Becketts, K M; Brockington, A; Rothman, R B

    1995-04-01

    Earlier work characterized the binding of the high-affinity cocaine analog 3 beta-(4-125iodophenyl)-tropane-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([125I]RTI-55) to membranes prepared from rat caudate. That investigation demonstrated that [125I]RTI-55-labeled serotonin (5-HT) transporters in addition to dopamine (DA) transporters and resolved [125I]RTI-55 binding to 5-HT transporters into two distinct components. In the present study, we characterized [125I]RTI-55 binding to membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus caudate. The first series of experiments established that [125I]RTI-55 labels both DA and 5-HT transporters and that 50 nM paroxetine and either 1000 nM 1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)homopiperazine (LR1111) or 500 nM (RTI-120) could be used to block [125I]RTI-55 binding to the 5-HT and DA transporters, thereby generating selective assay conditions for the DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively. Selective lesioning of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons with intracerebroventricular 6-hydroxydopamine and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine selectively decreased [125I]RTI-55 binding to DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively, thereby confirming the selectivity of the assay conditions. The ligand-selectivity pattern of the whole brain minus caudate 5-HT transporter correlated significantly with that of the caudate 5-HT transporter, although there were some striking differences for selected test agents. Additional experiments resolved [125I]RTI-55 binding to the 5-HT transporter into two components. A ligand-selectivity analysis of the two components failed to identify a highly selective test agent. In summary, the major findings of the present study are that [125I]RTI-55 labels both DA and 5-HT transporters in membranes prepared from whole brain minus caudate, that 50 nM paroxetine and either 1000 nM LR1111 or 500 nM RTI-120 can be used as a blocking agent to generate selective assay conditions for the DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively, and that [125

  6. Atomtronics: Ultracold-atom analogs of electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, B. T.; Kraemer, M.; Anderson, D. Z.; Holland, M. J.

    2007-02-15

    Atomtronics focuses on atom analogs of electronic materials, devices, and circuits. A strongly interacting ultracold Bose gas in a lattice potential is analogous to electrons in solid-state crystalline media. As a consequence of the gapped many-body energy spectrum, cold atoms in a lattice exhibit insulatorlike or conductorlike properties. P-type and N-type material analogs are created by introducing impurity sites into the lattice. Current through an atomtronic wire is generated by connecting the wire to an atomtronic battery which maintains the two contacts at different chemical potentials. The design of an atomtronic diode with a strongly asymmetric current-voltage curve exploits the existence of superfluid and insulating regimes in the phase diagram. The atom analog of a bipolar junction transistor exhibits large negative gain. Our results provide the building blocks for more advanced atomtronic devices and circuits such as amplifiers, oscillators, and fundamental logic gates.

  7. 3CAPS – a structural AP–site analogue as a tool to investigate DNA base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Schuermann, David; Scheidegger, Simon P.; Weber, Alain R.; Bjørås, Magnar; Leumann, Christian J.; Schär, Primo

    2016-01-01

    Abasic sites (AP-sites) are frequent DNA lesions, arising by spontaneous base hydrolysis or as intermediates of base excision repair (BER). The hemiacetal at the anomeric centre renders them chemically reactive, which presents a challenge to biochemical and structural investigation. Chemically more stable AP-site analogues have been used to avoid spontaneous decay, but these do not fully recapitulate the features of natural AP–sites. With its 3′–phosphate replaced by methylene, the abasic site analogue 3CAPS was suggested to circumvent some of these limitations. Here, we evaluated the properties of 3CAPS in biochemical BER assays with mammalian proteins. 3CAPS-containing DNA substrates were processed by APE1, albeit with comparably poor efficiency. APE1-cleaved 3CAPS can be extended by DNA polymerase β but repaired only by strand displacement as the 5′–deoxyribophosphate (dRP) cannot be removed. DNA glycosylases physically and functionally interact with 3CAPS substrates, underlining its structural integrity and biochemical reactivity. The AP lyase activity of bifunctional DNA glycosylases (NTH1, NEIL1, FPG), however, was fully inhibited. Notably, 3CAPS-containing DNA also effectively inhibited the activity of bifunctional glycosylases on authentic substrates. Hence, the chemically stable 3CAPS with its preserved hemiacetal functionality is a potent tool for BER research and a potential inhibitor of bifunctional DNA glycosylases. PMID:26733580

  8. 3CAPS - a structural AP-site analogue as a tool to investigate DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, David; Scheidegger, Simon P; Weber, Alain R; Bjørås, Magnar; Leumann, Christian J; Schär, Primo

    2016-03-18

    Abasic sites (AP-sites) are frequent DNA lesions, arising by spontaneous base hydrolysis or as intermediates of base excision repair (BER). The hemiacetal at the anomeric centre renders them chemically reactive, which presents a challenge to biochemical and structural investigation. Chemically more stable AP-site analogues have been used to avoid spontaneous decay, but these do not fully recapitulate the features of natural AP-sites. With its 3'-phosphate replaced by methylene, the abasic site analogue 3CAPS was suggested to circumvent some of these limitations. Here, we evaluated the properties of 3CAPS in biochemical BER assays with mammalian proteins. 3CAPS-containing DNA substrates were processed by APE1, albeit with comparably poor efficiency. APE1-cleaved 3CAPS can be extended by DNA polymerase β but repaired only by strand displacement as the 5'-deoxyribophosphate (dRP) cannot be removed. DNA glycosylases physically and functionally interact with 3CAPS substrates, underlining its structural integrity and biochemical reactivity. The AP lyase activity of bifunctional DNA glycosylases (NTH1, NEIL1, FPG), however, was fully inhibited. Notably, 3CAPS-containing DNA also effectively inhibited the activity of bifunctional glycosylases on authentic substrates. Hence, the chemically stable 3CAPS with its preserved hemiacetal functionality is a potent tool for BER research and a potential inhibitor of bifunctional DNA glycosylases.

  9. Solving a problem by analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Don

    1999-03-01

    This note is a description of a student solution to a problem. I found the solution exciting because it exemplifies the kind of solution by analogy that Feynman describes in The Feynman Lectures on Physics.

  10. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  11. Analog actuator-piston memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sable, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Simple analog control system of digitally controlled acuator uses 'stopped' position of actuator as 'memory' and potentiometer as sensing element during power failure to reload drive circuit to value equal to its last position preceding power loss.

  12. Analog device simulates physiological waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, D. M.

    1964-01-01

    An analog physiological simulator generates representative waveforms for a wide range of physiological conditions. Direct comparison of these waveforms with those from telemetric inputs permits quick detection of signal parameter degradation.

  13. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  14. The Robustness of Acoustic Analogies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, J. B.; Lele, S. K.; Wei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic analogies for the prediction of flow noise are exact rearrangements of the flow equations N(right arrow q) = 0 into a nominal sound source S(right arrow q) and sound propagation operator L such that L(right arrow q) = S(right arrow q). In practice, the sound source is typically modeled and the propagation operator inverted to make predictions. Since the rearrangement is exact, any sufficiently accurate model of the source will yield the correct sound, so other factors must determine the merits of any particular formulation. Using data from a two-dimensional mixing layer direct numerical simulation (DNS), we evaluate the robustness of two analogy formulations to different errors intentionally introduced into the source. The motivation is that since S can not be perfectly modeled, analogies that are less sensitive to errors in S are preferable. Our assessment is made within the framework of Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy, in which different choices of a base flow used in constructing L give different sources S and thus different analogies. A uniform base flow yields a Lighthill-like analogy, which we evaluate against a formulation in which the base flow is the actual mean flow of the DNS. The more complex mean flow formulation is found to be significantly more robust to errors in the energetic turbulent fluctuations, but its advantage is less pronounced when errors are made in the smaller scales.

  15. Early SEI milestones - Underwater habitats and Antarctic research outposts as analogs for long duration spaceflight and lunar and Mars outposts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.; Wharton, Robert A.; Andersen, Dale T.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1992-01-01

    The use of analog environments for space research is considered focusing on underwater habitats and Antarctic research sites as analogous settings to long-duration space flight. It is pointed out that the use of these earth analogs can provide engineers, scientists, and future crew members with critical 'mission' experience at a relatively low cost.

  16. Analog approach to mixed analog-digital circuit simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrodzki, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Logic simulation of digital circuits is a well explored research area. Most up-to-date CAD tools for digital circuits simulation use an event driven, selective trace algorithm and Hardware Description Languages (HDL), e.g. the VHDL. This techniques enable simulation of mixed circuits, as well, where an analog part is connected to the digital one through D/A and A/D converters. The event-driven mixed simulation applies a unified, digital-circuits dedicated method to both digital and analog subsystems. In recent years HDL techniques have been also applied to mixed domains, as e.g. in the VHDL-AMS. This paper presents an approach dual to the event-driven one, where an analog part together with a digital one and with converters is treated as the analog subsystem and is simulated by means of circuit simulation techniques. In our problem an analog solver used yields some numerical problems caused by nonlinearities of digital elements. Efficient methods for overriding these difficulties have been proposed.

  17. Antigenic drift in H5N1 avian influenza virus in poultry is driven by mutations in major antigenic sites of the hemagglutinin molecule analogous to those for human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Cattoli, Giovanni; Milani, Adelaide; Temperton, Nigel; Zecchin, Bianca; Buratin, Alessandra; Molesti, Eleonora; Aly, Mona Meherez; Arafa, Abdel; Capua, Ilaria

    2011-09-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus has been endemic in poultry in Egypt since 2008, notwithstanding the implementation of mass vaccination and culling of infected birds. Extensive circulation of the virus has resulted in a progressive genetic evolution and an antigenic drift. In poultry, the occurrence of antigenic drift in avian influenza viruses is less well documented and the mechanisms remain to be clarified. To test the hypothesis that H5N1 antigenic drift is driven by mechanisms similar to type A influenza viruses in humans, we generated reassortant viruses, by reverse genetics, that harbored molecular changes identified in genetically divergent viruses circulating in the vaccinated population. Parental and reassortant phenotype viruses were antigenically analyzed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and microneutralization (MN) assay. The results of the study indicate that the antigenic drift of H5N1 in poultry is driven by multiple mutations primarily occurring in major antigenic sites at the receptor binding subdomain, similarly to what has been described for human influenza H1 and H3 subtype viruses.

  18. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-08-23

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  19. All-optical analog comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-08-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function.

  20. All-optical analog comparator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  1. Teaching Scientific Analogies: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitoun, Hassan Hussein

    Cognitive psychologists have recently alluded to the role analogies might play in learning unfamiliar topics. However, since the use of analogies in science teaching has not been adequately addressed, analogies mean different things to different people. Therefore, a model for the teaching of scientific analogies is proposed. A theoretical…

  2. Analogies in Science and Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Simon; Salter, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Analogies are often used in science, but students may not appreciate their significance, and so the analogies can be misunderstood or discounted. For this reason, educationalists often express concern about the use of analogies in teaching. Given the important place of analogies in the discourse of science, it is necessary that students are…

  3. Analog circuits for relaxation networks.

    PubMed

    Card, H

    1993-12-01

    Selected examples are presented of recent advances, primarily from the U.S. and Canada, in analog circuits for relaxation networks. Relaxation networks having feedback connections exhibit potentially greater computational power per neuron than feedforward networks. They are also more poorly understood especially with respect to learning algorithms. Examples are described of analog circuits for (i) supervised learning in deterministic Boltzmann machines, (ii) unsupervised competitive learning and feature maps and (iii) networks with resistive grids for vision and audition tasks. We also discuss recent progress on in-circuit learning and synaptic weight storage mechanisms.

  4. Terrestrial analogs for space exploration habitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Paul D.; Brown, Jeri W.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) can use early earth-based analogs to simulate many aspects of space flight missions and system operation. These analogs can thus provide information supporting future missions to the moon and to Mars. A study was performed to investigate the potential of terrestrial analogs in simulating human space exploration missions. The study resulted in preliminary requirements and concepts for analog habitation systems, and further study in this area is necessary for SEI terrestrial analog development.

  5. Lesion-induced DNA weak structural changes detected by pulsed EPR spectroscopy combined with site-directed spin labelling

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mathis, Gérald; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Boulard, Yves; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) was applied to determine nanometre spin–spin distances on DNA duplexes that contain selected structural alterations. The present approach to evaluate the structural features of DNA damages is thus related to the interspin distance changes, as well as to the flexibility of the overall structure deduced from the distance distribution. A set of site-directed nitroxide-labelled double-stranded DNA fragments containing defined lesions, namely an 8-oxoguanine, an abasic site or abasic site analogues, a nick, a gap and a bulge structure were prepared and then analysed by the DEER spectroscopic technique. New insights into the application of 4-pulse DEER sequence are also provided, in particular with respect to the spin probes’ positions and the rigidity of selected systems. The lesion-induced conformational changes observed, which were supported by molecular dynamics studies, confirm the results obtained by other, more conventional, spectroscopic techniques. Thus, the experimental approaches described herein provide an efficient method for probing lesion-induced structural changes of nucleic acids. PMID:19304747

  6. Analogies and "Modeling Analogies" in Teaching: Some Examples in Basic Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupin, J. J.; Johsua, S.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the effect of modeling analogy on learning of the concepts of electricity in grade 6, 8, and 10. Describes 2 analogies (train analogy and thermal analogy) with diagrams and examples. Discusses the accessibility, transferability, and difficulty of each analogy. Reports treatment effect and some further implications. (YP)

  7. Understanding & Teaching Genetics Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Scott; Himelblau, Ed

    2013-01-01

    We present a collection of analogies that are intended to help students better understand the foreign and often nuanced vocabulary of the genetics curriculum. Why is it called the "wild type"? What is the difference between a locus, a gene, and an allele? What is the functional (versus a rule-based) distinction between dominant and…

  8. Geometrical Analogies in Mathematics Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eid, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    A typical form of thinking to approach problem solutions humanly is thinking in analogous structures. Therefore school, especially mathematical lessons should help to form and to develop corresponding heuristic abilities of the pupils. In the contribution, a summary of possibilities of mathematics lessons regarding this shall particularly be…

  9. Mathematical Analogy and Metaphorical Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicky, Jan

    2010-01-01

    How are we to understand the power of certain literary metaphors? The author argues that the apprehension of good metaphors is importantly similar to the apprehension of fruitful mathematical analogies: both involve a structural realignment of vision. The author then explores consequences of this claim, drawing conceptually significant parallels…

  10. Analogy between Thermodynamics and Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark A.

    1979-01-01

    Establishes and illustrates a formal analogy between the motion of a particle and the "motion" of the equilibrium state of a homogeneous system in a quasistatic process. The purpose is to show that there is a much larger set of natural coordinate transformations in thermodynamics. (GA)

  11. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  12. Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hongjing; Chen, Dawn; Holyoak, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    How can humans acquire relational representations that enable analogical inference and other forms of high-level reasoning? Using comparative relations as a model domain, we explore the possibility that bottom-up learning mechanisms applied to objects coded as feature vectors can yield representations of relations sufficient to solve analogy…

  13. Analogy of the Cell Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In this project, students compare the makeup of a cell to an everyday working unit or system. They create a three-dimensional object that represents their analogy. For example, students could create a car motor or manufacturing plant. (Of course, this is totally hand-created by them, so it can be a homemade re-creation of a system, not an actual…

  14. Electrical analog to projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondracek, Mark

    1998-04-01

    This article describes an electrical analog to traditional projectile problems given in high school and introductory college classes. It also discusses the importance of stressing the understanding of physical laws and principles to students, and that the physics behind a problem is more important than being able to memorize and use various equations.

  15. Analog Simulation of a Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Gary

    1982-01-01

    Presents an analog simulation of laser properties (finding time evolution of the intensity of a ruby laser pulse) which serves as the basis of a three-four hour laboratory experiment. Includes programs for solution to rate equations of a three-level laser and production of a giant pulse in a ruby laser. (Author/SK)

  16. Schema Training in Analogical Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Shani; Mayer, Richard E.

    1993-01-01

    In 3 experiments, 93, 97, and 86 college students, respectively, learned how to solve 20 verbal analogy problems and took transfer and memory tests. Results are inconsistent with active responding theory and further indicate that schema induction is maximized when the schemas are made salient and the cognitive system is not overloaded. (SLD)

  17. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed. PMID:26287177

  18. IADE: a system for intelligent automatic design of bioisosteric analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertl, Peter; Lewis, Richard

    2012-11-01

    IADE, a software system supporting molecular modellers through the automatic design of non-classical bioisosteric analogs, scaffold hopping and fragment growing, is presented. The program combines sophisticated cheminformatics functionalities for constructing novel analogs and filtering them based on their drug-likeness and synthetic accessibility using automatic structure-based design capabilities: the best candidates are selected according to their similarity to the template ligand and to their interactions with the protein binding site. IADE works in an iterative manner, improving the fitness of designed molecules in every generation until structures with optimal properties are identified. The program frees molecular modellers from routine, repetitive tasks, allowing them to focus on analysis and evaluation of the automatically designed analogs, considerably enhancing their work efficiency as well as the area of chemical space that can be covered. The performance of IADE is illustrated through a case study of the design of a nonclassical bioisosteric analog of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor—an analog that has won a recent "Design a Molecule" competition.

  19. Analog Nonvolatile Computer Memory Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd

    2007-01-01

    In nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) circuits of a proposed type, digital data would be stored in analog form in ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FFETs). This type of memory circuit would offer advantages over prior volatile and nonvolatile types: In a conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor static RAM, six transistors must be used to store one bit, and storage is volatile in that data are lost when power is turned off. In a conventional dynamic RAM, three transistors must be used to store one bit, and the stored bit must be refreshed every few milliseconds. In contrast, in a RAM according to the proposal, data would be retained when power was turned off, each memory cell would contain only two FFETs, and the cell could store multiple bits (the exact number of bits depending on the specific design). Conventional flash memory circuits afford nonvolatile storage, but they operate at reading and writing times of the order of thousands of conventional computer memory reading and writing times and, hence, are suitable for use only as off-line storage devices. In addition, flash memories cease to function after limited numbers of writing cycles. The proposed memory circuits would not be subject to either of these limitations. Prior developmental nonvolatile ferroelectric memories are limited to one bit per cell, whereas, as stated above, the proposed memories would not be so limited. The design of a memory circuit according to the proposal must reflect the fact that FFET storage is only partly nonvolatile, in that the signal stored in an FFET decays gradually over time. (Retention times of some advanced FFETs exceed ten years.) Instead of storing a single bit of data as either a positively or negatively saturated state in a ferroelectric device, each memory cell according to the proposal would store two values. The two FFETs in each cell would be denoted the storage FFET and the control FFET. The storage FFET would store an analog signal value

  20. Battery hydrometer with analog output

    SciTech Connect

    Patis, B.L.

    1982-09-21

    There is disclosed a battery hydrometer for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude related to the specific gravity of a battery electrolyte. The hydrometer includes a source of radiation for providing a detectable beam of radiation and a piston member arranged to be submerged within the electrolyte and to intercept and modulate the beam of radiation in response to the specific gravity of the electrolyte. The piston member is suspended within the electrolyte by a spring which exerts a compressive force upon the piston member against which the electrolyte must act. The hydrometer further includes a radiation detector aligned with the radiation source for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude responsive to the modulated beam of radiation.

  1. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties.

  2. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  3. Superconducting Analog to Digital Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    superconductivity, Josephson junctions, and superconducting quantum interference devices ( SQUIDs ) are briefly described. Various techniques to perform analog-to...deployment in the 1990s may require a dynamic range in excess of 90 dB (15- bit precision) [3]. However, at the present time, A/D conversion with 16-bit...Interference Devices ( SQUIDs ). JOSEPHSON EFFECTS AND JUNCTIONS Consider a very thin, non-superconducting region separating two superconductors. In 1962

  4. Stereoselective Syntheses of Soman Analog

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-28

    AD-A283 855 AD_ _ _ _ CONTRACT NO: DAMDl7-88-C-8021 0 / TITLE: STEREOSELECTIVE SYNTHESES OF SOMAN ANALOG SUBTITLE: Synthesis of Pentacoordinate...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES SUBTITLE: Synthesis of Pentacoordinate Phosphorus Compounds, "Bait and Switch" Compounds, and Soman Simulants as Hapten. for Production of...simulant. We reporit a detailed study on the synthesis , isolation and characterization of the four pure enantiomners; of [(S or R)-4 -amino-2,2-diniethyl-2

  5. Health as an analogical concept.

    PubMed

    Mordacci, R

    1995-10-01

    This article examines the normative structure of the concept of health and tries to suggest an account of it in a phenomenological-hermeneutic framework. It is argued that the concept of health has a logical priority to illness, though the latter has an experiential priority. The fundamental feature of the concept of health as discussed in the literature is initially recognized in the notion of 'norm', in both the bio-statistical and normative-ideal sense. An analysis of this body of literature reveals some weaknesses in bio-statistical definitions of health as well as in those normative ones which endorse a value-relativity thesis. An approach based on the analogical structure of language is then advanced. In this framework, the notion of biological normativeness proposed by G. Canguilhem is connected with an analysis of the language of health through etymologies. It is argued that health can be characterized as an analogy of 'plenitude', which is the common ideal reference of the various health-concepts. The analogical structuring of language allows the recognition of different levels of meaning, and therefore of different kinds of normativeness (biological, mental, social, moral). Some hints of a theory of health deriving from this framework are then given.

  6. DNA cleavage at the AP site via β-elimination mediated by the AP site-binding ligands.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yukiko S; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2016-02-15

    DNA is continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous factors such as oxidation and alkylation. In the base excision repair pathway, the damaged nucleobases are removed by DNA N-glycosylase to form the abasic sites (AP sites). The alkylating antitumor agent exhibits cytotoxicity through the formation of the AP site. Therefore blockage or modulation of the AP site repair pathway may enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. In this study, we have examined the effects of the nucleobase-polyamine conjugated ligands (G-, A-, C- and T-ligands) on the cleavage of the AP site. The G- and A-ligands cleaved DNA at the AP site by promoting β-elimination in a non-selective manner by the G-ligand, and in a selective manner for the opposing dT by the A-ligand. These results suggest that the nucleobase-polyamine conjugate ligands may have the potential for enhancement of the cytotoxicities of the AP site.

  7. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  8. Basic Electricity--a Novel Analogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Uses the analogy of water flow to introduce concepts in basic electricity. Presents a demonstration that uses this analogy to help students grasp the relationship between current, voltage, and resistance. (JRH)

  9. Third order digital-to-analog converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, W. P.

    1972-01-01

    System, consisting of sample and hold digital-to-analog converter, clock circuit, sample delay circuit, initial condition circuit and interpolator circuit, improves accuracy of reconstructed analog signal without increasing sample rates.

  10. RAPID SEMISYNTHESIS OF ACETYLATED AND SUMOYLATED HISTONE ANALOGS

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Abhinav; Weller, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    The density and diversity of post-translational modifications (PTMs) observed in histone proteins typically limits their purification to homogeneity from biological sources. Access to quantities of uniformly modified histones is, however, critical for investigating the downstream effects of histone PTMs on chromatin-templated processes. Therefore, a number of semisynthetic methodologies have been developed to generate histones bearing precisely defined PTMs or close analogs thereof. In this chapter, we present two optimized and rapid strategies for generating functional analogs of site-specifically acetylated and sumoylated histones. First, we describe a convergent strategy to site-specifically attach the small ubiquitin-like modifier-3 (SUMO-3) protein to the site of Lys12 in histone H4 by means of a disulfide linkage. We then describe the generation of thialysine analogs of histone H3 acetylated at Lys 14 or Lys 56, using thiol-ene coupling chemistry. Both strategies afford multi-milligram quantities of uniformly modified histones that are easily incorporated into mononucleosomes and nucleosome arrays for biophysical and biochemical investigations. These methods are readily extendable to any desired sites in the four core nucleosomal histones and their variant forms. PMID:27423861

  11. The Structure of Analogical Models in Science.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    analogies cannot. 8. A Freudian defense might claim that the theory merely reflects the illogic of the unconscious. But a theory about an unclarified...explanatory-predictive analogy is contrasted with literary expressive metaphor. Finally, within science, good 4 explanatory analogy is contrasted with...an initial comparison. To illustrate the points, analogies of historical importance are analyzed. Although the focus is on theory , some empirical

  12. Hegel, Analogy, and Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Joseph T.

    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel rejected the possibility of life outside of the Earth, according to several scholars of extraterrestrial life. Their position is that the solar system and specifically the planet Earth is the unique place in the cosmos where life, intelligence, and rationality can be. The present study offers a very different interpretation of Hegel's statements about the place of life on Earth by suggesting that, although Hegel did not believe that there were other solar systems where rationality is present, he did in fact suggest that planets in general, not the Earth exclusively, have life and possibly also intelligent inhabitants. Analogical syllogisms are superficial, according to Hegel, insofar as they try to conclude that there is life on the Moon even though there is no evidence of water or air on that body. Similar analogical arguments for life on the Sun made by Johann Elert Bode and William Herschel were considered by Hegel to be equally superficial. Analogical arguments were also used by astronomers and philosophers to suggest that life could be found on other planets in our solar system. Hegel offers no critique of analogical arguments for life on other planets, and in fact Hegel believed that life would be found on other planets. Planets, after all, have meteorological processes and therefore are "living" according to his philosophical account, unlike the Moon, Sun, and comets. Whereas William Herschel was already finding great similarities between the Sun and the stars and had extended these similarities to the property of having planets or being themselves inhabitable worlds, Hegel rejected this analogy. The Sun and stars have some properties in common, but for Hegel one cannot conclude from these similarities to the necessity that stars have planets. Hegel's arguments against the presence of life in the solar system were not directed against other planets, but rather against the Sun and Moon, both of which he said have a different

  13. Analogical Reasoning: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawis, Rene V.; Siojo, Luis T.

    The mathematical and philosophical origins of "analogy" are described and their influence on the thinking of intelligence theorists is traced. Theories of intelligence and cognition bearing on analogical reasoning are examined, specifically those of Spearman, Thorndike, Guilford and Piaget. The analogy test item is shown to be a paradigm…

  14. Reasoning by Analogy in Constructing Mathematical Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    A powerful way of understanding something new is by analogy with something already known. An analogy is defined as a mapping from one structure, which is already known (the base or source), to another structure that is to be inferred or discovered (the target). The research community has given considerable attention to analogical reasoning in the…

  15. The Micro-Category Account of Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Adam E.; Fugelsang, Jonathan A.; Kraemer, David J. M.; Dunbar, Kevin N.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we investigate how activation of mental representations of categories during analogical reasoning influences subsequent cognitive processing. Specifically, we present and test the central predictions of the "Micro-Category" account of analogy. This account emphasizes the role of categories in aligning terms for analogical mapping. In a…

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of indazole based analog sensitive Akt inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Okuzumi, Tatsuya; Ducker, Gregory S; Zhang, Chao; Aizenstein, Brian; Hoffman, Randy; Shokat, Kevan M

    2010-08-01

    The kinase Akt is a key signaling node in regulating cellular growth and survival. It is implicated in cancer by mutation and its role in the downstream transmission of aberrant PI3K signaling. For these reasons, Akt has become an increasingly important target of drug development efforts and several inhibitors are now reaching clinical trials. Paradoxically it has been observed that active site kinase inhibitors of Akt lead to hyperphosphorylation of Akt itself. To investigate this phenomenon we here describe the application of a chemical genetics strategy that replaces native Akt with a mutant version containing an active site substitution that allows for the binding of an engineered inhibitor. This analog sensitive strategy allows for the selective inhibition of a single kinase. In order to create the inhibitor selective for the analog sensitive kinase, a diversity of synthetic approaches was required, finally resulting in the compound PrINZ, a 7-substituted version of the Abbott Labs Akt inhibitor A-443654.

  17. Natural CO2 Analogs for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Scott H. Stevens; B. Scott Tye

    2005-07-31

    The report summarizes research conducted at three naturally occurring geologic CO{sub 2} fields in the US. The fields are natural analogs useful for the design of engineered long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in geologic formations. Geologic, engineering, and operational databases were developed for McElmo Dome in Colorado; St. Johns Dome in Arizona and New Mexico; and Jackson Dome in Mississippi. The three study sites stored a total of 2.4 billion t (46 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} equivalent to 1.5 years of power plant emissions in the US and comparable in size with the largest proposed sequestration projects. The three CO{sub 2} fields offer a scientifically useful range of contrasting geologic settings (carbonate vs. sandstone reservoir; supercritical vs. free gas state; normally pressured vs. overpressured), as well as different stages of commercial development (mostly undeveloped to mature). The current study relied mainly on existing data provided by the CO{sub 2} field operator partners, augmented with new geochemical data. Additional study at these unique natural CO{sub 2} accumulations could further help guide the development of safe and cost-effective design and operation methods for engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites.

  18. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF BIARYL ANALOGS OF ANTITUBULIN COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Tozatti, Camila Santos Suniga; Khodyuk, Rejane Gonçalves Diniz; da Silva, Adriano Olimpio; dos Santos, Edson dos Anjos; de Lima, Marcos Serrou do Amaral e Dênis Pires; Hamel, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of methanones and esters bearing different substitution patterns as spacer groups between aromatic rings. This series of compounds can be considered phenstatin analogs. Two of the newly synthesized compounds, 5a and 5c, strongly inhibited tubulin polymerization and the binding of [3H] colchicine to tubulin, suggesting that, akin to phenstatin and combretastatin A-4, they can bind to tubulin at the colchicine site. PMID:23087491

  19. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF BIARYL ANALOGS OF ANTITUBULIN COMPOUNDS.

    PubMed

    Tozatti, Camila Santos Suniga; Khodyuk, Rejane Gonçalves Diniz; da Silva, Adriano Olimpio; Dos Santos, Edson Dos Anjos; de Lima, Marcos Serrou do Amaral E Dênis Pires; Hamel, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of methanones and esters bearing different substitution patterns as spacer groups between aromatic rings. This series of compounds can be considered phenstatin analogs. Two of the newly synthesized compounds, 5a and 5c, strongly inhibited tubulin polymerization and the binding of [(3)H] colchicine to tubulin, suggesting that, akin to phenstatin and combretastatin A-4, they can bind to tubulin at the colchicine site.

  20. Classical analog of quantum phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ord, G.N.

    1992-07-01

    A modified version of the Feynman relativistic chessboard model (FCM) is investigated in which the paths involved are spirals in the space-time. Portions of the paths in which the particle`s proper time is reversed are interpreted in terms of antiparticles. With this intepretation the particle-antiparticle field produced by such trajectories provides a classical analog of the phase associated with particle paths in the unmodified FCM. It is shwon that in the nonrelativistic limit the resulting kernel is the correct Dirac propagator and that particle-antiparticle symmetry is in this case responsible for quantum interference. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  1. [Analogies between the thymus and epidermis].

    PubMed

    De Panfilis, G

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, similarities between epidermis and thymus are reviewed. Both epidermis and thymus deal with an epithelial stroma harbouring dendritic cells, which are bone-marrow derived. Both epithelia are keratinized, and a map can be constructed illustrating histo-topographic and antigenic similarities between thymic epithelial cells distributed in various thymic zones (i.e. subcapsular cortex, outer cortex, inner cortex, medulla, outer layers of Hassall's bodies, inner layers of Hassall's bodies) and keratinocytes of different epidermal layers. By contrast, a possible similarity between thymocytes and Langerhans cells is not so easy to demonstrate, although both cell types are CD1 positive. Rather, in our opinion a comparison is preferable of thymocytes to Thy-1 positive dendritic epidermal cells, due to morphological, antigenic, functional and especially lineage similarities. Similarities between thymus and epidermis are clearly important dealing with analogous molecular interactions, namely, thymic epithelial cells/thymocytes versus keratinocytes/T-lymphocytes. Indeed, our recent investigations demonstrated that a subset of keratinocytes is ICAM-1 positive, and the whole keratinocyte population is LFA-3 positive. Since the interaction thymic epithelial cells (ICAM-1 and LFA-3 positive)/thymocytes (LFA-1 and CD2 positive) has been shown to be necessary for promotion of activation and maturation of thymocytes, the interaction keratinocytes (ICAM-1 and LFA-3 positive, as we demonstrated)/T-lymphocytes (LFA-1 and CD2 positive as well) might be, by analogy, important not only for the "homing" of T-lymphocytes within the epidermis, but also for the epidermis being considered a peripheral inductive site for T-cell activation and maturation.

  2. A precondition prover for analogy.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, W W

    1995-01-01

    We describe here a prover PC (precondition) that normally acts as an ordinary theorem prover, but which returns a 'precondition' when it is unable to prove the given formula. If F is the formula attempted to be proved and PC returns the precondition Q, then (Q-->F) is a theorem (that PC can prove). This prover, PC, uses a proof-plan. In its simplest mode, when there is no proof-plan, it acts like ordinary abduction. We show here how this method can be used to derive certain proofs by analogy. To do this, it uses a proof-plan from a given guiding proof to help construct the proof of a similar theorem, by 'debugging' (automatically) that proof-plan. We show here the analogy proofs of a few simple example theorems and one hard pair, Ex4 and Ex4L. The given proof-plan for Ex4 is used by the system to prove automatically Ex4; and that same proof-plan is then used to prove Ex4L, during which the proof-plan is 'debugged' (automatically). These two examples are similar to two other, more difficult, theorems from the theory of resolution, namely GCR (the ground completeness of resolution) and GCLR (the ground completeness of lock resolution). GCR and GCLR have also been handled, in essence, by this system but not completed in all their details.

  3. delta C-13 Analysis of Mars Analog Carbonates Using Evolved Gas Cavity - Ringdown Spectrometry on the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; McAdam, A. C.; ten Kate, I. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two distinct geologic settings on Svalbard, using instrumentation and techniques in development for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return (MSR). The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, which will fly on MSL, was developed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), together with several partners. SAM consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph CGC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), which all analyze gases created by evolved gas analysis (EGA). The two sites studied represent "biotic" and "abiotic" analogs; the "biotic" site being the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, and the "abiotic" site being the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex. The data presented here represent experiments to measure the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates from these two analogs using evolved gas analysis coupled with a commercial cavity ringdown CO2 isotopic analyzer (Picarro) as a proxy for the TLS on SAM.

  4. Adaptive Problem Solving by Analogy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    developed and their advantages were demonstrated in a series of simulations. In addition, some psychological experiments were conducted in order to...simulations.  In  addition,  some  psychological  experiments were conducted  in order  to verify  the predictions of  the model. Within  the  project, we...tries  to map with  its analog  in  the  terrorist  situation.  Thus,  the  question  about  the  deep  psychological  motivation  of  the

  5. Fault diagnosis of analog circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, J. W.; Salama, A. E.

    1985-08-01

    Theory and algorithms associated with four main categories of modern techniques used to locate faults in analog circuits are presented. These four general approaches are: the fault dictionary (FDA), the parameter identification (PIA), the fault verification (FVA), and the approximation (AA) approaches. The preliminaries and problems associated with the FDA, such as fault dictionary construction, the methods of optimum measurement selection, fault isolation criteria, and efficient methods of fault simulation, are discussed. The PIA techniques that utilize either linear or nonlinear systems of equations for identification of network elements are examined. Description of the FVA includes node-fault diagnosis, branch-fault diagnosis, subnetwork testability conditions, as well as combinatorial techniques, the failure-bound technique, and the network decomposition technique. In the AA, probabilistic methods and optimization-based methods are considered. In addition, the artificial intelligence technique and the different measures of testability are presented. A series of block diagrams is included.

  6. Priming analogical reasoning with false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Threadgold, Emma; Ball, Linden J

    2015-08-01

    Like true memories, false memories are capable of priming answers to insight-based problems. Recent research has attempted to extend this paradigm to more advanced problem-solving tasks, including those involving verbal analogical reasoning. However, these experiments are constrained inasmuch as problem solutions could be generated via spreading activation mechanisms (much like false memories themselves) rather than using complex reasoning processes. In three experiments we examined false memory priming of complex analogical reasoning tasks in the absence of simple semantic associations. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated the robustness of false memory priming in analogical reasoning when backward associative strength among the problem terms was eliminated. In Experiments 2a and 2b, we extended these findings by demonstrating priming on newly created homonym analogies that can only be solved by inhibiting semantic associations within the analogy. Overall, the findings of the present experiments provide evidence that the efficacy of false memory priming extends to complex analogical reasoning problems.

  7. AnalogExplorer2 – Stereochemistry sensitive graphical analysis of large analog series

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ye; Zhang, Bijun; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    AnalogExplorer is a computational methodology for the extraction and organization of series of structural analogs from compound data sets and their graphical analysis. The method is suitable for the analysis of large analog series originating from lead optimization programs. Herein we report AnalogExplorer2 designed to explicitly take stereochemical information during graphical analysis into account and describe a freely available deposition of the original AnalogExplorer program, AnalogExplorer2, and exemplary compound sets to illustrate their use. PMID:26913194

  8. Design and Analysis of Reconfigurable Analog System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    34010010" �" �" �" �" �" �" �±" N3 N2 N± P1 P2 P3 * Current sources $RR = 1; *Ramp Rate (slope of the...2008/12/12/31e83bac-500f-4182- acca -4d360295fd9c.pdf, Analog Devices, Analog Dialogue 39-06, June 2005. [15] D. A. Johns, K. Martin "Analog Integrated

  9. Classical Analogs of a Diatomic Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, L.; Diaz-de-Anda, A.; Mendez-Sanchez, R. A.; Morales, A.; Flores, J.; Monsivais, G.

    2010-12-21

    Using one dimensional rods with different configurations classical analogs of quantum mechanical systems frequently used in solid state physics can be obtained. Among this analogs we have recently discussed locally periodic rods which lead to band spectra; the effect of a topological defect, and the Wannier Stark ladders. In this paper, we present an elastic analog of the diatomic chain and show how the acoustical and optical bands emerge, as well of the nature of the wave amplitudes.

  10. Robust hyperchaotic synchronization via analog transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoudi, S.; Tanougast, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel experimental chaotic synchronization technique via analog transmission is discussed. We demonstrate through Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) implementation design the robust synchronization of two embedded hyperchaotic Lorenz generators interconnected with an analog transmission line. The basic idea of this work consists in combining a numerical generation of chaos and transmitting it with an analog signal. The numerical chaos allows to overcome the callback parameter mismatch problem and the analog transmission offers robust data security. As application, this technique can be applied to all families of chaotic systems including time-delayed chaotic systems.

  11. Properties of compressible elastica from relativistic analogy.

    PubMed

    Oshri, Oz; Diamant, Haim

    2016-01-21

    Kirchhoff's kinetic analogy relates the deformation of an incompressible elastic rod to the classical dynamics of rigid body rotation. We extend the analogy to compressible filaments and find that the extension is similar to the introduction of relativistic effects into the dynamical system. The extended analogy reveals a surprising symmetry in the deformations of compressible elastica. In addition, we use known results for the buckling of compressible elastica to derive the explicit solution for the motion of a relativistic nonlinear pendulum. We discuss cases where the extended Kirchhoff analogy may be useful for the study of other soft matter systems.

  12. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system.

  13. Real World: Analog Testing in Extreme Environments

    NASA Video Gallery

    See how NASA uses analog testing to simulate space exploration. Explore extreme environments like the Aquarius underwater laboratory in Key Largo, Florida. Find out how scientists use mathematical ...

  14. Workshop on the role of natural analogs in geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.; Kovach, L.A.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) was held in San Antonio, Texas, on July 22-25, 1991. It was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). Invitations to the workshop were extended to a large number of individuals with a variety of technical and professional interests related to geologic disposal of nuclear waste and natural analog studies. The objective of the workshop was to examine the role of natural analog studies in performance assessment, site characterization, and prioritization of research related to geologic disposal of HLW.

  15. Study of the Binding between Camptothecin Analogs and FTO by Spectroscopy and Molecular Docking.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ting; Wang, Zechun; Zhang, Lijiao; Wang, Ning; Han, Xinxin; Wang, Ruiyong; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-04-11

    In this work, the interaction between camptothecin (CPT) analogs and fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) was investigated using spectroscopy and molecular docking. From the experimental results, it was found that the CPT analogs caused the fluorescence quenching of FTO through a static quenching procedure. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures, the number of binding sites were obtained, which suggested that the hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic force played major role in the reaction between CPT analogs and FTO. Results revealed that 10-hydroxycamptothecin was the strongest quencher.

  16. Phosphorylation of anti-HIV nucleoside analogs by nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; Xu, Y; Sellam, O; Sarfati, R; Janin, J; Véron, M; Deville-Bonne, D

    1999-01-01

    The reaction of NDP kinase with antiviral nucleoside triphosphates used in antiviral therapies was studied at the presteady state by fluorescence stopped-flow and compared with the steady-state parameters. The affinity of the analogs was determined by fluorescence titration of a mutated enzyme with an inserted Trp in the binding site. The lack of the 3' hydroxyl in analogs is shown to decrease the kcat more than the KD.

  17. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  18. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  19. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  20. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  1. The MARS2013 Mars analog mission.

    PubMed

    Groemer, Gernot; Soucek, Alexander; Frischauf, Norbert; Stumptner, Willibald; Ragonig, Christoph; Sams, Sebastian; Bartenstein, Thomas; Häuplik-Meusburger, Sandra; Petrova, Polina; Evetts, Simon; Sivenesan, Chan; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Foresta, Luca; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Turetschek, Thomas; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    We report on the MARS2013 mission, a 4-week Mars analog field test in the northern Sahara. Nineteen experiments were conducted by a field crew in Morocco under simulated martian surface exploration conditions, supervised by a Mission Support Center in Innsbruck, Austria. A Remote Science Support team analyzed field data in near real time, providing planning input for the management of a complex system of field assets; two advanced space suit simulators, four robotic vehicles, an emergency shelter, and a stationary sensor platform in a realistic work flow were coordinated by a Flight Control Team. A dedicated flight planning group, external control centers for rover tele-operations, and a biomedical monitoring team supported the field operations. A 10 min satellite communication delay and other limitations pertinent to human planetary surface activities were introduced. The fields of research for the experiments were geology, human factors, astrobiology, robotics, tele-science, exploration, and operations research. This paper provides an overview of the geological context and environmental conditions of the test site and the mission architecture, in particular the communication infrastructure emulating the signal travel time between Earth and Mars. We report on the operational work flows and the experiments conducted, including a deployable shelter prototype for multiple-day extravehicular activities and contingency situations.

  2. Experimental Studies of Mars-Analog Brines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaporite deposits may represent significant sinks of mobile cations (e.g., those of Ca, N, Mg, and Fe) and anions (e.g., those of C, N, S, and Cl) among the materials composing the Martian surface and upper crust. Carbon and nitrogen are especially interesting because of their role as atmospheric gases which can become incorporated into crustal rocks. However, the nature of evaporite precursor brines formed under Martian conditions is poorly understood. To date, only a very limited number of laboratory investigations have been reported which have any bearing on a better understanding of various processes related to brine or evaporite formation on Mars. Here we report on preliminary laboratory experiments that exposed igneous minerals analogous to those in Martian (Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) group) meteorites to a simulated Martian atmosphere and pure, deoxygenated water. Analysis of the water over intervals of time approaching 1 year showed that atmospheric gases dissolved to form carbonate and nitrate ions while minerals dissolved to form sulfate and chloride along with various cations. On an annual basis, ion formation gave a carbonate/sulfate ratio that is comparable to the ratio found among salts in SNC meteorites. The sulfate/chloride ratio of the experimental brines is higher than in SNC meteorites but lower than in surface soils measured at the Viking and Pathfinder landing sites.

  3. Crystal structure of a nucleoside model for the inter­strand cross-link formed by the reaction of 2′-de­oxy­guanosine and an abasic site in duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Michael J.; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Barnes, Charles L.; Gates, Kent S.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, 9-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hy­droxy-5-(hy­droxy­meth­yl)tetra­hydro­furan-2-yl]-2-{[(2R,4S,5R)-4-meth­oxy-5-(meth­oxy­meth­yl)tetra­hydro­furan-2-yl]amino}-1H-purin-6(9H)-one, C17H25N5O7, crystallizes with two independent mol­ecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, the guanosine moieties of mol­ecules A and B are linked by N—H⋯N and O—H⋯N hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, forming ribbons which are stacked to form columns along [100]. These columns are then linked by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the ribose moieties and numerous C—H⋯O inter­actions to complete the three-dimensional structure. PMID:27308004

  4. Expert analogy use in a naturalistic setting

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Donald R.; Krawczyk, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of analogy is an important component of human cognition. The type of analogy we produce and communicate depends heavily on a number of factors, such as the setting, the level of domain expertise present, and the speaker's goal or intent. In this observational study, we recorded economics experts during scientific discussion and examined the categorical distance and structural depth of the analogies they produced. We also sought to characterize the purpose of the analogies that were generated. Our results supported previous conclusions about the infrequency of superficial similarity in subject-generated analogs, but also showed that distance and depth characteristics were more evenly balanced than in previous observational studies. This finding was likely due to the nature of the goals of the participants, as well as the broader nature of their expertise. An analysis of analogical purpose indicated that the generation of concrete source examples of more general target concepts was most prevalent. We also noted frequent instances of analogies intended to form visual images of source concepts. Other common purposes for analogies were the addition of colorful speech, inclusion (i.e., subsumption) of a target into a source concept, or differentiation between source and target concepts. We found no association between depth and either of the other two characteristics, but our findings suggest a relationship between purpose and distance; i.e., that visual imagery typically entailed an outside-domain source whereas exemplification was most frequently accomplished using within-domain analogies. Overall, we observed a rich and diverse set of spontaneously produced analogical comparisons. The high degree of expertise within the observed group along with the richly comparative nature of the economics discipline likely contributed to this analogical abundance. PMID:25505437

  5. Michael Acceptor Approach to the Design of New Salvinorin A-based High Affinity Ligands for the Kappa-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Polepally, Prabhakar R.; Huben, Krzysztof; Vardy, Eyal; Setola, Vincent; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.

    2014-01-01

    The neoclerodane diterpenoid salvinorin A is a major secondary metabolite isolated from the psychoactive plant Salvia divinorum. Salvinorin A has been shown to have high affinity and selectivity for the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). To study the ligand–receptor interactions that occur between salvinorin A and the KOR, a new series of salvinorin A derivatives bearing potentially reactive Michael acceptor functional groups at C-2 was synthesized and used to probe the salvinorin A binding site. The κ-, δ-, and μ-opioid receptor (KOR, DOR and MOR, respectively) binding affinities and KOR efficacies were measured for the new compounds. Although none showed wash-resistant irreversible binding, most of them showed high affinity for the KOR, and some exhibited dual affinity to KOR and MOR. Molecular modeling techniques based on the recently-determined crystal structure of the KOR combined with results from mutagenesis studies, competitive binding, functional assays and structure–activity relationships, and previous salvinorin A–KOR interaction models were used to identify putative interaction modes of the new compounds with the KOR and MOR. PMID:25193297

  6. Michael acceptor approach to the design of new salvinorin A-based high affinity ligands for the kappa-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Polepally, Prabhakar R; Huben, Krzysztof; Vardy, Eyal; Setola, Vincent; Mosier, Philip D; Roth, Bryan L; Zjawiony, Jordan K

    2014-10-06

    The neoclerodane diterpenoid salvinorin A is a major secondary metabolite isolated from the psychoactive plant Salvia divinorum. Salvinorin A has been shown to have high affinity and selectivity for the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). To study the ligand-receptor interactions that occur between salvinorin A and the KOR, a new series of salvinorin A derivatives bearing potentially reactive Michael acceptor functional groups at C-2 was synthesized and used to probe the salvinorin A binding site. The κ-, δ-, and μ-opioid receptor (KOR, DOR and MOR, respectively) binding affinities and KOR efficacies were measured for the new compounds. Although none showed wash-resistant irreversible binding, most of them showed high affinity for the KOR, and some exhibited dual affinity to KOR and MOR. Molecular modeling techniques based on the recently-determined crystal structure of the KOR combined with results from mutagenesis studies, competitive binding, functional assays and structure-activity relationships, and previous salvinorin A-KOR interaction models were used to identify putative interaction modes of the new compounds with the KOR and MOR.

  7. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium.

  8. Digital and analog chemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jay T; Mehta, Anil K; Lynn, David G

    2012-12-18

    Living matter is the most elaborate, elegant, and complex hierarchical material known and is consequently the natural target for an ever-expanding scientific and technological effort to unlock and deconvolute its marvelous forms and functions. Our current understanding suggests that biological materials are derived from a bottom-up process, a spontaneous emergence of molecular networks in the course of chemical evolution. Polymer cooperation, so beautifully manifested in the ribosome, appeared in these dynamic networks, and the special physicochemical properties of the nucleic and amino acid polymers made possible the critical threshold for the emergence of extant cellular life. These properties include the precise and geometrically discrete hydrogen bonding patterns that dominate the complementary interactions of nucleic acid base-pairing that guide replication and ensure replication fidelity. In contrast, complex and highly context-dependent sets of intra- and intermolecular interactions guide protein folding. These diverse interactions allow the more analog environmental chemical potential fluctuations to dictate conformational template-directed propagation. When these two different strategies converged in the remarkable synergistic ribonucleoprotein that is the ribosome, this resulting molecular digital-to-analog converter achieved the capacity for both persistent information storage and adaptive responses to an ever-changing environment. The ancestral chemical networks that preceded the Central Dogma of Earth's biology must reflect the dynamic chemical evolutionary landscapes that allowed for selection, propagation, and diversification and ultimately the demarcation and specialization of function that modern biopolymers manifest. Not only should modern biopolymers contain molecular fossils of this earlier age, but it should be possible to use this information to reinvent these dynamic functional networks. In this Account, we review the first dynamic network

  9. Analogical Reasoning in Restructuring Scientific Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lucia; Sorzio, Paolo

    1996-01-01

    Presents the results of an experiment that evaluated the efficiency of analogy in the conceptual restructuring of a science topic. The experiment involved a fifth-grade class studying water and heat flow. Discovered that analogy can act as an effective trigger for restructuring knowledge. (MJP)

  10. Structure Mapping in Analogy and Similarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Dedre; Markman, Arthur B.

    1997-01-01

    It is suggested that both similarity and analogy involve a process of structural alignment and mapping. The structure mapping process is described as it has been worked out for analogy, and this view is then extended to similarity and used to generate new predictions. (SLD)

  11. Analogical Processes and College Developmental Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Although a solid body of research concerning the role of analogies in reading processes has emerged at a variety of age groups and reading proficiencies, few of those studies have focused on analogy use by readers enrolled in college developmental reading courses. The current study explores whether 232 students enrolled in mandatory (by placement…

  12. Understanding the Development of Analogical Reasoning Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Susan R.; Bisanz, Jeffrey

    This paper takes the position that theories about individual differences in childhood and theories about cognitive development both would be enhanced if the two lines of research were integrated. The heuristic value of this position is illustrated in the context of analogical reasoning tasks. A general model of analogy solution and potential…

  13. Children's Use of Analogy during Collaborative Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tzu-Jung; Anderson, Richard C.; Hummel, John E.; Jadallah, May; Miller, Brian W.; Nguyen-Jahiel, Kim; Morris, Joshua A.; Kuo, Li-Jen; Kim, Il-Hee; Wu, Xiaoying; Dong, Ting

    2012-01-01

    This microgenetic study examined social influences on children's development of analogical reasoning during peer-led small-group discussions of stories about controversial issues. A total of 277 analogies were identified among 7,215 child turns for speaking during 54 discussions from 18 discussion groups in 6 fourth-grade classrooms (N = 120; age…

  14. Rotanone analogs: method of preparation and use

    DOEpatents

    VanBrocklin, Henry F; O& #x27; Neil, James P; Gibbs, Andrew R; Erathodiyil, Nandanan

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides rotenone analogs and methods of making and using them. Labeled with single photon and positron emitting isotopes, the rotenone analogs of the present invention are useful in, for example, clinical imaging applications as tracers to measure cardiac blood flow and detect regions of ischemia.

  15. The Pennies-as-Electrons Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmann, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Everyday experiences familiarize students with the ways in which electricity is used, but often the underlying concepts remain a mystery. Teachers often use analogies to help students relate the flow of electrons to other common systems, but many times these analogies are incomplete and lead to more student misconceptions. However, the "pass the…

  16. Using Analogies to Develop Conceptual Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Sally

    Because analogies are such powerful tools for communicating they should be exploited more consciously for instructional purposes. Unfortunately, analogies as a topic of investigation in the school curriculum tend to surface only as a subheading within a figurative language lesson in English class or as a test item on the SAT, MAT, or GRE. Analogy…

  17. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 μM to 88 μM. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  18. Piperazine-based nucleic acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Jurgen; Silks, Louis A.; Michalczyk, Ryszard

    2005-01-11

    A novel nucleoside analog is disclosed which comprises a piperazine ring in the place of the ring ribose or deoxyribose sugar. Monomers utilizing a broad variety of nucleobases are disclosed, as well as oligomers comprising the monomers disclosed herein linked by a variety of linkages, including amide, phosphonamide, and sulfonamide linkages. A method of synthesizing the nucleoside analogs is also disclosed.

  19. The Multidimensionality of Verbal Analogy Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullstadius, Eva; Carlstedt, Berit; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2008-01-01

    The influence of general and verbal ability on each of 72 verbal analogy test items were investigated with new factor analytical techniques. The analogy items together with the Computerized Swedish Enlistment Battery (CAT-SEB) were given randomly to two samples of 18-year-old male conscripts (n = 8566 and n = 5289). Thirty-two of the 72 items had…

  20. Mathematical Analogs and the Teaching of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Kathy; Nason, Rod; Cooper, Tom

    The literature has noted that some mathematical analogs are more effective than others for the teaching of fractions. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of seven mathematical analogs commonly used in the teaching of the partitive quotient fraction construct. A sample of twelve purposively selected Year Three children were presented with…

  1. A Mechanical Analogy for the Photoelectric Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Milan S.; Djordjevich, Alexandar

    2006-01-01

    Analogy is a potent tool in the teacher's repertoire. It has been particularly well recognized in the teaching of science. However, careful planning is required for its effective application to prevent documented drawbacks when analogies are stretched too far. Befitting the occasion of the World Year of Physics commemorating Albert Einstein's 1905…

  2. Young Children's Analogical Reasoning in Science Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Jesper; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study in a classroom setting investigates first graders' (age 7-8 years, N = 25) ability to perform analogical reasoning and create their own analogies for two irreversible natural phenomena: mixing and heat transfer. We found that the children who contributed actively to a full-class discussion were consistently successful at…

  3. An Analog Computer for Electronic Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, A. L.; Iu, H. H. C.; Lu, D. D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a compact analog computer and proposes its use in electronic engineering teaching laboratories to develop student understanding of applications in analog electronics, electronic components, engineering mathematics, control engineering, safe laboratory and workshop practices, circuit construction, testing, and maintenance. The…

  4. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd, Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Existing models of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive (ex: bedrest). We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre- and post-flight astronaut performance data using the same tasks. Spline regression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of: leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/ BW of 79 J/kg, knee extension (KE) isokinetic/BW of 6 Nm/Kg and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg. Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of strength / BW has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant exercise targets.

  5. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd. Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Existing models (such as bed rest) of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive. We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power, or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre-and postflightastronaut performance data for the same tasks. Splineregression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/BW of 79 J/kg, isokineticknee extension (KE)/BW of 6 Nm/kg, and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg.Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of relative strength has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function, for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant strength thresholds.

  6. Computational Method for the Systematic Identification of Analog Series and Key Compounds Representing Series and Their Biological Activity Profiles.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-08-25

    A computational methodology is introduced for detecting all unique series of analogs in large compound data sets, regardless of chemical relationships between analogs. No prior knowledge of core structures or R-groups is required, which are automatically determined. The approach is based upon the generation of retrosynthetic matched molecular pairs and analog networks from which distinct series are isolated. The methodology was applied to systematically extract more than 17 000 distinct series from the ChEMBL database. For comparison, analog series were also isolated from screening compounds and drugs. Known biological activities were mapped to series from ChEMBL, and in more than 13 000 of these series, key compounds were identified that represented substitution sites of all analogs within a series and its complete activity profile. The analog series, key compounds, and activity profiles are made freely available as a resource for medicinal chemistry applications.

  7. Analogs Environments on Earth and the Search for Organics and Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. P.

    2005-12-01

    Analog environments on Earth provide an important tool to prepare for the search for organics and life on future missions to Mars. Sites on Mars that has been proposed as targets for the search include: the martian surface soils, the fringes of the martian polar ice, liquid water aquifers that may exist in the subsurface, and deep in the ice-rich martian polar permafrost. Each of these sites has corresponding analog sites on Earth. By studying the chemistry and microbiology of these analog sites we can develop approaches and instruments for future Mars missions. The analogs on Earth are geographically diverse and range from the Antarctic to the Arctic, from low deserts to mountain tops and to the subsurface. They also range in diversity of chemical environments; including extremes of pH, salt, temperature, and water availability. Analogs also illustrate preservation mechanisms. By searching for fossil and structural remnants of microbial life here on Earth we learn how to do this on Mars.

  8. An Analog Earth Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The earth climate is broadly governed by the radiative power of the sun as well as the heat retention and convective cooling of the atmosphere. I have constructed an analog earth model for an undergraduate climate class that simulates mean climate using these three parameters. The ‘earth’ is a hollow, black, bronze sphere (4 cm diameter) mounted on a thin insulated rod, and illuminated by two opposite optic fibers, with light focused on the sphere by a set of lenses. The sphere is encased in a large double-walled aluminum cylinder (34 cm diameter by 26 cm high) with separate water cooling jackets at the top, bottom, and sides. The cylinder can be filled with a gas of choice at a variety of pressures or can be run in vacuum. The exterior is cladded with insulation, and the temperature of the sphere, atmosphere and walls is monitored with thermocouples. The temperature and waterflow of the three cooling jackets can be monitored to establish the energy output of the whole system; the energy input is the energy yield of the two optic fibers. A small IR transmissive lens at the top provides the opportunity to hook up the fiber of a hyper spectrometer to monitor the emission spectrum of the black ‘earth’ sphere. A pressure gauge and gas inlet-outlet system for flushing of the cell completes it. The heat yield of the cooling water at the top is the sum of the radiative and convective components, whereas the bottom jacket only carries off the radiative heat of the sphere. Undergraduate E&ES students at Wesleyan University have run experiments with dry air, pure CO2, N2 and Ar at 1 atmosphere, and a low vacuum run was accomplished to calibrate the energy input. For each experiment, the lights are flipped on, the temperature acquisition routine is activated, and the sphere starts to warm up until an equilibrium temperature has been reached. The lights are then flipped off and the cooling sequence towards ambient is registered. The energy input is constant for a given

  9. Analog regulation of metabolic demand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The 3D structure of the chromosome of the model organism Escherichia coli is one key component of its gene regulatory machinery. This type of regulation mediated by topological transitions of the chromosomal DNA can be thought of as an analog control, complementing the digital control, i.e. the network of regulation mediated by dedicated transcription factors. It is known that alterations in the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA lead to a rich pattern of differential expressed genes. Using a network approach, we analyze these expression changes for wild type E. coli and mutants lacking nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) from a metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network perspective. Results We find a significantly higher correspondence between gene expression and metabolism for the wild type expression changes compared to mutants in NAPs, indicating that supercoiling induces meaningful metabolic adjustments. As soon as the underlying regulatory machinery is impeded (as for the NAP mutants), this coherence between expression changes and the metabolic network is substantially reduced. This effect is even more pronounced, when we compute a wild type metabolic flux distribution using flux balance analysis and restrict our analysis to active reactions. Furthermore, we are able to show that the regulatory control exhibited by DNA supercoiling is not mediated by the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), as the consistency of the expression changes with the TRN logic of activation and suppression is strongly reduced in the wild type in comparison to the mutants. Conclusions So far, the rich patterns of gene expression changes induced by alterations of the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA have been difficult to interpret. Here we characterize the effective networks formed by supercoiling-induced gene expression changes mapped onto reconstructions of E. coli's metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network. Our results show that DNA

  10. Investigation of Celestial Solid Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Our far infrared studies of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic aerogel grains have demonstrated that the mm and sub-mm wave absorption produced by the fundamental two level systems (TLS) mechanism represents a more significant contribution for these open grain structures than for bulk amorphous silicate grains. We found that the region with the anomalous temperature dependence of the spectral index due to the TLS excitations can extend in a fluffy material up to 80 per cm, which is well beyond its typical upper limit for bulk glasses. Currently there is no theoretical explanation for this surprising result. The effects of reduced dimensionality on the optical properties of carbonaceous grains have been studied with a systematic investigation of carbon aerogels. This spectroscopic approach has permitted a more reliable determination of the single grain mass normalized absorption coefficient based on the experimentally determined characteristics of the fluffy material rather than on first principles calculations involving the bulk properties of the substance. Our finding is that the electrical connectivity of the material is the main factor affecting its far infrared absorption coefficient. Another one of the main constituents of the interstellar dust, amorphous ice, has been investigated in the mm-wave region both in the high (HDA) and low (LDA) density amorphous phases and as a function of impurities. We found that doping either phase with ionic (LiCl) or molecular (methanol) impurities decreases the difference in the mm-wave absorption coefficient between the HDA and LDA ice phases so that the HDA spectrum can be used as an analog for impure ice absorption in the far infrared spectral region.

  11. Namibian Analogs To Titan Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Stephen D.; Lopes, R.; Kirk, R.; Stofan, E.; Farr, T.; Van der Ploeg, P.; Lorenz, R.; Radebaugh, J.

    2009-09-01

    Titan's equatorial dunes, observed in Cassini SAR, have been described as longitudinal, similar to longitudinal dunes in the Namib sand sea in southern Africa. Their "Y” junctions and the way they divert around topography are used as evidence of equatorial wind flow direction. In two instances of such diversion they exhibit overlying or crosshatched patterns in two distinct directions that have been interpreted as a transition to transverse dunes. Here we describe field observations of the Namibian dunes and these comparisons, we present images of the dunes from terrestrial SAR missions, and we discuss implications to both the Titan dunes and the wind regime that created them. Selected portions of the Namibian dunes resemble Titan's dunes in peak-to-peak distance and length. They are morphologically similar to Titan, and specific superficial analogs are common, but they also differ. For example, when Titan dunes encounter topography they either terminate abruptly, "climb” the upslope, or divert around; only the latter behavior is seen in remote sensing images of Namibia. Namib linear dunes do transition to transverse as they divert, but at considerably smaller wavelength, while at Titan the wavelengths are of the same scale. Crosshatching of similar-wavelength dunes does occur in Namibia, but not near obstacles. Many additional aeolian features that are seen at Namibia such as star dunes, serpentine ridges and scours have not been detected on Titan, although they might be below the Cassini SAR's 300-m resolution. These similarities and differences allow us to explore mechanisms of Titan dune formation, in some cases giving us clues as to what larger scale evidence to look for in SAR images. Viewed at similar resolution, they provide interesting comparisons with the Titan dunes, both in likeness and differences. A part of this work was carried out at JPL under contract with NASA.

  12. Analogies: Explanatory Tools in Web-Based Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Fowler, Shawn

    2007-01-01

    This article helps designers of Web-based science instruction construct analogies that are as effective as those used in classrooms by exemplary science teachers. First, the authors explain what analogies are, how analogies foster learning, and what form analogies should take. Second, they discuss science teachers' use of analogies. Third, they…

  13. Observed Methods for Generating Analogies in Scientific Problem Solving. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, John

    Evidence from video tapes of experts thinking aloud and using analogies in scientific problem solving is presented. Four processes appear to be important in using an analogy: (1) generating the analogy; (2) establishing confidence in the validity of the analogy relation; (3) understanding the analogous case; and (4) applying findings to the…

  14. Principles for Integrating Mars Analog Science, Operations, and Technology Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.

    2003-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the scientific community and NASA used terrestrial analog sites for understanding planetary features and for training astronauts to be scientists. Human factors studies (Harrison, Clearwater, & McKay 1991; Stuster 1996) have focused on the effects of isolation in extreme environments. More recently, with the advent of wireless computing, we have prototyped advanced EVA technologies for navigation, scheduling, and science data logging (Clancey 2002b; Clancey et al., in press). Combining these interests in a single expedition enables tremendous synergy and authenticity, as pioneered by Pascal Lee's Haughton-Mars Project (Lee 2001; Clancey 2000a) and the Mars Society s research stations on a crater rim on Devon Island in the High Canadian Arctic (Clancey 2000b; 2001b) and the Morrison Formation of southeast Utah (Clancey 2002a). Based on this experience, the following principles are proposed for conducting an integrated science, operations, and technology research program at analog sites: 1) Authentic work; 2) PI-based projects; 3) Unencumbered baseline studies; 4) Closed simulations; and 5) Observation and documentation. Following these principles, we have been integrating field science, operations research, and technology development at analog sites on Devon Island and in Utah over the past five years. Analytic methods include work practice simulation (Clancey 2002c; Sierhuis et a]., 2000a;b), by which the interaction of human behavior, facilities, geography, tools, and procedures are formalized in computer models. These models are then converted into the runtime EVA system we call mobile agents (Clancey 2002b; Clancey et al., in press). Furthermore, we have found that the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal (Jones, 1999) provides a vast repository or understanding astronaut and CapCom interactions, serving as a baseline for Mars operations and quickly highlighting opportunities for computer automation (Clancey, in press).

  15. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  16. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  17. Programmable Analog-To-Digital Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, Edward H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    High-speed analog-to-digital converter with programmable voltage steps that can be changed during operation. Allows concentration of converter resolution over specific portion of waveform. Particularly useful in digitizing wind-shear radar and lidar return signals, in digital oscilloscopes, and other applications in which desirable to increase digital resolution over specific area of waveform while accepting lower resolution over rest of waveform. Effective increase in dynamic range achieved without increase in number of analog-to-digital converter bits. Enabling faster analog-to-digital conversion.

  18. Pathogen-induced chemokine secretion from model intestinal epithelium is inhibited by lipoxin A4 analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, A T; McCormick, B; Neish, A S; Petasis, N A; Gronert, K; Serhan, C N; Madara, J L

    1998-01-01

    Enteric pathogens induce intestinal epithelium to secrete chemokines that direct movement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Mechanisms that might downregulate secretion of these proinflammatory chemokines and thus contain intestinal inflammation have not yet been elucidated. The antiinflammatory activities exhibited by the arachidonate metabolite lipoxin A4 (LXA4) suggests that this eicosanoid, which is biosynthesized in vivo at sites of inflammation, might play such a role. We investigated whether chemokine secretion could be regulated by stable analogs of LXA4. Monolayers of T84 intestinal epithelial cells were infected with Salmonella typhimurium, which elicits secretion of distinct apical (pathogen-elicited epithelial chemoattractant) and basolateral (IL-8) chemokines. Stable analogs of LXA4 inhibited S. typhimurium-induced (but not phorbol ester-induced) secretion of both IL-8 and pathogen-elicited epithelial chemoattractant. LXA4 stable analogs did not alter bacterial adherence to nor internalization by epithelia, indicating that LXA4 stable analogs did not block all signals that Salmonella typhimurium activates in intestinal epithelia, but likely led to attenuation of signals that mediate chemokine secretion. Inhibition of S. typhimurium-induced IL-8 secretion by LXA4 analogs was concentration- (IC50 approximately 1 nM) and time-dependent (maximal inhibition approximately 1 h). As a result of these effects, LXA4 stable analogs inhibited the ability of bacteria-infected epithelia to direct polymorphonuclear leukocyte movement. These data suggest that LXA4 and its stable analogs may be useful in downregulating active inflammation at mucosal surfaces. PMID:9576749

  19. Terrestrial subaqueous seafloor dunes: Possible analogs for Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neakrase, Lynn D.V.; Klose, Martina; Titus, Timothy N.

    2017-01-01

    Dunes on Venus, first discovered with Magellan Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the early 1990s, have fueled discussions about the viability of Venusian dunes and aeolian grain transport. Confined to two locations on Venus, the existence of the interpreted dunes provides evidence that there could be transportable material being mobilized into aeolian bedforms at the surface. However, because of the high-pressure high-temperature surface conditions, laboratory analog studies are difficult to conduct and results are difficult to extrapolate to full-sized, aeolian bedforms. Field sites of desert dunes, which are well-studied on Earth and Mars, are not analogous to what is observed on Venus because of the differences in the fluid environments. One potentially underexplored possibility in planetary science for Venus-analog dune fields could be subaqueous, seafloor dune fields on Earth. Known to the marine geology communities since the early 1960s, seafloor dunes are rarely cited in planetary aeolian bedform literature, but could provide a necessary thick-atmosphere extension to the classically studied aeolian dune environment literature for thinner atmospheres. Through discussion of the similarity of the two environments, and examples of dunes and ripples cited in marine literature, we provide evidence that subaqueous seafloor dunes could serve as analogs for dunes on Venus. Furthermore, the evidence presented here demonstrates the usefulness of the marine literature for thick-atmosphere planetary environments and potentially for upcoming habitable worlds and oceanic environment research program opportunities. Such useful cross-disciplinary discussion of dune environments is applicable to many planetary environments (Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, etc.) and potential future missions.

  20. Activation and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase isoforms by forskolin analogs.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele; Papa, Dan; Hübner, Melanie; Mou, Tung-Chung; Lushington, Gerald H; Seifert, Roland

    2008-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 to 9 are differentially expressed in tissues and constitute an interesting drug target. ACs 1 to 8 are activated by the diterpene, forskolin (FS). It is unfortunate that there is a paucity of AC isoform-selective activators. To develop such compounds, an understanding of the structure/activity relationships of diterpenes is necessary. Therefore, we examined the effects of FS and nine FS analogs on ACs 1, 2, and 5 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Diterpenes showed the highest potencies at AC1 and the lowest potencies at AC2. We identified full agonists, partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists, i.e., diterpenes that reduced basal AC activity. Each AC isoform exhibited a distinct pharmacological profile. AC2 showed the highest basal activity of all AC isoforms and highest sensitivity to inverse agonistic effects of 1-deoxy-forskolin, 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-forskolin, and, particularly, BODIPY-forskolin. In contrast, BODIPY-forskolin acted as partial agonist at the other ACs. 1-Deoxy-forskolin analogs were devoid of agonistic activity at ACs but antagonized the effects of FS in a mixed competitive/noncompetitive manner. At purified catalytic AC subunits, BODIPY-forskolin acted as weak partial agonist/strong partial antagonist. Molecular modeling revealed that the BODIPY group rotates promiscuously outside of the FS-binding site. Collectively, ACs are not uniformly activated and inhibited by FS and FS analogs, demonstrating the feasibility to design isoform-selective FS analogs. The two- and multiple-state models, originally developed to conceptualize ligand effects at G-protein-coupled receptors, can be applied to ACs to explain certain experimental data.

  1. Computer Analogies: Teaching Molecular Biology and Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Stanley; McArthur, John

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that computer science analogies can aid the understanding of gene expression, including the storage of genetic information on chromosomes. Presents a matrix of biology and computer science concepts. (DDR)

  2. Review of field-programmable analog arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulak, Glen; D'Mello, Dean R.

    1996-10-01

    The drive towards shorter design cycles for analog integrated circuits has given impetus to several developments in the area of field-programmable analog arrays (FPAAs). Various approaches have been taken in implementing topological and parametric programmability of analog circuits. Recent extensions of this work have married FPAAs to their digital counterparts (FPGAs) along with data conversion interfaces, to form field-programmable mixed signal arrays (FPMAs). This survey paper reviews work to data in the area of programmable analog and mixed signal circuits. The body of work reviewed includes university and industrial research, commercial products and patents. A time-line of important achievements in the area is drawn and the status of various activities is summarized.

  3. CMOS analog switches for adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Adaptive active low-pass filters incorporate CMOS (Complimentary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) analog switches (such as 4066 switch) that reduce variation in switch resistance when filter is switched to any selected transfer function.

  4. The Analog (Computer) As a Physiology Adjunct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Peter A.

    1979-01-01

    Defines and discusses the analog computer and its use in a physiology laboratory. Includes two examples: (1) The Respiratory Control Function and (2) CO-Two Control in the Respiratory System. Presents diagrams and mathematical models. (MA)

  5. Analog Computer Laboratory with Biological Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebel, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biological examples in teaching applications of the analog computer is discussed and several examples from mathematical ecology, enzyme kinetics, and tracer dynamics are described. (Author/GA)

  6. NASA Now: Exploring Asteroids: An Analog Mission

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Extreme Environment Mission Operations, or NEEMO, project lead Bill Todd describes this analog mission and how aquanauts living and working in an undersea habitat are helping NASA prepare ...

  7. An Electrical Analog Computer for Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruels, Mark C.

    1972-01-01

    Nonphysics majors are presented with a direct current experiment beyond Ohms law and series and parallel laws. This involves construction of an analog computer from common rheostats and student-assembled voltmeters. (Author/TS)

  8. Optical analog-to-digital converter

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen; Raring, James; Skogen, Erik J.

    2009-07-21

    An optical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is disclosed which converts an input optical analog signal to an output optical digital signal at a sampling rate defined by a sampling optical signal. Each bit of the digital representation is separately determined using an optical waveguide interferometer and an optical thresholding element. The interferometer uses the optical analog signal and the sampling optical signal to generate a sinusoidally-varying output signal using cross-phase-modulation (XPM) or a photocurrent generated from the optical analog signal. The sinusoidally-varying output signal is then digitized by the thresholding element, which includes a saturable absorber or at least one semiconductor optical amplifier, to form the optical digital signal which can be output either in parallel or serially.

  9. Use of analogy in learning scientific concepts.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, C M; McDaniel, M A

    1993-07-01

    Four experiments compared learning of scientific concepts as expressed in either traditional literal form or through an analogy. Comprehension of basic-level details and inferential implications was measured through multiple-choice testing. In Experiment 1, literal or analogical renditions were presented in textual form only. In Experiment 2, text was accompanied by a dynamic video. In Experiment 3, the video and text literal rendition was compared with a text-only analogical rendition. In Experiment 4, subjects read only about a familiar domain. Subjects consistently answered basic-level questions most accurately when concepts were expressed literally, but answered inferential questions most accurately when concepts were expressed analogically. Analysis of individual differences (Experiment 2) indicated that this interaction strongly characterized the conceptual learning of science novices. The results are discussed within the framework of schema induction.

  10. An Electronic Analog of the Diffraction Grating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Gives an outline description of electronic circuitry which is analogous to the optical diffraction grating or to crystals used in the Bragg reflection of X-rays or electron waves, and explains how to use it. (Author/GA)

  11. Analog hardware for learning neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Silvio P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This is a recurrent or feedforward analog neural network processor having a multi-level neuron array and a synaptic matrix for storing weighted analog values of synaptic connection strengths which is characterized by temporarily changing one connection strength at a time to determine its effect on system output relative to the desired target. That connection strength is then adjusted based on the effect, whereby the processor is taught the correct response to training examples connection by connection.

  12. ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL DATA CONVERTER

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, G.W.; Althouse, J.E.; Anderson, D.P.; Bussey, G.R.; Minnear, L.H.

    1960-09-01

    Electrical apparatus is described, particularly useful in telemetry work, for converting analog signals into electrical pulses and recording them. An electronic editor commands the taking of signal readings at a frequency which varies according to linearity of the analog signal being converted. Readings of information signals are recorded, along with time base readings and serial numbering, if desired, on magnetic tape and the latter may be used to operate a computer or the like. Magnetic tape data may be transferred to punched cards.

  13. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  14. The analogy between stereo depth and brightness.

    PubMed

    Brookes, A; Stevens, K A

    1989-01-01

    Apparent depth in stereograms exhibits various simultaneous-contrast and induction effects analogous to those reported in the luminance domain. This behavior suggests that stereo depth, like brightness, is reconstructed, ie recovered from higher-order spatial derivatives or differences of the original signal. The extent to which depth is analogous to brightness is examined. There are similarities in terms of contrast effects but dissimilarities in terms of the lateral inhibition effects traditionally attributed to underlying spatial-differentiation operators.

  15. Protein Structure Prediction with Visuospatial Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jim; Glasgow, Janice; Kuo, Tony

    We show that visuospatial representations and reasoning techniques can be used as a similarity metric for analogical protein structure prediction. Our system retrieves pairs of α-helices based on contact map similarity, then transfers and adapts the structure information to an unknown helix pair, showing that similar protein contact maps predict similar 3D protein structure. The success of this method provides support for the notion that changing representations can enable similarity metrics in analogy.

  16. Barrier analogs: Long-term performance issues, preliminary studies, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Chatters, J.C.; Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Link, S.O.; Hunter, C.R.

    1994-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Protective Barrier Development Program is funding studies of natural analogs of the long-term performance of waste site covers. Natural-analog studies examine past environments as evidence for projecting the future performance of engineered structures. The information generated by analog studies is needed to (1) evaluate the designs and results of short term experiments and demonstrations, (2) formulate performance-modeling problems that bound expected changes in waste site environments, and (3) understand emergent system attributes that cannot be evaluated with short-term experiments or computer models. Waste site covers will be part of dynamic environmental systems with attributes that transcend the traits of engineered components. This report discusses results of the previously unreported preliminary studies conducted in 1983 and 1984. These results indicate that analogs could play an important role in predicting the long-term behavior of engineered waste covers. Layered exposures of glacial-flood-deposited gravels mantled with silt or sand that resemble contemporary barrier designs were examined. Bergmounds, another anomaly left by cataclysmic glacial floods, were also examined as analogs of surface gravel.

  17. Students' Pre- and Post-Teaching Analogical Reasoning When They Draw their Analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga Mozzer, Nilmara; Justi, Rosária

    2012-02-01

    Analogies are parts of human thought. From them, we can acquire new knowledge or change that which already exists in our cognitive structure. In this sense, understanding the analogical reasoning process becomes an essential condition to understand how we learn. Despite the importance of such an understanding, there is no general agreement in cognitive science literature about this issue. In this study, we investigated students' analogical reasoning as a creative process where an environment was set up to foster the students' generating and explaining their own analogies. Data were gathered from pre- and post-teaching interviews, in which the 13-14-year-old students were asked to make comparisons that could explain how atoms are bound. Such data supported the discussion about how students reasoned analogically. Our results made it evident that the task aims and the students' salient knowledge exerted a great influence on the drawing of analogies.

  18. Optical domain analog to digital conversion methods and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-13

    Methods and apparatus for optical analog to digital conversion are disclosed. An optical signal is converted by mapping the optical analog signal onto a wavelength modulated optical beam, passing the mapped beam through interferometers to generate analog bit representation signals, and converting the analog bit representation signals into an optical digital signal. A photodiode receives an optical analog signal, a wavelength modulated laser coupled to the photodiode maps the optical analog signal to a wavelength modulated optical beam, interferometers produce an analog bit representation signal from the mapped wavelength modulated optical beam, and sample and threshold circuits corresponding to the interferometers produce a digital bit signal from the analog bit representation signal.

  19. Novel analogs of ghrelin: physiological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Halem, Heather A; Taylor, John E; Dong, Jesse Z; Shen, Yeelana; Datta, Rakesh; Abizaid, Alfonso; Diano, Sabrina; Horvath, Tamas; Zizzari, Philippe; Bluet-Pajot, Marie-Thèrèse; Epelbaum, Jacques; Culler, Michael D

    2004-08-01

    Ghrelin, the 28 amino acid peptide recently identified as the natural ligand for the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue (GHS) receptor, has multiple activities in addition to stimulation of GH secretion, including stimulation of feeding and weight gain. To utilize these actions for potential therapeutic benefit, we have produced analogs of human ghrelin with enhanced metabolic stability, affinity for the GHS receptor, and efficacy in stimulating weight gain. We have also discovered an analog of ghrelin, BIM-28163, that is an antagonist at the GHS receptor and that fully inhibits GHS receptor activation induced by native ghrelin. In vivo, BIM-28163 does not increase GH secretion but fully blocks ghrelin-induced GH secretion. In contrast, BIM-28163 acts as a full agonist with regard to the ghrelin actions of stimulating weight gain and food intake. These results suggest that a receptor other than the GHS receptor mediates the actions of ghrelin on feeding and weight gain. This concept is strengthened by our observation that at certain hypothalamic sites, BIM-28163 acts as an antagonist of ghrelin-induced neuronal activation, while at other sites, both ghrelin and BIM-28163 induce neuronal activation via the same receptor. Collectively, these results indicate the existence of a novel ghrelin receptor that may regulate the feeding activity of ghrelin. Using BIM-28163 as a tool to define the endogenous role of ghrelin in normal GH secretion, we have demonstrated that antagonism of the GHS receptor in normal rats does not impair the pulsatility of GH secretion but lowers the pulse amplitude and mean GH level. These results demonstrate that endogenous ghrelin acts to amplify the basic pattern of GH secretion established by the interplay of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of creating ghrelin analogs that are selective for specific activities, as well as their utility in dissecting the role of ghrelin in both

  20. Analog Signal Correlating Using an Analog-Based Signal Conditioning Front End

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman; Krasowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This innovation is capable of correlating two analog signals by using an analog-based signal conditioning front end to hard-limit the analog signals through adaptive thresholding into a binary bit stream, then performing the correlation using a Hamming "similarity" calculator function embedded in a one-bit digital correlator (OBDC). By converting the analog signal into a bit stream, the calculation of the correlation function is simplified, and less hardware resources are needed. This binary representation allows the hardware to move from a DSP where instructions are performed serially, into digital logic where calculations can be performed in parallel, greatly speeding up calculations.

  1. Reduction of stuttering frequency using analog electromyographic feedback.

    PubMed

    Guitar, B

    1975-12-01

    Three stutterers were taught to reduce resting muscle activity by using analog electromyographic feedback from four sites over different muscle groups. They were then trained to reduce muscle activity prior to uttering selected sentences. A functional analysis was performed to determine the relationship between the decrease in stuttering frequency on initial phonemes and the reduction of electrical activity at each muscle site. Subjects demonstrated different responses to training. One subject's greatest decrease in stuttering frequency was associated with muscle activity training at a lip site. A second subject's greatest decrease in stuttering was associated with training at a laryngeal site. A third subject's greatest decreases in stuttering were with both lip and laryngeal site training. Following these demonstrations that stuttering could be controlled with electromyographic feedback, a practical management program was designed for a fourth stutterer. Feedback training to reduce electromyographic activity when paired with speech resulted in elimination of stuttering in two monitored situations, conversations and telephone calls. Probes indicated the stuttering continued to be markedly reduced in all situations nine months after treatment.

  2. Bristol Dry Lake, California: An Analog for Ancient Lacustrine Environments on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates Bristol Dry Lake, CA, as an analog site for ancient lakes on Mars. Water chemistry and spectra were used to explore the geology and chemistry of chlorides at Bristol and their impact on possible habitable environments on Mars.

  3. Isolation and characterization of genetically engineered gallidermin and epidermin analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Ottenwälder, B; Kupke, T; Brecht, S; Gnau, V; Metzger, J; Jung, G; Götz, F

    1995-01-01

    Gallidermin (Gdm) and epidermin (Epi) are highly homologous tetracyclic polypeptide antibiotics that are ribosomally synthesized by a Staphylococcus gallinarum strain and a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain, respectively. These antibiotics are secreted into media and are distinguished by the presence of the unusual amino acids lanthionine, 3-methyllanthionine, didehydrobutyrine, and S-(2-aminovinyl)-D-cysteine, which are formed by posttranslational modification. To study the substrate specificities of the modifying enzymes and to obtain variants that exhibit altered or new biological activities, we changed certain amino acids by performing site-specific mutagenesis with the Gdm and Epi structural genes (gdmA and epiA, respectively). S. epidermidis Tü3298/EMS6, an epiA mutant of the Epi-producing strain, was used as the expression host. This mutant synthesized Epi, Gdm, or analogs of these antibiotics when the appropriate genes were introduced on a plasmid. No Epi or Gdm analogs were isolated from the supernatant when (i) hydroxyamino acids involved in thioether amino acid formation were replaced by nonhydroxyamino acids (S3N and S19A); (ii) C residues involved in thioether bridging were deleted (delta C21, C22 and delta C22); or (iii) a ring amino acid was replaced by an amino acid having a completely different character (G10E and Y20G). A strong decrease in production was observed when S residues involved in thioether amino acid formation were replaced by T residues (S16T and S19T). A number of conservative changes at positions 6, 12, and 14 on the Gdm backbone were tolerated and led to analogs that had altered biological properties, such as enhanced antimicrobial activity (L6V) or a remarkable resistance to proteolytic degradation (A12L and Dhb14P). The T14S substitution led to simultaneous production of two Gdm species formed by incomplete posttranslational modification (dehydration) of the S-14 residue. The fully modified Dhb14Dha analog exhibited

  4. Analog forecasting with dynamics-adapted kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Giannakis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Analog forecasting is a nonparametric technique introduced by Lorenz in 1969 which predicts the evolution of states of a dynamical system (or observables defined on the states) by following the evolution of the sample in a historical record of observations which most closely resembles the current initial data. Here, we introduce a suite of forecasting methods which improve traditional analog forecasting by combining ideas from kernel methods developed in harmonic analysis and machine learning and state-space reconstruction for dynamical systems. A key ingredient of our approach is to replace single-analog forecasting with weighted ensembles of analogs constructed using local similarity kernels. The kernels used here employ a number of dynamics-dependent features designed to improve forecast skill, including Takens’ delay-coordinate maps (to recover information in the initial data lost through partial observations) and a directional dependence on the dynamical vector field generating the data. Mathematically, our approach is closely related to kernel methods for out-of-sample extension of functions, and we discuss alternative strategies based on the Nyström method and the multiscale Laplacian pyramids technique. We illustrate these techniques in applications to forecasting in a low-order deterministic model for atmospheric dynamics with chaotic metastability, and interannual-scale forecasting in the North Pacific sector of a comprehensive climate model. We find that forecasts based on kernel-weighted ensembles have significantly higher skill than the conventional approach following a single analog.

  5. Analogy, higher order thinking, and education.

    PubMed

    Richland, Lindsey Engle; Simms, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Analogical reasoning, the ability to understand phenomena as systems of structured relationships that can be aligned, compared, and mapped together, plays a fundamental role in the technology rich, increasingly globalized educational climate of the 21st century. Flexible, conceptual thinking is prioritized in this view of education, and schools are emphasizing 'higher order thinking', rather than memorization of a cannon of key topics. The lack of a cognitively grounded definition for higher order thinking, however, has led to a field of research and practice with little coherence across domains or connection to the large body of cognitive science research on thinking. We review literature on analogy and disciplinary higher order thinking to propose that relational reasoning can be productively considered the cognitive underpinning of higher order thinking. We highlight the utility of this framework for developing insights into practice through a review of mathematics, science, and history educational contexts. In these disciplines, analogy is essential to developing expert-like disciplinary knowledge in which concepts are understood to be systems of relationships that can be connected and flexibly manipulated. At the same time, analogies in education require explicit support to ensure that learners notice the relevance of relational thinking, have adequate processing resources available to mentally hold and manipulate relations, and are able to recognize both the similarities and differences when drawing analogies between systems of relationships.

  6. Magnetic activity of seismic solar analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Beck, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    We present our latest results on the solar-stellar connection by studying 18 solar analogs that we identified among the Kepler seismic sample tep{salabert16a}. We measured their magnetic activity properties using observations collected by the Kepler satellite and the ground-based, high-resolution HERMES spectrograph. The photospheric (S{_ph}) and chromospheric (S) magnetic activity proxies of these seismic solar analogs are compared in relation to solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is actually comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs. Furthermore, we report on the discovery of temporal variability in the acoustic frequencies of the young (1 Gyr-old) solar analog KIC 10644253 with a modulation of about 1.5 years, which agrees with the derived photospheric activity tep{salabert16b}. It could actually be the signature of the short-period modulation, or quasi-biennal oscillation, of its magnetic activity as observed in the Sun and the 1-Gyr-old solar analog HD 30495. In addition, the lithium abundance and the chromospheric activity estimated from HERMES confirms that KIC 10644253 is a young and more active star than the Sun.

  7. Not All Analogies Are Created Equal: Associative and Categorical Analogy Processing following Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Gwenda L.; Cardillo, Eileen R.; Kranjec, Alexander; Lehet, Matthew; Widick, Page; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2012-01-01

    Current research on analogy processing assumes that different conceptual relations are treated similarly. However, just as words and concepts are related in distinct ways, different kinds of analogies may employ distinct types of relationships. An important distinction in how words are related is the difference between associative (dog-bone) and…

  8. The Effect of Analogy-Based Teaching on Students' Achievement and Students' Views about Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the analogy-based teaching on students' achievement and students' views about analogies. In this research, Solomon group design which is one of the experimental designs, was implemented. The sample of the research consists of 108 students in four 6th grade classes in Turkey. The achievement…

  9. Value and Limitations of Analogs in Teaching Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halford, Graeme S.; Boulton-Lewis, Gillian M.

    Analogical reasoning is frequently used in acquisition of mathematical concepts. Concrete representations used to teach mathematics are essentially analogs of mathematical concepts, and it is argued that analogies enter into mathematical concept acquisition in numerous other ways as well. According to Gentner's theory, analogies entail a…

  10. The Importance of Explicitly Mapping Instructional Analogies in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asay, Loretta Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Analogies are ubiquitous during instruction in science classrooms, yet research about the effectiveness of using analogies has produced mixed results. An aspect seldom studied is a model of instruction when using analogies. The few existing models for instruction with analogies have not often been examined quantitatively. The Teaching With…

  11. Analogy-Enhanced Instruction: Effects on Reasoning Skills in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remigio, Krisette B.; Yangco, Rosanelia T.; Espinosa, Allen A.

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the reasoning skills of first year high school students after learning general science concepts through analogies. Two intact heterogeneous sections were randomly assigned to Analogy-Enhanced Instruction (AEI) group and Non Analogy-Enhanced (NAEI) group. Various analogies were incorporated in the lessons of the AEI group for…

  12. Gravitoelectromagnetic analogy based on tidal tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, L. Filipe O.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.

    2008-07-15

    We propose a new approach to a physical analogy between general relativity and electromagnetism, based on tidal tensors of both theories. Using this approach we write a covariant form for the gravitational analogues of the Maxwell equations, which makes transparent both the similarities and key differences between the two interactions. The following realizations of the analogy are given. The first one matches linearized gravitational tidal tensors to exact electromagnetic tidal tensors in Minkowski spacetime. The second one matches exact magnetic gravitational tidal tensors for ultrastationary metrics to exact magnetic tidal tensors of electromagnetism in curved spaces. In the third we show that our approach leads to a two-step exact derivation of Papapetrou's equation describing the force exerted on a spinning test particle. Analogous scalar invariants built from tidal tensors of both theories are also discussed.

  13. Polymeric nanogel formulations of nucleoside analogs

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V

    2008-01-01

    Nanogels are colloidal microgel carriers that have been introduced recently as a prospective drug delivery system for nucleotide therapeutics. The crosslinked protonated polymer network of nanogels binds oppositely charged drug molecules, encapsulating them into submicron particles with a core-shell structure. The nanogel network also provides a suitable template for chemical engineering, surface modification and vectorisation. This review reveals recent attempts to develop novel drug formulations of nanogels with antiviral and antiproliferative nucleoside analogs in the active form of 5′-triphosphates; discusses structural approaches to the optimisation of nanogel properties, and; discusses the development of targeted nanogel drug formulations for systemic administration. Notably, nanogels can improve the CNS penetration of nucleoside analogs that are otherwise restricted from passing across the blood–brain barrier. The latest findings reviewed here demonstrate an efficient intracellular release of nucleoside analogs, encouraging further applications of nanogel carriers for targeted drug delivery. PMID:17184158

  14. Changes in analogical reasoning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Clark, E; Gardner, M K; Brown, G; Howell, R J

    1990-01-01

    This study sought to investigate adult intellectual development through an analysis of a particular type of cognitive ability, verbal analogical reasoning. The performance of 60 individuals between the ages of 20 and 79 was compared on 100 verbal analogies. The subjects consisted of six groups of ten individuals each (five males and five females), matched as a group for education and gender. Solution times and error rates served as the dependent measures. Results showed that there was a significant trend for the older subjects (60- and 70-year-olds) to be slower than the young subjects (20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-year-olds), but not necessarily more error prone. These data suggest that verbal analogical reasoning changes with age. Supplemental data demonstrated a change in other abilities as well (i.e., decline in perceptual-motor speed and spatial skill).

  15. Interaction of Chloramphenicol Tripeptide Analogs with Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenkov, A G; Shishkina, A V; Tashlitsky, V N; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A; Sumbatyan, N V

    2016-04-01

    Chloramphenicol amine peptide derivatives containing tripeptide fragments of regulatory "stop peptides" - MRL, IRA, IWP - were synthesized. The ability of the compounds to form ribosomal complexes was studied by displacement of the fluorescent erythromycin analog from its complex with E. coli ribosomes. It was found that peptide chloramphenicol analogs are able to bind to bacterial ribosomes. The dissociation constants were 4.3-10 µM, which is 100-fold lower than the corresponding values for chloramphenicol amine-ribosome complex. Interaction of the chloramphenicol peptide analogs with ribosomes was simulated by molecular docking, and the most probable contacts of "stop peptide" motifs with the elements of nascent peptide exit tunnel were identified.

  16. meso-Transdiene analogs inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Norrholm, Seth D; Culver, John P; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S; Harrod, Steven B; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Bardo, Michael T; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-03-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  17. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  18. Associative Pattern Recognition In Analog VLSI Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Winner-take-all circuit selects best-match stored pattern. Prototype cascadable very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chips built and tested to demonstrate concept of electronic associative pattern recognition. Based on low-power, sub-threshold analog complementary oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) VLSI circuitry, each chip can store 128 sets (vectors) of 16 analog values (vector components), vectors representing known patterns as diverse as spectra, histograms, graphs, or brightnesses of pixels in images. Chips exploit parallel nature of vector quantization architecture to implement highly parallel processing in relatively simple computational cells. Through collective action, cells classify input pattern in fraction of microsecond while consuming power of few microwatts.

  19. Fungitoxicity of chemical analogs with heartwood toxins.

    PubMed

    Grohs, B M; Kunz, B

    1998-07-01

    Trans-stilbene and tropolone as chemical analogs with naturally occurring fungitoxic heartwood compounds were studied with respect to their fungitoxic potency. While stilbene showed no fungitoxic activity towards the fungi Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanogenum, Penicillium glabrum, and Trichoderma harzianum in the concentrations tested, the minimal inhibiting concentration of tropolone was 10(-3) M for Penicillium glabrum and Trichoderma harzianum, and 10(-5) M for Aureobasidium pullulans var. melanogenum. In all cases, the effect of tropolone was a fungistatic one. Using chemical analogs for assessing the chemical basis of the fungitoxicity of tropolone, this substance proved to be the only compound tested which possesses fungitoxic properties.

  20. Analogies between elastic and capillary interfaces*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we exploit some analogies between flows near capillary interfaces and near elastic interfaces. We first consider the elastohydrodynamics of a ball bearing and the motion of a gas bubble inside a thin channel. It is shown that there is a strong analogy between these two lubrication problems, and the respective scaling laws are derived side by side. Subsequently, the paper focuses on the limit where the involved elastic interfaces become extremely soft. It is shown that soft gels and elastomers, like liquids, can be shaped by their surface tension. We highlight some recent advances on this class of elastocapillary phenomena.

  1. Analog graphic display method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for using an output device such as an LED to show the approximate analog level of a variable electrical signal wherein a modulating AC waveform is superimposed either on the signal or a reference voltage, both of which are then fed to a comparator which drives the output device. Said device flashes at a constant perceptible rate with a duty cycle which varies in response to variations in the level of the input signal. The human eye perceives these variations in duty cycle as analogous to variations in the level of the input signal.

  2. Analog graphic display method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-08-13

    Disclosed are an apparatus and method for using an output device such as an LED to show the approximate analog level of a variable electrical signal wherein a modulating AC waveform is superimposed either on the signal or a reference voltage, both of which are then fed to a comparator which drives the output device. Said device flashes at a constant perceptible rate with a duty cycle which varies in response to variations in the level of the input signal. The human eye perceives these variations in duty cycle as analogous to variations in the level of the input signal. 21 figures.

  3. Discrete analog computing with rotor-routers.

    PubMed

    Propp, James

    2010-09-01

    Rotor-routing is a procedure for routing tokens through a network that can implement certain kinds of computation. These computations are inherently asynchronous (the order in which tokens are routed makes no difference) and distributed (information is spread throughout the system). It is also possible to efficiently check that a computation has been carried out correctly in less time than the computation itself required, provided one has a certificate that can itself be computed by the rotor-router network. Rotor-router networks can be viewed as both discrete analogs of continuous linear systems and deterministic analogs of stochastic processes.

  4. Transparent Analogs for Alloy Phase Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experiments to add information to data base supporting use of transparent, partially miscible liquids and solids as analogs in studies of alloy solidification. Behavior of these materials observed directly while they undergo liquid/liquid and liquid/solid phase transformations. Light-scattering techniques used to determine phase boundaries. Transparent analogs allow observation of both solidification patterns and processes leading to those patterns, whereas metal alloys require tedious post-solidification metallographic analyses because processes not generally observed. Experiments with transparent substances safer and cheaper since conducted at much lower temperatures.

  5. Space flight nutrition research: platforms and analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Uchakin, Peter N.; Tobin, Brian W.

    2002-01-01

    Conducting research during actual or simulated weightlessness is a challenging endeavor, where even the simplest activities may present significant challenges. This article reviews some of the potential obstacles associated with performing research during space flight and offers brief descriptions of current and previous space research platforms and ground-based analogs, including those for human, animal, and cell-based research. This review is intended to highlight the main issues of space flight research analogs and leave the specifics for each physiologic system for the other papers in this section.

  6. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  7. Binary/Analog CCD Correlator Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    AD-AI04 438 TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INC DALLAS F/ 9 /5 BINARY/ANALOG CCD COPPEL TOR DE VELOPMEN.(U JUL 81 R A HAKEN F19628-78-C-0122 CLASSIFIED TI -08-79...ANALOG CCD CORRELATOR DEVELOPMENT Texas Instruments Inc. R. A. Hakln APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLMITED DTIC S ELECTE SEP 211981i D...transversal filter with split-electrode weighting is well recogniied as a useful tool liInumher of sampled-data filtering applications.’ However, these

  8. Parallel Analog-to-Digital Image Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokerson, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed integrated-circuit network of many identical units convert analog outputs of imaging arrays of x-ray or infrared detectors to digital outputs. Converter located near imaging detectors, within cryogenic detector package. Because converter output digital, lends itself well to multiplexing and to postprocessing for correction of gain and offset errors peculiar to each picture element and its sampling and conversion circuits. Analog-to-digital image processor is massively parallel system for processing data from array of photodetectors. System built as compact integrated circuit located near local plane. Buffer amplifier for each picture element has different offset.

  9. Pseudolog Digital-to-Analog Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivity decreases by 10 at beginning of each input decade. Method conceived to convert binary-coded data to suitable linear form for stripchart recording. Strip-chart recordings obtained from typical pressure readings in a vacuum system during pumpdown. In reading curve, BCD digital vacuum-gage output processed by analog-to-digital converter in such way that only reading digits (but not range) appear in output. In range and reading, range also converted to analog and placed as most significant digit.

  10. A quadratic analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. C.; Staples, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter with a square root transfer function has been developed for use with a pair of CCD imaging detectors in the White Light Coronagraph/X-ray XUV Telescope experiment to be flown as part of the Internal Solar Polar Mission. It is shown that in background-noise-limited instrumentation systems a quadratic analog-to-digital converter will allow a maximum dynamic range with a fixed number of data bits. Low power dissipation, moderately fast conversion time, and reliability are achieved in the proposed design using standard components and avoiding nonlinear elements.

  11. Lessons from Natural Analog Studies for Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, W. M.

    2009-12-01

    For over fifty years natural analog studies have provided lessons addressing scientific, technical, and social problems concerning geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Idealized concepts for permanent disposal environments evolved from an understanding of the geological, geochemical and hydrological characteristics of analogous rocks including natural salt deposits (as advocated by the US National Academy of Sciences in 1957), ancient cratonic rocks (as investigated at Lac du Bonnet, Canada, Aspö, Sweden, and Vienne, France), and marine sedimentary rock formations (as studied at Mol, Belgium, and Bure, France). Additional multidisciplinary studies have been conducted at natural sites that bear characteristics analogous to potential repository systems, notably at natural uranium (and thorium) deposits including Poços de Caldas, Brazil, Alligator Rivers, Australia, Peña Blanca, Mexico, and Oklo, Gabon. Researchers of natural analogs for geologic disposal have addressed technical uncertainties regarding processes that have transpired over large time and space scales, which are generally inaccessible to laboratory studies. Principal questions for nuclear waste disposal include the geochemical stability and alteration rates of radionuclide bearing minerals and the mechanisms and rates of transport of radionuclides in groundwater. In their most direct applications, natural analogs studies have been devoted to testing specific models for repository performance and the experimental data that support those models. Parameters used in predictive performance assessment modeling have been compared to natural system data, including mineral solubilities, sorption coefficients, diffusion rates, and colloid transport properties. For example, the rate of uraninite oxidation and the natural paragenesis of uranium mineral alteration at Peña Blanca have been compared favorably to results of experimental studies of spent fuel alteration related to the proposed repository

  12. Multichannel analog front-end and analog-to-digital converter ICs for silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Y. I.; Butuzov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Integrated circuit (IC) of multichannel analog front-end and a mixed-signal chip of multichannel analog-to-digital converter are presented. A chipset of these two ICs is intended for readout, analog preprocessing and analog to digital conversion of silicon photomultiplier array signals. The number of channels of the analog front-end IC as well as the types of their input stages depends on the application. The current test version of the chip contains three current-input channels and three voltage-input channels. Each of the channels includes a programmable pre-amplifier, integrator with baseline-holder, code-controlled amplifier, amplitude discriminator, two programmable timers, pulse-shaping low-pass filter, peak detector, and an output buffer with baseline tuning circuitry. The analog IC has code-configurable architecture. The mixed-signal IC includes nine main channels and one auxiliary channel, containing 10-bit analog-to-digital converter in each channel. It also has a buffer memory and a voltage reference. The chip features low power consumption, which is less than 0.5 mW per channel at a sampling rate of 100 kHz. Both ICs are implemented in 0.35 μm CMOS technology.

  13. Invention through Form and Function Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    "Invention through Form and Function Analogy" is an invention book for teachers and other leaders working with youth who are involving students in the invention process. The book consists of an introduction and set of nine learning cycle formatted lessons for teaching the principles of invention through the science and engineering design…

  14. Metaphor, Simile, Analogy and the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Fox argues that the poetic function of language fulfils the human need to symbolise. Metaphor, simile and analogy provide examples of the ways in which symbolic language can be used creatively. The neural representations of these processes therefore provide a means to determine the neurological basis of creative language. Neuro-imaging has…

  15. Analogies and Reconstruction of Mathematical Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fast, Gerald R.

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of utilizing analogies to effect conceptual change in mathematics. Forty-one high school seniors participated in a knowledge reconstruction process regarding their beliefs about everyday probability situations such as sports events or lotteries. These mathematics students were given…

  16. Reasoning by Analogy in Solving Comparison Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates 10-year-old children's abilities to reason by analogy in solving addition and subtraction comparison problems involving unknown compare sets and unknown reference sets. Children responded in a consistent manner to the tasks involving the basic addition problems, indicating substantial relational knowledge of these but responded in an…

  17. (-)-Botryodiplodin, A Unique Ribose Analog Toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many toxins owe their mechanisms of action to being structural analogs of essential metabolites, messengers or structural components. Examples range from tubo-curare to penicillin. Ribose plays a unique role in the metabolism of living organisms, whether prokaryotes or eukaryotes. It and its deri...

  18. An Analog Processor for Image Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a novel analog Vector Array Processor (VAP) that was designed for use in real-time and ultra-low power image compression applications. This custom CMOS processor is based architectually on the Vector Quantization (VQ) algorithm in image coding, and the hardware implementation fully exploits the inherent parallelism built-in the VQ algorithm.

  19. Aromatic Bagels: An Edible Resonance Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shirley

    2007-05-01

    A classroom demonstration involving the use of a bagel and cream cheese as an analogy for the two resonance contributors of benzene is described. This method emphasizes the deficiencies of using a single Lewis structure to describe the structure of benzene. Students are also reminded that benzene is a single entity and not a species that oscillates between two resonance contributors.

  20. The GMO-Nanotech (Dis)Analogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Ronald; Kay, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetically-modified-organism (GMO) experience has been prominent in motivating science, industry, and regulatory communities to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. However, there are some significant problems with the GMO-nanotech analogy. First, it overstates the likelihood of a GMO-like backlash against…

  1. Analog Acoustic Expression in Speech Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shintel, Hadas; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Okrent, Arika

    2006-01-01

    We present the first experimental evidence of a phenomenon in speech communication we call "analog acoustic expression." Speech is generally thought of as conveying information in two distinct ways: discrete linguistic-symbolic units such as words and sentences represent linguistic meaning, and continuous prosodic forms convey information about…

  2. Radiation Behavior of Analog Neural Network Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, H.; Zee, F.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network experiment conducted for the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1) 1-b launched in June 1994. Identical sets of analog feed-forward neural network chips was used to study and compare the effects of space and ground radiation on the chips. Three failure mechanisms are noted.

  3. Resistance Gene Analogs in Cherries (Prunus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic studies have shown that NBS-LRR Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) tend to occur in clusters and often map to major resistances gene or QTL. The identification and use of specific RGAs as molecular markers among plant material displaying differential resistance phenotypes has the potential to di...

  4. Oseltamivir analog with boron cluster modulator.

    PubMed

    Adamska, Anna; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Zwoliński, Krzysztof; Szczepek, Wojciech J; Król, Ewelina; Szewczyk, Bogusław; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of novel neuraminidase inhibitor -- carborane ester of oseltamivir carboxylic acid is described, and its physicochemical and spectral characteristics is provided. Surprisingly, carborane analog of oseltamivir is of an order of magnitude less active than its precursor, the corresponding ethyl ester, which is the active principle of pharmaceutical preparations used in influenza prophylactics and therapy.

  5. Image Quality in Analog and Digital Microtechniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, William

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the basic principles of the application of microfilm (analog) and electronic (digital) technologies for data storage. Image quality is examined, searching and retrieval capabilities are considered, and hardcopy output resolution is described. It is concluded that microfilm is still the preferred archival medium. (5 references) (LRW)

  6. A Mechanical Analogy for Ohm's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    do Couto Tavares, Milton; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A mechanical analogy between the microscopic motion of a charged carrier in an ordinary resistor and the macroscopic motion of a ball falling along a slanted board covered with a lattice of nails is introduced. The Drude model is also introduced to include the case of inelastic collisions. Computer simulation of the motion is described. (KR)

  7. Multivariate Analog of Hays Omega-Squared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachdeva, Darshan

    The multivariate analog of Hays omega-squared for estimating the strength of the relationship in the multivariate analysis of variance has been proposed in this paper. The multivariate omega-squared is obtained through the use of Wilks' lambda test criterion. Application of multivariate omega-squared to a numerical example has been provided so as…

  8. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  9. Dopaminergic activity of four analogs of butaclamol.

    PubMed

    Collu, R; Bouvier, C; Basak, A; Dugas, H

    1985-12-01

    The displacing potency of four analogs of the neuroleptic drug butaclamol were evaluated using dog striatal tissue and [3H]-Spiroperidol as ligand. Although significantly less powerful than the parent compound, two of them (N-isobutyl butaclamol equatorial; N-methyl butaclamol equatorial) could be used for dopaminergic receptor studies.

  10. High resolution multi-facies realizations of sedimentary reservoir and aquifer analogs

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Peter; Comunian, Alessandro; Höyng, Dominik; Mariethoz, Gregoire

    2015-01-01

    Geological structures are by nature inaccessible to direct observation. This can cause difficulties in applications where a spatially explicit representation of such structures is required, in particular when modelling fluid migration in geological formations. An increasing trend in recent years has been to use analogs to palliate this lack of knowledge, i.e., exploiting the spatial information from sites where the geology is accessible (outcrops, quarry sites) and transferring the observed properties to a study site deemed geologically similar. While this approach is appealing, it is difficult to put in place because of the lack of access to well-documented analog data. In this paper we present comprehensive analog data sets which characterize sedimentary structures from important groundwater hosting formations in Germany and Brazil. Multiple 2-D outcrop faces are described in terms of hydraulic, thermal and chemical properties and interpolated in 3-D using stochastic techniques. These unique data sets can be used by the wider community to implement analog approaches for characterizing reservoir and aquifer formations. PMID:26175910

  11. Optical folding-flash analog-to-digital converter with analog encoding.

    PubMed

    Jalali, B; Xie, Y M

    1995-09-15

    We describe an optically assisted folding-flash analog-to-digital converter. The periodic transfer function of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to perform analog folding on the electronic signal to be quantized. A novel analog encoding scheme for efficient generation of gray code digital data is proposed. The new encoding scheme eliminates the requirement for interferometers with ultralow V(pi), which, so far, has hindered the development of such systems. The encoding concept is experimentally demonstrated through the use of LiNbO(3) modulators.

  12. Reconnection in substorms and solar flares: analogies and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the crucial process in the release of magnetic energy associated with magnetospheric substorms and with solar flares. On the basis of three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations we investigate similarities and differences between the two scenarios. We address in particular mechanisms that lead to the onset of reconnection and on energy release, transport, and conversion mechanisms. Analogous processes might exist in the motion of field line footpoints on the sun and in magnetic flux addition to the magnetotail. In both cases such processes might lead to a loss of neighboring equilibrium, characterized by the formation of very thin embedded current sheet, which acts as trigger for reconnection. We find that Joule (or ohmic) dissipation plays only a minor role in the overall energy transfer associated with reconnection. The dominant transfer of released magnetic energy occurs to electromagnetic energy (Poynting) flux and to thermal energy transport as enthalpy flux. The former dominates in low-beta, specifically initially force-free current sheets expected for the solar corona, while the latter dominates in high-beta current sheets, such as the magnetotail. In both cases the outflow from the reconnection site becomes bursty, i.e. spatially and temporally localized, yet carrying most of the outflow energy. Hence an analogy might exist between bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetotail and pulses of Poynting flux in solar flares.

  13. Crater Serves as Terrestrial Analog for Martian Impact Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Ahmed; van der Kooij, Marco; Giugni, Laurent-Philippe

    Researchers try to resolve the mysteries of Mars' geomorphological and climatic past by looking for terrestrial analogs and then explaining the processes of their formation. The Haughton impact crater site on Devon Island in Canada's Nunavut Territory has been the focus of Mars analog studies because of the similarity of its geomorphological characteristics to those observed on Mars and its location in a comparable environment [Lee et al., 1998]. The availability of high-resolution space data of these characteristics is a necessity in such studies. The most detailed topographic survey on Mars used a non-imaging laser ranging device called the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA) aboard the Mars Global Surveyor Mission [Zuber et al., 1992]. The radar imaging technique selected for this study in the Nunavut Territory, spaceborne repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (INSAR), can render subtle, point-to-point details on variations in a coherent, three-dimensional manner of a seemingly featureless surface for which the traditional optical stereo matching techniques will fail to generate accurate topographic information [Rosen, 2001].

  14. The role of causal models in analogical inference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Seung; Holyoak, Keith J

    2008-09-01

    Computational models of analogy have assumed that the strength of an inductive inference about the target is based directly on similarity of the analogs and in particular on shared higher order relations. In contrast, work in philosophy of science suggests that analogical inference is also guided by causal models of the source and target. In 3 experiments, the authors explored the possibility that people may use causal models to assess the strength of analogical inferences. Experiments 1-2 showed that reducing analogical overlap by eliminating a shared causal relation (a preventive cause present in the source) from the target increased inductive strength even though it decreased similarity of the analogs. These findings were extended in Experiment 3 to cross-domain analogical inferences based on correspondences between higher order causal relations. Analogical inference appears to be mediated by building and then running a causal model. The implications of the present findings for theories of both analogy and causal inference are discussed.

  15. How the creative use of analogies can shape medical practice.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    Analogical reasoning is central to medical progress, and is either creative or conservative. According to Hofmann et al., conservative analogy relates concepts from old technology to new technologies with emphasis on preservation of comprehension and conduct. Creative analogy however brings new understanding to new technology, brings similarities existing in the source domain to a target domain where they previously had no bearing, and imports something entirely different from the content of the analogy itself. I defend the claim that while conservative analogies are useful by virtue of being comfortable to use from familiarity and experience, and are more easily accepted by society, they only lead to incremental advances in medicine. However, creative analogies are more exciting and productive because they generate previously unexpected associations across widely separated domains, emphasize relations over physical similarities, and structure over superficiality. I use kidney transplantation and anti-rejection medication development as an exemplar of analogical reasoning used to improve medical practice. Anti-rejection medication has not helped highly sensitized patients because of their propensity to rejecting most organs. I outline how conservative analogical reasoning led to anti-rejection medication development, but creative analogical reasoning helped highly sensitized and blood type incompatible patients through domino transplants, by which they obtain a kidney to which they are not sensitized. Creative analogical reasoning is more likely than conservative analogical reasoning to lead to revolutionary progress. While these analogies overlap and creative analogies eventually become conservative, progress is best facilitated by combining conservative and creative analogical reasoning.

  16. A Mars Analog for Wet-Based Glacial Alteration of Volcanic Terrains: Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing at Three Sisters, Oregon, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Scudder, N. A.; Horgan, B.; Rampe, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    This study characterizes wet-based glacial weathering products at a volcanic Mars analog site using thermal infrared remote sensing. Decorrelation stretches are used to examine the geographic relationships between compositional units.

  17. One-pot modification of 5'-capped RNA based on methionine analogs.

    PubMed

    Muttach, Fabian; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    This paper outlines chemically and enzymatically synthesized S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) analogs and their use in the site-specific modification of RNA by methyltransferases, enabling the facile attachment of clickable moieties to the nucleic acid. We then focus on methodological aspects of setting up a methyltransferase-based enzymatic cascade reaction starting from methionine analogs. This strategy is applied to the one-pot modification of the mRNA cap which is subsequently derivatized in copper-free and copper-catalyzed click reactions. We show that high transfer efficiencies to the cap are obtained using Se-propargyl-, hexenynyl- and azido-bearing methionine analogs. By switching to other methyltransferases our one-pot modification approach should be directly applicable to the regiospecific modification of other target molecules including nucleic acids, proteins and small molecules.

  18. Binding of a tritiated pepstatin analog to human renin

    SciTech Connect

    Cumin, F.; Nisato, D.; Gagnol, J.P.; Corvol, P.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction between human renin and a potent pepstatin analog, SR 42128, has been investigated using binding studies. Binding and enzymatic assays were performed at pH 5.7 and pH 7.4. We found one specific inhibitor binding site per molecule of renin at both pH's. The dissociation constant (KD) obtained at equilibrium was 14-fold lower at pH 5.7 than at pH 7.4, showing a pH effect on binding of (/sup 3/H)SR 42128. A similar decrease was measured in enzymatic studies. In nonequilibrium conditions, we demonstrated that only association kinetic constants have been affected by pH variations. Radioligands provided interesting tools to investigate enzyme-inhibitor relationships.

  19. Multilateral Research Opportunities in Ground Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The global economy forces many nations to consider their national investments and make difficult decisions regarding their investment in future exploration. International collaboration provides an opportunity to leverage other nations' investments to meet common goals. The Humans In Space Community shares a common goal to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration within and beyond Low Earth Orbit. Meeting this goal requires efficient use of limited resources and International capabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) is our primary platform to conduct microgravity research targeted at reducing human health and performance risks for exploration missions. Access to ISS resources, however, is becoming more and more constrained and will only be available through 2020 or 2024. NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is actively pursuing methods to effectively utilize the ISS and appropriate ground analogs to understand and mitigate human health and performance risks prior to embarking on human exploration of deep space destinations. HRP developed a plan to use ground analogs of increasing fidelity to address questions related to exploration missions and is inviting International participation in these planned campaigns. Using established working groups and multilateral panels, the HRP is working with multiple Space Agencies to invite International participation in a series of 30- day missions that HRP will conduct in the US owned and operated Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) during 2016. In addition, the HRP is negotiating access to Antarctic stations (both US and non-US), the German :envihab and Russian NEK facilities. These facilities provide unique capabilities to address critical research questions requiring longer duration simulation or isolation. We are negotiating release of international research opportunities to ensure a multilateral approach to future analog research campaigns, hoping to begin multilateral campaigns in the

  20. Not all analogies are created equal: Associative and categorical analogy processing following brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Gwenda L.; Cardillo, Eileen R.; Kranjec, Alexander; Lehet, Matthew; Widick, Page; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2012-01-01

    Current research on analogy processing assumes that different conceptual relations are treated similarly. However, just as words and concepts are related in distinct ways, different kinds of analogies may employ distinct types of relationships. An important distinction in how words are related is the difference between associative (dog-bone) and categorical (dog-cat) relations. To test the hypothesis that analogical mapping of different types of relations would have different neural instantiations, we tested patients with left and right hemisphere lesions on their ability to understand two types of analogies, ones expressing an associative relationship and others expressing a categorical relationship. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and behavioral analyses revealed that associative analogies relied on a large left-lateralized language network while categorical analogies relied on both left and right hemispheres. The verbal nature of the task could account for the left hemisphere findings. We argue that categorical relations additionally rely on the right hemisphere because they are more difficult, abstract, and fragile; and contain more distant relationships. PMID:22402184

  1. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  2. Playing with a double-edged sword: Analogies in biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgill, Marykay

    Analogy pervades our everyday reasoning. No situation we encounter is exactly like a situation we have encountered previously, and our ability to learn and survive in the world is based on our ability to find similarities between past and present situations and use the knowledge we have gained from past situations to manage current situations. Analogies can be powerful teaching tools because they can make new material intelligible to students by comparing it to material that is already familiar. It is clear, though, that not all analogies are good and that not all good analogies are useful to all students. In this study, I have used textbook analysis, classroom observations, student interviews and instructor interviews to determine the role that analogies play in biochemistry learning. Analogies are an important teaching technique in biochemistry classes, being used more often in both biochemistry classes and textbooks than they are in high school chemistry classes and textbooks. Most biochemistry students like, pay particular attention to, and remember the analogies their instructors provide; and they use these analogies to understand, visualize, and recall information from class. Even though students like and use analogies, they do not understand what analogies are or the mechanism by which they improve learning. For the students, analogies are simply any teaching technique that eases understanding, visualization, or recall. Instructors, on the other hand, have a good understanding of what analogies are and of how they should be presented in class; but they do not use analogies as effectively as they should. They do not plan, explain or identify the limitations of the analogies they use in class. However, regardless of how effectively instructors present analogies in class, this study indicates that, in general, analogies are useful in promoting understanding, visualization, recall, and motivation in biochemistry students at all levels. They would be even more

  3. The Value of Analog Research in the Search for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    All we know about life and our understanding of its distribution throughout the Universe is based on our understanding of how life originated and evolved, and how it has persisted here on Earth. As we have refined our list of requirements for earth-like organisms and explored the limits of our biosphere, a variety of possible extraterrestrial habitats that could support life have emerged. Although our access to other potentially habitable worlds is limited, we continue to increase our understanding of the environmental conditions on bodies in our solar system which can inform our search for appropriate analogue sites. There is no perfect analogue for other planetary habitable environments on Earth. Earth is a planet with plate tectonics, a hydrological cycle, a thick atmosphere and stronger gravity than most candidate systems. Moreover, present day Earth is a verdant, interconnected system resulting from billions of years of biosphere evolution. Such differences pose a challenge to analogue research and in particular limit the interpretation of the environment under study in important ways. Earth's extreme environments have been proposed as analogues of planetary environments. A common error is to assume if an environment is extreme or it is cold and dry it will make an excellent analogue site. The value of an analogue site is measured by a good assessment of the relevance of a site with rigorous attention to its Earth-based limitations is necessary and it will have different impacts depending on the question under study. Additionally, modern and ancient systems on earth can also be investigated in order to target a future search for as yet undetected terrestrial features and processes that preserve or indicate signs of past life. Despite any limitations, analogue research is essential and field research at these terrestrial sites represents a growing aspect of planetary science. Those relevant to the search for life are supported by NASA's Planetary Science

  4. Effect of the multifunctional proteins RPA, YB-1, and XPC repair factor on AP site cleavage by DNA glycosylase NEIL1.

    PubMed

    Pestryakov, Pavel; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Grin, Inga; Fomina, Elizaveta E; Kim, Ekaterina R; Hamon, Loïc; Eliseeva, Irina A; Petruseva, Irina O; Curmi, Patrick A; Ovchinnikov, Lev P; Lavrik, Olga I

    2012-04-01

    DNA glycosylases are key enzymes in the first step of base excision DNA repair, recognizing DNA damage and catalyzing the release of damaged nucleobases. Bifunctional DNA glycosylases also possess associated apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) lyase activity that nick the damaged DNA strand at an abasic (or AP) site, formed either spontaneously or at the first step of repair. NEIL1 is a bifunctional DNA glycosylase capable of processing lesions, including AP sites, not only in double-stranded but also in single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that proteins participating in DNA damage response, YB-1 and RPA, affect AP site cleavage by NEIL1. Stimulation of the AP lyase activity of NEIL1 was observed when an AP site was located in a 60 nt-long double-stranded DNA. Both RPA and YB-1 inhibited AP site cleavage by NEIL1 when the AP site was located in single-stranded DNA. Taking into account a direct interaction of YB-1 with the AP site, located in single-stranded DNA, and the high affinity of both YB-1 and RPA for single-stranded DNA, this behavior is presumably a consequence of a competition with NEIL1 for the DNA substrate. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein (XPC), a key protein of another DNA repair pathway, was shown to interact directly with AP sites but had no effect on AP site cleavage by NEIL1.

  5. Design of potent, proteolytically stable oxyntomodulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Muppidi, Avinash; Zou, Huafei; Yang, Peng Yu; Chao, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Lance; Nunez, Vanessa; Woods, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Incretin-based peptides are effective therapeutics for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Oxyntomodulin (OXM), a dual agonist of GLP-1R and GCGR, has shown superior weight loss and glucose lowering effects, compared to single GLP-1R agonists. To overcome the short half-life and rapid renal clearance of OXM, which limit its therapeutic potential, both lipid and PEG modified OXM analogs have been reported. However, these approaches often result in reduced potency or PEG-associated toxicity. Herein we report a new class of cross-linked OXM analogs that show increased plasma stability and higher potency in activating both GLP-1R and GCGR. Moreover, the extended in vivo half-life results in superior anti-hyperglycemic activity in mice compared to the wild-type OXM. PMID:26727558

  6. Optimal neural computations require analog processors

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1998-12-31

    This paper discusses some of the limitations of hardware implementations of neural networks. The authors start by presenting neural structures and their biological inspirations, while mentioning the simplifications leading to artificial neural networks. Further, the focus will be on hardware imposed constraints. They will present recent results for three different alternatives of parallel implementations of neural networks: digital circuits, threshold gate circuits, and analog circuits. The area and the delay will be related to the neurons` fan-in and to the precision of their synaptic weights. The main conclusion is that hardware-efficient solutions require analog computations, and suggests the following two alternatives: (i) cope with the limitations imposed by silicon, by speeding up the computation of the elementary silicon neurons; (2) investigate solutions which would allow the use of the third dimension (e.g. using optical interconnections).

  7. Terrestrial analogs of the hellespontus dunes, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breed, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    Geomorphic features in the Hellespontus region, Mars, were compared with dunes of the crescentic ridge type in numerous terrestrial sand seas quantitatively by dimensional analysis of dune lengths, widths, and wavelengths. Mean values for the Hellespontus dunes are close to mean values derived from measurements of all sampled terrestrial sand seas. Terrestrial analogs of form and areal distribution of the Hellespontus dunes are shown by comparison of scale ratios derived from the measurements. Dunes of similar form occur in South West Africa, in Pakistan, in the southeastern Arabian peninsula, in the Sahara, in eastern USSR and northern China, and in western North America. Terrestrial analogs closest to form and areal distribution of the Hellespontus dunes are in the Kara Kum Desert, Turkmen SSR, and in the Ala Shan (Gobi) Desert, China. ?? 1977.

  8. Observing spin optodynamical analog of cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Justin; Kohler, Jonathan; Spethmann, Nicolas; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Cavity Optomechanics has been realized in many diverse systems and led to many interesting results such as ponderomotive squeezing of light, beyond-SQL measurement sensitivity, and squeezing of mechanical oscillators. Optical cavities also allow sensitive measurements of the spin of an atomic ensemble. It has been proposed to utilize this sensitivity to realize an analog of optomechanics by measuring the precession of small excitations of a spin-oscillator around a transverse magnetic field. I will present our recent work in which we realize optomechanical analogs in our system such as cavity-assisted cooling and amplification and optical spring shifts. In addition, the presence of a high-energy `ground state' of the spin oscillator allows the realization of an effective negative mass oscillator which is demonstrated by an inverted sideband asymmetry. In our ongoing work we attempt to realize coherent quantum noise cancelation by coupling spin oscillation with mechanical oscillation.

  9. Submarine Analogs to Venusian Pancake Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, Nathan T.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology and dimensions of the large diameter, steep-sided, flat-topped "pancake domes" on Venus make them unlike any type of terrestrial subaerial volcano. Comparisons between images of Hawaiian seamounts and pancake domes show similarities in shapes and secondary features. The morphometry of pancake domes is closer to that of Pacific seamounts than subaerial lava domes. Considering both morphology and morphometry, seamounts seem a better analog to the pancake domes. The control of volatile exsolution by pressure on Venus and the seafloor can cause lavas to have similar viscosities and densities, although the latter will be counteracted by high buoyancy underwater. However, analogous effects of the Venusian and seafloor alone are probably not sufficient to produce similar volcanoes. Rather, Venusian lavas of various compositions may behave like basalt on the seafloor if appropriate rates and modes of extrusion and planetary thermal structure are also considered.

  10. The optical analogy for vector fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This paper develops the optical analogy for a general vector field. The optical analogy allows the examination of certain aspects of a vector field that are not otherwise readily accessible. In particular, in the cases of a stationary Eulerian flow v of an ideal fluid and a magnetostatic field B, the vectors v and B have surface loci in common with their curls. The intrinsic discontinuities around local maxima in absolute values of v and B take the form of vortex sheets and current sheets, respectively, the former playing a fundamental role in the development of hydrodyamic turbulence and the latter playing a major role in heating the X-ray coronas of stars and galaxies.

  11. Survey of Evaluated Isobaric Analog States

    SciTech Connect

    MacCormick, M.

    2014-06-15

    Isobaric analog states (IAS) can be used to estimate the masses of members belonging to the same isospin multiplet. Experimental and estimated IAS have been used frequently within the Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) in the past, but the associated set of evaluated masses have been published for the first time in AME2012 and NUBASE2012. In this paper the current trends of the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME) coefficients are shown. The T = 2 multiplet is used as a detailed illustration.

  12. Analog measurement of scattered optical fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. R.; Green, D. A.

    1995-12-01

    A statistical model that describes the analog measurement of a fluctuating light intensity that arises from a non-Gaussian scattering process is developed. The higher-order statistical moments are derived for a p-i-n diode receiver model and gamma-distributed intensity fluctuations. Criteria for the accurate measurement of the scattering fluctuations are found, and these are used to analyze data derived from an on-line scatterometer system. Implications for future on-line measurement technology are discussed.

  13. Transition State Analog Inhibitors for Esterases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-02

    advanced about 1970, it has led to the synthesis of powerful reversible Inhibitors for a number of enzymes. More recently, transition state analog theory...to inactivate It. Organophosphate anticholinesterases are a classic example; many of the more recent examples allow the enzyme to generate a strong...could be utilized to explore such mechanistic questions. A second more practical goal was to prepare anticholinesterases of novel structure and

  14. Analog Fiber Optic Recirculating Delay Line.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-31

    signal is input through a BNC type connector and a corresponding optical analog signal is output via a single mode optical fiber. The transmitter...second functional transmitter subdivision. The stripline fix- ture board provides an impedance matching stripline from a BNC input connector to the RF...drive signal input pin of the laser hybrid. Other socket pins on this circuit board provide for the proper routing of sensor outputs to the

  15. Biomedical sensor design using analog compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    The main drawback of current healthcare systems is the location-specific nature of the system due to the use of fixed/wired biomedical sensors. Since biomedical sensors are usually driven by a battery, power consumption is the most important factor determining the life of a biomedical sensor. They are also restricted by size, cost, and transmission capacity. Therefore, it is important to reduce the load of sampling by merging the sampling and compression steps to reduce the storage usage, transmission times, and power consumption in order to expand the current healthcare systems to Wireless Healthcare Systems (WHSs). In this work, we present an implementation of a low-power biomedical sensor using analog Compressed Sensing (CS) framework for sparse biomedical signals that addresses both the energy and telemetry bandwidth constraints of wearable and wireless Body-Area Networks (BANs). This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of biomedical signals that are suitable for a variety of diagnostic and treatment purposes. At the transmitter side, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) in order to generate the compressed version of the input analog bio-signal. At the receiver side, a reconstruction algorithm based on Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) condition is applied in order to reconstruct the original bio-signals form the compressed bio-signals with high probability and enough accuracy. We examine the proposed algorithm with healthy and neuropathy surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The proposed algorithm achieves a good level for Average Recognition Rate (ARR) at 93% and reconstruction accuracy at 98.9%. In addition, The proposed architecture reduces total computation time from 32 to 11.5 seconds at sampling-rate=29 % of Nyquist rate, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD)=26 %, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE)=3 %.

  16. CCD Analog Programmable Microprocessor (APUP) Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    failing module. Furthermore, the analog nature of charge- coupled devices (CCD’s) gives the prospect of a small-area, low-power, cost-effective...category, the data to be processed occur naturally in serial form and with storage times short enough that this category is a close match for CCD-based...future digital processors. Nonetheless, its pipeline nature might make it more suitable for a CCD type of implementation. The envelope detection block is

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of platensimycin analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Hong C.; Ding, Fa-Xiang; Singh, Sheo B.; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnan; Soisson, Stephen M.; Ha, Sookhee N.; Chen, Xun; Kodali, Srinivas; Wang, Jun; Dorso, Karen; Tata, James R.; Hammond, Milton L.; MacCoss, Malcolm; Colletti, Steven L.

    2009-07-23

    Platensimycin (1) displays antibacterial activity due to its inhibition of the elongation condensing enzyme (FabF), a novel mode of action that could potentially lead to a breakthrough in developing a new generation of antibiotics. The medicinal chemistry efforts were focused on the modification of the enone moiety of platensimycin and several analogs showed significant activity against FabF and possess antibacterial activity.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Furanonaphthoquinone Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kumiko; Hirai, Kei-Ichi; Koyama, Junko; Wada, Yasunao; Tamura, Toshihide

    1998-01-01

    Analogs of furanonaphthoquinone (FNQ) from Tecoma ipe Mart had MICs ranging from 1.56 to 25 μg/ml against gram-positive bacteria. FNQ showed significantly lower MICs against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus than against methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. FNQ inhibited Helicobacter pylori with an MIC of 0.1 μg/ml. Fungi, including pathogenic species, were sensitive to FNQ with MICs similar to those of amphotericin B. PMID:9517956

  19. The 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Lee

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) scientific investigations were completed on Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii in July 2012. The investigations were conducted on the southeast flank of the Mauna Kea volcano at an elevation of approximately 11,500 ft. This area is known as "Apollo Valley" and is in an adjacent valley to the Very Large Baseline Array dish antenna.

  20. Optical Oversampled Analog-to-Digital Conversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-29

    Introduction 1 1.1 Background and Motivation........................... 2 1.1.1 Nyquist Rate Conversion........................ 3 1.1.2 Optical A/ D ...processor [9] was used with the electronic analog input signal driving an optical beam deflector . This method of optical A/ D conversion was limited...implement an optical oversampled A/ D converter. From the theoretical development in Chapter 2 , there are two principal functions which require optical

  1. Magnetic Analog Random-Access Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed integrated, solid-state, analog random-access memory base on principle of magnetic writing and magnetoresistive reading. Current in writing conductor magnetizes storage layer. Remanent magnetization in storage layer penetrates readout layer and detected by magnetoresistive effect or Hall effect. Memory cells are part of integrated circuit including associated reading and writing transistors. Intended to provide high storage density and rapid access, nonvolatile, consumes little power, and relatively invulnerable to ionizing radiation.

  2. Total synthesis of neopeltolide and analogs

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yubo; Tu, Wangyang; Floreancig, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Neopeltolide, a potent cytotoxin from a Carribean sponge, was synthesized through a brief sequence that highlights the use of ethers as oxocarbenium ion precursors. Other key steps include an acid-mediated etherification and sequence that features a Sonogashira reaction, an intramolecular alkyne hydrosilylation reaction, and a Tamao oxidation. The alkene that is required for the oxidative cyclization can be hydrogenated to provide access to the natural product or an epimer, or can be epoxidized or dihydroxylated to form polar analogs. PMID:20697460

  3. On estimation of uncertainties in analog measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Stovall, J.P. )

    1990-11-01

    Computer control of power systems require evaluation of uncertainties in analog measurements and their reduction to a level that allows satisfactory control. In this paper a range of measurements is obtained from a substation to span peak- and light-load conditions and to include bus voltages, phase angles and line flows. Then the redundancies in measurements are used to formulate several functions relating these measurements with their attending errors. Minimization of these functions have yielded the required corrective coefficients.

  4. Automated D/3 to Visio Analog Diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Posey, Stephen B.

    2000-08-10

    ADVAD1 reads an ASCII file containing the D/3 DCS MDL input for analog points for a D/3 continuous database. It uses the information in the files to create a series of Visio files representing the structure of each analog chain, one drawing per Visio file. The actual drawing function is performed by Visio (requires Visio version 4.5+). The user can configure the program to select which fields in the database are shown on the diagram and how the information is to be presented. This gives a visual representation of the structure of the analog chains, showing selected fields in a consistent manner. Updating documentation can be done easily and the automated approach eliminates human error in the cadding process. The program can also create the drawings far faster than a human operator is capable, able to create approximately 270 typical diagrams in about 8 minutes on a Pentium II 400 MHz PC. The program allows for multiple option sets to be saved to provide different settings (i.e., different fields, different field presentations, and /or different diagram layouts) for various scenarios or facilities on one workstation. Option sets may be exported from the Windows registry to allow duplication of settings on another workstation.

  5. Targeting thyroid diseases with TSH receptor analogs.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan C; Chacón, Ana M; Latif, Rauf

    2013-12-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major regulator of thyroid function and growth, and is the key antigen in several pathological conditions including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and thyroid tumors. Various effective treatment strategies are currently available for many of these clinical conditions such as antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy, but they are not devoid of side effects. In addition, treatment of complications of Graves' disease such as Graves' ophthalmopathy is often difficult and unsatisfactory using current methods. Recent advances in basic research on both in vitro and in vivo models have suggested that TSH analogs could be used for diagnosis and treatment of some of the thyroid diseases. The advent of high-throughput screening methods has resulted in a group of TSH analogs called small molecules, which have the potential to be developed as promising drugs. Small molecules are low molecular weight compounds with agonist, antagonist and, in some cases, inverse agonist activity on TSHR. This short review will focus on current advances in development of TSH analogs and their potential clinical applications. Rapid advances in this field may lead to the conduct of clinical trials of small molecules related to TSHR for the management of Graves' disease, thyroid cancer, and thyroid-related osteoporosis in the coming years.

  6. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  7. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  8. Periglacial and glacial analogs for Martian landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossbacher, Lisa A.

    1992-01-01

    The list of useful terrestrial analogs for Martian landforms has been expanded to include: features developed by desiccation processes; catastrophic flood features associated with boulder-sized materials; and sorted ground developed at a density boundary. Quantitative analytical techniques developed for physical geography have been adapted and applied to planetary studies, including: quantification of the patterns of polygonally fractured ground to describe pattern randomness independent of pattern size, with possible correlation to the mechanism of origin and quantification of the relative area of a geomorphic feature or region in comparison to planetary scale. Information about Martian geomorphology studied in this project was presented at professional meetings world-wide, at seven colleges and universities, in two interactive televised courses, and as part of two books. Overall, this project has expanded the understanding of the range of terrestrial analogs for Martian landforms, including identifying several new analogs. The processes that created these terrestrial features are characterized by both cold temperatures and low humidity, and therefore both freeze-thaw and desiccation processes are important. All these results support the conclusion that water has played a significant role in the geomorphic history of Mars.

  9. Theory of analogous force on number sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, Enrique

    2003-10-01

    A general statistical thermodynamic theory that considers given sequences of x-integers to play the role of particles of known type in an isolated elastic system is proposed. By also considering some explicit discrete probability distributions px for natural numbers, we claim that they lead to a better understanding of probabilistic laws associated with number theory. Sequences of numbers are treated as the size measure of finite sets. By considering px to describe complex phenomena, the theory leads to derive a distinct analogous force fx on number sets proportional to (∂ px/∂ x) T at an analogous system temperature T. In particular, this leads to an understanding of the uneven distribution of integers of random sets in terms of analogous scale invariance and a screened inverse square force acting on the significant digits. The theory also allows to establish recursion relations to predict sequences of Fibonacci numbers and to give an answer to the interesting theoretical question of the appearance of the Benford's law in Fibonacci numbers. A possible relevance to prime numbers is also analyzed.

  10. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: Binding of nitroxide analogs of a local anesthetic and a photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Electron spin resonance was used to contrast the accessibility of tertiary and quaternary amine local anesthetics to their high affinity binding site in the desensitized Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AchR). Preincubation of AchR-rich membranes with agonist resulted in a substantial reduction in the initial association of the quaternary amine local anesthetic C6SLMEI with the receptor. The time-dependent reduction in association follows a biphasic exponential function having rate constants of 0.19 min{sup {minus}1} and 0.03 min{sup {minus}1}. In contrast, agonist preincubation did not produce a comparable decrease in the association of C6SL, a tertiary amine analog, with the AchR. The results are modeled in two ways: (1) A charge gate near the channel mouth in the desensitized receptor limits access of the permanently charged cationic local anesthetic (C6SLMEI), but not for the uncharged form of the tertiary amine anesthetic C6SL. (2) A hydrophobic pathway, possibly through a corridor in the annular lipid surrounding receptor subunits, allows the uncharged form of C6SL to reach the high affinity binding site in the AchR. A photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine {sup 125}I 4-azido salicylic acid-phosphatidylserine ({sup 125}I ASA-PS) was use to label both Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes and reconstituted AchR membranes. All four subunits of the AchR were found to incorporate label, with the {alpha} subunit incorporating approximately twice as much as each of the other subunits on a per mole basis. The regions of the AchR {alpha} subunit that incorporate {sup 125}I ASA-PS were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion. Eighty-one per cent of the incorporated label was localized to 11.7 and 10.1 kdal V8 cleavage fragments.

  11. Using Analogs for Chemistry Problem Solving: Does It Increase Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Arthur W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the effectiveness of using analogies in chemistry instruction. Students' mathematics anxiety, spatial visualization skill, and proportional reasoning ability were found to be important aptitudes for determining chemistry achievement. The relationship between analogs and algorithms is described. (KR)

  12. Evaluating The Global Inventory of Planetary Analog Environments on Earth: An Ontological Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: Field sites on Earth are routinely used to simulate planetary environments so that we can try to understand the evidence of processes such as sedimentary deposition, weathering, evolution of habitable environments, and behavior of spacecraft and instrumentation prior to selection of mission architectures, payload investigations and landing sites for in situ exploration of other planets. The rapid evolution of astrobiology science drivers for space exploration as well as increasing capability to explore planetary surfaces in situ has led to a proliferation of declarations that various Earth environments are analogs for less accessible planetary environments. We have not yet progressed to standardized measures of analog fidelity, and the analog value of field sites can be variable de-pending upon a variety of factors. Here we present a method of evaluating the fidelity and hence utility of analog environments by using an ontological approach to evaluating how well the analogs work. The use of ontologies as specification constructs is now quite common in artificial intelligence, systems engineering, business development and various informatics systems. We borrow from these developments just as they derive from the original use of ontology in philosophy, where it was meant as a systematic approach to describing the fundamental elements that define “being,” or existence [1]. An ontology is a framework for the specification of a concept or domain of interest. The knowledge regarding that domain, eg., inventory of objects, hierarchical classes, relationships and functions is what describes and defines the domain as a declarative formalism [2]. In the case of planetary environments, one can define a list of fundamen-tal attributes without which the domain (environment) in question must be defined (classified) otherwise. In particu-lar this is problematic when looking at ancient environments because of their alteration over time. In other words, their

  13. When Reasoning Modifies Memory: Schematic Assimilation Triggered by Analogical Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendetti, Michael S.; Wu, Aaron; Rowshanshad, Ebi; Knowlton, Barbara J.; Holyoak, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Analogical mapping highlights shared relations that link 2 situations, potentially at the expense of information that does not fit the dominant pattern of correspondences. To investigate whether analogical mapping can alter subsequent recognition memory for features of a source analog, we performed 2 experiments with 4-term proportional analogies…

  14. Can Pupils Use Taught Analogies for Electric Current?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, David; Solomon, Joan

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of analogies and models for teaching about electric current. Reports on a study in which one group of students used analogies to learn about electric current and one did not. Results indicate that, in this case, analogies did not play a significant role in student understanding. (TW)

  15. The Role of Causal Models in Analogical Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Seung; Holyoak, Keith J.

    2008-01-01

    Computational models of analogy have assumed that the strength of an inductive inference about the target is based directly on similarity of the analogs and in particular on shared higher order relations. In contrast, work in philosophy of science suggests that analogical inference is also guided by causal models of the source and target. In 3…

  16. Analog Microcontroller Model for an Energy Harvesting Round Counter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-12012 Analog Microcontroller Model for an Energy Harvesting Round Counter Sara...YYYY) 06-06-2012 2. REPORT TYPE FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Analog Microcontroller Model for an Energy ... Microcontroller The greatest energy requirements of the round counter circuitry are associated with the Microchip PIC12LF1822 microcontroller [4]. An analog

  17. Investigating and Theorizing Discourse during Analogy Writing in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellocchi, Alberto; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Explanations of the role of analogies in learning science at a cognitive level are made in terms of creating bridges between new information and students' prior knowledge. In this empirical study of learning with analogies in an 11th grade chemistry class, we explore an alternative explanation at the "social" level where analogy shapes…

  18. Interactive Optical Disc Systems: Part 1: Analog Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessler, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Details distinction between digital and analog data, advantages of analog storage, and optical disc use to store analog data. Configuration and potential of three levels of laser disc systems are explained. Selection of display devices for use with laser disc systems and accessing audio data are addressed. (Continued in next issue.) (EJS)

  19. Modern Communication: Exploring Physiological Transmission through Tech-Savvy Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollabaugh, Christopher R.; Milanick, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Analogies are often helpful for students to grasp key physiological concepts; sometimes the technical jargon makes the concept seem more complex than it actually is. In this article the authors provide several analogies for information transfer processes that sometimes confuse students. For an analogy to be useful, of course, it needs to be…

  20. Analogical Instruction in Statistics: Implications for Social Work Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Leela

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of analogies in statistics instruction. Much has been written about the difficulty social work students have with statistics. To address this concern, Glisson and Fischer (1987) called for the use of analogies. Understanding of analogical problem solving has surged in the last few decades with the integration of…

  1. Analogies in Medicine: Valuable for Learning, Reasoning, Remembering and Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Gil Patrus; Andrade-Filho, Jose de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Analogies are important tools in human reasoning and learning, for resolving problems and providing arguments, and are extensively used in medicine. Analogy and similarity involve a structural alignment or mapping between domains. This cognitive mechanism can be used to make inferences and learn new abstractions. Through analogies, we try to…

  2. Functional DNA: Teaching Infinite Series through Genetic Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, R. Travis

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an extended analogy that connects infinite sequences and series to the science of genetics, by identifying power series as "DNA for a function." This analogy allows standard topics such as convergence tests or Taylor approximations to be recast in a "forensic" light as mathematical analogs of genetic concepts such as DNA…

  3. Using Analogies as an Experiential Learning Technique in Multicultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthakaran, V.; Filsinger, Keri; White, Brittany

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors specifically address the use of narratives in the form of analogies as an experiential learning activity. The use of analogies as an experiential learning tool in multicultural education can be helpful in a number of ways. Analogies provide an alternative tool for processing multicultural topics with students who have…

  4. Administration of Biosimilar Insulin Analogs: Role of Devices.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fritz, Ingo; Khatami, Hootan; Edelman, Steven V

    2017-02-01

    With the expiration of patent protection for several originator insulin analog molecules, the availability of insulin analog copies is set to increase. Many regulatory authorities have developed, and continue to refine, guidelines for the approval of biosimilar insulin analogs. Aspects such as the structure, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of biosimilar insulin analogs are extensively addressed in these guidelines, but how the biosimilar insulin analog is administered to people with diabetes is not usually a topic. The aim of this article is to highlight that the delivery device-drug combination is of particular importance. Regulatory, legal, and practical aspects of the delivery device, be it a syringe, pen, or pump, have to be considered in the context of biosimilar insulin analogs. Although the safety and efficacy of biosimilar insulin analogs per se are of primary importance for physicians and people with diabetes, functions and features of the devices used for administration also require attention from a practical point of view. Unfortunately, although there are several clinical studies investigating the technical aspects of and patient preference for the originator insulin analog pens, there are currently very little published data for nonoriginator or biosimilar insulin analog pens. In addition, it is not known if it is safe to assume that a biosimilar insulin analog cartridge is compatible with an existing originator insulin analog pen. We believe that there is a need for more discussion on the role of devices for administration of biosimilar insulin analogs.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effect of thalidomide dithiocarbamate and dithioate analogs.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Roba; El-Sayed, Waheba; Agwa, Hussein S; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Moawia, Shaden; Zahran, Magdy A H

    2015-08-05

    Thalidomide has anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. It has been used to treat a variety of cancers and autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to characterize anti-inflammatory activities of novel thalidomide analogs by exploring their effects on splenocytes proliferation and macrophage functions and their antioxidant activity. MTT assay was used to assess the cytotoxic effect of thalidomide analogs against splenocytes. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB-P65) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nitric oxide (NO) was estimated by colorimetric assay. Antioxidant activity was examined by ORAC assay. Our results demonstrated that thalidomide dithioate analog 2 and thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 4 produced a slight increase in splenocyte proliferation compared with thalidomide. Thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 1 is a potent inhibitor of TNF-α production, whereas thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 5 is a potent inhibitor of both TNF-α and NO. Analog 2 has a pronounced inhibitory effect on NF-κB-P65 production level. All thalidomide analogs showed prooxidant activity against hydroxyl (OH) radical. Analog 1 and thalidomide dithioate analog 3 have prooxidant activity against peroxyl (ROO) radical in relation to thalidomide. On the other hand, analog 4 has a potent scavenging capacity against peroxyl (ROO) radical compared with thalidomide. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that thalidomide analogs might have valuable anti-inflammatory activities with more pronounced effect than thalidomide itself.

  6. Analogy Use in Eighth-Grade Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richland, Lindsey E.; Holyoak, Keith J.; Stigler, James W.

    2004-01-01

    Analogical reasoning has long been believed to play a central role in mathematics learning and problem solving (see Genter, Holyoak, & Kokinov, 2001); however, little is known about how analogy is used in everyday instructional contexts. This article examines analogies produced in naturally occurring U.S. mathematics lessons to explore…

  7. Comparison of Three Methods for Improving Verbal Analogies Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewenthal, Gloria G.; Pons, Manuel M.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between analogical reasoning and academic learning. Results show that efforts to improve academic achievement through training in analogical thinking are based on the correct assumption that analogical thinking can be trained and that various methods of training are effective in this regard. (MS)

  8. Historical Shifts in the Use of Analogy in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Dedre; Jeziorski, Michael

    Analogy is widely considered to be an important mechanism of scientific thinking and a source of creative insight in theory development. In this paper the implicit constraints that determine analogical soundness are considered. It first examines the constraints that govern analogical reasoning as it is predicted today. The scientific uses of…

  9. Spatial similarity and transferability of analog dates for precipitation downscaling over France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Jérémy; Hingray, Benoit; Favre, Anne-Catherine; Autin, Philémon; Gailhard, Joël; Zin, Isabella; Obled, Charles

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution weather scenarios generated for climate change impact studies from the output of climate models have to be spatially coherent. Analog Models (AMs) have a high potential to generate such scenarios. For each prediction day, they use as scenario the weather observed for days in a historical archive that are analog according to different predictors. When a same 'analog date' is chosen for a prediction at several sites, the spatial coherency is automatically fulfilled. The optimal predictors and next the optimal analog dates are however expected to depend on the location for which the prediction has to be made. In this study, a set of 8,981 locally AMs - specifically optimized for the probabilistic prediction of 8,981 local precipitation 'stations' over France - is used to explore the two following questions: How does the domain-optimized AM perform for precipitation prediction at another location if the analogy domain used to identify the analog dates (in terms of spatial shape of 1000 and 500 hPa geopotential fields) is optimized to predict precipitation at a given location (question of transferability)? To what extent are the analog dates derived from a first AM domain-optimized for a given location similar to those of a second AM domain-optimized for a second location (question of similarity)? The mean similarity level of analog dates obtained from two different AMs is assessed with the percentage of issued predictions for which the number of identical analog dates is larger to a given percentage threshold. The spatial transferability is assessed with the loss of prediction performance - expressed by the Continuous Ranked Probability Skill Score (CRPSS) - when the transposed AM is used instead of the locally domain-optimized one. In our case, the mean similarity level is very low excepted when the two locations are very close. The spatial transferability of the optimal analog dates obtained for a given location is conversely very wide: when they are

  10. Inviting Argument by Analogy: Analogical-Mapping-Based Comparison Activities as a Scaffold for Small-Group Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emig, Brandon R.; McDonald, Scott; Zembal-Saul, Carla; Strauss, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    This study invited small groups to make several arguments by analogy about simple machines. Groups were first provided training on analogical (structure) mapping and were then invited to use analogical mapping as a scaffold to make arguments. In making these arguments, groups were asked to consider three simple machines: two machines that they had…

  11. SSERVI Analog Regolith Simulant Testbed Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, Joseph; Schmidt, Gregory; Bailey, Brad; Gibbs, Kristina

    2016-10-01

    The Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley was founded in 2013 to act as a virtual institute that provides interdisciplinary research centered on the goals of its supporting directorates: NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and the Human Exploration & Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD).Primary research goals of the Institute revolve around the integration of science and exploration to gain knowledge required for the future of human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit. SSERVI intends to leverage existing JSC1A regolith simulant resources into the creation of a regolith simulant testbed facility. The purpose of this testbed concept is to provide the planetary exploration community with a readily available capability to test hardware and conduct research in a large simulant environment.SSERVI's goals include supporting planetary researchers within NASA, other government agencies; private sector and hardware developers; competitors in focused prize design competitions; and academic sector researchers.SSERVI provides opportunities for research scientists and engineers to study the effects of regolith analog testbed research in the planetary exploration field. This capability is essential to help to understand the basic effects of continued long-term exposure to a simulated analog test environment.The current facility houses approximately eight tons of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant in a test bin consisting of a 4 meter by 4 meter area, including dust mitigation and safety oversight.Facility hardware and environment testing scenarios could include, Lunar surface mobility, Dust exposure and mitigation, Regolith handling and excavation, Solar-like illumination, Lunar surface compaction profile, Lofted dust, Mechanical properties of lunar regolith, Surface features (i.e. grades and rocks)Numerous benefits vary from easy access to a controlled analog regolith simulant testbed, and

  12. A Web-based Collaborative Tool for Mars Analog Data Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Necsoiu, M.; Dinwiddie, C. L.; Heggy, E.; Farr, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    Solving today's complex research and modeling challenges are dependent on our ability to discover, access, integrate, and share information from multiple sources. The planetary sciences community is no exception'; over the last few years, the need for data mining and exploration tools that can expedite comparative studies between Martian and terrestrial analogs sites and aid the interpretation of Mars data sets has become evident. Data sharing maximizes scientific return from studies and data sets.

  13. Scalable analog wavefront sensor with subpixel resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Standard Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors use a CCD element to sample position and distortion of a target or guide star. Digital sampling of the element and transfer to a memory space for subsequent computation adds significant temporal delay, thus, limiting the spatial frequency and scalability of the system as a wavefront sensor. A new approach to sampling uses information processing principles in an insect compound eye. Analog circuitry eliminates digital sampling and extends the useful range of the system to control a deformable mirror and make a faster, more capable wavefront sensor.

  14. Soviet Space Stations as Analogs, Second Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluth, B. J.; Helppie, Martha

    1986-01-01

    The available literature that discusses the various aspects of the Soviet Salyut 6 and Salyut 7 space staions are examined as related to human productivity. The methodology for this analog was a search of unclassified literature. Additional information was obtained in interviews with the cosmonauts and some Soviet space personnel. Topics include: general layout and design of the spacecraft system; cosmonauts role in maintenance and repair; general layout and design of the Mir complex; effects of the environment on personnel; information and computer systems; organization systems; personality systems; and physical conditin of the cosmonaut.

  15. Analog/Digital System for Germanium Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    Electronic system containing analog and digital circuits makes high-precision, four-wire measurements of resistance of each germanium resistance thermometer (GRT) in array of devices, using alternating current (ac) of 1 micro-A. At end measurement interval, contents of negative register subtracted from positive one, resulting in very-narrow-band synchronous demodulation of carrier wave and suppression of out-of-band noise. Microprocessor free to perform other duties after measurement complete. Useful in noisy terrestrial environments encountered in factories.

  16. Solid-state-based analog of optomechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Naumann, Nicolas L.; Droenner, Leon; Carmele, Alexander; ...

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate a semiconductor quantum dot as a microscopic analog of a basic optomechanical setup. We show that optomechanical features can be reproduced by the solid-state platform, arising from parallels of the underlying interaction processes, which in the optomechanical case is the radiation pressure coupling and in the semiconductor case the electron–phonon coupling. We discuss bistabilities, lasing, and phonon damping, and recover the same qualitative behaviors for the semiconductor and the optomechanical cases expected for low driving strengths. However, in contrast to the optomechanical case, distinct signatures of higher order processes arise in the semiconductor model.

  17. Mars-Analog Evaporite Experiment: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Bullock, M. A.; Sharp, T.G.; Quinn, R.

    2005-01-01

    This research is part of a multiyear experimental investigation to understand the nature and evolution brines and evaporates on Mars. The spectacular discoveries of the MER rovers, particularly those of Opportunity at Meridiani, both illustrate the relevance, as well as guide the future direction, of this work. Here we report the initial results from our just-completed and tested evaporites apparatus, using a synthetic brine analog to our brine experiment simulating a modern Mars environment in which the brine was subjected to rapid evaporation under modern Martian conditions. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  18. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-07

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

  19. A bilateral frontoparietal network underlies visuospatial analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christine E; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2012-02-01

    Our ability to reason by analogy facilitates problem solving and allows us to communicate ideas efficiently. In this study, we examined the neural correlates of analogical reasoning and, more specifically, the contribution of rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC) to reasoning. This area of the brain has been hypothesized to integrate relational information, as in analogy, or the outcomes of subgoals, as in multi-tasking and complex problem solving. Using fMRI, we compared visuospatial analogical reasoning to a control task that was as complex and difficult as the analogies and required the coordination of subgoals but not the integration of relations. We found that analogical reasoning more strongly activated bilateral RLPFC, suggesting that anterior prefrontal cortex is preferentially recruited by the integration of relational knowledge. Consistent with the need for inhibition during analogy, bilateral, and particularly right, inferior frontal gyri were also more active during analogy. Finally, greater activity in bilateral inferior parietal cortex during the analogy task is consistent with recent evidence for the neural basis of spatial relation knowledge. Together, these findings indicate that a network of frontoparietal areas underlies analogical reasoning; we also suggest that hemispheric differences may emerge depending on the visuospatial or verbal/semantic nature of the analogies.

  20. Analogies in medicine: valuable for learning, reasoning, remembering and naming.

    PubMed

    Pena, Gil Patrus; Andrade-Filho, José de Souza

    2010-10-01

    Analogies are important tools in human reasoning and learning, for resolving problems and providing arguments, and are extensively used in medicine. Analogy and similarity involve a structural alignment or mapping between domains. This cognitive mechanism can be used to make inferences and learn new abstractions. Through analogies, we try to explain a knowledge to be achieved (the target), with pieces of information already familiar to the learner (the source), keeping in mind the constraints of similarity, structure and purpose. The purpose of this essay is to examine the use of analogies in medicine. We provide a brief review of the theoretical basis of analogical reasoning. This theoretical background is discussed in the light of actual examples of analogies retrieved from medical literature. In medicine, analogies have long been used to explain several physiologic and pathologic processes. Besides deeper structural relations, superficial attribute similarity is extensively used in many medical specialties. These attribute similarities are important in naming, categorizing and classifying, and play a role as learning and memorizing tools. Analogies also serve as basis for medical nomenclature. The choice of the source of analogies is highly dependent on cultural background, and may derive from ancient or diverse cultures. Learning by analogies may thus require research on culture diversity in order to establish an adequate justification and to comprehend the purpose of an analogy.

  1. Unconscious violinists and the use of analogies in moral argument.

    PubMed

    Wiland, E

    2000-12-01

    Analogies are the stuff out of which normative moral philosophy is made. Certainly one of the most famous analogies constructed by a philosopher in order to argue for a specific controversial moral conclusion is the one involving Judith Thomson's unconscious violinist. Reflection upon this analogy is meant to show us that abortion is generally not immoral even if the prenatal have the same moral status as the postnatal. This was and still is a controversial conclusion, and yet the analogy does seem to reveal in a very vivid way what makes abortion a reasonable response to a terrible situation. But Thomson's example has frequently been attacked on all sides for not being truly analogous to abortion. Here I develop a brand new analogy that sheds light on the issue with which Thomson was concerned, while at the same time avoiding most of the more serious objections made to her analogy.

  2. Acetyl-lysine analog peptides as mechanistic probes of protein deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian C; Denu, John M

    2007-12-21

    Class III histone deacetylases (Sir2 or sirtuins) catalyze the NAD+-dependent conversion of acetyl-lysine residues to nicotinamide, 2'-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose (OAADPr), and deacetylated lysine. Class I and II HDACs utilize a different deacetylation mechanism, utilizing an active site zinc to direct hydrolysis of acetyl-lysine residues to lysine and acetate. Here, using ten acetyl-lysine analog peptides, we have probed the substrate binding pockets of sirtuins and investigated the catalytic differences among sirtuins and class I and II deacetylases. For the sirtuin Hst2, acetyl-lysine analog peptide binding correlated with the hydrophobic substituent parameter pi with a slope of -0.35 from a plot of log Kd versus pi. Interestingly, propionyl- and butyryl-lysine peptides were found to bind tighter to Hst2 compared with acetyl-lysine peptide and showed measurable rates of catalysis with Hst2, Sirt1, Sirt2, and Sirt3, suggesting propionyl- and butyryl-lysine proteins may be sirtuin substrates in vivo. Unique among the acetyl-lysine analog peptides examined, homocitrulline peptide produced ADP-ribose instead of the corresponding OAADPr analog. The electron-withdrawing nature of each acetyl analog had a profound impact on the deacylation rate between deacetylase classes. The rate of catalysis with the acetyl-lysine analog peptides varied over five orders of magnitude with the class III deacetylase Hst2, revealing a linear free energy relationship with a slope of -1.57 when plotted versus the Taft constant, sigma*. HDAC8, a class I deacetylase, displayed the opposite trend with a slope of +0.79. These results are applicable toward the development of selective substrates and other mechanistic probes of protein deacetylases.

  3. Reaction of human UMP-CMP kinase with natural and analog substrates.

    PubMed

    Pasti, Claudia; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Veron, Michel; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Deville-Bonne, Dominique

    2003-04-01

    UMP-CMP kinase catalyses an important step in the phosphorylation of UTP, CTP and dCTP. It is also involved in the necessary phosphorylation by cellular kinases of nucleoside analogs used in antiviral therapies. The reactivity of human UMP-CMP kinase towards natural substrates and nucleotide analogs was reexamined. The expression of the recombinant enzyme and conditions for stability of the enzyme were improved. Substrate inhibition was observed for UMP and CMP at concentrations higher than 0.2 mm, but not for dCMP. The antiviral analog l-3TCMP was found to be an efficient substrate phosphorylated into l-3TCDP by human UMP-CMP kinase. However, in the reverse reaction, the enzyme did not catalyse the addition of the third phosphate to l-3TCDP, which was rather an inhibitor. By molecular modelling, l-3TCMP was built in the active site of the enzyme from Dictyostelium. Human UMP-CMP kinase has a relaxed enantiospecificity for the nucleoside monophosphate acceptor site, but it is restricted to d-nucleotides at the donor site.

  4. The importance of explicitly mapping instructional analogies in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay, Loretta Johnson

    Analogies are ubiquitous during instruction in science classrooms, yet research about the effectiveness of using analogies has produced mixed results. An aspect seldom studied is a model of instruction when using analogies. The few existing models for instruction with analogies have not often been examined quantitatively. The Teaching With Analogies (TWA) model (Glynn, 1991) is one of the models frequently cited in the variety of research about analogies. The TWA model outlines steps for instruction, including the step of explicitly mapping the features of the source to the target. An experimental study was conducted to examine the effects of explicitly mapping the features of the source and target in an analogy during computer-based instruction about electrical circuits. Explicit mapping was compared to no mapping and to a control with no analogy. Participants were ninth- and tenth-grade biology students who were each randomly assigned to one of three conditions (no analogy module, analogy module, or explicitly mapped analogy module) for computer-based instruction. Subjects took a pre-test before the instruction, which was used to assign them to a level of previous knowledge about electrical circuits for analysis of any differential effects. After the instruction modules, students took a post-test about electrical circuits. Two weeks later, they took a delayed post-test. No advantage was found for explicitly mapping the analogy. Learning patterns were the same, regardless of the type of instruction. Those who knew the least about electrical circuits, based on the pre-test, made the most gains. After the two-week delay, this group maintained the largest amount of their gain. Implications exist for science education classrooms, as analogy use should be based on research about effective practices. Further studies are suggested to foster the building of research-based models for classroom instruction with analogies.

  5. Unsaturated zone waters from the Nopal I natural analog, Chihuahua, Mexico -- Implications for radionuclide mobility at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

    1999-07-01

    Chemical and U-Th isotopic data on unsaturated zone waters from the Nopal I natural analog reveal effects of water-rock interaction and help constrain models of radionuclide release and transport at the site and, by analogy, at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Geochemical reaction-path modeling indicates that, under oxidizing conditions, dissolution of uraninite (spent fuel analog) by these waters will lead to eventual schoepite precipitation regardless of initial silica concentration provided that groundwater is not continuously replenished. Thus, less soluble uranyl silicates may not dominate the initial alteration assemblage and keep dissolved U concentrations low. Uranium-series activity ratios are consistent with models of U transport at the site and display varying degrees of leaching versus recoil mobilization. Thorium concentrations may reflect the importance of colloidal transport of low-solubility radionuclides in the unsaturated zone.

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Remote Sensing and Terrestrial Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars: Remote Sensing and Terrestrial Analogs" included the following:Physical Meaning of the Hapke Parameter for Macroscopic Roughness: Experimental Determination for Planetary Regolith Surface Analogs and Numerical Approach; Near-Infrared Spectra of Martian Pyroxene Separates: First Results from Mars Spectroscopy Consortium; Anomalous Spectra of High-Ca Pyroxenes: Correlation Between Ir and M ssbauer Patterns; THEMIS-IR Emissivity Spectrum of a Large Dark Streak near Olympus Mons; Geomorphologic/Thermophysical Mapping of the Athabasca Region, Mars, Using THEMIS Infrared Imaging; Mars Thermal Inertia from THEMIS Data; Multispectral Analysis Methods for Mapping Aqueous Mineral Depostis in Proposed Paleolake Basins on Mars Using THEMIS Data; Joint Analysis of Mars Odyssey THEMIS Visible and Infrared Images: A Magic Airbrush for Qualitative and Quantitative Morphology; Analysis of Mars Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data Using Large Mineral Reference Libraries ; Negative Abundance : A Problem in Compositional Modeling of Hyperspectral Images; Mars-LAB: First Remote Sensing Data of Mineralogy Exposed at Small Mars-Analog Craters, Nevada Test Site; A Tool for the 2003 Rover Mini-TES: Downwelling Radiance Compensation Using Integrated Line-Sight Sky Measurements; Learning About Mars Geology Using Thermal Infrared Spectral Imaging: Orbiter and Rover Perspectives; Classifying Terrestrial Volcanic Alteration Processes and Defining Alteration Processes they Represent on Mars; Cemented Volcanic Soils, Martian Spectra and Implications for the Martian Climate; Palagonitic Mars: A Basalt Centric View of Surface Composition and Aqueous Alteration; Combining a Non Linear Unmixing Model and the Tetracorder Algorithm: Application to the ISM Dataset; Spectral Reflectance Properties of Some Basaltic Weathering Products; Morphometric LIDAR Analysis of Amboy Crater, California: Application to MOLA Analysis of Analog Features on Mars; Airborne Radar Study of Soil Moisture at

  7. Analog VLSI for active drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vidyabhusan

    In today's cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to increase fuel efficiency which reduces these costs. Even a 1% reduction in drag can translate into estimated savings of tens of millions of dollars in annual fuel costs. Fluid mechanicists believe that microscopic vortex pairs impinging on the surface play an important role in turbulent transport that may cause large skin friction drag. The microscopic nature and unpredictable appearance of these structures has limited practical approaches to their control. With the advent of micromachining technology providing the ability to build mechanical structures with microscopic dimensions, the tools finally exist with which to detect and control the vortex structures. These sensors and actuators require control circuitry between them in order to build a complete system. We propose an analog VLSI system that can process information along a surface in a moving fluid with the goal of controlling actuators to minimize the surface shear stress. We obtain the information from the surface by using microsensors which measure the surface shear stress. The actuators interact with the fluid by moving up and down in an attempt to diminish the impact of the drag-inducing structures in the fluid. We have designed the fabricated an analog control system. We have tested the system in several different experiments to verify its effectiveness in providing a control signal that energizes an actuator. We also have studied the methodology for a completely integrated wafer-scale system.

  8. Digital and analog gene circuits for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Roquet, Nathaniel; Lu, Timothy K

    2014-05-01

    Biotechnology offers the promise of valuable chemical production via microbial processing of renewable and inexpensive substrates. Thus far, static metabolic engineering strategies have enabled this field to advance industrial applications. However, the industrial scaling of statically engineered microbes inevitably creates inefficiencies due to variable conditions present in large-scale microbial cultures. Synthetic gene circuits that dynamically sense and regulate different molecules can resolve this issue by enabling cells to continuously adapt to variable conditions. These circuits also have the potential to enable next-generation production programs capable of autonomous transitioning between steps in a bioprocess. Here, we review the design and application of two main classes of dynamic gene circuits, digital and analog, for biotechnology. Within the context of these classes, we also discuss the potential benefits of digital-analog interconversion, memory, and multi-signal integration. Though synthetic gene circuits have largely been applied for cellular computation to date, we envision that utilizing them in biotechnology will enhance the efficiency and scope of biochemical production with living cells.

  9. AFEII Analog Front End Board Design Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinov, Paul; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This document describes the design of the 2nd iteration of the Analog Front End Board (AFEII), which has the function of receiving charge signals from the Central Fiber Tracker (CFT) and providing digital hit pattern and charge amplitude information from those charge signals. This second iteration is intended to address limitations of the current AFE (referred to as AFEI in this document). These limitations become increasingly deleterious to the performance of the Central Fiber Tracker as instantaneous luminosity increases. The limitations are inherent in the design of the key front end chips on the AFEI board (the SVXIIe and the SIFT) and the architecture of the board itself. The key limitations of the AFEI are: (1) SVX saturation; (2) Discriminator to analog readout cross talk; (3) Tick to tick pedestal variation; and (4) Channel to channel pedestal variation. The new version of the AFE board, AFEII, addresses these limitations by use of a new chip, the TriP-t and by architectural changes, while retaining the well understood and desirable features of the AFEI board.

  10. Metaphor and analogy in everyday problem solving.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Lucas A; Landau, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    Early accounts of problem solving focused on the ways people represent information directly related to target problems and possible solutions. Subsequent theory and research point to the role of peripheral influences such as heuristics and bodily states. We discuss how metaphor and analogy similarly influence stages of everyday problem solving: Both processes mentally map features of a target problem onto the structure of a relatively more familiar concept. When individuals apply this structure, they use a well-known concept as a framework for reasoning about real world problems and candidate solutions. Early studies found that analogy use helped people gain insight into novel problems. More recent research on metaphor goes further to show that activating mappings has subtle, sometimes surprising effects on judgment and reasoning in everyday problem solving. These findings highlight situations in which mappings can help or hinder efforts to solve problems. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:394-405. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1407 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  11. Martian hillside gullies and icelandic analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Thorsteinsson, Thorsteinn; Sigurdsson, Freysteinn

    2003-04-01

    We report observations of Icelandic hillside gully systems that are near duplicates of gullies observed on high-latitude martian hillsides. The best Icelandic analogs involve basaltic talus slopes at the angle of repose, with gully formation by debris flows initiated by ground water saturation, and/or by drainage of water from upslope cliffs. We report not only the existence of Mars analog gullies, but also an erosional sequence of morphologic forms, found both on Mars and in Iceland. The observations support hypotheses calling for creation of martian gullies by aqueous processes. Issues remain whether the water in each case comes only from surficial sources, such as melting of ground ice or snow, or from underground sources such as aquifers that gain surface access in hillsides. Iceland has many examples of the former, but the latter mechanism is not ruled out. Our observations are consistent with the martian debris flow mechanism of F. Costard et al. (2001c, Science295, 110-113), except that classic debris flows begin at midslope more frequently than on Mars. From morphologic observations, we suggest that some martian hillside gully systems not only involve significant evolution by extended erosive activity, but gully formation may occur in episodes, and the time interval since the last episode is considerably less than the time interval needed to erase the gully through normal martian obliteration processes.

  12. Amygdalin analogs for the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Perez, Juan J

    2013-05-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most prevalent immune-mediated illness worldwide. The disease can still only be managed rather than cured, so treatments are aimed at clearing skin lesions and preventing their recurrence. Several treatments are available depending on the extent of the psoriatic lesion. Among the topical treatments corticostereoids, vitamin D3 analogs and retinoids are commonly used. However, these treatments may have adverse effects in the long term. Conversely, systemic conventional treatments include immunosuppresors such as cyclosporin or methotrexate associated with high toxicity levels. Biologicals are alternative therapeutical agents introduced in the last 10 years. These include fusion proteins or monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit the action of specific cytokines or to prevent T-lymphocyte activation. However, due to recent knowledge on the etiology of the disease, diverse new small molecules have appeared as promising alternatives for the treatment of psoriasis. Among them, inhibitors of JAK3, inhibitors of PDE 4 and amygdalin analogs. The latter are promising small molecules presently in preclinical studies which are the object of the present report.

  13. The gravitational analog of Faraday's induction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zile, Daniel; Overduin, James

    2015-04-01

    Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electromagnetic induction, was convinced that there must also be a gravitational analog of this law, and he carried out drop-tower experiments in 1849 to look for the electric current induced in a coil by changes in gravitational flux through the coil. This work, now little remembered, was in some ways the first investigation of what we would now call a unified-field theory. We revisit Faraday's experiments in the light of current knowledge and ask what might be learned if they were to be performed today. We then review the gravitational analog for Faraday's law that arises within the vector (or gravito-electromagnetic) approximation to Einstein's theory of general relativity in the weak-field, low-velocity limit. This law relates spinning masses and induced ``mass currents'' rather than spinning charges and electric currents, but is otherwise remarkably similar to its electromagnetic counterpart. The predicted effects are completely unobservable in everyday settings like those envisioned by Faraday, but are thought to be relevant in astrophysical contexts like the accretion disks around collapsed stars, thus bearing out Faraday's remarkable intuition. Undergraduate student.

  14. Photonic analog-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, George C.

    2007-03-01

    This paper reviews over 30 years of work on photonic analog-to-digital converters. The review is limited to systems in which the input is a radio-frequency (RF) signal in the electronic domain and the output is a digital version of that signal also in the electronic domain, and thus the review excludes photonic systems directed towards digitizing images or optical communication signals. The state of the art in electronic ADCs, basic properties of ADCs and properties of analog optical links, which are found in many photonic ADCs, are reviewed as background information for understanding photonic ADCs. Then four classes of photonic ADCs are reviewed: 1) photonic assisted ADC in which a photonic device is added to an electronic ADC to improve performance, 2) photonic sampling and electronic quantizing ADC, 3) electronic sampling and photonic quantizing ADC, and 4) photonic sampling and quantizing ADC. It is noted, however, that all 4 classes of “photonic ADC” require some electronic sampling and quantization. After reviewing all known photonic ADCs in the four classes, the review concludes with a discussion of the potential for photonic ADCs in the future.

  15. Menaquinone Analogs Inhibit Growth of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, Joseph A.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Mueller, Elizabeth A.; Spaulding, Adam R.; Vu, Bao G.; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N.; Kohler, Petra L.; Kirby, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria cause serious human illnesses through combinations of cell surface and secreted virulence factors. We initiated studies with four of these organisms to develop novel topical antibacterial agents that interfere with growth and exotoxin production, focusing on menaquinone analogs. Menadione, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and coenzymes Q1 to Q3 but not menaquinone, phylloquinone, or coenzyme Q10 inhibited the growth and to a greater extent exotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae at concentrations of 10 to 200 μg/ml. Coenzyme Q1 reduced the ability of S. aureus to cause toxic shock syndrome in a rabbit model, inhibited the growth of four Gram-negative bacteria, and synergized with another antimicrobial agent, glycerol monolaurate, to inhibit S. aureus growth. The staphylococcal two-component system SrrA/B was shown to be an antibacterial target of coenzyme Q1. We hypothesize that menaquinone analogs both induce toxic reactive oxygen species and affect bacterial plasma membranes and biosynthetic machinery to interfere with two-component systems, respiration, and macromolecular synthesis. These compounds represent a novel class of potential topical therapeutic agents. PMID:23959313

  16. Menaquinone analogs inhibit growth of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schlievert, Patrick M; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Mueller, Elizabeth A; Spaulding, Adam R; Vu, Bao G; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N; Kohler, Petra L; Kirby, John R

    2013-11-01

    Gram-positive bacteria cause serious human illnesses through combinations of cell surface and secreted virulence factors. We initiated studies with four of these organisms to develop novel topical antibacterial agents that interfere with growth and exotoxin production, focusing on menaquinone analogs. Menadione, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and coenzymes Q1 to Q3 but not menaquinone, phylloquinone, or coenzyme Q10 inhibited the growth and to a greater extent exotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae at concentrations of 10 to 200 μg/ml. Coenzyme Q1 reduced the ability of S. aureus to cause toxic shock syndrome in a rabbit model, inhibited the growth of four Gram-negative bacteria, and synergized with another antimicrobial agent, glycerol monolaurate, to inhibit S. aureus growth. The staphylococcal two-component system SrrA/B was shown to be an antibacterial target of coenzyme Q1. We hypothesize that menaquinone analogs both induce toxic reactive oxygen species and affect bacterial plasma membranes and biosynthetic machinery to interfere with two-component systems, respiration, and macromolecular synthesis. These compounds represent a novel class of potential topical therapeutic agents.

  17. Antarctic analog for dilational bands on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Brunt, K. M.

    2014-09-01

    Europa's surface shows signs of extension, which is revealed as lithospheric dilation expressed along ridges, dilational bands and ridged bands. Ridges, the most common tectonic feature on Europa, comprise a central crack flanked by two raised banks a few hundred meters high on each side. Together these three classes may represent a continuum of formation. In Tufts' Dilational Model ridge formation is dominated by daily tidal cycling of a crack, which can be superimposed with regional secular dilation. The two sources of dilation can combine to form the various band morphologies observed. New GPS data along a rift on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica is a suitable Earth analog to test the framework of Tufts' Dilational Model. As predicted by Tufts' Dilational Model, tensile failures in the Ross Ice Shelf exhibit secular dilation, upon which a tidal signal can be seen. From this analog we conclude that Tufts' Dilational Model for Europan ridges and bands may be credible and that the secular dilation is most likely from a regional source and not tidally driven.

  18. Antarctic Analog for Dilational Bands on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Brunt, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    Europa's surface shows signs of extension, which is revealed as lithospheric dilation expressed along ridges, dilational bands and ridged bands. Ridges, the most common tectonic feature on Europa, comprise a central crack flanked by two raised banks a few hundred meters high on each side. Together these three classes may represent a continuum of formation. In Tufts' Dilational Model ridge formation is dominated by daily tidal cycling of a crack, which can be superimposed with regional secular dilation. The two sources of dilation can combine to form the various band morphologies observed. New GPS data along a rift on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica is a suitable Earth analog to test the framework of Tufts' Dilational Model. As predicted by Tufts' Dilational Model, tensile failures in the Ross Ice Shelf exhibit secular dilation, upon which a tidal signal can be seen. From this analog we conclude that Tufts' Dilational Model for Europan ridges and bands may be credible and that the secular dilation is most likely from a regional source and not tidally driven.

  19. Operational Lessons Learned from NASA Analog Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Larissa S.

    2010-01-01

    vehicle and system capabilities are required to support the activities? How will the crew and the Earth-based mission control team interact? During the initial phases of manned planetary exploration, one challenge in particular is virtually the same as during the Apollo program: How can scientific return be maximized during a relatively short surface mission? Today, NASA is investigating solutions to these challenges by conducting analog missions. These Earth-based missions possess characteristics that are analogous to missions on the Moon or Mars. These missions are excellent for testing operational concepts, and the design, configuration, and functionality of spacesuits, robots, rovers, and habitats. Analog mission crews test specific techniques and procedures for surface field geology, biological sample collection, and planetary protection. The process of actually working an analog mission reveals a myriad of small details, which either contribute to or impede efficient operations, many of which would never have been thought about otherwise. It also helps to define the suite of tools, containers, and other small equipment that surface explorers will use. This paper focuses on how analog missions have addressed selected operational considerations for future planetary missions.

  20. Mega-ripples in Iran: A new analog for transverse aeolian ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    A new terrestrial analog site for transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) is described in this study. The Lut desert of Iran hosts large ripple-like aeolian bedforms, with the same horizontal length scales and patterns of TARs on Mars. Different classes of TARs and different types of other aeolian features such as sand dunes, zibars, dust devil tracks and yardangs can be found in this area, which signify an active aeolian region. This area represents a unique site to study the formation and evolution of these enigmatic features, with potential relevance toward a better understanding of TARs on Mars.

  1. Experiments on Evolving Software Models of Analog Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.

    1999-01-01

    Analog circuits are of great importance in electronic system design since the world is fundamentally analog in nature. While the amount of digital design activity far outpaces that of analog design, most digital systems require analog modules for interfacing with the external world. It was recently estimated that approximately 60% of digital application- specific integrated circuit designs incorporated analog circuits. With challenging analog circuit design problems and few analog design engineers, there are economic reasons for automating the analog design process, especially time-to-market considerations. Techniques for analog circuit design automation began appearing about two decades ago. These methods incorporated heuristics [6], knowledge bases [1], simulated annealing [5], and other algorithms. Efforts using techniques from evolutionary computation began appearing over the last few years. These include the use of genetic algorithms to select electronic component values (for example, the resistance value of a resistor), to select circuit topologies, and to design amplifiers using a limited set of canned topologies [4]. A genetic programming-based analog circuit design system has been demonstrated in which the circuit sizes, component values, and the circuit topologies are determined automatically [3]. The genetic-algorithm systems typically represent circuit structures as vectors of parameters encoded in binary strings, while the genetic programming system manipulates tree data structures.

  2. Synthetic Biology: A Unifying View and Review Using Analog Circuits.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jonathan J Y; Woo, Sung Sik; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2015-08-01

    We review the field of synthetic biology from an analog circuits and analog computation perspective, focusing on circuits that have been built in living cells. This perspective is well suited to pictorially, symbolically, and quantitatively representing the nonlinear, dynamic, and stochastic (noisy) ordinary and partial differential equations that rigorously describe the molecular circuits of synthetic biology. This perspective enables us to construct a canonical analog circuit schematic that helps unify and review the operation of many fundamental circuits that have been built in synthetic biology at the DNA, RNA, protein, and small-molecule levels over nearly two decades. We review 17 circuits in the literature as particular examples of feedforward and feedback analog circuits that arise from special topological cases of the canonical analog circuit schematic. Digital circuit operation of these circuits represents a special case of saturated analog circuit behavior and is automatically incorporated as well. Many issues that have prevented synthetic biology from scaling are naturally represented in analog circuit schematics. Furthermore, the deep similarity between the Boltzmann thermodynamic equations that describe noisy electronic current flow in subthreshold transistors and noisy molecular flux in biochemical reactions has helped map analog circuit motifs in electronics to analog circuit motifs in cells and vice versa via a `cytomorphic' approach. Thus, a body of knowledge in analog electronic circuit design, analysis, simulation, and implementation may also be useful in the robust and efficient design of molecular circuits in synthetic biology, helping it to scale to more complex circuits in the future.

  3. Adaptation and Fidelity: a Recipe Analogy for Achieving Both in Population Scale Implementation.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Lynn

    2016-05-01

    Balancing adherence to fidelity of evidence-based programs and adaptation to local context is one of the key debates in the adoption and implementation of effective programs. Concern about maintaining fidelity to achieve outcomes can result in replication of research-based models that can be a poor fit with the real world. Equally, unplanned adaptation can result in program drift away from the core elements needed to achieve outcomes. To support implementation of the Maternal Early Childhood Sustained Home-visiting (MECSH) program in multiple sites in three countries, an analogy was developed to identify how both fidelity and adaptation can be managed and successfully achieved. This article presents the Commonsense Cookery Book Basic Plain Cake with Variations recipe analogy to articulate the dual requirements of both fidelity and adaptation to achieve quality implementation of the MECSH program. Components classified by the analogy include identification of core ingredients, methods, and equipment that contribute to fundamental outcomes and fidelity to the evidence-based program, and a planned, collaborative approach to identification of needed variations to suit locally sourced capacity, needs, and tastes. Quality is achieved by identifying and measuring the core ingredients and the variations. Sourcing local ingredients and honoring of context support sustainability of quality practice. Using this analogy has assisted adopters of the MECSH program to understand that effective implementation requires uncompromised commitment to expectations of fidelity to the core components and methods; planned, proactive adaptation; systematic monitoring of both core program and agreed variations; and local ownership and sustainability.

  4. Molecular simulation of N-acetylneuraminic acid analogs and molecular dynamics studies of cholera toxin-Neu5Gc complex.

    PubMed

    Blessy, J Jino; Sharmila, D Jeya Sundara

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is an AB5 protein complex secreted by the pathogen Vibrio cholera, which is responsible for cholera infection. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc) is a derivative of neuraminic acid with nine-carbon backbone. NeuNAc is distributed on the cell surface mainly located in the terminal components of glycoconjugates, and also plays an important role in cell-cell interaction. In our current study, molecular docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were implemented to identify the potent NeuNAc analogs with high-inhibitory activity against CT protein. Thirty-four NeuNAc analogs, modified in different positions C-1/C-2/C-4/C-5/C-7/C-8/C-9, were modeled and docked against the active site of CT protein. Among the 34 NeuNAc analogs, the analog Neu5Gc shows the least extra precision glide score of -9.52 and glide energy of -44.71 kcal/mol. NeuNAc analogs block the CT active site residues HIS:13, ASN:90, LYS:91, GLN:56, GLN:61, and TRP:88 through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The MD simulation for CT-Neu5Gc docking complex was performed using Desmond. MD simulation of CT-Neu5Gc complex reveals the stable nature of docking interaction.

  5. Analog VLSI neural network integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kub, F. J.; Moon, K. K.; Just, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    Two analog very large scale integration (VLSI) vector matrix multiplier integrated circuit chips were designed, fabricated, and partially tested. They can perform both vector-matrix and matrix-matrix multiplication operations at high speeds. The 32 by 32 vector-matrix multiplier chip and the 128 by 64 vector-matrix multiplier chip were designed to perform 300 million and 3 billion multiplications per second, respectively. An additional circuit that has been developed is a continuous-time adaptive learning circuit. The performance achieved thus far for this circuit is an adaptivity of 28 dB at 300 KHz and 11 dB at 15 MHz. This circuit has demonstrated greater than two orders of magnitude higher frequency of operation than any previous adaptive learning circuit.

  6. Analog and digital codes in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    It has long been debated whether information in the brain is coded at the rate of neuronal spiking or at the precise timing of single spikes. Although this issue is essential to the understanding of neural signal processing, it is not easily resolved because the two mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. We suggest revising this coding issue so that one hypothesis is uniquely selected for a given spike train. To this end, we decide whether the spike train is likely to transmit a continuously varying analog signal or switching between active and inactive states. The coding hypothesis is selected by comparing the likelihood estimates yielded by empirical Bayes and hidden Markov models on individual data. The analysis method is applicable to generic event sequences, such as earthquakes, machine noises, and human communications, and enhances the gain in decoding signals and infers underlying activities.

  7. The Cannabinoid Acids, Analogs and Endogenous Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sumner H.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid acids are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds some of which are endogenous molecules and others that are metabolites of phytocannabinoids. The prototypic endogenous substance is N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAgly) that is closely related in structure to the cannabinoid agonist anandamide. The most studied phytocannabinoid is Δ9–THC-11-oic acid, the principal metabolite of Δ9–THC. Both types of acids have in common several biological actions such as low affinity for CB1, anti-inflammatory activity and analgesic properties. This suggests that there may be similarities in their mechanism of action, a point that is discussed in this review. Also presented are reports on analogs of the acids that provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic agents, such as ajulemic acid. PMID:24731541

  8. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  9. Cognitive performance in space and analogous environments.

    PubMed

    Casler, J G; Cook, J R

    1999-01-01

    Although human presence in space continues to expand, the literature contains relatively little coverage of human cognitive performance in the space operating environment. This article catalogs and compares the known investigations of human cognitive performance in space and in analogous environments. The methods, sample descriptions and treatments, and the results and limitations of the experiments or observations of 29 studies are compared with respect to 6 cognitive measures: (a) response time, (b) memory, (c) reasoning, (d) pattern recognition, (e) fine motor skills, and (f) dual-task performance. In general, the utility of the data is limited by small sample sizes, short observations periods, and homogeneity of the participant pool. Additionally, the variety of experimental methods used to date often makes generalization of results difficult. Although the combined results of these studies do not suggest a trend toward sustained cognitive performance impairment in the space operating environment, several cognitive performance measures do appear to be affected by an as yet undefined adaptation process.

  10. Holographic brain: a good analogy gone bad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2002-07-01

    One way of honoring the world's two greatest holographers is to remove from their field the association with the offbeat world of the holographic mind. Basing itself on analogical musings of two very creative scientists who were themselves not holographers, this 'field' of the holographic brain has strayed far from science and into the absurd. So much absurdity has been written by so many people that the one legitimate study of holographic principle in dolphins has been grouped too often with the nonsense. Here is taken most of the 'target statements' form one book. We could not bear to read them all this closely. We will attempt to determine what tidbit of fact led to the statements and to suggest alternative explanations when there is something to explain.

  11. X-Rays from Green Pea Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brorby, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    X-rays may have contributed to the heating and reionization of the IGM in the early universe. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) within small, low-metallicity galaxies are expected to be the main source of X-rays at this time. Since studying these high-redshift galaxies is currently impossible, we turn to local analogs that have the same properties the galaxies in the early are expected to have. A number of recent studies have shown an enhanced number of HMXBs in nearby low metallicity galaxies. We propose to observe a sample of metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG) in order to determine if the X-ray luminosity is enhanced relative to SFR, thereby providing further evidence to the importance of X-rays in the early universe.

  12. Scattering by interstellar graphite dust analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Gazi A.; Gogoi, Ankur

    2014-10-01

    The analysis of optical scattering data of interstellar carbonaceous graphite dust analog at 543.5 nm, 594.5 nm and 632.8 nm laser wavelengths by using an original laboratory light scattering setup is presented. The setup primarily consisted of a laser source, optical units, aerosol sprayer, data acquisition system and associated instrumentation. The instrument measured scattered light signals from 10° to 170° in steps of 1°. The results of the measurements of the volume scattering function β(θ) and degree of linear polarization P(θ) of the carbonaceous graphite dust particles that were sprayed in front of the laser beam by using an aerosol sprayer were subsequently compared with theoretically generated Mie plots with estimated parameters.

  13. Synthesis and biodistribution of radioiodinated nicotine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.M.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Marten, D.F.; Sadek, S.; Magarian, R.A.; Grunder, J.R.; Ice, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors reported previously on the synthesis and biodistribution of radioiodinated 5-iodonicotine. In their continuous effort to search for a potential brain as well as adrenal medulla imaging agent, the authors synthesized four radioiodinated nicotine analogs. The labeled compounds were prepared by brominating nicotinic acid, and reacting the acylated product with the appropriate amines to give the respective amides which were then reduced with diborane to the amines. I-125 labeling was done by halogen exchange. Biodistribution studies performed in female Sprague-Dawley rats showed that all these compounds were taken up rapidly by the brain and the adrenal. The highest uptake of all these compounds in both organs occurred at 2 minutes after tail vein injections. The organ:blood ratios at 2 minutes and the T/sub 1/3/ (min.) of radioactivity in these organs were compared.

  14. ANIMAL ANALOGIES IN FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF FACES.

    PubMed

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Wadlinger, Heather A; Luevano, Victor X; White, Benjamin M; Xing, Cai; Zhang, Yi

    2011-08-01

    Analogies between humans and animals based on facial resemblance have a long history. We report evidence for reverse anthropomorphism and the extension of facial stereotypes to lions, foxes, and dogs. In the stereotype extension, more positive traits were attributed to animals judged more attractive than con-specifics; more childlike traits were attributed to those judged more babyfaced. In the reverse anthropomorphism, human faces with more resemblance to lions, ascertained by connectionist modeling of facial metrics, were judged more dominant, cold, and shrewd, controlling attractiveness, babyfaceness, and sex. Faces with more resemblance to Labradors were judged warmer and less shrewd. Resemblance to foxes did not predict impressions. Results for lions and dogs were consistent with trait impressions of these animals and support the species overgeneralization hypothesis that evolutionarily adaptive reactions to particular animals are overgeneralized, with people perceived to have traits associated with animals their faces resemble. Other possible explanations are discussed.

  15. Atwood and Poggendorff: an insightful analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, R. L.; Borges, P. F.; Karam, R.

    2016-11-01

    Atwood’s treatise, in which the Atwood machine appears, was published in 1784. About 70 years later, Poggendorff showed experimentally that the weight of an Atwood machine is reduced when it is brought to motion. In the present paper, a twofold connection between this experiment and the Atwood machine is established. Firstly, if the Poggendorff apparatus is taken as an ideal one, the equations of motion of the apparatus coincide with the equations of motion of the compound Atwood machine. Secondly, if the Poggendorff apparatus, which works as a lever, is rebalanced, the equations of this equilibrium provide us with the solution for a compound Atwood machine with the same bodies. This analogy is pedagogically useful because it illustrates a common strategy to transform a dynamic in a static situation improving students’ comprehension of Newton’s laws and equilibrium.

  16. Cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and related analogs in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Sumner H; Zurier, Robert B

    2009-03-01

    This review covers reports published in the last 5 years on the anti-inflammatory activities of all classes of cannabinoids, including phytocannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, synthetic analogs such as ajulemic acid and nabilone, the endogenous cannabinoids anandamide and related compounds, namely, the elmiric acids, and finally, noncannabinoid components of Cannabis that show anti-inflammatory action. It is intended to be an update on the topic of the involvement of cannabinoids in the process of inflammation. A possible mechanism for these actions is suggested involving increased production of eicosanoids that promote the resolution of inflammation. This differentiates these cannabinoids from cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors that suppress the synthesis of eicosanoids that promote the induction of the inflammatory process.

  17. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  18. Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Rashi S.; Ganguly, Kumkum; Silks, Louis A.

    2013-01-08

    Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

  19. Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Rashi; Ganguly, Kumkum; Silks, Louis A

    2011-12-06

    Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

  20. Analogies and metaphors in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Masukume, Gwinyai; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2012-02-01

    Medicine is traditionally known as an 'art', and not an exact 'science'. Medical images of clinical signs and pathology were communicated through 'metaphors' in the 19th and early 20th centuries to make recognition easier in anticipation of the clinical counterpart when encountered in medical practice. They have served as teaching aids, enhancing memory retention for medical students, nurses and doctors and have withstood the test of time. Standard medical textbooks contain metaphors that have become entrenched in teaching, learning and examining in medical schools and hospitals worldwide. The continued use of metaphors has given rise to an ongoing debate, particularly in Africa, due to the usage of inappropriate or unfamiliar metaphors which are not locally or culturally relevant. Despite this, medical analogies will no doubt continue to be useful for medical education, clinical practice and 'aide memoirs' for examinations, and bring light humour, for a long time to come.

  1. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  2. Four-gate transistor analog multiplier circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M. (Inventor); Blalock, Benjamin (Inventor); Cristoloveanu, Sorin (Inventor); Chen, Suheng (Inventor); Akarvardar, Kerem (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A differential output analog multiplier circuit utilizing four G.sup.4-FETs, each source connected to a current source. The four G.sup.4-FETs may be grouped into two pairs of two G.sup.4-FETs each, where one pair has its drains connected to a load, and the other par has its drains connected to another load. The differential output voltage is taken at the two loads. In one embodiment, for each G.sup.4-FET, the first and second junction gates are each connected together, where a first input voltage is applied to the front gates of each pair, and a second input voltage is applied to the first junction gates of each pair. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  3. Automating analog design: Taming the shrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, A.

    1990-01-01

    The pace of progress in the design of integrated circuits continues to amaze observers inside and outside of the industry. Three decades ago, a 50 transistor chip was a technological wonder. Fifteen year later, a 5000 transistor device would 'wow' the crowds. Today, 50,000 transistor chips will earn a 'not too bad' assessment, but it takes 500,000 to really leave an impression. In 1975 a typical ASIC device had 1000 transistors, took one year to first samples (and two years to production) and sold for about 5 cents per transistor. Today's 50,000 transistor gate array takes about 4 months from spec to silicon, works the first time, and sells for about 0.02 cents per transistor. Fifteen years ago, the single most laborious and error prone step in IC design was the physical layout. Today, most IC's never see the hand of a layout designer: and automatic place and route tool converts the engineer's computer captured schematic to a complete physical design using a gate array or a library of standard cells also created by software rather than by designers. CAD has also been a generous benefactor to the digital design process. The architect of today's digital systems creates the design using an RTL or other high level simulator. Then the designer pushes a button to invoke the logic synthesizer-optimizer tool. A fault analyzer checks the result for testability and suggests where scan based cells will improve test coverage. One obstinate holdout amidst this parade of progress is the automation of analog design and its reduction to semi-custom techniques. This paper investigates the application of CAD techniques to analog design.

  4. Optical analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evanchuk, Vincent L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for converting the intensity of an unknown optical signal (B) into an electrical signal in digital form utilizes two elongated optical attenuators (11, 13), one for the unknown optical signal from a source (10) and one for a known optical signal (A) from a variable source (12), a plurality of photodetectors (e.g., 17, 18) along each attenuator for detecting the intensity of the optical signals, and a plurality of comparators (e.g., 21) connected to the photodetectors in pairs to determine at what points being compared the attenuated known signal equals the attenuated unknown signal. The intensity of the unknown relative to the known is thus determined by the output of a particular comparator. That output is automatically encoded to a relative intensity value in digital form through a balancing feedback control (24) and encoder (23). The digital value may be converted to analog form in a D-to-A converter (27) and used to vary the source of the known signal so that the attenuated intensity of the known signal at a predetermined point (comparator 16) equals the attenuated intensity of the unknown signal at the predetermined point of comparison. If the known signal is then equal to the unknown, there is verification of the analog-to-digital conversion being complete. Otherwise the output of the comparator indicating equality at some other point along the attenuators will provide an output which is encoded and added, through an accumulator comprised of a register (25) and an adder (26), to a previous relative intensity value thereby to further vary the intensity of the known signal source. The steps are repeated until full conversion is verified.

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of nifuroxazide and analogs. II.

    PubMed

    Tavares, L C; Chisté, J J; Santos, M G; Penna, T C

    1999-09-01

    Nifuroxazyde and six analogs were synthesized by varying the substitute from the para-position of the benzenic ring and the heteroatom of the heterocyclic ring. The MIC of seven resultant compounds was determined by serial dilutions, testing the ATCC 25923 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant increase in the anti-microbial activity of thyophenic analogs, as compared with furanic and pyrrholic analogs, was observed. In addition, unlike the cyano and hydroxyl groups, the acetyl group promoted anti-microbial activity.

  6. Assembly of a Neural Analog Computer. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-15

    Neural Computer . Analog VLSI Implementation of Neural Systems, IEEE Carver Mead, Mohammed Ismail, Eds., Kiluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, MA. 1989... Analog Neural Compuer With Modular Architecture for Real-Time Dynamic Computations . IEEE Transactions On Solid State Circuits V 27 82.-92 1992. 9...D FINAL REPORT PHASE II ONR CONTRACT # N00014-91-c-0204 ASSEMBLY OF A NEURAL ANALOG COMPUTER This documen: he- tbeen approved fox public reiease and

  7. Rapid Learning in a Children's Museum via Analogical Comparison.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Dedre; Levine, Susan C; Ping, Raedy; Isaia, Ashley; Dhillon, Sonica; Bradley, Claire; Honke, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether analogical training could help children learn a key principle of elementary engineering-namely, the use of a diagonal brace to stabilize a structure. The context for this learning was a construction activity at the Chicago Children's Museum, in which children and their families build a model skyscraper together. The results indicate that even a single brief analogical comparison can confer insight. The results also reveal conditions that support analogical learning.

  8. A Quantitative Approach to Determine Analogous Areas Using Environmental Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    determining the analogous areas. Instead of a MATLAB-based fuzzy logic approach, this method uses ArcMap software as a tool for performing analogous...area searches and display of results. This method is more efficient and user-friendly than the fuzzy logic approach, and allows users to easily...addition, a different approach is used in determining the analogous areas. Instead of a MATLAB-based, fuzzy logic approach, this method uses ArcMap

  9. Hardware Evolution of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA). The performance of these evolved controllers is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller.

  10. CRC handbook of neurohypophyseal hormone analogs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, K.; Lebl, M.; Brtnik, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book is discussed in two parts. The Part 1 discusses the: Prohormones and Hormonogens of Neuro-hypophyseal Hormones, Analogs with Inhibitory properties. Analogs with Dissociated and/or High activities. Introduction. Uterotonic Activity. Galactogogic Activity. Pressor Activity. Antidiuretic Activity. References. Part 2 discusses the Other Important Activities. CNS Activities. Corticotropin- and ..beta..-Entriuretic Action. Natriferic Action. References. Practical Use in Human and Veterinary Medicine. Introduction. Methyloxytocin. Deamino-Oxytocin. Cargutocin. Glypressin. Octapressin. Desmopressin. Analogs Clinically Tried But Not Introduced into Production and Routine Clinical Practice. References. Tables of Analogs and Index.

  11. Non-analog Monte Carlo estimators for radiation momentum deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Hykes, Joshua M

    2008-01-01

    The standard method for calculating radiation momentum deposition in Monte Carlo simulations is the analog estimator, which tallies the change in a particle's momentum at each interaction with the matter. Unfortunately, the analog estimator can suffer from large amounts of statistical error. In this paper, we present three new non-analog techniques for estimating momentum deposition. Specifically, we use absorption, collision, and track-length estimators to evaluate a simple integral expression for momentum deposition that does not contain terms that can cause large amounts of statistical error in the analog scheme. We compare our new non-analog estimators to the analog estimator with a set of test problems that encompass a wide range of material properties and both isotropic and anisotropic scattering. In nearly all cases, the new non-analog estimators outperform the analog estimator. The track-length estimator consistently yields the highest performance gains, improving upon the analog-estimator figure of merit by factors of up to two orders of magnitude.

  12. Analog solar system model relates celestial bodies spatially

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerg, H. R.

    1966-01-01

    Portable analog planetarium indicates the relative time and space angular locations of the sun and planets. Distance measuring scales, angular direction indicators, and typical probe trajectories are included.

  13. ISS Update: ISTAR -- International Space Station Testbed for Analog Research

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Sandra Fletcher, EVA Systems Flight Controller. They discuss the International Space Station Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) activity that...

  14. Physical analogy between continuum thermodynamics and classical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Umantsev, Alex

    2004-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is the profound physical analogy between a continuum thermodynamical system, which evolves with relaxation under (possibly) nonisothermal conditions, and a classical mechanical system of a few interacting particles moving with dissipation in (possibly), time-dependent nonconservative fields. This analogy is applied to the problem of phase transitions in a one-dimensional thermodynamic system. The thermomechanical analogy stems from the validity of variational methods in mechanics and thermodynamics and allows for a different interpretation of the dynamical selection principle in the theory of pattern formation. This physical analogy is very helpful for understanding different nonlinear thermodynamic phenomena and for developing intuition in numerical simulations.

  15. Modulation of GABA-A receptors of astrocytes and STC-1 cells by taurine structural analogs.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Cabrera-Ruíz, Elizabeth; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2014-11-01

    Taurine activates and modulates GABA receptors in vivo as well as those expressed in heterologous systems. This study aimed to determine whether the structural analogs of taurine: homotaurine and hypotaurine, have the ability to activate GABA-A receptors that include GABAρ subunits. The expression of GABA-A receptors containing GABAρ has been reported in the STC-1 cells and astrocytes. In both cell types, taurine, homo-, and hypotaurine gated with low efficiency a picrotoxin-sensitive GABA-A receptor. The known bimodal modulatory effect of taurine on GABAρ receptors was not observed; however, differences between the activation and deactivation rates were detected when they were perfused together with GABA. In silico docking simulations suggested that taurine, hypo-, and homotaurine do not form a cation-π interaction such as that generated by GABA in the agonist-binding site of GABAρ. This observation complements the electrophysiological data suggesting that taurine and its analogs act as partial agonists of GABA-A receptors. All the observations above suggest that the structural analogs of taurine are partial agonists of GABA-A receptors that occupy the agonist-binding site, but their structures do not allow the proper interaction with the receptor to fully gate its Cl(-) channel.

  16. Is the link from working memory to analogy causal? No analogy improvements following working memory training gains.

    PubMed

    Richey, J Elizabeth; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Schunn, Christian D; Schneider, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Analogical reasoning has been hypothesized to critically depend upon working memory through correlational data, but less work has tested this relationship through experimental manipulation. An opportunity for examining the connection between working memory and analogical reasoning has emerged from the growing, although somewhat controversial, body of literature suggests complex working memory training can sometimes lead to working memory improvements that transfer to novel working memory tasks. This study investigated whether working memory improvements, if replicated, would increase analogical reasoning ability. We assessed participants' performance on verbal and visual analogy tasks after a complex working memory training program incorporating verbal and spatial tasks. Participants' improvements on the working memory training tasks transferred to other short-term and working memory tasks, supporting the possibility of broad effects of working memory training. However, we found no effects on analogical reasoning. We propose several possible explanations for the lack of an impact of working memory improvements on analogical reasoning.

  17. Mars Analog Mission: Glacier Simulation AMADEE-15 by Austrian Space Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groemer, Gernot; Losiak, Anna; Soucek, Alexander; Plank, Clemens; Zanardini, Laura; Sejkora, Nina; Sams, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Austrian Space Forum: The Austrian Space Forum (OeWF, Österreichisches Weltraum Forum) is a non-profit, citizen-science organization of aerospace specialists and enthusiasts. One of its specialisations is Mars analog research. Analog studies and analog instrument validation supported all planetary surface missions so far [1] and are considered as an effective tool to prepare for future missions to Mars [2,3,4,5,6,7]. Since 2006, OeWF has conducted 11 Mars analog field campaigns in diverse locations that represented: 1) average current Mars conditions (the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah in 2006 [8] and the Northern Sahara near Erfoud, Morocco in 2013 [9]); 2) the early and wet Mars (analog site of Rio Tinto Spain in 2011 [10]); and 3) subsurface exploration (Dachstein Ice Caves in 2012). During these campaigns, 68 experiments and major engineering tests were performed, whichwere mostly focused on astrobiology, robotics, human factors, geoscience and spacesuit operations. Major assets of OeWF include two advanced spacesuit simulators Aouda [11], an increasingly evolving Mission Support Center, a dedicated Remote Science Support team [12], and a growing set of Standard Operating Procedures defining major workflows within a mission team. The spacesuit simulators were operated by a total of 18 analog astronauts, who were selected and trained during a >6 month program. Total EVA time is nearly 600 hours, leading to a significant experience in analog field simulations. AMADEE-15: The mission took place between August 2nd and 14th 2015 at the Kaunertal Glacier in Tyrol, Austria. This glacier was selected as a study site because of its accessibility and high number of micro-landscapes analogous to those expected on Mars in locations where abundant water ice is present. As such it is considered a first-tier Mars analog [13]. The Base station was located at N 46.86320, E 10.71401 at 2800 masl, the highest reached location was on elevation of 2887 m. Eleven

  18. Site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO/sub 2/ content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate.

  19. Transcription blockage by stable H-DNA analogs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shristi; Ogloblina, Anna M; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Dolinnaya, Nina G; Yakubovskaya, Marianna G; Mirkin, Sergei M; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-08-18

    DNA sequences that can form unusual secondary structures are implicated in regulating gene expression and causing genomic instability. H-palindromes are an important class of such DNA sequences that can form an intramolecular triplex structure, H-DNA. Within an H-palindrome, the H-DNA and canonical B-DNA are in a dynamic equilibrium that shifts toward H-DNA with increased negative supercoiling. The interplay between H- and B-DNA and the fact that the process of transcription affects supercoiling makes it difficult to elucidate the effects of H-DNA upon transcription. We constructed a stable structural analog of H-DNA that cannot flip into B-DNA, and studied the effects of this structure on transcription by T7 RNA polymerase in vitro. We found multiple transcription blockage sites adjacent to and within sequences engaged in this triplex structure. Triplex-mediated transcription blockage varied significantly with changes in ambient conditions: it was exacerbated in the presence of Mn(2+) or by increased concentrations of K(+) and Li(+). Analysis of the detailed pattern of the blockage suggests that RNA polymerase is sterically hindered by H-DNA and has difficulties in unwinding triplex DNA. The implications of these findings for the biological roles of triple-stranded DNA structures are discussed.

  20. Research on uranium deposits as analogies of radioactive waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The disposal of highly radioactive waste deep underground in suitable geological formations is proposed by many countries to protect public health and safety. The study of natural analogies of nuclear waste repositories is one method of validating mathematical models and assuring that a proposed repository site and design will be safe. Since 1981, the AAEC has studied the major uranium deposits in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory of Australia as natural analogues of radioactive waste repositories. Results have been obtained on the following: (1) the migration of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes, (2) the behavior of naturally occurring levels of selected fission products and transuranium nuclides, e.g. technetium-99, iodine-129 and plutonium-239; (3) the role of specific minerals in retarding migration, and (4) the importance of colloidal material, in the migration of thorium. The AAEC has initiated a wider international project entitled The Alligator Rivers Analogue Project which will enable participating organizations to obtain additional results and to apply them in modeling, planning and regulating waste repositories.